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Sample records for amp signaling networks

  1. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

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    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  2. Phosphodiesterase 4 and compartmentalization of cyclic AMP signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhengChao; SHI FangXiong

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), as a second messenger, plays a critical role in cellular signaling transduction. However, it is not clear how this apparently identical cAMP signal induces divergent physiological responses. The potential explanation that cAMP signaling is compartmentalized was proposed by Buxton and Brunton twenty years ago. Compartmentalization of cAMP signaling allows spatially distinct pools of protein kinase A (PKA) to be differently activated. Research on cAMP signaling has regained impetus in many fields of life sciences due to the progress in understanding cAMP signaling complexity and functional diversity. The cAMP/PKA signaling compartments are maintained by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) which bind PKA and other signaling proteins, and by PDEs which hydrolyse cAMP and thus terminate PKA activity. PDE4 enzymes belong to PDE superfamily and stand at a crossroad that allows them to integrate various signaling pathways with that of cAMP in spatially distinct compartments. In the current review, the nomenclature, taxonomy and gene expression of PDE4, and the system and region of its effect are described. In addition, the idiographic molecules, mechanisms, and regulation models of PDE4 are summarized. Furthermore, the important roles PDE4 plays in the maturation of rat granulosa cells and cAMP signaling compartmentalization are discussed.

  3. Revisiting cAMP signaling in the carotid body

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    Ana Rita eNunes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic carotid body (CB activation is now recognized as being essential in the development of hypertension and promoting insulin resistance; thus, it is imperative to characterize the chemotransduction mechanisms of this organ in order to modulate its activity and improve patient outcomes. For several years, and although controversial, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP was considered an important player in initiating the activation of the CB. However, its relevance was partially displaced in the 90s by the emerging role of the mitochondria and molecules such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and O2-sensitive K+ channels. Neurotransmitters/neuromodulators binding to metabotropic receptors are essential to chemotransmission in the CB, and cAMP is central to this process. cAMP also contributes to raise intracellular Ca2+ levels, and is intimately related to the cellular energetic status (AMP/ATP ratio. Furthermore, cAMP signaling is a target of multiple current pharmacological agents used in clinical practice. This review provides an outline on 1 the classical view of the cAMP-signaling pathway in the CB that originally supported its role in the O2/CO2 sensing mechanism, 2 present recent evidence on CB cAMP neuromodulation and 3 discuss how CB activity is affected by current clinical therapies that modify cAMP-signaling, namely dopaminergic drugs, caffeine (modulation of A2A/A2B receptors and roflumilast (PDE4 inhibitors. cAMP is key to any process that involves metabotropic receptors and the intracellular pathways involved in CB disease states are likely to involve this classical second messenger. Research examining the potential modification of cAMP levels and/or interactions with molecules associated with CB hyperactivity is currently in its beginning and this review will open doors for future explorations.

  4. cAMP signaling in blood platelets - old friends and new players.

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    Zaher eRaslan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Atherothrombosis, the pathology underlying numerous cardiovascular diseases, is a major cause of death globally. Hyperactive blood platelets play a key role in the atherothrombotic process through the release of inflammatory mediators and formation of thrombi. In healthy blood vessels, excessive platelet activation is restricted by endothelial-derived prostacyclin (PGI2 through cyclic adenosine-5’-monophosphate (cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA-dependent mechanisms. Elevation in intracellular cAMP is associated with the control of a number of distinct platelet functions including actin polymerisation, granule secretion, calcium mobilisation and integrin activation. Unfortunately, in atherosclerotic disease the protective effects of cAMP are compromised, which may contribute to pathological thrombosis. The cAMP signalling network in platelets is highly complex with the presence of multiple isoforms of adenylyl cyclase (AC, PKA and phosphodiesterases (PDE. However, a precise understanding of the relationship between specific AC, PKA and PDE isoforms, and how individual signalling substrates are targeted to control distinct platelet functions is still lacking. In other cells types, compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling has emerged as a key mechanism to allow precise control of specific cell functions. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs play an important role in this spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signalling networks. Evidence of AKAP-mediated compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling in blood platelets has begun to emerge and is providing new insights into the regulation of platelet function. Dissecting the mechanisms that allow cAMP to control excessive platelet activity without preventing effective haemostasis may unleash the possibility of therapeutic targeting of the pathway to control unwanted platelet activity.

  5. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

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    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  6. Novel cAMP signalling paradigms: therapeutic implications for airway disease

    OpenAIRE

    Billington, Charlotte K; Hall, Ian P

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery over 50 years ago, cAMP has been the archetypal second messenger introducing students to the concept of cell signalling at the simplest level. As explored in this review, however, there are many more facets to cAMP signalling than the path from Gs-coupled receptor to adenylyl cyclase (AC) to cAMP to PKA to biological effect. After a brief description of this canonical cAMP signalling pathway, a snapshot is provided of the novel paradigms of cAMP signalling. As in the airwa...

  7. Multiple Facets of cAMP Signalling and Physiological Impact: cAMP Compartmentalization in the Lung

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    Martina Schmidt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelling, processes encompassed by increased airway smooth muscle mass, epithelial changes, goblet cell and submucosal gland hyperplasia. In addition to inflammatory cells, airway smooth muscle cells and (myofibroblasts, epithelial cells underpin a variety of key responses in the airways such as inflammatory cytokine release, airway remodelling, mucus hypersecretion and airway barrier function. Cigarette smoke, being next to environmental pollution the main cause of COPD, is believed to cause epithelial hyperpermeability by disrupting the barrier function. Here we will focus on the most recent progress on compartmentalized signalling by cAMP. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, cAMP-specific phospho-diesterases (PDEs maintain compartmentalized cAMP signalling. Intriguingly, spatially discrete cAMP-sensing signalling complexes seem also to involve distinct members of the A-kinase anchoring (AKAP superfamily and IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAPs. In this review, we will highlight the interaction between cAMP and the epithelial barrier to retain proper lung function and to alleviate COPD symptoms and focus on the possible molecular mechanisms involved in this process. Future studies should include the development of cAMP-sensing multiprotein complex specific disruptors and/or stabilizers to orchestrate cellular functions. Compartmentalized cAMP signalling regulates important cellular processes in the lung and may serve as a therapeutic target.

  8. cAMP Signals in Drosophila Motor Neurons Are Confined to Single Synaptic Boutons

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    Isabella Maiellaro

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP plays an important role in synaptic plasticity. Although there is evidence for local control of synaptic transmission and plasticity, it is less clear whether a similar spatial confinement of cAMP signaling exists. Here, we suggest a possible biophysical basis for the site-specific regulation of synaptic plasticity by cAMP, a highly diffusible small molecule that transforms the physiology of synapses in a local and specific manner. By exploiting the octopaminergic system of Drosophila, which mediates structural synaptic plasticity via a cAMP-dependent pathway, we demonstrate the existence of local cAMP signaling compartments of micrometer dimensions within single motor neurons. In addition, we provide evidence that heterogeneous octopamine receptor localization, coupled with local differences in phosphodiesterase activity, underlies the observed differences in cAMP signaling in the axon, cell body, and boutons.

  9. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  10. Modulation of the cAMP signaling pathway after traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Atkins, Coleen M.; Oliva, Anthony A.; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Pearse, Damien D.; Bramlett, Helen M; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2007-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in both focal and diffuse brain pathologies that are exacerbated by the inflammatory response and progress from hours to days after the initial injury. Using a clinically relevant model of TBI, the parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (FPI) model, we found injury-induced impairments in the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway. Levels of cAMP were depressed in the ipsilateral parietal cortex and hippocampus, as well as activation of its downstream targ...

  11. Cultured lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects have altered cAMP signal transduction.

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    Nagy, L E; Diamond, I; Gordon, A.

    1988-01-01

    Previous work has shown that freshly isolated lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects show significantly reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels. This decrease could be due to ethanol-induced cellular adaptation or to a genetic difference in the regulation of cAMP signal transduction. Therefore, we cultured human lymphocytes in defined medium without ethanol for 7-8 days and then examined differences in receptor-dependent cAMP accumulation between lymphocytes from alcoholic an...

  12. Global and local missions of cAMP signaling in neural plasticity, learning and memory

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    Daewoo eLee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been a popular model to study cAMP signaling and resultant behaviors due to its powerful genetic approaches. All molecular components (AC, PDE, PKA, CREB, etc essential for cAMP signaling have been identified in the fly. Among them, adenylyl cyclase (AC gene rutabaga and phosphodiesterase (PDE gene dunce have been intensively studied to understand the role of cAMP signaling. Interestingly, these two mutant genes were originally identified on the basis of associative learning deficits. This commentary summarizes findings on the role of cAMP in Drosophila neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and memory. It mainly focuses on two distinct mechanisms (global versus local regulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic plasticity related to cAMP homeostasis. This dual regulatory role of cAMP is to increase the strength of excitatory neural circuits on one hand, but to act locally on postsynaptic GABA receptors to decrease inhibitory synaptic plasticity on the other. Thus the action of cAMP could result in a global increase in the neural circuit excitability and memory. Implications of this cAMP signaling related to drug discovery for neural diseases are also described.

  13. Dynamics of β-adrenergic/cAMP signaling and morphological changes in cultured astrocytes.

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    Vardjan, Nina; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The morphology of astrocytes, likely regulated by cAMP, determines the structural association between astrocytes and the synapse, consequently modulating synaptic function. β-Adrenergic receptors (β-AR), which increase cytosolic cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i ), may affect cell morphology. However, the real-time dynamics of β-AR-mediated cAMP signaling in single live astrocytes and its effect on cell morphology have not been studied. We used the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensor Epac1-camps to study time-dependent changes in [cAMP]i ; morphological changes in primary rat astrocytes were monitored by real-time confocal microscopy. Stimulation of β-AR by adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline, a specific agonist of β-AR, rapidly increased [cAMP]i (∼15 s). The FRET signal response, mediated via β-AR, was faster than in the presence of forskolin (twofold) and dibutyryl-cAMP (>35-fold), which directly activate adenylyl cyclase and Epac1-camps, respectively, likely due to slow entry of these agents into the cytosol. Oscillations in [cAMP]i have not been recorded, indicating that cAMP-dependent processes operate in a slow time domain. Most Epac1-camps expressing astrocytes revealed a morphological change upon β-AR activation and attained a stellate morphology within 1 h. The morphological changes exhibited a bell-shaped dependency on [cAMP]i . The 5-10% decrease in cell cross-sectional area and the 30-50% increase in cell perimeter are likely due to withdrawal of the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region and the appearance of protrusions on the surface of astrocytes. Because astrocyte processes ensheath neurons, β-AR/cAMP-mediated morphological changes can modify the geometry of the extracellular space, affecting synaptic, neuronal, and astrocyte functions in health and disease.

