WorldWideScience

Sample records for amp-epac-rap1 signal-activated endothelial

  1. Determination of strongly overlapping signaling activity from microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidaut Ghislain

    2006-02-01

    factor databases. This can be used to investigate the specificity and success of targeted therapeutics as well as to elucidate signaling activity in normal and disease processes.

  2. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  3. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  4. Mitochondria and Endothelial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kluge, Matthew A.; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Vita, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to their role in other cell types with higher energy demands, mitochondria in endothelial cells primarily function in signaling cellular responses to environmental cues. This article provides an overview of key aspects of mitochondrial biology in endothelial cells, including subcellular location, biogenesis, dynamics, autophagy, ROS production and signaling, calcium homeostasis, regulated cell death, and heme biosynthesis. In each section, we introduce key concepts and then review...

  5. Trifluoperazine: corneal endothelial phototoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, D.S.; Csukas, S.; Green, K. (Medical Coll. of Georgia, Augusta (USA))

    1983-10-01

    Trifluoperazine is used for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Perfusion of corneal endothelial cells with trifluoperazine-HC1 concurrent with exposure to long wavelength ultraviolet light resulted in a corneal swelling rate greater than that found in perfused corneas not exposed to ultraviolet light. Exposure of endothelial cells to 25 W incandescent light during perfusion with trifluoperazine-HC1 did not result in a higher corneal swelling rate compared to those perfused in the dark. The increased corneal swelling rate could be produced by pre-exposure of the trifluoperazine-HC1 perfusing solution to ultraviolet light suggesting the production of toxic photoproducts during exposure of trifluoperazine-HC1 to ultraviolet light. Perfusion of corneal endothelial cells with non-ultraviolet illuminated trifluoperazine-HC1 had no effect on endothelial cell membranes or ultrastructure. This is in contrast to cells perfused with trifluoperazine-HC1 that had been exposed to ultraviolet light in which there was an alteration of mitochondria and a loss of cytoplasmic homogeneity. The data imply that the trifluoperazine-HC1 photoproduct had an adverse effect on cellular transport mechanisms. The study also further demonstrates the value of the corneal endothelial cell model for identifying the physiological and anatomical changes occuring in photo-induced toxic reactions.

  6. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M.; Ferrández, Julia; Cano, Beatriz; Naranjo, Belén; Nájera, Victoria A.; González, Maricruz; Lindahl, Anna M.; Cejudo, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlle...

  7. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor ePuerto-Galán; Juan Manuel Pérez-Ruiz; Julia eFerrández; Beatriz eCano; Belén eNaranjo; Victoria Armario Nájera; Maricruz eGonzález; Anna Marika eLindahl; Francisco Javier Cejudo

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly con...

  8. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Pyczek; Rolf Buslei; David Schult; Annett Hölsken; Michael Buchfelder; Ina Heß; Heidi Hahn; Anja Uhmann

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox...

  9. Endothelial RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asdonk, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.asdonk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Motz, Inga; Werner, Nikos [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Coch, Christoph; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther [Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Nickenig, Georg; Zimmer, Sebastian [Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str. 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation impairs endothelial function in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RIG-I activation alters HCAEC biology in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPC function is affected by RIG-I stimulation in vitro. -- Abstract: Background: Endothelial dysfunction is a crucial part of the chronic inflammatory atherosclerotic process and is mediated by innate and acquired immune mechanisms. Recent studies suggest that pattern recognition receptors (PRR) specialized in immunorecognition of nucleic acids may play an important role in endothelial biology in a proatherogenic manner. Here, we analyzed the impact of endothelial retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) activation upon vascular endothelial biology. Methods and results: Wild type mice were injected intravenously with 32.5 {mu}g of the RIG-ligand 3pRNA (RNA with triphosphate at the 5 Prime end) or polyA control every other day for 7 days. In 3pRNA-treated mice, endothelium-depended vasodilation was significantly impaired, vascular oxidative stress significantly increased and circulating endothelial microparticle (EMP) numbers significantly elevated compared to controls. To gain further insight in RIG-I dependent endothelial biology, cultured human coronary endothelial cells (HCAEC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) were stimulated in vitro with 3pRNA. Both cells types express RIG-I and react with receptor upregulation upon stimulation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation is enhanced in both cell types, whereas apoptosis and proliferation is not significantly affected in HCAEC. Importantly, HCAEC release significant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines in response to RIG-I stimulation. Conclusion: This study shows that activation of the cytoplasmatic nucleic acid receptor RIG-I leads to endothelial dysfunction. RIG-I induced endothelial damage could therefore be an important pathway in atherogenesis.

  10. PROKR2 missense mutations associated with Kallmann syndrome impair receptor signalling activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Fabre, Ludovic; Teixeira, Luis; Labesse, Gilles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) combines hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency, and anosmia or hyposmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis. In a large series of KS patients, ten different missense mutations (p.R85C, p.R85H, p.R164Q, p.L173R, p.W178S, p.Q210R, p.R268C, p.P290S, p.M323I, p.V331M) have been identified in the gene encoding the G protein-coupled receptor prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2), most often in the heterozygous state. Many of these mutations were, however, also found in clinically unaffected individuals, thus raising the question of their actual implication in the KS phenotype. We reproduced each of the ten mutations in a recombinant murine Prokr2, and tested their effects on the signalling activity in transfected HEK-293 cells, by measuring intracellular calcium release upon ligand-activation of the receptor. We found that all mutated receptors except one (M323I) had decreased signalling activities. These could be explained by different defective mechanisms. Three mutations (L173R, W178S, P290S) impaired cell surface-targeting of the receptor. One mutation (Q210R) abolished ligand-binding. Finally, five mutations (R85C, R85H, R164Q, R268C, V331M) presumably impaired G protein-coupling of the receptor. In addition, when wild-type and mutant receptors were coexpressed in HEK-293 cells, none of the mutant receptors that were retained within the cells did affect cell surface-targeting of the wild-type receptor, and none of the mutant receptors properly addressed at the plasma membrane did affect wild-type receptor signalling activity. This argues against a dominant negative effect of the mutations in vivo. PMID:18826963

  11. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kono

    Full Text Available Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials.

  12. Endothelial dysfunction: EDCF revisited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAUL M Vanhoutte

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial cells can initiate contraction (constriction) of the vascular smooth muscle cells that surround them. Such endothelium-dependent, acute increases in contractile tone can be due to the withdrawal of the production of nitric oxide, to the production of vasoconstrictor peptides (angiotensin Ⅱ, endothelin-1), to the formation of oxygen-derived free radicals(superoxide anions) and/or the release of vasoconstrictor metabolites of arachidonic acid. The latter have been termed endothelium-derived contracting factor (EDCF) as they can contribute to moment-to-moment changes in contractile activity of the underlying vascular smooth muscle cells. To judge from animal experiments, EDCF-mediated responses are exacerbated when the production of nitric oxide is impaired as well as by aging, spontaneous hypertension and diabetes. To judge from human studies, they contribute to the blunting of endothelium-dependent vasodilatations in aged subjects and essential hypertensive patients. Since EDCF causes vasoconstriction by activation of the TP-receptors on the vascular smooth muscle cells, selective antagonists at these receptors prevent endothelium-dependent contractions, and curtail the endothelial dysfunction in hypertension and diabetes.

  13. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor ePuerto-Galán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen- and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  14. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Ferrández, Julia; Cano, Beatriz; Naranjo, Belén; Nájera, Victoria A; González, Maricruz; Lindahl, Anna M; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs), thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Danger signals activating innate immunity in graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiser, Robert; Penack, Olaf; Holler, Ernst; Idzko, Marco

    2011-09-01

    Extensive cell death with consecutive release of danger signals can cause immune-mediated tissue destruction. The abundance of cell death is likely to determine the relevance of the danger signals as physiological mechanisms that counteract immune activation may be overruled. Such constellation is conceivable in chemo-/radiotherapy-induced tissue damage, reperfusion injury, trauma, and severe infection. Studies on graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) development have to consider the effects of chemo-/radiotherapy-related tissue damage leading to the release of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. Our previous work has demonstrated a role for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as an endogenous danger signal in GvHD. Besides ATP, uric acid or soluble extracellular matrix components are functional danger signals that activate the NLRP3 inflammasome when released from dying cells or from extracellular matrix. In contrast to sterile inflammation, GvHD is more complex since bacterial components that leak through damaged intestinal barriers and the skin can activate pattern recognition receptors and directly contribute to GvHD pathogenesis. These exogenous danger signals transmit immune activation via toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors of the innate immune system. This review covers both the impact of endogenous and exogenous danger signals activating innate immunity in GvHD.

  16. Proliferative and signaling activities of insulin analogues in endometrial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizen, Daniel; Sarfstein, Rive; Bruchim, Ilan; Weinstein, Doron; Laron, Zvi; Werner, Haim

    2015-05-01

    Insulin analogues have been developed to achieve further improvement in the therapy of diabetes. However, modifications introduced into the insulin molecule may enhance their affinity for the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R). Hyperinsulinemia has been identified as a risk factor for endometrial cancer. We hypothesized that insulin analogues may elicit atypical proliferative and signaling activities in endometrial cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that glargine, but not detemir, stimulated cell proliferation, displayed an anti-apoptotic effect, and had a positive effect on cell cycle progression in endometrial cancer cell lines ECC-1 and USPC-1. In addition, we showed that glargine and detemir induced dual activation of the insulin receptor (INSR) and IGF1R in both cell types. Furthermore, we showed that glargine elicited signaling events that are markedly different from those induced by insulin. In conclusion, our data support the concept that, although insulin analogues were designed to display insulin-like metabolic effects, glargine and, possibly, additional analogues exhibit IGF1-like activities and, accordingly, may function as IGF1 analogues. PMID:25697343

  17. Estetrol modulates endothelial nitric oxide synthesis in human endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Magdalena eMontt-Guevara

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Estetrol (E4 is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout ageing in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2 and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use.

  18. Estetrol Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Russo, Eleonora; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is a key player for vascular function and disease during pregnancy and throughout aging in women. Endothelial NO is an established target of estrogens that enhance its formation in human endothelial cells. We here addressed the effects of E4 on the activity and expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). E4 stimulated the activation of eNOS and NO secretion in HUVEC. E4 was significantly less effective compared to E2, and a peculiar concentration-dependent effect was found, with higher amounts of E4 being less effective than lower concentrations. When E2 was combined with E4, an interesting pattern was noted. E4 antagonized NO synthesis induced by pregnancy-like E2 concentrations. However, E4 did not impede the modest induction of NO synthesis associated with postmenopausal-like E2 levels. These results support the hypothesis that E4 may be a regulator of NO synthesis in endothelial cells and raise questions on its peculiar signaling in this context. Our results may be useful to interpret the role of E4 during human pregnancy and possibly to help develop this interesting steroid for clinical use. PMID:26257704

  19. Genetics of corneal endothelial dystrophies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chitra Kannabiran

    2009-12-01

    The corneal endothelium maintains the level of hydration in the cornea. Dysfunction of the endothelium results in excess accumulation of water in the corneal stroma, leading to swelling of the stroma and loss of transparency. There are four different corneal endothelial dystrophies that are hereditary, progressive, non-inflammatory disorders involving dysfunction of the corneal endothelium. Each of the endothelial dystrophies is genetically heterogeneous with different modes of transmission and/or different genes involved in each subtype. Genes responsible for disease have been identified for only a subset of corneal endothelial dystrophies. Knowledge of genes involved and their function in the corneal endothelium can aid understanding the pathogenesis of the disorder as well as reveal pathways that are important for normal functioning of the endothelium.

  20. Endothelial keratoplasty: evolution and horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Teixeira Grottone

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial keratoplasty has been adopted by corneal surgeons worldwide as an alternative to penetrating keratoplasty (PK in the treatment of corneal endothelial disorders. Since the first surgeries in 1998, different surgical techniques have been used to replace the diseased endothelium. Compared with penetrating keratoplasty, all these techniques may provide faster and better visual rehabilitation with minimal change in refractive power of the transplanted cornea, minimal induced astigmatism, elimination of suture-induced complications and late wound dehiscence, and a reduced demand for postoperative care. Translational research involving cell-based therapy is the next step in work on endothelial keratoplasty. The present review updates information on comparisons among different techniques and predicts the direction of future treatment.

  1. Endothelial dysfunction after non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, E S; Fonnes, S; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    transplantation and vascular surgery respectively) had an improvement in endothelial dysfunction 1 month after surgery. CONCLUSION: Endothelial function changes in relation to surgery. Assessment of endothelial function by non-invasive measures has the potential to guide clinicians in the prevention or treatment......BACKGROUND: More than 50% of patients with increased troponin levels after non-cardiac surgery have an impaired endothelial function pre-operatively. Non-invasive markers of endothelial function have been developed for the assessment of endothelial dysfunction. The aim of this paper...... was to systematically review the literature to evaluate the association between non-cardiac surgery and non-invasive markers of endothelial function. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library Database according to the PRISMA guidelines. Endothelial dysfunction was described only...

  2. Traumatic corneal endothelial rings from homemade explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Soo Khai; Rudkin, Adam K; Galanopoulos, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Traumatic corneal endothelial rings are remarkably rare ocular findings that may result from blast injury. We present a unique case of bilateral traumatic corneal endothelial rings secondary to blast injury from homemade explosives. PMID:23474743

  3. Hedgehog signal activation coordinates proliferation and differentiation of fetal liver progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Yoshikazu [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Itoh, Tohru, E-mail: itohru@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Miyajima, Atsushi [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2009-09-10

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays crucial roles in development and homeostasis of various organs. In the adult liver, it regulates proliferation and/or viability of several types of cells, particularly under injured conditions, and is also implicated in stem/progenitor cell maintenance. However, the role of this signaling pathway during the normal developmental process of the liver remains elusive. Although Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the ventral foregut endoderm from which the liver derives, the expression disappears at the onset of the liver bud formation, and its possible recurrence at the later stages has not been investigated. Here we analyzed the activation and functional relevance of Hh signaling during the mouse fetal liver development. At E11.5, Shh and an activation marker gene for Hh signaling, Gli1, were expressed in Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts, the fetal liver progenitor cells, and the expression was rapidly decreased thereafter as the development proceeded. In the culture of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts isolated from the E11.5 liver, activation of Hh signaling stimulated their proliferation and this effect was cancelled by a chemical Hh signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine. In contrast, hepatocyte differentiation of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts in vitro as manifested by the marker gene expression and acquisition of ammonia clearance activity was significantly inhibited by forced activation of Hh signaling. Taken together, these results demonstrate the temporally restricted manner of Hh signal activation and its role in promoting the hepatoblast proliferation, and further suggest that the pathway needs to be shut off for the subsequent hepatic differentiation of hepatoblasts to proceed normally.

  4. Endothelial potential of human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Zoldan, Janet; Basevitch, Yaara; Langer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Growing interest in using endothelial cells for therapeutic purposes has led to exploring human embryonic stem cells as a potential source for endothelial progenitor cells. Embryonic stem cells are advantageous when compared with other endothelial cell origins, due to their high proliferation capability, pluripotency, and low immunogenity. However, there are many challenges and obstacles to overcome before the vision of using embryonic endothelial progenitor cells in the clinic can be realize...

  5. Retinal Endothelial Cell Apoptosis Stimulates Recruitment of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatwadekar, Ashay D.; Glenn, Josephine V.; Curtis, Tim M.; Grant, Maria B.; Stitt, Alan W.; Gardiner, Tom A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) contribute to vascular repair although it is uncertain how local endothelial cell apoptosis influences their reparative function. This study was conducted to determine how the presence of apoptotic bodies at sites of endothelial damage may influence participation of EPCs in retinal microvascular repair. Methods Microlesions of apoptotic cell death were created in monolayers of retinal microvascular endothelial cells (RMECs) by using the photodynamic drug verteporfin. The adhesion of early-EPCs to these lesions was studied before detachment of the apoptotic cells or after their removal from the wound site. Apoptotic bodies were fed to normal RMECs and mRNA levels for adhesion molecules were analyzed. Results Endothelial lesions where apoptotic bodies were left attached at the wound site showed a fivefold enhancement in EPC recruitment (P < 0.05) compared with lesions where the apoptotic cells had been removed. In intact RMEC monolayers exposed to apoptotic bodies, expression of ICAM, VCAM, and E-selectin was upregulated by 5- to 15-fold (P < 0.05– 0.001). EPCs showed a characteristic chemotactic response (P < 0.05) to conditioned medium obtained from apoptotic bodies, whereas analysis of the medium showed significantly increased levels of VEGF, IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α when compared to control medium; SDF-1 remained unchanged. Conclusions The data indicate that apoptotic bodies derived from retinal capillary endothelium mediate release of proangiogenic cytokines and chemokines and induce adhesion molecule expression in a manner that facilitates EPC recruitment. PMID:19474402

  6. Induction of proteinuria by cannabinoid receptors 1 signaling activation in CB1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Ho, Cheng; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Proteinuria is not only a sign of kidney damage but is also involved in the progression of renal disease as an independent pathologic factor. Although patients with mutated type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) polymorphism are associated with renal microvascular damage, the biologic role of CB1 signaling in proteinuria remains uncharacterized till now. Herein, we investigate whether CB1 participates in glomerular proteinuria in CB1 transgenic mice and treatment with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 rat, neither of which are diabetic models. The CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher kidney weight and urinary protein concentrations but not blood glucose levels compared with the wild-type group. A combination of laser-capture microsdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical validation revealed that CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in renal glomeruli than that of the wild-type group. Geneticorpharmacological activation of CB1 by transgenic CB1 mice or treatment with WIN55212-2 reduced nephrin expression in the renal glomeruli compared with that of the wild-type group in the glomerular mesanglium. Taken together, CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 induced proteinuria with upregulation of CB1 resulting in impaired nephrin expression, by inducing excess VEGF reaction in the renal glomeruli. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of CB1 signaling revealed VEGF-dependent nephrin depression of glomerulopathy. Controlling CB1 activity can be used an alternative strategy for sustaining renal function in the presence of CB1 activation.

  7. Estetrol Modulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Montt-Guevara, Maria Magdalena; Giretti, Maria Silvia; Russo, Eleonora; Giannini, Andrea; Mannella, Paolo; Genazzani, Andrea Riccardo; Genazzani, Alessandro David; Simoncini, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Estetrol (E4) is a natural human estrogen that is present at high concentrations during pregnancy. E4 has been reported to act as an endogenous estrogen receptor modulator, exerting estrogenic actions on the endometrium or the central nervous system but presenting antagonistic effects on the breast. Due to these characteristics, E4 is currently being developed for a number of clinical applications, including contraception and menopausal hormone therapy. Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is a key ...

  8. Challenges in pediatric endothelial keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed endothelial keratoplasty (EK in three eyes of two siblings (2.5 years, male and 3.5 years, female with congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED and report the intraoperative and postoperative difficulties. Repeated iris prolapse, apprehension of crystalline lens touch due to positive vitreous pressure, and need for frequent air injections to attach the graft were intraoperative challenges in all three eyes. These were addressed by use of Sheet′s glide instead of Busin′s glide during graft insertion and suturing of main and side ports before air injection. One eye had graft dislocation on second postoperative day due to eye rubbing by the child. Graft was repositioned with air and a venting incision was created. Postoperative examination required repeated general anesthesia. Corneal edema resolved completely in all three eyes. Present case series highlights the possible intraoperative and postoperative challenges and their solutions in pediatric EK for CHED.

  9. Cataract surgery after Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Chaurasia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of endothelial dysfunction in phakic patients is sometimes a dilemma for corneal surgeons. Phakic patients with visually significant cataract and endothelial dysfunction are preferably managed by performing combined cataract surgery with endothelial keratoplasty. However, combined surgery may be deferred in eyes with early incipient cataract, younger age and where anterior chamber is poorly visualized. As cataract formation may be accelerated after endothelial keratoplasty, these eyes may need cataract surgery subsequently. Surgical intervention in eyes with endothelial keratoplasty is of concern as this may affect the graft adversely and threaten graft survival. In this report, we describe the intraoperative surgical details and postoperative clinical course of a patient who underwent phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation after Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK.

  10. Resveratrol: A Multifunctional Compound Improving Endothelial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huige; Förstermann, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    The red wine polyphenol resveratrol boosts endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxations. The improvement of endothelial function by resveratrol is largely attributable to nitric oxide (NO) derived from endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). By stimulating eNOS expression, eNOS phosphorylation and eNOS deacetylation, resveratrol enhances endothelial NO production. By upregulating antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) and suppressing the expression a...

  11. Endothelial function and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinlay, S; Libby, P; Ganz, P

    2001-08-01

    The endothelium produces a number of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor substances that not only regulate vasomotor tone, but also the recruitment and activity of inflammatory cells and the propensity towards thrombosis. Endothelial vasomotor function is a convenient way to assess these other functions, and is related to the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. Lipids (particularly low density lipoprotein cholesterol) and oxidant stress play a major role in impairing these functions, by reducing the bioavailability of nitric oxide and activating pro-inflammatory signalling pathways such as nuclear factor kappa B. Biomechanical forces on the endothelium, including low shear stress from disturbed blood flow, also activate the endothelium increasing vasomotor dysfunction and promoting inflammation by upregulating pro-atherogenic genes. In contrast, normal laminar shear stress promotes the expression of genes that may protect against atherosclerosis. The sub-cellular structure of endothelial cells includes caveolae that play an integral part in regulating the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase. Low density lipoprotein cholesterol and oxidant stress impair caveolae structure and function and adversely affect endothelial function. Lipid-independent pathways of endothelial cell activation are increasingly recognized, and may provide new therapeutic targets. Endothelial vasoconstrictors, such as endothelin, antagonize endothelium-derived vasodilators and contribute to endothelial dysfunction. Some but not all studies have linked certain genetic polymorphisms of the nitric oxide synthase enzyme to vascular disease and impaired endothelial function. Such genetic heterogeneity may nonetheless offer new insights into the variability of endothelial function. PMID:11507322

  12. A microscopic view on the renal endothelial glycocalyx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dane, M.J.; Berg, B.M. van den; Lee, D.H.; Boels, M.G.; Tiemeier, G.L.; Avramut, M.C.; Zonneveld, A.J. van; Vlag, J. van der; Vink, H.; Rabelink, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells perform key homeostatic functions such as regulating blood flow, permeability, and aiding immune surveillance for pathogens. While endothelial activation serves normal physiological adaptation, maladaptation of these endothelial functions has been identified as an important effecto

  13. Determinants of visual quality after endothelial keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Andrew M J; Tsatsos, Michael; Hossain, Parwez N; Anderson, David F

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial keratoplasty is now favored over full-thickness penetrating keratoplasty for corneal decompensation secondary to endothelial dysfunction. Although endothelial keratoplasty has evolved as surgeons strive to improve outcomes, fewer patients than expected achieve best corrected visual acuity of 20/20 despite healthy grafts and no ocular comorbidities. Reasons for this remain unclear, with theories including anterior stromal changes, differences in graft thickness and regularity, induced high-order aberrations, and the nature of the graft-host interface. Newer iterations of endothelial keratoplasty such as thin manual Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty, ultrathin automated Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty, and Descemet membrane endothelial keratoplasty have achieved rates of 20/20 acuity of approximately 50%, comparable to modern cataract surgery, and it may be that a ceiling exists, particularly in the older age group of patients. Establishing the relative contribution of the factors that determine visual quality following endothelial keratoplasty will help drive further innovation, optimizing visual and patient-reported outcomes while improving surgical efficacy and safety. PMID:26708363

  14. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and pharmacological treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin; Bo; Su

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium exerts multiple actions involving regulation of vascular permeability and tone, coagulation and fibrinolysis, inflammatory and immunological reactions and cell growth. Alterations of one or more such actions may cause vascular endothelial dysfunction. Different risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, homocystinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, smo-king, inflammation, and aging contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. Mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction are multiple, including impaired endothelium-derived vasodilators, enhanced endothelium-derived vasoconstrictors, over production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, activation of inflammatory and immune reactions, and imbalance of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Endothelial dysfunction occurs in many cardiovascular diseases, which involves different mechanisms, depending on specific risk factors affecting the disease. Among these mechanisms, a reduction in nitric oxide(NO) bioavailability plays a central role in the development of endothelial dysfunction because NO exerts diverse physiological actions, including vasodilation, anti-inflammation, antiplatelet, antiproliferation and antimigration. Experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that a variety of currently used or investigational drugs, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin AT1 receptors blockers, angiotensin-(1-7), antioxidants, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, endothelial NO synthase enhancers, phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, sphingosine-1-phosphate and statins, exert endothelial protective effects. Due to the difference in mechanisms of action, these drugs need to be used according to specific mechanisms underlying endothelial dysfunction of the disease.

  15. Enhancement of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity by HCV core protein promotes cell growth of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein has been implicated as a potential oncogene or a cofactor in HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Overactivation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling is a major factor in oncogenesis of HCC. However, the pathogenesis of HCV core-associated Wnt/β-catenin activation remains to be further characterized. Therefore, we attempted to determine whether HCV core protein plays an important role in regulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling in HCC cells. METHODOLOGY: Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity was investigated in core-expressing hepatoma cells. Protein and gene expression were examined by Western blot, immunofluorescence staining, RT-qPCR, and reporter assay. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HCV core protein significantly enhances Tcf-dependent transcriptional activity induced by Wnt3A in HCC cell lines. Additionally, core protein increases and stabilizes β-catenin levels in hepatoma cell line Huh7 through inactivation of GSK-3β, which contributes to the up-regulation of downstream target genes, such as c-Myc, cyclin D1, WISP2 and CTGF. Also, core protein increases cell proliferation rate and promotes Wnt3A-induced tumor growth in the xenograft tumor model of human HCC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HCV core protein enhances Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity, hence playing an important role in HCV-associated carcinogenesis.

  16. Zinc Finger Homeodomain Factor Zfhx3 Is Essential for Mammary Lactogenic Differentiation by Maintaining Prolactin Signaling Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Ma, Gui; Zhang, Xiaolin; He, Yuan; Li, Mei; Han, Xueying; Fu, Liya; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Nagy, Tamas; Zhao, Qiang; Fu, Li; Dong, Jin-Tang

    2016-06-10

    The zinc finger homeobox 3 (ZFHX3, also named ATBF1 for AT motif binding factor 1) is a transcription factor that suppresses prostatic carcinogenesis and induces neuronal differentiation. It also interacts with estrogen receptor α to inhibit cell proliferation and regulate pubertal mammary gland development in mice. In the present study, we examined whether and how Zfhx3 regulates lactogenic differentiation in mouse mammary glands. At different stages of mammary gland development, Zfhx3 protein was expressed at varying levels, with the highest level at lactation. In the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cell line, an in vitro model of lactogenesis, knockdown of Zfhx3 attenuated prolactin-induced β-casein expression and morphological changes, indicators of lactogenic differentiation. In mouse mammary tissue, knock-out of Zfhx3 interrupted lactogenesis, resulting in underdeveloped glands with much smaller and fewer alveoli, reduced β-casein expression, accumulation of large cytoplasmic lipid droplets in luminal cells after parturition, and failure in lactation. Mechanistically, Zfhx3 maintained the expression of Prlr (prolactin receptor) and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity, whereas knockdown and knock-out of Zfhx3 in HC11 cells and mammary tissues, respectively, decreased Prlr expression, Stat5 phosphorylation, and the expression of Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 target genes. These findings indicate that Zfhx3 plays an essential role in proper lactogenic development in mammary glands, at least in part by maintaining Prlr expression and Prlr-Jak2-Stat5 signaling activity. PMID:27129249

  17. [Transplantation of corneal endothelial cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Shiro

    2002-12-01

    Though conventional corneal transplantation has achieved great success, it still has several drawbacks including limited availability of donor corneas, recurrent allograft rejection, and subsequent graft failure in certain cases. Reconstructing clinically usable corneas by applying the technology of regenerative medicine can offer a solution to these problems, as well as making corneal transplantation a non-emergency surgery and enabling the usage of banked corneal cells. In the present study, we focused on corneal endothelium that is critical for corneal transparency and investigated the reconstruction of cornea utilizing cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). We succeeded in steadily culturing HCECs by using culture dishes pre-coated with extracellular matrix produced by calf corneal endothelial cells and culture media that contained basic fibroblast growth factor and fetal bovine serum. We performed the following analysis utilizing these cultured HCECs. The older the donor was, the more frequently large senescent cells appeared in the passaged HCECs. The telomeres of HCECs were measured as terminal restriction fragments (TRF) by Southern blotting. HCECs, in vivo from donors in their seventies had a long TRFs of over 12 kilobases. Passaging shortened the TRFs but there was no difference in TRFs among donors of various ages. These results indicated that shortening of telomere length is not related to senescence of HCECs. We investigated the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the senescence of in vivo HCECs. The results indicated that AGE-protein in the aqueous humor is endocytosed into HCECs via AGE receptors expressed on the surface of HCECs and damages HCECs by producing reactive oxygen species and inducing apoptosis, suggesting that AGEs, at least partly, cause the senescence of HECEs. HCECs were cultured using adult human serum instead of bovine serum to get rid of bovine material that can be infected with prions. Primary and passage

  18. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Stephen F; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of soluble mediators from resident cells (e.g., mast cells, macrophages) and/or recruited blood cells. The interaction of the mediators with receptors expressed on the surface of endothelial cells diminishes barrier function either by altering the expression of adhesive proteins in the inter-endothelial junctions, by altering the organization of the cytoskeleton, or both. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteolytic enzymes (e.g., matrix metalloproteinase, elastase), oncostatin M, and VEGF are part of a long list of mediators that have been implicated in endothelial barrier failure. In this review, we address the role of blood borne cells, including, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and platelets, in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in health and disease. Attention is also devoted to new targets for therapeutic intervention in disease states with morbidity and mortality related to endothelial barrier dysfunction. PMID:25838983

  19. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  20. Targeting CD9 produces stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis: A novel antiangiogenic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamisasanuki, Taro [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Tokushige, Saori [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroto [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Khai, Ngin Cin; Wang, Yuqing [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Sakamoto, Taiji [Department of Ophthalmology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kosai, Ken-ichiro, E-mail: kosai@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Gene Therapy and Regenerative Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} CD9 plays stimulus-independent roles in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression is effective in an angiogenic disease model. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression predominantly affects activated endothelial cells. {yields} CD9 is involved in endothelial cell proliferation, but not survival. {yields} CD9 is part of angiogenic machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. -- Abstract: The precise roles of tetraspanin CD9 are unclear. Here we show that CD9 plays a stimulus-independent role in angiogenesis and that inhibiting CD9 expression or function is a potential antiangiogenic therapy. Knocking down CD9 expression significantly inhibited in vitro endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Injecting CD9-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA-CD9) markedly inhibited HGF- or VEGF-induced subconjunctival angiogenesis in vivo. Both results revealed potent and stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects of targeting CD9. Furthermore, intravitreous injections of siRNA-CD9 or anti-CD9 antibodies were therapeutically effective for laser-induced retinal and choroidal neovascularization in mice, a representative ocular angiogenic disease model. In terms of the mechanism, growth factor receptor and downstream signaling activation were not affected, whereas abnormal localization of integrins and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed during angiogenesis, by knocking down CD9 expression. Notably, knocking down CD9 expression did not induce death and mildly inhibited proliferation of quiescent endothelial cells under conditions without an angiogenic stimulus. Thus, CD9 does not directly affect growth factor-induced signal transduction, which is required in angiogenesis and normal vasculature, but is part of the angiogenesis machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In conclusion, targeting CD9 produced stimulus

  1. Targeting CD9 produces stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis: A novel antiangiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → CD9 plays stimulus-independent roles in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. → Targeting CD9 expression is effective in an angiogenic disease model. → Targeting CD9 expression predominantly affects activated endothelial cells. → CD9 is involved in endothelial cell proliferation, but not survival. → CD9 is part of angiogenic machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. -- Abstract: The precise roles of tetraspanin CD9 are unclear. Here we show that CD9 plays a stimulus-independent role in angiogenesis and that inhibiting CD9 expression or function is a potential antiangiogenic therapy. Knocking down CD9 expression significantly inhibited in vitro endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Injecting CD9-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA-CD9) markedly inhibited HGF- or VEGF-induced subconjunctival angiogenesis in vivo. Both results revealed potent and stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects of targeting CD9. Furthermore, intravitreous injections of siRNA-CD9 or anti-CD9 antibodies were therapeutically effective for laser-induced retinal and choroidal neovascularization in mice, a representative ocular angiogenic disease model. In terms of the mechanism, growth factor receptor and downstream signaling activation were not affected, whereas abnormal localization of integrins and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed during angiogenesis, by knocking down CD9 expression. Notably, knocking down CD9 expression did not induce death and mildly inhibited proliferation of quiescent endothelial cells under conditions without an angiogenic stimulus. Thus, CD9 does not directly affect growth factor-induced signal transduction, which is required in angiogenesis and normal vasculature, but is part of the angiogenesis machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In conclusion, targeting CD9 produced stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects

  2. Role of precoating in artificial vessel endothelialization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖乐; 时德

    2004-01-01

    @@ As the progress of vascular surgery, artificial vessels have become the substitute for large and middle diameter vessels but have not for small diameter ones owing to thrombogenesis and occlusion within a short period of time after being applied.Artificial vessel endothelialization is one of the ideal methods to resolve such issue and has been improved continuously since Herring1 in 1978 put forward this term in the first time and utilized vascular endothelial cells (ECs) harvested from living animals to perform the test of artificial vessel endothelialization.

  3. Asiaticoside Inhibits TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Hyperpermeability of Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Lai Yen; Ng, Chin Theng; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Baharuldin, Mohamad Taufik Hidayat; Arifah, Abdul Kadir; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul; Zuraini, Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    The increase in endothelial permeability often promotes edema formation in various pathological conditions. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), a pro-atherogenic cytokine, impairs endothelial barrier function and causes endothelial dysfunction in early stage of atherosclerosis. Asiaticoside, one of the triterpenoids derived from Centella asiatica, is known to possess antiinflammatory activity. In order to examine the role of asiaticoside in preserving the endothelial barrier, we assessed its effects on endothelial hyperpermeability and disruption of actin filaments evoked by TNF-α in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). TNF-α caused an increase in endothelial permeability to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran. Asiaticoside pretreatment significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced increased permeability. Asiaticoside also prevented TNF-α-induced actin redistribution by suppressing stress fiber formation. However, the increased F to G actin ratio stimulated by TNF-α was not changed by asiaticoside. Cytochalasin D, an actin depolymerizing agent, was used to correlate the anti-hyperpermeability effect of asiaticoside with actin cytoskeleton. Surprisingly, asiaticoside failed to prevent cytochalasin D-induced increased permeability. These results suggest that asiaticoside protects against the disruption of endothelial barrier and actin rearrangement triggered by TNF-α without a significant change in total actin pool. However, asiaticoside seems to work by other mechanisms to maintain the integrity of endothelial barrier rather than stabilizing the F-actin organization.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fuchs endothelial dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein that is part of type VIII collagen. Type VIII collagen is largely found within the cornea, surrounding the endothelial cells. Specifically, type VIII collagen is a major component of a tissue at ...

  5. Endothelial progenitor cells in cardiovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Poay; Sian; Sabrina; Lee; Kian; Keong; Poh

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been associated with the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adult endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs) are derived from hematopoietic stem cells and are capable of forming new blood vessels through a process of vas-culogenesis. There are studies which report correlations between circulating EPCs and cardiovascular risk fac-tors. There are also studies on how pharmacotherapies may influence levels of circulating EPCs. In this review, we discuss the potential role of endothelial progenitor cells as both diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. In addition, we look at the interaction between cardio-vascular pharmacotherapies and endothelial progenitor cells. We also discuss how EPCs can be used directly and indirectly as a therapeutic agent. Finally, we evalu-ate the challenges facing EPC research and how these may be overcome.

  6. Blood cells and endothelial barrier function

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Stephen F.; Granger, D Neil

    2015-01-01

    The barrier properties of endothelial cells are critical for the maintenance of water and protein balance between the intravascular and extravascular compartments. An impairment of endothelial barrier function has been implicated in the genesis and/or progression of a variety of pathological conditions, including pulmonary edema, ischemic stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, angioedema, sepsis and cancer. The altered barrier function in these conditions is often linked to the release of solub...

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species, SUMOylation, and Endothelial Inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Nhat-Tu Le; Corsetti, James P; Janet L. Dehoff-Sparks; Sparks, Charles E.; Keigi Fujiwara; Jun-ichi Abe

    2012-01-01

    Although the exact mechanism through which NADPH oxidases (Nox’s) generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) is still not completely understood, it is widely considered that ROS accumulation is the cause of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. Increasing pieces of evidence strongly indicate the role for ROS in endothelial inflammation and dysfunction and subsequent development of atherosclerotic plaques, which are causes of various pathological cardiac events. An overview for a causative relati...

  8. In vivo endothelial gene regulation in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Shohet Ralph V; Maresh J Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background An authentic survey of the transcript-level response of the diabetic endothelium in vivo is key to understanding diabetic cardiovascular complications such as accelerated atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction. Methods We used streptozotocin to induce a model of type I diabetes in transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein under the control of an endothelial-specific promoter (Tie2-GFP) allowing rapid isolation of aortic endothelium. Three weeks after trea...

  9. Novel mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Guang; Lucas, Rudolf; Caldwell, Ruth; YAO, Lin; Romero, Maritza J.; Caldwell, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This condition increases the risk of developing coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral arterial disease fourfold. Endothelial dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of vascular disease in diabetes mellitus patients and has recently received increased attention. In this review article, some recent developments that could improve the knowledge of diabetes-induced endothelial dysfunction are d...

  10. Endothelial cell–restricted disruption of FoxM1 impairs endothelial repair following LPS-induced vascular injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, You-Yang; Gao, Xiao-Pei; Zhao, Yidan D.; Mirza, Muhammad K.; Frey, Randall S.; Kalinichenko, Vladimir V.; Wang, I-Ching; Costa, Robert H.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2006-01-01

    Recovery of endothelial integrity after vascular injury is vital for endothelial barrier function and vascular homeostasis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of endothelial barrier repair following injury. To investigate the functional role of forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) in the mechanism of endothelial repair, we generated endothelial cell–restricted FoxM1-deficient mice (FoxM1 CKO mice). These mutant mice were viable and exhibited no overt phenotype. However, in response to...

  11. Ultrasound assessment of endothelial function in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko J Järvisalo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Mikko J Järvisalo1,2, Olli T Raitakari21Department of Internal Medicine, Satakunta Central Hospital, Pori, Finland; 2Department of Clinical Physiology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, FinlandAbstract: Although the clinical complications of atherosclerosis arise from developed lesions in old age, the atherosclerotic disease is a lifelong process with roots in childhood. Endothelial dysfunction is currently considered an early stage in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, which precedes the formation of structural atherosclerotic changes. Improvements in noninvasive imaging modalities, mainly in ultrasound imaging, have made it possible to assess the endothelial health of asymptomatic children with or without cardiovascular risk factors. By using noninvasive ultrasound for endothelial function, important insights have been gained into the early stages of atherosclerosis and the effects of cardiovascular risk factors on vasculature in childhood. The ultrasound test of endothelial function is affordable, available, and safe and may be considered a potent aid in clinical risk stratification of children at high risk for subsequent clinical atherosclerosis in adulthood. At present, this methodology serves only research purposes, as many issues including reproducibility and normal values for healthy children need to be solved before clinical use can be considered. In adults, however, recent studies have shown that attenuated endothelial function predicts the occurrence of future cardiovascular events.Keywords: atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, ultrasound imaging, childhood vasculature

  12. In vivo endothelial gene regulation in diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohet Ralph V

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An authentic survey of the transcript-level response of the diabetic endothelium in vivo is key to understanding diabetic cardiovascular complications such as accelerated atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction. Methods We used streptozotocin to induce a model of type I diabetes in transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein under the control of an endothelial-specific promoter (Tie2-GFP allowing rapid isolation of aortic endothelium. Three weeks after treatment, endothelial cells were isolated from animals with blood glucose > 350 mg/dl. Aortae from the root to the renal bifurcation were rapidly processed by mincing and proteolytic digestion followed by fluorescent activated cell sorting to yield endothelial cell populations of >95% purity. RNA was isolated from >50,000 endothelial cells and subjected to oligo dT amplification prior to transcriptional analysis on microarrays displaying long oligonucleotides representing 32,000 murine transcripts. Five regulated transcripts were selected for analysis by real-time PCR. Results Within replicate microarray experiments, 19 transcripts were apparently dysregulated by at least 70% within diabetic mice. Up-regulation of glycam1, slc36a2, ces3, adipsin and adiponectin was confirmed by real-time PCR. Conclusion By comprehensively examining cellular gene responses in vivo in a whole animal model of type I diabetes, we have identified novel regulation of key endothelial transcripts that likely contribute to the metabolic and pro-inflammatory responses that accompany diabetes.

  13. Endothelial Dysfunction in Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis M. Steyers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD. As the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is increasingly recognized as an inflammatory process, similarities between atherosclerosis and systemic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, lupus, psoriasis, spondyloarthritis and others have become a topic of interest. Endothelial dysfunction represents a key step in the initiation and maintenance of atherosclerosis and may serve as a marker for future risk of cardiovascular events. Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases manifest endothelial dysfunction, often early in the course of the disease. Therefore, mechanisms linking systemic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis may be best understood at the level of the endothelium. Multiple factors, including circulating inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α, reactive oxygen species, oxidized LDL (low density lipoprotein, autoantibodies and traditional risk factors directly and indirectly activate endothelial cells, leading to impaired vascular relaxation, increased leukocyte adhesion, increased endothelial permeability and generation of a pro-thrombotic state. Pharmacologic agents directed against TNF-α-mediated inflammation may decrease the risk of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease in these patients. Understanding the precise mechanisms driving endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases may help elucidate the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in the general population.

  14. Effects of vascular endothelial growth factor on angiogenesis of the endothelial cells isolated from cavernous malformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN YuZhen; ZHAO Yao; WANG HaiJie; ZHOU LiangFu; MAO Ying; LIU Rui; SHU Jia; WANG YongFei

    2008-01-01

    Human cerebral cavernous malformation (CM) is a common vascular malformation of the central nervous system. We have investigated the biological characteristics of CM endothelial cells and the cellular and molecular mechanisms of CM angiogenesis to offer new insights into exploring effective measures for treatment of this disease. The endothelial cells were isolated from CM tissue masses dissected during operation and expanded in vitro. Expression of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 was examined with immunocytochemical staining. Proliferation, migration and tube formation of CM endothelial cells were determined using MTT, wounding and transmigration assays, and three-dimensional collagen type Ⅰ gel respectively. The endothelial cells were successfully isolated from the tissue specimens of 25 CMs dissected without dipolar electrocoagulation. The cells show the general characteristics of the vascular endothelial cells. Expression of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 on the cells is higher than that on the normal cerebral microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment with VEGF, numbers of the proliferated and migrated cells, the maximal distance of cell migration and the length and area of capillary-like struc-tures formed in the three-dimensional collagen gel increase significantly. These results demonstrate that expression of VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 on CM endothelial cells is up-regulated. By binding to re-ceptors, VEGF may activate the downstream signaling pathways and promote proliferation, migration and tube formation of CM endothelial cells. VEGF/VEGFR signaling pathways play important regulating roles in CM angiogenesis.

  15. Protection of Coronary Endothelial Function during Cardiac Surgery: Potential of Targeting Endothelial Ion Channels in Cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelium plays a critical role in the control of blood flow by producing vasoactive factors to regulate vascular tone. Ion channels, in particular, K+ channels and Ca2+-permeable channels in endothelial cells, are essential to the production and function of endothelium-derived vasoactive factors. Impairment of coronary endothelial function occurs in open heart surgery that may result in reduction of coronary blood flow and thus in an inadequate myocardial perfusion. Hyperkalemic exposure and concurrent ischemia-reperfusion during cardioplegic intervention compromise NO and EDHF-mediated function and the impairment involves alterations of K+ channels, that is, KATP and KCa, and Ca2+-permeable TRP channels in endothelial cells. Pharmacological modulation of these channels during ischemia-reperfusion and hyperkalemic exposure show promising results on the preservation of NO and EDHF-mediated endothelial function, which suggests the potential of targeting endothelial K+ and TRP channels for myocardial protection during cardiac surgery.

  16. Relationship of RhoA signaling activity with ezrin expression and its significance in the prognosis for breast cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Li; LIU Yue-ping; ZHANG Xiang-hong; GENG Cui-zhi; LI Zeng-huai

    2013-01-01

    Background We have recently reported that RhoA may regulate the invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells as an upstream signal of ezrin in vitro.In this study,we examined the relationship of RhoA signaling activity with ezrin expression in breast cancer and its prognostic significance in patients with breast cancer.Methods Paraffin tumor sections of breast cancer were collected retrospectively from 487 patients diagnosed between 2001 and 2004.Immunohistochemical methods were used to detect the expression of RhoA,phosphorylated (activated) RhoA,and ezrin.Results Ezrin overexpression was detectable in 15.2% of 487 invasive breast cancers.The majority (85.1%) of ezrin-overexpressing tumors coexpressed phosphorylated RhoA; 78.8% of tumors with phosphorylated RhoA cooverexpressed ezrin.Patients whose cancers showed overexpression of ezrin or expression of phosphorylated RhoA had shorter survival rates.Conclusions RhoA activation is important in human breast cancer due to its upregulation of ezrin; thus,agents that target phosphorylated RhoA may be useful in the treatment of tumors with ezrin overexpression.

  17. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells.

  18. Unbiased identification of signal-activated transcription factors by barcoded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Pauline; Rando, Gianpaolo; Fleury-Olela, Fabienne; Schibler, Ueli

    2016-08-15

    The discovery of transcription factors (TFs) controlling pathways in health and disease is of paramount interest. We designed a widely applicable method, dubbed barcorded synthetic tandem repeat promoter screening (BC-STAR-PROM), to identify signal-activated TFs without any a priori knowledge about their properties. The BC-STAR-PROM library consists of ∼3000 luciferase expression vectors, each harboring a promoter (composed of six tandem repeats of synthetic random DNA) and an associated barcode of 20 base pairs (bp) within the 3' untranslated mRNA region. Together, the promoter sequences encompass >400,000 bp of random DNA, a sequence complexity sufficient to capture most TFs. Cells transfected with the library are exposed to a signal, and the mRNAs that it encodes are counted by next-generation sequencing of the barcodes. This allows the simultaneous activity tracking of each of the ∼3000 synthetic promoters in a single experiment. Here we establish proof of concept for BC-STAR-PROM by applying it to the identification of TFs induced by drugs affecting actin and tubulin cytoskeleton dynamics. BC-STAR-PROM revealed that serum response factor (SRF) is the only immediate early TF induced by both actin polymerization and microtubule depolymerization. Such changes in cytoskeleton dynamics are known to occur during the cell division cycle, and real-time bioluminescence microscopy indeed revealed cell-autonomous SRF-myocardin-related TF (MRTF) activity bouts in proliferating cells. PMID:27601530

  19. Endothelial Cell Response to Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Reila Tainá; Nguyen, Daniel; Stephens, Danielle; Pamuk, Ferda; Fernandes, Daniel; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Kantarci, Alpdogan

    2016-07-01

    Vascular response is an essential aspect of an effective immune response to periodontal disease pathogens, as new blood vessel formation contributes to wound healing and inflammation. Gaining a greater understanding of the factors that affect vascular response may then contribute to future breakthroughs in dental medicine. In this study, we have characterized the endothelial cell response to the common bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum, an important bridging species that facilitates the activity of late colonizers of the dental biofilm. Endothelial cells were infected with Fusobacterium nucleatum (strain 25586) for periods of 4, 12, 24, or 48 h. Cell proliferation and tube formation were analyzed, and expression of adhesion molecules (CD31 and CD34) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors 1 and 2 was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Data indicate that F. nucleatum impaired endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. The findings suggest that the modified endothelial cell response acts as a mechanism promoting the pathogenic progression of periodontal diseases and may potentially suggest the involvement of periodontopathogens in systemic diseases associated with periodontal inflammation. PMID:27185790

  20. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Zakirova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the role of endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction in the development of angina pectoris (AP in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. 83 patients with IHD were included in the study. 30 patients had AP of functional class (FC-II, 27 patients - FC-III and 26 patients - FC-IV. The control group consisted of 25 healthy persons. Bicycle ergometry, daily ECG monitoring and echocardiography were used for verification of IHD. Endothelial vasodilating function was assessed by endothelium-dependent (EDVD and endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EIDVD of brachial artery. Vasoconstrictive function was assessed by the level of endothelin (ET-1. Endothelial adhesive function was evaluated by plasma concentration of intracellular adhesion molecules – JCAM-1, VCAM-1 and Е-selectin.Results. Normal EDVD and EIDVD were observed in patients with AP of FC-II. The more severe FC of AP the more prominent endothelial vasodilating dysfunction was revealed as well as the higher levels of ET-1 and intracellular adhesion molecules. Patients with AP of FC-IV had hyperexpression of JCAM-1, VCAM-1, Е-selectin and ET-1 and low levels of EDVD and EIDVD.Conclusion. Progression of IHD related with growing endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction.

  1. Development of Endothelial-Specific Single Inducible Lentiviral Vectors for Genetic Engineering of Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guanghua; Kramer, M Gabriela; Fernandez-Ruiz, Veronica; Kawa, Milosz P; Huang, Xin; Liu, Zhongmin; Prieto, Jesus; Qian, Cheng

    2015-11-27

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are able to migrate to tumor vasculature. These cells, if genetically modified, can be used as vehicles to deliver toxic material to, or express anticancer proteins in tumor. To test this hypothesis, we developed several single, endothelial-specific, and doxycycline-inducible self-inactivating (SIN) lentiviral vectors. Two distinct expression cassettes were inserted into a SIN-vector: one controlled by an endothelial lineage-specific, murine vascular endothelial cadherin (mVEcad) promoter for the expression of a transactivator, rtTA2S-M2; and the other driven by an inducible promoter, TREalb, for a firefly luciferase reporter gene. We compared the expression levels of luciferase in different vector constructs, containing either the same or opposite orientation with respect to the vector sequence. The results showed that the vector with these two expression cassettes placed in opposite directions was optimal, characterized by a robust induction of the transgene expression (17.7- to 73-fold) in the presence of doxycycline in several endothelial cell lines, but without leakiness when uninduced. In conclusion, an endothelial lineage-specific single inducible SIN lentiviral vector has been developed. Such a lentiviral vector can be used to endow endothelial progenitor cells with anti-tumor properties.

  2. Corneal endothelial changes in superficial epithelial keratopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A M; Grant, G; Gillies, W E

    1986-05-01

    A series of five cases is described in which superficial punctate keratopathy was associated with endothelial cell changes. The most striking change was the presence of dark areas or blebs, usually two to four cell diameters in extent. There was also distortion and crumpling of the corneal endothelium, mild pleomorphism and polymegathism of the endothelial cells, with a reduced cell count in some cases. These blebs have previously been reported in hard and soft contact lens wearers and are due to intercellular oedema with separation of endothelial cells from Descemet's membrane. Anoxia and interference with osmosis have been proposed as possible mechanisms for the production of these blebs, but our cases demonstrate that fine disruption of the corneal epithelium can affect the integrity of the corneal endothelium and may lead to significant damage over a long period of time. PMID:3801208

  3. Heterogeneity in Signaled Active Avoidance: Substantive and Methodological Relevance of Diversity in Instrumental Defensive Responses to Threat Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Robert Galatzer-Levy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals exposed to traumatic stressors follow divergent patterns including resilience and chronic stress. However, researchers utilizing animal models that examine threat responses typically use central tendency statistics that assume population homogeneity, potentially overlooking fundamental differences that can explain human diversity in response to traumatic stressors. The current study tests this assumption by identifying and replicating common heterogeneous patterns of response to signaled active avoidance (AA training where rats are trained to prevent an aversive outcome (shock by performing a instrumental behavior (shuttling between chambers during the presentation of a conditioned threat cue (tone. Study 1 conducted three days of signaled AA training (n = 81 animals and study 2 conducted five days of training (n = 186 animals. Four trajectories were identified in both samples including animals that acquired and retained avoidance behavior on the first day (Rapid Avoiders: 22% & 25%; those who never successfully acquired avoidance (Non-Avoiders; 20% &16%; a modal class who acquired avoidance over three days (Modal Avoiders; 37% & 50%; and a population who demonstrated a slow pattern of avoidance, failed to fully acquire avoidance in study 1 and did acquire avoidance on days 4 and 5 in study 2 (Slow Avoiders; 22.0% & 9%. With the exception of the Slow Avoiders in Study 1, populations that acquired demonstrated rapid step-like increases leading to asymptotic levels of avoidance. These findings indicate that avoidance responses are heterogeneous in a way that may be informative for understanding resilience and chronic stress responses such as PTSD as well as the nature of instrumental behavior acquisition. Characterizing heterogeneous populations based on their response to threat cues would increase the accuracy and translatability of such models and potentially lead to new discoveries that explain diversity in instrumental defensive

  4. Establishment of outgrowth endothelial cells from peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Ramirez, Javier; Hofman, Menno; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Hebbel, Robert P; Voorberg, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) are important tools when investigating diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for vascular disease. In this protocol, mononuclear cells are isolated from peripheral blood and plated on type I collagen at ∼135,000 cells per cm(2) in endothelial cell differentiation medium. On average, 0.34 colonies of endothelial cells per milliliter of blood can be obtained. Colonies of endothelial cells become visible after 14-28 d. Upon confluence, these rapidly expanding colonies can be passaged and have been shown to propagate up to 10(18)-fold. Isolated BOECs are phenotypically similar to vascular endothelial cells, as revealed by their cobblestone morphology, the presence of endothelial cell-specific Weibel-Palade bodies and the expression of endothelial cell markers such as VE-cadherin. The protocol presented here also provides a particularly useful tool for the ex vivo assessment of endothelial cell function from patients with different vascular abnormalities. PMID:22918388

  5. Anesthetic propofol overdose causes endothelial cytotoxicity in vitro and endothelial barrier dysfunction in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ming-Chung [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chia-Ling [Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Yang, Tsan-Tzu; Choi, Pui-Ching [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hsing, Chung-Hsi [Department of Anesthesiology, Chi Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chiou-Feng, E-mail: cflin@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    An overdose and a prolonged treatment of propofol may cause cellular cytotoxicity in multiple organs and tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and immune cells; however, the underlying mechanism remains undocumented, particularly in vascular endothelial cells. Our previous studies showed that the activation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 is pro-apoptotic in phagocytes during overdose of propofol treatment. Regarding the intravascular administration of propofol, we therefore hypothesized that propofol overdose also induces endothelial cytotoxicity via GSK-3. Propofol overdose (100 μg/ml) inhibited growth in human arterial and microvascular endothelial cells. After treatment, most of the endothelial cells experienced caspase-independent necrosis-like cell death. The activation of cathepsin D following lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) determined necrosis-like cell death. Furthermore, propofol overdose also induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least in part. Caspase-3 was activated and acted downstream of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP) loss; however, lysosomal cathepsins were not required for endothelial cell apoptosis. Notably, activation of GSK-3 was essential for propofol overdose-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis, but not necrosis-like cell death. Intraperitoneal administration of a propofol overdose in BALB/c mice caused an increase in peritoneal vascular permeability. These results demonstrate the cytotoxic effects of propofol overdose, including cathepsin D-regulated necrosis-like cell death and GSK-3-regulated mitochondrial apoptosis, on endothelial cells in vitro and the endothelial barrier dysfunction by propofol in vivo. Highlights: ► Propofol overdose causes apoptosis and necrosis in endothelial cells. ► Propofol overdose triggers lysosomal dysfunction independent of autophagy. ► Glycogen synthase kinase-3 facilitates propofol overdose-induced apoptosis. ► Propofol overdose causes an increase

  6. Chlorine Gas Exposure Causes Systemic Endothelial Dysfunction by Inhibiting Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase–Dependent Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Honavar, Jaideep; Samal, Andrey A.; Bradley, Kelley M.; Brandon, Angela; Balanay, Joann; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; MohanKumar, Krishnan; Maheshwari, Akhil; Postlethwait, Edward M.; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2010-01-01

    Chlorine gas (Cl2) exposure during accidents or in the military setting results primarily in injury to the lungs. However, the potential for Cl2 exposure to promote injury to the systemic vasculature leading to compromised vascular function has not been studied. We hypothesized that Cl2 promotes extrapulmonary endothelial dysfunction characterized by a loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-derived signaling. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to Cl2 for 30 minutes, and eNOS-depe...