  14. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

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    Xiaoying Li

    Full Text Available Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator, PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  15. cAMP signaling prevents podocyte apoptosis via activation of protein kinase A and mitochondrial fusion.

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    Li, Xiaoying; Tao, Hua; Xie, Kewei; Ni, Zhaohui; Yan, Yucheng; Wei, Kai; Chuang, Peter Y; He, John Cijiang; Gu, Leyi

    2014-01-01

    Our previous in vitro studies suggested that cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling prevents adriamycin (ADR) and puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced apoptosis in podocytes. As cAMP is an important second messenger and plays a key role in cell proliferation, differentiation and cytoskeleton formation via protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) pathways, we sought to determine the role of PKA or Epac signaling in cAMP-mediated protection of podocytes. In the ADR nephrosis model, we found that forskolin, a selective activator of adenylate cyclase, attenuated albuminuria and improved the expression of podocyte marker WT-1. When podocytes were treated with pCPT-cAMP (a selective cAMP/PKA activator), PKA activation was increased in a time-dependent manner and prevented PAN-induced podocyte loss and caspase 3 activation, as well as a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential. We found that PAN and ADR resulted in a decrease in Mfn1 expression and mitochondrial fission in podocytes. pCPT-cAMP restored Mfn1 expression in puromycin or ADR-treated podocytes and induced Drp1 phosphorylation, as well as mitochondrial fusion. Treating podocytes with arachidonic acid resulted in mitochondrial fission, podocyte loss and cleaved caspase 3 production. Arachidonic acid abolished the protective effects of pCPT-cAMP on PAN-treated podocytes. Mdivi, a mitochondrial division inhibitor, prevented PAN-induced cleaved caspase 3 production in podocytes. We conclude that activation of cAMP alleviated murine podocyte caused by ADR. PKA signaling resulted in mitochondrial fusion in podocytes, which at least partially mediated the effects of cAMP.

  16. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

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    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  17. Linking cellular actin status with cAMP signaling in Candida albicans.

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    Wang, Yue; Zou, Hao; Fang, Hao-Ming; Zhu, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans has a remarkable ability to switch growth forms. Particularly, the yeast-to-hyphae switch is closely linked with its virulence. A range of chemicals and conditions can promote hyphal growth including serum, peptidoglycan, CO2, neutral pH, and elevated temperature. All these signals act essentially through the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 that synthesizes cAMP. Cells lacking Cyr1 are completely defective in hyphal growth. Recently, cellular actin status is found to influence cAMP synthesis. However, how Cyr1 senses and processes multiple external and internal signals to produce a contextually proper level of cAMP remains unclear. We hypothesized that Cyr1 itself possesses multiple sensors for different signals and achieves signal integration through a combined allosteric effect on the catalytic center. To test this hypothesis, we affinity-purified a Cyr1-containing complex and found that it could enhance cAMP synthesis upon treatment with serum, peptidoglycan or CO2 in vitro. The data indicate that the complex is an essentially intact sensor/effector apparatus for cAMP synthesis. The complex contains two more subunits, the cyclase-associated protein Cap1 and G-actin. We discovered that G-actin plays a regulatory role, rendering cAMP synthesis responsive to actin dynamics. These findings shed new lights on the mechanisms that regulate cAMP-mediated responses in fungi.

  18. cAMP-independent signal pathways stimulate hyphal morphogenesis in Candida albicans.

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    Parrino, Salvatore M; Si, Haoyu; Naseem, Shamoon; Groudan, Kevin; Gardin, Justin; Konopka, James B

    2017-03-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans can transition from budding to hyphal growth, which promotes biofilm formation and invasive growth into tissues. Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase to form cAMP induces hyphal morphogenesis. The failure of cells lacking adenylyl cyclase (cyr1Δ) to form hyphae has suggested that cAMP signaling is essential for hyphal growth. However, cyr1Δ mutants also grow slowly and have defects in morphogenesis, making it unclear whether hyphal inducers must stimulate cAMP, or if normal basal levels of cAMP are required to maintain cellular health needed for hyphal growth. Interestingly, supplementation of cyr1Δ cells with low levels of cAMP enabled them to form hyphae in response to the inducer N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), suggesting that a basal level of cAMP is sufficient for stimulation. Furthermore, we isolated faster-growing cyr1Δ pseudorevertant strains that can be induced to form hyphae even though they lack cAMP. The pseudorevertant strains were not induced by CO2 , consistent with reports that CO2 directly stimulates adenylyl cyclase. Mutational analysis showed that induction of hyphae in a pseudorevertant strain was independent of RAS1, but was dependent on the EFG1 transcription factor that acts downstream of protein kinase A. Thus, cAMP-independent signals contribute to the induction of hyphal responses.

  19. Eviprostat Activates cAMP Signaling Pathway and Suppresses Bladder Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

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    Masayuki Takeda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eviprostat is a popular phytotherapeutic agent for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. At present, the signaling mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects are still poorly understood. Given that cAMP has been reported to suppress cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy in various pathological situations, we asked whether the effect of Eviprostat could be ascribed to the activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. In the study, exposure of cAMP response element (CRE-secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP (CRE-SEAP-reporter cells to Eviprostat elevated SEAP secretion, which was associated with an increased phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP and cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB, as well as enhanced expression of CRE-regulated protein connexin43, indicating an activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. Consistent with these observations, Eviprostat-induced expression of Cx43 was abolished in the presence of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 or PKA inhibitor H89, whereas it was mimicked by adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin. Further analysis demonstrated that Eviprostat significantly potentiated the effect of phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3 inhibitor, but not that of PDE4 inhibitor, on CRE activation. Moreover, Eviprostat suppressed PDGF-induced activation of ERK and Akt and inhibited cell proliferation and hillock formation in both mesangial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. Collectively, activation of the cAMP signaling pathway could be an important mechanism by which Eviprostat exerts its therapeutic effects for LUTS.

  20. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

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    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  1. Cyclic AMP functions as a primary sexual signal in gametes of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

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    Pasquale, S M; Goodenough, U W

    1987-11-01

    When Chlamydomonas reinhardtii gametes of opposite mating type are mixed together, they adhere by a flagella-mediated agglutination that triggers three rapid mating responses: flagellar tip activation, cell wall loss, and mating structure activation accompanied by actin polymerization. Here we show that a transient 10-fold elevation of intracellular cAMP levels is also triggered by sexual agglutination. We further show that gametes of a single mating type can be induced to undergo all three mating responses when presented with exogenous dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP). These events are also induced by cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitors, which elevate endogenous cAMP levels and act synergistically with db-cAMP. Non-agglutinating mutants of opposite mating type will fuse efficiently in the presence of db-cAMP. No activation of mating events is induced by calcium plus ionophores, 8-bromo-cGMP, dibutyryl-cGMP, nigericin at alkaline pH, phorbol esters, or forskolin. H-8, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase, inhibits mating events in agglutinating cells and antagonizes the effects of cAMP on non-agglutinating cells. Adenylate cyclase activity was detected in both the gamete cell body and flagella, with the highest specific activity displayed in flagellar membrane fractions. The flagellar membrane adenylate cyclase is preferentially stimulated by Mn++, unresponsive to NaF, GTP, GTP gamma S, AlF4-, and forskolin, and is inhibited by trifluoperazine. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity is also present in flagella. Our observations indicate that cAMP is a sufficient initial signal for all of the known mating reaction events in C. reinhardtii, and suggest that the flagellar cyclase and/or phosphodiesterase may be important loci of control for the agglutination-stimulated production of this signal.

  2. Cooperation between cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea in insulin secretion.

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    Shibasaki, T; Takahashi, T; Takahashi, H; Seino, S

    2014-09-01

    Although glucose is physiologically the most important regulator of insulin secretion, glucose-induced insulin secretion is modulated by hormonal and neural inputs to pancreatic β-cells. Most of the hormones and neurotransmitters evoke intracellular signals such as cAMP, Ca²⁺ , and phospholipid-derived molecules by activating G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In particular, cAMP is a key second messenger that amplifies insulin secretion in a glucose concentration-dependent manner. The action of cAMP on insulin secretion is mediated by both protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent and Epac2A-dependent mechanisms. Many of the proteins expressed in β-cells are phosphorylated by PKA in vitro, but only a few proteins in which PKA phosphorylation directly affects insulin secretion have been identified. On the other hand, Epac2A activates the Ras-like small G protein Rap in a cAMP-dependent manner. Epac2A is also directly activated by various sulfonylureas, except for gliclazide. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analogue, and glibenclamide, a sulfonylurea, synergistically activate Epac2A and Rap1, whereas adrenaline, which suppresses cAMP production in pancreatic β-cells, blocks activation of Epac2A and Rap1 by glibenclamide. Thus, cAMP signalling and sulfonylurea cooperatively activate Epac2A and Rap1. This interaction could account, at least in part, for the synergistic effects of incretin-related drugs and sulfonylureas in insulin secretion. Accordingly, clarification of the mechanism of Epac2A activation may provide therapeutic strategies to improve insulin secretion in diabetes.

  3. Multiple facets of cAMP signalling and physiological impact : cAMP compartmentalization in the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburger, Anouk; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP) are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelli

  4. G beta gamma signaling reduces intracellular cAMP to promote meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

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    Gill, Arvind; Hammes, Stephen R

    2007-02-01

    In nearly every vertebrate species, elevated intracellular cAMP maintains oocytes in prophase I of meiosis. Prior to ovulation, gonadotropins trigger various intra-ovarian processes, including the breakdown of gap junctions, the activation of EGF receptors, and the secretion of steroids. These events in turn decrease intracellular cAMP levels in select oocytes to allow meiotic progression, or maturation, to resume. Studies suggest that cAMP levels are kept elevated in resting oocytes by constitutive G protein signaling, and that the drop in intracellular cAMP that accompanies maturation may be due in part to attenuation of this inhibitory G protein-mediated signaling. Interestingly, one of these G protein regulators of meiotic arrest is the Galpha(s) protein, which stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise intracellular cAMP in two important animal models of oocyte development: Xenopus leavis frogs and mice. In addition to G(alpha)(s), constitutive Gbetagamma activity similarly stimulates adenylyl cyclase to raise cAMP and prevent maturation in Xenopus oocytes; however, the role of Gbetagamma in regulating meiosis in mouse oocytes has not been examined. Here we show that Gbetagamma does not contribute to the maintenance of murine oocyte meiotic arrest. In fact, contrary to observations in frog oocytes, Gbetagamma signaling in mouse oocytes reduces cAMP and promotes oocyte maturation, suggesting that Gbetagamma might in fact play a positive role in promoting oocyte maturation. These observations emphasize that, while many general concepts and components of meiotic regulation are conserved from frogs to mice, specific differences exist that may lead to important insights regarding ovarian development in vertebrates.

  5. Actin induction during PMA and cAMP-dependent signal pathway activation in Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

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    Ortiz, D; del Carmen Dominguez-Robles, M; Villegas-Sepúlveda, N; Meza, I

    2000-10-01

    Activation of PKC or cAMP-dependent signalling pathways in Entamoeba histolytica triggers the phosphorylation of proteins involved in actin rearrangements necessary for adhesion and locomotion. Analogous motifs to SRE and CRE sequences--known to respond to PMA and cAMP--were identified within the 5' regulatory region (5'RR) of one of the parasite actin genes. These sequences could be involved in the actin transcriptional upregulation reported during signalling. To test this hypothesis, a plasmid containing the 5'RR of the actin gene fused to the bacterial neomycin gene (neo) was used for stable transfection. Expression of neo and endogenous actin was measured after stimulation of transfected amoebae by PMA and dcAMP. It was found that both compounds induced neo and actin expression and showed a co-operative effect in the induction of neo. Induction by PMA or dcAMP failed if the directing amoebic 5'RR lacked SRE and CRE motifs. Transfection of amoebae with plasmid constructs, containing either progressive deletions of the actin 5'RR or site-directed mutations of the SRE and CRE-like motifs, corroborated that these sequences and a co-ordinated participation of PKC- and PKA-activated transcription factors are responsible for the increments in neo and actin mRNAs. In vivo, these PMA and cAMP-response elements could play an important role in regulating actin expression and organization in signalling processes activated during tissue invasion.

  6. cAMP-Signalling Regulates Gametocyte-Infected Erythrocyte Deformability Required for Malaria Parasite Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghania Ramdani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blocking Plasmodium falciparum transmission to mosquitoes has been designated a strategic objective in the global agenda of malaria elimination. Transmission is ensured by gametocyte-infected erythrocytes (GIE that sequester in the bone marrow and at maturation are released into peripheral blood from where they are taken up during a mosquito blood meal. Release into the blood circulation is accompanied by an increase in GIE deformability that allows them to pass through the spleen. Here, we used a microsphere matrix to mimic splenic filtration and investigated the role of cAMP-signalling in regulating GIE deformability. We demonstrated that mature GIE deformability is dependent on reduced cAMP-signalling and on increased phosphodiesterase expression in stage V gametocytes, and that parasite cAMP-dependent kinase activity contributes to the stiffness of immature gametocytes. Importantly, pharmacological agents that raise cAMP levels in transmissible stage V gametocytes render them less deformable and hence less likely to circulate through the spleen. Therefore, phosphodiesterase inhibitors that raise cAMP levels in P. falciparum infected erythrocytes, such as sildenafil, represent new candidate drugs to block transmission of malaria parasites.

  7. Developmental regulation and evolution of cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez-Curto, Elisa

    2007-01-01

    Through evolution the social amoebas have developed mechanisms to adapt to environmental changes and ensure survival. This thesis explores the evolutionary origins of cAMP signalling and regulation of developmental decisions in the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. It also shows the first mol

  8. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  9. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  10. The RGS protein Crg2 regulates both pheromone and cAMP signalling in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chaoyang; Hsueh, Yen-Ping; Chen, Lydia; Heitman, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    G proteins orchestrate critical cellular functions by transducing extracellular signals into internal signals and controlling cellular responses to environmental cues. G proteins typically function as switches that are activated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and negatively controlled by regulator of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins. In the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, three G protein alpha subunits (Gpa1, Gpa2 and Gpa3) have been identified. In a previous study, we identified the RGS protein Crg2 involved in regulating the pheromone response pathway through Gpa2 and Gpa3. In this study, a role for Crg2 was established in the Gpa1-cAMP signalling pathway that governs mating and virulence. We show that Crg2 physically interacts with Gpa1 and crg2 mutations increase cAMP production. crg2 mutations also enhance mating filament hyphae production, but reduce cell-cell fusion and sporulation efficiency during mating. Although crg2 mutations and the Gpa1 dominant active allele GPA1(Q284L) enhanced melanin production under normally repressive conditions, virulence was attenuated in a murine model. We conclude that Crg2 participates in controlling both Gpa1-cAMP-virulence and pheromone-mating signalling cascades and hypothesize it may serve as a molecular interface between these two central signalling conduits.

  11. The RGS protein Crg2 regulates pheromone and cyclic AMP signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Gui; Wang, Yan-Li; Whittington, Amy; Li, Lie; Wang, Ping

    2008-09-01

    Crg1 and Crg2 are regulators of G-protein signaling homologs found in the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. Crg1 negatively regulates pheromone responses and mating through direct inhibition of Galpha subunits Gpa2 and Gpa3. It has also been proposed that Crg2 has a role in mating, as genetic crosses involving Deltacrg2 mutants resulted in formation of hyperfilaments. We found that mutation of Gpa2 and Gpa3 partially suppressed the hyperfilamentation, mutation of Gpa3 alleviated Deltacrg2-specfic cell swelling, and mutation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase Cpk1 blocked both processes. These findings indicate that Gpa2 and Gpa3 function downstream of Crg2 and that Gpa3 is also epistatic to Crg2 in a Cpk1-dependent morphogenesis process linked to mating. Significantly, we found that Deltacrg2 mutants formed enlarged capsules that mimic cells expressing a constitutively active GPA1(Q284L) allele and that the levels of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) were also elevated, suggesting that Crg2 also negatively regulates the Gpa1-cAMP signaling pathway. We further showed that Crg2 interacted with Gpa3 and Gpa1, but not Gpa2, in a pulldown assay and that Crg2 maintained a higher in vitro GTPase-activating protein activity toward Gpa3 and Gpa1 than to Gpa2. Finally, we found that dysregulation of cAMP due to the Crg2 mutation attenuated virulence in a murine model of cryptococcosis. Taken together, our study reveals Crg2 as an RGS (regulator of G-protein signaling) protein of multiregulatory function, including one that controls mating distinctly from Crg1 and one that serves as a novel inhibitor of Gpa1-cAMP signaling.

  12. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  13. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  15. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  16. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  17. Dopamine receptors modulate cytotoxicity of natural killer cells via cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter in the nervous system, has been shown to modulate immune function. We have previously reported that five subtypes of DA receptors, including D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R and D5R, are expressed in T lymphocytes and they are involved in regulation of T cells. However, roles of these DA receptor subtypes and their coupled signal-transduction pathway in modulation of natural killer (NK cells still remain to be clarified. The spleen of mice was harvested and NK cells were isolated and purified by negative selection using magnetic activated cell sorting. After NK cells were incubated with various drugs for 4 h, flow cytometry measured cytotoxicity of NK cells against YAC-1 lymphoma cells. NK cells expressed the five subtypes of DA receptors at mRNA and protein levels. Activation of D1-like receptors (including D1R and D5R with agonist SKF38393 enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity, but activation of D2-like receptors (including D2R, D3R and D4R with agonist quinpirole attenuated NK cells. Simultaneously, SKF38393 elevated D1R and D5R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding (CREB level in NK cells, while quinpirole reduced D3R and D4R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated CREB level in NK cells. These effects of SKF38393 were blocked by SCH23390, an antagonist of D1-like receptors, and quinpirole effects were abolished by haloperidol, an antagonist of D2-like receptors. In support these results, H89, an inhibitor of phosphokinase A (PKA, prevented the SKF38393-dependent enhancement of NK cells and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC, counteracted the quinpirole-dependent suppression of NK cells. These findings show that DA receptor subtypes are involved in modulation of NK cells and suggest that D1-like receptors facilitate NK cells by stimulating D1R/D5R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway and D2-like receptors suppress NK cells by inhibiting D3R/D4R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway. The

  18. cAMP/PKA信号通路在肾上腺肿瘤中的作用%Effect of cAMP/PKA Signaling Pathways on Adrenal Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张科; 刘昌荣

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate effect of cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase a ( cAMP/PKA) signaling pathways on adrenal tumors. Methods Human H295R cells of adrenal tumor cells were randomly divided into control group, group A and B. Control group did not undergo any treatment;group A was incubated with cAMP deriva-tives db-cAMP;group B was incubated with db-cAMP and inhibitor of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway H-89. In three groups, PKA activities were detected, and phosphorylation levels of CREB protein were also detected by Western Blot method;72 h cell proliferation levels were detected by CCK8 assay, and capacities of hormone secretion were detected by glucocorticoid secretion experiment. Results Levels of PKA activity, CREB protein phosphorylation, cell proliferation and glucocorticoid secretion were significantly higher in group A than those in control group and group B (P0. 05). Conclusion The ab-normal activation of cAMP/PKA signaling pathways can promote formation and functional effect of adrenal tumors.%目的:探讨cAMP/PKA信号通路在肾上腺肿瘤中的作用。方法将人肾上腺肿瘤H295R细胞随机分为对照组、实验组A及实验组B,对照组不进行处理,实验组A加入cAMP衍生物db-cAMP,实验组B加入db-cAMP及cAMP/PKA信号通路抑制剂H-89,分别检测细胞PKA活性;应用Western Blot方法检测cAMP/PKA信号通路下游CREB蛋白的磷酸化水平;CCK8实验检测细胞72 h的增殖水平;糖皮质激素分泌实验检测3组H295R的激素分泌能力。结果实验组A的PKA活性水平、CREB蛋白的磷酸化水平、细胞增殖水平、糖皮质激素分泌水平均较对照组和实验组B显著升高(P<0.05);而实验组B与对照组比较差异无统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 cAMP/PKA信号通路的异常活化能够促进肾上腺肿瘤的形成与功能的发挥。

  19. Controlling fertilization and cAMP signaling in sperm by optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Vera; Alvarez, Luis; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Hegemann, Peter; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2015-01-20

    Optogenetics is a powerful technique to control cellular activity by light. The light-gated Channelrhodopsin has been widely used to study and manipulate neuronal activity in vivo, whereas optogenetic control of second messengers in vivo has not been examined in depth. In this study, we present a transgenic mouse model expressing a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (bPAC) in sperm. In transgenic sperm, bPAC mimics the action of the endogenous soluble adenylyl cyclase (SACY) that is required for motility and fertilization: light-stimulation rapidly elevates cAMP, accelerates the flagellar beat, and, thereby, changes swimming behavior of sperm. Furthermore, bPAC replaces endogenous adenylyl cyclase activity. In mutant sperm lacking the bicarbonate-stimulated SACY activity, bPAC restored motility after light-stimulation and, thereby, enabled sperm to fertilize oocytes in vitro. We show that optogenetic control of cAMP in vivo allows to non-invasively study cAMP signaling, to control behaviors of single cells, and to restore a fundamental biological process such as fertilization.