  7. Endothelial cell markers reflecting endothelial cell dysfunction in patients with mixed connective tissue disease

    OpenAIRE

    Soltész Pál (1961-) (belgyógyász, kardiológus); Bereczki Dániel (1960-) (neurológus); Szodoray Péter (1973-) (belgyógyász, orvos); Magyar Mária Tünde (1970-) (neurológus); Dér Henrietta (1977-) (orvos); Csípő István (1953-) (vegyész); Hajas Ágota Helga (1985-) (orvos); Paragh György (1953-) (belgyógyász, kardiológus, endokrinológus, lipidológus, sürgősségi orvostani szakorvos, belgyógyászati angiológiai minősített orvos); Szegedi Gyula (1936-2013) (belgyógyász, immunológus); Bodolay Edit (1950-) (belgyógyász, allergológus és klinikai immunológus)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and endothelial dysfunction in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and to determine which biomarkers are associated with atherosclerotic complications, such as cardiovascular disease. Methods Fifty MCTD patients and 38 healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls were enrolled in this study. In order to describe endothelial dysfunction, we assessed flow-mediated di...

  8. Modified Descemet's Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty for Congenital Hereditary Endothelial Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoodreza Panahi-Bazaz; Farideh Sharifipour; Mohammad Malekahmadi

    2014-01-01

    A 19-year-old male with congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED) presented with severe bilateral corneal clouding precluding any view of the intraocular structures. He underwent modified Descemet′s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) technique including a suture pull-through technique to prevent lens damage. Surgery resulted in progressive clearing of the cornea and decreased corneal thickness. Visual acuity increased from hand motions preoperatively to counting fin...

  9. The Novel Methods for Analysis of Exosomes Released from Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jinju Wang; Runmin Guo; Yi Yang; Bradley Jacobs; Suhong Chen; Ifeanyi Iwuchukwu; Gaines, Kenneth J.; Yanfang Chen; Richard Simman; Guiyuan Lv; Keng Wu; Bihl, Ji C.

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes (EXs) are cell-derived vesicles that mediate cell-cell communication and could serve as biomarkers. Here we described novel methods for purification and phenotyping of EXs released from endothelial cells (ECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by combining microbeads and fluorescence quantum dots (Q-dots®) techniques. EXs from the culture medium of ECs and EPCs were isolated and detected with cell-specific antibody conjugated microbeads and second antibody conjugated Q-dots by ...

  10. Endothelialized ePTFE Graft by Nanobiotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    The Apparatus for Processing the Tubular Graft Modification Will be Designed and Evaluated.; The On-site Capturing of the Endothelial (Progenitor) Cells by Peptide-mediated Selective Adhesion in Vitro and in Vivo Will Also be Elucidated.; The Patency Rate of ITRI-made Artificial Blood Vessels Will be Evaluated by the Porcine Animal Model.

  11. Endothelial signalling events during leukocyte transmigration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.L. Hordijk

    2006-01-01

    The notion that it takes two to tango is certainly true for leukocyte transendothelial migration. A growing pallet of leukocyte adhesion-induced signaling events in endothelial cells have been identified, mediating both short-term (i.e. permeability) as well as long-term (i.e. regulation of transcri

  12. Optical Investigations of Endothelial Cell Motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Ninna Struck

    A monolayer of endothelial cells lines the entire circulatory system and create a barrier between the circulatory system and the tissues. To create and maintain an intact barrier, the individual cells have to connect tightly with their neighbors, which causes a highly correlated motion between...

  13. Circulating endothelial cells in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Christopher J; Lip, Gregory Y H; Blann, Andrew D

    2006-10-17

    Quantification of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in peripheral blood is developing as a novel and reproducible method of assessing endothelial damage/dysfunction. The CECs are thought to be mature cells that have detached from the intimal monolayer in response to endothelial injury and are a different cell population to endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The EPCs are nonleukocytes derived from the bone marrow that are believed to have proliferative potential and may be important in vascular regeneration. Currently accepted methods of CEC quantification include the use of immunomagnetic bead separation (with cell counting under fluorescence microscopy) and flow cytometry. Several recent studies have shown increased numbers of CECs in cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, such as unstable angina, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, and critical limb ischemia, but no change in stable intermittent claudication, essential hypertension, or atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, CEC quantification at 48 h after acute myocardial infarction has been shown to be an accurate predictor of major adverse coronary events and death at both 1 month and 1 year. This article presents an overview of the pathophysiology of CECs in the setting of cardiovascular disease and a brief comparison with EPCs. PMID:17045885

  14. Brain endothelial dysfunction in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Patricia L; Gong, Yi; Snyder, Juliet M T; Jimenez, Sandra; Lok, Josephine; Lo, Eng H; Moser, Ann B; Grabowski, Eric F; Frosch, Matthew P; Eichler, Florian S

    2015-11-01

    See Aubourg (doi:10.1093/awv271) for a scientific commentary on this article.X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene leading to accumulation of very long chain fatty acids. Its most severe neurological manifestation is cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. Here we demonstrate that progressive inflammatory demyelination in cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy coincides with blood-brain barrier dysfunction, increased MMP9 expression, and changes in endothelial tight junction proteins as well as adhesion molecules. ABCD1, but not its closest homologue ABCD2, is highly expressed in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, far exceeding its expression in the systemic vasculature. Silencing of ABCD1 in human brain microvascular endothelial cells causes accumulation of very long chain fatty acids, but much later than the immediate upregulation of adhesion molecules and decrease in tight junction proteins. This results in greater adhesion and transmigration of monocytes across the endothelium. PCR-array screening of human brain microvascular endothelial cells after ABCD1 silencing revealed downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of the transcription factor c-MYC (encoded by MYC). Interestingly, MYC silencing mimicked the effects of ABCD1 silencing on CLDN5 and ICAM1 without decreasing the levels of ABCD1 protein itself. Together, these data demonstrate that ABCD1 deficiency induces significant alterations in brain endothelium via c-MYC and may thereby contribute to the increased trafficking of leucocytes across the blood-brain barrier as seen in cerebral adrenouleukodystrophy.

  15. Novel mechanisms of endothelial mechano-transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Jun-ichi; Berk, Bradford C

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a focal disease that develops preferentially where non-laminar, disturbed blood flow (d-flow) occurs such as branches, bifurcations, and curvatures of large arteries. Endothelial cells sense and respond differently to d-flow compared to steady laminar flow (s-flow). D-flow that occurs in so-called athero-prone areas activates pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling, and this results in endothelial dysfunction and leads to subsequent development of atherosclerosis. In contrast, s-flow as “athero-protective flow” promotes expression of many anti-inflammatory genes such as Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibits endothelial inflammation and athrogenesis. Here we will discuss that d-flow and s-flow induce pro- and anti-atherogenic events via flow type-specific “mechanotransduction” pathways. We will focus on five mechano-sensitive pathways: MEK5 (MAPK/ERK kinase 5)-ERK5-KLF2 signaling, ERK5-PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) signaling, and mechano-signaling pathways involving SUMOylation, protein kinase C-ζ, (PKCζ), and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (p90RSK). We believe that clarifying regulation mechanisms between these two flow types will provide new insights into therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25301843

  16. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Ugo; Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  17. The control of vascular endothelial cell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murota, S; Morita, I; Suda, N

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism by which MCI-186 showed a potent cytoprotective effect on the in vitro endothelial cell injury due to 15-HPETE was studied. Stimulation of human leukocytes with various chemical mediators such as TPA, f-Met-Leu-Phe, LTB4, etc. elicited the production of active oxygens, which could be detected by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Among the chemical mediators tested, TPA elicited the chemiluminescence the most, and f-Met-Leu-Phe and LTB4 came next. When the leukocytes were directly placed on a monolayer of cultured endothelial cells, followed by stimulating the leukocytes with TPA, severe endothelial cell injury was observed. The effect of TPA was dose dependent. There was good correlation between the active oxygen releasing activity and the cytotoxic activity. When the leukocytes were placed on a filter which was set apart from the monolayer of endothelial cell in a culture dish, and stimulated the leukocytes with TPA, no cytotoxicity was observed. These data strongly suggest that the substance responsible for the cytotoxicity must be a very labile and short-lived substance, presumably active oxygens. On the other hand, MCI-186 was found to have a complete quenching activity to the chemiluminescence due to active oxygens in the TPA-leukocyte system. Taken together, these factors indicate that the potent cytoprotective effect of MCI-186 may be due to its specific radical scavenging activity. PMID:2248437

  18. Selective endothelial overexpression of arginase II induces endothelial dysfunction and hypertension and enhances atherosclerosis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris L Vaisman

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders associated with endothelial dysfunction, such as atherosclerosis, have decreased nitric oxide (NO bioavailability. Arginase in the vasculature can compete with eNOS for L-arginine and has been implicated in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of endothelial-specific elevation of arginase II expression on endothelial function and the development of atherosclerosis.Transgenic mice on a C57BL/6 background with endothelial-specific overexpression of human arginase II (hArgII gene under the control of the Tie2 promoter were produced. The hArgII mice had elevated tissue arginase activity except in liver and in resident peritoneal macrophages, confirming endothelial specificity of the transgene. Using small-vessel myography, aorta from these mice exhibited endothelial dysfunction when compared to their non-transgenic littermate controls. The blood pressure of the hArgII mice was 17% higher than their littermate controls and, when crossed with apoE -/- mice, hArgII mice had increased aortic atherosclerotic lesions.We conclude that overexpression of arginase II in the endothelium is detrimental to the cardiovascular system.

  19. Radioprotection of human endothelial cells with amifostine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreopoulos, D.; Schleicher, U.M.; Ammon, J. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiotherapie - Onkologie; Cotarelo, C.L.; Hand, S. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Pathologie

    1999-11-01

    Materials and methods: We studied the effect of amifostine on radiation sensitivity of human endothelial cells and several tumor cell lines (HeLa, MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC-3). The cells were incubated in medium with a concentration of 1 {mu}g/{mu}l amifostine and after 1 hour irradiated with 10 or 20 Gy single dose. Proliferation index was measured by BrdU assay after another 8 and 24 hours. Results: The results show a higher proliferation rate of endothelial cells following radiation plus amifostine, compared with radiation alone. Amifostine induced an increase of proliferation in the control-non-irradiated human endothelial cells. After irradiation with 10 Gy single dose the proliferation of amifostine treated human endothelial cells was still higher. Amifostine exerts no apparent proliferative effect on the tumor cells. Conclusions: The results presented indicate that amifostine acts as an activation of proliferation of the human endothelial cells in a simple in-vitro system and indicate that amifostine supplementation prior to radiation therapy might exert a radioprotective effect to healthy tissue without spurring tumor growth. (orig.) [German] Material und Methode: Humane Endothelzellen und verschiedene Tumorzellinien (HeLa, MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC-3) wurden fuer eine Stunde mit 1 {mu}g/{mu}l Amifostin inkubiert und dann mit Dosen von 10 und 20 Gy bestrahlt. Die Proliferationsaktivitaet wurde mittels BrdU-Assay nach acht und 24 Stunden gemessen. Ergebnisse: Amifostin fuehrt zu einer verstaerkten Proliferation der unbestrahlten Endothelzellen. Nach der Bestrahlung mit 10 Gy Einzeitdosis zeigen die Endothelzellen mit Amifostin-Zusatz eine staerkere Proliferation als die Zellen ohne Amifostin. Ein protektiver Effekt auf die Tumorzellinien war nicht feststellbar. Schlussfolgerung: Die bisherigen Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Amifostin einen radioprotektiven Effekt auf humane Endothelzellen ausuebt und deren Proliferation stimuliert, ohne jedoch die Proliferation der Tumorzellen

  20. Homocysteine alters monocyte-endothelial interaction in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether homocysteine induced endothelial damage through monocyte-endothelial interaction and to characterize both cell types in vitro.Methods Radiomethods were performed on monocyte adhesion to/through endothelium and endothelial damage experiments. Results Homocysteine-treated endothelial cells increased monocyte adhesion and transmigration. Homocysteine-treated monocytes induced endothelial detachment, but this effect was blocked by catalase. These effects were increased with higher concentrations of homocysteine. Monocyte surface glycoprotein antibodies CD11b/CD18 and CD14 inhibited these processes.Conclusions Homocysteine alters monocyte-endothelial interaction in vitro, eventually bringing about endothelial damage through release of H2O2. These phenomena are mediated through monocyte surface glycoproteins CD11b/CD18 and CD14. Upregulation of these processes in vivo may contribute to acceleration of atherosclerosis in patients with elevated plasma homocysteine levels.

  1. The role of H2S bioavailability in endothelial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Szabo, Csaba; Ichinose, Fumito; Ahmed, Asif; Whiteman, Matthew; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction reflects pathophysiological changes in the phenotype and functions of endothelial cells that result from and/or contribute to a plethora of cardiovascular diseases. Here we review the role of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction, one of the fastest advanced and hottest research topics. Conventionally treated as an environment pollutant, H2S is also produced in endothelial cells and participates in the fine regulation of endothelial integrity and functions. Disturbed H2S bioavailability has been suggested to be a novel indicator of the progress and prognosis of endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction appears to exhibit in different forms in different pathologies but therapeutics aimed at remedying the altered H2S bioavailability may benefit all. PMID:26071118

  2. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  3. Genipin inhibits endothelial exocytosis via nitric oxide in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-fa WANG; Shao-yu WU; Jin-jun RAO; Lin L(U); Wei XU; Jian-xin PANG; Zhong-qiu LIU; Shu-guang WU; Jia-jie ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Exocytosis of endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies, which contain von Willebrand factor (VWF), P-selectin and other modulators, plays an important role in both inflammation and thrombosis. The present study investigates whether genipin,an aglycon of geniposide, inhibits endothelial exocytosis.Methods: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were isolated from umbilical cords and cultured. The concentration of VWF in cell supernatants was measured using an ELISA Kit. P-selectin translocation on the cell surface was analyzed by cell surface ELISA. Cell viability was measured using a Cell Counting Kit-8. Mouse bleeding times were measured by amputating the tail tip. Western blot analysis was used to determine the amount of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phospho-eNOS present. Nitric oxide (NO) was measured in the cell supernatants as nitrite using an NO Colorimetric Assay.Results: Genipin inhibited thrombin-induced VWF release and P-selectin translocation in HUVECs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The drug had no cytotoxic effect on the cells at the same doses that were able to inhibit exocytosis. The functional study that demonstrated that genipin inhibited exocytosis in vivo also showed that genipin prolonged the mouse bleeding time. Furthermore, genipin activated eNOS phosphorylation, promoted enzyme activation and increased NO production. L-NAME, an inhibitor of NOS, reversed the inhibitory effects of genipin on endothelial exocytosis.Conclusion: Genipin inhibits endothelial exocytosis in HUVECs. The mechanism by which this compound inhibits exocytosis may be related to its ability to stimulate eNOS activation and NO production. Our findings suggest a novel antiinflammatory mechanism for genipin. This compound may represent a new treatment for inflammation and/or thrombosis in which excess endothelial exocytosis plays a pathophysiological role.

  4. Endothelial progenitor cells with Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG Xiao-dong; ZHANG Yun; LIU Li; SUN Ning; ZHANG Ming-yi; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2011-01-01

    Background Endothelial dysfunction is thought to be critical events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD).Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have provided insight into maintaining and repairing endothelial function. To study the relation between EPCs and AD, we explored the number of circulating EPCs in patients with AD.Methods A total of 104 patients were recruited from both the outpatients and inpatients of the geriatric neurology department at General Hospital, rianjin Medical University. Consecutive patients with newly diagnosed AD (n=30),patients with vascular dementia (VaD, n=34), and healthy elderly control subjects with normal cognition (n=40) were enrolled after matching for age, gender, body mass index, medical history, current medication and Mini Mental State Examination. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity was examined with transcranial Doppler. Endothelial function was evaluated according to the level of EPCs, and peripheral blood EPCs was counted by flow cytometry.Results There were no significant statistical differences of clinical data in AD, VaD and control groups (P >0.05). The patients with AD showed decreased CD34-positive (CD34+) or CD133-positive (CD133+) levels compared to the control subjects, but there were no significant statistical differences in patients with AD. The patients with AD had significantly lower CD34+CD133+ EPCs(CD34 and CD133 double positive endothelial progenitor cells) than the control subjects (P <0.05). In the patients with AD, a lower CD34+CD133+ EPCs count was independently associated with a lower Mini-Mental State Examination score (r=0.514, P=0.004). Patients with VaD also showed a significant decrease in CD34+CD133+ EPCs levels, but this was not evidently associated with the Mini-Mental State Examination score. The changes of middle cerebral artery flow velocity were similar between AD and VaD. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity was decreased in the AD and VaD groups and significantly lower than

  5. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Promote Directional Three-Dimensional Endothelial Network Formation by Secreting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshinori Abe; Yoshiyuki Ozaki; Junichi Kasuya; Kimiko Yamamoto; Joji Ando; Ryo Sudo; Mariko Ikeda; Kazuo Tanishita

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) transplantation induces the formation of new blood-vessel networks to supply nutrients and oxygen, and is feasible for the treatment of ischemia and cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of EPCs as a source of proangiogenic cytokines and consequent generators of an extracellular growth factor microenvironment in three-dimensional (3D) microvessel formation is not fully understood. We focused on the contribution of EPCs as a source of proangiogenic cytoki...

  6. Circulating Endothelial Microparticles in Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Tramontano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endothelial Microparticles (EMPs are small vesicles shed from activated or apoptotic endothelial cells and involved in cellular cross-talk. Whether EMP immunophenotypes vary according to stimulus in Diabetes Mellitus (DM is not known. We studied the cellular adhesion molecule (CAM profile of circulating EMPs in patients with and without Diabetes Mellitus type 2, who were undergoing elective cardiac catheterization. Methods and Results. EMPs were analyzed by flow cytometry. The absolute median number of EMPs (EMPs/L specific for CD31, CD105, and CD106 was significantly increased in the DM population. The ratio of CD62E/CD31 EMP populations reflected an apoptotic process. Conclusion. Circulating CD31+, CD105+, and CD106+ EMPs were significantly elevated in patients with DM. EMPs were the only independent predictors of DM in our study cohort. In addition, the EMP immunophenotype reflected an apoptotic process. Circulating EMPs may provide new options for risk assessment.

  7. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  8. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS) Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jason; Magenau, Astrid; Rodriguez, Macarena; Rentero, Carles; Royo, Teresa; Enrich, Carlos; Thomas, Shane R; Grewal, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC). Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1) colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL)-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells. PMID:26977592

  9. Activation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide (eNOS Occurs through Different Membrane Domains in Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Tran

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells respond to a large range of stimuli including circulating lipoproteins, growth factors and changes in haemodynamic mechanical forces to regulate the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and maintain blood pressure. While many signalling pathways have been mapped, the identities of membrane domains through which these signals are transmitted are less well characterized. Here, we manipulated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC with cholesterol and the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC. Using a range of microscopy techniques including confocal, 2-photon, super-resolution and electron microscopy, we found that sterol enrichment had differential effects on eNOS and caveolin-1 (Cav1 colocalisation, membrane order of the plasma membrane, caveolae numbers and Cav1 clustering. We found a correlation between cholesterol-induced condensation of the plasma membrane and enhanced high density lipoprotein (HDL-induced eNOS activity and phosphorylation suggesting that cholesterol domains, but not individual caveolae, mediate HDL stimulation of eNOS. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-induced and shear stress-induced eNOS activity was relatively independent of membrane order and may be predominantly controlled by the number of caveolae on the cell surface. Taken together, our data suggest that signals that activate and phosphorylate eNOS are transmitted through distinct membrane domains in endothelial cells.

  10. Metformin improves endothelial function in aortic tissue and microvascular endothelial cells subjected to diabetic hyperglycaemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Suparna; Lakshmanan, Arun P; Hwang, Mu Ji; Kubba, Haidar; Mushannen, Ahmed; Triggle, Chris R; Ding, Hong

    2015-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms whereby metformin, the first line drug for type 2 diabetes (T2DM), mediates its antidiabetic effects remain elusive, particularly as to whether metformin has a direct protective action on the vasculature. This study was designed to determine if a brief 3-h exposure to metformin protects endothelial function against the effects of hyperglycaemia. We investigated the protective effects of metformin on endothelial-dependent vasodilatation (EDV) in thoracic aortae from T2DM db/db mice and on high glucose (HG, 40 mM) induced changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signaling in mouse microvascular endothelial cells (MMECs) in culture. Exposure of aortae from db+/? non-diabetic control mice to high glucose (HG, 40 mM) containing Krebs for 3-h significantly (Pmetformin; metformin also improved ACh-induced EDV in aortae from diabetic db/db mice. Immunoblot analysis of MMECs cultured in HG versus NG revealed a significant reduction of the ratio of phosphorylated (p-eNOS)/eNOS and p-Akt/Akt, but not the expression of total eNOS or Akt. The 3-h exposure of MMECs to metformin significantly (Pmetformin can reverse/reduce the impact of HG on endothelial function, via mechanisms linked to increased phosphorylation of eNOS and Akt.

  11. Sequence of Endothelial Signaling during Lung Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Yiming, Maimaiti T.; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Bhattacharya, Sunita

    2005-01-01

    Although high tidal volume ventilation exacerbates lung injury, the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response are not clear. Here, we exposed isolated lungs to high or low tidal volume ventilation, while perfusing lungs with whole blood, or blood depleted of leukocytes and platelets. Then, we determined signaling responses in freshly isolated lung endothelial cells by means of immunoblotting and immunofluorescence approaches. In depleted blood perfusion, high tidal volume induced modest...

  12. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    N. E. Zakirova; R. G. Oganov; A. N. Zakirova; M. P. Plotnikova; G. M. Salakhova

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the role of endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction in the development of angina pectoris (AP) in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD).Material and methods. 83 patients with IHD were included in the study. 30 patients had AP of functional class (FC)-II, 27 patients - FC-III and 26 patients - FC-IV. The control group consisted of 25 healthy persons. Bicycle ergometry, daily ECG monitoring and echocardiography were used for verification of IHD. E...

  13. Endothelial cell transfection of ex vivo arteries

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Alexander Lohman, Adam Straub & Brant Isakson ### Abstract The vascular endothelium plays an essential role in regulating blood vessel tone, blood flow and blood pressure. Current vascular model systems for examination of endothelial cell biology and blood vessel physiology and pathology rely on cell culture and the generation of genetically modified animals. While these systems are advantageous for studying the endothelium, many cell culture models omit the contribution ...

  14. Endothelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Regenerative Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Damian Medici

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) is a fundamental cellular mechanism that regulates embryonic development and diseases such as cancer and fibrosis. Recent developments in biomedical research have shown remarkable potential to harness the EndMT process for tissue engineering and regeneration. As an alternative to traditional or artificial stem cell therapies, EndMT may represent a safe method for engineering new tissues to treat degenerative diseases by mimicking a process that occur...

  15. Chlorpromazine-induced corneal endothelial phototoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, D.S.; Csukas, S.; Green, K.

    1982-04-01

    Chlorpromazine, which has been used extensively for the treatment of psychiatric disorders, is known to accumulate in the posterior corneal stroma, lens, and uveal tract. Because it is a phototoxic compound, the potential exists for it to cause cellular damage after light exposure. Specular microscopic perfusion of corneal endothelial cells in darkness with 0.5 mM chlorpromazine HCl resulted in a swelling rate of 18 +/- 2 micrometer/hr, whereas corneas exposed to long-wavelength ultraviolet light for 3 min in the presence of 0.5 mM chlorpromazine swelled at 37 +/- 9 micrometer/hr (p less than 0.01). Preirradiation of 0.5 mM chlorpromazine solution with ultraviolet light for 30 min and subsequent corneal perfusion with the solution resulted in a corneal swelling rate of 45 +/- 19 micrometer/hr. Cornea endothelial cells perfused with 0.5 mM chlorpromazine that was preirradiated with ultraviolet light showed marked swelling on scanning electron microscopic examination, whereas those perfused with nonirradiated chlorpromazine were flat and showed a normal mosaic pattern. Combining either 500 U/ml catalase or 290 U/ml superoxide dismutase with chlorpromazine did not alter photoinduction of corneal swelling. The data suggest that corneal endothelial chlorpromazine phototoxicity is secondary to cytotoxic products resulting from the photodynamically induced decomposition of chlorpromazine and is not caused by hydrogen peroxide or superoxide anion generated during the phototoxic reaction.

  16. Doinseunggitang Ameliorates Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetic Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Joo Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, a chronic and progressive disease characterized by vascular inflammation, is a leading cause of death in diabetes patients. Doinseunggitang (DYSGT, traditional prescription, has been used for promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of DYSGT on endothelial dysfunction in diabetic atherosclerosis animal model. Apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE KO mice fed on a Western diet were treated with DYSGT (200 mg/kg/day. DYSGT significantly lowered blood glucose level and glucose tolerance as well as systolic blood pressure. Metabolic parameter showed that DYSGT markedly decreased triglyceride and LDL-cholesterol levels. In the thoracic aorta, the impairment of vasorelaxation response to acetylcholine and atherosclerotic lesion was attenuated by DYSGT. Furthermore, DYSGT restored the reduction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression, leading to the inhibition of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and endothelin-1 (ET-1 expression. In conclusion, DYSGT improved the development of diabetic atherosclerosis via attenuation of the endothelial dysfunction, possibly by inhibiting ET-1, cell adhesion molecules, and lesion formation. Therefore, these results suggest that Korean traditional prescription Doinseunggitang may be useful in the treatment and prevention of diabetic vascular complications.

  17. Peripheral arterial endothelial dysfunction of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Shang, Jingwei; Sato, Kota; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-07-15

    This study evaluates endothelial functions of neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). The reactive hyperemia index (RHI) of peripheral arterial tonometry and serological data were compared between age- and gender-matched normal controls (n=302) and five disease groups (ALS; n=75, PD; n=180, PSP; n=30, MSA; n=35, SCA; n=53). Correlation analyses were performed in ALS with functional rating scale-revised (FRS-R), and in PD with the Hehn-Yahr scale (H-Y) and a heart to mediastinum ratio using (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy (MIBG). The RHI of ALS and PD, but not of PSP, MSA or SCA, were significantly lower than normal controls (p<0.01). ALS showed a negative correlation of RHI with serum triglycerides (TG) and immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels, but not with disease severity (FRS-R) or rates of disease progression (∆FRS-R). On the other hand, PD showed a negative correlation of RHI with a progressive disease severity (H-Y) and a positive correlation of RHI with early/delayed MIBG scintigraphy, but not with serological data. The present study demonstrated significant declines of peripheral arterial endothelial functions in ALS and PD. The RHI of ALS was more correlated with disease duration and serum parameters while the RHI of PD was more correlated with disease severity and MIBG, suggesting different mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27288784

  18. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jennifer S; Gritz, Emily C; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Hirschi, Karen K

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  19. Endothelial Mechanosignaling: Does One Sensor Fit All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Forces are important in the cardiovascular system, acting as regulators of vascular physiology and pathology. Residing at the blood vessel interface, cells (endothelial cell, EC) are constantly exposed to vascular forces, including shear stress. Shear stress is the frictional force exerted by blood flow, and its patterns differ based on vessel geometry and type. These patterns range from uniform laminar flow to nonuniform disturbed flow. Although ECs sense and differentially respond to flow patterns unique to their microenvironment, the mechanisms underlying endothelial mechanosensing remain incompletely understood. Recent Advances: A large body of work suggests that ECs possess many mechanosensors that decorate their apical, junctional, and basal surfaces. These potential mechanosensors sense blood flow, translating physical force into biochemical signaling events. Critical Issues: Understanding the mechanisms by which proposed mechanosensors sense and respond to shear stress requires an integrative approach. It is also critical to understand the role of these mechanosensors not only during embryonic development but also in the different vascular beds in the adult. Possible cross talk and integration of mechanosensing via the various mechanosensors remain a challenge. Future Directions: Determination of the hierarchy of endothelial mechanosensors is critical for future work, as is determination of the extent to which mechanosensors work together to achieve force-dependent signaling. The role and primary sensors of shear stress during development also remain an open question. Finally, integrative approaches must be used to determine absolute mechanosensory function of potential mechanosensors. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 373–388. PMID:27027326

  20. Endothelial-Cardiomyocyte Interactions in Cardiac Development and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Patrick C.H.; Davis, Michael E.; Lisowski, Laura K.; Lee, Richard T.

    2009-01-01

    Communication between endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes regulates not only early cardiac development but also adult cardiomyocyte function, including the contractile state. In the normal mammalian myocardium, each cardiomyocyte is surrounded by an intricate network of capillaries and is next to endothelial cells. Cardiomyocytes depend on endothelial cells not only for oxygenated blood supply but also for local protective signals that promote cardiomyocyte organization and survival. While endothelial cells direct cardiomyocytes, cardiomyocytes reciprocally secrete factors that impact endothelial cell function. Understanding how endothelial cells communicate with cardiomyocytes will be critical for cardiac regeneration, in which the ultimate goal is not simply to improve systolic function transiently but to establish new myocardium that is both structurally and functionally normal in the long term. PMID:16460266

  1. Response to anti-VEGF-A treatment of endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puddu, Alessandra; Sanguineti, Roberta; Traverso, Carlo Enrico; Viviani, Giorgio L; Nicolò, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of two anti-VEGF-A drugs, Ranibizumab and Aflibercept, on the expression and secretion of VEGFs family members, and on their influence in proliferation and migration of endothelial cells (HECV) in vitro. HECV cells were exposed 24 h (T1), 4 days (T2) and 6 days (T3) to Ranibizumab or Aflibercept at pharmacodynamically relevant concentrations (Ranibizumab: 12.5 μg/ml and 125 μg/ml; Aflibercept: 50 μg/ml and 500 μg/ml). Cell viability and then expression and secretion of VEGF-A, VEGF-B, VEGF-C and PlGF were evaluated respectively by Real Time-PCR and ELISA. Intracellular signaling activated by VEGF-A and VEGF-C was investigated evaluating phosphorylation of VEGFR2. Influence in would healing was evaluated through scratch assay. In general no differences were observed among the tested concentrations of anti-vegf drugs. Ranibizumab and Aflibercept did not affect HECV cell viability in all experimental times. At T1, Ranibizumab decreased mRNA levels of VEGF-A, induced VEGF-C secretion, abrogated phosphorylation of VEGFR2 stimulated by VEGF-A, and impaired ability of HECV cells to repair wound healing. Aflibercept decreased mRNA levels of VEGF-A, -B and PlGF; slightly increased basal level of phVEGFR2, and completely abrogated phosphorylation stimulated by VEGF-A and VEGF-C. No effects on secretion of VEGF-B and on would healing were observed after exposure to Aflibercept. Prolonged exposure to anti-VEGFs decreased expression and secretion of VEGF-A and VEGF-B, up-regulated VEGF-C mRNA levels and its secretion, and increased basal phosphorylation of VEGFR2. Acute treatment with Ranibizumab or Aflibercept evoked different responses on endothelial cells, however these differences were lost after prolonged exposure. Scratch test results suggest that treatment with Ranibizumab may be more effective than Aflibercept in reducing angiogenic potential of endothelial cells in vitro.

  2. Protein kinase D activity controls endothelial nitric oxide synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sánchez-Ruiloba, Lucía; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; Zaragoza, Carlos; Iglesias, Teresa; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates key functions of the endothelium, such as angiogenesis or vessel repair in processes involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. One of the effector kinases that become activated in endothelial cells upon VEGF treatment is protein kinase D (PKD). Here, we show that PKD phosphorylates eNOS, leading to its activation and a concomitant increase in NO synthesis. Using mass spectrometry, we show that the purified active kinase ...

  3. Endothelial injury and repair in vasculitis of the young

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, L

    2009-01-01

    The vasculitides are a wide spectrum of disorders which are characterised by vascular inflammation. Endothelial injury can occur as a consequence of inappropriate inflammation and is central to the pathogenesis of these varied diseases. This thesis documents the development of assays for detection of novel biomarkers of endothelial injury and/or activation and subsequent reparative responses in children with primary systemic vasculitis. It focuses in particular on circulating endothelial cell...

  4. Endothelial microparticles and the diagnosis of the vasculitides.

    OpenAIRE

    Brogan, P A; Dillon, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    Recently there has been considerable interest in a novel surrogate marker of endothelial injury, endothelial microparticles (EMP), in a number of diseases characterised by endothelial injury. This review examines the data relating to EMP in human disease states, and examines the potential for EMP to provide a window onto the activated endothelium in primary systemic vasculitides. The utility of EMP for the diagnosis and monitoring of active vasculitis is discussed.

  5. Sildenafil Reduces Insulin-Resistance in Human Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Caterina Mammi; Donatella Pastore; Lombardo, Marco F; Francesca Ferrelli; Massimiliano Caprio; Claudia Consoli; Manfredi Tesauro; Lucia Gatta; Massimo Fini; Massimo Federici; Paolo Sbraccia; Giulia Donadel; Alfonso Bellia; Giuseppe M Rosano; Andrea Fabbri

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The efficacy of Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors to re-establish endothelial function is reduced in diabetic patients. Recent evidences suggest that therapy with PDE5 inhibitors, i.e. sildenafil, may increase the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins in the heart and cardiomyocytes. In this study we analyzed the effect of sildenafil on endothelial cells in insulin resistance conditions in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cel...

  6. Endothelial cell-derived interleukin-6 regulates tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial cells play a complex role in the pathobiology of cancer. This role is not limited to the making of blood vessels to allow for influx of oxygen and nutrients required for the high metabolic demands of tumor cells. Indeed, it has been recently shown that tumor-associated endothelial cells secrete molecules that enhance tumor cell survival and cancer stem cell self-renewal. The hypothesis underlying this work is that specific disruption of endothelial cell-initiated signaling inhibits tumor growth. Conditioned medium from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) stably transduced with silencing RNA for IL-6 (or controls) was used to evaluate the role of endothelial-derived IL-6 on the activation of key signaling pathways in tumor cells. In addition, these endothelial cells were co-transplanted with tumor cells into immunodefficient mice to determine the impact of endothelial cell-derived IL-6 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. We observed that tumor cells adjacent to blood vessels show strong phosphorylation of STAT3, a key mediator of tumor progression. In search for a possible mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway, we observed that silencing interleukin (IL)-6 in tumor-associated endothelial cells inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor cells. Notably, tumors vascularized with IL-6-silenced endothelial cells showed lower intratumoral microvessel density, lower tumor cell proliferation, and slower growth than tumors vascularized with control endothelial cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-6 secreted by endothelial cells enhance tumor growth, and suggest that cancer patients might benefit from targeted approaches that block signaling events initiated by endothelial cells

  7. Corneal thickness and endothelial density before and after cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ventura, A.; Walti, R; Bohnke, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Deturgescence of the corneal stroma is controlled by the pumping action of the endothelial layer and can be monitored by measurement of central corneal thickness (pachymetry). Loss or damage of endothelial cells leads to an increase in corneal thickness, which may ultimately induce corneal decompensation and loss of vision. Little is known about the effect of moderate reductions in endothelial cell number on the thickness of the corneal stroma. This study aimed to investigate ...

  8. Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia of the mandibular lingual mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Benay Tokman; (S)ebnem (S)im(s)ek; Erkan Erkmen; Tülin Oygur

    2004-01-01

    @@ In 1923, Masson1 described an unusual papillary endothelial proliferation that he named as "hemangioendotheliome vegetant intravasculaire". In 1976, Clearkin and Enzinger2 coined the term intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia (IPEH) that is now in use. This term refers to the presence of endothelium lined papillary projections within a vascular space. Characteristically, the papillary structures are composed of a single layer of swollen or plump endothelial cells without cellular pleomorphism, mitotic activity or necrosis.

  9. Modified descemet′s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty for congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoodreza Panahi-Bazaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male with congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy (CHED presented with severe bilateral corneal clouding precluding any view of the intraocular structures. He underwent modified Descemet′s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK technique including a suture pull-through technique to prevent lens damage. Surgery resulted in progressive clearing of the cornea and decreased corneal thickness. Visual acuity increased from hand motions preoperatively to counting fingers at 4 m after 4 months. DSAEK can be successfully performed in phakic eyes with CHED as an alternative to penetrating keratoplasty. It has the advantage of less wound problems and better preservation of globe integrity especially in children.

  10. Syncytin is involved in breast cancer-endothelial cell fusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Holck, S.; Christensen, I.J.;

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells can fuse spontaneously with normal host cells, including endothelial cells, and such fusions may strongly modulate the biological behaviour of tumors. However, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We now show that human breast cancer cell lines and 63 out of 165 (38%) breast cancer...... and inhibits fusions between breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. Moreover, a syncytin inhibitory peptide also inhibits fusions between cancer and endothelial cells. These results are the first to show that syncytin is expressed by human cancer cells and is involved in cancer-endothelial cell fusions....

  11. The endothelial surface layer: a new target of research in kidney failure and peritoneal dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Vlahu

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx is an important regulator of vascular homeostasis, and damage to this complex structure results in increased vascular vulnerability. Together with associated plasma molecules it forms the endothelial surface layer. Because of its vasculoprotective effects, the endothelial

  12. Loss of endothelial barrier integrity in mice with conditional ablation of podocalyxin (Podxl) in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrillo, Angélica; Porras, Gracia; Ayuso, Matilde S; González-Manchón, Consuelo

    2016-08-01

    Podocalyxin (Podxl) has an essential role in the development and function of the kidney glomerular filtration barrier. It is also expressed by vascular endothelia but perinatal lethality of podxl(-/-) mice has precluded understanding of its function in adult vascular endothelial cells (ECs). In this work, we show that conditional knockout mice with deletion of Podxl restricted to the vascular endothelium grow normally but most die spontaneously around three months of age. Histological analysis showed a nonspecific inflammatory infiltrate within the vessel wall frequently associated with degenerative changes, and involving vessels of different caliber in one or more organs. Podxl-deficient lung EC cultures exhibit increased permeability to dextran and macrophage transmigration. After thrombin stimulation, ECs lacking Podxl showed delayed recovery of VE-cadherin cell contacts, persistence of F-actin stress fibers, and sustained phosphorylation of the ERM complex and activation of RhoA, suggesting a failure in endothelial barrier stabilization. The results suggest that Podxl has an essential role in the regulation of endothelial permeability by influencing the mechanisms involved in the restoration of endothelial barrier integrity after injury. PMID:27289182

  13. Infection of hepatitis B virus in extrahepatic endothelial tissues mediated by endothelial progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lili

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV replication has been reported to be involved in many extrahepatic viral disorders; however, the mechanism by which HBV is trans-infected into extrahepatic tissues such as HBV associated myocarditis remains largely unknown. Results In this study, we showed that human cord blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs could be effectively infected by uptake of HBV in vitro. Exposure of EPCs with HBV resulted in HBV DNA and viral particles were detected in EPCs at day 3 after HBV challenge, which were peaked around day 7 and declined in 3 weeks. Consistently, HBV envelope surface and core antigens were first detected in EPCs at day 3 after virus challenge and were retained to be detectable for 3 weeks. In contrast, HBV covalently closed circular DNA was not detected in EPCs at any time after virus challenge. Intravenous transplantation of HBV-treated EPCs into myocardial infarction and acute renal ischemia mouse model resulted in incorporation of HBV into injured heart, lung, and renal capillary endothelial tissues. Conclusion These results strongly support that EPCs serve as virus carrier mediating HBV trans-infection into the injured endothelial tissues. The findings might provide a novel mechanism for HBV-associated myocarditis and other HBV-related extrahepatic diseases as well.

  14. Erythropoietin improves cardiac function through endothelial progenitor cell and vascular endothelial growth factor mediated neovascularization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; Lipsic, Erik; van der Meer, Peter; van der Harst, Pirn; Oeseburg, Hisko; Sarvaas, Gideon J. Du Marchie; Koster, Johan; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Schoemaker, Regien G.

    2007-01-01

    Aims Erythropoietin (EPO) improves cardiac function and induces neovascutarization in chronic heart failure (CHF), although the exact mechanism has not been elucidated. We studied the effects of EPO on homing and incorporation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) into the myocardial microvasculatur

  15. [Hypertension, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitenberg, A

    2006-10-01

    Increased blood pressure induces functional and structural changes of the vascular endothelium. Depression of endothelium-dependant vasodilatation is an early manifestation of endothelial dysfunction due to hypertension. It can be demonstrated by pharmacological or physiological tests. Decreased availability of nitric oxide (NO) is a major determinant of the depression of vasodilatation. It may be caused by a reduction in the activity of NO-endothelial synthase (NOSe) related to: 1) a deficit in substrate (L-arginine), 2) an inhibition by asymmetrical dimethylarginine, 3) a deficit in the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). However, the increase in oxidative stress, a producer of superoxide radicals which combine with NO to form peroxynitrates (ONOO-), is the determining factor. It is related to activation of membranous NAD(P)H oxidases initiated by the stimulation of activating mecanosensors of protein C kinase. The message is amplified by oxidation of BH4 which transforms the NOSe into a producer of superoxide radicals. A cascade of auto-amplification loops leading to atherosclerosis and its complications is then triggered. The superoxide radicals and the peroxynitrates oxidise the LDL-cholesterol. They activate the nuclear factor-kappaB which controls the genes stimulating the expression of many proteins: angiotensinogen and AT1 receptors which stimulate the sympathetic system, receptors of oxidised LDL, adhesion and migration factors (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin and MCP-1), pro-inflammatory cytokins (interleukines and TNF-alpha), growth factors (MAP kinases), plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. The monocytes and smooth muscle cells produce metalloproteinases and pro-inflammatory cytokins which destabilise the atheromatous plaque and favourise vascular remodelling. Inshort, the endothelial dysfunction due to hypertension plays a role in a complex physiopathological process and is a marker of future cardiovascular events. PMID:17100143

  16. Production of soluble Neprilysin by endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuruppu, Sanjaya, E-mail: Sanjaya.Kuruppu@monash.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Building 77, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia); Rajapakse, Niwanthi W. [Department of Physiology, Building 13F, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia); Minond, Dmitriy [Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, 11350 SW Village Parkway, Port Saint Lucie, FL 34987 (United States); Smith, A. Ian [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Building 77, Monash University, Wellington Rd, Clayton, Vic 3800 (Australia)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • A soluble full-length form of Neprilysin exists in media of endothelial cells. • Exosomal release is the key mechanism for the production of soluble Neprilysin. • Inhibition of ADAM-17 by specific inhibitors reduce Neprilysin release. • Exosome mediated release of Neprilysin is dependent on ADAM-17 activity. - Abstract: A non-membrane bound form of Neprilysin (NEP) with catalytic activity has the potential to cleave substrates throughout the circulation, thus leading to systemic effects of NEP. We used the endothelial cell line Ea.hy926 to identify the possible role of exosomes and A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM-17) in the production of non-membrane bound NEP. Using a bradykinin based quenched fluorescent substrate (40 μM) assay, we determined the activity of recombinant human NEP (rhNEP; 12 ng), and NEP in the media of endothelial cells (10% v/v; after 24 h incubation with cells) to be 9.35 ± 0.70 and 6.54 ± 0.41 μmols of substrate cleaved over 3 h, respectively. The presence of NEP in the media was also confirmed by Western blotting. At present there are no commercially available inhibitors specific for ADAM-17. We therefore synthesised two inhibitors TPI2155-14 and TPI2155-17, specific for ADAM-17 with IC{sub 50} values of 5.36 and 4.32 μM, respectively. Treatment of cells with TPI2155-14 (15 μM) and TPI2155-17 (4.3 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in NEP activity in media (62.37 ± 1.43 and 38.30 ± 4.70, respectively as a % of control; P < 0.0001), implicating a possible role for ADAM-17 in NEP release. However, centrifuging media (100,000g for 1 h at 4 °C) removed all NEP activity from the supernatant indicating the likely role of exosomes in the release of NEP. Our data therefore indicated for the first time that NEP is released from endothelial cells via exosomes, and that this process is dependent on ADAM-17.

  17. Enhancing endothelial progenitor cell for clinical use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) havebeen demonstrated to correlate negatively with vascularendothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors.However, translation of basic research into the clinicalpractice has been limited by the lack of unambiguousand consistent definitions of EPCs and reduced EPCcell number and function in subjects requiring them forclinical use. This article critically reviews the definitionof EPCs based on commonly used protocols, their valueas a biomarker of cardiovascular risk factor in subjectswith cardiovascular disease, and strategies to enhanceEPCs for treatment of ischemic diseases.

  18. Obstructive sleep apnea and endothelial progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Qing Wang,1,* Qi Wu,2,* Jing Feng,3,4 Xin Sun5 1The Second Respiratory Department of the First People's Hospital of Kunming, Yunnan, People's Republic of China; 2Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 3Respiratory Department of Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 5Respiratory Department of Tianjin Haihe Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA occurs in 4% of middle-aged men and 2% of middle-aged women in the general population, and the prevalence is even higher in specific patient groups. OSA is an independent risk factor for a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Endothelial injury could be the pivotal determinant in the development of cardiovascular pathology in OSA. Endothelial damage ultimately represents a dynamic balance between the magnitude of injury and the capacity for repair. Bone marrow–derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs within adult peripheral blood present a possible means of vascular maintenance that could home to sites of injury and restore endothelial integrity and normal function. Methods: We summarized pathogenetic mechanisms of OSA and searched for available studies on numbers and functions of EPCs in patients with OSA to explore the potential links between the numbers and functions of EPCs and OSA. In particular, we tried to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of the effects of OSA on EPCs. Conclusion: Intermittent hypoxia cycles and sleep fragmentation are major pathophysiologic characters of OSA. Intermittent hypoxia acts as a trigger of oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, and sympathetic activation. Sleep fragmentation is associated with a burst of sympathetic activation and systemic inflammation. In most studies, a reduction in circulating EPCs has

  19. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed. PMID:21570034

  20. Production of soluble Neprilysin by endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A soluble full-length form of Neprilysin exists in media of endothelial cells. • Exosomal release is the key mechanism for the production of soluble Neprilysin. • Inhibition of ADAM-17 by specific inhibitors reduce Neprilysin release. • Exosome mediated release of Neprilysin is dependent on ADAM-17 activity. - Abstract: A non-membrane bound form of Neprilysin (NEP) with catalytic activity has the potential to cleave substrates throughout the circulation, thus leading to systemic effects of NEP. We used the endothelial cell line Ea.hy926 to identify the possible role of exosomes and A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 (ADAM-17) in the production of non-membrane bound NEP. Using a bradykinin based quenched fluorescent substrate (40 μM) assay, we determined the activity of recombinant human NEP (rhNEP; 12 ng), and NEP in the media of endothelial cells (10% v/v; after 24 h incubation with cells) to be 9.35 ± 0.70 and 6.54 ± 0.41 μmols of substrate cleaved over 3 h, respectively. The presence of NEP in the media was also confirmed by Western blotting. At present there are no commercially available inhibitors specific for ADAM-17. We therefore synthesised two inhibitors TPI2155-14 and TPI2155-17, specific for ADAM-17 with IC50 values of 5.36 and 4.32 μM, respectively. Treatment of cells with TPI2155-14 (15 μM) and TPI2155-17 (4.3 μM) resulted in a significant decrease in NEP activity in media (62.37 ± 1.43 and 38.30 ± 4.70, respectively as a % of control; P < 0.0001), implicating a possible role for ADAM-17 in NEP release. However, centrifuging media (100,000g for 1 h at 4 °C) removed all NEP activity from the supernatant indicating the likely role of exosomes in the release of NEP. Our data therefore indicated for the first time that NEP is released from endothelial cells via exosomes, and that this process is dependent on ADAM-17

  1. Using cultured endothelial cells to study endothelial barrier dysfunction: Challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, Jurjan; Weijers, Ester M; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; Malik, Asrar B; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-08-01

    Despite considerable progress in the understanding of endothelial barrier regulation and the identification of approaches that have the potential to improve endothelial barrier function, no drug- or stem cell-based therapy is presently available to reverse the widespread vascular leak that is observed in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. The translational gap suggests a need to develop experimental approaches and tools that better mimic the complex environment of the microcirculation in which the vascular leak develops. Recent studies have identified several elements of this microenvironment. Among these are composition and stiffness of the extracellular matrix, fluid shear stress, interaction of endothelial cells (ECs) with pericytes, oxygen tension, and the combination of toxic and mechanic injurious stimuli. Development of novel cell culture techniques that integrate these elements would allow in-depth analysis of EC biology that closely approaches the (patho)physiological conditions in situ. In parallel, techniques to isolate organ-specific ECs, to define EC heterogeneity in its full complexity, and to culture patient-derived ECs from inducible pluripotent stem cells or endothelial progenitor cells are likely to advance the understanding of ARDS and lead to development of therapeutics. This review 1) summarizes the advantages and pitfalls of EC cultures to study vascular leak in ARDS, 2) provides an overview of elements of the microvascular environment that can directly affect endothelial barrier function, and 3) discusses alternative methods to bridge the gap between basic research and clinical application with the intent of improving the translational value of present EC culture approaches. PMID:27343194

  2. Examining the critical roles of human CB2 receptor residues Valine 3.32 (113) and Leucine 5.41 (192) in ligand recognition and downstream signaling activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqarni, Mohammed; Myint, Kyaw Zeyar; Tong, Qin; Yang, Peng; Bartlow, Patrick; Wang, Lirong; Feng, Rentian; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2014-09-26

    We performed molecular modeling and docking to predict a putative binding pocket and associated ligand-receptor interactions for human cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). Our data showed that two hydrophobic residues came in close contact with three structurally distinct CB2 ligands: CP-55,940, SR144528 and XIE95-26. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments and subsequent functional assays implicated the roles of Valine residue at position 3.32 (V113) and Leucine residue at position 5.41 (L192) in the ligand binding function and downstream signaling activities of the CB2 receptor. Four different point mutations were introduced to the wild type CB2 receptor: V113E, V113L, L192S and L192A. Our results showed that mutation of Val113 with a Glutamic acid and Leu192 with a Serine led to the complete loss of CB2 ligand binding as well as downstream signaling activities. Substitution of these residues with those that have similar hydrophobic side chains such as Leucine (V113L) and Alanine (L192A), however, allowed CB2 to retain both its ligand binding and signaling functions. Our modeling results validated by competition binding and site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggest that residues V113 and L192 play important roles in ligand binding and downstream signaling transduction of the CB2 receptor.

  3. Increased endothelial cell-leukocyte interaction in murine schistosomiasis: possible priming of endothelial cells by the disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suellen D S Oliveira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Schistosomiasis is an intravascular parasitic disease associated with inflammation. Endothelial cells control leukocyte transmigration and vascular permeability being modulated by pro-inflammatory mediators. Recent data have shown that endothelial cells primed in vivo in the course of a disease keep the information in culture. Herein, we evaluated the impact of schistosomiasis on endothelial cell-regulated events in vivo and in vitro. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experimental groups consisted of Schistosoma mansoni-infected and age-matched control mice. In vivo infection caused a marked influx of leukocytes and an increased protein leakage in the peritoneal cavity, characterizing an inflamed vascular and cellular profile. In vitro leukocyte-mesenteric endothelial cell adhesion was higher in cultured cells from infected mice as compared to controls, either in the basal condition or after treatment with the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF. Nitric oxide (NO donation reduced leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells from control and infected groups; however, in the later group the effect was more pronounced, probably due to a reduced NO production. Inhibition of control endothelial NO synthase (eNOS increased leukocyte adhesion to a level similar to the one observed in the infected group. Besides, the adhesion of control leukocytes to endothelial cells from infected animals is similar to the result of infected animals, confirming that schistosomiasis alters endothelial cells function. Furthermore, NO production as well as the expression of eNOS were reduced in cultured endothelial cells from infected animals. On the other hand, the expression of its repressor protein, namely caveolin-1, was similar in both control and infected groups. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Schistosomiasis increases vascular permeability and endothelial cell-leukocyte interaction in vivo and in vitro. These effects are partially

  4. Emerging Role of Endothelial and Inflammatory Markers in Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menha Swellam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Endothelial disturbance and excess inflammatory response are pathogenic mechanisms in pre-eclampsia (PE. Authors determine the clinical diagnostic role for thrombomodulin (TM, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 as endothelial markers and C-reactive protein (CRP, and interlukin-6 (IL-6 as inflammatory markers when tested independently or in combinations.

  5. ICAM-1 Clustering on Endothelial Cells Recruits VCAM-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. van Buul; J. van Rijssel; F.P.J. van Alphen; A.M. van Stalborch; E.P.J. Mul; P.L. Hordijk

    2010-01-01

    In the initial stages of transendothelial migration, leukocytes use the endothelial integrin ligands ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 for strong adhesion. Upon adhesion of the leukocyte to endothelial ICAM-1, ICAM-1 is clustered and recruited to the adhered leukocyte, promoting strong adhesion. In this study, we p

  6. Endothelial cell cultures as a tool in biomaterial research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirkpatrick, CJ; Otto, M; Kooten, TV; Krump, [No Value; Kriegsmann, J; Bittinger, F

    1999-01-01

    Progress in biocompatibility and tissue engineering would today be inconceivable without the aid of in vitro techniques. Endothelial cell cultures represent a valuable tool not just in haemocompatibility testing, but also in the concept of designing hybrid organs. In the past endothelial cells (EC)

  7. Endothelial Function in Migraine With Aura – A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butt, Jawad H; Franzmann, Ulriche; Kruuse, Christina

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An increased risk of ischemic stroke is repeatedly reported in young subjects with migraine with aura (MA). Such may be caused by changes in endothelial function. The present review evaluates current evidence on endothelial function in MA patients. METHODS: A systematic search...