  20. Dual chemotaxis signalling regulates Dictyostelium development: intercellular cyclic AMP pulses and intracellular F-actin disassembly waves induce each other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicker, Michael G; Grutsch, James F

    2008-10-01

    Aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae periodically emit and relay cAMP, which regulates their chemotaxis and morphogenesis into a multicellular, differentiated organism. Cyclic AMP also stimulates F-actin assembly and chemotactic pseudopodium extension. We used actin-GFP expression to visualise for the first time intracellular F-actin assembly as a spatio-temporal indicator of cell reactions to cAMP, and thus the kinematics of cell communication, in aggregating streams. Every natural cAMP signal pulse induces an autowave of F-actin disassembly, which propagates from each cell's leading end to its trailing end at a linear rate, much slower than the calculated and measured velocities of cAMP diffusion in aggregating Dictyostelium. A sequence of transient reactions follows behind the wave, including anterior F-actin assembly, chemotactic pseudopodium extension and cell advance at the cell front and, at the back, F-actin assembly, extension of a small retrograde pseudopodium (forcing a brief cell retreat) and chemotactic stimulation of the following cell, yielding a 20s cAMP relay delay. These dynamics indicate that stream cell behaviour is mediated by a dual signalling system: a short-range cAMP pulse directed from one cell tail to an immediately following cell front and a slower, long-range wave of intracellular F-actin disassembly, each inducing the other.

  1. Performance Evaluation Of Macro amp Micro Mobility In HMIP Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Ali Abdelgadir

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Changing the location of mobile node during transmission or receiving of data always caused changing of the address of the mobile node which results in packet loss as well as delay in time taken to locate the new address of the Mobile Node therefore delay of data receiving is caused this problem was known as micro-mobility issue. To resolve this problem and ascurrently mobile IP is the most promising solution for mobility management in the Internet. Several IP micro mobility approaches have been proposed to enhance the performance of mobile IP which supports quality of service minimum packet loss limited handoff delay and scalability and power conservation but they are not scalable for macro mobility. A practical solution would therefore require integration of mobile IP and micro mobility protocols where mobile IP handles macro mobility and HMIP cellular IP HAWAII handles micro mobility. In this paper an integrated mobility management protocol for IP based wireless networks is proposed and analyzed.HIERARCHICAL MICRO MOBILITY PROTOCOL is used. To identify the impact of micro-mobility in IP based Wireless Network to implement selected micro-mobility model of Hierarchal Micro Mobility Protocol in network simulator and for more analysis and measurements results and for the purpose of performance comparison between both Macro and Micro mobility Protocol Management.. Simulation results presented in this paper are based on ns 2

  2. Microprocessor control and networking for the amps breadboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Stephen A.

    1987-01-01

    Future space missions will require more sophisticated power systems, implying higher costs and more extensive crew and ground support involvement. To decrease this human involvement, as well as to protect and most efficiently utilize this important resource, NASA has undertaken major efforts to promote progress in the design and development of autonomously managed power systems. Two areas being actively pursued are autonomous power system (APS) breadboards and knowledge-based expert system (KBES) applications. The former are viewed as a requirement for the timely development of the latter. Not only will they serve as final testbeds for the various KBES applications, but will play a major role in the knowledge engineering phase of their development. The current power system breadboard designs are of a distributed microprocessor nature. The distributed nature, plus the need to connect various external computer capabilities (i.e., conventional host computers and symbolic processors), places major emphasis on effective networking. The communications and networking technologies for the first power system breadboard/test facility are described.

  3. cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 is linked to JNK-signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushijima, Hironori [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1, Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Shiwagun, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Maeda, Masatomo, E-mail: mmaeda@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1, Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Shiwagun, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of a JNK activator anisomycin on the proteolysis was examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisomycin stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK activated the CRM1 mediated nuclear export of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK further stimulated slowly the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. -- Abstract: A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 by proteasomes around its IC50. We further examined the effects of SP600125 on the degradation of GATA-6 in detail, since an activator of JNK (anisomycin) is available. Interestingly, anisomycin immediately stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm, and then the cytoplasmic content of GATA-6 decreased slowly through degradation by proteasomes. Such an effect of anisomycin was inhibited by SP600125, indicating that the observed phenomenon might be linked to the JNK signaling pathway. The inhibitory effect of SP600125 could not be ascribed to the inhibition of PKA, since phosphorylation of CREB occurred in the presence of dbcAMP and SP600125. The nuclear export of GATA-6 was inhibited by leptomycin B, suggesting that CRM1-mediated export could be activated by anisomycin. Furthermore, it seems likely that the JNK activated by anisomycin may stimulate not only the nuclear export of GATA-6 through CRM1 but also the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In contrast, A-kinase might activate only the latter process through JNK.

  4. Neural Network Communications Signal Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Technical Information Report for the Neural Network Communications Signal Processing Program, CDRL A003, 31 March 1993. Software Development Plan for...track changing jamming conditions to provide the decoder with the best log- likelihood ratio metrics at a given time. As part of our development plan we...Artificial Neural Networks (ICANN-91) Volume 2, June 24-28, 1991, pp. 1677-1680. Kohonen, Teuvo, Raivio, Kimmo, Simula, Oli, Venta , 011i, Henriksson

  5. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway in depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Zhang, Yingquan; Qiao, Mingqi

    2013-03-25

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  6. Functional characterization of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ji; Zhang, Tao; Ji, Hongbin; Tao, Kaixiong; Guo, Jianping; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-12-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a ubiquitously expressed metabolic sensor among various species. Specifically, cellular AMPK is phosphorylated and activated under certain stressful conditions, such as energy deprivation, in turn to activate diversified downstream substrates to modulate the adaptive changes and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Recently, emerging evidences have implicated the potential roles of AMPK signaling in tumor initiation and progression. Nevertheless, a comprehensive description on such topic is still in scarcity, especially in combination of its biochemical features with mouse modeling results to elucidate the physiological role of AMPK signaling in tumorigenesis. Hence, we performed this thorough review by summarizing the tumorigenic role of each component along the AMPK signaling, comprising of both its upstream and downstream effectors. Moreover, their functional interplay with the AMPK heterotrimer and exclusive efficacies in carcinogenesis were chiefly explained among genetically altered mice models. Importantly, the pharmaceutical investigations of AMPK relevant medications have also been highlighted. In summary, in this review, we not only elucidate the potential functions of AMPK signaling pathway in governing tumorigenesis, but also potentiate the future targeted strategy aiming for better treatment of aberrant metabolism-associated diseases, including cancer.

  7. Stress and glucocorticoids impair memory retrieval via β2-adrenergic, Gi/o-coupled suppression of cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutsky, Keith; Ouyang, Ming; Castelino, Christina B; Zhang, Lei; Thomas, Steven A

    2011-10-05

    Acute stress impairs the retrieval of hippocampus-dependent memory, and this effect is mimicked by exogenous administration of stress-responsive glucocorticoid hormones. It has been proposed that glucocorticoids affect memory by promoting the release and/or blocking the reuptake of norepinephrine (NE), a stress-responsive neurotransmitter. It has also been proposed that this enhanced NE signaling impairs memory retrieval by stimulating β(1)-adrenergic receptors and elevating levels of cAMP. In contrast, other evidence indicates that NE, β(1), and cAMP signaling is transiently required for the retrieval of hippocampus-dependent memory. To resolve this discrepancy, wild-type rats and mice with and without gene-targeted mutations were stressed or treated with glucocorticoids and/or adrenergic receptor drugs before testing memory for inhibitory avoidance or fear conditioning. Here we report that glucocorticoids do not require NE to impair retrieval. However, stress- and glucocorticoid-induced impairments of retrieval depend on the activation of β(2) (but not β(1))-adrenergic receptors. Offering an explanation for the opposing functions of these two receptors, the impairing effects of stress, glucocorticoids and β(2) agonists on retrieval are blocked by pertussis toxin, which inactivates signaling by G(i/o)-coupled receptors. In hippocampal slices, β(2) signaling decreases cAMP levels and greatly reduces the increase in cAMP mediated by β(1) signaling. Finally, augmenting cAMP signaling in the hippocampus prevents the impairment of retrieval by systemic β(2) agonists or glucocorticoids. These results demonstrate that the β(2) receptor can be a critical effector of acute stress, and that β(1) and β(2) receptors can have quite distinct roles in CNS signaling and cognition.

  8. Mathematical Modelling Plant Signalling Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Muraro, D.

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades, molecular genetic studies and the completion of the sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome have increased knowledge of hormonal regulation in plants. These signal transduction pathways act in concert through gene regulatory and signalling networks whose main components have begun to be elucidated. Our understanding of the resulting cellular processes is hindered by the complex, and sometimes counter-intuitive, dynamics of the networks, which may be interconnected through feedback controls and cross-regulation. Mathematical modelling provides a valuable tool to investigate such dynamics and to perform in silico experiments that may not be easily carried out in a laboratory. In this article, we firstly review general methods for modelling gene and signalling networks and their application in plants. We then describe specific models of hormonal perception and cross-talk in plants. This mathematical analysis of sub-cellular molecular mechanisms paves the way for more comprehensive modelling studies of hormonal transport and signalling in a multi-scale setting. © EDP Sciences, 2013.

  9. Gpr161 anchoring of PKA consolidates GPCR and cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Verena A; Mayrhofer, Johanna E; Ilouz, Ronit; Tschaikner, Philipp; Raffeiner, Philipp; Röck, Ruth; Courcelles, Mathieu; Apelt, Federico; Lu, Tsan-Wen; Baillie, George S; Thibault, Pierre; Aanstad, Pia; Stelzl, Ulrich; Taylor, Susan S; Stefan, Eduard

    2016-07-12

    Scaffolding proteins organize the information flow from activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to intracellular effector cascades both spatially and temporally. By this means, signaling scaffolds, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), compartmentalize kinase activity and ensure substrate selectivity. Using a phosphoproteomics approach we identified a physical and functional connection between protein kinase A (PKA) and Gpr161 (an orphan GPCR) signaling. We show that Gpr161 functions as a selective high-affinity AKAP for type I PKA regulatory subunits (RI). Using cell-based reporters to map protein-protein interactions, we discovered that RI binds directly and selectively to a hydrophobic protein-protein interaction interface in the cytoplasmic carboxyl-terminal tail of Gpr161. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that a binary complex between Gpr161 and RI promotes the compartmentalization of Gpr161 to the plasma membrane. Moreover, we show that Gpr161, functioning as an AKAP, recruits PKA RI to primary cilia in zebrafish embryos. We also show that Gpr161 is a target of PKA phosphorylation, and that mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site affects ciliary receptor localization. Thus, we propose that Gpr161 is itself an AKAP and that the cAMP-sensing Gpr161:PKA complex acts as cilium-compartmentalized signalosome, a concept that now needs to be considered in the analyzing, interpreting, and pharmaceutical targeting of PKA-associated functions.