  8. Diagnosis and Management of Iridocorneal Endothelial Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Sacchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The iridocorneal endothelial (ICE syndrome is a rare ocular disorder that includes a group of conditions characterized by structural and proliferative abnormalities of the corneal endothelium, the anterior chamber angle, and the iris. Common clinical features include corneal edema, secondary glaucoma, iris atrophy, and pupillary anomalies, ranging from distortion to polycoria. The main subtypes of this syndrome are the progressive iris atrophy, the Cogan-Reese syndrome, and the Chandler syndrome. ICE syndrome is usually diagnosed in women in the adult age. Clinical history and complete eye examination including tonometry and gonioscopy are necessary to reach a diagnosis. Imaging techniques, such as in vivo confocal microscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy, are used to confirm the diagnosis by revealing the presence of “ICE-cells” on the corneal endothelium and the structural changes of the anterior chamber angle. An early diagnosis is helpful to better manage the most challenging complications such as secondary glaucoma and corneal edema. Treatment of ICE-related glaucoma often requires glaucoma filtering surgery with antifibrotic agents and the use of glaucoma drainage implants should be considered early in the management of these patients. Visual impairment and pain associated with corneal edema can be successfully managed with endothelial keratoplasty.

  9. Simulated microgravity upregulates an endothelial vasoconstrictor prostaglandin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, D. S.; Han, S.; Purdy, R. E.

    2001-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide contributes to the vascular hyporesponsiveness to norepinephrine (NE) observed in carotid arteries from rats exposed to simulated microgravity. The goal of the present study was to determine whether a cyclooxygenase product of arachidonic acid also influences vascular responsiveness in this setting. Microgravity was simulated in rats by hindlimb unweighting (HU). After 20 days of HU, carotid arteries were isolated from control and HU-treated rats, and vascular rings were mounted in tissue baths for the measurement of isometric contraction. Two cyclooxygenase inhibitors, indomethacin and ibuprofen, and the selective thromboxane A(2) prostanoid-receptor antagonist, SQ-29548, had no effect on the contraction to NE in control vessels but markedly reduced contraction to NE in HU vessels. When the endothelium was removed, indomethacin no longer had any effect on the NE-induced contraction in HU vessels. In endothelium-intact vessels in the presence of indomethacin, the addition of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(G)-L-nitro-arginine methyl ester, to the medium bathing HU vessels increased the contraction to NE to the level of that of the control vessels. These results indicate that HU treatment induced two endothelial changes in carotid artery that opposed each other. Nitric oxide activity was increased and was responsible for the vascular hyporesponsiveness to NE. The activity of a vasoconstrictor prostaglandin was also increased, and attenuated the vasodilating effect of nitric oxide.

  10. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Enter the Aging Arena.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate eWilliamson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Age is a significant risk factor for the development of vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Although pharmacological treatments, including statins and anti-hypertensive drugs, have improved the prognosis for patients with cardiovascular disease, it remains a leading cause of mortality in those aged 65 years and over. Furthermore, given the increased life expectancy of the population in developed countries, there is a clear need for alternative treatment strategies. Consequently, the relationship between aging and progenitor cell-mediated repair is of great interest. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs play an integral role in the cellular repair mechanisms for endothelial regeneration and maintenance. However, EPCs are subject to age-associated changes that diminish their number in circulation and function, thereby enhancing vascular disease risk. A great deal of research is aimed at developing strategies to harness the regenerative capacity of these cells.In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the cells termed ‘EPCs’, examine the impact of age on EPC-mediated repair and identify therapeutic targets with potential for attenuating the age-related decline in vascular health via beneficial actions on EPCs.

  11. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Atkeson

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Amy Atkeson, Sanja JelicDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NYAbstract: Endothelial activation and inflammation are important mediators of accelerated atherogenesis and consequent increased cardiovascular morbidity in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Repetitive episodes of hypoxia/reoxygenation associated with transient cessation of breathing during sleep in OSA resemble ischemia/reperfusion injury and may be the main culprit underlying endothelial dysfunction in OSA. Additional factors such as repetitive arousals resulting in sleep fragmentation and deprivation and individual genetic suseptibility to vascular manifestations of OSA contribute to impaired endothelial function in OSA. The present review focuses on possible mechanisms that underlie endothelial activation and inflammation in OSA.Keywords: endothelial, obstructive sleep apnea, inflammation, dysfunction

  12. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is a Secreted Angiogenic Mitogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, David W.; Cachianes, George; Kuang, Wun-Jing; Goeddel, David V.; Ferrara, Napoleone

    1989-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was purified from media conditioned by bovine pituitary folliculostellate cells (FC). VEGF is a heparin-binding growth factor specific for vascular endothelial cells that is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo. Complementary DNA clones for bovine and human VEGF were isolated from cDNA libraries prepared from FC and HL60 leukemia cells, respectively. These cDNAs encode hydrophilic proteins with sequences related to those of the A and B chains of platelet-derived growth factor. DNA sequencing suggests the existence of several molecular species of VEGF. VEGFs are secreted proteins, in contrast to other endothelial cell mitogens such as acidic or basic fibroblast growth factors and platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor. Human 293 cells transfected with an expression vector containing a bovine or human VEGF cDNA insert secrete an endothelial cell mitogen that behaves like native VEGF.

  13. ACE INHIBITORS ARE RATIONAL PHARMACOTHERAPY OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Metrova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study effects of ACE inhibitor perindopril on markers of endothelial dysfunction in therapy of patients with arterial hypertension (HT.Material and methods. 82 patients with HT, complicated by ischemic stroke were involved in the study. 30 patients with uncomplicated HT were included into control group. Antihypertensive therapy with perindopril (52 patients or amlodipine (30 patients was conducted additionally to standard neurotropic therapy in hypertensive patients with ischemic stroke. Phase-contrast microscopy and enzyme immunoassay were used for screening of endothelial dysfunction markers (blebbing, desquamated endothelial cells, membrane-liberated parts, sPECAM-1.Results. Reduction in levels of markers of endothelial dysfunction was observed among patients treated with perindopril in comparison with patients who did not receive ACE inhibitor or patients of control group. Target levels of blood pressure were reached in 96% of patients treated with perindopril. Сonclusion. ACE inhibitors in therapy patients with HT reduce endothelial dysfunction additionally to antihypertensive effect.

  14. Endothelial nitric oxide: protector of a healthy mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katusic, Zvonimir S; Austin, Susan A

    2014-04-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide (NO) is generated by constitutively active endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), an essential enzyme responsible for cardiovascular homeostasis. Historically, endothelial NO was first recognized as a major vasodilator involved in control of vasomotor function and local blood flow. In this review, our attention is focused on the emerging role of endothelial NO in linking cerebrovascular function with cognition. We will discuss the recognized ability of endothelial NO to modulate processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), influence functional status of microglia, and affect cognitive function. Existing evidence suggests that the loss of NO in cultured human cerebrovascular endothelium causes increased expression of APP and β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) thereby resulting in increased secretion of amyloid β peptides (Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42). Furthermore, increased expression of APP and BACE1 as well as increased production of Aβ peptides was detected in the cerebral microvasculature and brain tissue of eNOS-deficient mice. Since Aβ peptides are considered major cytotoxic molecules responsible for the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, these observations support the concept that a loss of endothelial NO might significantly contribute to the initiation and progression of cognitive decline. In addition, genetic inactivation of eNOS causes activation of microglia and promotes a pro-inflammatory phenotype in the brain. Behavioural analysis revealed that eNOS-deficient mice exhibit impaired cognitive performance thereby indicating that selective loss of endothelial NO has a detrimental effect on the function of neuronal cells. Together with findings from prior studies demonstrating the ability of endothelial NO to affect synaptic plasticity, mitochondrial biogenesis, and function of neuronal progenitor cells, it is becoming apparent that the role of endothelial NO in the control of central nervous system function is very complex. We

  15. Polymorphisms in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) predict sunitinib-induced hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eechoute, K.; Veldt, A.A. van der; Oosting, S.; Kappers, M.H.; Wessels, J.A.M.; Gelderblom, H.; Guchelaar, H.J.; Reyners, A.K.; Herpen, C.M. van; Haanen, J.B.; Mathijssen, R.H.; Boven, E.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is an important side effect of sunitinib treatment. In a retrospective study in 255 patients, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, endothelin-1 (ET-1), and endothelium-derived nitri

  16. Polymorphisms in Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Predict Sunitinib-Induced Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eechoute, K.; van der Veldt, A. A. M.; Oosting, S.; Kappers, M. H. W.; Wessels, J. A. M.; Gelderblom, H.; Guchelaar, H-J; Reyners, A. K. L.; van Herpen, C. M. L.; Haanen, J. B.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Boven, E.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is an important side effect of sunitinib treatment. In a retrospective study in 255 patients, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, endothelin-1 (ET-1), and endothelium-derived nitri

  17. Endothelial differentiation gene-1, a new downstream gene is involved in RTEF-1 induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping He

    Full Text Available Related Transcriptional Enhancer Factor-1 (RTEF-1 has been suggested to induce angiogenesis through regulating target genes. Whether RTEF-1 has a direct role in angiogenesis and what specific genes are involved in RTEF-1 driven angiogenisis have not been elucidated. We found that over-expressing RTEF-1 in Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells-1 (HMEC-1 significantly increased endothelial cell aggregation, growth and migration while the processes were inhibited by siRNA of RTEF-1. In addition, we observed that Endothelial differentiation gene-1 (Edg-1 expression was up-regulated by RTEF-1 at the transcriptional level. RTEF-1 could bind to Edg-1 promoter and subsequently induce its activity. Edg-1 siRNA significantly blocked RTEF-1-driven increases in endothelial cell aggregation in a Matrigel assay and retarded RTEF-1-induced endothelial cell growth and migration. Pertussis Toxin (PTX, a Gi/Go protein sensitive inhibitor, was found to inhibit RTEF-1 driven endothelial cell aggregation and migration. Our data demonstrates that Edg-1 is a potential target gene of RTEF-1 and is involved in RTEF-1-induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells. Gi/Go protein coupled receptor pathway plays a role in RTEF-1 driven angiogenesis in endothelial cells.

  18. Changes of macrovascular endothelial ultrastructure and gene expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆颖理; 胡申江; 沈周俊; 邵一川

    2004-01-01

    Background The most intimidatory pathological changes in patients with DM are cardiovascular illnesses, which are the major causes of death in diabetic patients and are far more prevalent than in nondiabetics because of accelerated atherosclerosis. In this study, we tried to clarify the changes in macrovascular endothelial ultrastructure and in the gene expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)mRNA in diabetic rats. Methods The study was conducted on 52 of 10-week old Sprague Dawley (SD) rats with body weight of (320±42) g. SD rats were divided into: experimental group treated with a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 60 mg/kg), (male, n=20, diabetes mellitus (DMM)); female, n=12, diabetes mellitus female (DMF)) and control group (male, n=10, diabetes mellitus male control (DMMC); female, n=10, diabetes mellitus female control (DMFC)). Four weeks after treatment, half of the rats were sacrificed; the remainders were sacrificed ten weeks after treatment. One part of the abdominal aortic sample was stored under glutaraldehyde (volume fraction ψB = 2.5 %). After the process of chemical fixation, chemical dehydration, drying and conductivity enhancement, all samples were observed and photographed using scanning electron microscopy (Leica-Stereoscan 260, England). The other part of the abdominal aortic sample was treated with liquid nitrogen and the expression of eNOSmRNA was assessed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Results The aortic lumen of both experimental groups adsorbed much more debris than that of either control group. The endothelial surfaces of diabetic rats were coarse, wrinkled and protuberant like fingers or villi. The vascular endothelial lesions of diabetic male rats were very distinct after 4 weeks, and as obvious as those at 10 weeks. The vascular endothelial lesions of diabetic female rats were not severe at 4 weeks and only became marked after 10 weeks. In both males and females, the abdominal aortic eNOSmRNA content

  19. Endothelial permeability is controlled by spatially defined cytoskeletal mechanics: AFM force mapping of pulmonary endothelial monolayer

    OpenAIRE

    Birukova, Anna A.; Arce, Fernando T.; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Dudek, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Lal, Ratnesh; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2008-01-01

    Actomyosin contraction directly regulates endothelial cell (EC) permeability, but intracellular redistribution of cytoskeletal tension associated with EC permeability is poorly understood. We used atomic force microscopy (AFM), EC permeability assays and fluorescence microscopy to link barrier regulation, cell remodeling and cytoskeletal mechanical properties in EC treated with barrier-protective as well as barrier-disruptive agonists. Thrombin, VEGF and H2O2 increased EC permeability, disrup...

  20. 1Application of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Magnetic Twisting Cytometry to Quantitate Mechano-Chemical Signaling Activities in a Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sungsoo; Wang, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Mechanotransduction is the process by which living cells sense mechanical forces and then convert them into biochemical signaling. Recently we showed that mechanical stress is transduced from the cell surface to remote cytoplasmic sites within 0.3 s, which is at least 40 to 50 times faster than soluble factor-induced signal transduction, and the sites of mechanotransduction colocalize with sites where mechanical stress causes microtubule displacement. These results suggest that mechanotransduction employs mechanisms different from those of soluble factor-induced signal transduction. Here we describe a protocol that utilizes fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and a magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC) device to capture rapid mechano-chemical signaling activities in living cells. PMID:18728305

  1. Endothelial and platelet markers in diabetes mellitus type 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Kubisz; Lucia Stanciaková; Ján Stasko; Peter Galajda; Marián Mokáň

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is an extremely common disorder which carries a risk of vascular impairment. DM type2 (DM2) can be characterized by the dysfunction ofhaemostasis manifesting by stimulated coagulation process,disorder of platelet function and decreased fibrinolyticactivity. These all are the reasons why DM2 is the mostcommon acquired thrombophilia. Endothelial dysfunctionalong with platelet hyperactivity are unquestionablyinvolved in the hyperactivation of platelets and clottingfactors in DM. As a natural consequence of continuousinvestigation, many markers of endothelial dysfunctionand diabetic thrombocytopathy have been identifiedand considered for implementation in clinical practice.Endothelial function can be assessed by the evaluationof endothelial markers, circulating molecules synthesisedin various amounts by the endothelium. These markersprecede the signs of evident microangiopathy. Plateletshave an ethiopathogenic relation to the microangiopathy inDM. Their increased activity was confirmed in both typesof DM. Predictors of endothelial and platelet disorder couldimprove the screening of individuals at increased risk, thusleading to the early diagnosis, appropriate treatment, aswell as to the effective prevention of the complications ofDM2. In the article we deal with the mechanisms involvedin the pathogenesis of endothelial and platelet functionalabnormalities, endothelial and platelet markers of DM2considered for implementation in clinical practice andpossibilities of their detection.

  2. Assessment of Endothelial Dysfunction in Childhood Obesity and Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Bruyndonckx

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The association of obesity with noncommunicable diseases, such as cardiovascular complications and diabetes, is considered a major threat to the management of health care worldwide. Epidemiological findings show that childhood obesity is rapidly rising in Western society, as well as in developing countries. This pandemic is not without consequences and can affect the risk of future cardiovascular disease in these children. Childhood obesity is associated with endothelial dysfunction, the first yet still reversible step towards atherosclerosis. Advanced research techniques have added further insight on how childhood obesity and associated comorbidities lead to endothelial dysfunction. Techniques used to measure endothelial function were further brought to perfection, and novel biomarkers, including endothelial progenitor cells, were discovered. The aim of this paper is to provide a critical overview on both in vivo as well as in vitro markers for endothelial integrity. Additionally, an in-depth description of the mechanisms that disrupt the delicate balance between endothelial damage and repair will be given. Finally, the effects of lifestyle interventions and pharmacotherapy on endothelial dysfunction will be reviewed.

  3. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  4. Hypertension alters phosphorylation of VASP in brain endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlier, Zulfikar; Basar, Murat; Kocamaz, Erdogan; Kiraz, Kemal; Tanriover, Gamze; Kocer, Gunnur; Arlier, Sefa; Giray, Semih; Nasırcılar, Seher; Gunduz, Filiz; Senturk, Umit K; Demir, Necdet

    2015-04-01

    Hypertension impairs cerebral vascular function. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) mediates active reorganization of the cytoskeleton via membrane ruffling, aggregation and tethering of actin filaments. VASP regulation of endothelial barrier function has been demonstrated by studies using VASP(-/-) animals under conditions associated with tissue hypoxia. We hypothesize that hypertension regulates VASP expression and/or phosphorylation in endothelial cells, thereby contributing to dysfunction in the cerebral vasculature. Because exercise has direct and indirect salutary effects on vascular systems that have been damaged by hypertension, we also investigated the effect of exercise on maintenance of VASP expression and/or phosphorylation. We used immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry to examine the effect of hypertension on VASP expression and phosphorylation in brain endothelial cells in normotensive [Wistar-Kyoto (WKY)] and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats under normal and exercise conditions. In addition, we analyzed VASP regulation in normoxia- and hypoxia-induced endothelial cells. Brain endothelial cells exhibited significantly lower VASP immunoreactivity and phosphorylation at the Ser157 residue in SHR versus WKY rats. Exercise reversed hypertension-induced alterations in VASP phosphorylation. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry indicated reduction in VASP phosphorylation in hypoxic versus normoxic endothelial cells. These results suggest that diminished VASP expression and/or Ser157 phosphorylation mediates endothelial changes associated with hypertension and exercise may normalize these changes, at least in part, by restoring VASP phosphorylation. PMID:24894047

  5. Silencing of directional migration in roundabout4 knockdown endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts David D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Roundabouts are axon guidance molecules that have recently been identified to play a role in vascular guidance as well. In this study, we have investigated gene knockdown analysis of endothelial Robos, in particular roundabout 4 (robo4, the predominant Robo in endothelial cells using small interfering RNA technology in vitro. Results Robo1 and Robo4 knockdown cells display distinct activity in endothelial cell migration assay. The knockdown of robo4 abrogated the chemotactic response of endothelial cells to serum but enhanced a chemokinetic response to Slit2, while robo1 knockdown cells do not display chemotactic response to serum or VEGF. Robo4 knockdown endothelial cells unexpectedly show up regulation of Rho GTPases. Zebrafish Robo4 rescues both Rho GTPase homeostasis and serum reduced chemotaxis in robo4 knockdown cells. Robo1 and Robo4 interact and share molecules such as Slit2, Mena and Vilse, a Cdc42-GAP. In addition, this study mechanistically implicates IRSp53 in the signaling nexus between activated Cdc42 and Mena, both of which have previously been shown to be involved with Robo4 signaling in endothelial cells. Conclusion This study identifies specific components of the Robo signaling apparatus that work together to guide directional migration of endothelial cells.

  6. Insomnia and endothelial function - the HUNT 3 fitness study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linn B Strand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insomnia is associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. To our knowledge, no previous studies have examined insomnia in relation to endothelial function, an indicator of preclinical atherosclerosis. Our aim was to assess the association of insomnia with endothelial function in a large population based study of healthy individuals. METHODS: A total of 4 739 participants free from known cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases, cancer, and sarcoidosis, and who were not using antihypertensive medication were included in the study. They reported how often they had experienced difficulties falling asleep at night, repeated awakenings during the night, early awakenings without being able to go back to sleep, and daytime sleepiness. Endothelial function was measured by flow mediated dilation (FMD derived from the brachial artery. RESULTS: We found no consistent association between the insomnia symptoms and endothelial function in multiadjusted models, but individual insomnia symptoms may be related to endothelial function. Among women who reported early awakenings, endothelial function may be lower than in women without this symptom (p = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided no evidence that endothelial function, an early indicator of atherosclerosis, is an important linking factor between insomnia and CHD. Further studies are needed to explore the complex interrelation between sleep and cardiovascular pathology.

  7. Phagocytosis by glomerular endothelial cells in infection-related glomerulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velthuysen, M L; Mayen, A E; Prins, F A; de Heer, E; Bruijn, J A; Fleuren, G J

    1994-01-01

    Glomerulonephritis in BALB/c mice following infection with Trypanosoma brucei is characterized by albuminuria and glomerular deposition of immunoglobulins. Electron-dense deposits are present in the mesangium, as well as subendothelially and subepithelially along the glomerular capillary wall. In this study the nature of intracytoplasmic, electron-dense, round structures observed in glomerular endothelial cells was investigated by immunoelectron-microscopy and enzyme histochemistry. The presence of these structures was related in time with the development of proteinuria. Mice from the C57BL10 strain, which upon infection develop glomerular immune complexes without proteinuria, were examined as well. The results demonstrated that the first endothelial changes, occurring 3-4 weeks after infection, were swelling of endothelial cells containing intracytoplasmic, electron-dense, round structures. These changes were seen prior to the onset of proteinuria, and were not present in glomeruli of mice that did not develop proteinuria. The endothelial granules were shown to contain immunoglobulins and typical lysosomal enzymes, providing evidence for phagocytosis by the glomerular endothelial cells. Liver endothelial cells did not show comparable changes. Thus, local phagocytosis by glomerular endothelial cells is shown to be a specific event in the development of glomerular disease. PMID:7800204

  8. Endothelial HIF signaling regulates pulmonary fibrosis-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Andrew J; Carrick, Ryan P; McConaha, Melinda E; Jones, Brittany R; Shay, Sheila D; Moore, Christy S; Blackwell, Thomas R; Gladson, Santhi; Penner, Niki L; Burman, Ankita; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Hemnes, Anna R; Karwandyar, Ayub K; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Talati, Megha A; Dong, Hui-Jia; Gleaves, Linda A; Carrier, Erica J; Gaskill, Christa; Scott, Edward W; Majka, Susan M; Fessel, Joshua P; Haase, Volker H; West, James D; Blackwell, Timothy S; Lawson, William E

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicating chronic parenchymal lung disease, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Since the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) signaling pathway is important for development of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hypoxia, we investigated whether HIF signaling in vascular endothelium regulates development of PH related to pulmonary fibrosis. We generated a transgenic model in which HIF is deleted within vascular endothelial cells and then exposed these mice to chronic intraperitoneal bleomycin to induce PH associated with lung fibrosis. Although no differences in the degree of fibrotic remodeling were observed, we found that endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected against development of PH, including right ventricle and pulmonary vessel remodeling. Similarly, endothelial HIF-deficient mice were protected from PH after a 4-wk exposure to normobaric hypoxia. In vitro studies of pulmonary vascular endothelial cells isolated from the HIF-targeted mice and controls revealed that endothelial HIF signaling increases endothelial cell expression of connective tissue growth factor, enhances vascular permeability, and promotes pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation and wound healing ability, all of which have the potential to impact the development of PH in vivo. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that vascular endothelial cell HIF signaling is necessary for development of hypoxia and pulmonary fibrosis associated PH. As such, HIF and HIF-regulated targets represent a therapeutic target in these conditions.

  9. "All-laser" endothelial corneal transplant in human patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Menabuoni, Luca; Malandrini, Alex; Canovetti, Annalisa; Lenzetti, Ivo; Pini, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Femtosecond laser sculpturing of corneal tissue is commonly used for the preparation of endothelial flaps. Diode laser welding of ocular tissues is a procedure that enables minimally invasive suturing of tissues. The combination of these laser based techniques results in a new approach to minimally invasive ophthalmic surgery, such as in endothelial corneal transplant (or endothelial keratoplasty - EK). In this work we present the "all laser" EK performed in human subjects. 24 pseudophakic patients with bullous keratopathy underwent EK: the femtosecond laser was used to prepare the 100 ìm thick and 8.5 mm diameter donor Descemet endothelial flap. After staining the stromal layer of the donor flap with a liquid ICG solution, the donor flap was inserted in the recipient eye by the use of the Busin injector. Then, the endothelial layer was laser-welded to the recipient eye (10 laser spots around the periphery of the flap), in order to reduce the risk of postoperative dislocation of the transplanted flap. A transplanted flap engraftment was observed in all the treated eyes. The staining procedure used to perform laser welding also enabled to evidence the stromal side of the donor flap, so as the flap was always placed in the right side position. The endothelial cells counts in both the laserwelded flaps and in a control group were in good agreement. The proposed technique is easy to perform and enables the reduction of postoperative endothelial flap dislocations.

  10. Mapping key regions of the RXFP2 low-density lipoprotein class-A module that are involved in signal activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Roy C K; Bathgate, Ross A D; Bruell, Shoni; Wade, John D; Gooley, Paul R; Petrie, Emma J

    2014-07-22

    The peptide hormone INSL3 and its receptor, RXFP2, have co-evolved alongside relaxin and its receptor, RXFP1. Both RXFP1 and RXFP2 are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) containing the hallmark seven transmembrane helices in addition to a distinct ectodomain of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and a single low-density lipoprotein class-A (LDLa) module at the N-terminus. RXFP1 and RXFP2 are the only mammalian GPCRs known to contain an LDLa, and its removal does not perturb primary ligand binding to the LRRs; however, signaling is abolished. This presents a general mechanism whereby ligand binding induces a conformational change in the receptor to position the LDLa to elicit a signal response. Although the LDLa interaction site has not been identified, the residues important to the action have been mapped within the RXFP1 LDLa module. In this study, we comprehensively study the RXFP2 LDLa module. We determine its structure using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and concurrently investigate the signaling of an RXFP2 with the LDLa removed (RXFP2-short), confirming that the LDLa is essential to signaling. We then replaced the LDLa with the second ligand binding module from the LDL receptor, LB2, creating the RXFP2-LB2 chimera. Unlike that in the equivalent RXFP1-LB2 chimera, signaling is rescued albeit modestly. Guided by the NMR structure, we dissected regions of the RXFP2 LDLa to identify specific residues that are important to signal activation. We determine that although the module is important to the activation of RXFP2, unlike the RXFP1 receptor, specific residues in the N-terminus of the domain are not involved in signal activation. PMID:24983702

  11. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Activation beyond Robust Nuclear β-Catenin Accumulation in Nondysplastic Barrett’s Esophagus: Regulation via Dickkopf-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestis Lyros

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation has been reported only during the late steps of Barrett’s esophagus (BE neoplastic progression, but not in BE metaplasia, based on the absence of nuclear β-catenin. However, β-catenin transcriptional activity has been recorded in absence of robust nuclear accumulation. Thus, we aimed to investigate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling in nondysplastic BE. METHODS: Esophageal tissues from healthy and BE patients without dysplasia were analyzed for Wnt target gene expression by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Esophageal squamous (EPC1-& EPC2-hTERT, BE metaplastic (CP-A, and adenocarcinoma (OE33 cell lines were characterized for Wnt activation by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and luciferase assay. Wnt activity regulation was examined by using recombinant Wnt3a and Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1 as well as Dkk1 short interfering RNA. RESULTS: Wnt target genes (AXIN2, c-MYC, Cyclin D1, Dkk1 and Wnt3a were significantly upregulated in nondysplastic BE compared with squamous mucosa. Elevated levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin were detected in nondysplastic BE. Nuclear active β-catenin and TOPflash activity were increased in CP-A and OE33 cells compared with squamous cells. Wnt3a-mediated β-catenin signaling activation was abolished by Dkk1 in CP-A cells. TOPFlash activity was elevated following Dkk1 silencing in CP-A but not in OE33 cells. Dysplastic and esophageal adenocarcinoma tissues demonstrated further Dkk1 and AXIN2 overexpression. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the absence of robust nuclear accumulation, β-catenin is transcriptionally active in nondysplastic BE. Dkk1 overexpression regulates β-catenin signaling in BE metaplastic but not in adenocarcinoma cells, suggesting that early perturbation of Dkk1-mediated signaling suppression may contribute to BE malignant transformation.

  12. DIFFERENT RESPONSES OF CHORIOCAPILLARY ENDOTHELIAL CELLS AND RETINALCAPILLARY ENDOTHELIAL CELLS TO MITOGENIC AND VASOACTIVE FACTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李维业; 刘熙朴; MyronYanoff

    1994-01-01

    The reaponses of choriocapillary endothelial cells(CCE) and retinal capillary ondothelial cells (RCE) in cul-ture,in terms of phosphoinositide (PI) breakdown and cellular mitogenesis,to retinal pigment epithelial cell (RPE)-conditioned medium and vasoactive agents have been compared.RPE-conditioned medium did not induce PI breakdown in either type of cell.However,it stimulated DNA synthesis in CCE but not in RCE.Bradykinin (BDK)acted as both a fast signaling and a slow mitogenic factor on CCE,out BDK did not affect PI turnover or DNA synthesis in RCE.In contrast,thrombin stimulated PI turnover in RCE but not in CCE,though it did not in-duce 3H-thymidine incorporation into either type of cell.These differences in cellular functions between CCE and RCE following stimulation suggest that induction of DNA synthesis and recptor-mediated PI turnover by external factors is determined,at least in part,by the origin of the capillary endothelial cell.Therefore,extrapolation to CCE pathophysiology from experiments using endothelial cells from other capillary origins may not be valid.

  13. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Burger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2∙- generation, and nitric oxide (NO production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47phox, p67phox, and p22phox and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2∙- production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation.

  14. Improved endothelialization of titanium vascular implants by extracellular matrix secreted from endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Qiufen; Zhao, Yuancong; Xue, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2010-12-01

    A variety of metals have been widely used in construction of cardiovascular implants (CVIs), such as artificial heart valves, ventricular pumps, and vascular stents. Although great effects have been put into rigorous anticoagulation, late thrombosis still occurred due to inferior blood and cell compatibility. Natural endothelium is popularly regarded as the only substance that has long-term anticoagulant ability. So, establishment of a compact endothelial cell (EC) monolayer on CVIs surface is a guarantee for their long-term potency. In the work described here, titanium (Ti) disks were coated with extracellular matrix (ECM) directly secreted by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), so as to help ECs proliferate and migrate and to improve their endothelialization in vivo. Deposition of ECM on Ti disks was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The surface topography and wettability of the Ti disks significantly changed after ECM deposition. Most importantly, it was found that ECM deposition inhibited platelet adhesion, stimulated EC proliferation, increased EC migration speed in vitro, and eventually accelerated the re-cellularization speed of Ti disks in vivo. These important results render it reasonable and feasible to modify CVIs with ECM secreted from ECs for improving their long-term potency. PMID:20666613

  15. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2 (∙-)) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47(phox), p67(phox), and p22(phox) and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2 (∙-) production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  16. Structure and function of endothelial caveolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stan, Radu-Virgil

    2002-06-01

    Caveolae are spherical invaginations of the plasma membrane and associated vesicles that are found at high surface densities in most cells, endothelia included. Their structural framework has been shown to consist of oligomerized caveolin molecules interacting with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolae have been involved in many cellular functions such as endocytosis, signal transduction, mechano-transduction, potocytosis, and cholesterol trafficking. Some confusion still persists in the field with respect to the relationship between caveolae and the lipid rafts, which have been involved in many of the above functions. In addition to all these, endothelial caveolae have been involved in capillary permeability by their participation in the process of transcytosis. This short review will focus on their structure and components, methods used to determine these components, and the role of caveolae in the transendothelial exchanges between blood plasma and the interstitial fluid. PMID:12112442

  17. Endothelial cells, tissue factor and infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes-Bezerra L.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue factor is a transmembrane procoagulant glycoprotein and a member of the cytokine receptor superfamily. It activates the extrinsic coagulation pathway, and induces the formation of a fibrin clot. Tissue factor is important for both normal homeostasis and the development of many thrombotic diseases. A wide variety of cells are able to synthesize and express tissue factor, including monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells. Tissue factor expression can be induced by cell surface components of pathogenic microorganisms, proinflammatory cytokines and membrane microparticles released from activated host cells. Tissue factor plays an important role in initiating thrombosis associated with inflammation during infection, sepsis, and organ transplant rejection. Recent findings suggest that tissue factor can also function as a receptor and thus may be important in cell signaling. The present minireview will focus on the role of tissue factor in the pathogenesis of septic shock, infectious endocarditis and invasive aspergillosis, as determined by both in vivo and in vitro models.

  18. Endoderm Generates Endothelial Cells during Liver Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Goldman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Organogenesis requires expansion of the embryonic vascular plexus that migrates into developing organs through a process called angiogenesis. Mesodermal progenitors are thought to derive endothelial cells (ECs that contribute to both embryonic vasculogenesis and the subsequent organ angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that during development of the liver, which is an endoderm derivative, a subset of ECs is generated from FOXA2+ endoderm-derived fetal hepatoblast progenitor cells expressing KDR (VEGFR2/FLK-1. Using human and mouse embryonic stem cell models, we demonstrate that KDR+FOXA2+ endoderm cells developing in hepatic differentiation cultures generate functional ECs. This introduces the concept that ECs originate not exclusively from mesoderm but also from endoderm, supported in Foxa2 lineage-tracing mouse embryos by the identification of FOXA2+ cell-derived CD31+ ECs that integrate the vascular network of developing fetal livers.

  19. Collective cell motion in endothelial monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collective cell motility is an important aspect of several developmental and pathophysiological processes. Despite its importance, the mechanisms that allow cells to be both motile and adhere to one another are poorly understood. In this study we establish statistical properties of the random streaming behavior of endothelial monolayer cultures. To understand the reported empirical findings, we expand the widely used cellular Potts model to include active cell motility. For spontaneous directed motility we assume a positive feedback between cell displacements and cell polarity. The resulting model is studied with computer simulations and is shown to exhibit behavior compatible with experimental findings. In particular, in monolayer cultures both the speed and persistence of cell motion decreases, transient cell chains move together as groups and velocity correlations extend over several cell diameters. As active cell motility is ubiquitous both in vitro and in vivo, our model is expected to be a generally applicable representation of cellular behavior

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase in the microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaohong; Keller, T C Stevenson; Begandt, Daniela; Butcher, Joshua T; Biwer, Lauren; Keller, Alexander S; Columbus, Linda; Isakson, Brant E

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, NOS3) is responsible for producing nitric oxide (NO)--a key molecule that can directly (or indirectly) act as a vasodilator and anti-inflammatory mediator. In this review, we examine the structural effects of regulation of the eNOS enzyme, including post-translational modifications and subcellular localization. After production, NO diffuses to surrounding cells with a variety of effects. We focus on the physiological role of NO and NO-derived molecules, including microvascular effects on vessel tone and immune response. Regulation of eNOS and NO action is complicated; we address endogenous and exogenous mechanisms of NO regulation with a discussion of pharmacological agents used in clinical and laboratory settings and a proposed role for eNOS in circulating red blood cells.

  1. Endurance Capacity Is Not Correlated with Endothelial Function in Male University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Wang; Xian-bo Zeng; Feng-juan Yao; Fang Wu; Chen Su; Zhen-guo Fan; Zhu Zhu; Jun Tao; Yi-jun Huang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endurance capacity, assessed by 1000-meter (1000 m) run of male university students, is an indicator of cardiovascular fitness in Chinese students physical fitness surveillance. Although cardiovascular fitness is related to endothelial function closely in patients with cardiovascular diseases, it remains unclear whether endurance capacity correlates with endothelial function, especially with circulating endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a new sensitive marker of endothelial dysfu...

  2. High glucose mediates endothelial-to-chondrocyte transition in human aortic endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Rining

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is one of the common complications in diabetes mellitus. Many studies have shown that high glucose (HG caused cardiovascular calcification, but its underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Recently, medial calcification has been most commonly described in the vessels of patients with diabetes. Chondrocytes were involved in the medial calcification. Recent studies have shown that the conversion into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs via the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT could be triggered in chondrocytes. Our previous research has indicated that HG induced EndMT in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs. Therefore, we addressed the question of whether HG-induced EndMT could be transitioned into MSCs and differentiated into chondrocytes. Methods HAECs were divided into three groups: a normal glucose (NG group, HG group (30 mmol/L, and mannitol (5.5 mmol/L NG + 24.5 mmol/L group. Pathological changes were investigated using fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to detect the co-expression of endothelial markers, such as CD31, and fibroblast markers, such as fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP-1. The expression of FSP-1 was detected by real time-PCR and western blots. Endothelial-derived MSCs were grown in MSC medium for one week. The expression of the MSCs markers STRO-1, CD44, CD10 and the chondrocyte marker SOX9 was detected by immunofluorescence staining and western blots. Chondrocyte expression was detected by alcian blue staining. Calcium deposits were analyzed by alizarin red staining. Results The incubation of HAECs exposed to HG resulted in a fibroblast-like phenotype. Double staining of the HAECs indicated a co-localization of CD31 and FSP-1. The expression of FSP-1 was significantly increased in the HG group, and the cells undergoing EndMT also expressed STRO-1, CD44 and SOX9 compared with the controls (P  Conclusions Our

  3. Descemet Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty for Endothelial Dysfunction in Xeroderma Pigmentosum: A Clinicopathological Correlation and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vira, Divya; Fernandes, Merle; Mittal, Ruchi

    2016-07-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) mainly affects the ocular surface; however, endothelial damage may also occur. We would like to report changes in the endothelial-Descemet layer and review the literature on similar findings in patients with XP, including the role of Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) in the management of a 21-year-old man who presented with nonresolving corneal edema in the right eye after excision biopsy for conjunctival intraepithelial neoplasia. His best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was 20/200 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. On general examination, there was patchy hyperpigmentation of the exposed areas of skin suggestive of XP. On examination of the right eye, there was stromal edema involving the exposed half of cornea. The left eye appeared normal. Pachymetry readings were 860 and 600 μm in the right and left eye, respectively. Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty was performed for endothelial dysfunction and the stripped endothelium, and Descemet membrane (DM) was sent for histopathologic evaluation. Postoperatively, the donor lenticule was well apposed and the overlying stromal edema resolved. The patient achieved a BCVA of 20/30 in the right eye without progression of corneal scarring at 1-year follow-up. In the meanwhile, however, the left eye developed corneal edema. Histopathology revealed gross attenuation of endothelial cells with uniform thickness of the DM. Corneal endothelial dysfunction in XP is amenable to treatment with DSAEK. PMID:25996422

  4. Validation of an endothelial roll preparation for Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty by a cornea bank using "no touch" dissection technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Anne-Sophie; Burillon, Carole; Desanlis, Adeline; Damour, Odile; Kocaba, Viridiana; Auxenfans, Céline

    2016-06-01

    Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK) selectively replaces the damaged posterior part of the cornea. However, the DMEK technique relies on a manually-performed dissection that is time-consuming, requires training and presents a potential risk of endothelial graft damages leading to surgery postponement when performed by surgeons in the operative room. To validate precut corneal tissue preparation for DMEK provided by a cornea bank in order to supply a quality and security precut endothelial tissue. The protocol was a technology transfer from the Netherlands Institute for Innovative Ocular Surgery (NIIOS) to Lyon Cornea Bank, after formation in NIIOS to the DMEK "no touch" dissection technique. The technique has been validated in selected conditions (materials, microscope) and after a learning curve, cornea bank technicians prepared endothelial tissue for DMEK. Endothelial cells densities (ECD) were evaluated before and after preparation, after storage and transport to the surgery room. Microbiological and histological controls have been done. Twenty corneas were manually dissected; 18 without tears. Nineteen endothelial grafts formed a double roll. The ECD loss after cutting was 3.3 % (n = 19). After transportation 7 days later, we found an ECD loss of 25 % (n = 12). Three days after cutting and transportation, we found 2.1 % of ECD loss (n = 7). Histology found an endothelial cells monolayer lying on Descemet membrane. The mean thickness was 12 ± 2.2 µm (n = 4). No microbial contamination was found (n = 19). Endothelial roll stability has been validated at 3 days in our cornea bank. Cornea bank technicians trained can deliver to surgeons an ECD controlled, safety and ready to use endothelial tissue, for DMEK by "no touch" technique, allowing time saving, quality and security for surgeons.

  5. Integrin engagement mediates tyrosine dephosphorylation on platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, T T; Yan, L G; Madri, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily expressed on endothelial cells, platelets, neutrophils, and monocytes and plays a role during endothelial cell migration. Phosphoamino acid analysis and Western blot analysis with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody show that endothelial PECAM-1 is tyrosine-phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is decreased with endothelial cell migration on fibronectin and collagen and with cell sprea...

  6. Improvement in endothelial dysfunction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with N-acetylcysteine and atorvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothsna Kudaravalli

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The presence of arterial stiffness indicated endothelial dysfunction. There was reduction in RI and SI with treatment of N-acetylcysteine and atorvastatin suggesting improvement in endothelial dysfunction. There was decrease in CRP (a marker of inflammation and MDA after treatment with N-acetylcysteine suggesting improvement in endothelial dysfunction. There was reduction in CRP after treatment with atorvastatin, suggesting improvement in endothelial function. Improvement in endothelial dysfunction is associated with decreased incidence of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular accidents.

  7. Endothelial cell growth factor and ionophore A23187 stimulation of production of inositol phosphates in porcine aorta endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Moscat, J; Moreno, F.; Herrero, C.; C. López; García-Barreno, P.

    1988-01-01

    The existence of a bovine brain-derived endothelial cell growth factor has recently been reported, but its mode of action is unknown. We show that the endothelial cell growth factor is a potent stimulant of inositol monophosphate release in porcine aorta endothelial cells. Although the activation of phospholipase C by this factor does not appear to be dependent on Ca2+, the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 stimulates release of inositol phosphates. It is suggested that the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3...

  8. Red Raspberry Phenols Inhibit Angiogenesis: A Morphological and Subcellular Analysis Upon Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, M; Machado, V; Costa, R; Figueira, M E; Sepodes, B; Barata, P; Ribeiro, L; Soares, R

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenols are a class of natural compounds whose potential as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-angiogenesis has been reported in many pathological conditions. Red raspberry extract, rich in polyphenols, has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects and prevent cell proliferation in distinct animal models. However, the signaling pathways involved remain unknown. Herein, we used human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) to determine the influence of red raspberry phenolic compound extract concentrations, ranging from 10 to 250 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL, on endothelium viability (MTS assay), proliferation (BrdU incorporation), migration (injury assay), and capillary-like structures formation (Matrigel assay). Protein expression in cell lysates was determined by Western blot analysis. We showed that red raspberry extracts reduced cell viability (GI50  = 87,64 ± 6,59 μg GAE/mL) and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. A significant abrogation of cells ability to migrate to injured areas, even at low concentrations, was observed by injury assay. Cell assembly into capillary-like structures on Matrigel also decreased in a dose dependent-manner for higher extract concentrations, as well as the number of branching points per unit of area. Protein expression analysis showed a dose-dependent decrease in Phospho-VEGFR2 expression, implying abrogation of VEGF signaling activity. We also showed for the first time that red raspberry phenolic compounds induce the rearrangement of filamentous actin cytoskeleton, with an isotropy increase found for higher testing concentrations. Taken together, our findings corroborate the anti-angiogenic potential of red raspberry phenolic compounds and provide new insights into their mode of action upon endothelium. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1604-1612, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26590362

  9. Associations of endothelial function and air temperature in diabetic subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Objective: Epidemiological studies consistently show that air temperature is associated with changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the biological mechanisms underlying the association remain largely unknown. As one index of endothelial functio...

  10. A microscopic view on the renal endothelial glycocalyx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Martijn J C; van den Berg, Bernard M; Lee, Dae Hyun; Boels, Margien G S; Tiemeier, Gesa L; Avramut, M Cristina; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; van der Vlag, Johan; Vink, Hans; Rabelink, Ton J

    2015-05-01

    Endothelial cells perform key homeostatic functions such as regulating blood flow, permeability, and aiding immune surveillance for pathogens. While endothelial activation serves normal physiological adaptation, maladaptation of these endothelial functions has been identified as an important effector mechanism in the progression of renal disease as well as the associated development of cardiovascular disease. The primary interface between blood and the endothelium is the glycocalyx. This carbohydrate-rich gel-like structure with its associated proteins mediates most of the regulatory functions of the endothelium. Because the endothelial glycocalyx is a highly dynamic and fragile structure ex vivo, and traditional tissue processing for staining and perfusion-fixation usually results in a partial or complete loss of the glycocalyx, studying its dimensions and function has proven to be challenging. In this review, we will outline the core functions of the glycocalyx and focus on different techniques to study structure-function relationships in kidney and vasculature.

  11. Nipah virus infection and glycoprotein targeting in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisner Andrea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic Nipah virus (NiV causes fatal respiratory and brain infections in animals and humans. The major hallmark of the infection is a systemic endothelial infection, predominantly in the CNS. Infection of brain endothelial cells allows the virus to overcome the blood-brain-barrier (BBB and to subsequently infect the brain parenchyma. However, the mechanisms of NiV replication in endothelial cells are poorly elucidated. We have shown recently that the bipolar or basolateral expression of the NiV surface glycoproteins F and G in polarized epithelial cell layers is involved in lateral virus spread via cell-to-cell fusion and that correct sorting depends on tyrosine-dependent targeting signals in the cytoplasmic tails of the glycoproteins. Since endothelial cells share many characteristics with epithelial cells in terms of polarization and protein sorting, we wanted to elucidate the role of the NiV glycoprotein targeting signals in endothelial cells. Results As observed in vivo, NiV infection of endothelial cells induced syncytia formation. The further finding that infection increased the transendothelial permeability supports the idea of spread of infection via cell-to-cell fusion and endothelial cell damage as a mechanism to overcome the BBB. We then revealed that both glycoproteins are expressed at lateral cell junctions (bipolar, not only in NiV-infected primary endothelial cells but also upon stable expression in immortalized endothelial cells. Interestingly, mutation of tyrosines 525 and 542/543 in the cytoplasmic tail of the F protein led to an apical redistribution of the protein in endothelial cells whereas tyrosine mutations in the G protein had no effect at all. This fully contrasts the previous results in epithelial cells where tyrosine 525 in the F, and tyrosines 28/29 in the G protein were required for correct targeting. Conclusion We conclude that the NiV glycoprotein distribution is responsible for

  12. Endothelial progenitors in sepsis: vox clamantis in deserto?

    OpenAIRE

    Goligorsky, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    In this issue of Critical Care, Patschan and colleagues present a study of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in patients with sepsis. The importance of this study is in focusing attention on several frequently ignored aspects of sepsis. Among those are the phenomenon of microvascular dysfunction, which is potentially responsible for profound metabolic perturbations at the tissue level, and the role of endothelial progenitors in repair processes. Other important aspects of the study are the ...

  13. Characterization of adhesive interactions between human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Avraham, H; Cowley, S; Chi, S. Y.; Jiang, S.; Groopman, J E

    1993-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is essential for many immunological functions and is believed to be important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Adhesive interactions between human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes were characterized in vitro using the CMK megakaryocytic cell line as well as marrow megakaryocytes. Although there was no adhesion between unactivated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and megakaryocytes, treatment of HUVEC with inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 beta, tumor ...

  14. Endothelial tubes assemble from intracellular vacuoles in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Makoto; Saunders, W Brian; Bayless, Kayla J; Dye, Louis; Davis, George E; Weinstein, Brant M

    2006-07-27

    The formation of epithelial tubes is crucial for the proper development of many different tissues and organs, and occurs by means of a variety of different mechanisms. Morphogenesis of seamless, properly patterned endothelial tubes is essential for the development of a functional vertebrate circulatory system, but the mechanism of vascular lumenization in vivo remains unclear. Evidence dating back more than 100 years has hinted at an important function for endothelial vacuoles in lumen formation. More than 25 years ago, in some of the first endothelial cell culture experiments in vitro, Folkman and Haudenschild described "longitudinal vacuoles" that "appeared to be extruded and connected from one cell to the next", observations confirmed and extended by later studies in vitro showing that intracellular vacuoles arise from integrin-dependent and cdc42/Rac1-dependent pinocytic events downstream of integrin-extracellular-matrix signalling interactions. Despite compelling data supporting a model for the assembly of endothelial tubes in vitro through the formation and fusion of vacuoles, conclusive evidence in vivo has been lacking, primarily because of difficulties associated with imaging the dynamics of subcellular endothelial vacuoles deep within living animals. Here we use high-resolution time-lapse two-photon imaging of transgenic zebrafish to examine how endothelial tubes assemble in vivo, comparing our results with time-lapse imaging of human endothelial-cell tube formation in three-dimensional collagen matrices in vitro. Our results provide strong support for a model in which the formation and intracellular and intercellular fusion of endothelial vacuoles drives vascular lumen formation. PMID:16799567

  15. Phylogenetic Analysis of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    KASAP, Murat

    2005-01-01

    The secreted glycoprotein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and specific mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, capable of stimulating angiogenesis during embryonic development and tumor formation. Despite intensive research, the functions of several VEGF family members remain a mystery. Insight into their evolutionary relationships could profoundly improve our understanding of why there are so many VEGFs and why we have not been able to dissect their function to our sati...

  16. Brain endothelial TAK1 and NEMO safeguard the neurovascular unit

    OpenAIRE

    Ridder, Dirk A.; Wenzel, Jan; Müller, Kristin; Töllner, Kathrin; Tong, Xin-Kang; Assmann, Julian C; Stroobants, Stijn; Weber, Tobias; Niturad, Cristina; Fischer, Lisanne; Lembrich, Beate; Wolburg, Hartwig; Grand'Maison, Marilyn; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Korpos, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), a key component of NF-κB signaling, cause the genetic disease incontinentia pigmenti (IP). This leads to severe neurological symptoms, but the mechanisms underlying brain involvement were unclear. Here, we show that selectively deleting Nemo or the upstream kinase Tak1 in brain endothelial cells resulted in death of endothelial cells, a rarefaction of brain microvessels, cerebral hypoperfusion, a disrupted blood–brain barrier (BB...

  17. Conditional Gene Targeting in Mouse High Endothelial Venules

    OpenAIRE

    Kawashima, Hiroto; Hirakawa, Jotaro; Tobisawa, Yuki; Fukuda, Minoru; Saga, Yumiko

    2009-01-01

    High endothelial venules (HEVs) are specialized blood vessels of secondary lymphoid organs composed of endothelial cells with a characteristic cuboidal morphology. Lymphocytes selectively adhere to and migrate across HEVs to initiate immune responses. In this study, we established a novel transgenic mouse line expressing Cre recombinase under the transcriptional control of the gene encoding HEV-expressed sulfotransferase, N-acetylglucosamine-6-O-sulfotransferase 2 (GlcNAc6ST-2), using bacteri...

  18. Effect of orthostasis on endothelial function: a gender comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandu Goswami

    Full Text Available As the vascular endothelium has multiple functions, including regulation of vascular tone, it may play a role in the pathophysiology of orthostatic intolerance. We investigated the effect of orthostasis on endothelial function using EndoPAT®, a non-invasive and user-independent method, and across gender. As sex steroid hormones are known to affect endothelial function, this study examined the potential effect of these hormones on the endothelial response to orthostasis by including females at different phases of the menstrual cycle (follicular and luteal-where the hormone balance differs, and females taking an oral contraceptive. A total of 31 subjects took part in this study (11 males, 11 females having normal menstrual cycles and 9 females taking oral contraceptive. Each subject made two visits for testing; in the case of females having normal menstrual cycles the first session was conducted either 1-7 (follicular or 14-21 days (luteal after the start of menstruation, and the second session two weeks later, i.e., during the other phase, respectively. Endothelial function was assessed at baseline and following a 20-min orthostatic challenge (active standing. The EndoPAT® index increased from 1.71 ± 0.09 (mean ± SEM at baseline to 2.07 ± 0.09 following orthostasis in females (p<0.001. In males, the index increased from 1.60 ± 0.08 to 1.94 ± 0.13 following orthostasis (p<0.001. There were no significant differences, however, in the endothelial response to orthostasis between females and males, menstrual cycle phases and the usage of oral contraceptive. Our results suggest an increased vasodilatatory endothelial response following orthostasis in both females and males. The effect of gender and sex hormones on the endothelial response to orthostasis appears limited. Further studies are needed to determine the potential role of this post orthostasis endothelial response in the pathophysiology of orthostatic intolerance.

  19. Genetic endothelial systems biology of sickle stroke risk

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Milbauer, Liming; Wei, Peng; Enenstein, Judy; Jiang, Aixiang; Hillery, Cheryl A.; Scott, J. Paul; Nelson, Stephen C.; Bodempudi, Vidya; Topper, James N.; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Hirsch, Betsy; Pan, Wei; Hebbel, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic differences in endothelial biology could underlie development of phenotypic heterogeneity among persons afflicted with vascular diseases. We obtained blood outgrowth endothelial cells from 20 subjects with sickle cell anemia (age, 4-19 years) shown to be either at-risk (n = 11) or not-at-risk (n = 9) for ischemic stroke because of, respectively, having or not having occlusive disease at the circle of Willis. Gene expression profiling identified no significant single gene differences b...

  20. Variations in mass transfer to single endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Zhang, Ji; Wada, Shigeo; Shaw, James E; Won, Doyon; Cybulsky, Myron I; Yip, Chris M; Ethier, C Ross

    2009-06-01

    Mass transfer between flowing blood and arterial mural cells (including vascular endothelial cells) may play an important role in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells are known to have an apical surface topography that is not flat, and hence mass transfer patterns to individual endothelial cells are likely affected by the local cellular topography. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between vascular endothelial cell surface topography and cellular level mass transfer. Confluent porcine endothelial monolayers were cultured under both shear and static conditions and atomic force microscopy was used to measure endothelial cell topography. Using finite element methods and the measured cell topography, flow and concentration fields were calculated for a typical, small, blood-borne solute. A relative Sherwood number was defined as the difference between the computed Sherwood number and that predicted by the Leveque solution for mass transfer over a flat surface: this eliminates the effects of axial location on mass transfer efficiency. The average intracellular relative Sherwood number range was found to be dependent on cell height and not dependent on cell elongation due to shear stress in culture. The mass flux to individual cells reached a maximum at the highest point on the endothelial cell surface, typically corresponding to the nucleus of the cell. Therefore, for small receptor-mediated solutes, increased solute uptake efficiency can be achieved by concentrating receptors near the nucleus. The main conclusion of the work is that although the rate of mass transfer varies greatly over an individual cell, the average mass transfer rate to a cell is close to that predicted for a flat cell. In comparison to other hemodynamic factors, the topography of endothelial cells therefore seems to have little effect on mass transfer rates and is likely physiologically insignificant.

  1. Platelets Enhance Endothelial Adhesiveness in High Tidal Volume Ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Yiming, Maimaiti T.; Lederer, David J.; Sun, Li; Huertas, Alice; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Bhattacharya, Sunita

    2008-01-01

    Although platelets induce lung inflammation, leading to acute lung injury (ALI), the extent of platelet–endothelial cell (EC) interactions remains poorly understood. Here, in a ventilation-stress model of lung inflammation, we show that platelet–EC interactions are important. We obtained freshly isolated lung endothelial cells (FLECs) from isolated, blood-perfused rat lungs exposed to ventilation at low tidal volume (LV) or stress-inducing high tidal volume (HV). Immunofluorescence and immuno...

  2. Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Factors That Stimulate Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Drevets, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes infection of endothelial cells upregulates surface expression of adhesion molecules and stimulates neutrophil adhesion to infected cell monolayers. The experiments presented here tested the roles of specific bacterial virulence factors as triggers for this inflammatory phenotype and function. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers were infected with wild-type L. monocytogenes or L. monocytogenes mutants; then surface expression of E-selectin and neutro...

  3. Endothelial cell pseudopods and angiogenesis of breast cancer tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun LuZhe

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A neoplastic tumor cannot grow beyond a millimeter or so in diameter without recruitment of endothelial cells and new blood vessels to supply nutrition and oxygen for tumor cell survival. This study was designed to investigate formation of new blood vessels within a human growing breast cancer tumor model (MDA MB231 in mammary fat pad of nude female mouse. Once the tumor grew to 35 mm3, it developed a well-vascularized capsule. Histological sections of tumors greater than 35 mm3 were stained with PAS, with CD-31 antibody (an endothelial cell maker, or with hypoxia inducible factor 1α antibody (HIF. The extent of blood vessel and endothelial cell pseudopod volume density was measured by ocular grid intercept counting in the PAS stained slides. Results The tumor area within 100–150 μm of the well-vascularized capsule had few blood vessels and only occasional endothelial cell pseudopods, whereas the area greater than 150 μm from the capsule had more blood vessels, capillaries, and a three-fold increase in volume density of pseudopods sprouting from the capillary endothelial cells. This subcortical region, rich in pseudopods, some of which were observed to have vacuoles/lumens, was strongly positive for presence of HIF. In some larger tumors, pseudopods were observed to insinuate for mm distances through hypoxic regions of the tumor. Conclusion The positive correlation between presence of HIF and the increased extent of pseudopods suggests volume density measure of the latter as a quantifiable marker of tumor hypoxia. Apparently, hypoxic regions of the tumor produce HIF leading to production of vascular endothelial growth factors that stimulate sprouting of capillary endothelial cells and formation of endothelial cell pseudopods.

  4. Fluid Mechanical Forces and Endothelial Mitochondria: A Bioengineering Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Scheitlin, Christopher G.; Nair, Devi M.; Crestanello, Juan A.; Zweier, Jay L; Alevriadou, B. Rita

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is the hallmark of every cardiovascular disease/condition, including atherosclerosis and ischemia/reperfusion injury. Fluid shear stress acting on the vascular endothelium is known to regulate cell homeostasis. Altered hemodynamics is thought to play a causative role in endothelial dysfunction. The dysfunction is associated with/preceded by mitochondrial oxidative stress. Studies by our group and others have shown that the form and/or function of the mitochondrial...

  5. Mitochondrial function in vascular endothelial cell in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Pangare, Meenal; Makino, Ayako

    2012-01-01

    Micro- and macrovascular complications are commonly seen in diabetic patients and endothelial dysfunction contributes to the development and progression of the complications. Abnormal functions in endothelial cells lead to the increase in vascular tension and atherosclerosis, followed by systemic hypertension as well as increased incident of ischemia and stroke in diabetic patients. Mitochondria are organelles serving as a source of energy production and as regulators of cell survival (e.g., ...

  6. Radiation-induced apoptosis in microvascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Langley, R. E.; Bump, E A; Quartuccio, S. G.; Medeiros, D.; Braunhut, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    The response of the microvasculature to ionizing radiation is thought to be an important factor in the overall response of both normal tissues and tumours. It has recently been reported that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), a potent mitogen for endothelial cells, protects large vessel endothelial cells from radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro. Microvessel cells are phenotypically distinct from large vessel cells. We studied the apoptotic response of confluent monolayers of capillary en...

  7. Fructose Induces the Inflammatory Molecule ICAM-1 in Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Glushakova, Olena; Kosugi, Tomoki; Roncal, Carlos; Mu, Wei; Heinig, Marcelo; Cirillo, Pietro; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G.; Richard J Johnson; Nakagawa, Takahiko

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have linked fructose intake with the metabolic syndrome, and it was recently reported that fructose induces an inflammatory response in the rat kidney. Here, we examined whether fructose directly stimulates endothelial inflammatory processes by upregulating the inflammatory molecule intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). When human aortic endothelial cells were stimulated with physiologic concentrations of fructose, ICAM-1 mRNA and protein expression increased in a ...

  8. Lonidamine Causes Inhibition of Angiogenesis-Related Endothelial Cell Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Donatella Del Bufalo; Daniela Trisciuoglio; Marco Scarsella; Giulia D'Amati; Antonio Candiloro; Angela Iervolino; Carlo Leonetti; Gabriella Zupi

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether lonidamine (LND) interferes with some steps in angiogenesis progression. We report here, for the first time, that LND inhibited angiogenic-related endothelial cell functions in a dose-dependent manner (1-50 μg/ml). In particular, LND decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, and morphogenesis on matrigel of different endothelial cell lines. Zymographic and Western blot analysis assays showed that LND treatment produced a reduction in the secreti...

  9. Paclitaxel Induces Thrombomodulin Downregulation in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huang-Joe; Lu, Te-Ling; Huang, Haimei; Huang, Huey-Chun

    2011-01-01

    Patients with paclitaxel-eluting stents are at risk of developing stent thrombosis upon premature discontinuation of dual antiplatelet therapy. In this study, we set out to clarify whether paclitaxel can modulate thrombomodulin expression in human aortic endothelial cells. Human aortic endothelial cells were stimulated with paclitaxel. Methoxyphenyl tetrazolium inner salt cell viability assay, Western blot analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemical assay were perfo...

  10. Tissue factor expression by endothelial cells in sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Solovey, A; Gui, L; Key, N. S.; Hebbel, R.P.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the vascular endothelium in activation of the coagulation system, a fundamental homeostatic mechanism of mammalian biology, is uncertain because there is little evidence indicating that endothelial cells in vivo express tissue factor (TF), the system's triggering mechanism. As a surrogate for vessel wall endothelium, we examined circulating endothelial cells (CEC) from normals and patients with sickle cell anemia, a disease associated with activation of coagulation. We find that s...

  11. Endothelial cell repopulation after stenting determines in-stent neointima formation: effects of bare-metal vs. drug-eluting stents and genetic endothelial cell modification.

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, G; van Kampen, E.; Hale, AB; McNeill, E; Patel, J.; Crabtree, MJ; Ali, Z; Hoerr, RA; Alp, NJ; Channon, KM

    2013-01-01

    Aims Understanding endothelial cell repopulation post-stenting and how this modulates in-stent restenosis is critical to improving arterial healing post-stenting. We used a novel murine stent model to investigate endothelial cell repopulation post-stenting, comparing the response of drug-eluting stents with a primary genetic modification to improve endothelial cell function. Methods and results Endothelial cell repopulation was assessed en face in stented arteries in ApoE−/− mice with end...

  12. Human endothelial senescence can be induced by TNF-α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    TNF-α is one of the most important proinfiammatory cytokines in mediating multiple physio-pathological functions during immunological responses. Vascular endothelial cells, when stimulated by TNF-α2 can increase the expression of multiple cytokines and cellular adhesion molecules and, in turn, actively promote the inflammatory responses by recruiting and activating of leukocytes to the inflammatory site. In addition to endothelial death induced by TNF-α2 we found for the first time that TNF-α can also induce the human endothelial cells senescence. The induced senescent endothelial cells will display SA-β-Gal staining and they were arrested in G0-G1 phase. We found that Aψm would always be up-regulated in response to TNF-α stimulation at early time but when the cells become senescent, A ψmshows a tendency to decrease. It may reflect the sthenic function of mitochondria at early time in response to TNF-αstimulation and decay when the endothelial cells were induced senescent. ROS fluctuates at early time and also decreases when the endothelial cells become senescent. Our results show that the change of mitochondrial function may be related to the senescent process.``

  13. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  14. Prolonged organ culture reduces the incidence of endothelial immune reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, P; Heinzelmann, S; Böhringer, D; Reinhard, T

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The number of antigen-presenting cells decreases during organ culture of corneoscleral discs. This might result in a decrease of immune reactions with increasing duration of organ culture. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed a retrospective analysis of all penetrating keratoplasties that were consecutively performed over the last 5 years.PATIENTS AND METHODS All cases of penetrating keratoplasties (n=1006) were divided into two groups, with the division made at the median of the storage time (21 days). These two groups were compared by a Cox proportional hazards survival model regarding the incidence of endothelial immune reactions, clear graft survival, and chronic endothelial cell loss following penetrating keratoplasty considering patient's age, donor's age, and risk situation as co-variates.RESULTS We observed statistically significantly fewer endothelial immune reactions (20.1% (95% confidence interval 15.5-24.5%) after 2 years) in the group with a storage time of more than 21 days compared with the group with a storage time of culture did not have a statistically significant effect on clear graft survival or chronic endothelial cell loss.CONCLUSION Our results demonstrate that an increased duration of organ culture leads to a lower incidence of endothelial immune reactions following penetrating keratoplasty. However, we do not recommend increased storage times in general as overall graft survival did not improve. The reason for this apparent paradox may be that the endothelial cell count decreases during storage time. PMID:26493031

  15. Protein kinase D activity controls endothelial nitric oxide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Sánchez-Ruiloba, Lucía; Gómez-Parrizas, Mónica; Zaragoza, Carlos; Iglesias, Teresa; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2014-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates key functions of the endothelium, such as angiogenesis or vessel repair in processes involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation. One of the effector kinases that become activated in endothelial cells upon VEGF treatment is protein kinase D (PKD). Here, we show that PKD phosphorylates eNOS, leading to its activation and a concomitant increase in NO synthesis. Using mass spectrometry, we show that the purified active kinase specifically phosphorylates recombinant eNOS on Ser1179. Treatment of endothelial cells with VEGF or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activates PKD and increases eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of PKD and gene silencing of both PKD1 and PKD2 abrogate VEGF signaling, resulting in a clear diminished migration of endothelial cells in a wound healing assay. Finally, inhibition of PKD in mice results in an almost complete disappearance of the VEGF-induced vasodilatation, as monitored through determination of the diameter of the carotid artery. Hence, our data indicate that PKD is a new regulatory kinase of eNOS in endothelial cells whose activity orchestrates mammalian vascular tone. PMID:24928905

  16. MicroRNAs in Hyperglycemia Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskomani Silambarasan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia is closely associated with prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Hyperglycemia increases the risk of vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease and cerebro/cardiovascular diseases. Under hyperglycemic conditions, the endothelial cells become dysfunctional. In this study, we investigated the miRNA expression changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to different glucose concentrations (5, 10, 25 and 40 mM glucose and at various time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h. miRNA microarray analyses showed that there is a correlation between hyperglycemia induced endothelial dysfunction and miRNA expression. In silico pathways analyses on the altered miRNA expression showed that the majority of the affected biological pathways appeared to be associated to endothelial cell dysfunction and apoptosis. We found the expression of ten miRNAs (miR-26a-5p, -26b-5p, 29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -140-5p, -192-5p, -221-3p and -320a to increase gradually with increasing concentration of glucose. These miRNAs were also found to be involved in endothelial dysfunction. At least seven of them, miR-29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -221-3p, -320a and -192-5p, can be correlated to endothelial cell apoptosis.

  17. Endothelial Dysfunction in Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Nicola; De Ceglie, Vincenzo; D'Elia, Alessandra

    2016-04-20

    An endothelial dysfunction has been described in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) patients. The purpose of our review was to: i) identify, evaluate and review recent research about cardiovascular risk factors involvement and signs of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL; ii) implication of these discovering in clinical practice and future research. A Medline literature search was conducted to identify any study on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL, published in the English language in the last decade. The following MEDLINE search terms were used: sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) and endothelial dysfunction (text words). Additional studies were identified by hand searching the references of original articles and review articles. Studies were not excluded on the basis of the qualitative or quantitative definitions of SSHL, treatment regimens, or outcome measures. Data were extracted from included papers by a reviewer. Information on the patients, investigations, methods, interventions, and outcomes were systematically analyzed. Characteristics and results of all included studies were reviewed systematically. High levels of adhesion molecules, hyperhomocysteinemia and lower folate levels, unbalanced oxidative status, a lower value of flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery and a reduced percentage of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients affected by ISSHL support the hypothesis that this syndrome should be considered as a microcirculation disorder based on endothelial dysfunction and drive clinicians to implement all the traditional strategies used for preventing cardiovascular events, to also reduce the likelihood of ISSHL occurrence. PMID:27588164

  18. MicroRNAs in Hyperglycemia Induced Endothelial Cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silambarasan, Maskomani; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Kaur, Charanjit; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is closely associated with prediabetes and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Hyperglycemia increases the risk of vascular complications such as diabetic retinopathy, diabetic nephropathy, peripheral vascular disease and cerebro/cardiovascular diseases. Under hyperglycemic conditions, the endothelial cells become dysfunctional. In this study, we investigated the miRNA expression changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to different glucose concentrations (5, 10, 25 and 40 mM glucose) and at various time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h). miRNA microarray analyses showed that there is a correlation between hyperglycemia induced endothelial dysfunction and miRNA expression. In silico pathways analyses on the altered miRNA expression showed that the majority of the affected biological pathways appeared to be associated to endothelial cell dysfunction and apoptosis. We found the expression of ten miRNAs (miR-26a-5p, -26b-5p, 29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -140-5p, -192-5p, -221-3p and -320a) to increase gradually with increasing concentration of glucose. These miRNAs were also found to be involved in endothelial dysfunction. At least seven of them, miR-29b-3p, -29c-3p, -125b-1-3p, -130b-3p, -221-3p, -320a and -192-5p, can be correlated to endothelial cell apoptosis. PMID:27070575

  19. Rapid homogeneous endothelialization of high aspect ratio microvascular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Nisarga; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Haller, Carolyn A; Allen, Mark G; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2015-08-01

    Microvascularization of an engineered tissue construct is necessary to ensure the nourishment and viability of the hosted cells. Microvascular constructs can be created by seeding the luminal surfaces of microfluidic channel arrays with endothelial cells. However, in a conventional flow-based system, the uniformity of endothelialization of such an engineered microvascular network is constrained by mass transfer of the cells through high length-to-diameter (L/D) aspect ratio microchannels. Moreover, given the inherent limitations of the initial seeding process to generate a uniform cell coating, the large surface-area-to-volume ratio of microfluidic systems demands long culture periods for the formation of confluent cellular microconduits. In this report, we describe the design of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) microvascular constructs with reentrant microchannels that facilitates rapid, spatially homogeneous endothelial cell seeding of a high L/D (2 cm/35 μm; > 550:1) aspect ratio microchannels. MEMS technology was employed for the fabrication of a monolithic, elastomeric, reentrant microvascular construct. Isotropic etching and PDMS micromolding yielded a near-cylindrical microvascular channel array. A 'stretch - seed - seal' operation was implemented for uniform incorporation of endothelial cells along the entire microvascular area of the construct yielding endothelialized microvascular networks in less than 24 h. The feasibility of this endothelialization strategy and the uniformity of cellularization were established using confocal microscope imaging.

  20. Endothelial dysfunction in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Quaranta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An endothelial dysfunction has been described in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL patients. The purpose of our review was to: i identify, evaluate and review recent research about cardiovascular risk factors involvement and signs of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL; ii implication of these discovering in clinical practice and future research. A Medline literature search was conducted to identify any study on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL, published in the English language in the last decade. The following MEDLINE search terms were used: sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL and endothelial dysfunction (text words. Additional studies were identified by hand searching the references of original articles and review articles. Studies were not excluded on the basis of the qualitative or quantitative definitions of SSHL, treatment regimens, or outcome measures. Data were extracted from included papers by a reviewer. Information on the patients, investigations, methods, interventions, and outcomes were systematically analyzed. Characteristics and results of all included studies were reviewed systematically. High levels of adhesion molecules, hyperhomocysteinemia and lower folate levels, unbalanced oxidative status, a lower value of flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery and a reduced percentage of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients affected by ISSHL support the hypothesis that this syndrome should be considered as a microcirculation disorder based on endothelial dysfunction and drive clinicians to implement all the traditional strategies used for preventing cardiovascular events, to also reduce the likelihood of ISSHL occurrence.

  1. Endothelial Dysfunction in Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Nicola; De Ceglie, Vincenzo; D'Elia, Alessandra

    2016-04-20

    An endothelial dysfunction has been described in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL) patients. The purpose of our review was to: i) identify, evaluate and review recent research about cardiovascular risk factors involvement and signs of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL; ii) implication of these discovering in clinical practice and future research. A Medline literature search was conducted to identify any study on the involvement of endothelial dysfunction in ISSHL, published in the English language in the last decade. The following MEDLINE search terms were used: sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) and endothelial dysfunction (text words). Additional studies were identified by hand searching the references of original articles and review articles. Studies were not excluded on the basis of the qualitative or quantitative definitions of SSHL, treatment regimens, or outcome measures. Data were extracted from included papers by a reviewer. Information on the patients, investigations, methods, interventions, and outcomes were systematically analyzed. Characteristics and results of all included studies were reviewed systematically. High levels of adhesion molecules, hyperhomocysteinemia and lower folate levels, unbalanced oxidative status, a lower value of flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery and a reduced percentage of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients affected by ISSHL support the hypothesis that this syndrome should be considered as a microcirculation disorder based on endothelial dysfunction and drive clinicians to implement all the traditional strategies used for preventing cardiovascular events, to also reduce the likelihood of ISSHL occurrence.

  2. Atorvastatin prevents Plasmodium falciparum cytoadherence and endothelial damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubrier Florent

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adhesion of Plasmodium falciparum parasitized red blood cell (PRBC to human endothelial cells (EC induces inflammatory processes, coagulation cascades, oxidative stress and apoptosis. These pathological processes are suspected to be responsible for the blood-brain-barrier and other organs' endothelial dysfunctions observed in fatal cases of malaria. Atorvastatin, a drug that belongs to the lowering cholesterol molecule family of statins, has been shown to ameliorate endothelial functions and is widely used in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Methods The effect of this compound on PRBC induced endothelial impairments was assessed using endothelial co-culture models. Results Atorvastatin pre-treatment of EC was found to reduce the expression of adhesion molecules and P. falciparum cytoadherence, to protect cells against PRBC-induced apoptosis and to enhance endothelial monolayer integrity during co-incubation with parasites. Conclusions These results might suggest a potential interest use of atorvastatin as a protective treatment to interfere with the pathophysiological cascades leading to severe malaria.

  3. Endothelial cell tumor growth is Ape/ref-1 dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ayan; Khanna, Savita; Roy, Sashwati; Pan, Xueliang; Sen, Chandan K; Gordillo, Gayle M

    2015-09-01

    Tumor-forming endothelial cells have highly elevated levels of Nox-4 that release H2O2 into the nucleus, which is generally not compatible with cell survival. We sought to identify compensatory mechanisms that enable tumor-forming endothelial cells to survive and proliferate under these conditions. Ape-1/ref-1 (Apex-1) is a multifunctional protein that promotes DNA binding of redox-sensitive transcription factors, such as AP-1, and repairs oxidative DNA damage. A validated mouse endothelial cell (EOMA) tumor model was used to demonstrate that Nox-4-derived H2O2 causes DNA oxidation that induces Apex-1 expression. Apex-1 functions as a chaperone to keep transcription factors in a reduced state. In EOMA cells Apex-1 enables AP-1 binding to the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (mcp-1) promoter and expression of that protein is required for endothelial cell tumor formation. Intraperitoneal injection of the small molecule inhibitor E3330, which specifically targets Apex-1 redox-sensitive functions, resulted in a 50% decrease in tumor volume compared with mice injected with vehicle control (n = 6 per group), indicating that endothelial cell tumor proliferation is dependent on Apex-1 expression. These are the first reported results to establish Nox-4 induction of Apex-1 as a mechanism promoting endothelial cell tumor formation.

  4. Lack of vimentin impairs endothelial differentiation of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraas, Liana C; Ahsan, Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeletal filament vimentin is inherent to the endothelial phenotype and is critical for the proper function of endothelial cells in adult mice. It is unclear, however, if the presence of vimentin is necessary during differentiation to the endothelial phenotype. Here we evaluated gene and protein expression of differentiating wild type embryonic stem cells (WT ESCs) and vimentin knockout embryonic stem cells (VIM -/- ESCs) using embryoid bodies (EBs) formed from both cell types. Over seven days of differentiation VIM -/- EBs had altered morphology compared to WT EBs, with a rippled outer surface and a smaller size due to decreased proliferation. Gene expression of pluripotency markers decreased similarly for EBs of both cell types; however, VIM -/- EBs had impaired differentiation towards the endothelial phenotype. This was quantified with decreased expression of markers along the specification pathway, specifically the early mesodermal marker Brachy-T, the lateral plate mesodermal marker FLK1, and the endothelial-specific markers TIE2, PECAM, and VE-CADHERIN. Taken together, these results indicate that the absence of vimentin impairs spontaneous differentiation of ESCs to the endothelial phenotype in vitro. PMID:27480130

  5. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs. PMID:27287800

  6. Lonidamine Causes Inhibition of Angiogenesis-Related Endothelial Cell Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Del Bufalo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess whether lonidamine (LND interferes with some steps in angiogenesis progression. We report here, for the first time, that LND inhibited angiogenic-related endothelial cell functions in a dose-dependent manner (1-50 μg/ml. In particular, LND decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, and morphogenesis on matrigel of different endothelial cell lines. Zymographic and Western blot analysis assays showed that LND treatment produced a reduction in the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and metalloproteinase-9 by endothelial cells. Vessel formation in a matrigel plug was also reduced by LND. The viability, migration, invasion, and matrix metalloproteinase production of different tumor cell lines were not affected by low doses of LND (1-10 μg/ml, whereas 50 μg/ml LND, which corresponds to the dose used in clinical management of tumors, triggered apoptosis both in endothelial and tumor cells. Together, these data demonstrate that LND is a compound that interferes with endothelial cell functions, both at low and high doses. Thus, the effect of LND on endothelial cell functions, previously undescribed, may be a significant contributor to the antitumor effect of LND observed for clinical management of solid tumors.

  7. High-density lipoprotein endocytosis in endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stefanie; Fruhwürth; Margit; Pavelka; Robert; Bittman; Werner; J; Kovacs; Katharina; M; Walter; Clemens; Rhrl; Herbert; Stangl

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To describe the way stations of high-density lipoprotein(HDL) uptake and its lipid exchange in endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: A combination of fluorescence microscopy using novel fluorescent cholesterol surrogates and electron microscopy was used to analyze HDL endocytosis in great detail in primary human endothelial cells. Further, HDL uptake was quantified using radio-labeled HDL particles. To validate the in vitro findings mice were injected with fluorescently labeled HDL and particle uptake in the liver was analyzed using fluorescencemicroscopy. RESULTS: HDL uptake occurred via clathrin-coated pits, tubular endosomes and multivesicular bodies in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. During uptake and resecretion, HDL-derived cholesterol was exchanged at a faster rate than cholesteryl oleate, resembling the HDL particle pathway seen in hepatic cells. In addition, lysosomes were not involved in this process and thus HDL degradation was not detectable. In vivo, we found HDL mainly localized in mouse hepatic endothelial cells. HDL was not detected in parenchymal liver cells, indicating that lipid transfer from HDL to hepatocytes occurs primarily via scavenger receptor, class B, type Ⅰ mediated selective uptake without concomitant HDL endocytosis. CONCLUSION: HDL endocytosis occurs via clathrincoated pits, tubular endosomes and multivesicular bodies in human endothelial cells. Mouse endothelial cells showed a similar HDL uptake pattern in vivo indicating that the endothelium is one major site of HDL endocytosis and transcytosis.

  8. Nitrones reverse hyperglycemia-induced endothelial dysfunction in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headley, Colwyn A; DiSilvestro, David; Bryant, Kelsey E; Hemann, Craig; Chen, Chun-An; Das, Amlan; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana; Durand, Grégory; Villamena, Frederick A

    2016-03-15

    Hyperglycemia has been implicated in the development of endothelial dysfunction through heightened ROS production. Since nitrones reverse endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction, increase antioxidant enzyme activity, and suppress pro-apoptotic signaling pathway and mitochondrial dysfunction from ROS-induced toxicity, the objective of this study was to determine whether nitrone spin traps DMPO, PBN and PBN-LA were effective at duplicating these effects and improving glucose uptake in an in vitro model of hyperglycemia-induced dysfunction using bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). BAEC were cultured in DMEM medium with low (5.5mM glucose, LG) or high glucose (50mM, HG) for 14 days to model in vivo hyperglycemia as experienced in humans with metabolic disease. Improvements in cell viability, intracellular oxidative stress, NO and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)​ levels, mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose transport, and activity of antioxidant enzymes were measured from single treatment of BAEC with nitrones for 24h after hyperglycemia. Chronic hyperglycemia significantly increased intracellular ROS by 50%, decreased cell viability by 25%, reduced NO bioavailability by 50%, and decreased (BH4) levels by 15% thereby decreasing NO production. Intracellular glucose transport and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also decreased by 50% and 25% respectively. Nitrone (PBN and DMPO, 50 μM) treatment of BAEC grown in hyperglycemic conditions resulted in the normalization of outcome measures except for SOD and catalase activities. Our findings demonstrate that the nitrones reverse the deleterious effects of hyperglycemia in BAEC. We believe that in vivo testing of these nitrone compounds in models of cardiometabolic disease is warranted.

  9. Synthesis of an endothelial cell mimicking surface containing thrombomodulin and endothelial protein C receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kador, Karl Erich

    Synthetic materials for use in blood contacting applications have been studied for many years with limited success. One of the main areas of need for these materials is the design of synthetic vascular grafts for use in the hundreds of thousands of patients who have coronary artery bypass grafting, many without suitable veins for autologous grafts. The design of these grafts is constrained by two common modes of failure, the formation of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and thrombosis. IH formation has been previously linked to a mismatching of the mechanical properties of the graft and has been overcome by creating grafts using materials whose compliance mimics that of the native artery. Several techniques and surface modification have been designed to limit thrombosis on the surface of synthetic materials. One which has shown the greatest promise is the immobilization of Thrombomodulin (TM), a protein found on the endothelial cell membrane lining native blood vessels involved in the activation of the anticoagulant Protein C (PC). While TM immobilization has been shown to arrest thrombin formation and limit fibrous formations in in-vitro and in-vivo experiments, it has shown to be transport limiting under arterial flow. On the endothelial cell surface, TM is co-localized with Endothelial Protein C Receptor (EPCR), which increases PC transport onto the cell surface and increases PC activation via TM between 20-100 fold. This dissertation will describe the chemical modification of medical grade polyurethane (PU), whose compliance has been shown to match that of native arteries. This modification will enable the immobilization of two proteins on an enzymatically relevant scale estimated at less than 10 nm. This dissertation will further describe the immobilization of the proteins TM and EPCR, and analyze the ability of a surface co-immobilized with these proteins to activate the anticoagulant PC. Finally, it will compare the ability of this co-immobilized surface to delay

  10. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: ► Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. ► Endothelial VEGFR levels are

  11. A biphasic endothelial stress-survival mechanism regulates the cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factor A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, Antony M.; Odell, Adam F. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mughal, Nadeem A. [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Issitt, Theo; Ulyatt, Clare; Walker, John H. [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi [Leeds Vascular Institute, Leeds General Infirmary, Great George Street, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan, E-mail: s.ponnambalam@leeds.ac.uk [Endothelial Cell Biology Unit, School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is an essential cytokine that regulates endothelial function and angiogenesis. VEGF-A binding to endothelial receptor tyrosine kinases such as VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 triggers cellular responses including survival, proliferation and new blood vessel sprouting. Increased levels of a soluble VEGFR1 splice variant (sFlt-1) correlate with endothelial dysfunction in pathologies such as pre-eclampsia; however the cellular mechanism(s) underlying the regulation and function of sFlt-1 are unclear. Here, we demonstrate the existence of a biphasic stress response in endothelial cells, using serum deprivation as a model of endothelial dysfunction. The early phase is characterized by a high VEGFR2:sFlt-1 ratio, which is reversed in the late phase. A functional consequence is a short-term increase in VEGF-A-stimulated intracellular signaling. In the late phase, sFlt-1 is secreted and deposited at the extracellular matrix. We hypothesized that under stress, increased endothelial sFlt-1 levels reduce VEGF-A bioavailability: VEGF-A treatment induces sFlt-1 expression at the cell surface and VEGF-A silencing inhibits sFlt-1 anchorage to the extracellular matrix. Treatment with recombinant sFlt-1 inhibits VEGF-A-stimulated in vitro angiogenesis and sFlt-1 silencing enhances this process. In this response, increased VEGFR2 levels are regulated by the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and PKB/Akt signaling pathways and increased sFlt-1 levels by the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. We conclude that during serum withdrawal, cellular sensing of environmental stress modulates sFlt-1 and VEGFR2 levels, regulating VEGF-A bioavailability and ensuring cell survival takes precedence over cell proliferation and migration. These findings may underpin an important mechanism contributing to endothelial dysfunction in pathological states. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endothelial cells mount a stress response under conditions of low serum. Black

  12. Endothelial Surface Protrusion by a Point Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Lu, Lan; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2016-03-01

    During leukocyte rolling on the endothelium, surface protrusion and membrane tether extraction occur consecutively on leukocytes. Both surface protrusion and tether extraction of leukocytes stabilize leukocyte rolling. Tethers can also be extracted from endothelial cells (ECs), but surface protrusion of ECs has never been confirmed to exist. In this study, we examined EC surface protrusion with the micropipette aspiration technique. We found that, like leukocytes, surface protrusion on an EC did exist when a point force was imposed. Both the protrusional stiffness and the crossover force of EC surface protrusion were dependent on the force loading rate and the cytoskeletal integrity, but neither of them was dependent on tumor necrosis factor α stimulation. Temperature (37°C) affected the protrusional stiffness only at small force loading rates. When a neutrophil was employed to directly impose the pulling force on the EC, simultaneous surface protrusion from both cells occurred, and it can be modeled as two springs connected in series, although the spring constants should be adjusted according to the force loading rate. Therefore, EC surface protrusion is an important aspect of leukocyte rolling, and it should not be ignored when leukocyte rolling stability is studied systematically. PMID:26958891

  13. Cytoskeleton, cytoskeletal interactions, and vascular endothelial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Jingli Wang,1 Michael E Widlansky1,21Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine Division, 2Department of Pharmacology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USAAbstract: Far from being inert, the vascular endothelium is a critical regulator of vascular function. While the endothelium participates in autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine signaling, it also transduces mechanical signals from the cell surface involving key cell structural elements. In this review, we discuss the structure of the vascular endothelium and its relationship to traditional cardiovascular risk factors and clinical cardiovascular events. Further, we review the emerging evidence that cell structural elements, including the glycocalyx, intercellular junctions, and cytoskeleton elements, help the endothelium to communicate with its environment to regulate vascular function, including vessel permeability and signal transduction via nitric oxide bioavailability. Further work is necessary to better delineate the regulatory relationships between known key regulators of vascular function and endothelial cell structural elements.Keywords: endothelium, shear stress, eNOS, cardiovascular risk factors, glycocalyx

  14. The endothelial function in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, M

    2006-06-01

    Cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass exerts many different actions which modify the natural function of endothelial cells. The main determinant is the activation of the coagulation system both through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways, leading to an overwhelming thrombin formation. To counteract the coagulant effects of thrombin, heparin is used in large doses. As a result, the endothelium is asked to promote all its anticoagulant properties, basically through the AT release from the surface, the tissue factor pathway inhibitor release, and the activation of the protein C protein S system. At the end of cardiac operations, all these systems are depleted, and low levels of antithrombin, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, protein C are available for further anticoagulant effects. There is the evidence that levels of antithrombin activity below 50% at the end of cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass are associated to bad outcomes in terms of surgical revision rate, thromboembolic events, and neurological events. Exogenous antithrombin administration has a well defined action in limiting thrombin formation during cardiac operations; however, we are still lacking an evidence-based information about the clinical impact of this and others possible preventive strategies based on exogenous administration of antithrombin before or during cardiac operations. PMID:16682923

  15. Endothelial lipase is a major determinant of HDL level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Tatsuro; Choi, Sungshin; Kundu, Ramendra K.; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Rubin, Edward M.; Cooper, Allen D.; Quertermous, Thomas

    2003-01-30

    For the past three decades, epidemiologic studies have consistently demonstrated an inverse relationship between plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and coronary heart disease (CHD). Population-based studies have provided compelling evidence that low HDL-C levels are a risk factor for CHD, and several clinical interventions that increased plasma levels of HDL-C were associated with a reduction in CHD risk. These findings have stimulated extensive investigation into the determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. Turnover studies using radiolabeled apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein component of HDL, suggest that plasma HDL-C concentrations are highly correlated with the rate of clearance of apolipoprotein AI. However, the metabolic mechanisms by which HDL are catabolized have not been fully defined. Previous studies in humans with genetic deficiency of cholesteryl ester transfer protein, and in mice lacking the scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), have demonstrated that these proteins participate in the removal of cholesterol from HDL, while observations in individuals with mutations in hepatic lipase indicate that this enzyme hydrolyzes HDL triglycerides. In this issue of the JCI, reports from laboratories of Tom Quertermous and Dan Rader now indicate that endothelial lipase (LIPG), a newly identified member of the lipase family, catalyzes the hydrolysis of HDL phospholipids and facilitates the clearance of HDL from the circulation. Endothelial lipase was initially cloned by both of these laboratories using entirely different strategies. Quertermous and his colleagues identified endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells undergoing tube formation, whereas the Rader group cloned endothelial lipase as a transcript that was upregulated in the human macrophage-like cell line THP-1 exposed to oxidized LDL. Database searches revealed that endothelial lipase shows strong sequence similarity to lipoprotein

  16. The Protective Effects of Curcumin on Obesity-Related Glomerulopathy Are Associated with Inhibition of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Activation in Podocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-li Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of curcumin, one of the most important active ingredients of turmeric, on podocyte injury in vitro and obesity-related glomerulopathy (ORG in vivo. Cellular experiments in vitro showed that curcumin significantly antagonized leptin-induced downregulation of the mRNA and protein expression of podocyte-associated molecules including nephrin, podocin, podoplanin, and podocalyxin. Animal experiments in vivo showed that curcumin significantly reduced the body weight, Lee’s index, abdominal fat index, urinary protein excretion, and average glomerular diameter and significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expressions of the above podocyte-associated molecules in ORG mice. Furthermore, the experiments in vitro and in vivo both displayed that curcumin could downregulate the mRNA and protein expressions of Wnt1, Wnt2b, Wnt6, and β-catenin and upregulate the phosphorylation level of β-catenin protein in podocytes and renal tissue. In conclusion, curcumin is able to alleviate the harmful reaction of leptin on podocytes and reduce the severity of ORG. The above protective effects are associated with the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation in podocytes.

  17. Notch Signaling Activation in Cervical Cancer Cells Induces Cell Growth Arrest with the Involvement of the Nuclear Receptor NR4A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lichun; Liu, Mingqiu; Sun, Guang-Chun; Yang, Xu; Qian, Qingqing; Feng, Shuyu; Mackey, L. Vienna; Coy, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a second leading cancer death in women world-wide, with most cases in less developed countries. Notch signaling is highly conserved with its involvement in many cancers. In the present study, we established stable cervical cell lines with Notch activation and inactivation and found that Notch activation played a suppressive role in cervical cancer cells. Meanwhile, the transient overexpression of the active intracellular domain of all four Notch receptors (ICN1, 2, 3, and 4) also induced the suppression of cervical cancer Hela cell growth. ICN1 also induced cell cycle arrest at phase G1. Notch1 signaling activation affected the expression of serial genes, especially the genes associated with cAMP signaling, with an increase of genes like THBS1, VCL, p63, c-Myc and SCG2, a decrease of genes like NR4A2, PCK2 and BCL-2. Particularly, The nuclear receptor NR4A2 was observed to induce cell proliferation via MTT assay and reduce cell apoptosis via FACS assay. Furthermore, NR4A2's activation could reverse ICN1-induced suppression of cell growth while erasing ICN1-induced increase of tumor suppressor p63. These findings support that Notch signaling mediates cervical cancer cell growth suppression with the involvement of nuclear receptor NR4A2. Notably, Notch/NR4A2/p63 signaling cascade possibly is a new signling pathway undisclosed. PMID:27471554

  18. New thiazolidinediones affect endothelial cell activation and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Martina; Tripodi, Gustavo L; Ferrer, Renila; Boscá, Lisardo; Pitta, Marina G R; Pitta, Ivan R; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P

    2016-07-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists used in treating type 2 diabetes that may exhibit beneficial pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of three new TZDs [GQ-32 (3-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl-5-(4-nitro-benzylidene)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), GQ-169 (5-(4-chloro-benzylidene)-3-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), and LYSO-7 (5-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-ylmethylene)-3-(4-chlorobenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione)] on endothelial cells. The effects of the new TZDs were evaluated on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell migration, tube formation and the gene expression of adhesion molecules and angiogenic mediators in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). PPARγ activation by new TZDs was addressed with a reporter gene assay. The three new TZDs activated PPARγ and suppressed the tumor necrosis factor α-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. GQ-169 and LYSO-7 also inhibited the glucose-induced ROS production. Although NO production assessed with 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein-FM probe indicated that all tested TZDs enhanced intracellular levels of NO, only LYSO-7 treatment significantly increased the release of NO from HUVEC measured by chemiluminescence analysis of culture media. Additionally, GQ-32 and GQ-169 induced endothelial cell migration and tube formation by the up-regulation of angiogenic molecules expression, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A and interleukin 8. GQ-169 also increased the mRNA levels of basic fibroblast growth factor, and GQ-32 enhanced transforming growth factor-β expression. Together, the results of this study reveal that these new TZDs act as partial agonists of PPARγ and modulate endothelial cell activation and endothelial dysfunction besides to stimulate migration and tube formation. PMID:27108791

  19. Modulation of endothelial nitric oxide by plant-derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christoph A; Dirsch, Verena M

    2009-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), is recognised as a central anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic principle in the vasculature. Decreased availability of NO in the vasculature promotes the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated that a growing list of natural products, as components of the daily diet or phytomedical preparations, may improve vascular function by enhancing NO bioavailability. In this article we first outline common pathways modulating endothelial NO production or bioavailability to provide a basis for subsequent mechanistic discussions. Then we comprehensively review natural products and plant extracts known to positively influence eNOS activity and/or endothelial function in vitro or in vivo. We will discuss red wine, highlighting polyphenols, oligomeric procyanidins (OPC) and resveratrol as modulators of endothelial NO production. Other dietary products and their active components known to activate eNOS include cocoa (OPC and its monomer (-)-epicatechin), pomegranates (polyphenols), black and green tea (flavanoids, especially epigallocatechin gallate), olive oil (oleic acid and polyphenols), soy (genistein), and quercetin, one of the most abundant flavonoids in plants. In addition, phytomedical preparations made from ginkgo, hawthorn and ginseng, as well as formulations used in traditional Chinese Medicine, have been shown to affect endothelial NO production. Recurring phytochemical patterns among active fractions and purified compounds are discussed. In summary, there is increasing evidence that several single natural products and plant extracts influence endothelial NO production. Identification of such compounds and characterisation of their cellular actions may increase our knowledge of the regulation of endothelial NO production and could provide valuable clues for the prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19497380

  20. The endothelin system in breast tumour–endothelial cell interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Botha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of endothelin-1 (ET-1 and its receptors (ET-RA and ET-RB in tumour development and progression involves complex interactions. ET-1, produced by tumours and associated cells like endothelial cells, functions in an autocrine and paracrine manner to promote tumour angiogenesis. Thus, we hypothesised that endothelin, released into the tumour milieu by both tumours and the tumour vasculature, would influence angiogenesis. Therefore, this preliminary study aimed to investigate changes in ET1, ET-RA and ET-RB in breast tumour and microvascular endothelial cultures when each cell type was exposed directly to the other (co-culture model as well as to the conditioned-medium metabolites of the other (challenge model. ET-1 secretion was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and ET-1, ET-RA and ET-RB expression investigated by the linked streptavidin–biotin method. In challenge experiments, endothelial metabolites significantly increased secretion of breast tumour ET-1. Tumour metabolites promoted endothelial membrane projections with no effect on ET-1 secretion. ET-1 and its receptors were immunolocalised in both cell types, including in projections. Increasing cancer cell conditioned medium resulted in decreased endothelial ET-RA and increased ET-RB staining. Co-cultures demonstrated ET proteins in projections of both cell types as well as at heterogeneous contact points. The findings support a role for the endothelin system in endothelial cell and breast cancer cell invasion. It is tempting to consider that early endothelial and tumour cell alterations may be promoted by ET-1 produced by both cell types. Further work is required that will examine localised cellular gene expression of the endothelin system as well as its pro-invasive and angiogenic effects in breast cancer models.

  1. Synergism of matrix stiffness and vascular endothelial growth factor on mesenchymal stem cells for vascular endothelial regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Kathryn; Floren, Michael; Tan, Yan; Tseng, Pi Ou Nancy; Tan, Wei

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for vascular tissue regeneration. Research has demonstrated that individual factors in the cell microenvironment such as matrix elasticity and growth factors regulate MSC differentiation to vascular lineage. However, it is not well understood how matrix elasticity and growth factors combine to direct the MSC fate. This study examines the combined effects of matrix elasticity and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on both MSC differentiation into endothelial lineage and MSC paracrine signaling. MSCs were seeded in soft nanofibrous matrices with or without VEGF, and in Petri dishes with or without VEGF. Only MSCs seeded in three-dimensional soft matrices with VEGF showed significant increases in the expression of endothelial markers (vWF, eNOS, Flt-1, and Flk-1), while eliminating the expression of smooth muscle marker (SM-α-actin). MSCs cultured in VEGF alone on two-dimensional dishes showed increased expression of both early-stage endothelial and smooth muscle markers, indicating immature vascular differentiation. Furthermore, MSCs cultured in soft matrices with VEGF showed faster upregulation of endothelial markers compared with MSCs cultured in VEGF alone. Paracrine signaling studies found that endothelial cells cultured in the conditioned media from MSCs differentiated in the soft matrix and VEGF condition exhibited increased migration and formation of capillary-like structures. These results demonstrate that VEGF and soft matrix elasticity act synergistically to guide MSC differentiation into mature endothelial phenotype while enhancing paracrine signaling. Therefore, it is critical to control both mechanical and biochemical factors to safely regenerate vascular tissues with MSCs.

  2. Endothelial biocompatibility and accumulation of SPION under flow conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuszak, Jasmin; Zaloga, Jan; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Lyer, Stefan [Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), Else Kröner-Fresenius Stiftungsprofessur for Nanomedicine, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Nowak, Johannes; Odenbach, Stefan [Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, Measuring and Automation Technology, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), Else Kröner-Fresenius Stiftungsprofessur for Nanomedicine, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Cicha, Iwona, E-mail: Iwona_Cicha@yahoo.com [Section of Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine (SEON), Else Kröner-Fresenius Stiftungsprofessur for Nanomedicine, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic targeting is considered a promising method to accumulate the nanoparticles at the sites of atherosclerotic lesions, but little is known about the biological effects of magnetic nanoparticles on the vascular wall. Here, we investigated endothelial cell growth and vitality upon treatment with SPION (0–60 µg/mL) using two complementing methods: real-time cell analysis and live-cell microscopy. Moreover, the uptake of circulating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) was assessed in an in vitro model of arterial bifurcations. At the tested concentrations, SPIONs were well tolerated and had no major influence on endothelial cell growth. Our results further showed a uniform distribution of endothelial SPION uptake independent of channel geometry or hemodynamic conditions: In the absence of magnetic force, no increase in accumulation of SPIONs at non-uniform shear stress region at the outer walls of bifurcation was observed. Application of external magnet allowed enhanced accumulation of SPIONs at the regions of non-uniform shear stress. Increased uptake of SPIONs at non-uniform shear stress region was well tolerated by endothelial cells (ECs) and did not affect endothelial cell viability or attachment. These findings indicate that magnetic targeting can constitute a promising and safe technique for the delivery of imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles to atherosclerotic lesions.

  3. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampi, Marsha C; Faber, Courtney J; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  4. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha C Lampi

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  5. Reversibility of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes: role of polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganya, N; Bhakkiyalakshmi, E; Sarada, D V L; Ramkumar, K M

    2016-07-01

    The endothelium, a thin single sheet of endothelial cells, is a metabolically active layer that coats the inner surface of blood vessels and acts as an interface between the circulating blood and the vessel wall. The endothelium through the secretion of vasodilators and vasoconstrictors serves as a critical mediator of vascular homeostasis. During the development of the vascular system, it regulates cellular adhesion and vessel wall inflammation in addition to maintaining vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. A shift in the functions of the endothelium towards vasoconstriction, proinflammatory and prothrombic states characterise improper functioning of these cells, leading to endothelial dysfunction (ED), implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including diabetes. Major mechanisms of ED include the down-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase levels, differential expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress. ED tends to be the initial event in macrovascular complications such as coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, stroke and microvascular complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy. Numerous strategies have been developed to protect endothelial cells against various stimuli, of which the role of polyphenolic compounds in modulating the differentially regulated pathways and thus maintaining vascular homeostasis has been proven to be beneficial. This review addresses the factors stimulating ED in diabetes and the molecular mechanisms of natural polyphenol antioxidants in maintaining vascular homeostasis. PMID:27264638

  6. Endothelial Dysfunction and Amyloid-β-Induced Neurovascular Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Kenzo; Wang, Gang; Park, Laibaik

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebrovascular diseases share common vascular risk factors that have disastrous effects on cerebrovascular regulation. Endothelial cells, lining inner walls of cerebral blood vessels, form a dynamic interface between the blood and the brain and are critical for the maintenance of neurovascular homeostasis. Accordingly, injury in endothelial cells is regarded as one of the earliest symptoms of impaired vasoregulatory mechanisms. Extracellular buildup of amyloid-β (Aβ) is a central pathogenic factor in AD. Aβ exerts potent detrimental effects on cerebral blood vessels and impairs endothelial structure and function. Recent evidence implicates vascular oxidative stress and activation of the non-selective cationic channel transient receptor potential melastatin (TRPM)-2 on endothelial cells in the mechanisms of Aβ-induced neurovascular dysfunction. Thus, Aβ triggers opening of TRPM2 channels in endothelial cells leading to intracellular Ca(2+) overload and vasomotor dysfunction. The cerebrovascular dysfunction may contribute to AD pathogenesis by reducing the cerebral blood supply, leading to increased susceptibility to vascular insufficiency, and by promoting Aβ accumulation. The recent realization that vascular factors contribute to AD pathobiology suggests new targets for the prevention and treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:26328781

  7. Traction Forces of Endothelial Cells under Slow Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Cecile M.; Brugues, Agusti; Bazellieres, Elsa; Ricco, Pierre; Lacroix, Damien; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are constantly exposed to fluid shear stresses that regulate vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The mechanical responses of endothelial cells to relatively high shear flow such as that characteristic of arterial circulation has been extensively studied. Much less is known about the responses of endothelial cells to slow shear flow such as that characteristic of venous circulation, early angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, intracranial aneurysm, or interstitial flow. Here we used a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic technique to measure traction forces exerted by confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayers under slow shear flow. We found that cells respond to flow with rapid and pronounced increases in traction forces and cell-cell stresses. These responses are reversible in time and do not involve reorientation of the cell body. Traction maps reveal that local cell responses to slow shear flow are highly heterogeneous in magnitude and sign. Our findings unveil a low-flow regime in which endothelial cell mechanics is acutely responsive to shear stress. PMID:26488643

  8. SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suowen; Yin, Meimei; Koroleva, Marina; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Zhang, Wenbo; Bai, Peter; Little, Peter J.; Jin, Zheng Gen

    2016-01-01

    SIRT6 is an important member of sirtuin family that represses inflammation, aging and DNA damage, three of which are causing factors for endothelial dysfunction. SIRT6 expression is decreased in atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE−/− mice and human patients. However, the role of SIRT6 in regulating vascular endothelial function and atherosclerosis is not well understood. Here we show that SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Global and endothelium-specific SIRT6 knockout mice exhibited impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Moreover, SIRT6+/− haploinsufficient mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) also displayed impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Importantly, SIRT6+/−;ApoE−/− mice after HFD feeding exhibited exacerbated atherosclerotic lesion development, concurrent with increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine VCAM-1. Loss- and gain-of-SIRT6 function studies in cultured human endothelial cells (ECs) showed that SIRT6 attenuated monocyte adhesion to ECs. RNA-sequencing profiling revealed that SIRT6 overexpression decreased the expression of multiple atherosclerosis-related genes, including proatherogenic gene TNFSF4 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 4). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that SIRT6 decreased TNFSF4 gene expression by binding to and deacetylating H3K9 at TNFSF4 gene promoter. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that SIRT6 play a pivotal role in maintaining endothelial function and increased SIRT6 activity could be a new therapeutic strategy to combat atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27249230

  9. Endothelial function in normotensive and high-normal hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavnik, F L; Ajzen, S A; Christofalo, D M J; Barbosa, C S P; Kohlmann, O

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a mild increment in blood pressure level on endothelial function, we evaluated 61 healthy volunteers (24 women, 37 men, and aged 35-50 years). All subjects underwent a blood chemistry panel to exclude any metabolic abnormalities and were submitted to a Doppler ultrasound of the brachial artery to assess endothelial function. We assessed the endothelial response to reactive hyperaemia and exogenous nitric oxide administration considering an increase in systolic blood pressure (SBP) at each 10-mm Hg interval. Our study population was divided as follows: SBP or =115 mm Hg and or = 125 mm Hg and or = 135 mm Hg and < 140 mm Hg (SG4, n=15). We found a significant difference in flow-mediated dilation among SG2, SG3 and SG4, 16.2+/-5.6, 13.4+/-5.2 and 11.5+/-3.6%, P<0.05, respectively). After nitrate administration, we observed a nonsignificant decrease in brachial artery dilation among groups, P=0.217. Our data showed in a healthy normotensive population, without any risk factor for atherosclerotic disease that small increases in SBP but not in diastolic blood pressure may impair endothelial function even in subjects considered as high-normal, meaning that this population deserves more attention than usually ascribed to intervene and prevent complications, as endothelial dysfunction may represent an early change in those who develop hypertension later in life. PMID:17287837

  10. Infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis exacerbates endothelial injury in obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Ao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A number of studies have revealed a link between chronic periodontitis and cardiovascular disease in obese patients. However, there is little information about the influence of periodontitis-associated bacteria, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, on pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity. METHODS: In vivo experiment: C57BL/6J mice were fed with a high-fat diet (HFD or normal chow diet (CD, as a control. Pg was infected from the pulp chamber. At 6 weeks post-infection, histological and immunohistochemical analysis of aortal tissues was performed. In vitro experiment: hTERT-immortalized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HuhT1 were used to assess the effect of Pg/Pg-LPS on free fatty acid (FFA induced endothelial cells apoptosis and regulation of cytokine gene expression. RESULTS: Weaker staining of CD31 and increased numbers of TUNEL positive cells in aortal tissue of HFD mice indicated endothelial injury. Pg infection exacerbated the endothelial injury. Immunohistochemically, Pg was detected deep in the smooth muscle of the aorta, and the number of Pg cells in the aortal wall was higher in HFD mice than in CD mice. Moreover, in vitro, FFA treatment induced apoptosis in HuhT1 cells and exposure to Pg-LPS increased this effect. In addition, Pg and Pg-LPS both attenuated cytokine production in HuhT1 cells stimulated by palmitate. CONCLUSIONS: Dental infection of Pg may contribute to pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by accelerating FFA-induced endothelial injury.

  11. Acrylamide induces accelerated endothelial aging in a human cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Cyril; Boulanger, Eric; Maladry, François; Tessier, Frédéric J; Lorenzi, Rodrigo; Nevière, Rémi; Desreumaux, Pierre; Beuscart, Jean-Baptiste; Puisieux, François; Grossin, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Acrylamide (AAM) has been recently discovered in food as a Maillard reaction product. AAM and glycidamide (GA), its metabolite, have been described as probably carcinogenic to humans. It is widely established that senescence and carcinogenicity are closely related. In vitro, endothelial aging is characterized by replicative senescence in which primary cells in culture lose their ability to divide. Our objective was to assess the effects of AAM and GA on human endothelial cell senescence. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured in vitro were used as model. HUVECs were cultured over 3 months with AAM or GA (1, 10 or 100 μM) until growth arrest. To analyze senescence, β-galactosidase activity and telomere length of HUVECs were measured by cytometry and semi-quantitative PCR, respectively. At all tested concentrations, AAM or GA reduced cell population doubling compared to the control condition (p < 0.001). β-galactosidase activity in endothelial cells was increased when exposed to AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (≥1 μM) (p < 0.05). AAM (≥10 μM) or GA (100 μM) accelerated telomere shortening in HUVECs (p < 0.05). In conclusion, in vitro chronic exposure to AAM or GA at low concentrations induces accelerated senescence. This result suggests that an exposure to AAM might contribute to endothelial aging.

  12. The effects of glucocorticoids on cultured human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maca, R D; Fry, G L; Hoak, J C

    1978-04-01

    The effects of hydrocortisone, dexamethasone and prednisone on the morphology, replication, DNA synthesis, cell protein content and protein synthesis of cultured, human endothelial cells were evaluated. After culturing the cells with these glucocorticoids for 24-48 h, the cells covered a greater portion of the culture surface area. The mean surface area of the individual endothelial cell treated with glucocorticoids was 1.53 times greater than that of the untreated control endothelial cell. When compared with controls, the endothelial cover provided by the cells treated with glucocorticoids was more extensive and in many instances covered the entire culture surface. The change in morphology was associated with an increase in protein synthesis and protein content of the cells without an increase in DNA synthesis or cellular replication. Dexamethasone was approximately 10-fold more effective than hydrocortisone, while prednisone was the least effective. Aldosterone, DOCA, testosterone, progesterone, oestradiol and oestriol were ineffective. These studies indicate that glucocorticoids can alter the morphology and biochemistry of cultured endothelial cells and may have implications for the effects of steroids in the treatment of thrombocytopenic states and vascular disorders in man. PMID:646949

  13. Experiment Study of Effect of Perfiuorohexyloctane on Corneal Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Ding; Chunfang Li; Lin Lu; Guanguang Feng; Huling Zheng

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of Perfluorohexyloctane (F6H8)on corneal endothelial celIs(CEC) of rabbit eyes. Methods: Fifteen New Zealand white rabbits were devided into two groups:experimental group(F6H8) and control group(BSS) . All rabbits underwent anterior chamber injection of 0. 15ml F6H8 or BSS. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy and corneal endothelium photography were performed pre-operatively and postoperatively. Histopathological examination and Transmission electron microscopy(TEM) were done after the rabbits were sacrificed. Results: All the corneas were clear. Since 4 weeks after operation, the endothelial cells were markedly irregular in size and shape and the number of endothelial cells was markedly decreased. Multilayered retrocorneal membranes (RCM)grew gradually 2 weeks after surgery. Vacuolar degeneration was seen in some endothelial cells. Nuclear degeneration and edema of plasma were seen in TEM. Conclusion: Corneal endothelial cell degenerated after contacting with F6H8 for 2 ~4weeks. As a silicone solvent, it should be removed completely after injection. We don't recommend it to be used as a new intraocular temponade. Eye Science 2001: 17:21 ~ 26.