  10. The cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway is involved in the pyrogenic effect of CRH in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The primary action of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is stimulation of the synthesis and release of adrenocorticotropic hormone and β-endorphin from the pituitary in response to stress. In addition, a number of studies indicate that CRH exerts other physiological actions within the central nervous system which are independent of the pituitary. These include increased body temperature and thermogenesis. However, the intracellular mechanism responsible for pyrogenic action of CRH is still unclear. The purpose of these studies was to determine whether or not cAMP was involved in the pyrogenic action of CRH in the rat. Intracerebroventricular (icv) microinjection of CRH (2.5 μg, 5.0 μg, 10 μg) caused increases in colonic temperature and hypothalamus cAMP level in conscious rats. The pyrogenic effects of CRH were abolished or markedly inhibited by prior injection (icv) of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2,,3,-dideoxyadenosine (DDA, 30 μg) or an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, adenosine-3,,5,-(cyclic) monophosphorothionate (Rp-cAMPs, 15 μg). This is the first report demonstrating the pyrogenic effcet of centrally administration of CRH on the rat via the cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway.

  11. Inhibin alpha gene expression in human trophoblasts is regulated by interactions between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depoix, Christophe L; Debiève, Frédéric; Hubinont, Corinne

    2014-11-01

    Inhibin α (Inha) gene expression is regulated, in rat granulosa cells, via a cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-response element (CRE) found in a region of the promoter that is homologous to the human INHA promoter. We previously found that during in vitro cytotrophoblast differentiation, human INHA gene expression was regulated by TFAP2A via association with an AP-2 site located upstream of this CRE. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the human INHA gene was also regulated by cAMP in trophoblasts, and to investigate the possible crosstalk between TFAP2 and cAMP signaling pathways in the regulation of INHA gene expression. Treatment with cAMP or forskolin increased INHA mRNA expression by 7- and 2-fold in primary cytotrophoblasts and choriocarcinoma-derived BeWo cells, respectively. Treatment with the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 reduced forskolin-induced luciferase activity by ∼40% in BeWo cells transfected with an INHA promoter-driven luciferase reporter vector. TFAP2 overexpression increased basal luciferase activity, whereas the dominant repressor KCREB abolished it. Surprisingly, mutation of the CRE also eliminated the TFAP2-induced transcription, although TFAP2 overexpression was still able to increase forskolin-induced luciferase activity when the AP-2 binding site, but not the CRE site, was mutated. Thus, INHA gene expression is upregulated by cAMP via CRE in human trophoblasts, and TFAP2 regulates this expression by interacting with CRE.

  12. Signaling transcript profile of the asexual intraerythrocytic development cycle of Plasmodium falciparum induced by melatonin and cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Andrei; Parreira, Kleber S.; Moraes, Miriam S.; Martins, David C.; Hashimoto, Ronaldo F.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Garcia, Célia R.S.

    2016-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), Plasmodium falciparum is the deadliest parasite among all species. This parasite possesses the ability to sense molecules, including melatonin (MEL) and cAMP, and modulate its cell cycle accordingly. MEL synchronizes the development of this malaria parasite by activating several cascades, including the generation of the second messenger cAMP. Therefore, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis in P. falciparum erythrocytic stages (ring, trophozoite and schizont) treated with MEL and cAMP. To investigate the expression profile of P. falciparum genes regulated by MEL and cAMP, we performed RNA-Seq analysis in three P. falciparum strains (control, 3D7; protein kinase 7 knockout, PfPK7-; and PfPK7 complement, PfPK7C). In the 3D7 strain, 38 genes were differentially expressed upon MEL treatment; however, none of the genes in the trophozoite (T) stage PfPK7- knockout parasites were differentially expressed upon MEL treatment for 5 hours compared to untreated controls, suggesting that PfPK7 may be involved in the signaling leading to differential gene expression. Moreover, we found that MEL modified the mRNA expression of genes encoding membrane proteins, zinc ion-binding proteins and nucleic acid-binding proteins, which might influence numerous functions in the parasite. The RNA-Seq data following treatment with cAMP show that this molecule modulates different genes throughout the intraerythrocytic cycle, namely, 75, 101 and 141 genes, respectively, in the ring (R), T and schizont (S) stages. Our results highlight P. falciparum's perception of the external milieu through the signaling molecules MEL and cAMP, which are able to drive to changes in gene expression in the parasite. PMID:28050233

  13. cAMP-dependent signaling regulates the adipogenic effect of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller; Liaset, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    The effect of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-6 PUFAs) on adipogenesis and obesity is controversial. Using in vitro cell culture models, we show that n-6 PUFAs was pro-adipogenic under conditions with base-line levels of cAMP, but anti-adipogenic when the levels of cAMP were elevated. The anti...

  14. Mapping the follicle-stimulating hormone-induced signalling networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline eGloaguen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH is a central regulator of male and female reproductive function. Over the last decade, there has been a growing perception of the complexity associated with FSH-induced cellular signalling. It is now clear that the canonical Gs/cAMP/PKA pathway is not the sole mechanism that must be considered in FSH biological actions. In parallel, consistent with the emerging concept of biased agonism, several examples of ligand-mediated selective signalling pathway activation by gonadotropin receptors have been reported. In this context, it is important to gain an integrative view of the signalling pathways induced by FSH and how they interconnect to form a network. In this review, we propose a first attempt at building topological maps of various pathways known to be involved in the FSH-induced signalling network. We discuss the multiple facets of FSH-induced signalling and how they converge to the hormone integrated biological response. Despite of their incompleteness, these maps of the FSH-induced signalling network represent a first step towards gaining a system-level comprehension of this hormone’s actions, which may ultimately facilitate the discovery of novel regulatory processes and therapeutic strategies for infertilities and non-steroidal contraception.

  15. Glutamate Acts as a Key Signal Linking Glucose Metabolism to Incretin/cAMP Action to Amplify Insulin Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghupurjan Gheni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Incretins, hormones released by the gut after meal ingestion, are essential for maintaining systemic glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion. The effect of incretins on insulin secretion occurs only at elevated glucose concentrations and is mediated by cAMP signaling, but the mechanism linking glucose metabolism and cAMP action in insulin secretion is unknown. We show here, using a metabolomics-based approach, that cytosolic glutamate derived from the malate-aspartate shuttle upon glucose stimulation underlies the stimulatory effect of incretins and that glutamate uptake into insulin granules mediated by cAMP/PKA signaling amplifies insulin release. Glutamate production is diminished in an incretin-unresponsive, insulin-secreting β cell line and pancreatic islets of animal models of human diabetes and obesity. Conversely, a membrane-permeable glutamate precursor restores amplification of insulin secretion in these models. Thus, cytosolic glutamate represents the elusive link between glucose metabolism and cAMP action in incretin-induced insulin secretion.

  16. Noradrenalin and dopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu eNomura

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cerebral cortex, whereas the cortical distribution ofdopaminergic fibers is more restricted. However, the relative functional impact ofnoradrenalin and dopamine receptors in various cortical regions is largely unknown. Using aspecific genetic label, we first confirmed that noradrenergic fibers innervate the entire cortexwhereas dopaminergic fibers were present in all layers of restricted medial and lateral areasbut only in deep layers of other areas. Imaging of a genetically-encoded sensor revealed thatnoradrenalin and dopamine widely activate PKA in cortical pyramidal neurons of frontal,parietal and occipital regions with scarce dopaminergic fibers. Responses to noradrenalin hadhigher amplitude, velocity and occurred at more than 10 fold lower dose than those elicited bydopamine, whose amplitude and velocity increased along the antero-posterior axis. Thepharmacology of these responses was consistent with the involvement of Gs-coupled beta1adrenergic and D1/D5 dopaminergic receptors, but the inhibition of both noradrenalin anddopamine responses by beta adrenergic antagonists was suggestive of the existence of beta1-D1/D5 heteromeric receptors. Responses also involved Gi-coupled alpha2 adrenergic and D2-like dopaminergic receptors that markedly reduced their amplitude and velocity andcontributed to their cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Our results reveal that noradrenalin anddopamine receptors both control cAMP-PKA signaling throughout the cerebral cortex withmoderate regional and laminar differences. These receptors can thus mediate widespreadeffects of both catecholamines, which are reportedly co-released by cortical noradrenergicfibers beyond the territory of dopaminergic fibers.

  17. Prostaglandin E2 negatively regulates AMP-activated protein kinase via protein kinase A signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Koji; Cao, Xia; Yamauchi, Masako; Kozaki, Yasuko; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kambe, Fukushi

    2009-01-01

    We investigated possible involvement of prostaglandin (PG) E2 in regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). When osteoblastic MG63 cells were cultured in serum-deprived media, Thr-172 phosphorylation of AMPK alpha-subunit was markedly increased. Treatment of the cells with PGE2 significantly reduced the phosphorylation. Ser-79 phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a direct target for AMPK, was also reduced by PGE2. On the other hand, PGE2 reciprocally increased Ser-485 phosphorylation of the alpha-subunit that could be associated with inhibition of AMPK activity. These effects of PGE2 were mimicked by PGE2 receptor EP2 and EP4 agonists and forskolin, but not by EP1 and EP3 agonists, and the effects were suppressed by an adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 and a protein kinase A inhibitor H89. Additionally, the PGE2 effects were duplicated in primary calvarial osteoblasts. Together, the present study demonstrates that PGE2 negatively regulates AMPK activity via activation of protein kinase A signaling pathway.

  18. Bioinformatics analyses for signal transduction networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Research in signaling networks contributes to a deeper understanding of organism living activities. With the development of experimental methods in the signal transduction field, more and more mechanisms of signaling pathways have been discovered. This paper introduces such popular bioin-formatics analysis methods for signaling networks as the common mechanism of signaling pathways and database resource on the Internet, summerizes the methods of analyzing the structural properties of networks, including structural Motif finding and automated pathways generation, and discusses the modeling and simulation of signaling networks in detail, as well as the research situation and tendency in this area. Now the investigation of signal transduction is developing from small-scale experiments to large-scale network analysis, and dynamic simulation of networks is closer to the real system. With the investigation going deeper than ever, the bioinformatics analysis of signal transduction would have immense space for development and application.