  14. Endothelial cells regulate neural crest and second heart field morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Milgrom-Hoffman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac and craniofacial developmental programs are intricately linked during early embryogenesis, which is also reflected by a high frequency of birth defects affecting both regions. The molecular nature of the crosstalk between mesoderm and neural crest progenitors and the involvement of endothelial cells within the cardio–craniofacial field are largely unclear. Here we show in the mouse that genetic ablation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Flk1 in the mesoderm results in early embryonic lethality, severe deformation of the cardio–craniofacial field, lack of endothelial cells and a poorly formed vascular system. We provide evidence that endothelial cells are required for migration and survival of cranial neural crest cells and consequently for the deployment of second heart field progenitors into the cardiac outflow tract. Insights into the molecular mechanisms reveal marked reduction in Transforming growth factor beta 1 (Tgfb1 along with changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM composition. Our collective findings in both mouse and avian models suggest that endothelial cells coordinate cardio–craniofacial morphogenesis, in part via a conserved signaling circuit regulating ECM remodeling by Tgfb1.

  15. Healing arterial ulcers: Endothelial lining regeneration upon vascular denudation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Austin I; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Thrombosis and restenosis are the most prevalent late complications of coronary artery stenting. Current standards of clinical care focus on prevention of smooth muscle cell proliferation by the use of drug-eluting stents able to release anti-proliferative drugs. Unfortunately, these drugs also block endothelial cell proliferation and, in this manner, prevent recovery of endothelial cell coverage. Continued lack of endothelial repair leaves the root cause of thrombosis and restenosis unchanged, creating a vicious cycle where drug-mediated prevention of restenosis simultaneously implies promotion of thrombosis. In this issue of Vascular Pharmacology, Hussner and colleagues provide in vitro evidence and a mechanistic basis for the use of atorvastatin in stents as a way to bypass this roadblock. Here we review the pathological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches to restore flow in occluded arteries. We argue that rational design of drug eluting stents should focus on specific inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation with concurrent stimulation of endothelial regeneration. We comment on the current poor understanding of the cellular and molecular regulation of endothelial cell proliferation in the context of a functional artery, and on the pitfalls of extrapolating from the well-studied process of neovascularization by sprouting vessel formation.

  16. Effect of Antioxidants on Endothelial Cell Reactive Oxygen Species (ROI) Generation and Adhesion of Leukocytes to Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Qian; Michael Grafe; Kristoph Graf; Hans Lehmkuhl; Eckart Fleck

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether antioxidants inhibit adhesion of leukocytes to endothelium and furthermore, whether all antioxidants regulate NF-κB activation through a redox sensitive mechanism. Methods The effect of the antioxidative substances pyrrolidin dithiocarbamat (PDTC),dichloroisocumarin (DCI), chrysin and probucol on the endothelial leukocyte adhesion were examined under near physiological flow conditions. The antioxidative activity of antioxidants was measured in a DCF fluorescence assay with flow cytometry. The activation of NF-κB in endothelial cells was investigated in a gel shift assay. Results PDTC and probucol did not show an inhibitory effect to the formation of intracellular H2O2 in TNFct activated human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) . Chrysin showed a moderate effect.DCI showed a strong antioxidative effect. In contrast,PDTC and chrysin inhibited the adhesion of HL 60 cells to TNFa-stimulated HUVEC. DCI and probucol did not have influence on the adhesion within the area of the examined shear stresses. Only PDTC inhibited the TNFα-induced activation of NF-kB in endothelial cells.Conclusion The inhibition of the endothelial leukocyte adhesion by antioxidative substances is not to be explained by its antioxidative characteristics only. The inhibitory effect of PDTC on NF-kB activation was probably not related to its antioxidative properties.

  17. Interleukin 3 stimulates proliferation and triggers endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 gene activation of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzi, M F; Garbarino, G; Rossi, P R; Pagliardi, G L; Arduino, C; Avanzi, G C; Pegoraro, L

    1993-06-01

    Proliferation and functional activation of endothelial cells within a tissue site of inflammation are regulated by humoral factors released by cells, such as T lymphocytes and monocytes, infiltrating the perivascular space. In the present study we investigated the effects of interleukin 3 (IL-3), an activated T lymphocyte-derived cytokine, on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Proliferative activity, evaluated both by estimation of the fraction of cells in the S phase and by direct cell count demonstrated that IL-3, at the dose of 25 ng/ml, enhances more than threefold both DNA synthesis and cell proliferation above baseline control conditions. Binding studies with radioiodinated ligand demonstrated that HUVEC constitutively express a smaller number of IL-3 binding sites (approximately 99 binding sites per cell, with an apparent Kd of 149 pM). Accordingly, molecular analysis showed the presence of transcripts for both alpha and beta subunits of the IL-3 receptor. Functional activation of endothelial cells was evaluated by the expression of the endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1) transcript and by leukocyte adhesion. The ELAM-1 gene transcript was clearly detectable 4 h after IL-3 addition and started to decrease after 12 h. Moreover, IL-3-induced ELAM-1 transcription was followed by enhanced adhesion of neutrophils and CD4+ T cells to HUVEC. The findings that IL-3 can stimulate both proliferation and functional activation of endothelial cells suggest that this cytokine can be involved in sustaining the process of chronic inflammation.

  18. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  19. Arginase Inhibitor in the Pharmacological Correction of Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihail V. Pokrovskiy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about a way of correction of endothelial dysfunction with the inhibitor of arginase: L-norvaline. There is an imbalance between vasoconstriction and vasodilatation factors of endothelium on the basis of endothelial dysfunction. Among vasodilatation agents, nitrogen oxide plays the basic role. Amino acid L-arginine serves as a source of molecules of nitrogen oxide in an organism. Because of the high activity of arginase enzyme which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-arginine into ornithine and urea, the bioavailability of nitrogen oxide decreases. The inhibitors of arginase suppress the activity of the given enzyme, raising and production of nitrogen oxide, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  20. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension, bone marrow, endothelial cell precursors and serotonin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayme-Dietrich, Estelle; Banas, Sophie M; Monassier, Laurent; Maroteaux, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin and bone-marrow-derived stem cells participate together in triggering pulmonary hypertension. Our work has shown that the absence of 5-HT2B receptors generates permanent changes in the composition of the blood and bone-marrow in the myeloid lineages, particularly in endothelial cell progenitors. The initial functions of 5-HT2B receptors in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are restricted to bone-marrow cells. They contribute to the differentiation/proliferation/mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells from the bone-marrow. Those bone-marrow-derived cells have a critical role in the development of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular remodeling. These data indicate that bone-marrow derived endothelial progenitors play a key role in the pathogenesis of PAH and suggest that interactions involving serotonin and bone morphogenic protein type 2 receptor (BMPR2) could take place at the level of the bone-marrow. PMID:27687599

  1. Brain endothelial TAK1 and NEMO safeguard the neurovascular unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridder, Dirk A.; Wenzel, Jan; Müller, Kristin; Töllner, Kathrin; Tong, Xin-Kang; Assmann, Julian C.; Stroobants, Stijn; Weber, Tobias; Niturad, Cristina; Fischer, Lisanne; Lembrich, Beate; Wolburg, Hartwig; Grand’Maison, Marilyn; Papadopoulos, Panayiota; Korpos, Eva; Truchetet, Francois; Rades, Dirk; Sorokin, Lydia M.; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Bedell, Barry J.; Pasparakis, Manolis; Balschun, Detlef; D’Hooge, Rudi; Löscher, Wolfgang; Hamel, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), a key component of NF-κB signaling, cause the genetic disease incontinentia pigmenti (IP). This leads to severe neurological symptoms, but the mechanisms underlying brain involvement were unclear. Here, we show that selectively deleting Nemo or the upstream kinase Tak1 in brain endothelial cells resulted in death of endothelial cells, a rarefaction of brain microvessels, cerebral hypoperfusion, a disrupted blood–brain barrier (BBB), and epileptic seizures. TAK1 and NEMO protected the BBB by activating the transcription factor NF-κB and stabilizing the tight junction protein occludin. They also prevented brain endothelial cell death in a NF-κB–independent manner by reducing oxidative damage. Our data identify crucial functions of inflammatory TAK1–NEMO signaling in protecting the brain endothelium and maintaining normal brain function, thus explaining the neurological symptoms associated with IP. PMID:26347470

  2. Endothelial perturbations and therapeutic strategies in normal tissue radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most cancer patients are treated with radiotherapy, but the treatment can also damage the surrounding normal tissue. Radiotherapy side-effects diminish patients’ quality of life, yet effective biological interventions for normal tissue damage are lacking. Protecting microvascular endothelial cells from the effects of irradiation is emerging as a targeted damage-reduction strategy. We illustrate the concept of the microvasculature as a mediator of overall normal tissue radiation toxicity through cell death, vascular inflammation (hemodynamic and molecular changes) and a change in functional capacity. Endothelial cell targeted therapies that protect against such endothelial cell perturbations and the development of acute normal tissue damage are mostly under preclinical development. Since acute radiation toxicity is a common clinical problem in cutaneous, gastrointestinal and mucosal tissues, we also focus on damage in these tissues

  3. Endothelial glycocalyx dimensions are reduced in growing collateral arteries and modulate leucocyte adhesion in arteriogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, Sebastian; Schirmer, Stephan H.; Hekking, Liesbeth H. P.; Post, Jan Andries; Ionita, Mihaela G.; de Groot, Daphne; van Royen, Niels; van den Berg, Bernard; Vink, Hans; Moser, Martin; Bode, Christoph; de Kleijn, Dominique; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Piek, Jan J.; Hoefer, Imo E.

    2009-01-01

    During collateral artery growth, monocytes adhere to the endothelium and secrete cytokines from the perivascular space promoting arteriogenesis. Recently, the endothelial glycocalyx has been shown to modulate leucocyte infiltration in atherogenic regions. The role of this endothelial surface coating

  4. Carbon black nanoparticles promote endothelial activation and lipid accumulation in macrophages independently of intracellular ROS production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yi; Roursgaard, Martin; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh;

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) may cause vascular effects including endothelial dysfunction and foam cell formation, with oxidative stress and inflammation as supposed central mechanisms. We investigated oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation caused by nano-sized carbon...

  5. Is manual counting of corneal endothelial cell density in eye banks still acceptable? The French experience

    OpenAIRE

    Thuret, G; Manissolle, C; Acquart, S.; Petit, J-C Le; Maugery, J; Campos-Guyotat, L; Doughty, M J; Gain, P

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To examine the differences in manual endothelial cell counting methods in French eye banks and to analyse whether these differences could explain some substantial discrepancies observed in endothelial cell density (ECD) for corneas made available for transplant.

  6. Phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediates vascular endothelial growth factor-induced penile erection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicki, Biljana; Palese, Michael A; Crone, Julie K; Burnett, Arthur L

    2004-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced penile erection is mediated by activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) through its phosphorylation. We assessed the role of constitutively activated eNOS in VEGF-induced penile erection using wild-type (WT) and eNOS-knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice with and without vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. Adult WT and eNOS(-/-) mice were subjected to sham operation or bilateral castration to induce vasculogenic erectile dysfunction. At the time of surgery, animals were injected intracavernosally with a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing human VEGF145 (10(9) particle units) or with empty virus (Ad.Null). After 7 days, erectile function was assessed in response to cavernous nerve electrical stimulation. Total and phosphorylated protein kinase B (Akt) as well as total and phosphorylated eNOS were quantitatively assessed in mice penes using Western immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. In intact WT mice, VEGF145 significantly increased erectile responses, and in WT mice after castration, it completely recovered penile erection. However, VEGF145 failed to increase erectile responses in intact eNOS(-/-) mice and only partially recovered erectile function in castrated eNOS(-/-) mice. In addition, VEGF145 significantly increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Serine 1177 by approximately 2-fold in penes of both intact and castrated WT mice. The data provide a molecular explanation for VEGF stimulatory effect on penile erection, which involves phosphorylated eNOS (Serine 1177) mediation. PMID:14522830

  7. Glucagon-like peptide-1 activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li DING; Jin ZHANG

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) on endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs),and elucidate whether GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) and GLP-1(9-36) are involved in these effects.Methods:HUVECs were used.The activity of eNOS was measured with NOS assay kit.Phosphorylated and total eNOS proteins were detected using Western blot analysis.The level of eNOS mRNA was quantified with real-time RT-PCR.Results:Incubation of HUVECs with GLP-1 (50-5000 pmol/L) for 30 min significantly increased the activity of eNOS.Incubation of HUVECs with GLP-1 (500-5000 pmol/L) for 5 or 10 min increased eNOS phosphorylated at ser-1177.Incubation with GLP-1 (5000 pmol/L) for 48 h elevated the level of eNOS protein,did not affect the level of eNOS mRNA.GLP-1R agonists exenatide and GLP-1(9-36) at the concentration of 5000 pmol/L increased the activity,phosphorylation and protein level of eNOS.GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) or DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin,which abolished GLP-1(9-36) formation,at the concentration of 5000 pmol/L partially blocked the effects of GLP-1 on eNOS.Conclusion:GLP-1 upregulated the activity and protein expression of eNOS in HUVECs through the GLP-1R-dependent and GLP-1(9-36)-related pathways.GLP-1 may prevent or delay the formation of atherosclerosis in diabetes mellitus by improving the function of eNOS.

  8. Characterization of vascular endothelial progenitor cells from chicken bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Chunyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are a type of stem cell used in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and regeneration. At present, most of the EPCs studied are from human and mouse, whereas the study of poultry-derived EPCs has rarely been reported. In the present study, chicken bone marrow-derived EPCs were isolated and studied at the cellular level using immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Results We found that the majority of chicken EPCs were spindle shaped. The growth-curves of chicken EPCs at passages (P 1, -5 and -9 were typically “S”-shaped. The viability of chicken EPCs, before and after cryopreservation was 92.2% and 81.1%, respectively. Thus, cryopreservation had no obvious effects on the viability of chicken EPCs. Dil-ac-LDL and FITC-UAE-1 uptake assays and immunofluorescent detection of the cell surface markers CD34, CD133, VEGFR-2 confirmed that the cells obtained in vitro were EPCs. Observation of endothelial-specific Weibel-Palade bodies using transmission electron microscopy further confirmed that the cells were of endothelial lineage. In addition, chicken EPCs differentiated into endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells upon induction with VEGF and PDGF-BB, respectively, suggesting that the chicken EPCs retained multipotency in vitro. Conclusions These results suggest that chicken EPCs not only have strong self-renewal capacity, but also the potential to differentiate into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This research provides theoretical basis and experimental evidence for potential therapeutic application of endothelial progenitor cells in the treatment of atherosclerosis, vascular injury and diabetic complications.

  9. Recovery of Corneal Endothelial Cells from Periphery after Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ouk Choi

    Full Text Available Wound healing of the endothelium occurs through cell enlargement and migration. However, the peripheral corneal endothelium may act as a cell resource for the recovery of corneal endothelium in endothelial injury.To investigate the recovery process of corneal endothelial cells (CECs from corneal endothelial injury.Three patients with unilateral chemical eye injuries, and 15 rabbit eyes with corneal endothelial chemical injuries were studied. Slit lamp examination, specular microscopy, and ultrasound pachymetry were performed immediately after chemical injury and 1, 3, 6, and 9 months later. The anterior chambers of eyes from New Zealand white rabbits were injected with 0.1 mL of 0.05 N NaOH for 10 min (NaOH group. Corneal edema was evaluated at day 1, 7, and 14. Vital staining was performed using alizarin red and trypan blue.Specular microscopy did not reveal any corneal endothelial cells immediately after injury. Corneal edema subsided from the periphery to the center, CEC density increased, and central corneal thickness decreased over time. In the animal study, corneal edema was greater in the NaOH group compared to the control at both day 1 and day 7. At day 1, no CECs were detected at the center and periphery of the corneas in the NaOH group. Two weeks after injury, small, hexagonal CECs were detected in peripheral cornea, while CECs in mid-periphery were large and non-hexagonal.CECs migrated from the periphery to the center of the cornea after endothelial injury. The peripheral corneal endothelium may act as a cell resource for the recovery of corneal endothelium.

  10. Endothelial function in male body builders taking anabolic androgenic steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Hashemi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adverse cardiovascular events have been reported in body builders taking anabolic steroids. Adverse effects of AAS on endothelial function can initiate atherosclerosis. This study evaluates endothelial function in body builders using AAS, compared with non-steroids using athletes as controls. Methods: We recruited 30 nonsmoking male body builders taking AAS, 14 in build up phase, 8 in work out phase, and 8 in post steroid phase, and 30 nonsmoking male athletes who denied ever using steroids. Serum lipids and fasting plasma glucose were measured to exclude dyslipidemia and diabetes. Brachial artery diameter was measured by ultrasound at rest, after cuff inflation, and after sublingual glyceriltrinitrate (GTN to determine flow mediated dilation (FMD, nitro mediated dilation (NMD and ratio of FMD to NMD (index of endothelial function. Result: Use of AAS was associated with higher body mass index (BMI and low density lipoprotein–cholesterol (LDL-C. Mean ratio of flow mediated dilatation after cuff deflation to post GTN dilatation of brachial artery (index of endothelial function in body builders taking AAS was significantly lower than control group (0.96(0.05 versus 1(0.08; p=0.03. After adjusting BMI, age and weight, no significant difference was seen in index of endothelial function between two groups (p=0 .21. Conclusion: Our study indicates that taking AAS in body builders doesn’t have direct effect on endothelial function. Future study with bigger sample size and measurement of AAS metabolites is recommended. Key words: endothelium, lipids, anabolic steroids, body builders

  11. Opioid-induced proliferation of vascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Leo

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sandra Leo1,2, Rony Nuydens1, Theo F Meert11Pain and Neurology, CNS Department, Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, a division of Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V, Beerse, Belgium; 2Laboratory of Biological Psychology, University of Leuven, Leuven, BelgiumAbstract: Angiogenesis is an important issue in cancer research and opioids are often used to treat pain in cancer patients. Therefore it is important to know if the use of opioids is associated with an aberrant stimulation of tumor growth triggered by the stimulation of angiogenesis in cancer patients. Some studies in the literature have suggested the presence of the μ3 opioid receptor, known as the receptor for many opioids, on endothelial cells, which are key players in the process of angiogenesis. In this study we used endothelial cells known to express the μ3 opioid receptor (MOR3, to evaluate the effects of morphine on angiogenesis. We first investigated the effect of morphine on the proliferation of endothelial cells. We showed that morphine is able to stimulate vascular endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. This effect of morphine is mediated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway as pre-treatment with PD98059 inhibited this excessive proliferation. Because previous studies indicated nitric oxide (NO as a downstream messenger we investigated the role of NO in the aberrant proliferation of endothelial cells. Our data could not confirm these findings using intracellular NO measurements and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The potential use and pitfalls of opioids in cancer patients is discussed in light of these negative findings. Keywords: endothelial cells, morphine, cell proliferation, MAPK, nitric oxide, μ3 opioid receptor, angiogenesis

  12. SIRT1 regulates endothelial Notch signaling in lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 acts as a key regulator of vascular endothelial homeostasis, angiogenesis, and endothelial dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanism for SIRT1-mediated lung carcinoma angiogenesis remains unknown. Herein, we report that the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide 1 (NAD1-dependent deacetylase SIRT1 can function as an intrinsic negative modulator of Delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4/Notch signaling in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC xenograft-derived vascular endothelial cells (lung cancer-derived ECs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SIRT1 negatively regulates Notch1 intracellular domain (N1IC and Notch1 target genes HEY1 and HEY2 in response to Delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4 stimulation. Furthermore, SIRT1 deacetylated and repressed N1IC expression. Quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP analysis and gene reporter assay demonstrated that SIRT1 bound to one highly conserved region, which was located at approximately -500 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of Notch1,and repressed Notch1 transcription. Inhibition of endothelial cell growth and sprouting angiogenesis by DLL4/Notch signaling was enhanced in SIRT1-silenced lung cancer-derived EC and rescued by Notch inhibitor DAPT. In vivo, an increase in proangiogenic activity was observed in Matrigel plugs from endothelial-specific SIRT1 knock-in mice. SIRT1 also enhanced tumor neovascularization and tumor growth of LLC xenografts. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that SIRT1 facilitates endothelial cell branching and proliferation to increase vessel density and promote lung tumor growth through down-regulation of DLL4/Notch signaling and deacetylation of N1IC. Thus, targeting SIRT1 activity or/and gene expression may represent a novel mechanism in the treatment of lung cancer.

  13. Antiangiogenic effects of melatonin in endothelial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-García, Virginia; González, Alicia; Alonso-González, Carolina; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Cos, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Endothelial cells represent one of the critical cellular elements in tumor microenvironment playing a crucial role in the growth and progression of cancer through controlling angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) produced from tumor cells is essential for the expansion of breast cancer and may function in both paracrine and autocrine manners to promote proliferation, growth, survival and migration of endothelial cells. Since melatonin regulates tumor microenvironment by decreasing the secretion of VEGF by malignant epithelial cells and also regulates VEGF expression in human breast cancer cells, the aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-angiogenic activity of melatonin against the pro-angiogenic effects of breast cancer cells. In this work, we demonstrate that melatonin strongly inhibited the proliferation as well as invasion/migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Melatonin disrupted tube formation and counteracted the VEGF-stimulated tubular network formation by HUVEC. In addition, conditioned media collected from human breast cancer cells were angiogenically active and stimulated tubule length formation and this effect was significantly counteracted by the addition of anti-VEGF or melatonin. Melatonin also disintegrated preformed capillary network. All these findings demonstrate that melatonin may play a role in the paracrine interactions that take place between malignant epithelial cells and proximal endothelial cells. Melatonin could be important in reducing endothelial cell proliferation, invasion, migration and tube formation, through a downregulatory action on VEGF. Taken together, our findings suggest that melatonin could potentially be beneficial as an antiangiogenic agent in breast cancer with possible future clinical applications. PMID:23473980

  14. Endothelial progenitors in sepsis: vox clamantis in deserto?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goligorsky, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    In this issue of Critical Care, Patschan and colleagues present a study of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in patients with sepsis. The importance of this study is in focusing attention on several frequently ignored aspects of sepsis. Among those are the phenomenon of microvascular dysfunction, which is potentially responsible for profound metabolic perturbations at the tissue level, and the role of endothelial progenitors in repair processes. Other important aspects of the study are the regenerative capacity of mobilized EPCs and the dissociation between the numerical value and clonogenic competence. Attempting to restore the competence to EPCs should be a priority in the future. PMID:21489327

  15. Berberine protects vascular endothelial cells in hypertensive rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yang; Ding, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to investigate the effect and mechanism of berberine on vascular endothelial cell injury. Methods: The isolated aortic endothelial cells were divided into negative control group, spontaneous hypertension group, and berberine group (1.25, 2.5, and 5 μmol/L berberine). CCK-8 assay was performed to detect cell proliferation. Annexin V-FITC flow cytometry and Hochest33342/PI staining were used to measure cell apoptosis. Expression of TLR4, Myd88, and NF-κB was detected wi...

  16. Involvement of local lamellipodia in endothelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Jerome W; Zhang, Xun E; Worthylake, Rebecca A; Souza-Smith, Flavia M

    2015-01-01

    Recently we observed that endothelial cells cultured in tightly confluent monolayers display frequent local lamellipodia, and that thrombin, an agent that increases endothelial permeability, reduces lamellipodia protrusions. This led us to test the hypothesis that local lamellipodia contribute to endothelial barrier function. Movements of subcellular structures containing GFP-actin or VE-cadherin-GFP expressed in endothelial cells were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of endothelial barrier function. Changes in both lamellipodia dynamics and TER were assessed during baseline and after cells were treated with either the barrier-disrupting agent thrombin, or the barrier-stabilizing agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin was used to selectively block lamellipodia formation, and was used to test their role in the barrier function of endothelial cell monolayers and isolated, perfused rat mesenteric venules. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Rac1 and RhoA activation were evaluated using G-LISA assays. The role of Rac1 was tested with the specific inhibitor NSC23766 or by expressing wild-type or dominant negative GFP-Rac1. The results show that thrombin rapidly decreased both TER and the lamellipodia protrusion frequency. S1P rapidly increased TER in association with increased protrusion frequency. Blebbistatin nearly abolished local lamellipodia protrusions while cortical actin fibers and stress fibers remained intact. Blebbistatin also significantly decreased TER of cultured endothelial cells and increased permeability of isolated rat mesenteric venules. Both thrombin and S1P increased MLC phosphorylation and activation of RhoA. However, thrombin and S1P had differential impacts on Rac1, correlating with the changes in TER and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. Overexpression of Rac1 elevated, while NSC23766 and

  17. Involvement of local lamellipodia in endothelial barrier function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome W Breslin

    Full Text Available Recently we observed that endothelial cells cultured in tightly confluent monolayers display frequent local lamellipodia, and that thrombin, an agent that increases endothelial permeability, reduces lamellipodia protrusions. This led us to test the hypothesis that local lamellipodia contribute to endothelial barrier function. Movements of subcellular structures containing GFP-actin or VE-cadherin-GFP expressed in endothelial cells were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER served as an index of endothelial barrier function. Changes in both lamellipodia dynamics and TER were assessed during baseline and after cells were treated with either the barrier-disrupting agent thrombin, or the barrier-stabilizing agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P. The myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin was used to selectively block lamellipodia formation, and was used to test their role in the barrier function of endothelial cell monolayers and isolated, perfused rat mesenteric venules. Myosin light chain (MLC phosphorylation was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Rac1 and RhoA activation were evaluated using G-LISA assays. The role of Rac1 was tested with the specific inhibitor NSC23766 or by expressing wild-type or dominant negative GFP-Rac1. The results show that thrombin rapidly decreased both TER and the lamellipodia protrusion frequency. S1P rapidly increased TER in association with increased protrusion frequency. Blebbistatin nearly abolished local lamellipodia protrusions while cortical actin fibers and stress fibers remained intact. Blebbistatin also significantly decreased TER of cultured endothelial cells and increased permeability of isolated rat mesenteric venules. Both thrombin and S1P increased MLC phosphorylation and activation of RhoA. However, thrombin and S1P had differential impacts on Rac1, correlating with the changes in TER and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. Overexpression of Rac1 elevated

  18. Involvement of Local Lamellipodia in Endothelial Barrier Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Jerome W.; Zhang, Xun E.; Worthylake, Rebecca A.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we observed that endothelial cells cultured in tightly confluent monolayers display frequent local lamellipodia, and that thrombin, an agent that increases endothelial permeability, reduces lamellipodia protrusions. This led us to test the hypothesis that local lamellipodia contribute to endothelial barrier function. Movements of subcellular structures containing GFP-actin or VE-cadherin-GFP expressed in endothelial cells were recorded using time-lapse microscopy. Transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) served as an index of endothelial barrier function. Changes in both lamellipodia dynamics and TER were assessed during baseline and after cells were treated with either the barrier-disrupting agent thrombin, or the barrier-stabilizing agent sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). The myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin was used to selectively block lamellipodia formation, and was used to test their role in the barrier function of endothelial cell monolayers and isolated, perfused rat mesenteric venules. Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Rac1 and RhoA activation were evaluated using G-LISA assays. The role of Rac1 was tested with the specific inhibitor NSC23766 or by expressing wild-type or dominant negative GFP-Rac1. The results show that thrombin rapidly decreased both TER and the lamellipodia protrusion frequency. S1P rapidly increased TER in association with increased protrusion frequency. Blebbistatin nearly abolished local lamellipodia protrusions while cortical actin fibers and stress fibers remained intact. Blebbistatin also significantly decreased TER of cultured endothelial cells and increased permeability of isolated rat mesenteric venules. Both thrombin and S1P increased MLC phosphorylation and activation of RhoA. However, thrombin and S1P had differential impacts on Rac1, correlating with the changes in TER and lamellipodia protrusion frequency. Overexpression of Rac1 elevated, while NSC23766 and

  19. Raman microscopy as a novel tool to detect endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranska, Malgorzata; Kaczor, Agnieszka; Malek, Kamilla; Jaworska, Aleksandra; Majzner, Katarzyna; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Pacia, Marta Z; Zajac, Grzegorz; Dybas, Jakub; Wiercigroch, Ewelina

    2015-08-01

    Raman microscopy, a label-free method with high spatial resolution, shows growing potential in various fields of medical diagnostics. Several proof-of-concept studies related to the application of Raman microscopy to detect endothelial dysfunction are summarized in this work. Both ex vivo measurements of the tissues in the murine models of endothelial pathologies, as well as in vitro investigations of the cell cultures in the context of cellular transport, drug action and inflammation processes are discussed. The future directions in application of Raman spectroscopy-based methods in such studies are also described. PMID:26321275

  20. Endothelial effects of antihypertensive treatment: focus on irbesartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Negro

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Roberto NegroDepartment of Endocrinology, “V Fazzi” Hospital, Lecce ItalyAbstract: The endothelium is characterized by a wide range of important homeostatic functions. It participates in the control of hemostasis, blood coagulation and fibrinolysis, platelet and leukocyte interactions with the vessel wall, regulation of vascular tone, and of blood pressure. Many crucial vasoactive endogenous compounds are produced by the endothelial cells to control the functions of vascular smooth muscle cells and of circulating blood cells. These complex systems determine a fine equilibrium which regulates the vascular tone. Impairments in endothelium-dependent vasodilation lead to the so called endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is then characterized by unbalanced concentrations of vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, the most important being represented by nitric oxide (NO and angiotensin II (AT II. High angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE activity leads to increased AT II generation, reduced NO levels with subsequent vasoconstriction. The net acute effect results in contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells and reduced lumen diameter. Furthermore, when increased ACE activity is chronically sustained, increase in growth, proliferation and differentiation of the vascular smooth muscle cells takes place; at the same time, a decrease in the anti-proliferative action by NO, a decrease in fibinolysis and an increase in platelets aggregation may be observed. AT II is then involved not only in the regulation of blood pressure, but also in vascular inflammation, permeability, smooth muscle cells remodelling, and oxidative stress which in turn lead to atherosclerosis and increased cardiovascular risk. Given the pivotal role exerted by AT II in contributing to alteration of endothelial function, treatment with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs may be of particular interest to restore a physiological activity of endothelial

  1. Uptake of gold nanoparticles in primary human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingberg, Henrik; Oddershede, Lene B.; Löschner, Katrin;

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are relevant in nanomedicine for drug delivery in the vascular system, where endothelial cells are the first point of contact. We investigated the uptake of 80 nm AuNPs in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by flow cytometry, 3D confocal microscopy......-dependent increase of AuNPs inside cells measured by flow cytometry, spICP-MS and 3D confocal microscopy. The latter also showed that AuNPs were located in the cytosol. This was supported by FIB/SEM, showing that AuNPs were located in membrane enclosures in the cytoplasm as single particles or agglomerates of 2...

  2. Cytokine production by endothelial cells infected with human T cell lymphotropic virus type I.

    OpenAIRE

    H. Takashima; Eguchi, K.; Kawakami, A; Kawabe, Y; Migita, K; Sakai, M; Origuchi, T; Nagataki, S.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the ability of human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) to infect endothelial cells and induce cytokine production by these cells. METHODS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cocultured with HTLV-I infected T cell line (MT-2 cells) or uninfected T cell line (CEM cells). RESULTS: Following coculture with MT-2 cells, endothelial cells expressed HTLV-I specific core antigens. Endothelial cells cocultured with MT-2 cells produced significant amoun...

  3. In Vitro Guidance of Dental Pulp Cells by Nd:YAG Laser-Irradiated Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Yoshiko Murakami; Yamada, Yoshishige; Kimura, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: After endothelial cells were ablated by neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation, we investigated the response of pulp cells by examining the expression of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1). Background data: The reaction of stimulated blood vessels is related to the initiation of dentinogenesis. After artificial injury of endothelial cells, pulp cells migrate to the site of the injured endothelial cells. Materials and methods: Rat aortic endothelial cel...

  4. Regulation of endothelial metabolism by laminar shear stress and flow-induced transcription factor KLF2

    OpenAIRE

    Doddaballapur, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Flow hemodynamics regulates endothelial cell (EC) responses and laminar shear stress induces an atheroprotective and quiescent phenotype. The flow-responsive transcription factor KLF2 is a pivotal mediator of endothelial quiescence, but the precise mechanism is unclear. In this doctoral study, we assessed the hypothesis that laminar shear stress and KLF2 regulate endothelial quiescence by controlling endothelial metabolism. Laminar flow exposure and KLF2 over expression in HUVECs reduced g...

  5. Role of endothelial Nox2 NADPH oxidase in angiotensin II-induced hypertension and vasomotor dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Murdoch, Colin E.; Alom-Ruiz, Sara P.; Wang, Minshu; Zhang, Min; Walker, Simon; Yu, Bin; Brewer, Alison; Shah, Ajay M.

    2011-01-01

    NADPH oxidase (Nox)-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to be involved in angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Several Nox isoforms are expressed in the vessel wall, among which Nox2 is especially abundant in the endothelium. Endothelial Nox2 levels rise during hypertension but little is known about the cell-specific role of endothelial Nox2 in vivo. To address this question, we generated transgenic mice with endothelial-specific overexpression of Nox2 ...

  6. NADPH oxidase 4 protects against development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice

    OpenAIRE

    Langbein, Heike; Brunssen, Coy; Hofmann, Anja; Cimalla, Peter; Brux, Melanie; Bornstein, Stefan R; Deussen, Andreas; Koch, Edmund; Morawietz, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Aims Endothelial dysfunction is an early step in the development of atherosclerosis. Increased formation of superoxide anions by NADPH oxidase Nox1, 2, and 5 reduces nitric oxide availability and can promote endothelial dysfunction. In contrast, recent evidence supports a vasoprotective role of H2O2 produced by main endothelial isoform Nox4. Therefore, we analysed the impact of genetic deletion of Nox4 on endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (Ldl...

  7. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Primary endo...thelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Prima...ry endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Primary endo...thelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Prima...ry endothelial cells SRX393516,SRX244128,SRX393518 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Primary... endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Primary en...dothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Prima...ry endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Primary endo...thelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Prima...ry endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Primary en...dothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Prima...ry endothelial cells SRX393516,SRX393518,SRX244128 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Primary en...dothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Primary... endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Prima...ry endothelial cells SRX393516,SRX393518,SRX244128 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Prima...ry endothelial cells SRX393518,SRX393516,SRX244128 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Prima...ry endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Primary... endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Primary en...dothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Primary... endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  6. Vinculin associates with endothelial VE-cadherin junctions to control force-dependent remodeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huveneers, S.; Oldenburg, J.; Spanjaard, E.; Van Der Krogt, G.; Grigoriev, I.; Akhmanova, A.; Rehmann, H.; de Rooij, J.

    2012-01-01

    To remodel endothelial cell-cell adhesion, inflammatory cytokine- and angiogenic growth factor-induced signals impinge on the vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) complex, the central component of endothelial adherens junctions. This study demonstrates that junction remodeling takes place at

  7. Endothelial progenitor cells give rise to pro-angiogenic smooth muscle-like progeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, Jan-Renier A. J.; Krenning, Guido; Brinker, Marja G. L.; Koerts, Jasper A.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Reciprocal plasticity exists between endothelial and mesenchymal lineages. For instance, mature endothelial cells adopt a smooth muscle-like phenotype through transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF beta 1)-driven endothelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EndMT). Peripheral blood contains circ

  8. DMPD: Lipopolysaccharide signaling in endothelial cells. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16357866 Lipopolysaccharide signaling in endothelial cells. Dauphinee SM, Karsan A.... Lab Invest. 2006 Jan;86(1):9-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Lipopolysaccharide signaling in endothe...lial cells. PubmedID 16357866 Title Lipopolysaccharide signaling in endothelial cells. Authors Dauphinee SM,

  9. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells DRX014747 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 TFs and others Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.10.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Histone Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.CDV.05.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells hg19 Unclassified Cardiovascular Brachioceph...alic endothelial cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Brachiocephalic_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  12. Caveolin-1 Deficiency Induces Spontaneous Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Murine Pulmonary Endothelial Cells in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhaodong; Wermuth, Peter J.; Benn, Bryan S.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2013-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) induces endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndoMT) in murine lung endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro. Owing to the important role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in TGF-β receptor internalization and TGF-β signaling, the participation of CAV1 in the induction of EndoMT in murine lung ECs was investigated. Pulmonary ECs were isolated from wild-type and Cav1 knockout mice using immunomagnetic methods with sequential anti-CD31 and a...

  13. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  14. Endothelial cell counts after Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty versus penetrating keratoplasty in Asian eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Marcus Ang1,2, Jodhbir S Mehta1–4, Arundhati Anshu1,2, Hon Kiat Wong5, Hla M Htoon2, Donald Tan1–31Singapore National Eye Centre, 2Singapore Eye Research Institute, 3Department of Ophthalmology, National University Health Systems, 4Department of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, 5Department of Ophthalmology, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, SingaporeBackground: The purpose of this study was to compare endothelial cell counts after Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK and penetrating keratoplasty in Asian eyes.Methods: This was a retrospective study of patients from our prospective Singapore Corneal Transplant Study cohort who received corneal transplantation in 2006–2008. We compared eyes that underwent DSAEK or penetrating keratoplasty for Fuchs’ endothelial dystrophy or pseudophakic and aphakic bullous keratopathy. Clinical data, and donor and recipient characteristics were recorded. Of 241 patients who met our inclusion criteria, 68 underwent DSAEK and 173 underwent penetrating keratoplasty. The main outcome measure was endothelial cell loss at 1 year. Secondary outcome measures were graft survival and visual outcomes at 1-year follow-up.Results: There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics of patients between the treatment groups. Percent endothelial cell loss at 1-year follow-up was greater in penetrating keratoplasty eyes (40.9% ± 2.9% compared with DSAEK eyes (22.4% ± 2.3%; P < 0.001. DSAEK-treated eyes had significantly superior uncorrected visual acuity (mean difference = 0.42 ± 0.0059; P < 0.001 and best spectacle-corrected visual acuity (mean difference = 0.14 ± 0.032; P < 0.001 as compared with penetrating keratoplasty-treated eyes. Penetrating keratoplasty-treated eyes had worse astigmatism as compared with DSAEK-treated eyes (-3.0 ± 2.1 versus -1.7 ± 0.8; P < 0.001. Graft survival at 1 year was comparable in both groups, ie, 66/68 (97.0% DSAEK-treated eyes

  15. METABOLIC CAPACITY REGULATES IRON HOMEOSTATIS IN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sensitivity of endothelial cells to oxidative stress and the high concentrations of iron in mitochondria led us to test the hypotheses that (1) changes in respiratory capacity alter iron homeostasis, and (2) lack of aerobic metabolism decreases labile iron stores and attenuat...

  16. Apoptosis and calcification of vascular endothelial cell under hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kuaifa; Chen, Zhujun; Liu, Meng; Peng, Jian; Wu, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it is found that increase in Hcy level in blood can directly or indirectly cause vascular endothelial cell injury and induce vascular calcification. However, the mechanism of vascular endothelial cell injury and vascular calcification has not been studied thoroughly. This paper carried out experiment for research aiming at discussing the effect and action mechanism of Hhcy on endothelial cells and vascular calcification. Firstly, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured and then intervened by Hcy of different concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1, 1.0, 3.0, 5.0 mmol/L) and at different action time (3, 6, 12, 24 h). Then apoptosis rate and reactive oxygen were detected by flow cytometry. At the same time, the model for the culture of rat vascular calcification was set up and induced into Hhcy so as to detect the total plasma Hcy level and judge vascular calcification degree. The results showed that with the increase in Hcy concentration and extension of action period, the apoptosis rate and generation of reactive oxygen of HUVECs all significantly increased, and the differences were all statistically significant (P animal calcification model, mass of black particle deposition was seen after Von Kossa staining of rat vessels in calcification group. Compared with the control group, the vascular calcium content, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin content in calcification group all increased (P benefits on clinical prevention works. PMID:25476479

  17. Reproducibility of different methods to measure the endothelial function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onkelinx, Steven; Cornelissen, Veronique; Goetschalckx2, Kaatje; Thomaes, Tom; Verhamme, Peter; Vanhees, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Full text via link. This study compares the reliability and reproducibility of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT) to assess endothelial function. Eighteen volunteers with coronary heart disease underwent simultaneous testing of FMD by means of brachial artery ultr

  18. Transition of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells to endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are heterogeneous. A fraction of these cells constitute multipotent cells that can self-renew and mainly give rise to mesodermal lineage cells such as adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into endothelial cell

  19. Flow through flexible cylinders inspired by the endothelial glycocalyx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lauren; Fovargue, Daniel; Miller, Laura

    2009-11-01

    Inspired by the recent shift in hypertension research, we present a new computational model to better examine blood flow induced shear stress in the endothelial surface layer (ESL). The ESL is the luminal side barrier between blood and the endothelial cells that line the vessel wall and has been of interest due to its function as a mechanotransducer.footnotetextSquire, J. M., Chew, M., Nneji, G., Neal, C., Barry, J. & Michel, C. C., 2001. Quasi-periodic substructure in the microvessel endothelial glycocalyx: a possible explanation for molecular filtering? J. Struct. Bio. 136, 239-255. Further, it is believed that shear stress seen by the ESL, induced by blood flow, is converted to chemical responses such as blood pressure regulation. We utilize the Immersed Boundary method to simulate blood flow through a vessel and examine the shear stress at the ESL over different heights and flexibilities. We compare our results in the Reynolds number regime of a canine capillary with previous computational modelsfootnotetextWeinbaum, S., Tarbell, J., Damiano, E., 2000. The Structure and Function of the Endothelial Glycocalyx Layer. Pfl"ugers Arch. -- Eur. J. Physiol. 440, 653--666. and experimental results.

  20. Soluble vascular endothelial growth factor in various blood transfusion components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Werther, K; Mynster, T;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood transfusion may reduce survival after curative surgery for solid tumors. This may be related to extracellular content of cancer growth factors present in transfusion components. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent stimulator of angiogenesis in solid tumors...

  1. New insights in endothelial and smooth muscle cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo, Víctor Arana; De Haro, Roberto; Sosa-Melgarejo, Jorge; Méndez, José D

    2007-01-01

    Based on immunohistochemical techniques against connexins and the intercellular flux of staining molecules, it has previously been shown that electrotonic communication occurs among endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, this due to the presence of myoendothelial gap junctions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the density of myoendothelial contacts in the left coronary and internal mammary arteries as well as in the left saphenous vein by means of electron microscopy, the distance between both cells participating in an myoendothelial contact with a semi-automatic image analysis system and the presence of homocellular and heterocellular gap junctions between endothelial and smooth muscle cells by using the immunohistochemical technique and confocal microscopy in thoracic aorta were also analyzed. The results are that all blood vessels studied present myoendothelial contacts, while density studies show that they are more abundant in the saphenous vein. The myoendothelial contact distance is constant and in no case the cytoplasmic processes reach the plasma membrane of the partner cell toward which they are advanced. Homocellular gap junctions were found between smooth muscle cells and between endothelial cells. Heterocellular gap junctions were absent, evidencing the possibility that signaling molecules between endothelial and smooth muscle cells may be transferred through plasma membranes as was once thought and not necessarily by electrotonic communication. PMID:17383847

  2. Endothelial Dysfunction and Vitamin D Levels in Kidney Allograft Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ALTAN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been several studies demonstrating a relationship between vitamin D and cardiovascular disease. Vitamin D Deficiency/Insufficiency (D/I is a common problem in chronic renal disease and also renal transplant recipients, however, there is a variation between the summer and winter periods.We investigated whether there is a relationship between vitamin D D/I and endothelial dysfunction in renal transplant recipients (RTR. We also evaluated vitamin D levels in summer and winter. Flowmediated dilatation (FMD, soluble endothelial protein receptor C (sEPRC and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM were chosen for markers of endothelial function.Firty-five patients were recruited to the study. Winter measurements were performed on March, summer measurements were performed in September.In the winter, methe an vitamin D level was 18.8±7.5, compared with 34.3±13.0 ng/ml in the summer period (p<0.0001. There were 38 (84% and 20 (44% patients in the winter and summer periods with vitamin D D/I, respectively. We did not find any significant association between vitamin D D/I and FMD, sTM or sEPCR in either period.While vitamin D D/I is a common finding during winter in RTR, it recovers in the summer. Moreover, vitamin D D/I seems not to be associated with endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Ex Vivo Behaviour of Human Bone Tumor Endothelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Infante, Teresa [SDN-Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, IRCCS, 80143 Naples (Italy); Cesario, Elena [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy); Gallo, Michele; Fazioli, Flavio [Division of Skeletal Muscles Oncology Surgery, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); De Chiara, Annarosaria [Anatomic Pathology Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Tutucci, Cristina; Apice, Gaetano [Medical Oncology of Bone and Soft Sarcoma tissues Unit, National Cancer Institute, Pascale Foundation, 80131 Naples (Italy); Nigris, Filomena de, E-mail: filomena.denigris@unina2.it [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Second University of Naples, 80138 Naples (Italy)

    2013-04-11

    Cooperation between endothelial cells and bone in bone remodelling is well established. In contrast, bone microvasculature supporting the growth of primary tumors and metastasis is poorly understood. Several antiangiogenic agents have recently been undergoing trials, although an extensive body of clinical data and experimental research have proved that angiogenic pathways differ in each tumor type and stage. Here, for the first time, we characterize at the molecular and functional level tumor endothelial cells from human bone sarcomas at different stages of disease and with different histotypes. We selected a CD31{sup +} subpopulation from biopsies that displayed the capability to grow as adherent cell lines without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our findings show the existence in human primary bone sarcomas of highly proliferative endothelial cells expressing CD31, CD44, CD105, CD146 and CD90 markers. These cells are committed to develop capillary-like structures and colony formation units, and to produce nitric oxide. We believe that a better understanding of tumor vasculature could be a valid tool for the design of an efficacious antiangiogenic therapy as adjuvant treatment of sarcomas.

  4. Nanofiber density determines endothelial cell behavior on hydrogel matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, Fernanda V., E-mail: fernanda@intelab.ufsc.br [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Rambo, Carlos R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Dias, Paulo F. [Department of Cell Biology, Embryology and Genetics, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil); Porto, Luismar M. [Department of Chemical and Food Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, 88040-900 Florianópolis, SC (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    When cultured under static conditions, bacterial cellulose pellicles, by the nature of the polymer synthesis that involves molecular oxygen, are characterized by two distinct surface sides. The upper surface is denser in fibers (entangled) than the lower surface that shows greater surface porosity. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to exploit how the microarchitecture (i.e., surface porosity, fiber network structure, surface topology, and fiber density) of bacterial cellulose pellicle surfaces influence cell–biomaterial interaction and therefore cell behavior. Adhesion, cell ingrowth, proliferation, viability and cell death mechanisms were evaluated on the two pellicle surface sides. Cell behavior, including secondary necrosis, is influenced only by the microarchitecture of the surface, since the biomaterial is extremely pure (constituted of cellulose and water only). Cell–cellulose fiber interaction is the determinant signal in the cell–biomaterial responses, isolated from other frequently present interferences such as protein and other chemical traces usually present in cell culture matrices. Our results suggest that microarchitecture of hydrogel materials might determine the performance of biomedical products, such as bacterial cellulose tissue engineering constructs (BCTECs). - Highlights: • Topography of BC pellicle is relevant to determine endothelial cells' fate. • Cell–biomaterial response is affected by the topography of BC-pellicle surface. • Endothelial cells exhibit different behavior depending on the BC topography. • Apoptosis and necrosis of endothelial cells were affected by the BC topography.

  5. Bioengineered transplantable porcine livers with re-endothelialized vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, In Kap; Peng, Li; Peloso, Andrea; Smith, Charesa J; Dhal, Abritee; Deegan, Daniel B; Zimmerman, Cindy; Clouse, Cara; Zhao, Weixin; Shupe, Thomas D; Soker, Shay; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    Donor shortage remains a continued challenge in liver transplantation. Recent advances in tissue engineering have provided the possibility of creating functional liver tissues as an alternative to donor organ transplantation. Small bioengineered liver constructs have been developed, however a major challenge in achieving functional bioengineered liver in vivo is the establishment of a functional vasculature within the scaffolds. Our overall goal is to bioengineer intact livers, suitable for transplantation, using acellular porcine liver scaffolds. We developed an effective method for reestablishing the vascular network within decellularized liver scaffolds by conjugating anti-endothelial cell antibodies to maximize coverage of the vessel walls with endothelial cells. This procedure resulted in uniform endothelial attachment throughout the liver vasculature extending to the capillary bed of the liver scaffold and greatly reduced platelet adhesion upon blood perfusion in vitro. The re-endothelialized livers, when transplanted to recipient pigs, were able to withstand physiological blood flow and maintained for up to 24 h. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that vascularized bioengineered livers, of clinically relevant size, can be transplanted and maintained in vivo, and represents the first step towards generating engineered livers for transplantation to patients with end-stage liver failure. PMID:25433603

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampen, Kim R.; ter Elst, Arja; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    This review is designed to provide an overview of the current literature concerning vascular endothelial growth factor signaling (VEGF) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aberrant VEGF signaling operates in the bone marrow of AML patients and is related to a poor prognosis. The altered signaling pathw

  7. Metabolic fate of rat heart endothelial lipoprotein lipase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When isolated rat hearts were perfused with medium containing 125I-labeled bovine lipoprotein lipase (LPL), they bound both lipase activity and radioactivity. More than 80% of the bound lipase could be rapidly released by heparin. Low concentrations of bovine LPL displaced 50-60% of the endogeneous, endothelial-bound LPL. Higher concentrations caused additional binding. Both binding and exchange were rapid processes. The hearts continuously released endogenous LPL into the medium. An antiserum that inhibited bovine but not rat LPL was used to differentiate endogeneous and exogeneous LPL activity. When the pool of endothelial LPL was labeled with bovine 125I-labeled LPL and then chased with unlabeled bovine LPL, approximately 50% of the labeled lipase was rapidly displaced. During chase perfusion with medium only, catalytically active bovine LPL appeared in the perfusate. The rate of release was similar to that observed for endogeneous LPL activity and amounted to 10-13% of the heparin-releasable fraction in the first 5 min of perfusion. There was little or no degradation of bovine 125I-labeled LPL to fragments or acid-soluble products. These results indicate that endothelial LPL is accessible for exchange with exogeneous LPL and that detachment rather than degradation may be the pathway for catabolism of endothelial LPL

  8. Prognostic value of endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana; Marice; Ladeia; Raphael; Ribeiro; Sampaio; Maiara; CostaHita; Luis; F; Adan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus are at high risk of developing atherosclerosis, associated with higher rates of micro and macro vascular involvement such as coronary artery disease and renal disease. The role of hyperglycemia to induce synthesis of reactive oxygen species by the oxidation of glucose, leading to an increased production of advanced glycosylation end products, as well as inflammation and oxidative stress has been proposed as a possible mechanism in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction(ED). The interaction between C-peptide- the connecting segment of pro-insulin-and nitric oxide in vasodilation is also discussed. Therefore, endothelial dysfunction has been identified as an early marker of vascular disorder in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In some other diseases, ED has been considered an independent predictor of vascular disease, regardless of the method used. Studies have demonstrated the importance of endothelial dysfunction as an useful tool for identifying the risk of vascular complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, particularly as regards to renal impairment. The aim of this review is to clarify the prognostic value of endothelial dysfunction as a marker of vascular disease in these subjects.

  9. Shear stress mediates endothelial adaptations to exercise training in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinken, T.M.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Hopkins, N.; Dawson, E.A.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Although episodic changes in shear stress have been proposed as the mechanism responsible for the effects of exercise training on the vasculature, this hypothesis has not been directly addressed in humans. We examined brachial artery flow-mediated dilation, an index of NO-mediated endothelial functi

  10. Endothelial Cells Promote Pigmentation through Endothelin Receptor B Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzetti, Claire; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Ghorbel, Houda Hammami; Cardot-Leccia, Nathalie; Ambrosetti, Damien; Bahadoran, Philippe; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Ballotti, Robert; Mahns, Andre; Passeron, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Findings of increased vascularization in melasma lesions and hyperpigmentation in acquired bilateral telangiectatic macules suggested a link between pigmentation and vascularization. Using high-magnification digital epiluminescence dermatoscopy, laser confocal microscopy, and histological examination, we showed that benign vascular lesions of the skin have restricted but significant hyperpigmentation compared with the surrounding skin. We then studied the role of microvascular endothelial cells in regulating skin pigmentation using an in vitro co-culture model using endothelial cells and melanocytes. These experiments showed that endothelin 1 released by microvascular endothelial cells induces increased melanogenesis signaling, characterized by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor phosphorylation, and increased tyrosinase and dopachrome tautomerase levels. Immunostaining for endothelin 1 in vascular lesions confirmed the increased expression on the basal layer of the epidermis above small vessels compared with perilesional skin. Endothelin acts through the activation of endothelin receptor B and the mitogen-activated protein kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and p38, to induce melanogenesis. Finally, culturing of reconstructed skin with microvascular endothelial cells led to increased skin pigmentation that could be prevented by inhibiting EDNRB. Taken together these results demonstrated the role of underlying microvascularization in skin pigmentation, a finding that could open new fields of research for regulating physiological pigmentation and for treating pigmentation disorders such as melasma. PMID:26308584

  11. Are endothelial cell bioeffects from acoustic droplet vaporization proximity dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) produces gas microbubbles that provide a means of selective occlusion in gas embolotherapy. Vaporization and subsequent occlusion occur inside blood vessels supplying the targeted tissue, such as tumors. Theoretical and computational studies showed that ADV within a vessel can impart high fluid mechanical stresses on the vessel wall. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated that vaporization at an endothelial layer may affect cell attachment and viability. The current study is aimed at investigating the role of vaporization distance away from the endothelial layer. HUVECs were cultured in OptiCell™ chambers until reaching confluence. Dodecafluoropentane microdroplets were added, attaining a 10:1 droplet to cell ratio. A single ultrasound pulse (7.5 MHz) consisting of 16 cycles (~ 2 μs) and a 5 MPa peak rarefactional pressure was used to produce ADV while varying the vaporization distance from the endothelial layer (0 μm, 500 μm, 1000 μm). Results indicated that cell attachment and viability was significantly different if the distance was 0 μm (at the endothelial layer). Other distances were not significantly different from the control. ADV will significantly affect the endothelium if droplets are in direct contact with the cells. Droplet concentration and flow conditions inside blood vessels may play an important role. This work was supported by NIH grant R01EB006476.

  12. Role of microparticles in endothelial dysfunction and arterial hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas; Helbing; Christoph; Olivier; Christoph; Bode; Martin; Moser; Philipp; Diehl

    2014-01-01

    Microparticles are small cell vesicles that can be released by almost all eukaryotic cells during cellular stress and cell activation. Within the last 1-2 decades it has been shown that microparticles are useful blood surrogate markers for different pathological conditions, such as vascular inflammation, coagulation and tumour diseases. Several studies have investigated the abundance of microparticles of different cellular origins in multiple cardiovascular diseases. It thereby has been shown that microparticles released by platelets, leukocytes and endothelial cells can be found in conditions of endothelial dysfunction, acute and chronic vascular inflammation and hypercoagulation. In addition to their function as surrogate markers, several studies indicate that circulating microparticles can fuse with distinct target cells, such as endothelial cells or leukocyte, and thereby deliver cellular components of their parental cells to the target cells. Hence, microparticles are a novel entity of circulating, paracrine, biological vectors which can influence the phenotype, the function and presumably even the transcriptome of their target cells.This review article aims to give a brief overview about the microparticle biology with a focus on endothelial activation and arterial hypertension. More detailed information about the role of microparticles in pathophysiology and disease can be found in already published work.

  13. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.;

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an exaggerated immune response, endothelial damage/dysfunction, and increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). The inter-relationship(s) between indices of complement activation (soluble membrane attack complex, sMAC), inflammation (hs......, IR was an independent predictor of sMAC in the CHF group beta = 0.37 (p complement system and thus...

  14. Impaired endothelial function and blood flow in repetitive strain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunnekreef, J.J.; Benda, N.M.M.; Schreuder, T.H.A.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Thijssen, D.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) is a disabling upper extremity overuse injury that may be associated with pathophysiological changes in the vasculature. In this study we investigated whether RSI is associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired exercise-induced blood flow in the affected forear

  15. High glucose augments stress-induced apoptosis in endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenwen Zhong; Yang Liu; Hui Tian

    2009-01-01

    Hyperglycemia has been identified as one of the important factors involved in the microvascular complications of diabetes, and has been related to increased cardiovascular mortality. Endothelial damage and dysfunction result from diabetes; therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the response of endothelial cells to stressful stimuli, modelled in normal and high glucose concentrations in vitro. Eahy 926 endothelial cells were cultured in 5 mmol/L or 30 mmol/L glucose conditions for a 24 hour period and oxidative stress was induced by exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or tumour necrosis factor- α (TNF- α ), following which the protective effect of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone was assessed. Apoptosis, necrosis and cell viability were determined using an ELISA for DNA fragmentation, an enzymatic lactate dehydrogenase assay and an MTT assay, respectively. High glucose significantly increased the susceptibility of Eahy 926 cells to apoptosis in the presence of 500 μmol/L H2O2, above that induced in normal glucose (P<0.02). A reduction of H2O2- and TNF- α -induced apoptosis occurred in both high and low glucose after treatment with dexametha-sone (P<0.05). Conclusion high glucose is effective in significantly augmenting stress caused by H2O2, but not in causing stress alone. These findings suggest a mechanism by which short term hyperglycemia may facilitate and augment endothelial damage.

  16. Microvesicles: potential markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Lin; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Microvesicles (MVs, also known as microparticles) are small membranous structures that are released from platelets and cells upon activation or during apoptosis. Microvesicles have been found in blood, urine, synovial fluid, extracellular spaces of solid organs, atherosclerotic plaques, tumors, and elsewhere. Here, we focus on new clinical and basic work that implicates MVs as markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction and hence novel contributors to cardiovascular and other diseases. Recent findings Advances in the detection of MVs and the use of cell type-specific markers to determine their origin have allowed studies that associated plasma concentrations of specific MVs with major types of endothelial dysfunction – namely, inappropriate or maladaptive vascular tone, leukocyte recruitment, and thrombosis. Recent investigations have highlighted microvesicular transport of key biologically active molecules besides tissue factor, such as ligands for pattern-recognition receptors, elements of the inflammasome, and morphogens. Microvesicles generated from human cells under different pathologic circumstances, e.g., during cholesterol loading or exposure to endotoxin, carry different subsets of these molecules and thereby alter endothelial function through several distinct, well-characterized molecular pathways. Summary Clinical and basic studies indicate that MVs may be novel markers and mediators of endothelial dysfunction. This work has advanced our understanding of the development of cardiovascular and other diseases. Opportunites and obstacles to clinical applications are discussed. PMID:22248645

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 expression in mycosis fungoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ida Holst; Willerslev-Olsen, Andreas; Vetter-Kauczok, Claudia;

    2012-01-01

    Here, we have studied vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3) expression in mycosis fungoides (MF), the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Immunohistochemistry revealed that in two-thirds of 34 patients, VEGFR-3 was expressed in situ by both tumor and stromal...

  18. Nanoparticle accumulation and transcytosis in brain endothelial cell layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Dong; Raghnaill, Michelle Nic; Bramini, Mattia; Mahon, Eugene; Åberg, Christoffer; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a selective barrier, which controls and limits access to the central nervous system (CNS). The selectivity of the BBB relies on specialized characteristics of the endothelial cells that line the microvasculature, including the expression of intercellular tight juncti

  19. Maternal biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction and preterm delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Chen

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction is key to the development of atherosclerosis. Preterm delivery foreshadows later maternal cardiovascular disease (CVD, but it is not known if endothelial dysfunction also occurs. We prospectively measured circulating biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in pregnant women with preterm or term delivery.We conducted a case-control study nested within a large prospective epidemiological study of young, generally healthy pregnant women. Women who delivered preterm (<37 completed weeks gestation, n = 240 and controls who delivered at term (n = 439 were included. Pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia were analyzed separately. Circulating endothelial dysfunction biomarkers included soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1 and soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin.Elevated levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were positively associated with preterm delivery independent of usual risk factors. At entry (∼16 wks, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR was 1.73 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.09-2.74 for the highest quartile of sICAM-1 versus the lowest quartile and for sVCAM-1 the AOR was 2.17 (95% CI 1.36-3.46. When analysis was limited to cases with a spontaneous preterm delivery, the results were unchanged. Similar results were obtained for the 3rd trimester (∼30 wks. Elevated sE-selectin was increased only in preterm delivery complicated by preeclampsia; risk was increased at entry (AOR 2.32, 95% CI 1.22-4.40 and in the 3rd trimester (AOR 3.37, 95% CI 1.78-6.39.Impaired endothelial function as indicated by increased levels of soluble molecules commonly secreted by endothelial cells is a pathogenic precursor to CVD that is also present in women with preterm delivery. Our findings underscore the need for follow-up studies to determine if improving endothelial function prevents later CVD risk in women.

  20. Endothelial microparticles carrying hedgehog-interacting protein induce continuous endothelial damage in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Di-Min; Wu, Qiu-Ling; Zheng, Peng; Chen, Ping; Zhang, Ran; Li, Bei-Bei; Fang, Jun; Xia, Ling-Hui; Hong, Mei

    2016-05-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that endothelial microparticles (EMPs), a marker of endothelial damage, are elevated in acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and that endothelial damage is implicated in the pathogenesis of aGVHD, but the mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we detected the plasma EMP levels and endothelial damage in patients and mice with aGVHD in vivo and then examined the effects of EMPs derived from injured endothelial cells (ECs) on endothelial damage and the role of hedgehog-interacting protein (HHIP) carried by EMPs in these effects in vitro. Our results showed that EMPs were persistently increased in the early posttransplantation phase in patients and mice with aGVHD. Meanwhile, endothelial damage was continuous in aGVHD mice, but was temporary in non-aGVHD mice after transplantation. In vitro, EMPs induced endothelial damage, including increased EC apoptosis, enhanced reactive oxygen species, decreased nitric oxide production and impaired angiogenic activity. Enhanced expression of HHIP, an antagonist for the Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway, was observed in patients and mice with aGVHD and EMPs from injured ECs. The endothelial damage induced by EMPs was reversed when the HHIP incorporated into EMPs was silenced with an HHIP small interfering RNA or inhibited with the SHH pathway agonist, Smoothened agonist. This work supports a feasible vicious cycle in which EMPs generated during endothelial injury, in turn, aggravate endothelial damage by carrying HHIP into target ECs, contributing to the continuously deteriorating endothelial damage in the development of aGVHD. EMPs harboring HHIP would represent a potential therapeutic target for aGVHD. PMID:27009877

  1. Comparison of peripheral endothelial function in shift versus nonshift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suessenbacher, Alois; Potocnik, Miriam; Dörler, Jakob; Fluckinger, Gabriele; Wanitschek, Maria; Pachinger, Otmar; Frick, Matthias; Alber, Hannes F

    2011-03-15

    Shift working is related to increased cardiovascular morbidity. Peripheral endothelial dysfunction, an inherent feature of early atherosclerosis, has been suggested as a surrogate marker of cardiovascular risk. Whether shift working is associated with peripheral endothelial dysfunction has not been investigated to date. A total of 48 male shift workers (SWs) and 47 male nonshift workers (NSWs) (mean age 43 ± 5 years) were recruited from a glass manufactory. The SWs and NSWs were matched according to age, body mass index, smoking habits, family history of premature coronary artery disease, prevalence of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, and work place. Their sport habits were also documented. Peripheral endothelial function was assessed using the EndoPAT technique to determine the peripheral arterial tone (PAT) index. According to the study design, no difference was found in the risk factor profiles between the SWs and NSWs. Despite a greater percentage of regular physical activity among the SWs (16.7 vs 4.3%, p = 0.05), shift working was associated with a reduced PAT index compared to working only on the day shift (PAT index 1.73 ± 0.4 vs 1.94 ± 0.5, p = 0.03). In the NSW group, the participants with regular physical training (n = 16) had a greater PAT index than those without regular physical activity (n = 12; PAT index 2.28 ± 0.45 vs 1.86 ± 0.51, p = 0.03). No such difference was found in the SWs. In conclusion, SWs had a reduced PAT index compared with NSWs, suggesting endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, the known increased cardiovascular risk in those shift working might be related to endothelial dysfunction.

  2. Nitrative Stress Participates in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Injury in Hyperhomocysteinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu; Sun, Qi; Liu, Teng; Wang, Huanyuan; Jiao, Kun; Xu, Jiahui; Liu, Xin; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of nitrative stress in vascular endothelial injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), thirty healthy adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperhomocysteinemia model, and hyperhomocysteinemia with FeTMPyP (peroxynitrite scavenger) treatment. The endothelium-dependent dilatation of thoracic aorta in vitro was determined by response to acetylcholine (ACh). The histological changes in endothelium were assessed by HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) in thoracic aorta was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was quantified by flow cytometry. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused significant endothelial injury and dysfunction including vasodilative and histologic changes, associated with higher expression of NT in thoracic aorta. FeTMPyP treatment reversed these injuries significantly. Further, the effect of nitrative stress on cultured EPCs in vitro was investigated by administering peroxynitrite donor (3-morpholino-sydnonimine, SIN-1) and peroxynitrite scavenger (FeTMPyP). The roles of nitrative stress on cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Also, the phospho-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel of cultured EPCs was detected. Our data showed that the survival of EPCs was much lower in SIN-1 group than in vehicle group, both the apoptosis and necrosis of EPCs were much more severe, and the p-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel were obviously declined. Subsequent pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed these changes. Further, pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed homocysteine-induced EPC injury. In conclusion, this study indicates that

  3. Sensor to detect endothelialization on an active coronary stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffey Arthur C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A serious complication with drug-eluting coronary stents is late thrombosis, caused by exposed stent struts not covered by endothelial cells in the healing process. Real-time detection of this healing process could guide physicians for more individualized anti-platelet therapy. Here we present work towards developing a sensor to detect this healing process. Sensors on several stent struts could give information about the heterogeneity of healing across the stent. Methods A piezoelectric microcantilever was insulated with parylene and demonstrated as an endothelialization detector for incorporation within an active coronary stent. After initial characterization, endothelial cells were plated onto the cantilever surface. After they attached to the surface, they caused an increase in mass, and thus a decrease in the resonant frequencies of the cantilever. This shift was then detected electrically with an LCR meter. The self-sensing, self-actuating cantilever does not require an external, optical detection system, thus allowing for implanted applications. Results A cell density of 1300 cells/mm2 on the cantilever surface is detected. Conclusions We have developed a self-actuating, self-sensing device for detecting the presence of endothelial cells on a surface. The device is biocompatible and functions reliably in ionic liquids, making it appropriate for implantable applications. This sensor can be placed along the struts of a coronary stent to detect when the struts have been covered with a layer of endothelial cells and are no longer available surfaces for clot formation. Anti-platelet therapy can be adjusted in real-time with respect to a patient's level of healing and hemorrhaging risks.

  4. Melatonin modulates aromatase activity and expression in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-García, Virginia; González, Alicia; Martínez-Campa, Carlos; Alonso-González, Carolina; Cos, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Melatonin is known to suppress the development of endocrine-responsive breast cancers by interacting with the estrogen signaling pathways. Paracrine interactions between malignant epithelial cells and proximal stromal cells are responsible for local estrogen biosynthesis. In human breast cancer cells and peritumoral adipose tissue, melatonin downregulates aromatase, which transforms androgens into estrogens. The presence of aromatase on endothelial cells indicates that endothelial cells may contribute to tumor growth by producing estrogens. Since human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) express both aromatase and melatonin receptors, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of melatonin to regulate the activity and expression of aromatase on endothelial cells, thus, modulating local estrogen biosynthesis. In the present study, we demonstrated that melatonin inhibits the growth of HUVECs and reduces the local biosynthesis of estrogens through the downregulation of aromatase. These results are supported by three lines of evidence. Firstly, 1 mM of melatonin counteracted the testosterone-induced cell proliferation of HUVECs, which is dependent on the local biosynthesis of estrogens from testosterone by the aromatase activity of the cells. Secondly, we found that 1 mM of melatonin reduced the aromatase activity of HUVECs. Finally, by real‑time RT-PCR, we demonstrated that melatonin significantly downregulated the expression of aromatase as well as its endothelial-specific aromatase promoter region I.7. We conclude that melatonin inhibits aromatase activity and expression in HUVECs by regulating gene expression of specific aromatase promoter regions, thereby reducing the local production of estrogens. PMID:23450505

  5. Nitrative Stress Participates in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Injury in Hyperhomocysteinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu; Sun, Qi; Liu, Teng; Wang, Huanyuan; Jiao, Kun; Xu, Jiahui; Liu, Xin; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of nitrative stress in vascular endothelial injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), thirty healthy adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperhomocysteinemia model, and hyperhomocysteinemia with FeTMPyP (peroxynitrite scavenger) treatment. The endothelium-dependent dilatation of thoracic aorta in vitro was determined by response to acetylcholine (ACh). The histological changes in endothelium were assessed by HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) in thoracic aorta was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was quantified by flow cytometry. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused significant endothelial injury and dysfunction including vasodilative and histologic changes, associated with higher expression of NT in thoracic aorta. FeTMPyP treatment reversed these injuries significantly. Further, the effect of nitrative stress on cultured EPCs in vitro was investigated by administering peroxynitrite donor (3-morpholino-sydnonimine, SIN-1) and peroxynitrite scavenger (FeTMPyP). The roles of nitrative stress on cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Also, the phospho-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel of cultured EPCs was detected. Our data showed that the survival of EPCs was much lower in SIN-1 group than in vehicle group, both the apoptosis and necrosis of EPCs were much more severe, and the p-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel were obviously declined. Subsequent pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed these changes. Further, pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed homocysteine-induced EPC injury. In conclusion, this study indicates that

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor and not cyclooxygenase 2 promotes endothelial cell viability in the pancreatic tumor microenvironment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, Desmond P

    2010-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), often coexpressed in cancer, are associated with poor prognosis. However, results from pancreatic cancer trials of their inhibitors were disappointing. This study delineated the role of COX-2 and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in angiogenesis and VEGF regulation.

  7. ANTIBODIES DEFINING RAT ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS - RECA-1, A PAN-ENDOTHELIAL CELL-SPECIFIC MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DUIJVESTIJN, AM; VANGOOR, H; KLATTER, F; MAJOOR, GD; VANBUSSEL, E; VRIESMAN, PJCV

    1992-01-01

    We have been searching for antibodies reactive with rat endothelial cells. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb), named RECA-1 and RECA-2 were produced and tested in immunoperoxidase staining on frozen sections of various rat tissues. Staining patterns were compared to those obtained with the mAbs OX-2, O

  8. Isolation of endothelial cells from human placental microvessels: effect of different proteolytic enzymes on releasing endothelial cells from villous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugele, B; Lange, F

    2001-01-01

    Approaches for the isolation of human placental microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) using proteolytic enzymes have been described recently. However, the isolation procedure and enzyme composition most suitable for optimal disaggregation of placental tissue and isolation of HPMEC has not yet been established. We tested different proteolytic enzymes and enzyme mixtures for their capabilities of releasing endothelial cells from human term placental villous tissue. Best results were obtained with a mixture of collagenase/dispase/deoxyribonuclease I (0.28%/0.25%/0.01%). By adding a discontinuous Percoll gradient centrifugation step to the enzymatic dispersion, about 1 x 10(6) cells/g tissue with more than 30% von Willebrand factor (vWf)-positive cells were obtained. However, the total cell number and number of vWf-positive cells were highly dependent on the lot of collagenase used. A perfusion step prior to mincing of villous tissue did not increase the amount of vWf-positive cells. We conclude that the methods described in this study are suitable to isolate high yields of HPMEC and that the composition of the collagenase preparation is crucial to the successful release of endothelial cells from placental tissue. To obtain pure HPMEC, further separation steps, e.g., cell sorting with antibodies against endothelial specific cell surface antigens are necessary. PMID:11573814

  9. Activated platelets from diabetic rats cause endothelial dysfunction by decreasing Akt/endothelial NO synthase signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Ishida

    Full Text Available Diabetes is associated with endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation, both of which may contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. The purpose of this study was to characterize circulating platelets in diabetes and clarify their effects on endothelial function. Male Wistar rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ to induce diabetes. Each experiment was performed by incubating carotid arterial rings with platelets (1.65×10(7 cells/mL; 30 min isolated from STZ or control rats. Thereafter, the vascular function was characterized in isolated carotid arterial rings in organ bath chambers, and each expression and activation of enzymes involved in nitric oxide and oxidative stress levels were analyzed. Endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by acetylcholine was significantly attenuated in carotid arteries treated with platelets isolated from STZ rats. Similarly, treatment with platelets isolated from STZ rats significantly reduced ACh-induced Akt/endothelial NO synthase signaling/NO production and enhanced TXB2 (metabolite of TXA2, while CD61 (platelet marker and CD62P (activated platelet marker were increased in carotid arteries treated with platelets isolated from STZ rats. Furthermore, the platelets isolated from STZ rats decreased total eNOS protein and eNOS dimerization, and increased oxidative stress. These data provide direct evidence that circulating platelets isolated from diabetic rats cause dysfunction of the endothelium by decreasing NO production (via Akt/endothelial NO synthase signaling pathway and increasing TXA2. Moreover, activated platelets disrupt the carotid artery by increasing oxidative stress.

  10. Delta- and gamma-tocotrienol isomers are potent in inhibiting inflammation and endothelial activation in stimulated human endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muid, Suhaila; Froemming, Gabriele R. Anisah; Rahman, Thuhairah; Ali, A. Manaf; Nawawi, Hapizah M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tocotrienols (TCTs) are more potent antioxidants than α-tocopherol (TOC). However, the effectiveness and mechanism of the action of TCT isomers as anti-atherosclerotic agents in stimulated human endothelial cells under inflammatory conditions are not well established. Aims 1) To compare the effects of different TCT isomers on inflammation, endothelial activation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). 2) To identify the two most potent TCT isomers in stimulated human endothelial cells. 3) To investigate the effects of TCT isomers on NFκB activation, and protein and gene expression levels in stimulated human endothelial cells. Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with various concentrations of TCT isomers or α-TOC (0.3–10 µM), together with lipopolysaccharides for 16 h. Supernatant cells were collected and measured for protein and gene expression of cytokines (interleukin-6, or IL-6; tumor necrosis factor-alpha, or TNF-α), adhesion molecules (intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1, or ICAM-1; vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, or VCAM-1; and e-selectin), eNOS, and NFκB. Results δ-TCT is the most potent TCT isomer in the inhibition of IL-6, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and NFκB, and it is the second potent in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS. γ-TCT isomer is the most potent isomer in inhibiting e-selectin and eNOS, and it is the second most potent in inhibiting is IL-6, VCAM-1, and NFκB. For ICAM-1 protein expression, the most potent is δ-TCT followed by α-TCT. α- and β-TCT inhibit IL-6 at the highest concentration (10 µM) but enhance IL-6 at lower concentrations. γ-TCT markedly increases eNOS expression by 8–11-fold at higher concentrations (5–10 µM) but exhibits neutral effects at lower concentrations. Conclusion δ- and γ-TCT are the two most potent TCT isomers in terms of the inhibition of inflammation and endothelial activation whilst enhancing eNOS, possibly mediated via the NFκB pathway. Hence, there is a

  11. Effects of Nebivolol on Endothelial Gene Expression during Oxidative Stress in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulisse Garbin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium plays a key role in the development of atherogenesis and its inflammatory and proliferative status influences the progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of two beta blockers such as nebivolol and atenolol on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs following an oxidant stimulus. HUVECs were incubated with nebivolol or atenolol (10 micromol/L for 24 hours and oxidative stress was induced by the addition of oxidized (ox-LDL. Ox-LDL upregulated adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ICAM-2, ICAM-3, E-selectin, and P-selectin; proteins linked to inflammation (IL-6 and TNFalpha, thrombotic state (tissue factor, PAI-1 and uPA, hypertension such as endothelin-1 (ET-1, and vascular remodeling such as metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9 and protease inhibitor (TIMP-1. The exposure of HUVECs to nebivolol, but not to atenolol, reduced these genes upregulated by oxidative stress both in terms of protein and RNA expression. The known antioxidant properties of the third generation beta blocker nebivolol seem to account to the observed differences seen when compared to atenolol and support the specific potential protective role of this beta blocker on the expression of a number of genes involved in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis.

  12. Endothelialization of Magnetic Graft Materials using SPION-labeled Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Brant R.; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Harbuzariu, Adriana; McIntosh, Malcolm; Harburn, J. Jonathan; Parakka, Anthony; Kalra, Manju; Holmes, David; Simari, Robert D.; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.

    2010-12-01

    Seeding vascular grafts with autologous endothelial cells (EC) has been shown to improve in vivo patency, but high cost and development time have prevented widespread clinical use. A technique for loading EC with superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanospheres (SPIONs) was recently described. SPION-loaded EC experience magnetic attractive forces in the presence of sufficient magnetic field gradients. Using a multi-factorial design of experiments approach, the quantity and spatial distribution of magnetizable metal particles within a poly (ether urethane) matrix were systematically varied to produce unique material specimens. Specimens were seeded with SPION-loaded ECs, and cell coverage was quantified at various post-seeding time intervals using micrographic image analysis. The effects of changing design parameters on cell capture and sustained cell viability on magnetic substrates were statistically examined. Magnetized ferrites and samarium cobalt demonstrated cell capture, though cytotoxicity prevented sustained cell growth. Cobalt chromium substrates showed effective cell capture and growth to near complete confluence for up to one month.

  13. Increasing matrix stiffness upregulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells mediated by integrin β1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yinying; Xie, Xiaoying; Wang, Zhiming; Hu, Chao; Zheng, Qiongdan; Wang, Yaohui; Chen, Rongxin; Xue, Tongchun; Chen, Jie; Gao, Dongmei; Wu, Weizhong; Ren, Zhenggang; Cui, Jiefeng

    2014-02-14

    Matrix stiffness as a novel regulation factor involves in modulating the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) invasion or metastasis. However, the mechanism by which matrix stiffness modulates HCC angiogenesis remains unknown. Here, using buffalo rat HCC models with different liver matrix stiffness backgrounds and an in vitro cell culture system of mechanically tunable Collagen1 (COL1)-coated polyacrylamide gel, we investigated the effects of different matrix stiffness levels on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in HCC cells and explored its regulatory mechanism for controlling HCC angiogenesis. Tissue microarray analysis showed that the expression levels of VEGF and CD31 were gradually upregulated in tumor tissues with increasing COL1 and lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression, indicating a positive correlation between tumor angiogenesis and matrix rigidity. The expression of VEGF and the phosphorylation levels of PI3K and Akt were all upregulated in HCC cells on high-stiffness gel than on low-stiffness gel. Meanwhile, alteration of intergrin β1 expression was found to be the most distinctive, implying that it might mediate the response of HCC cells to matrix stiffness simulation. After integrin β1 was blocked in HCC cells using specific monoclonal antibody, the expression of VEGF and the phosphorylation levels of PI3K and Akt at different culture times were accordingly suppressed and downregulated in the treatment group as compared with those in the control group. All data suggested that the extracellular matrix stiffness stimulation signal was transduced into HCC cells via integrin β1, and this signal activated the PI3K/Akt pathway and upregulated VEGF expression. This study unveils a new paradigm in which matrix stiffness as initiators to modulate HCC angiogenesis.

  14. Capture of circulatory endothelial progenitor cells and accelerated re-endothelialization of a bio-engineered stent in human ex vivo shunt and rabbit denudation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Larsen (Katarína); K.L. Cheng (Caroline); D. Tempel (Dennie); S. Parker (Sherry); S. Yazdani (Saami); W.K. den Dekker (Wijnand); H.J. Houtgraaf (Jaco); R. de Jong (Renate); S. Swager-ten Hoor (Stijn); E. Ligtenberg (Erik); S.R. Hanson (Stephen); R. Rowland (Steve); F. Kolodgie (Frank); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); R. Virmani (Renu); H.J. Duckers (Henricus)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe Genous™ Bio-engineered R™ stent (GS) aims to promote vascular healing by capture of circulatory endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) to the surface of the stent struts, resulting in accelerated re-endothelialization. Here, we assessed the function of the GS in comparison to bare-metal

  15. Effect of endothelial progenitor cells in neovascularization and their application in tumor therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Fang; HA Xiao-qin

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the effect of endothelial progenitor cells in neovascularization as well as their application to the therapy of tumors.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed for relevant English language articles published from 1997 to 2009. The search term was "endothelial progenitor cells".Study selection Articles regarding the role of endothelial progenitor cells in neovascularization and their application to the therapy of tumors were selected.Results Endothelial progenitor cells isolated from bone marrow, umbilical cord blood and peripheral blood can proliferate, mobilize and differentiate into mature endothelial cells. Experiments suggest endothelial progenitor cells take part in forming the tumor vascular through a variety of mechanisms related to vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinases, chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 and its receptor C-X-C receptor-4, erythropoietin, Notchsignal pathway and so on. Evidence demonstrates that the number and function change of endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood can be used as a biomarker of the response of cancer patients to anti-tumor therapy and predict the prognosis and recurrence. In addition, irradiation temporarily increased endothelial cells number and decreased the endothelial progenitor cell counts in animal models. Meanwhile, in preclinical experiments, therapeutic gene-modified endothelial progenitor cells have been approved to attenuate tumor growth and offer a novel strategy for cell therapy and gene therapy of cancer.Conclusions Endothelial progenitor cells play a particular role in neovascularization and have attractively potential prognostic and therapeutic applications to malignant tumors. However, a series of problems, such as the definitive biomarkers of endothelial progenitor cells, their interrelationship with radiotherapy and their application in cell therapy and gene therapy of tumors, need further investigation.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Human Lung Lymphatic Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lorusso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of lymphatic endothelial cells from the respiratory system may be crucial to investigate the role of the lymphatic system in the normal and diseased lung. We describe a simple and inexpensive method to harvest, isolate, and expand lymphatic endothelial cells from the human lung (HL-LECs. Fifty-five samples of healthy lung selected from patients undergoing lobectomy were studied. A two-step purification tool, based on paramagnetic sorting with monoclonal antibodies to CD31 and Podoplanin, was employed to select a pure population of HL-LECs. The purity of HL-LECs was assessed by morphologic criteria, immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and functional assays. Interestingly, these cells retain in vitro several receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs implicated in cell survival and proliferation. HL-LECs represent a clinically relevant cellular substrate to study lymphatic biology, lymphoangiogenesis, interaction with microbial agents, wound healing, and anticancer therapy.

  17. Mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction in obesity-associated hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Lobato

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is strongly associated with high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes. These conditions synergistically increase the risk of cardiovascular events. A number of central and peripheral abnormalities can explain the development or maintenance of high blood pressure in obesity. Of great interest is endothelial dysfunction, considered to be a primary risk factor in the development of hypertension. Additional mechanisms also related to endothelial dysfunction have been proposed to mediate the development of hypertension in obese individuals. These include: increase in both peripheral vasoconstriction and renal tubular sodium reabsorption, increased sympathetic activity and overactivation of both the renin-angiotensin system and the endocannabinoid system and insulin resistance. The discovery of new mechanisms regulating metabolic and vascular function and a better understanding of how vascular function can be influenced by these systems would facilitate the development of new therapies for treatment of obesity-associated hypertension.

  18. “Decoding” Angiogenesis: New Facets Controlling Endothelial Cell Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewduth, Raj; Santoro, Massimo M.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is a unique and crucial biological process occurring during both development and adulthood. A better understanding of the mechanisms that regulates such process is mandatory to intervene in pathophysiological conditions. Here we highlight some recent argument on new players that are critical in endothelial cells, by summarizing novel discoveries that regulate notorious vascular pathways such as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), Notch and Planar Cell Polarity (PCP), and by discussing more recent findings that put metabolism, redox signaling and hemodynamic forces as novel unforeseen facets in angiogenesis. These new aspects, that critically regulate angiogenesis and vascular homeostasis in health and diseased, represent unforeseen new ground to develop anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:27493632

  19. Effects of irradiated biodegradable polymer in endothelial cell monolayer formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeitman, Claudia R.; Grosso, Mariela F. del [CONICET – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Behar, Moni [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); García Bermúdez, Gerardo, E-mail: ggb@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [CONICET – Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, TANDAR-CNEA (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, UNSAM (Argentina)

    2013-11-01

    In this work we study cell adhesion, proliferation and cell morphology of endothelial cell cultured on poly-L-lactide acid (PLLA) modified by heavy ion irradiation. Thin films of PLLA samples were irradiated with sulfur (S) at energies of 75 MeV and gold (Au) at 18 MeV ion-beams. Ion beams were provided by the Tandar (Buenos Aires, Argentina) and Tandetron (Porto Alegre, Brazil) accelerators, respectively. The growth of a monolayer of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) onto unirradiated and irradiated surfaces has been studied by in vitro techniques in static culture. Cell viability and proliferation increased on modified substrates. But the results on unirradiated samples, indicate cell death (necrosis/apoptosis) with the consequent decrease in proliferation. We analyzed the correlation between irradiation parameters and cell metabolism and morphology.

  20. Features of endothelial dysfunction in early diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T; Bjerre-Knudsen, J; Feldt-Rasmussen, B;

    1989-01-01

    ); group II (n = 11), incipient diabetic nephropathy (30-300 mg albumin excreted per 24 h); and group III (n = 10), clinical diabetic nephropathy (more than 300 mg albumin excreted per 24 h). Nine non-diabetic men served as controls. The rise in tPA antigen with exercise was similar in the controls......The release of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) by vascular endothelial cells during exercise was studied in forty men with insulin-dependent diabetes. Three groups, matched for age and diabetes duration, were defined as: group I (n = 19), normal urinary albumin excretion (less than 30 mg/24 h.......01) and II (difference not significant, p = 0.06) than in group I and normal controls. These findings suggest that insulin-dependent diabetic patients with only slightly raised urinary albumin excretion have general endothelial cell dysfunction or damage. It is not yet clear whether these changes...

  1. Characterization of Bioeffects on Endothelial Cells under Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Robinson; Li, David S; Fowlkes, J Brian; Bull, Joseph L

    2015-12-01

    Gas embolotherapy is achieved by locally vaporizing microdroplets through acoustic droplet vaporization, which results in bubbles that are large enough to occlude blood flow directed to tumors. Endothelial cells, lining blood vessels, can be affected by these vaporization events, resulting in cell injury and cell death. An idealized monolayer of endothelial cells was subjected to acoustic droplet vaporization using a 3.5-MHz transducer and dodecafluoropentane droplets. Treatments included insonation pressures that varied from 2 to 8 MPa (rarefactional) and pulse lengths that varied from 4 to 16 input cycles. The bubble cloud generated was directly dependent on pressure, but not on pulse length. Cellular damage increased with increasing bubble cloud size, but was limited to the bubble cloud area. These results suggest that vaporization near the endothelium may impact the vessel wall, an effect that could be either deleterious or beneficial depending on the intended overall therapeutic application.

  2. Endothelial and lipoprotein lipases in human and mouse placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie L S; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Christoffersen, Christina;

    2005-01-01

    Placenta expresses various lipase activities. However, a detailed characterization of the involved genes and proteins is lacking. In this study, we compared the expression of endothelial lipase (EL) and LPL in human term placenta. When placental protein extracts were separated by heparin......-Sepharose affinity chromatography, the EL protein eluted as a single peak without detectable phospholipid or triglyceride (TG) lipase activity. The major portion of LPL protein eluted slightly after EL. This peak also had no lipase activity and most likely contained monomeric LPL. Fractions eluting at a higher Na......Cl concentration contained small amounts of LPL protein (most likely dimeric LPL) and had substantial TG lipase activity. In situ hybridization studies showed EL mRNA expression in syncytiotrophoblasts and endothelial cells and LPL mRNA in syncytiotrophoblasts. In contrast, immunohistochemistry showed EL and LPL...

  3. Inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis by netrin-1 during angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castets, Marie; Coissieux, Marie-May; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Bernard, Laure; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Bernet, Agnès; Laudet, Vincent; Mehlen, Patrick

    2009-04-01

    Netrin-1 was recently proposed to play an important role in embryonic and pathological angiogenesis. However, data reported led to the apparently contradictory conclusions that netrin-1 is either a pro- or an antiangiogenic factor. Here, we reconcile these opposing observations by demonstrating that netrin-1 acts as a survival factor for endothelial cells, blocking the proapoptotic effect of the dependence receptor UNC5B and its downstream death signaling effector, the serine/threonine kinase DAPK. The netrin-1 effect on blood vessel development is mimicked by caspase inhibitors in ex vivo assays, and the inhibition of caspase activity, the silencing of the UNC5B receptor, and the silencing of DAPK are each sufficient to rescue the vascular sprouting defects induced by netrin-1 silencing in zebrafish. Thus, the proapoptotic effect of unbound UNC5B and the survival effect of netrin-1 on endothelial cells finely tune the angiogenic process. PMID:19386270

  4. The Glycoprofile Patterns of Endothelial Cells in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Barkhordari, A.; CJP Jones; RW Stoddart; SF McClure; McClure, J; S Rahimi Moghadam

    2014-01-01

    [THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED FOR DUPLICATE PUBLICATION] Background: The pathological classification of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis has been a matter of debate and controversy for histopathologists.Objective: To identify and specify the glycotypes of capillary endothelial cells in usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) compared to those found in normal tissue.Methods: Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 16 cases of UIP were studied by lectin histochemistry with a pan...

  5. Endothelial progenitor cells regenerate infracted myocardium with neovascularisation development ☆

    OpenAIRE

    M.T. Abd El Aziz; Abd El Nabi, E.A.; Abd El Hamid, M.; D. Sabry; Atta, H.M.; L.A. Rahed; A. Shamaa; Mahfouz, S.; Taha, F.M.; S. Elrefaay; Gharib, D.M.; Elsetohy, Khaled A

    2013-01-01

    We achieved possibility of isolation, characterization human umbilical cord blood endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), examination potency of EPCs to form new blood vessels and differentiation into cardiomyoctes in canines with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). EPCs were separated and cultured from umbilical cord blood. Their phenotypes were confirmed by uptake of double stains dioctadecyl tetramethylindocarbocyanine-labeled acetylated LDL and FITC-labeled Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1 (DILDL-...

  6. Endothelial dysfunction in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezamoddin Berjis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Endothelial dysfunction probably has a role in the etiology of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL. The aim of this study was determining of the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and SSNHL. Materials and Methods: In a case-control study, 30 patients with SSNHL and 30 otherwise healthy age and sex-matched controls were studied. Demographic data gathered included age, gender, family history of SSNHL, and history of smoking, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Laboratory data included measurement of hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar (FBS and lipid profile. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD. Results: The two groups were the same in age (47.9 ± 9.3 and 48.1 ± 9.6 years, P = 0.946 with female/male ratio of 1:1 in both groups. Diabetes and dyslipidemia were more frequent in patients than controls (20% vs. 0%, P = 0.024. Brachial artery diameter was greater in patients than controls before (4.24 ± 0.39 vs. 3.84 ± 0.23 mm, P < 0.001 and after ischemia (4.51 ± 0.43 vs. 4.28 ± 0.27 mm, P = 0.020, but FMD was lower in patients than controls (6.21 ± 3.0 vs. 11.52 ± 2.30%, P < 0.001. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that FMD was associated with SSNHL independent from FBS and lipid profile (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] =0.439 [0.260-0.740], P = 0.002. Conclusion: Endothelial dysfunction, among other cardiovascular risk factors, is associated with SSNHL. This association is independent from other cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes and dyslipidemia.

  7. The Glycoprofile Patterns of Endothelial Cells in Usual Interstitial Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Barkhordari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN RETRACTED FOR DUPLICATE PUBLICATION] Background: The pathological classification of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis has been a matter of debate and controversy for histopathologists.Objective: To identify and specify the glycotypes of capillary endothelial cells in usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP compared to those found in normal tissue.Methods: Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks from 16 cases of UIP were studied by lectin histochemistry with a panel of 27 biotinylated lectins and an avidin-peroxidase revealing system.Results: High expression of several classes of glycan was seen de novo in capillary endothelial cells from patients with UIP including small complex and bi/tri-antennary bisected complex N-linked sequences bolund by Concanavalin A and erythro-phytohemagglutinin, respectively, GalNAca1 residues bound by Helix pomatia and Maclura pomifera agglutinins, and L-fucosylated derivatives of type II glycan chains recognized by Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I. Glycans bound by agglutinins from Lycopersicon esculentum (β1,4GlcNAc and Wisteria floribunda (GalNAc as well as GlcNAc oligomers bound by Phytolacca americana and succinylated Wheat Germ agglutinin were also seen in the capillary endothelial cells of UIP. In contrast, L-fucosylated derivatives of type I glycan chains were absent in cells from cases of UIP when Anguilla anguilla agglutinin was applied, unlike the situation in normal tissue.Conclusion: These results may indicate existence of two distinct populations of endothelial cell in UIP with markedly different patterns of glycosylation, reflecting a pattern of differentiation and angiogenesis, which is not detectable morphologically.

  8. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Kusumanto, Yoka Hadiani

    2006-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, an angiogenic growth factor. Since the recognition of VEGF’s pivotal role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis research has evolved from cell culture and animal experiments to application in humans. The studies described in this thesis aim to contribute to the evaluation of circulating VEGF as a surrogate marker in the quantification of angiogenesis and of the therapeutic role of V...

  9. Adiponectin promotes endothelial progenitor cell number and function

    OpenAIRE

    Shibata, Rei; Skurk, Carsten; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Galasso, Gennaro; Kondo, Kazuhisa; Ohashi, Taiki; Shimano, Masayuki; Kihara, Shinji; Murohara, Toyoaki; Walsh, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Obesity-linked diseases are associated with suppressed endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) function. Adiponectin is an adipose-derived protein that is downregulated in obese and diabetic subjects. Here, we investigated the effects of adiponectin on EPCs. EPC levels did not increase in adiponectin deficient (APN-KO) in response to hindlimb ischemia. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of adiponectin increased EPC levels in both WT and APN-KO mice. Incubation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells ...

  10. Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Antibody for Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Joseph A.; Hsu, Frank P K; Jacob, Arun T; Bota, Daniela A.; Alexandru, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive investigation, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains one of the deadliest cancers, with low progression-free survival and high one-year mortality. Current first-line therapy includes surgery with adjuvant radiation therapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy, but virtually all tumors recur. Given the highly vascular nature of GBM and its high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and other angiogenic factors, recent investigation has turned to bevacizumab, an antivascular...

  11. Endothelial cell pseudopods and angiogenesis of breast cancer tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Sun LuZhe; Short Nicholas; Cameron Ivan L; Hardman W Elaine

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background A neoplastic tumor cannot grow beyond a millimeter or so in diameter without recruitment of endothelial cells and new blood vessels to supply nutrition and oxygen for tumor cell survival. This study was designed to investigate formation of new blood vessels within a human growing breast cancer tumor model (MDA MB231 in mammary fat pad of nude female mouse). Once the tumor grew to 35 mm3, it developed a well-vascularized capsule. Histological sections of tumors greater than...

  12. Enhanced Re-Endothelialization of Decellularized Rat Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabler, Collin T; Caires, Luiz C; Mondrinos, Mark J; Marcinkiewicz, Cezary; Lazarovici, Philip; Wolfson, Marla R; Lelkes, Peter I

    2016-05-01

    Decellularized lung tissue has been recognized as a potential platform to engineer whole lung organs suitable for transplantation or for modeling a variety of lung diseases. However, many technical hurdles remain before this potential may be fully realized. Inability to efficiently re-endothelialize the pulmonary vasculature with a functional endothelium appears to be the primary cause of failure of recellularized lung scaffolds in early transplant studies. Here, we present an optimized approach for enhanced re-endothelialization of decellularized rodent lung scaffolds with rat lung microvascular endothelial cells (ECs). This was achieved by adjusting the posture of the lung to a supine position during cell seeding through the pulmonary artery. The supine position allowed for significantly more homogeneous seeding and better cell retention in the apex regions of all lobes than the traditional upright position, especially in the right upper and left lobes. Additionally, the supine position allowed for greater cell retention within large diameter vessels (proximal 100-5000 μm) than the upright position, with little to no difference in the small diameter distal vessels. EC adhesion in the proximal regions of the pulmonary vasculature in the decellularized lung was dependent on the binding of EC integrins, specifically α1β1, α2β1, and α5β1 integrins to, respectively, collagen type-I, type-IV, and fibronectin in the residual extracellular matrix. Following in vitro maturation of the seeded constructs under perfusion culture, the seeded ECs spread along the vascular wall, leading to a partial reestablishment of endothelial barrier function as inferred from a custom-designed leakage assay. Our results suggest that attention to cellular distribution within the whole organ is of paramount importance for restoring proper vascular function. PMID:26935764

  13. Corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in Phramongkutklao Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narumon Sopapornamorn

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Narumon Sopapornamorn1, Manapon Lekskul1, Suthee Panichkul21Department of Ophthalmology, Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine, Bangkok, ThailandObjective: To describe the corneal endothelial density and morphology in patients of Phramongkutklao Hospital and the relationship between endothelial cell parameters and other factors.Methods: Four hundred and four eyes of 202 volunteers were included. Noncontact specular microscopy was performed after taking a history and testing the visual acuity, intraocular pressure measurement, Schirmer’s test and routine eye examination by slit lamp microscope. The studied parameters included mean endothelial cell density (MCD, coefficient of variation (CV, and percentage of hexagonality.Results: The mean age of volunteers was 45.73 years; the range being 20 to 80 years old. Their MCD (SD, mean percentage of CV (SD and mean (SD percentage of hexagonality were 2623.49(325 cell/mm2, 39.43(8.23% and 51.50(10.99%, respectively. Statistically, MCD decreased significantly with age (p < 0.01. There was a significant difference in the percentage of CV between genders. There was no statistical significance between parameters and other factors.Conclusion: The normative data of the corneal endothelium of Thai eyes indicated that, statistically, MCD decreased significantly with age. Previous studies have reported no difference in MCD, percentage of CV, and percentage of hexagonality between gender. Nevertheless, significantly different percentages of CV between genders were presented in this study.Keywords: Corneal endothelial cell, parameters, age, gender, smoking, Thailand

  14. Effect of Intracameral Use of Dexamethasone on Corneal Endothelial Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of intracameral dexamethasone on corneal endothelium. Study Design: Quasi experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Layton Rehmatulla Benevolent Trust Eye Hospital, Lahore, from May 2011 to January 2012. Methodology: Study subjects were adults of either gender with senile cataract who underwent phacoemulsification. They were divided in two groups, each had 110 patients. Group-A received subconjunctival injection of dexamethasone (2 mg/0.5 ml) at the end of surgery while group-B received intracameral injection of dexamethasone (0.4 mg/0.1 ml) at the end of surgery. Endothelial cell count was performed by specular microscopy pre-operatively and postoperatively at first week, first month and three months. Outcome measures included changes in endothelial cell count. Results were compared using t-test for means. Results: There were 55 (50%) males and 55 (50%) females in group-A and 44 (40%) males and 66 (60%) females in group-B. In group-A, there were 66 (60%) right and 44 (40%) left eyes while group-B had 62 (56.36%) right and 48 (43.63%) left eyes. Mean age in group-A was 55.17 A +- 5.93 years and 54.87 A +- 5.55 years in group-B. Mean phacoemulsification time in group-A was 1.92 A +- 0.63 minutes and 1.82 A +- 0.54 minutes in group-B. After 3 months, in group-A, there was 7.55 A +- 1.19% endothelial cell loss while in group-B, there was 7.63 A +- 1.10% endothelial cell loss. The difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (p=0.614). Conclusion: Use of intracameral dexamethasone at the end of cataract surgery is safe for corneal endothelium. (author)

  15. Hypothyroidism Is Associated With Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Sara, Jaskanwal D; Zhang, Ming; Gharib, Hossein; Lerman, Lilach O.; Lerman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypothyroidism is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease, beyond that which can be explained by its association with conventional cardiovascular risk factors. Coronary endothelial dysfunction precedes atherosclerosis, has been linked to adverse cardiovascular events, and may account for some of the increased risk in patients with hypothyroidism. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between epicardial and microvascular coronary...

  16. Endothelial glycocalyx conditions influence nanoparticle uptake for passive targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng MJ; Kumar R.; Sridhar S; Webster TJ; Ebong EE

    2016-01-01

    Ming J Cheng,1 Rajiv Kumar,2 Srinivas Sridhar,1–3 Thomas J Webster,1,4 Eno E Ebong1 1Department of Chemical Engineering, 2Department of Physics, Northeastern University, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 4Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Cardiovascular diseases are facilitated by endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and coincide with EC glycocalyx coat shedding. These ...

  17. Endothelial changes following irradiation. Pt. 3. Morphological changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Fazhi; Sugihara, Tsuneki; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Minagawa, Takehiko; Hattori, Yuichi [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-08-01

    Both ears of rabbits were radiated with a single 45 Gy dose of {sup 60C}o. At one hour, 1, 4, 6 and 10 weeks after the irradiation, the blood vessels grossly were observed and fixed by proximal perfusion with 2% glutaraldehyde phosphate buffered solution and prepared for SEM observation. Parts of vessels from the same rabbit were fixed in 10% formalin and paraffin sections were prepared for standard HE staining. Epilation was observed beginning at four weeks after irradiation. There was scar formation at 10 weeks. Small skin ulcers and secretion from the auditory canal also were observed. Epilation was almost complete, and there was thickening of the irradiated ears. HE staining did not reveal any obvious intimal proliferation. The smooth muscle of the tunica media was disorganized to some extent. There was neutrophil infiltration in the adventitia, especially around the vasa vasorum. Progressive fibrosis in the adventitia also was identified. SEM study showed changes in endothelial cells occurring from the fourth week. The endothelial cells shrank, while areas of the basement membrane at the widened intercellular became exposed from six weeks after irradiation. In severely irradiated areas, endothelial cells became detached from the basement membrane. Dehiscence of the internal elastic membrane resulted in an exposure of bared connective tissue. The detached area was covered by fibrin, platelets, erythrocytes and degenerated protein. (K.H.)

  18. Denture-Related Stomatitis Is Associated with Endothelial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Maciąg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral inflammation, such as periodontitis, can lead to endothelial dysfunction, accelerated atherosclerosis, and vascular dysfunction. The relationship between vascular dysfunction and other common forms of oral infections such as denture-related stomatitis (DRS is unknown. Similar risk factors predispose to both conditions including smoking, diabetes, age, and obesity. Accordingly, we aimed to investigate endothelial function and major vascular disease risk factors in 44 consecutive patients with dentures with clinical and microbiological features of DRS (n=20 and without DRS (n=24. While there was a tendency for higher occurrence of diabetes and smoking, groups did not differ significantly in respect to major vascular disease risk factors. Groups did not differ in main ambulatory blood pressure, total cholesterol, or even CRP. Importantly, flow mediated dilatation (FMD was significantly lower in DRS than in non-DRS subjects, while nitroglycerin induced vasorelaxation (NMD or intima-media thickness (IMT was similar. Interestingly, while triglyceride levels were normal in both groups, they were higher in DRS subjects, although they did not correlate with either FMD or NMD. Conclusions. Denture related stomatitis is associated with endothelial dysfunction in elderly patients with dentures. This is in part related to the fact that diabetes and smoking increase risk of both DRS and cardiovascular disease.

  19. Coniferyl Aldehyde Ameliorates Radiation Intestine Injury via Endothelial Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ye Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Lee, Yoonjin; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yunsil [Ewha Woman' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Younggyu [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Cancer treatments related gastrointestinal toxicity has also been recognized as a significant economic burden. Especially, extensive apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cell of the lamina propria is the primary lesion initiating intestinal radiation damage after abdominal radiation therapy. Coniferyl aldehyde (CA) is phenolic compounds isolated from cork stoppers, and one of the major pyrolysis products of lignin. Shi H. was support for the empirical use of CA as a medicinal food for cardiovascular diseases. CA has positive effect in broad way but there is no consequence in radiation induced intestine damage. Here, we investigate effect of CA on small intestine after abdominal IR to mice in this study. In this study, CA increased the survival rate in C3H mice against 13.5 Gy abdominal IR. We found CA protects small intestine via preventing endothelial cell apoptosis and enhancing their angiogenic activity. CA also showed protective effect on crypt cell survival. Endothelial cell survival may affect crypt cell protection against IR. From this data, we concluded that CA is effective for protection against abdominal radiation injury. CA could ameliorate side-effect of radiation therapy.

  20. Vascular endothelial dysfunction: a tug of war in diabetic nephropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Chakkarwar, Vishal Arvind; Krishan, Pawan; Singh, Manjeet

    2009-03-01

    Vascular endothelium regulates vascular tone and maintains free flow of blood in vessels. Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) results in reduced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), reduced generation and bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The eNOS uncoupling in VED leads to eNOS mediated production of ROS that further damage the endothelial cells by upregulating the proinflammatory mediators and adhesion molecules. VED has been associated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, atherosclerosis, coronary artery diseases, diabetes mellitus and nephropathy. Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia followed by micro and macrovascular complications. A correlation between diabetes and VED has been demonstrated in various studies. The downregulation of eNOS in diabetes has been noted to accelerate diabetic nephropathy. Moreover, various endogenous vasoconstrictors are also upregulated in diabetic nephropathy. VED has been shown to be involved in diabetic nephropathy by inducing nodular glomerulosclerosis followed by glomerular basement membrane thickness and mesangial expansion, which ultimately decline glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Thus it is suggested that diabetes-induced VED could be one of the culprits involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels. PMID:26571019

  2. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  3. Curcumin and folic acid abrogated methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankrityayan, Himanshu; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2016-01-01

    Methotrexate, an antifolate drug widely used in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and cancer, is known to cause vascular endothelial dysfunction by causing hyperhomocysteinemia, direct injury to endothelium or by increasing the oxidative stress (raising levels of 7,8-dihydrobiopterin). Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and therapeutic spectra similar to that of methotrexate. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of curcumin on methotrexate induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and also compare its effect with that produced by folic acid (0.072 μg·g(-1)·day(-1), p.o., 2 weeks) per se and in combination. Male Wistar rats were exposed to methotrexate (0.35 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), i.p.) for 2 weeks to induce endothelial dysfunction. Methotrexate exposure led to shedding of endothelium, decreased vascular reactivity, increased oxidative stress, decreased serum nitrite levels, and increase in aortic collagen deposition. Curcumin (200 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) and 400 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1), p.o.) for 4 weeks prevented the increase in oxidative stress, decrease in serum nitrite, aortic collagen deposition, and also vascular reactivity. The effects were comparable with those produced by folic acid therapy. The study shows that curcumin, when concomitantly administered with methotrexate, abrogated its vascular side effects by preventing an increase in oxidative stress and abating any reduction in physiological nitric oxide levels.

  4. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia. PMID:22771710

  5. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2016-07-12

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell. The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins, and G protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphorylation of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an endothelial cell subjected to a step increase of wall shear stress from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1-5 min) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases. PMID:27410748

  6. Antioxidant Effects of Sheep Whey Protein on Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthalia Kerasioti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS may cause endothelial dysfunction and consequently vascular disease. In the present study, the possible protective effects of sheep whey protein (SWP from tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (tBHP- induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells (EA.hy926 were assessed using oxidative stress biomarkers. These oxidative stress biomarkers were glutathione (GSH and ROS levels determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS, protein carbonyls (CARB, and oxidized glutathione (GSSG were determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that SWP at 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, and 6.24 mg of protein mL−1 increased GSH up to 141%, while it decreased GSSG to 46.7%, ROS to 58.5%, TBARS to 52.5%, and CARB to 49.0%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that SWP protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress. Thus, SWP may be used for developing food supplements or biofunctional foods to attenuate vascular disturbances associated with oxidative stress.