  19. Melanocortin 1 receptor mutations impact differentially on signalling to the cAMP and the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; Zanna, Paola; García-Borrón, José C

    2009-10-06

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a Gs protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, is a major determinant of skin pigmentation, phototype and cancer risk. MC1R activates cAMP and mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/ERK2 signalling. When expressed in rat pheochromocytoma cell line cells, the R151C, R160W and D294H MC1R variants associated with melanoma and impaired cAMP signalling mediated ERK activation and ERK-dependent, agonist-induced neurite outgrowth comparable with wild-type. Dose-response curves for ERK activation and cAMP production indicated higher sensitivity of the ERK response. Thus, the melanoma-associated MC1R mutations impact differently on cAMP and ERK signalling, suggesting that cAMP is not responsible for functional coupling of MC1R to the ERK cascade.

  20. Phospholipase D1 mediates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling for glucose uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose homeostasis is maintained by a balance between hepatic glucose production and peripheral glucose utilization. In skeletal muscle cells, glucose utilization is primarily regulated by glucose uptake. Deprivation of cellular energy induces the activation of regulatory proteins and thus glucose uptake. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is known to play a significant role in the regulation of energy balances. However, the mechanisms related to the AMPK-mediated control of glucose uptake have yet to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we found that AMPK-induced phospholipase D1 (PLD1 activation is required for (14C-glucose uptake in muscle cells under glucose deprivation conditions. PLD1 activity rather than PLD2 activity is significantly enhanced by glucose deprivation. AMPK-wild type (WT stimulates PLD activity, while AMPK-dominant negative (DN inhibits it. AMPK regulates PLD1 activity through phosphorylation of the Ser-505 and this phosphorylation is increased by the presence of AMP. Furthermore, PLD1-S505Q, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant, shows no changes in activity in response to glucose deprivation and does not show a significant increase in (14C-glucose uptake when compared to PLD1-WT. Taken together, these results suggest that phosphorylation of PLD1 is important for the regulation of (14C-glucose uptake. In addition, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK is stimulated by AMPK-induced PLD1 activation through the formation of phosphatidic acid (PA, which is a product of PLD. An ERK pharmacological inhibitor, PD98059, and the PLD inhibitor, 1-BtOH, both attenuate (14C-glucose uptake in muscle cells. Finally, the extracellular stresses caused by glucose deprivation or aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR; AMPK activator regulate (14C-glucose uptake and cell surface glucose transport (GLUT 4 through ERK stimulation by AMPK-mediated PLD1 activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results

  1. Signal Transduction in Dictyostelium fgd A Mutants with a Defective Interaction between Surface cAMP Receptors and a GTP-binding Regulatory Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1988-01-01

    Transmembrane signal transduction was investigated in four Dictyostelium discoideum mutants that belong to the fgd A complementation group. The results show the following. (a) Cell surface cAMP receptors are present in fgd A mutants, but cAMP does not induce any of the intracellular responses, inclu

  2. Novel mechanisms and signaling pathways of esophageal ulcer healing: the role of prostaglandin EP2 receptors, cAMP, and pCREB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Amrita; Baatar, Dolgor; Jones, Michael K; Tarnawski, Andrzej S

    2014-09-15

    Clinical studies indicate that prostaglandins of E class (PGEs) may promote healing of tissue injury e.g., gastroduodenal and dermal ulcers. However, the precise roles of PGEs, their E-prostanoid (EP) receptors, signaling pathways including cAMP and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and their relation to VEGF and angiogenesis in the tissue injury healing process remain unknown, forming the rationale for this study. Using an esophageal ulcer model in rats, we demonstrated that esophageal mucosa expresses predominantly EP2 receptors and that esophageal ulceration triggers an increase in expression of the EP2 receptor, activation of CREB (the downstream target of the cAMP signaling), and enhanced VEGF gene expression. Treatment of rats with misoprostol, a PGE1 analog capable of activating EP receptors, enhanced phosphorylation of CREB, stimulated VEGF expression and angiogenesis, and accelerated esophageal ulcer healing. In cultured human esophageal epithelial (HET-1A) cells, misoprostol increased intracellular cAMP levels (by 163-fold), induced phosphorylation of CREB, and stimulated VEGF expression. A cAMP analog (Sp-cAMP) mimicked, whereas an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (Rp-cAMP) blocked, these effects of misoprostol. These results indicate that the EP2/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway mediates the stimulatory effect of PGEs on angiogenesis essential for tissue injury healing via the induction of CREB activity and VEGF expression.

  3. Leptin interferes with 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP signaling to inhibit steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HoYuen Basil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of female infertility. Leptin, an adipocytokine which is elevated during obesity, may influence gonadal function through modulating steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. Methods The effect of leptin on progesterone production in simian virus 40 immortalized granulosa (SVOG cells was examined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The effect of leptin on the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, P450scc, 3betaHSD in SVOG cells was examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mRNA expression of leptin receptor isoforms in SVOG cells were examined by using PCR. SVOG cells were co-treated with leptin and specific pharmacological inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in leptin-reduced progesterone production. Silencing RNA against leptin receptor was used to determine that the inhibition of leptin on cAMP-induced steroidogenesis acts in a leptin receptor-dependent manner. Results and Conclusion In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying leptin-regulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. We show that leptin inhibits 8-bromo cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that leptin inhibits expression of the cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, the rate limiting de novo protein in progesterone synthesis. Leptin induces the activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK but only the ERK1/2 (PD98059 and p38 (SB203580 inhibitors attenuate the leptin-induced inhibition of cAMP-stimulated StAR protein expression and progesterone production. These data suggest that the leptin-induced MAPK signal transduction pathway interferes with cAMP/PKA-stimulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. Moreover, siRNA mediated knock-down of the endogenous leptin receptor attenuates the effect of leptin on cAMP-induced StAR protein expression and progesterone

  4. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka, E-mail: apiwkowska@cmdik.pan.pl [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Jankowski, Maciej [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenetics (Poland)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  5. Cannabinoid receptor type 1- and 2-mediated increase in cyclic AMP inhibits T cell receptor-triggered signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Christine; Smida, Michal; Höllt, Volker; Schraven, Burkhart; Kraus, Jürgen

    2009-12-18

    The aim of this study was to characterize inhibitory mechanisms on T cell receptor signaling mediated by the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Both receptors are coupled to G(i/o) proteins, which are associated with inhibition of cyclic AMP formation. In human primary and Jurkat T lymphocytes, activation of CB1 by R(+)-methanandamide, CB2 by JWH015, and both by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced a short decrease in cyclic AMP lasting less than 1 h. However, this decrease was followed by a massive (up to 10-fold) and sustained (at least up to 48 h) increase in cyclic AMP. Mediated by the cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase A and C-terminal Src kinase, the cannabinoids induced a stable phosphorylation of the inhibitory Tyr-505 of the leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck). By thus arresting Lck in its inhibited form, the cannabinoids prevented the dephosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-505 in response to T cell receptor activation, which is necessary for the subsequent initiation of T cell receptor signaling. In this way the cannabinoids inhibited the T cell receptor-triggered signaling, i.e. the activation of the zeta-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa, the linker for activation of T cells, MAPK, the induction of interleukin-2, and T cell proliferation. All of the effects of the cannabinoids were blocked by the CB1 and CB2 antagonists AM281 and AM630. These findings help to better understand the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids and explain the beneficial effects of these drugs in the treatment of T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis.

  6. Diatom acclimation to elevated CO2 via cAMP signalling and coordinated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennon, Gwenn M. M.; Ashworth, Justin; Groussman, Ryan D.; Berthiaume, Chris; Morales, Rhonda L.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Orellana, Mónica V.; Armbrust, E. V.

    2015-08-01

    Diatoms are responsible for ~40% of marine primary productivity, fuelling the oceanic carbon cycle and contributing to natural carbon sequestration in the deep ocean. Diatoms rely on energetically expensive carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to fix carbon efficiently at modern levels of CO2 (refs , , ). How diatoms may respond over the short and long term to rising atmospheric CO2 remains an open question. Here we use nitrate-limited chemostats to show that the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana rapidly responds to increasing CO2 by differentially expressing gene clusters that regulate transcription and chromosome folding, and subsequently reduces transcription of photosynthesis and respiration gene clusters under steady-state elevated CO2. These results suggest that exposure to elevated CO2 first causes a shift in regulation, and then a metabolic rearrangement. Genes in one CO2-responsive cluster included CCM and photorespiration genes that share a putative cAMP-responsive cis-regulatory sequence, implying these genes are co-regulated in response to CO2, with cAMP as an intermediate messenger. We verified cAMP-induced downregulation of CCM gene δ-CA3 in nutrient-replete diatom cultures by inhibiting the hydrolysis of cAMP. These results indicate an important role for cAMP in downregulating CCM and photorespiration genes under elevated CO2 and provide insights into mechanisms of diatom acclimation in response to climate change.

  7. The cyclase-associated protein CAP as regulator of cell polarity and cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and found that the mutant cells have normal levels of the aggregation phase-specific adenylyl cyclase and that receptor-mediated activation is intact. However, cAMP relay that is responsible for the generation of propagating cAMP waves that control the chemotactic aggregation of starving Dictyostelium cells was altered, and the cAMP-induced cGMP production was significantly reduced. The data suggest an interaction of CAP with adenylyl cyclase in Dictyostelium and an influence on signaling pathways directly as well as through its function as a regulatory component of the cytoskeleton.

  8. Signaling governed by G proteins and cAMP is crucial for growth, secondary metabolism and sexual development in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Studt

    Full Text Available The plant-pathogenic fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is a notorious rice pathogen causing hyper-elongation of infected plants due to the production of gibberellic acids (GAs. In addition to GAs, F. fujikuroi produces a wide range of other secondary metabolites, such as fusarins, fusaric acid or the red polyketides bikaverins and fusarubins. The recent availability of the fungal genome sequence for this species has revealed the potential of many more putative secondary metabolite gene clusters whose products remain to be identified. However, the complex regulation of secondary metabolism is far from being understood. Here we studied the impact of the heterotrimeric G protein and the cAMP-mediated signaling network, including the regulatory subunits of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA, to study their effect on colony morphology, sexual development and regulation of bikaverins, fusarubins and GAs. We demonstrated that fusarubin biosynthesis is negatively regulated by at least two Gα subunits, FfG1 and FfG3, which both function as stimulators of the adenylyl cyclase FfAC. Surprisingly, the primary downstream target of the adenylyl cyclase, the PKA, is not involved in the regulation of fusarubins, suggesting that additional, yet unidentified, cAMP-binding protein(s exist. In contrast, bikaverin biosynthesis is significantly reduced in ffg1 and ffg3 deletion mutants and positively regulated by FfAC and FfPKA1, while GA biosynthesis depends on the active FfAC and FfPKA2 in an FfG1- and FfG3-independent manner. In addition, we provide evidence that G Protein-mediated/cAMP signaling is important for growth in F. fujikuroi because deletion of ffg3, ffac and ffpka1 resulted in impaired growth on minimal and rich media. Finally, sexual crosses of ffg1 mutants showed the importance of a functional FfG1 protein for development of perithecia in the mating strain that carries the MAT1-1 idiomorph.

  9. cAMP/PKA Signaling Inhibits Osteogenic Differentiation and Bone Formation in Rodent Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Mulder, Winfried; Steeghs, Ilse; Klundert, van de Christine; Fernandes, Hugo; Liu, Jun; Arends, Roel; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) activation induces in vitro osteogenesis and in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). To analyze the species-specific response of this phenomenon and to translate our findings into a clinical trial, suitable

  10. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zequn Jiang; Shasha Li; Yunyi Liu; Pengyi Deng; Jianguo Huang; Guangyuan He

    2011-01-01

    In this study,we confirmed that sesamin,an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil,is a novel skin-tanning compound.The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells.The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin.Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmiaassociated transcription factor (MITF).Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB),but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt.Moreover,sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway.Consistent with these results,sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89,a PKA inhibitor,but not by SB203580,a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002,a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor.Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89.These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase,which was,in turn,due to the activation of cAMP signaling.

  11. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zequn; Li, Shasha; Liu, Yunyi; Deng, Pengyi; Huang, Jianguo; He, Guangyuan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we confirmed that sesamin, an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil, is a novel skin-tanning compound. The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells. The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin. Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB), but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt. Moreover, sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway. Consistent with these results, sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89, a PKA inhibitor, but not by SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89. These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase, which was, in turn, due to the activation of cAMP signaling.

  12. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Maite Rocío, E-mail: arana@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás, E-mail: gtocchetti@live.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Domizi, Pablo, E-mail: domizi@ibr-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Arias, Agostina, E-mail: agoarias@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo, E-mail: jprigalli@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Ruiz, María Laura, E-mail: ruiz@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  13. Reciprocal bystander effect between α-irradiated macrophage and hepatocyte is mediated by cAMP through a membrane signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Li, Jitao; Yuan, Dexiao; Bai, Yang; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated cells can induce biological effects on vicinal non-irradiated bystander cells, meanwhile the bystander cells may rescue the irradiated cells through a feedback signal stress. To elucidate the nature of this reciprocal effect, we examined the interaction between α-irradiated human macrophage cells U937 and its bystander HL-7702 hepatocyte cells using a cell co-culture system. Results showed that after 6h of cell co-culture, mitochondria depolarization corresponding to apoptosis was significantly induced in the HL-7702 cells, but the formation of micronuclei in the irradiated U937 cells was markedly decreased compared to that without cell co-culture treatment. This reciprocal effect was not observed when the cell membrane signaling pathway was blocked by filipin that inhibited cAMP transmission from bystander cells to irradiated cells. After treatment of cells with exogenous cAMP, forskolin (an activator of cAMP) or KH-7 (an inhibitor of cAMP), respectively, it was confirmed that cAMP communication from bystander cells to targeted cells could mitigate radiation damage in U739 cells, and this cAMP insufficiency in the bystander cells contributed to the enhancement of bystander apoptosis. Moreover, the bystander apoptosis in HL-7702 cells was aggravated by cAMP inhibition but it could not be evoked when p53 of HL-7702 cells was knocked down no matter of forskolin and KH-7 treatment. In conclusion, this study disclosed that cAMP could be released from bystander HL-7702 cells and compensated to α-irradiated U937 cells through a membrane signaling pathway and this cAMP communication played a profound role in regulating the reciprocal bystander effects.

  14. The NO/cGMP pathway inhibits transient cAMP signals through the activation of PDE2 in striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina ePolito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The NO-cGMP signaling plays an important role in the regulation of striatal function although the mechanisms of action of cGMP specifically in medium spiny neurons (MSNs remain unclear. Using genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, including a novel Epac-based sensor (EPAC-SH150 with increased sensitivity for cAMP, we analyze the cGMP response to NO and whether it affected cAMP/PKA signaling in MSNs. The Cygnet2 sensor for cGMP reported large responses to NO donors in both striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, and this cGMP signal was controlled partially by PDE2. At the level of cAMP brief forskolin stimulations produced transient cAMP signals which differed between D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons. NO inhibited these cAMP transients through cGMP-dependent PDE2 activation, an effect that was translated and magnified downstream of cAMP, at the level of PKA. PDE2 thus appears as a critical effector of NO which modulates the post-synaptic response of MSNs to dopaminergic transmission.

  15. Hyperactivation of NF-κB via the MEK signaling is indispensable for the inhibitory effect of cAMP on DNA damage-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloster, Martine M; Naderi, Elin H; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Heidi K; Naderi, Soheil

    2011-04-21

    With cAMP signaling having a profound inhibitory effect on DNA damage-induced apoptosis in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cells, understanding how this signaling pathway affects the survival capacity of the cell has important implications for cancer therapy. We have recently shown that p53 is critical for the inhibitory effect of cAMP on genotoxic agents-mediated apoptosis in BCP-ALLs. Here, we show that elevation of cAMP levels in cells exposed to DNA damage enhances the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB by accelerating the phosphorylation of IKKβ and thereby phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. Furthermore, we show that the ability of cAMP to potentiate the ionizing radiation-induced activation of NF-κB requires the activity of MEK. Importantly, pharmacological or genetic ablation of NF-κB reversed the inhibitory effect of cAMP on DNA damage-induced apoptosis, demonstrating that, in addition to p53, cAMP relies on the activity of NF-κB to provide cells with a survival advantage in the face of DNA damage. Collectively, our results uncover a novel and important interaction between the cAMP and NF-κB pathways that may have implications for the targeted treatment of lymphoid malignancies, such as BCP-ALL, in which aberrant NF-κB activity functions as a driving force for treatment resistance.

  16. The importance of dietary modulation of cAMP and insulin signaling in adipose tissue and the development of obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays a pivotal role in whole body energy homeostasis. In this review, we summarize knowledge of the seemingly paradoxical roles of insulin and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in adipocyte differentiation and function, emphasizing the interplay between the two...... of obesity by changing energy expenditure and/or feed efficiency. We review results demonstrating how the balance between different classes of carbohydrates and proteins modulates the obesigenic action of saturated as well as unsaturated fatty acids pointing to insulin as a key determinant in the regulation...

  17. Reciprocal bystander effect between α-irradiated macrophage and hepatocyte is mediated by cAMP through a membrane signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mingyuan [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, China–Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130033 (China); Dong, Chen; Xie, Yuexia; Li, Jitao; Yuan, Dexiao; Bai, Yang [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China); Shao, Chunlin, E-mail: clshao@shmu.edu.cn [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, No. 2094 Xie-Tu Road, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-05-15

    Highlights: • α-Irradiation induced reciprocal effects between macrophage and hepatocyte cells. • cAMP played a protective role in regulating the reverse bystander effect. • cAMP communication contributed to the reciprocal effects via membrane signaling. • p53 was required for cAMP-regulated bystander effect in the recipient cells. - Abstract: Irradiated cells can induce biological effects on vicinal non-irradiated bystander cells, meanwhile the bystander cells may rescue the irradiated cells through a feedback signal stress. To elucidate the nature of this reciprocal effect, we examined the interaction between α-irradiated human macrophage cells U937 and its bystander HL-7702 hepatocyte cells using a cell co-culture system. Results showed that after 6 h of cell co-culture, mitochondria depolarization corresponding to apoptosis was significantly induced in the HL-7702 cells, but the formation of micronuclei in the irradiated U937 cells was markedly decreased compared to that without cell co-culture treatment. This reciprocal effect was not observed when the cell membrane signaling pathway was blocked by filipin that inhibited cAMP transmission from bystander cells to irradiated cells. After treatment of cells with exogenous cAMP, forskolin (an activator of cAMP) or KH-7 (an inhibitor of cAMP), respectively, it was confirmed that cAMP communication from bystander cells to targeted cells could mitigate radiation damage in U739 cells, and this cAMP insufficiency in the bystander cells contributed to the enhancement of bystander apoptosis. Moreover, the bystander apoptosis in HL-7702 cells was aggravated by cAMP inhibition but it could not be evoked when p53 of HL-7702 cells was knocked down no matter of forskolin and KH-7 treatment. In conclusion, this study disclosed that cAMP could be released from bystander HL-7702 cells and compensated to α-irradiated U937 cells through a membrane signaling pathway and this cAMP communication played a profound role in

  18. The AMP-activated protein kinase AAK-2 links energy levels and insulin-like signals to lifespan in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apfeld, Javier; O'Connor, Greg; McDonagh, Tom; DiStefano, Peter S.; Curtis, Rory

    2004-01-01

    Although limiting energy availability extends lifespan in many organisms, it is not understood how lifespan is coupled to energy levels. We find that the AMP:ATP ratio, a measure of energy levels, increases with age in Caenorhabditis elegans and can be used to predict life expectancy. The C. elegans AMP-activated protein kinase α subunit AAK-2 is activated by AMP and functions to extend lifespan. In addition, either an environmental stressor that increases the AMP:ATP ratio or mutations that lower insulin-like signaling extend lifespan in an aak-2-dependent manner. Thus, AAK-2 is a sensor that couples lifespan to information about energy levels and insulin-like signals. PMID:15574588

  19. Biguanides suppress hepatic glucagon signalling by decreasing production of cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Russell A; Chu, Qingwei; Xie, Jianxin; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2013-02-14

    Glucose production by the liver is essential for providing a substrate for the brain during fasting. The inability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose output is a major aetiological factor in the hyperglycaemia of type-2 diabetes mellitus and other diseases of insulin resistance. For fifty years, one of the few classes of therapeutics effective in reducing glucose production has been the biguanides, which include phenformin and metformin, the latter the most frequently prescribed drug for type-2 diabetes. Nonetheless, the mechanism of action of biguanides remains imperfectly understood. The suggestion a decade ago that metformin reduces glucose synthesis through activation of the enzyme AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been challenged by genetic loss-of-function experiments. Here we provide a novel mechanism by which metformin antagonizes the action of glucagon, thus reducing fasting glucose levels. In mouse hepatocytes, metformin leads to the accumulation of AMP and related nucleotides, which inhibit adenylate cyclase, reduce levels of cyclic AMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity, abrogate phosphorylation of critical protein targets of PKA, and block glucagon-dependent glucose output from hepatocytes. These data support a mechanism of action for metformin involving antagonism of glucagon, and suggest an approach for the development of antidiabetic drugs.