  7. Antioxidant Effects of Sheep Whey Protein on Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerasioti, Efthalia; Stagos, Dimitrios; Georgatzi, Vasiliki; Bregou, Erinda; Priftis, Alexandros; Kafantaris, Ioannis; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause endothelial dysfunction and consequently vascular disease. In the present study, the possible protective effects of sheep whey protein (SWP) from tert-butyl hydroperoxide- (tBHP-) induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells (EA.hy926) were assessed using oxidative stress biomarkers. These oxidative stress biomarkers were glutathione (GSH) and ROS levels determined by flow cytometry. Moreover, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls (CARB), and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were determined spectrophotometrically. The results showed that SWP at 0.78, 1.56, 3.12, and 6.24 mg of protein mL(-1) increased GSH up to 141%, while it decreased GSSG to 46.7%, ROS to 58.5%, TBARS to 52.5%, and CARB to 49.0%. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that SWP protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress. Thus, SWP may be used for developing food supplements or biofunctional foods to attenuate vascular disturbances associated with oxidative stress. PMID:27127549

  8. Design of biomimetic vascular grafts with magnetic endothelial patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Delphine; Le Visage, Catherine; Ino, Julia; Gazeau, Florence; Letourneur, Didier; Wilhelm, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The development of small diameter vascular grafts with a controlled pluricellular organization is still needed for effective vascular tissue engineering. Here, we describe a technological approach combining a tubular scaffold and magnetically labeled cells to create a pluricellular and organized vascular graft, the endothelialization of which could be monitored by MRI prior to transplantation. A novel type of scaffold was developed with a tubular geometry and a porous bulk structure enabling the seeding of cells in the scaffold pores. A homogeneous distribution of human mesenchymal stem cells in the macroporous structure was obtained by seeding the freeze-dried scaffold with the cell suspension. The efficient covering of the luminal surface of the tube was then made possible thanks to the implementation of a magnetic-based patterning technique. Human endothelial cells or endothelial progenitors were magnetically labeled with iron oxide nanoparticles and successfully attracted to the 2-mm lumen where they attached and formed a continuous endothelium. The combination of imaging modalities [fluorescence imaging, histology, and 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] evidenced the integrity of the vascular construct. In particular, the observation of different cell organizations in a vascular scaffold within the range of resolution of single cells by 4.7 T MRI is reported. PMID:23295155

  9. Circulating Endothelial Microparticles: A Key Hallmark of Atherosclerosis Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshav Raj Paudel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of circulating microparticles (MPs are raised in various cardiovascular diseases. Their increased level in plasma is regarded as a biomarker of alteration in vascular function. The prominent MPs present in blood are endothelial microparticles (EMPs described as complex submicron (0.1 to 1.0 μm vesicles like structure, released in response to endothelium cell activation or apoptosis. EMPs possess both physiological and pathological effects and may promote oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. EMPs release is triggered by inducer like angiotensin II, lipopolysaccharide, and hydrogen peroxide leading to the progression of atherosclerosis. However, there are multiple physiological pathways for EMPs generation like NADPH oxidase derived endothelial ROS formation, Rho kinase pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Endothelial dysfunction is a key initiating event in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Atheroemboli, resulting from ruptured carotid plaques, is a major cause of stroke. Increasing evidence suggests that EMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, acting as a marker of damage, either exacerbating disease progression or triggering a repair response. In this regard, it has been suggested that EMPs have the potential to act as biomarkers of disease status. This review aims to provide updated information of EMPs in relation to atherosclerosis pathogenesis.

  10. Asymmetric dimethylarginine, endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability and mortality in sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua S Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasma concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, are raised in patients with chronic vascular disease, causing increased cardiovascular risk and endothelial dysfunction, but the role of ADMA in acute inflammatory states is less well defined. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a prospective longitudinal study in 67 patients with acute sepsis and 31 controls, digital microvascular reactivity was measured by peripheral arterial tonometry and blood was collected at baseline and 2-4 days later. Plasma ADMA and L-arginine concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Baseline plasma L-arginine: ADMA ratio was significantly lower in sepsis patients (median [IQR] 63 [45-103] than in hospital controls (143 [123-166], p<0.0001 and correlated with microvascular reactivity (r = 0.34, R(2 = 0.12, p = 0.02. Baseline plasma ADMA was independently associated with 28-day mortality (Odds ratio [95% CI] for death in those in the highest quartile (≥ 0.66 µmol/L = 20.8 [2.2-195.0], p = 0.008, and was independently correlated with severity of organ failure. Increase in ADMA over time correlated with increase in organ failure and decrease in microvascular reactivity. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired endothelial and microvascular function due to decreased endothelial NO bioavailability is a potential mechanism linking increased plasma ADMA with organ failure and death in sepsis.

  11. Genistein Attenuates Vascular Endothelial Impairment in Ovariectomized Hyperhomocysteinemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy is a well-known independent risk factor for vascular diseases in the general population. This study was to explore the effect of genistein (GST, a natural bioactive compound derived from legumes, on HHcy-induced vascular endothelial impairment in ovariectomized rats in vivo. Thirty-two adult female Wistar rats were assigned randomly into four groups (n=8: (a Con: control; (b Met: 2.5% methionine diet; (c OVX + Met: ovariectomy + 2.5% methionine diet; (d OVX + Met + GST: ovariectomy + 2.5% methionine diet + supplementation with genistein. After 12 wk of different treatment, the rats' blood, toracic aortas and liver samples were collected for analysis. Results showed that high-methionine diet induced both elevation of plasma Hcy and endothelial dysfunction, and ovariectomy deteriorated these injuries. Significant improvement of both functional and morphological changes of vascular endothelium was observed in OVX + Met + GST group; meanwhile the plasma Hcy levels decreased remarkably. There were significant elevations of plasma ET-1 and liver MDA levels in ovariectomized HHcy rats, and supplementation with genistein could attenuate these changes. These results implied that genistein could lower the elevated Hcy levels, and prevent the development of endothelial impairment in ovariectomized HHcy rats. This finding may shed a novel light on the anti-atherogenic activities of genistein in HHcy patients.

  12. Endothelial Dysfunction Correlates with Liver Fibrosis in Chronic HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Barone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection can exert proatherogenic activities due to its direct action on vessel walls and/or via the chronic inflammatory process involving the liver. Aims. To clarify the role of HCV in atherosclerosis development in monoinfected HCV patients at different degrees of liver fibrosis and with no risk factors for coronary artery disease. Methods. Forty-five patients were included. Clinical, serological, and anthropometric parameters, liver fibrosis (transient liver elastometry (fibroscan and aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI, carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT, and brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD were assessed. Patients were divided into 3 tertiles according to fibroscan values. Results. Patients in the third tertile (fibroscan value >11.5 KPa showed FMD values were significantly lower than second and first tertiles (4.7±1.7% versus 7.1±2.8%, p=0.03. FMD values were inversely related to liver elastomeric values. c-IMT values were normal. The risk for endothelial dysfunction development in the third tertile (p=0.02 was 6.9 higher than the first tertile. A fibroscan value >11.5 KPa had a positive predictive power equal to 79% for endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions. HCV advanced liver fibrosis promotes atherosclerosis by inducing endothelial dysfunction independently of common cardiovascular risk factors.

  13. Mechanical property quantification of endothelial cells using scanning acoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelke, A.; Brand, S.; Kundu, T.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Blase, C.

    2012-04-01

    The mechanical properties of cells reflect dynamic changes of cellular organization which occur during physiologic activities like cell movement, cell volume regulation or cell division. Thus the study of cell mechanical properties can yield important information for understanding these physiologic activities. Endothelial cells form the thin inner lining of blood vessels in the cardiovascular system and are thus exposed to shear stress as well as tensile stress caused by the pulsatile blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction might occur due to reduced resistance to mechanical stress and is an initial step in the development of cardiovascular disease like, e.g., atherosclerosis. Therefore we investigated the mechanical properties of primary human endothelial cells (HUVEC) of different age using scanning acoustic microscopy at 1.2 GHz. The HUVECs are classified as young (tD 90 h) cells depending upon the generation time for the population doubling of the culture (tD). Longitudinal sound velocity and geometrical properties of cells (thickness) were determined using the material signature curve V(z) method for variable culture condition along spatial coordinates. The plane wave technique with normal incidence is assumed to solve two-dimensional wave equation. The size of the cells is modeled using multilayered (solid-fluid) system. The propagation of transversal wave and surface acoustic wave are neglected in soft matter analysis. The biomechanical properties of HUVEC cells are quantified in an age dependent manner.

  14. Oxidative Stress-Dependent Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez-Mendez, Ana María; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Ríos, Amelia; Escalante, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is involved in several cardiovascular diseases including coronary artery disease and endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial Endothelium vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agonists play a key role in regulation of vascular tone. In this study, we evaluated coronary vascular response in an 8 weeks diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice model. Coronary perfusion pressure in response to acetylcholine in isolated hearts from obese mice showed increased vasoconstriction and reduced vasodilation responses compared with control mice. Vascular nitric oxide assessed in situ with DAF-2 DA showed diminished levels in coronary arteries from obese mice in both basal and acetylcholine-stimulated conditions. Also, released prostacyclin was decreased in heart perfusates from obese mice, along with plasma tetrahydrobiopterin level and endothelium nitric oxide synthase dimer/monomer ratio. Obesity increased thromboxane A2 synthesis and oxidative stress evaluated by superoxide and peroxynitrite levels, compared with control mice. Obese mice treated with apocynin, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, reversed all parameters to normal levels. These results suggest that after 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, the increase in oxidative stress lead to imbalance in vasoactive substances and consequently to endothelial dysfunction in coronary arteries.

  15. Endothelial targeting of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV via surface vimentin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristopher J Koudelka

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV is a plant comovirus in the picornavirus superfamily, and is used for a wide variety of biomedical and material science applications. Although its replication is restricted to plants, CPMV binds to and enters mammalian cells, including endothelial cells and particularly tumor neovascular endothelium in vivo. This natural capacity has lead to the use of CPMV as a sensor for intravital imaging of vascular development. Binding of CPMV to endothelial cells occurs via interaction with a 54 kD cell-surface protein, but this protein has not previously been identified. Here we identify the CPMV binding protein as a cell-surface form of the intermediate filament vimentin. The CPMV-vimentin interaction was established using proteomic screens and confirmed by direct interaction of CPMV with purified vimentin, as well as inhibition in a vimentin-knockout cell line. Vimentin and CPMV were also co-localized in vascular endothelium of mouse and rat in vivo. Together these studies indicate that surface vimentin mediates binding and may lead to internalization of CPMV in vivo, establishing surface vimentin as an important vascular endothelial ligand for nanoparticle targeting to tumors. These results also establish vimentin as a ligand for picornaviruses in both the plant and animal kingdoms of life. Since bacterial pathogens and several other classes of viruses also bind to surface vimentin, these studies suggest a common role for surface vimentin in pathogen transmission.

  16. Differential regulation of angiopoietin 1 and angiopoietin 2 during dengue virus infection of human umbilical vein endothelial cells: implications for endothelial hyperpermeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Siew Pei; Ng, Mah Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2013-12-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DV) can result in dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, where patients suffer from bleeding and plasma leakage involving endothelial cells. Angiopoietins (Ang) 1 and 2 are important angiogenic factors that affect endothelial barrier integrity. In this study, DV was observed to induce endothelial leakage at multiplicity of infection of 10 in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with interendothelial gap formation. Immunostaining of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) and zona occludin 1 (ZO-1) showed the absence of these endothelial junctional proteins at the cell-cell contact zones between adjacent cells. In addition, Ang1 that is required for protecting against endothelial hyperpermeability was found to be down-regulated during DV infection. Treatment with increasing concentrations of recombinant Ang1 was shown to prevent DV-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in a dose-dependent manner by preventing the down-regulation of VE-cadherin and ZO-1 at cell membrane. In contrast, the expression of Ang2, the natural antagonist of Ang1, was observed to be up-regulated during DV infection. Recombinant Ang2 added to HUVEC at non-toxic concentrations showed decreased in transendothelial electrical resistance reading and the down-regulation of VE-cadherin and ZO-1. These findings suggest that DV reduces the expression of Ang1 and enhances the expression of Ang2 in endothelial cells and that this imbalance of Ang 1 and Ang 2 may play a contributing role to the increased permeability of human primary endothelial cells during DV infection. PMID:23989887

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor attachment to hydroxyapatite via self-assembled monolayers promotes angiogenic activity of endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, Kimberly D., E-mail: solomonk@livemail.uthscsa.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); UTSA-UTHSCSA Joint Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, San Antonio, TX (United States); Ong, Joo L., E-mail: anson.ong@utsa.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); UTSA-UTHSCSA Joint Graduate Program in Biomedical Engineering, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-06-30

    Currently, tissue engineered constructs for critical sized bone defects are non-vascularized. There are many strategies used in order to promote vascularization, including delivery of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this study, hydroxyapatite (HA) was coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The SAMs were in turn used to covalently bind VEGF to the surface of HA. The different SAM chain length ratios (phosphonoundecanoic acid (11-PUDA):16-phosphonohexadecanoic acid (16-PHDA) utilized in this study were 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25, and 100:0. Surfaces were characterized by contact angle (CA) and atomic force microscopy, and an in vitro VEGF release study was performed. It was observed that CA and root-mean-squared roughness were not significantly affected by the addition of SAMs, but that CA was significantly lowered with the addition of VEGF. VEGF release profiles of bound VEGF groups all demonstrated less initial burst release than adsorbed control, indicating that VEGF was retained on the HA surface when bound by SAMs. An in vitro study using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) demonstrated that bound VEGF increased metabolic activity and caused sustained production of angiopoietin-2, an angiogenic marker, over 28 days. In conclusion, SAMs provide a feasible option for growth factor delivery from HA surfaces, enhancing angiogenic activity of HAECs in vitro. - Highlights: • Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is attached to hydroxyapatite (HA). • Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) delay the release of VEGF from hydroxyapatite. • SAM chain length ratio affects the total mass of VEGF released. • VEGF on HA up-regulates proliferation and angiogenic activity of endothelial cells.

  18. The Secretome of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Promotes Brain Endothelial Cell Activity through PI3-Kinase and MAP-Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Santo, Stefano; Seiler, Stefanie; Fuchs, Anna-Lena; Staudigl, Jennifer; Widmer, Hans Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis and vascular remodelling are crucial events in tissue repair mechanisms promoted by cell transplantation. Current evidence underscores the importance of the soluble factors secreted by stem cells in tissue regeneration. In the present study we investigated the effects of paracrine factors derived from cultured endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) on rat brain endothelial cell properties and addressed the signaling pathways involved. Methods Endothelial cells derived from rat brain (rBCEC4) were incubated with EPC-derived conditioned medium (EPC-CM). The angiogenic response of rBCEC4 to EPC-CM was assessed as effect on cell number, migration and tubular network formation. In addition, we have compared the outcome of the in vitro experiments with the effects on capillary sprouting from rat aortic rings. The specific PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 and the MEK/ERK inhibitor PD98059 were used to study the involvement of these two signaling pathways in the transduction of the angiogenic effects of EPC-CM. Results Viable cell number, migration and tubule network formation were significantly augmented upon incubation with EPC-CM. Similar findings were observed for aortic ring outgrowth with significantly longer sprouts. The EPC-CM-induced activities were significantly reduced by the blockage of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Similarly to the outcome of the rBCEC4 experiments, inhibition of the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways significantly interfered with capillary sprouting induced by EPC-CM. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that EPC-derived paracrine factors substantially promote the angiogenic response of brain microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, our findings identified the PI3K/AKT and MEK/ERK pathways to play a central role in mediating these effects. PMID:24755675

  19. SIRT3 Deficiency Induces Endothelial Insulin Resistance and Blunts Endothelial-Dependent Vasorelaxation in Mice and Human with Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Yang; Julei Zhang; Wenjuan Xing; Xing Zhang; Jie Xu; Haifeng Zhang; Li Chen; Xiaona Ning; Gang Ji; Jia Li; Qingchuan Zhao; Feng Gao

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the critical role of Sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) in the development of many metabolic diseases, but the contribution of SIRT3 to vascular homeostasis remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of SIRT3 in endothelial insulin resistance and vascular dysfunction in obesity. We found an impaired insulin-induced mesenteric vasorelaxation and concomitant reduced vascular SIRT3 expression in morbid obese human subjects compared with the non-obese sub...

  20. Natural antioxidant dihydroxybenzyl alcohol blocks ritonavir-induced endothelial dysfunction in porcine pulmonary arteries and human endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weakley, Sarah M.; Jiang, Jun; Lü, Jianming; Wang, Xinwen; Lin, Peter H.; Yao, Qizhi; Chen, Changyi

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Patients with HIV have an increased incidence of pulmonary artery hypertension. This study was designed to determine if the naturally occurring antioxidant dihydroxybenzyl alcohol (DHBA) could counteract the deleterious effects of ritonavir (RTV), an HIV-protease inhibitor known to impair endothelial function and increase oxidative stress. Material/Methods Antioxidant assays were performed on DHBA in a cell free system. Glutathione (GSH) levels were measured in human pulmon...

  1. Vascular endothelial growth factor attachment to hydroxyapatite via self-assembled monolayers promotes angiogenic activity of endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, tissue engineered constructs for critical sized bone defects are non-vascularized. There are many strategies used in order to promote vascularization, including delivery of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In this study, hydroxyapatite (HA) was coated with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The SAMs were in turn used to covalently bind VEGF to the surface of HA. The different SAM chain length ratios (phosphonoundecanoic acid (11-PUDA):16-phosphonohexadecanoic acid (16-PHDA) utilized in this study were 0:100, 25:75, 50:50, 75:25, and 100:0. Surfaces were characterized by contact angle (CA) and atomic force microscopy, and an in vitro VEGF release study was performed. It was observed that CA and root-mean-squared roughness were not significantly affected by the addition of SAMs, but that CA was significantly lowered with the addition of VEGF. VEGF release profiles of bound VEGF groups all demonstrated less initial burst release than adsorbed control, indicating that VEGF was retained on the HA surface when bound by SAMs. An in vitro study using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) demonstrated that bound VEGF increased metabolic activity and caused sustained production of angiopoietin-2, an angiogenic marker, over 28 days. In conclusion, SAMs provide a feasible option for growth factor delivery from HA surfaces, enhancing angiogenic activity of HAECs in vitro. - Highlights: • Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is attached to hydroxyapatite (HA). • Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) delay the release of VEGF from hydroxyapatite. • SAM chain length ratio affects the total mass of VEGF released. • VEGF on HA up-regulates proliferation and angiogenic activity of endothelial cells

  2. Mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for efficient delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengtie; Fan, Wei; Chang, Jiang; Xiao, Yin

    2013-09-01

    In this article, we, for the first time, investigated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds for the delivery of vascular endothelial growth factor. We have found that mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds have significantly higher loading efficiency and more sustained release of vascular endothelial growth factor than non-mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds. In addition, vascular endothelial growth factor delivery from mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds has improved the viability of endothelial cells. The study has suggested that mesopore structures in mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds play an important role in improving the loading efficiency, decreasing the burst release, and maintaining the bioactivity of vascular endothelial growth factor, indicating that mesoporous bioactive glass scaffolds are an excellent carrier of vascular endothelial growth factor for potential bone tissue engineering applications.

  3. Analysis of vascular endothelial dysfunction genes and related pathways in obesity through systematic bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jing; Sun, Ling; Xu, Qiuqin; Hou, Miao; Ding, Yueyue; Huang, Jie; Chen, Ye; Cao, Lei; Zhang, Jianmin; Qian, Weiguo; Lv, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become an increasingly serious health problem and popular research topic. It is associated with many diseases, especially cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related endothelial dysfunction. This study analyzed genes related to endothelial dysfunction and obesity and then summarized their most significant signaling pathways. Genes related to vascular endothelial dysfunction and obesity were extracted from a PubMed database, and analyzed by STRING, DAVID, and Gene-Go Meta-Core software. 142 genes associated with obesity were found to play a role in endothelial dysfunction in PubMed. A significant pathway (Angiotensin system maturation in protein folding and maturation) associated with obesity and endothelial dysfunction was explored. The genes and the pathway explored may play an important role in obesity. Further studies about preventing vascular endothelial dysfunction obesity should be conducted through targeting these loci and pathways.

  4. An Important Method in the Investigation of Vascular Pathologies: Endothelial Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusufhan Yazır

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells line the interior surface of blood vessels and form an interface between circulating blood in the lumen and the rest of the vessel wall. Endothelial cells are involved in many aspects of vascular biology, including barrier function, vasoconstriction, coagulation and inflamation. The endothelial cells in different organs have different functions and surface phenotype. These cells express prostoglandin-I2, platelet activating factor, collagen, endothelin-1, laminin, fibronectin and growth factors including platelet derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor. İn the cell culture, cells can be isolated, maintened and proliferate in the laboratory conditions. The techniques of the cell culture have allowed scientists to use the cells in vitro for experimental studies, such as the production of vaccine, antibody and enzime, drug research, cell-cell interactions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell is a good source for endothelial cell, because it is cheaper, easy to find and has the basic features of the normal endothelial cells.

  5. Overexpression of Ref-1 Inhibits Lead-induced Endothelial Cell Death via the Upregulation of Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwon Ho; Lee, Sang Ki; Kim, Hyo Shin; Cho, Eun Jung; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Ji Young; Park, Myoung Soo; Chang, Seok Jong; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2009-12-01

    The role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1/redox factor-1 (Ref-1) on the lead (Pb)-induced cellular response was investigated in the cultured endothelial cells. Pb caused progressive cellular death in endothelial cells, which occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. However, Ref-1 overexpression with AdRef-1 significantly inhibited Pb-induced cell death in the endothelial cells. Also the overexpression of Ref-1 significantly suppressed Pb-induced superoxide and hydrogen peroxide elevation in the endothelial cells. Pb exposure induced the downregulation of catalase, it was inhibited by the Ref-1 overexpression in the endothelial cells. Taken together, our data suggests that the overexpression of Ref-1 inhibited Pb-induced cell death via the upregulation of catalase in the cultured endothelial cells.

  6. Growth factor-and cytokine-stimulated endothelial progenitor cells in post-ischemic cerebral neovascularization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philip V.Peplow

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells are resident in the bone marrow blood sinusoids and circulate in the peripheral circulation. They mobilize from the bone marrow after vascular injury and home to the site of injury where they differentiate into endothelial cells. Activation and mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells from the bone marrow is induced via the production and release of endothelial progenitor cell-activating factors and includes speciifc growth factors and cytokines in response to peripheral tissue hypoxia such as after acute ischemic stroke or trauma. Endotheli-al progenitor cells migrate and home to speciifc sites following ischemic stroke via growth factor/cytokine gradients. Some growth factors are less stable under acidic conditions of tissue isch-emia, and synthetic analogues that are stable at low pH may provide a more effective therapeutic approach for inducing endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and promoting cerebral neovas-cularization following ischemic stroke.

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A165b Is Protective and Restores Endothelial Glycocalyx in Diabetic Nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltean, Sebastian; Qiu, Yan; Ferguson, Joanne K; Stevens, Megan; Neal, Chris; Russell, Amy; Kaura, Amit; Arkill, Kenton P; Harris, Kirstie; Symonds, Clare; Lacey, Katja; Wijeyaratne, Lihini; Gammons, Melissa; Wylie, Emma; Hulse, Richard P; Alsop, Chloe; Cope, George; Damodaran, Gopinath; Betteridge, Kai B; Ramnath, Raina; Satchell, Simon C; Foster, Rebecca R; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Donaldson, Lucy F; Barratt, Jonathan; Baelde, Hans J; Harper, Steven J; Bates, David O; Salmon, Andrew H J

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of ESRD in high-income countries and a growing problem across the world. Vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) is thought to be a critical mediator of vascular dysfunction in diabetic nephropathy, yet VEGF-A knockout and overexpression of angiogenic VEGF-A isoforms each worsen diabetic nephropathy. We examined the vasculoprotective effects of the VEGF-A isoform VEGF-A165b in diabetic nephropathy. Renal expression of VEGF-A165b mRNA was upregulated in diabetic individuals with well preserved kidney function, but not in those with progressive disease. Reproducing this VEGF-A165b upregulation in mouse podocytes in vivo prevented functional and histologic abnormalities in diabetic nephropathy. Biweekly systemic injections of recombinant human VEGF-A165b reduced features of diabetic nephropathy when initiated during early or advanced nephropathy in a model of type 1 diabetes and when initiated during early nephropathy in a model of type 2 diabetes. VEGF-A165b normalized glomerular permeability through phosphorylation of VEGF receptor 2 in glomerular endothelial cells, and reversed diabetes-induced damage to the glomerular endothelial glycocalyx. VEGF-A165b also improved the permeability function of isolated diabetic human glomeruli. These results show that VEGF-A165b acts via the endothelium to protect blood vessels and ameliorate diabetic nephropathy. PMID:25542969

  8. Protective Effects of Resveratrol on TNF-α-Induced Endothelial Cytotoxicity in Baboon Femoral Arterial Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial injury induced by inflammatory factors plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Endothelial cell (EC apoptosis, proliferation, migration, and cellular adhesion molecule (CAM expression contribute to the development of atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of resveratrol (0.1–100 μM on the proliferation, migration, and CAM expression of primary cultures of baboon arterial endothelial cells (BAECs. In addition, we tested its effects under normal conditions as well as under inflammatory conditions induced by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α administered either by cotreatment, pretreatment, or posttreatment. Immunocytochemistry, MTT, wound-healing, and flow cytometry assays were performed. The resveratrol treatment significantly enhanced BAEC proliferation and attenuated TNF-α-induced impairment of proliferation at the optimal doses of 1–50 µM. Resveratrol at a high dose (100 μM and TNF-α impaired BAEC migration, while low doses of resveratrol (1–50 μM attenuated TNF-α-induced impairment of BAEC migration. Moreover, resveratrol inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that the resveratrol protects BAECs after inflammatory stimulation as well as ameliorates inflammatory effects at low concentrations. Consequently, resveratrol should be considered as a candidate drug for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory vascular diseases.

  9. Recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 activates endothelial cells and increases the permeability of endothelial cell monolayer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Li Zhang

    Full Text Available The recombinant Treponema pallidum protein Tp0965 (rTp0965, one of the many proteins derived from the genome of T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, shows strong immunogenicity and immunoreactivity. In this study, we investigated the effects of rTp0965 on the endothelial barrier. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs with rTp0965 resulted in increased levels of ICAM-1, E-selectin, and MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. These increases contributed to the adhesion and chemataxis of monocytes (THP-1 cells to HUVECs preincubated with rTp0965. In addition, rTp0965 induced reorganization of F-actin and decreased expression of claudin-1 in HUVECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the RhoA/ROCK signal pathway protected against rTp0965-induced higher endothelial permeability as well as transendothelial migration of monocytes. These data indicate that Tp0965 protein may play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of syphilis.

  10. Fo Shou San, an ancient Chinese herbal decoction, protects endothelial function through increasing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy W C Bi

    Full Text Available Fo Shou San (FSS is an ancient herbal decoction comprised of Chuanxiong Rhizoma (CR; Chuanxiong and Angelicae Sinensis Radix (ASR; Danggui in a ratio of 2:3. Previous studies indicate that FSS promotes blood circulation and dissipates blood stasis, thus which is being used widely to treat vascular diseases. Here, we aim to determine the cellular mechanism for the vascular benefit of FSS. The treatment of FSS reversed homocysteine-induced impairment of acetylcholine (ACh-evoked endothelium-dependent relaxation in aortic rings, isolated from rats. Like radical oxygen species (ROS scavenger tempol, FSS attenuated homocysteine-stimulated ROS generation in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, and it also stimulated the production of nitric oxide (NO as measured by fluorescence dye and biochemical assay. In addition, the phosphorylation levels of both Akt kinase and endothelial NO synthases (eNOS were markedly increased by FSS treatment, which was abolished by an Akt inhibitor triciribine. Likewise, triciribine reversed FSS-induced NO production in HUVECs. Finally, FSS elevated intracellular Ca(2+ levels in HUVECs, and the Ca(2+ chelator BAPTA-AM inhibited the FSS-stimulated eNOS phosphorylation. The present results show that this ancient herbal decoction benefits endothelial function through increased activity of Akt kinase and eNOS; this effect is causally via a rise of intracellular Ca(2+ and a reduction of ROS.

  11. Hydrogel Surfaces to Promote Attachment and Spreading of Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Nichol, Jason William; Bae, Hojae; Tekin, Halil; Bischoff, Joyce; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Endothelialization of artificial vascular grafts is a challenging process in cardiovascular tissue engineering. Functionalized biomaterials could be promising candidates to promote endothelialization in repair of cardiovascular injuries. The purpose of this study was to synthesize hyaluronic acid (HA) and heparin based hydrogels that could promote adhesion and spreading of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). We report that the addition of heparin into HA-based hydrogels provides an attractiv...

  12. Endothelial Dysfunction Is Associated With Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Mi Jung; Han, Seung Hyeok; Lee, Jung Eun; Choi, Hoon Young; Yoon, Chang-Yun; Kim, Eun Jin; Han, Jae Hyun; Han, Ji Suk; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Kang, Shin-Wook; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endothelial dysfunction is implicated in increased cardiovascular risk in nondialyzed population. However, the prognostic impact of endothelial dysfunction on cardiovascular outcome has not been investigated in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. We prospectively determined endothelial function by brachial artery endothelium-dependent vasodilation (flow-mediated dilation [FMD]) in 143 nondiabetic PD patients and 32 controls. Primary outcome was a major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascu...

  13. Induction of procoagulant activity on human endothelial cells by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Geelen, S; Bhattacharyya, C; Tuomanen, E

    1992-01-01

    The inflammatory response in infection caused by gram-negative organisms involves induction of procoagulant activity (PCA) on human endothelial cells. Although infections caused by gram-positive organisms are also associated with fibrin formation and thrombosis, the bacterial determinants inducing PCA are unknown. This study shows that intact pneumococci and the pneumococcal cell wall efficiently induce PCA on human endothelial cells. Upon exposure of endothelial cells to pneumococci, PCA was...

  14. Is there a relationship between endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene polymorphisms and ankylosing spondylitis?

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Sari; Yusuf Ziya Igci; Gercek Can; Ali Taylan; Dilek Solmaz; Bulent Gogebakan; Servet Akar; Zeynep Eslik; Giray Bozkaya; Nurullah Akkoc

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Nitric oxide is produced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and its production can be influenced by polymorphisms of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene. Because candidate genes responsible for susceptibility to ankylosing spondylitis are mostly unknown and available data suggest that there may be problems related to the nitric oxide pathway, such as endothelial dysfunction and increased asymmetric dimethylarginine, this study aimed to assess the association of common end...

  15. Oxidative Stress Induces Endothelial Cell Senescence via Downregulation of Sirt6

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Liu; Hua Liu; Yonju Ha; Tilton, Ronald G.; Wenbo Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that diabetes accelerates aging and endothelial cell senescence is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, including diabetic retinopathy. Oxidative stress is recognized as a key factor in the induction of endothelial senescence and diabetic retinopathy. However, specific mechanisms involved in oxidative stress-induced endothelial senescence have not been elucidated. We hypothesized that Sirt6, which is a nuclear, chromatin-bound protei...

  16. Jujuboside B Reduces Vascular Tension by Increasing Ca2+ Influx and Activating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yixiu; Zhang, Xin; Li, Jiannan; Bian, Yu; Sheng, Miaomiao; Liu, Bin; Fu, Zidong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    Jujuboside B has been reported to have protective effect on many cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of Jujuboside B on vascular tension and endothelial function are unknown. The present study investigated the effects of Jujuboside B on reducing vascular tension, protecting endothelial function and the potential mechanisms. The tension of isolated rat thoracic aorta ring was measured by Wire myograph system. The concentration of nitric oxide (NO) and the activity of endothelial nitr...

  17. Function and Mode of Regulation of Endothelial Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Irina; Edelman, Elazer R.; Methe, Heiko

    2009-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach to implement endothelial cells as a cellular delivery therapy for vascular disease. We and others previously demonstrated that endothelial cells embedded in three-dimensional collagen-based matrices retain their full biosecretory spectrum, enabling them to serve as powerful regulators of vascular diseases. Fascinatingly, matrix embedding of endothelial cells not only allows for their implantation but also seems to provide protection from allo- and xe...

  18. Nox2 NADPH Oxidase Has a Critical Role in Insulin Resistance–Related Endothelial Cell Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Sukumar, Piruthivi; Viswambharan, Hema; Imrie, Helen; Cubbon, Richard M.; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Gage, Matthew; Galloway, Stacey; Skromna, Anna; Kandavelu, Parkavi; Santos, Celio X.; Gatenby, V. Kate; Smith, Jessica; Beech, David J; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Channon, Keith M.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is characterized by excessive endothelial cell generation of potentially cytotoxic concentrations of reactive oxygen species. We examined the role of NADPH oxidase (Nox) and specifically Nox2 isoform in superoxide generation in two complementary in vivo models of human insulin resistance (endothelial specific and whole body). Using three complementary methods to measure superoxide, we demonstrated higher levels of superoxide in insulin-resistant endothelial cells, which cou...

  19. Angiostatin binds ATP synthase on the surface of human endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moser, Tammy L.; Stack, M. Sharon; Asplin, Iain; Enghild, Jan J; Højrup, Peter; Everitt, Lorraine; Hubchak, Susan; Schnaper, H. William; Pizzo, Salvatore V.

    1999-01-01

    Angiostatin, a proteolytic fragment of plasminogen, is a potent antagonist of angiogenesis and an inhibitor of endothelial cell migration and proliferation. To determine whether the mechanism by which angiostatin inhibits endothelial cell migration and/or proliferation involves binding to cell surface plasminogen receptors, we isolated the binding proteins for plasminogen and angiostatin from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Binding studies demonstrated that plasminogen and angiostatin...

  20. Expression and Function of the Homeostatic Molecule Del-1 in Endothelial Cells and the Periodontal Tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Jieun Shin; Hosur, Kavita B.; Kalyani Pyaram; Ravi Jotwani; Shuang Liang; Triantafyllos Chavakis; George Hajishengallis

    2013-01-01

    Developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1) is an endothelial cell-secreted protein that limits the recruitment of neutrophils by antagonizing the interaction between the LFA-1 integrin on neutrophils and the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 on endothelial cells. Mice with genetic or age-associated Del-1 deficiency exhibit increased neutrophil infiltration in the periodontium resulting in inflammatory bone loss. Here we investigated additional novel mechanisms whereby Del-1 could interf...

  1. Regulation of Thrombomodulin Expression and Release in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells by Cyclic Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Fiona A.; Alisha McLoughlin; Rochfort, Keith D.; Colin Davenport; Murphy, Ronan P.; Cummins, Philip M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Thrombomodulin (TM), an integral membrane glycoprotein expressed on the lumenal surface of vascular endothelial cells, promotes anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. Release of functional TM from the endothelium surface into plasma has also been reported. Much is still unknown however about how endothelial TM is regulated by physiologic hemodynamic forces (and particularly cyclic strain) intrinsic to endothelial-mediated vascular homeostasis. Methods This ...

  2. Functional and gene expression analysis of hTERT overexpressed endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruna Takano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Haruna Takano1, Satoshi Murasawa1,2, Takayuki Asahara1,2,31Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe, Japan; 2RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Kobe 650-0047, Japan; 3Tokai University of School of Medicine, Tokai, JapanAbstract: Telomerase dysfunction contributes to cellular senescence. Recent advances indicate the importance of senescence in maintaining vascular cell function in vitro. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT overexpression is thought to lead to resistance to apoptosis and oxidative stress. However, the mechanism in endothelial lineage cells is unclear. We tried to generate an immortal endothelial cell line from human umbilical vein endothelial cells using a no-virus system and examine the functional mechanisms of hTERT overexpressed endothelial cell senescence in vitro. High levels of hTERT genes and endothelial cell-specific markers were expressed during long-term culture. Also, angiogenic responses were observed in hTERT overexpressed endothelial cell. These cells showed a delay in senescence and appeared more resistant to stressed conditions. PI3K/Akt-related gene levels were enhanced in hTERT overexpressed endothelial cells. An up-regulated PI3K/Akt pathway caused by hTERT overexpression might contribute to anti-apoptosis and survival effects in endothelial lineage cells.Keywords: endothelial, telomerase, senescence, oxidative stress, anti-apoptosis, PI3K/Akt pathway

  3. Surface modification and endothelialization of biomaterials as potential scaffolds for vascular tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiangkui; Feng, Yakai; Guo, Jintang; Wang, Haixia; Li, Qian; Yang, Jing; Hao, Xuefang; Lv, Juan; Ma, Nan; Li, Wenzhong

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification and endothelialization of vascular biomaterials are common approaches that are used to both resist the nonspecific adhesion of proteins and improve the hemocompatibility and long-term patency of artificial vascular grafts. Surface modification of vascular grafts using hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol), zwitterionic polymers, heparin or other bioactive molecules can efficiently enhance hemocompatibility, and consequently prevent thrombosis on artificial vascular grafts. However, these modified surfaces may be excessively hydrophilic, which limits initial vascular endothelial cell adhesion and formation of a confluent endothelial lining. Therefore, the improvement of endothelialization on these grafts by chemical modification with specific peptides and genes is now arousing more and more interest. Several active peptides, such as RGD, CAG, REDV and YIGSR, can be specifically recognized by endothelial cells. Consequently, graft surfaces that are modified by these peptides can exhibit targeting selectivity for the adhesion of endothelial cells, and genes can be delivered by targeting carriers to specific tissues to enhance the promotion and regeneration of blood vessels. These methods could effectively accelerate selective endothelial cell recruitment and functional endothelialization. In this review, recent developments in the surface modification and endothelialization of biomaterials in vascular tissue engineering are summarized. Both gene engineering and targeting ligand immobilization are promising methods to improve the clinical outcome of artificial vascular grafts. PMID:26023741

  4. Endothelial cell chimerism by fluorescence in situ hybridization in gender mismatched renal allograft biopsies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Hong-wei; SHI Bing-yi; QIAN Ye-yong; NA Yan-qun; ZENG Xuan; ZHONG Ding-rong; LU Min; ZOU Wan-zhong; WU Shi-fei

    2007-01-01

    Background The blood vessels of a transplanted organ are the interface between donor and recipient. The endothelium in the blood vessels is thought to be the major target for graft rejection. Endothelial cells of a transplanted organ can be of recipient origin after transplantation. In this study, we tested whether endothelial chimerism correlated with the graft rejection and cold ischemia.Methods We studied the biopsy samples from 34 renal transplants of female recipients who received the kidney from a male donor for the presence of endothelial cells of recipient origin. We examined the tissue sections of renal biopsy samples by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the presence of endothelial cells containing two X chromosomes using a biotinylated Y chromosome probe and digoxigenin labelled X chromosome probe, and then analyzed the relationship between the endothelial cell chimerism and the rejection and cold ischemia.Results Endothelial chimerism was common and irrespective of rejections (P>0.05). The cold ischemic time of chimerism group was longer than no chimerism group ((14.83±4.03) hours vs (11.27±3.87) hours, P<0.05).Conclusions There is no correlation between the percentage of recipient endothelial cells in vascular endothelial cells and the type of graft rejection. The endothelium damaged by ischemic injury might be repaired by the endothelial cells from the recipient.

  5. Effects of blood products on inflammatory response in endothelial cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Urner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transfusing blood products may induce inflammatory reactions within the vascular compartment potentially leading to a systemic inflammatory response. Experiments were designed to assess the inflammatory potential of different blood products in an endothelial cell-based in vitro model and to compare baseline levels of potentially activating substances in transfusion products. METHODS: The inflammatory response from pre-activated (endotoxin-stimulated and non-activated endothelial cells as well as neutrophil endothelial transmigration in response to packed red blood cells (PRBC, platelet concentrates (PC and fresh frozen plasma (FFP was determined. Baseline inflammatory mediator and lipid concentrations in blood products were evaluated. RESULTS: Following incubation with all blood products, an increased inflammatory mediator release from endothelial cells was observed. Platelet concentrates, and to a lesser extent also FFP, caused the most pronounced response, which was accentuated in already pre-stimulated endothelial cells. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells as well as blood product-induced migration of neutrophils through the endothelium was in good agreement with the lipid content of the according blood product. CONCLUSION: Within the group of different blood transfusion products both PC and FFP have a high inflammatory potential with regard to activation of endothelial cells. Inflammation upon blood product exposure is strongly accentuated when endothelial cells are pre-injured. High lipid contents in the respective blood products goes along with an accentuated inflammatory reaction from endothelial cells.

  6. Tumor endothelial marker 5 expression in endothelial cells during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor endothelial marker (TEM) 5 is an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor upregulated in endothelial cells during tumor and physiologic angiogenesis. So far, the mechanisms leading to upregulation of TEM5 and its function during angiogenesis have not been identified. Here, we report that TEM5 expression in endothelial cells is induced during capillary-like network formation on Matrigel, during capillary morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen I matrix, and upon confluence on a two-dimensional matrix. TEM5 expression was not induced by a variety of soluble angiogenic factors, including VEGF and bFGF, in subconfluent endothelial cells. TEM5 upregulation was blocked by toxin B from Clostridium difficile, an inhibitor of the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. The Rho inhibitor C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum did not affect TEM5 expression, whereas the Rac inhibitor NSC23766 suppressed TEM5 upregulation. An excess of the soluble TEM5 extracellular domain or an inhibitory monoclonal TEM5 antibody blocked contact inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation resulting in multilayered islands within the endothelial monolayer and increased vessel density during capillary formation. Based on our results we conclude that TEM5 expression during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of proliferation in endothelial cells.

  7. Tumor endothelial marker 5 expression in endothelial cells during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallon, Mario, E-mail: m.vallon@arcor.de [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Rohde, Franziska; Janssen, Klaus-Peter [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Essler, Markus [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany)

    2010-02-01

    Tumor endothelial marker (TEM) 5 is an adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor upregulated in endothelial cells during tumor and physiologic angiogenesis. So far, the mechanisms leading to upregulation of TEM5 and its function during angiogenesis have not been identified. Here, we report that TEM5 expression in endothelial cells is induced during capillary-like network formation on Matrigel, during capillary morphogenesis in a three-dimensional collagen I matrix, and upon confluence on a two-dimensional matrix. TEM5 expression was not induced by a variety of soluble angiogenic factors, including VEGF and bFGF, in subconfluent endothelial cells. TEM5 upregulation was blocked by toxin B from Clostridium difficile, an inhibitor of the small GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42. The Rho inhibitor C3 transferase from Clostridium botulinum did not affect TEM5 expression, whereas the Rac inhibitor NSC23766 suppressed TEM5 upregulation. An excess of the soluble TEM5 extracellular domain or an inhibitory monoclonal TEM5 antibody blocked contact inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation resulting in multilayered islands within the endothelial monolayer and increased vessel density during capillary formation. Based on our results we conclude that TEM5 expression during capillary morphogenesis is induced by the small GTPase Rac and mediates contact inhibition of proliferation in endothelial cells.

  8. Inhibitory Effect of the Punica granatum Fruit Extract on Angiotensin-II Type I Receptor and Thromboxane B2 in Endothelial Cells Induced by Plasma from Preeclamptic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Widya Kusumawati; Kusnarman Keman; Setyawati Soeharto

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate whether the Punica granatum fruit extract modulates the Angiotensin-II Type I receptor (AT1-R) and thromboxane B2 level in endothelial cells induced by plasma from preeclamptic patients. Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical vascular endothelial cells. At confluence, endothelial cells were divided into five groups, which included endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from normal pregnancy (NP), endothelial cells exposed to 2% plasma from preeclampti...

  9. Endothelial LSP1 Modulates Extravascular Neutrophil Chemotaxis by Regulating Nonhematopoietic Vascular PECAM-1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mokarram; Qadri, Syed M; Xu, Najia; Su, Yang; Cayabyab, Francisco S; Heit, Bryan; Liu, Lixin

    2015-09-01

    During inflammation, leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions generate molecular signals that regulate cell functions. The Ca(2+)- and F-actin-binding leukocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1) expressed in leukocytes and nonhematopoietic endothelial cells is pivotal in regulating microvascular permeability and leukocyte recruitment. However, cell-specific function of LSP1 during leukocyte recruitment remains elusive. Using intravital microscopy of cremasteric microvasculature of chimeric LSP1-deficient mice, we show that not neutrophil but endothelial LSP1 regulates neutrophil transendothelial migration and extravascular directionality without affecting the speed of neutrophil migration in tissue in response to CXCL2 chemokine gradient. The expression of PECAM-1-sensitive α6β1 integrins on the surface of transmigrated neutrophils was blunted in mice deficient in endothelial LSP1. Functional blocking studies in vivo and in vitro elucidated that α6β1 integrins orchestrated extravascular directionality but not the speed of neutrophil migration. In LSP1-deficient mice, PECAM-1 expression was reduced in endothelial cells, but not in neutrophils. Similarly, LSP1-targeted small interfering RNA silencing in murine endothelial cells mitigated mRNA and protein expression of PECAM-1, but not ICAM-1 or VCAM-1. Overexpression of LSP1 in endothelial cells upregulated PECAM-1 expression. Furthermore, the expression of transcription factor GATA-2 that regulates endothelial PECAM-1 expression was blunted in LSP1-deficient or LSP1-silenced endothelial cells. The present study unravels endothelial LSP1 as a novel cell-specific regulator of integrin α6β1-dependent neutrophil extravascular chemotactic function in vivo, effective through GATA-2-dependent transcriptional regulation of endothelial PECAM-1 expression. PMID:26238489

  10. Firewall function of the endothelial glycocalyx in the regulation of sodium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Stefanie; Wiesinger, Anne; Straeter, Alexandra S; Peters, Wladimir; Oberleithner, Hans; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina

    2012-02-01

    Plasma sodium, slightly above normal and in presence of aldosterone, stiffens vascular endothelium and reduces nitric oxide release with the consequence of endothelial dysfunction. This process is mediated by epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) and, most likely, the endothelial Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Both, ENaC and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, are located in the plasma membrane of endothelial cells and embedded in the endothelial glycocalyx (eGC). This negatively charged biopolymer is directly exposed to the blood stream and selectively buffers sodium ions. We hypothesize that the glycocalyx could interfere with endothelial sodium transport when extracellular sodium varies in the physiological range. Therefore, we modeled the endothelial cell as a pump-leak system measuring changes of intracellular sodium in cultured human endothelial cells. Experiments were performed under low/high extracellular sodium conditions before and after enzymatic eGC removal, and with inhibition of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and ENaC, respectively. Three major observations were made: (1) eGC removal by heparinase treatment facilitates sodium to enter/exit the endothelial cells. (2) The direction of net sodium movement across the endothelial plasma membrane depends on the concentration of extracellular sodium which regulates both the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and ENaC activity. (3) Removal of eGC and inhibition of sodium transport modify the electrical resistance of endothelial cells. We conclude that the eGC serves as a potential "firewall" preventing uncontrolled access of sodium to the pump-leak system of the endothelial cell. After eGC removal, sodium access to the system is facilitated. Thus the pump-leak system could be regulated by ambient sodium and control vascular permeability in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:22057584

  11. Galectin-3 induces pulmonary artery endothelial cell morphogenesis and angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; LI Yu-mei; WANG Xiao-yan; ZHU Da-ling

    2016-01-01

    AIM:Increasing evidence suggests that carbohydrate-binding proteins play an essential role in tumor growth and metastasis .Ga-lectin-3, a multifunctional protein of an expanding family of β-galactoside-binding animal lectins , is the major nonintegrin cellular laminin-binding protein , and is implicated in a variety of biologic events , such as inflammation and angiogenesis .Because galectin-3 expression was shown to participate in mediating tumor angiogenesis and initiate signaling cascades in several diseases .We hypothe-sized that galectin-3 may promote pulmonary vascular endothelial neovascularization .METHODS:Hypoxic and MCT rat model of pul-monary artery remodeling was used .The mRNA and protein levels of galectin-3 in rats were measured by in situ hybrization and West-ern blot analysis.Endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, migration and tube formation were measured using MTT , cell scratch and Matri-gel assays, respectively.Protein expression was quantitated by Western blot analysis .LC 3A/B staining was detected with cellular im-munofluorescence staining .RESULTS:We found that galectin-3 was localized on the intima and adventitial wall .Galectin-3 was in-creased after rat hypoxia and MCT administration .Galectin-3 promoted EC proliferation , migration and tube formation , while its roles were reversed by RNA interference.Galectin-3 induced Atg 5, Beclin-1, LAMP-2, and LC 3A/B expression increases.Galectin-3 al-so increased LC 3A/B staining in ECs.Akt/mTOR and GSK-3βsignaling pathways were activated after galectin-3 treated ECs using its specific phosphorylation antibodies , while blocked it with LY294002 inhibited cell autophagy and EC dynamic alterations induced by galectin-3.CONCLUSION:These findings demonstrate that galectin-3 can induce an Akt signaling cascade leading to cell autoph-agy, and then the differentiation and angiogenesis of pulmonary artery endothelial cells .

  12. Junctional communication is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, M S; Spray, D C; Chanson, M; Montesano, R; Orci, L; Meda, P

    1989-12-01

    Using an in vitro model in which a confluent monolayer of capillary endothelial cells is mechanically wounded, gap junction-mediated intercellular communication has been studied by loading the cells with the fluorescent dye, Lucifer Yellow. Approximately 40-50% of the cells in a nonwounded confluent monolayer were coupled in groups of four to five cells (basal level). Basal levels of communication were also observed in sparse and preconfluent cultures, but were reduced in postconfluent monolayers. 30 min after wounding, coupling was markedly reduced between cells lining the wound. Communication at the wound was partially reestablished by 2 h, exceeded basal levels after 6 h and reached a maximum after 24 h, at which stage approximately 90% of the cells were coupled in groups of six to seven cells. When the wound had closed (after 8 d), the increase in communication was no longer observed. Induction of wound-associated communication was unaffected by exposure of the cells to the DNA synthesis inhibitor mitomycin C, but was prevented by the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide. The induction of wound-associated communication was also inhibited when migration was prevented by placing the cells immediately after wounding at 22 degrees C or after exposure to cytochalasin D, suggesting that the increase in communication is dependent on cells migrating into the wound area. In contrast, migration was not prevented when coupling was blocked by exposure of the cells to retinoic acid, although this agent did disrupt the characteristic sheet-like pattern of migration typically seen during endothelial repair. These results suggest that junctional communication may play an important role in wound repair, possibly by coordinating capillary endothelial cell migration. PMID:2592412

  13. Involvement of Rho-kinase in experimental vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhvanit I; Singh, Manjeet

    2006-02-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of fasudil (Rho-kinase inhibitor) in diabetes mellitus (DM) and hyperhomocyteinemia (HHcy) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED). Streptozotocin (55 mg kg(-1), i.v., once only) and methionine (1.7% w/w, p.o., daily for 4 weeks) were administered to rats to produce DM (serum glucose >140 mg dl(-1)) and HHcy (serum homocysteine >10 microM) respectively. VED was assessed using isolated aortic ring, electron microscopy of thoracic aorta, and serum concentration of nitrite/nitrate. Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration was estimated to assess oxidative stress. Atorvastatin has been employed in the present study as standard agent to improve vascular endothelial dysfunction. Fasudil (15 mg kg(-1) and 30 mg kg(-1), p.o., daily) and atorvastatin (30 mg kg(-1), p.o., daily) treatments significantly attenuated increase in serum glucose and homocysteine but their concentrations remained markedly higher than sham control value. Fasudil and atorvastatin treatments markedly prevented DM and HHcy-induced (i) attenuation of acetylcholine induced endothelium-dependent relaxation, (ii) impairment of vascular endothelial lining, (iii) decrease in serum nitrite/nitrate concentration, and (iv) increase in serum TBARS. It may be concluded that fasudil prevented DM and HHcy-induced VED partially by decreasing serum glucose and homocysteine concentration due to inhibition of Rho-kinase. Moreover, inhibition of Rho-kinase by fasudil and consequent prevention of oxidative stress may have directly improved VED in diabetic and hyperhomocysteinemic rats. The Rho-kinase appears to be a pivotal target site involved in DM and HHcy-induced VED.

  14. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO2 nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO2 nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells

  15. Carnosine facilitates nitric oxide production in endothelial f-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Nakashima, Yukiko; Toda, Ken-Ichi

    2009-11-01

    We examined the effect of carnosine (beta-alanyl-histidine) on nitric oxide (NO) production and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation in endothelial F-2 cells. Carnosine enhanced NO production in a dose-dependent manner, and the stimulatory effect of carnosine was observed at concentrations exceeding 5 mM. The carnosine-stimulated NO production was inhibited by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but not by N(G)-nitro-D-arginine methyl ester. In contrast, beta-alanine, histidine (carnosine components) and anserine (N-methyl carnosine) failed to increase NO production. Carnosine had no effect on NO production for the initial 5 min, but thereafter resulted in a gradual increase in NO production up to 15 min. Carnosine did not induce phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177. The carnosine-induced increase in NO production was observed even when extracellular Ca2+ was depleted by ethylene glycol bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N'-N'-tetraacetic acid however, the effect was abolished upon depletion of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA. After F-2 cells were incubated with carnosine for 4 min, intracellular Ca2+ concentration gradually increased. The carnosine-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration occurred even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. These results indicate that carnosine facilitates NO production in endothelial F-2 cells. It is also suggested that eNOS is activated by Ca2+, which might be released from intracellular Ca2+ stores in response to carnosine. PMID:19881293

  16. Automated quantification reveals hyperglycemia inhibits endothelial angiogenic function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Prisco

    Full Text Available Diabetes Mellitus (DM has reached epidemic levels globally. A contributing factor to the development of DM is high blood glucose (hyperglycemia. One complication associated with DM is a decreased angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube formation assay (TFA is the most widely utilized in vitro assay designed to assess angiogenic factors and conditions. In spite of the widespread use of Matrigel TFAs, quantification is labor-intensive and subjective, often limiting experiential design and interpretation of results. This study describes the development and validation of an open source software tool for high throughput, morphometric analysis of TFA images and the validation of an in vitro hyperglycemic model of DM.Endothelial cells mimic angiogenesis when placed onto a Matrigel coated surface by forming tube-like structures. The goal of this study was to develop an open-source software algorithm requiring minimal user input (Pipeline v1.3 to automatically quantify tubular metrics from TFA images. Using Pipeline, the ability of endothelial cells to form tubes was assessed after culture in normal or high glucose for 1 or 2 weeks. A significant decrease in the total tube length and number of branch points was found when comparing groups treated with high glucose for 2 weeks versus normal glucose or 1 week of high glucose.Using Pipeline, it was determined that hyperglycemia inhibits formation of endothelial tubes in vitro. Analysis using Pipeline was more accurate and significantly faster than manual analysis. The Pipeline algorithm was shown to have additional applications, such as detection of retinal vasculature.

  17. Specific endothelial binding and tumor uptake of radiolabeled angiostatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung-Han; Song, Sung Hee; Paik, Jin-Young; Byun, Sang Sung; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Choe, Yearn Seong; Kim, Byung-Tae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwondong, Kangnamgu, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    Angiostatin (AS) is a potent antiangiogenic agent which inhibits tumor growth through specific action on proliferating endothelial cells. Imaging of radiolabeled AS would enhance our knowledge on the pharmacokinetics of AS and might provide useful information relating to tumor neovasculature. We therefore investigated the potential of radiolabeled AS as a novel tumor imaging agent. Human angiostatin was radioiodine labeled using the lactoperoxidase method. Competition binding studies showed a dose-dependent inhibition of {sup 125}I-AS binding to endothelial cells by excess unlabeled AS, and a displacement curve demonstrated that specific binding was dose dependent and saturable, with a K{sub d} value of 169 nM. Gel analysis showed that {sup 125}I-AS remained stable in serum for up to 24 h without significant degradation. Intravenously injected {sup 125}I-AS in rats was cleared from the blood in an exponential fashion. Biodistribution data from human colon cancer-bearing Balb/C nude mice showed high uptake in the kidneys, stomach, liver, and lungs. Tumor uptake was 3.2{+-}0.7, 2.6{+-}0.2, and 1.7{+-}0.2%ID/g at 2, 4, and 9 h after injection, respectively. Tumor to muscle count ratio increased from 3.1{+-}0.5 at 2 h to 4.4{+-}0.5 at 9 h. Serial scintigraphy from 1 to 5 h after {sup 123}I-AS injection demonstrated high uptake in the kidneys and bladder, consistent with renal excretion. There was clear demarcation of tumor by 1 h, with gradual increase in contrast over time (4-h tumor to contralateral thigh ratio =4.7{+-}1.1). Thus, radioiodine-labeled angiostatin binds specifically to endothelial cells and has potential as a novel tumor imaging agent. (orig.)

  18. Thalidomide effect in endothelial cell of acute radiation proctitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ki-Tae Kim; Hiun-Suk Chae; Jin-Soo Kim; Hyung-Keun Kim; Young-Seok Cho; Whang Choi; Kyu-Yong Choi; Sang-Young Rho; Suk-Jin Kang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether thalidomide prevents microvascular injury in acute radiation proctitis in white rats. METHODS: Fourteen female Wistar rats were used:six in the radiation group,six in the thalidomide group,and two in normal controls.The radiation and thalidomide groups were irradiated at the pelvic area using a single 30 Gy exposure.The thalidomide (150 mg/kg) was injected into the peritoneum for 7 d from the day of irradiation.All animals were sacrificed and the rectums were removed on day 8 after irradiation.The microvessels of resected specimens were immunohistochemically stained with thrombomodulin (TM),yon Willebrand Factor (vWF),and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).RESULTS: The microscopic scores did not differ significantly between the radiation and thalidomide groups,but both were higher than in the control group.Expression of TM was significantly lower in the endothelial cells (EC) of the radiation group than in the control and thalidomide groups (P < 0.001).The number of capillaries expressing vWF in the EC was higher in the radiation group (15.3 ± 6.8) than in the control group (3.7 ± 1.7),and the number of capillaries expressing vWF was attenuated by thalidomide (10.8 ± 3.5,P < 0.001).The intensity of VEGF expression in capillaries was greater in the radiation group than in the control group and was also attenuated by thalidomide (P = 0.003).CONCLUSION: The mechanisms of acute radiationinduced proctitis in the rats are related to endothelial cell injury of microvessel,which may be attenuated with thalidomide.

  19. Development of novel arginase inhibitors for therapy of endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen eSteppan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial dysfunction and resulting vascular pathology have been identified as an early hallmark of multiple diseases, including diabetes mellitus. One of the major contributors to endothelial dysfunction is a decrease in nitric oxide (NO bioavailability, impaired NO signaling and an increase in the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS. In the endothelium NO is produced by eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase, for which L-arginine is a substrate. Arginase, an enzyme critical in the urea cycle also metabolizes L-arginine, thereby directly competing with eNOS for their common substrate and constraining its bioavailability for eNOS, thereby compromising NO production. Arginase expression and activity is upregulated in many cardiovascular diseases including ischemia reperfusion injury, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and diabetes mellitus. More importantly, since the 1990s, specific arginase inhibitors such as N-hydroxy-guanidinium or N-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine, and boronic acid derivatives, such as, 2(S-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid, and S-(2-boronoethyl-L-cysteine (BEC, that can bridge the binuclear manganese cluster of arginase have been developed. These highly potent and specific inhibitors can now be used to probe arginase function and thereby modulate the redox milieu of the cell by changing the balance between NO and ROS. Inspired by this success, drug discovery programs have recently led to the identification of α-α-disubstituted amino acid based arginase inhibitors (such as (R-2-amino-6-borono-2-(2-(piperidin-1-ylethylhexanoic acid, that are currently under early investigation as therapeutics. Finally, some investigators concentrate on identification of plant derived compounds with arginase inhibitory capability, such as piceatannol-3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (PG. All of these synthesized or naturally derived small molecules may represent novel therapeutics for vascular disease particularly that associated with diabetes.

  20. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, Claudia, E-mail: Claudia.Strobel@med.uni-jena.de [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Experimental Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Oehring, Hartmut [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Anatomy II (Germany); Herrmann, Rudolf [University of Augsburg, Department of Physics (Germany); Förster, Martin [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Internal Medicine I, Division of Pulmonary Medicine and Allergy/Immunology (Germany); Reller, Armin [University of Augsburg, Department of Physics (Germany); Hilger, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid.hilger@med.uni-jena.de [Jena University Hospital – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Department of Experimental Radiology, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells.

  1. Biomarkers of Endothelial Cell Activation in Early Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    and mortality in sepsis and that (ii) soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) holds promise as a novel prognostic marker in sepsis. METHODS: This was a prospective, multicenter, observational study of a convenience sample of emergency department (ED) patients with a suspected infection presenting to one...... molecule 1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). Outcomes were organ dysfunction and in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: We enrolled a total of 166 patients: 63 with sepsis (38%), 61 with severe sepsis (37%), and 42 with septic shock (25%). All endothelial biomarkers were significantly associated...... with sepsis severity, P

  2. A novel approach to the assessment of vascular endothelial function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathasivam, S; Siddiqui, Z; Greenwald, S [Pathology Group, Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Phababpha, S; Sengmeuan, P; Detchaporn, P; Kukongviriyapan, U, E-mail: s.e.greenwald@qmul.ac.uk [Department of Physiology, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen (Thailand)

    2011-08-17

    Impaired endothelial function (EF) is associated with atherogenesis, and its quantitative assessment has prognostic value. Currently, methods based on assessing flow-mediated dilation (FMD) are technically difficult and expensive. We tested a novel way of assessing EF by measuring the time difference between pulses arriving at the middle fingers of each hand (f-f{Delta}T), whilst FMD is induced in one arm. We compared f-f{Delta}T with standard methods in healthy and diseased subjects. Our findings suggest that the proposed simple and inexpensive technique gives comparable results and has the potential to qualitatively assess EF in the clinical setting, although further work is required.

  3. Endothelial and lipoprotein lipases in human and mouse placenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Christoffersen, Christina;

    2005-01-01

    Placenta expresses various lipase activities. However, a detailed characterization of the involved genes and proteins is lacking. In this study, we compared the expression of endothelial lipase (EL) and LPL in human term placenta. When placental protein extracts were separated by heparin...... protein associated with both cell types. In mouse placentas, lack of LPL expression resulted in increased EL mRNA expression. These results suggest that the cellular expression of EL and LPL in human placenta is different. Nevertheless, the two lipases might have overlapping functions in the mouse...... placenta. Our data also suggest that the major portions of both proteins are stored in an inactive form in human term placenta....

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor antagonist therapy for retinopathy of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2014-12-01

    In this article, the growing problem of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) worldwide, treatments for severe ROP including standard-of-care laser treatment, and the need for new treatments are discussed. Also discussed are the reasons to consider inhibiting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway in severe ROP and the concerns about broad VEGF inhibition. Finally, the potential role of VEGF in ROP based on studies in animal models of oxygen-induced retinopathy, the effects of anti-VEGF based on basic research data, and the clinical relevance of these data are covered. PMID:25459781

  5. Rhubarb Antagonizes Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-induced Vascular Endothelial Permeability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Liang Cui; Sheng Zhang; Zhao-Tao Tian; Zhao-Fen Lin; De-Chang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background:Intact endothelial structure and function are critical for maintaining microcirculatory homeostasis.Dysfunction of the latter is an underlying cause of various organ pathologies.In a previous study,we showed that rhubarb,a traditional Chinese medicine,protected intestinal mucosal microvascular endothelial cells in rats with metastasizing septicemia.In this study,we investigated the effects and mechanisms of rhubarb on matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9)-induced vascular endothelial (VE) permeability.Methods:Rhubarb monomers were extracted and purified by a series of chromatography approaches.The identity of these monomers was analyzed by hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR),carbon-13 NMR,and distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer magnetic resonance spectroscopy.We established a human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer on a Transwell insert.We measured the HUVEC permeability,proliferation,and the secretion of VE-cadherin into culture medium using fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran assay,3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay,and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,respectively,in response to treatment with MMP9 and/or rhubarb monomers.Results:A total of 21 rhubarb monomers were extracted and identified.MMP9 significantly increased the permeability of the HUVEC monolayer,which was significantly reduced by five individual rhubarb monomer (emodin,3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid,1-O-caffeoyl-2-(4-hydroxyl-O-cinnamoyl)-β-D-glucose,daucosterol linoleate,and rhein) or a combination of all five monomers (1 μmol/L for each monomer).Mechanistically,the five-monomer mixture at 1 μmol/L promoted HUVEC proliferation.In addition,MMP9 stimulated the secretion of VE-cadherin into the culture medium,which was significantly inhibited by the five-monomer mixture.Conclusions:The rhubarb mixture of emodin,3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid,1-O-caffeoyl-2-(4-hydroxyl

  6. Flow-induced Expression and Phosphorylation of VASPin Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muller; SYLYAINE; Jean-FranoisSYOLTZ

    2005-01-01

    1 Introduction It is well known that mechanical forces have important influence on endothelial cells, in particular, on cytoskeleton reorganization. VASP (vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein) is a 46 KD actin associated protein. It is a member of Ena/VASP protein family and composed of EVH1, proline-rich and EVH2 domains. It is considered as an important component of the sub-cellular regions where remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton takes place, such as the front of spreading lamellipodia in motile cell...

  7. Endothelial progenitor cells: what use for the cardiologist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddique Aurangzeb

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPC were first described in 1997 and have since been the subject of numerous investigative studies exploring the potential of these cells in the process of cardiovascular damage and repair. Whilst their exact definition and mechanism of action remains unclear, they are directly influenced by different cardiovascular risk factors and have a definite role to play in defining cardiovascular risk. Furthermore, EPCs may have important therapeutic implications and further understanding of their pathophysiology has enabled us to explore new possibilities in the management of cardiovascular disease. This review article aims to provide an overview of the vast literature on EPCs in relation to clinical cardiology.

  8. Histamine release and endothelial leakage from an intravascular contrast medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raininko, R.

    1981-04-01

    The endothelial injury produced by meglumine iodamide was studied in the rat aorta. A mixture of blood and contrast medium was more toxic to the endothelium than the pure contrast agent. This difference disappeared after premedication with antihistamine, which did not affect the injury produced by the pure contrast agent. Meglumine iodamide appears to cause a release of histamine from blood but not from the aortic endothelium nor from surrounding tissues in amounts demonstrable by this method. Leucocytes are a source of histamine after intravascular contrast medium administration.

  9. Renal endothelial injury and microvascular dysfunction in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sudhanshu Kumar; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The kidney is comprised of heterogeneous cell populations that function together to perform a number of tightly controlled, complex and interdependent processes. Renal endothelial cells contribute to vascular tone, regulation of blood flow to local tissue beds, modulation of coagulation and inflammation, and vascular permeability. Both ischemia and sepsis have profound effects on the renal endothelium, resulting in microvascular dysregulation resulting in continued ischemia and further injury. In recent years, the concept of the vascular endothelium as an organ that is both the source of and target for inflammatory injury has become widely appreciated. Here we revisit the renal endothelium in the light of ever evolving molecular advances. PMID:25795503

  10. Ischemic preconditioning enhances integrity of coronary endothelial tight junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhao [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States); Jin, Zhu-Qiu, E-mail: zhu-qiu.jin@sdstate.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 57007 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac tight junctions are present between coronary endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning preserves the structural and functional integrity of tight junctions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Myocardial edema is prevented in hearts subjected to ischemic preconditioning. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ischemic preconditioning enhances translocation of ZO-2 from cytosol to cytoskeleton. -- Abstract: Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) is one of the most effective procedures known to protect hearts against ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury. Tight junction (TJ) barriers occur between coronary endothelial cells. TJs provide barrier function to maintain the homeostasis of the inner environment of tissues. However, the effect of IPC on the structure and function of cardiac TJs remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that myocardial IR injury ruptures the structure of TJs and impairs endothelial permeability whereas IPC preserves the structural and functional integrity of TJs in the blood-heart barrier. Langendorff hearts from C57BL/6J mice were prepared and perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Cardiac function, creatine kinase release, and myocardial edema were measured. Cardiac TJ function was evaluated by measuring Evans blue-conjugated albumin (EBA) content in the extravascular compartment of hearts. Expression and translocation of zonula occludens (ZO)-2 in IR and IPC hearts were detected with Western blot. A subset of hearts was processed for the observation of ultra-structure of cardiac TJs with transmission electron microscopy. There were clear TJs between coronary endothelial cells of mouse hearts. IR caused the collapse of TJs whereas IPC sustained the structure of TJs. IR increased extravascular EBA content in the heart and myocardial edema but decreased the expression of ZO-2 in the cytoskeleton. IPC maintained the structure of TJs. Cardiac EBA content and edema were reduced in IPC hearts. IPC

  11. Olive Oil Supplements Ameliorate Endothelial Dysfunction Caused by Concentrated Ambient Particulate Matter Exposure in Healthy Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Context: Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) induces endothelial dysfunction, a risk factor for clinical cardiovascular events and progression of atherosclerosis. Dietary supplements such as olive oil and fish oil have beneficial effects on endothelial function, and ther...

  12. Haemostatic function and biomarkers of endothelial damage before and after platelet transfusion in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A M; Leinøe, E B; Johansson, P I;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The beneficial effect of platelet transfusion on haemostasis is well established, but there is emerging evidence that platelet transfusion induces an inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells. BACKGROUND: We investigated haemostatic function and endothelial biomarkers before...

  13. Vascular damage in testicular cancer patients : A study on endothelial activation by bleomycin and cisplatin in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuver, Janine; De Haas, Esther C.; Van Zweeden, Martine; Gietema, Jourik A.; Meijer, Coby

    2010-01-01

    Following treatment with bleomycin- and cisplatin-containing chemotherapy, testicular cancer patients frequently develop vascular complications, which may result from damage to endothelial cells. Understanding bleomycin- and cisplatin-induced endothelial alterations may help to develop strategies to

  14. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Prima...hu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Prima...hu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Prima...hu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells hg19 All antigens Cardiovascular Prima...hu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Primary_umbilical_vein_endothelial_cells.bed ...

  18. High syndecan-1 levels in acute myeloid leukemia are associated with bleeding, thrombocytopathy, endothelial cell damage, and leukocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Mette Vestskov; Leinøe, Eva Birgitte; Johansson, Pär I;

    2013-01-01

    The risk of hemorrhage is influenced by multiple factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We investigated whether hemorrhage in AML patients was associated with endothelial perturbation, potentially caused by thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction and leukocytosis. Biomarkers of endothelial...

  19. GABAB Receptors Expressed in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells Mediate Intracellular Calcium Concentration Regulation and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Ping Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAB receptors regulate the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i in a number of cells (e.g., retina, airway epithelium and smooth muscle, but whether they are expressed in vascular endothelial cells and similarly regulate the [Ca2+]i is not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of GABAB receptors, a subclass of receptors to the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, in cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs, and to explore if altering receptor activation modified [Ca2+]i and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS translocation. Real-time PCR, western blots and immunofluorescence were used to determine the expression of GABAB1 and GABAB2 in cultured HAECs. The effects of GABAB receptors on [Ca2+]i in cultured HAECs were demonstrated using fluo-3. The influence of GABAB receptors on eNOS translocation was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Both GABAB1 and GABAB2 mRNA and protein were expressed in cultured HAECs, and the GABAB1 and GABAB2 proteins were colocated in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. One hundred μM baclofen caused a transient increase of [Ca2+]i and eNOS translocation in cultured HAECs, and the effects were attenuated by pretreatment with the selective GABAB receptor antagonists CGP46381 and CGP55845. GABAB receptors are expressed in HAECs and regulate the [Ca2+]i and eNOS translocation. Cultures of HAECs may be a useful in vitro model for the study of GABAB receptors and vascular biology.

  20. Profound Endothelial Damage Predicts Impending Organ Failure and Death in Sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Maria E; Johansson, Pär I.; Ostrowski, Sisse R;

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial damage contributes to organ failure and mortality in sepsis, but the extent of the contribution remains poorly quantified. Here, we examine the association between biomarkers of superficial and profound endothelial damage (syndecan-1 and soluble thrombomodulin [sTM], respectively), or...

  1. Recent advances in understanding the roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, Tetsuo; Futamura, Kyoko; Orihara, Kanami; Emi-Sugie, Maiko; Saito, Hirohisa; Matsumoto, Kenji; Matsuda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic disorders commonly involve both chronic tissue inflammation and remodeling caused by immunological reactions to various antigens on tissue surfaces. Due to their anatomical location, vascular endothelial cells are the final responders to interact with various exogenous factors that come into contact with the epithelial surface, such as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and antigens. Recent studies have shed light on the important roles of endothelial cells in the development and exacerbation of allergic disorders. For instance, endothelial cells have the greatest potential to produce several key molecules that are deeply involved in allergic inflammation, such as periostin and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17). Additionally, endothelial cells were recently shown to be important functional targets for IL-33--an essential regulator of allergic inflammation. Notably, almost all endothelial cell responses and functions involved in allergic inflammation are not suppressed by corticosteroids. These corticosteroid-refractory endothelial cell responses and functions include TNF-α-associated angiogenesis, leukocyte adhesion, IL-33-mediated responses and periostin and TARC production. Therefore, these unique responses and functions of endothelial cells may be critically involved in the pathogenesis of various allergic disorders, especially their refractory processes. Here, we review recent studies, including ours, which have elucidated previously unknown pathophysiological roles of vascular endothelial cells in allergic inflammation and discuss the possibility of endothelium-targeted therapy for allergic disorders.

  2. Does a low-salt diet exert a protective effect on endothelial function in normal rats?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, AH; Gschwend, S; Kocks, MJA; Buikema, H; de Zeeuw, D; Navis, GJ

    2001-01-01

    Sodium restriction is often used as an adjunct in the treatment of conditions characterized by endothelial dysfunction, such as hypertension and heart or kidney disease. However, the effect of sodium restriction on endothelial function is not known. Therefore, male Wistar rats were studied after a f

  3. A role for activated endothelial cells in red blood cell clearance: implications for vasopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fens, Marcel H A M; van Wijk, Richard; Andringa, Grietje;

    2012-01-01

    with endothelial cells, marked erythrophagocytosis occurred in the presence of lactadherin under both static and flow conditions. As a consequence, intracellular organization was disturbed and endothelial cells were seen to change shape (‘rounding up’). Increased expression of apoptotic markers indicated...

  4. Unmasking Silent Endothelial Activation in the Cardiovascular System Using Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliere, Julie; Martinez de Lizarrondo, Sara; Choudhury, Robin P; Quenault, Aurélien; Le Béhot, Audrey; Delage, Christine; Chauveau, Dominique; Schanstra, Joost P; Bascands, Jean-Loup; Vivien, Denis; Gauberti, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial activation is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases, acting either as a cause or a consequence of organ injury. To date, we lack suitable methods to measure endothelial activation in vivo. In the present study, we developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method allowing non-invasive endothelial activation mapping in the vasculature of the main organs affected during cardiovascular diseases. In clinically relevant contexts in mice (including systemic inflammation, acute and chronic kidney diseases, diabetes mellitus and normal aging), we provided evidence that this method allows detecting endothelial activation before any clinical manifestation of organ failure in the brain, kidney and heart with an exceptional sensitivity. In particular, we demonstrated that diabetes mellitus induces chronic endothelial cells activation in the kidney and heart. Moreover, aged mice presented activated endothelial cells in the kidneys and the cerebrovasculature. Interestingly, depending on the underlying condition, the temporospatial patterns of endothelial activation in the vascular beds of the cardiovascular system were different. These results demonstrate the feasibility of detecting silent endothelial activation occurring in conditions associated with high cardiovascular risk using molecular MRI. PMID:26379785

  5. Construction of extracellular microenvironment to improve surface endothelialization of NiTi alloy substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To mimic extracellular microenvironment of endothelial cell, a bioactive multilayered structure of gelatin/chitosan pair, embedding with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), was constructed onto NiTi alloy substrate surface via a layer-by-layer assembly technique. The successful fabrication of the multilayered structure was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurement, attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The growth behaviors of endothelial cells on various NiTi alloy substrates were investigated in vitro. Cytoskeleton observation, MTT assay, and wound healing assay proved that the VEGF-embedded multilayer structure positively stimulated adhesion, proliferation and motogenic responses of endothelial cells. More importantly, the present system promoted the nitric oxide production of endothelial cells. The approach affords an alternative to construct extracellular microenvironment for improving surface endothelialization of a cardiovascular implant. - Highlights: • Biofunctional multilayer films mimicking extracellular microenvironment were successfully fabricated. • Multilayered structure stimulated the biological responses of endothelial cells. • The approach affords an efficient approach for surface endothelialization of stent implant

  6. RAPID ENDOTHELIALIZATION OF VASCULAR PROSTHESES BY SEEDING AUTOLOGOUS VENOUS TISSUE FRAGMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NOISHIKI, Y; YAMANE, Y; TOMIZAWA, Y; OKOSHI, T; SATOH, S; WILDEVUUR, CRH; SUZUKI, K

    1992-01-01

    A method was developed to obtain rapid endothelialization of a fabric vascular prosthesis by seeding autologous venous tissue fragments into its wall. In an animal study, complete endothelialization was observed in the entire inner surface of the prosthesis within 2 weeks after implantation. A piece

  7. Construction of extracellular microenvironment to improve surface endothelialization of NiTi alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peng, E-mail: liupeng79@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); State Key Laboratory of Molecular Engineering of Polymers, Department of Macromolecular Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhao, Yongchun; Yan, Ying; Hu, Yan; Yang, Weihu [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Cai, Kaiyong, E-mail: kaiyong_cai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology of Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-10-01

    To mimic extracellular microenvironment of endothelial cell, a bioactive multilayered structure of gelatin/chitosan pair, embedding with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), was constructed onto NiTi alloy substrate surface via a layer-by-layer assembly technique. The successful fabrication of the multilayered structure was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurement, attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The growth behaviors of endothelial cells on various NiTi alloy substrates were investigated in vitro. Cytoskeleton observation, MTT assay, and wound healing assay proved that the VEGF-embedded multilayer structure positively stimulated adhesion, proliferation and motogenic responses of endothelial cells. More importantly, the present system promoted the nitric oxide production of endothelial cells. The approach affords an alternative to construct extracellular microenvironment for improving surface endothelialization of a cardiovascular implant. - Highlights: • Biofunctional multilayer films mimicking extracellular microenvironment were successfully fabricated. • Multilayered structure stimulated the biological responses of endothelial cells. • The approach affords an efficient approach for surface endothelialization of stent implant.

  8. PECULIARITIES OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN PATIENTS WITH GOUT AND ITS CHANGES DURING THE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Magdeeva

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work was to study questions connected with peculiarities of endothelial dysfunction in patients with gout Anticoagulant and fibrinolytic activities and activityofVillebrand factor were investigated. We have revealled endothelial dysfunction, which expressiveness decreased after 3-months treatmentin patients with gout

  9. Radiological imaging of florid intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia in the mandibule: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng-Sheng; Li, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular papillary endothelial hyperplasia was a rare benign vascular proliferative process as a result of papillary proliferation of the endothelial cells within the vessels. To our knowledge, we reported the second case occurring in the madibule, and the first reported in 1984 in the literature. We discussed manifestations of multislice computed tomography and panoramic radiography about the lesion and relevant literature was reviewed.

  10. Association between endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾玥

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD)patients.Methods Ninety-four stable CAPD patients from a single center were enrolled in this cross-sectional study.Ultrasound evaluation was conducted on brachial artery to estimate endothelial-dependent

  11. Translational Medicine Study on Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Barrier Function and Myocardial Ischemia/Re-perfusion Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yeong Yeh Lee

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial barrier is defined as the ability of endothelial cells and their components that make up the microvascular wall structure in controlling the cellular components and marco-molecular substances in blood from penetrating vascular walls. It is the place for the selective exchange of oxygen, nutrients and metabolites, and has kernel effect in maintaining myocardial micro-environmental homeostasis. In clinic, microvascular permeability is commonly used as the index for evaluating endothelial barrier function. Myocardial microvascular endothelial cells, inter-endothelial connexin and basilar membrane (BM) interact synergically to constitute the basis for barrier function, which has a selective permeability effect on interaction between nutrient substances and other myocardial cell molecules. Increase of microvascular permeability is closely associated with cardiovascular events like coronary heart disease (CHD) and myocardial ischemia, and is the risk factor for CHD attack. And deep exploration of the mechanism of endothelial permeability and positive selection of new-type re-perfusion complementary drugs for alleviating endothelial permeability can be beneifcial in improving the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Therefore, from the view of translational medicine, this study mainly summarized the increase of microvascular permeability and its pathological signiifcance after AMI, physiological and pathological mechanisms of regulating microvascular permeability and complementary therapies for AMI re-perfusion as well as microvascular endothelial barrier function, hoping to provide a basis for improving the prognosis of patients with AMI.

  12. Corneal endothelial cell changes associated with cataract surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hugod, Mikkel; Storr-Paulsen, Allan; Norregaard, Jens Christian;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in patients with and without diabetes after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation.......To investigate the corneal endothelial cell density and morphology in patients with and without diabetes after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation....

  13. Translational Medicine Study on Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Barrier Function and Myocardial Ischemia/Re-perfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong Yeh Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial barrier is defined as the ability of endothelial cells and their components that make up the microvascular wall structure in controlling the cellular components and marco-molecular substances in blood from penetrating vascular walls. It is the place for the selective exchange of oxygen, nutrients and metabolites, and has kernel effect in maintaining myocardial micro-environmental homeostasis. In clinic, microvascular permeability is commonly used as the index for evaluating endothelial barrier function. Myocardial microvascular endothelial cells, inter-endothelial connexin and basilar membrane (BM interact synergically to constitute the basis for barrier function, which has a selective permeability effect on interaction between nutrient substances and other myocardial cell molecules. Increase of microvascular permeability is closely associated with cardiovascular events like coronary heart disease (CHD and myocardial ischemia, and is the risk factor for CHD attack. And deep exploration of the mechanism of endothelial permeability and positive selection of new-type re-perfusion complementary drugs for alleviating endothelial permeability can be beneficial in improving the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Therefore, from the view of translational medicine, this study mainly summarized the increase of microvascular permeability and its pathological significance after AMI, physiological and pathological mechanisms of regulating microvascular permeability and complementary therapies for AMI re-perfusion as well as microvascular endothelial barrier function, hoping to provide a basis for improving the prognosis of patients with AMI.

  14. Endothelial progenitor cell differentiation using cryopreserved, umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-ho JANG; Hugh C KIM; Sun-kyung KIM; Jeong-eun CHOI; Young-jin KIM; Hyun-woo LEE; Seok-yun KANG; Joon-seong PARK; Jin-hyuk CHOI; Ho-yeong LIM

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the endothelial differentiation potentiality of umbilical cord blood (UCB), we induced the differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC)from cryopreserved UCB-derived mononuclear cells (MNC). Methods: MNC from cryopreserved UCB and peripheral blood (PB) were cultured in M199 medium with endothelial cell growth supplements for 14 d. EPC were characterized by RT-PCR,flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry analysis. The proliferation of differen-tiated EPC was studied by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTI') assay, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentra-tion was measured using an ELISA kit. Characteristics of UCB-derived EPC were compared with those of PB-derived EPC. Results: A number of round-shaped cells were loosely attached to the bottom after 24 h culture, and numerous spindle-shaped cells began to appear from the round-shaped ones on d 7. Those cells expressed endothelial markers such as, Fit-1/VEGFR-1, ecNOS, VE-cadherin, yon Willebrand factor, and secreted VEGF. The patterns of endothelial markers of EPC from PB and UCB did not show striking differences. The results of the prolifera-tion and secretion of VEGF were also similar. Conclusion: We successfully cul-tured UCB cells stored at -196 ℃ into cells with the quality of endothelial cells.Those EPC could be used for angiogenic therapeutics by activating adjacent endothelial cells and enhancing angiogenesis.

  15. Relationship between protecitve effect of probucol on endothelial cells and asymmetrical dimethylarginine levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-linJIANG; Xiao-hongZHANG; Han-wuDENG; Yuan-JianLI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between protective effect of probucol on endothelial cells and endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor levels. METHODS: Endothelial cells were treated with oxidative-low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) (100 rag/L) or lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC) (5 mg/L) for 48 h, and the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), levels of nitric oxide (NO),

  16. Persistent Inflammation and Endothelial Activation in HIV-1 Infected Patients after 12 Years of Antiretroviral Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Ullum, Henrik; Katzenstein, Terese L;

    2013-01-01

    The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART).......The study investigated markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in HIV infected patients after 12 years of successful combination antiretroviral treatment (cART)....

  17. Therapeutic Approach in the Improvement of Endothelial Dysfunction: The Current State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Radenković

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium has a central role in the regulation of blood flow through continuous modulation of vascular tone. This is primarily accomplished by balanced release of endothelial relaxing and contractile factors. The healthy endothelial cells are essential for maintenance of vascular homeostasis involving antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, pro-fibrinolytic, anti-adhesive, or anticoagulant effects. Oppositely, endothelial dysfunction is primarily characterized by impaired regulation of vascular tone as a result of reduced endothelial nitric oxide (NO synthase activity, lack of cofactors for NO synthesis, attenuated NO release, or increased NO degradation. So far, the pharmacological approach in improving/reversal of endothelial dysfunction was shown to be beneficial in clinical trials that have investigated actions of different cardiovascular drugs. The aim of this paper was to summarize some of the latest clinical findings related to therapeutic possibilities for improving endothelial dysfunction in different pathological conditions. In the majority of presented clinical investigations, the assessment of improvement or reversal of endothelial dysfunction was performed through the flow-mediated dilatation measurement, and in some of those endothelial progenitor cells’ count was used for the same purpose. Still, given the fast and continuous development of this field, the evidence acquisition included the MEDLINE data base screening and the selection of articles published between 2010 and 2012.

  18. Endothelial Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Polyglycolic Acid/Polylactic Acid Mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; Gu, Yunpeng; Liu, Zhenjun; Qi, Yue; Ma, Gui E; Kang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cell (ADSC) is considered as a cell source potentially useful for angiogenesis in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This study investigated the growth and endothelial differentiation of human ADSCs on polyglycolic acid/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) mesh compared to 2D plastic. Cell adhesion, viability, and distribution of hADSCs on PGA/PLA mesh were observed by CM-Dil labeling, live/dead staining, and SEM examination while endothelial differentiation was evaluated by flow cytometry, Ac-LDL/UEA-1 uptake assay, immunofluorescence stainings, and gene expression analysis of endothelial related markers. Results showed hADSCs gained a mature endothelial phenotype with a positive ratio of 21.4 ± 3.7% for CD31+/CD34- when induced in 3D mesh after 21 days, which was further verified by the expressions of a comprehensive range of endothelial related markers, whereas hADSCs in 2D induced and 2D/3D noninduced groups all failed to differentiate into endothelial cells. Moreover, compared to 2D groups, the expression for α-SMA was markedly suppressed in 3D cultured hADSCs. This study first demonstrated the endothelial differentiation of hADSCs on the PGA/PLA mesh and pointed out the synergistic effect of PGA/PLA 3D culture and growth factors on the acquisition of mature characteristic endothelial phenotype. We believed this study would be the initial step towards the generation of prevascularized tissue engineered constructs.

  19. Biological behaviour and role of endothelial progenitor cells in vascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiu-hua; SHE Ming-peng

    2007-01-01

    Obiective To review the biological behaviour of endothelial progenitor cells and their role in vascular diseases.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed for relevant English language articles published from 1985 to March 2007.The search term was "endothelial progenitor cells".Study selection Articles about the biological behaviour of endothelial progenitor cells and their roles in the pathogenesis of vascular diseases such as atherogenesis were used.Results Progenitor cells in bone marrow,peripheral blood and adventitia can differentiate into mature endothelial cells (ECs).The progenitor cells,which express certain surface markers including AC133,CD34 and KDR,enable restoration of the microcirculation and ECs when injury or ischaemia occurs.Endothelial progenitor cells used in experimental models and clinical trials for ischaemic syndromes could restore endothelial integrity and inhibit neointima development.Moreover,their number and functional properties are influenced by certain cytokines and atherosclerotic risk factors.Impairment of the progenitor cells might limit the regenerative capacity,even lead to the development of atherosclerosis or other vascular diseases.Conclusions Endothelial progenitor cells have a particular role in prevention and treatment of certain cardiovascular diseases.However,many challenges remain in understanding differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells,their mobilization and revascularization.

  20. CD40-TRAF Signaling Upregulates CX3CL1 and TNF-α in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells but Not in Retinal Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Greene

    Full Text Available CD40, CX3CL1 and TNF-α promote atheroma and neointima formation. CD40 and TNF-α are also central to the development of diabetic retinopathy while CX3CL1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of this retinopathy. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CD40 ligation increases CX3CL1 and TNF-α protein expression in human endothelial cells from the aorta and retina. CD154 (CD40 ligand upregulated membrane-bound and soluble CX3CL1 in human aortic endothelial cells. CD154 triggered TNF-α production by human aortic endothelial cells. TNF Receptor Associated Factors (TRAF are key mediators of CD40 signaling. Compared to human aortic endothelial cells that express wt CD40, cells that express CD40 with a mutation that prevents TRAF2,3 recruitment, or CD40 with a mutation that prevents TRAF6 recruitment exhibited a profound inhibition of CD154-driven upregulation of membrane bound and soluble CX3CL1 as well as of TNF-α secretion. While both CD154 and TNF-α upregulated CX3CL1 in human aortic endothelial cells, these stimuli could act independently of each other. In contrast to human aortic endothelial cells, human retinal endothelial cells did not increase membrane bound or soluble CX3CL1 expression or secrete TNF-α in response to CD154 even though CD40 ligation upregulated ICAM-1 and CCL2 in these cells. Moreover, TNF-α did not upregulate CX3CL1 in retinal endothelial cells. In conclusion, CD40 ligation increases CX3CL1 protein levels and induces TNF-α production in endothelial cells. However, endothelial cells are heterogeneous in regards to these responses. Human aortic but not retinal endothelial cells upregulated CX3CL1 and TNF-α in response to CD40 ligation, as well as upregulated CX3CL1 in response to TNF-α. These dissimilarities may contribute to differences in regulation of inflammation in large vessels versus the retina.

  1. Systemic endothelial activation occurs in both mild and severe malaria. Correlating dermal microvascular endothelial cell phenotype and soluble cell adhesion molecules with disease severity.

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, G D; Ly, V. C.; Nguyen, T.H.; Nguyen, H.P.; Bethell, D.; Wyllie, S.; Louwrier, K.; Fox, S B; Gatter, K C; Day, N P; Tran, T. H.; White, N J; Berendt, A R

    1998-01-01

    Fatal Plasmodium falciparum malaria is accompanied by systemic endothelial activation. To study endothelial activation directly during malaria and sepsis in vivo, the expression of cell adhesion molecules on dermal microvascular endothelium was examined in skin biopsies and correlated with plasma levels of soluble (circulating) ICAM-1, E-selectin, and VCAM-1 and the cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Skin biopsies were obtained from 61 cases of severe malaria, 42 cases of uncomplicat...

  2. Adhesion of human basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils to interleukin 1-activated human vascular endothelial cells: contributions of endothelial cell adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1) promote adhesiveness in human umbilical vein endothelial cells for leukocytes including basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils, and induce expression of adherence molecules including ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), ELAM-1 (endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1), and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). In the present study, blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing ICAM-1, ELAM-1, and VCAM-1 have been used to compare their ...

  3. Retinal Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Induces Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression and Initiates Early Diabetic Retinal Leukocyte Adhesion in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Joussen, Antonia M; Poulaki, Vassiliki; Qin, Wenying; Kirchhof, Bernd; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Wiegand, Stanley J.; Rudge, John; Yancopoulos, George D.; Adamis, Anthony P.

    2002-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to the diabetic retinal vasculature results in early blood-retinal barrier breakdown, capillary nonperfusion, and endothelial cell injury and death. Previous work has shown that intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD18 are required for these processes. However the relevant in vivo stimuli for ICAM-1 and CD18 expression in diabetes remain unknown. The current study investigated the causal role of endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nitric oxid...

  4. Constitutive production and thrombin-induced release of vascular endothelial growth factor by human megakaryocytes and platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Möhle, Robert; Green, David; Moore, Malcolm A. S.; Nachman, Ralph L.; Rafii, Shahin

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that coculture of bone marrow microvascular endothelial cells with hematopoietic progenitor cells results in proliferation and differentiation of megakaryocytes. In these long-term cultures, bone marrow microvascular endothelial cell monolayers maintain their cellular integrity in the absence of exogenous endothelial growth factors. Because this interaction may involve paracrine secretion of cytokines, we evaluated megakaryocytic cells for secretion of vascular endothelial growt...

  5. Fullerene derivatives protect endothelial cells against NO-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao Fang; Han Dong; Qu Ying; Liu Ying; Zhao Yuliang; Chen Chunying [CAS Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), Beijing 100190 (China); Li Wei [CAS Key Laboratory for Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)], E-mail: chenchy@nanoctr.cn

    2009-06-03

    Functional fullerene derivatives have been demonstrated with potent antioxidation properties. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical that plays a part in leading to brain damage when it is accumulated to a high concentration. The possible scavenging activity of NO by the hydroxylated fullerene derivative C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22} and malonic acid derivative C{sub 60}(C(COOH){sub 2}){sub 2} was investigated using primary rat brain cerebral microvessel endothelial cells (CMECs). Results demonstrate that sodium nitroprusside (SNP), used as an NO donor, caused a marked decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. However, fullerene derivatives can remarkably protect against the apoptosis induced by NO assault. In addition, fullerene derivatives can also prevent NO-induced depolymerization of cytoskeleton and damage of the nucleus and accelerate endothelial cell repair. Further investigation shows that the sudden increase of the intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by NO was significantly attenuated by post-treatment with fullerene derivatives. Our results suggest that functional fullerene derivatives are potential applications for NO-related disorders.

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  7. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Microvascular Complications: Friends or Foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai-Guo Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being featured as metabolic disorder, diabetic patients are largely affected by hyperglycemia-induced vascular abnormality. Accumulated evidence has confirmed the beneficial effect of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in coronary heart disease. However, antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF treatment is the main therapy for diabetic retinopathy and nephropathy, indicating the uncertain role of EPCs in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular disease. In this review, we first illustrate how hyperglycemia induces metabolic and epigenetic changes in EPCs, which exerts deleterious impact on their number and function. We then discuss how abnormal angiogenesis develops in eyes and kidneys under diabetes condition, focusing on “VEGF uncoupling with nitric oxide” and “competitive angiopoietin 1/angiopoietin 2” mechanisms that are shared in both organs. Next, we dissect the nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular complications. After we overview the current EPCs-related strategies, we point out new EPCs-associated options for future exploration. Ultimately, we hope that this review would uncover the mysterious nature of EPCs in diabetic microvascular disease for therapeutics.

  8. Cationic Nanocylinders Promote Angiogenic Activities of Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Bok Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers have been used extensively taking forms as scaffolds, patterned surface and nanoparticle for regenerative medicine applications. Angiogenesis is an essential process for successful tissue regeneration, and endothelial cell–cell interaction plays a pivotal role in regulating their tight junction formation, a hallmark of angiogenesis. Though continuous progress has been made, strategies to promote angiogenesis still rely on small molecule delivery or nuanced scaffold fabrication. As such, the recent paradigm shift from top-down to bottom-up approaches in tissue engineering necessitates development of polymer-based modular engineering tools to control angiogenesis. Here, we developed cationic nanocylinders (NCs as inducers of cell–cell interaction and investigated their effect on angiogenic activities of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs in vitro. Electrospun poly (l-lactic acid (PLLA fibers were aminolyzed to generate positively charged NCs. The aninolyzation time was changed to produce two different aspect ratios of NCs. When HUVECs were treated with NCs, the electrostatic interaction of cationic NCs with negatively charged plasma membranes promoted migration, permeability and tubulogenesis of HUVECs compared to no treatment. This effect was more profound when the higher aspect ratio NC was used. The results indicate these NCs can be used as a new tool for the bottom-up approach to promote angiogenesis.

  9. Endothelial dysfunction in cirrhosis: Role of inflammationand oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Balasubramaniyan Vairappan

    2015-01-01

    This review describes the recent developments in thepathobiology of endothelial dysfunction (ED) in thecontext of cirrhosis with portal hypertension and definesnovel strategies and potential targets for therapy. EDhas prognostic implications by predicting unfavourableearly hepatic events and mortality in patients withportal hypertension and advanced liver diseases. EDcharacterised by an impaired bioactivity of nitric oxide(NO) within the hepatic circulation and is mainly dueto decreased bioavailability of NO and accelerateddegradation of NO with reactive oxygen species.Furthermore, elevated inflammatory markers also inhibitNO synthesis and causes ED in cirrhotic liver. Therefore,improvement of NO availability in the hepatic circulationcan be beneficial for the improvement of endothelialdysfunction and associated portal hypertension inpatients with cirrhosis. Furthermore, therapeutic agentsthat are identified in increasing NO bioavailabilitythrough improvement of hepatic endothelial nitricoxide synthase (eNOS) activity and reduction in hepaticasymmetric dimethylarginine, an endogenous modulatorof eNOS and a key mediator of elevated intrahepaticvascular tone in cirrhosis would be interestingtherapeutic approaches in patients with endothelialdysfunction and portal hypertension in advanced liverdiseases.

  10. Prune melanoidins protect against oxidative stress and endothelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadino, Anna Maria; Cossu, Annalisa; Piga, Antonio; Madrau, Monica Assunta; Del Caro, Alessandra; Colombino, Maria; Paglietti, Bianca; Rubino, Salvatore; Iaccarino, Ciro; Crosio, Claudia; Sanna, Bastiano; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2011-06-01

    The health-promoting effects of fruit and vegetable consumption are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. Whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed plums (prunes) were isolated and their presence confirmed by hydroxymethylfurfural content and browning index. Oxidative-induced endothelial cell (EC) damage is the trigger for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD); therefore the potential protective effect of prune melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cell damage was investigated on human endothelial ECV304 cells. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox status was assessed by using the novel, redox-sensitive, ratiometric fluorescent protein sensor (roGFP), while mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was investigated with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. Treatment of ECV304 cells with hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation, in addition to MMP dissipation, with ensuing cell death. Pretreatment of ECV304 with prune melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide elicited phenomena, clearly indicating that these polymers protect human EC against oxidative stress.

  11. Human endothelial senescence induced by IL-1α in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Aiyu; ZHOU Jianjun; LIU Yabing; FENG Meifu; ZHOU Rouli

    2004-01-01

    Interleukin 1(IL-1) is an important proinflammatory cytokine that causes pleiotropic effects. Vascular endothelial cells stimulated by IL-1α can lead to the inflammatory response. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also generated at the site of inflammation and serve as an important factor against foreign invader. Here we report that long-term stimulation of human vein endothelial cells with IL-1α can accelerate their senescence associated with β-galactosidase activity. The flow cytometric analyses showed that most of the induced cells entered G0-G1 phase. DNA damage was more severe in senescent cells by comet assay. The induced cells by IL-1α had higher levels of ROS and malonyldialdehyde (MDA), lower activity of antioxidant enzymes and lower capacity of total antioxidant systems than control, which led to cell damage and cell degeneration, that is to say, which contributed to cellular senescence. Our results gave a direct proof to a new hypothesis-"the inflammation hypothesis of aging" on cellular level, and also provided a basis for the study on anti-aging and aging-related diseases.

  12. Flow-dependent mass transfer may trigger endothelial signaling cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrangi, Prashanthi; Sosa, Martha; Shyy, John Y-J; Rodgers, Victor G J

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that fluid mechanical forces directly impact endothelial signaling pathways. But while this general observation is clear, less apparent are the underlying mechanisms that initiate these critical signaling processes. This is because fluid mechanical forces can offer a direct mechanical input to possible mechanotransducers as well as alter critical mass transport characteristics (i.e., concentration gradients) of a host of chemical stimuli present in the blood stream. However, it has recently been accepted that mechanotransduction (direct mechanical force input), and not mass transfer, is the fundamental mechanism for many hemodynamic force-modulated endothelial signaling pathways and their downstream gene products. This conclusion has been largely based, indirectly, on accepted criteria that correlate signaling behavior and shear rate and shear stress, relative to changes in viscosity. However, in this work, we investigate the negative control for these criteria. Here we computationally and experimentally subject mass-transfer limited systems, independent of mechanotransduction, to the purported criteria. The results showed that the negative control (mass-transfer limited system) produced the same trends that have been used to identify mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, the widely used viscosity-related shear stress and shear rate criteria are insufficient in determining mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, research should continue to consider the importance of mass transfer in triggering signaling cascades.

  13. Microtubule dynamics control HGF-induced lung endothelial barrier enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinyong; Tian, Yufeng; Moldobaeva, Nurgul; Sarich, Nicolene; Birukova, Anna A

    2014-01-01

    Microtubules (MT) play a vital role in many cellular functions, but their role in peripheral actin cytoskeletal dynamics which is essential for control of endothelial barrier and monolayer integrity is less understood. We have previously described the enhancement of lung endothelial cell (EC) barrier by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) which was associated with Rac1-mediated remodeling of actin cytoskeleton. This study investigated involvement of MT-dependent mechanisms in the HGF-induced enhancement of EC barrier. HGF-induced Rac1 activation was accompanied by phosphorylation of stathmin, a regulator of MT dynamics. HGF also stimulated MT peripheral growth monitored by time lapse imaging and tracking analysis of EB-1-decorated MT growing tips, and increased the pool of acetylated tubulin. These effects were abolished by EC pretreatment with HGF receptor inhibitor, downregulation of Rac1 pathway, or by expression of a stathmin-S63A phosphorylation deficient mutant. Expression of stathmin-S63A abolished the HGF protective effects against thrombin-induced activation of RhoA cascade, permeability increase, and EC barrier dysfunction. These results demonstrate a novel MT-dependent mechanism of HGF-induced EC barrier regulation via Rac1/PAK1/stathmin-dependent control of MT dynamics. PMID:25198505

  14. Microtubule dynamics control HGF-induced lung endothelial barrier enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyong Tian

    Full Text Available Microtubules (MT play a vital role in many cellular functions, but their role in peripheral actin cytoskeletal dynamics which is essential for control of endothelial barrier and monolayer integrity is less understood. We have previously described the enhancement of lung endothelial cell (EC barrier by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF which was associated with Rac1-mediated remodeling of actin cytoskeleton. This study investigated involvement of MT-dependent mechanisms in the HGF-induced enhancement of EC barrier. HGF-induced Rac1 activation was accompanied by phosphorylation of stathmin, a regulator of MT dynamics. HGF also stimulated MT peripheral growth monitored by time lapse imaging and tracking analysis of EB-1-decorated MT growing tips, and increased the pool of acetylated tubulin. These effects were abolished by EC pretreatment with HGF receptor inhibitor, downregulation of Rac1 pathway, or by expression of a stathmin-S63A phosphorylation deficient mutant. Expression of stathmin-S63A abolished the HGF protective effects against thrombin-induced activation of RhoA cascade, permeability increase, and EC barrier dysfunction. These results demonstrate a novel MT-dependent mechanism of HGF-induced EC barrier regulation via Rac1/PAK1/stathmin-dependent control of MT dynamics.

  15. Thermal Pretreatment Improves Viability of Cryopreserved Human Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Nicola; Sun, Huan; Chatterjee, Anamika; Saha, Debapriya; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2015-10-01

    A high survival rate of cryopreserved cells requires optimal cooling and thawing rates in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA) or a combination of CPAs in adequate concentrations. One of the most widely used CPAs, dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO), however is toxic at high concentrations and has detrimental effects on cellular functions. Additional processing steps are necessary to remove the CPA after thawing, which make the process expensive and time consuming. Therefore it is of great interest to develop new cryoprotective strategies to replace the currently used CPAs or to reduce their concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate if thermal activation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC ST-1.6R), prior to cryopreservation, could improve their post-thaw viability since the resulting heat shock protein expression acts as an intrinsic cellular protection mechanism. The results of this study suggest that both heat and cold shock pretreatments improve cryopreservation outcome of the HPMEC ST-1.6R cells. By re-cultivating cells after heat shock treatment before cryopreservation, a significant increase in cellular membrane integrity and adherence capacity could be achieved. However a combination of thermal activation and cryopreservation with alternative CPAs such as ectoine and L-proline could not further enhance the cell viability. The results of this study showed that pretreatment of endothelial cells with thermal activation could be used to reduce the Me2SO concentration required in order to preserve cell viability after cryopreservation. PMID:26419006

  16. Modeling human endothelial cell transformation in vascular neoplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria W. Wen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell (EC-derived neoplasias range from benign hemangioma to aggressive metastatic angiosarcoma, which responds poorly to current treatments and has a very high mortality rate. The development of treatments that are more effective for these disorders will be expedited by insight into the processes that promote abnormal proliferation and malignant transformation of human ECs. The study of primary endothelial malignancy has been limited by the rarity of the disease; however, there is potential for carefully characterized EC lines and animal models to play a central role in the discovery, development and testing of molecular targeted therapies for vascular neoplasias. This review describes molecular alterations that have been identified in EC-derived neoplasias, as well as the processes that underpin the immortalization and tumorigenic conversion of ECs. Human EC lines, established through the introduction of defined genetic elements or by culture of primary tumor tissue, are catalogued and discussed in relation to their relevance as models of vascular neoplasia.

  17. Endothelial Progenitor Cells for Diagnosis and Prognosis in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Oriana Aragona

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify, evaluate, and synthesize evidence on the predictive power of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs in cardiovascular disease, through a systematic review of quantitative studies. Data Sources. MEDLINE was searched using keywords related to “endothelial progenitor cells” and “endothelium” and, for the different categories, respectively, “smoking”; “blood pressure”; “diabetes mellitus” or “insulin resistance”; “dyslipidemia”; “aging” or “elderly”; “angina pectoris” or “myocardial infarction”; “stroke” or “cerebrovascular disease”; “homocysteine”; “C-reactive protein”; “vitamin D”. Study Selection. Database hits were evaluated against explicit inclusion criteria. From 927 database hits, 43 quantitative studies were included. Data Syntheses. EPC count has been suggested for cardiovascular risk estimation in the clinical practice, since it is currently accepted that EPCs can work as proangiogenic support cells, maintaining their importance as regenerative/reparative potential, and also as prognostic markers. Conclusions. EPCs showed an important role in identifying cardiovascular risk conditions, and to suggest their evaluation as predictor of outcomes appears to be reasonable in different defined clinical settings. Due to their capability of proliferation, circulation, and the development of functional progeny, great interest has been directed to therapeutic use of progenitor cells in atherosclerotic diseases. This trial is registered with registration number: Prospero CRD42015023717.

  18. High precision measurement of electrical resistance across endothelial cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschugguel, W; Zhegu, Z; Gajdzik, L; Maier, M; Binder, B R; Graf, J

    1995-05-01

    Effects of vasoactive agonists on endothelial permeability was assessed by measurement of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) grown on porous polycarbonate supports. Because of the low values of TEER obtained in this preparation (< 5 omega cm2) a design of an Ussing type recording chamber was chosen that provided for a homogeneous electric field across the monolayer and for proper correction of series resistances. Precision current pulses and appropriate rates of sampling and averaging of the voltage signal allowed for measurement of < 0.1 omega resistance changes of the endothelium on top of a 21 omega series resistance of the support and bathing fluid layers. Histamine (10 microM) and thrombin (10 U/ml) induced an abrupt and substantial decrease of TEER, bradykinin (1 microM) was less effective, PAF (380 nM) and LTC4 (1 microM) had no effect. TEER was also reduced by the calcium ionophore A-23187 (10 microM). The technique allows for measurements of TEER in low resistance monolayer cultures with high precision and time resolution. The results obtained extend previous observations in providing quantitative data on the increase of permeability of HUVECs in response to vasoactive agonists.

  19. Visualization of endothelial actin cytoskeleton in the mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Fraccaroli

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis requires coordinated changes in cell shape of endothelial cells (ECs, orchestrated by the actin cytoskeleton. The mechanisms that regulate this rearrangement in vivo are poorly understood - largely because of the difficulty to visualize filamentous actin (F-actin structures with sufficient resolution. Here, we use transgenic mice expressing Lifeact-EGFP to visualize F-actin in ECs. We show that in the retina, Lifeact-EGFP expression is largely restricted to ECs allowing detailed visualization of F-actin in ECs in situ. Lifeact-EGFP labels actin associated with cell-cell junctions, apical and basal membranes and highlights actin-based structures such as filopodia and stress fiber-like cytoplasmic bundles. We also show that in the skin and the skeletal muscle, Lifeact-EGFP is highly expressed in vascular mural cells (vMCs, enabling vMC imaging. In summary, our results indicate that the Lifeact-EGFP transgenic mouse in combination with the postnatal retinal angiogenic model constitutes an excellent system for vascular cell biology research. Our approach is ideally suited to address structural and mechanistic details of angiogenic processes, such as endothelial tip cell migration and fusion, EC polarization or lumen formation.

  20. Barrier stabilizing mediators in regulation of microvascular endothelial permeability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Qiao-bing

    2012-01-01

    Increase of microvascular permeability is one of the most important pathological events in the pathogenesis of trauma and bum injury.Massive leakage of fluid from vascular space leads to lose of blood plasma and decrease of effective circulatory blood volume,resulting in formation of severe tissue edema,hypotension or even shock,especially in severe bum injury.Fluid resuscitation has been the only valid approach to sustain patient's blood volume for a long time,due to the lack of overall and profound understanding of the mechanisms of vascular hyperpenneability response.There is an emerging concept in recent years that some so-called barrier stabilizing mediators play a positive role in preventing the increase of vascular permeability.These mediators may be released in response to proinflammatory mediators and serve to restore endothelial barrier function.Some of these stabilizing mediators are important even in quiescent state because they preserve basal vascular permeability at low levels.This review introduces some of these mediators and reveals their underlying signaling mechanisms during endothelial barrier enhancing process.