  20. Biasing vector network analyzers using variable frequency and amplitude signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, J. E.; Zagorodnii, V.; Hutchison, A.; Celinski, Z.

    2016-08-01

    We report the development of a test setup designed to provide a variable frequency biasing signal to a vector network analyzer (VNA). The test setup is currently used for the testing of liquid crystal (LC) based devices in the microwave region. The use of an AC bias for LC based devices minimizes the negative effects associated with ionic impurities in the media encountered with DC biasing. The test setup utilizes bias tees on the VNA test station to inject the bias signal. The square wave biasing signal is variable from 0.5 to 36.0 V peak-to-peak (VPP) with a frequency range of DC to 10 kHz. The test setup protects the VNA from transient processes, voltage spikes, and high-frequency leakage. Additionally, the signals to the VNA are fused to ½ amp and clipped to a maximum of 36 VPP based on bias tee limitations. This setup allows us to measure S-parameters as a function of both the voltage and the frequency of the applied bias signal.

  1. Regulatory Roles of Metabolites in Cell Signaling Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Li; Wei Xu; Shimin Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that cellular metabolites,in addition to being sources of fuel and macromolecular substrates,are actively involved in signaling and epigenetic regulation.Many metabolites,such as cyclic AMP,which regulates phosphorylation/dephosphorylation,have been identified to modulate DNA and histone methylation and protein stability.Metabolite-driven cellular regulation occurs through two distinct mechanisms:proteins allosterically bind or serve as substrates for protein signaling pathways,and metabolites covalently modify proteins to regulate their functions.Such novel protein metabolites include fumarate,succinyl-CoA,propionyl-CoA,butyryl-CoA and crontonyl-CoA.Other metabolites,including α-ketoglutarate,succinate and fumarate,regulate epigenetic processes and cell signaling via protein binding.Here,we summarize recent progress in metabolite-derived post-translational protein modification and metabolite-binding associated signaling regulation.Uncovering metabolites upstream of cell signaling and epigenetic networks permits the linkage of metabolic disorders and human diseases,and suggests that metabolite modulation may be a strategy for innovative therapeutics and disease prevention techniques.

  2. Functional status and relationships of melanocortin 1 receptor signaling to the cAMP and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 pathways in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Journé, Fabrice; Ghanem, Ghanem; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C

    2012-12-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a major determinant of skin phototype frequently mutated in melanoma, is a Gs protein-coupled receptor that regulates pigment production in melanocytes. MC1R stimulation activates cAMP synthesis and the extracellular signal-regulated (ERK) ERK1 and ERK2. In human melanocytes, ERK activation by MC1R relies on cAMP-independent transactivation of the c-KIT receptor. Thus MC1R functional coupling to the cAMP and ERK pathways may involve different structural requirements giving raise to biased effects of skin cancer-associated mutations. We evaluated the impact of MC1R mutations on ERK activation, cAMP production and agonist binding. We found that MC1R mutations impair cAMP production much more often than ERK activation, suggesting less stringent requirements for functional coupling to the ERK pathway. We examined the crosstalk of the cAMP and ERK pathways in HBL human melanoma cells (wild-type for MC1R, NRAS and BRAF). ERK activation by constitutively active upstream effectors or pharmacological inhibition had little effect on MC1R-stimulated cAMP synthesis. High cAMP levels were compatible with normal ERK activation but, surprisingly, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin abolished ERK activation by MC1R, most likely by a cAMP-independent mechanism. These results indicate little crosstalk of the cAMP and ERK pathways in HBL melanoma cells. Finally, we studied cAMP accumulation in a panel of 22 human melanoma cell lines stimulated with MC1R agonists or forskolin. cAMP synthesis was often inhibited, even in cells wild-type for MC1R and NRAS. Therefore, the cAMP pathway is more frequently impaired in melanoma than could be predicted by the MC1R or NRAS genotype.

  3. Community detection by signaling on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanqing; Li, Menghui; Zhang, Peng; Fan, Ying; di, Zengru

    2008-07-01

    Based on a signaling process of complex networks, a method for identification of community structure is proposed. For a network with n nodes, every node is assumed to be a system which can send, receive, and record signals. Each node is taken as the initial signal source to excite the whole network one time. Then the source node is associated with an n -dimensional vector which records the effects of the signaling process. By this process, the topological relationship of nodes on the network could be transferred into a geometrical structure of vectors in n -dimensional Euclidean space. Then the best partition of groups is determined by F statistics and the final community structure is given by the K -means clustering method. This method can detect community structure both in unweighted and weighted networks. It has been applied to ad hoc networks and some real networks such as the Zachary karate club network and football team network. The results indicate that the algorithm based on the signaling process works well.

  4. Reconstruction of periodic signals using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Danilo Rairán Antolines

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we reconstruct a periodic signal by using two neural networks. The first network is trained to approximate the period of a signal, and the second network estimates the corresponding coefficients of the signal's Fourier expansion. The reconstruction strategy consists in minimizing the mean-square error via backpro-pagation algorithms over a single neuron with a sine transfer function. Additionally, this paper presents mathematical proof about the quality of the approximation as well as a first modification of the algorithm, which requires less data to reach the same estimation; thus making the algorithm suitable for real-time implementations.

  5. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  6. cAMP and cGMP signaling: sensory systems with prokaryotic roots adopted by eukaryotic cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jacque-Lynne F; Leroux, Michel R

    2010-08-01

    An exciting discovery of the new millennium is that primary cilia, organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, play crucial roles in vertebrate development by modulating Hedgehog, Wnt and PDGF signaling. Analysis of the literature and sequence databases reveals that the ancient signal transduction pathway, which uses cGMP in eukaryotes or related cyclic di-GMP in bacteria, exists in virtually all eukaryotes. However, many eukaryotes that secondarily lost cilia during evolution, including flowering plants, slime molds and most fungi, lack otherwise evolutionarily conserved cGMP signaling components. Based on this intriguing phylogenetic distribution, the presence of cGMP signaling proteins within cilia, and the indispensable roles that cGMP plays in transducing environmental signals in divergent ciliated cells (e.g. vertebrate photoreceptors and Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons), we propose that cGMP signaling has a strong ciliary basis. cAMP signaling, also inherent to bacteria and crucial for cilium-dependent olfaction, similarly appears to have widespread usage in diverse cilia. Thus, we argue here that both cyclic nucleotides play essential and potentially ubiquitous roles in modulating ciliary functions.

  7. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory.

  8. Signal transduction in Dictyostelium fgd A mutants with a defective interaction between surface cAMP receptors and a GTP-binding regulatory protein [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1988 Dec;107(6 Pt 1):following 2463

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Transmembrane signal transduction was investigated in four Dictyostelium discoideum mutants that belong to the fgd A complementation group. The results show the following. (a) Cell surface cAMP receptors are present in fgd A mutants, but cAMP does not induce any of the intracellular responses, including the activation of adenylate or guanylate cyclase and chemotaxis. (b) cAMP induces down- regulation and the covalent modification (presumably phosphorylation) of the cAMP receptor. (c) The inhi...

  9. Modulation of signaling through GPCR-cAMP-PKA pathways by PDE4 depends on stimulus intensity: Possible implications for the pathogenesis of acrodysostosis without hormone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Emmanuelle; Le Stunff, Catherine; Briet, Claire; Dumaz, Nicolas; Silve, Caroline

    2017-02-15

    In acrodysostosis without hormone resistance, a disease caused by phosphodiesterase (PDE)-4D mutations, increased PDE activity leads to bone developmental defects but with normal renal responses to PTH. To identify potential mechanisms for these disparate responses, we compared the effect of PDE activity on hormone signaling through the GPCR-Gsα-cAMP-PKA pathway in cells from two lineages, HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing PTH1R (HEKpthr) and human dermal fibroblasts, including studies evaluating cAMP levels using an Epac-based BRET-sensor for cAMP (CAMYEL). For ligand-induced responses inducing strong cAMP accumulation, the inhibition of PDE4 activity resulted in relatively small further increases. In contrast, when ligand-induced cAMP accumulation was of lesser intensity, the inhibition of PDE4 had a more pronounced effect. Similar results were obtained evaluating downstream events (cellular CREB phosphorylation and CRE-luciferase activity). Thus, the ability of PDE4 to modulate signaling through GPCR-cAMP-PKA pathways can depend on the cell type and stimulus intensity.

  10. Automated modelling of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aach John

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intracellular signal transduction is achieved by networks of proteins and small molecules that transmit information from the cell surface to the nucleus, where they ultimately effect transcriptional changes. Understanding the mechanisms cells use to accomplish this important process requires a detailed molecular description of the networks involved. Results We have developed a computational approach for generating static models of signal transduction networks which utilizes protein-interaction maps generated from large-scale two-hybrid screens and expression profiles from DNA microarrays. Networks are determined entirely by integrating protein-protein interaction data with microarray expression data, without prior knowledge of any pathway intermediates. In effect, this is equivalent to extracting subnetworks of the protein interaction dataset whose members have the most correlated expression profiles. Conclusion We show that our technique accurately reconstructs MAP Kinase signaling networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This approach should enhance our ability to model signaling networks and to discover new components of known networks. More generally, it provides a method for synthesizing molecular data, either individual transcript abundance measurements or pairwise protein interactions, into higher level structures, such as pathways and networks.

  11. Simulating complex calcium-calcineurin signaling network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, J.; Kaandorp, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding of processes in which calcium signaling is involved is of fundamental importance in systems biology and has many applications in medicine. In this paper we have studied the particular case of the complex calcium-calcineurin-MCIP-NFAT signaling network in cardiac myocytes, the understan

  12. Bacillus bombysepticus α-Toxin Binding to G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Regulates cAMP/PKA Signaling Pathway to Induce Host Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens and their toxins target host receptors, leading to aberrant behavior or host death by changing signaling events through subversion of host intracellular cAMP level. This is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Previous studies describe toxins that increase cAMP in host cells, resulting in death through G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathways by influencing adenylyl cyclase or G protein activity. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2 has a central role in regulation of GPCR desensitization. However, little information is available about the pathogenic mechanisms of toxins associated with GRK2. Here, we reported a new bacterial toxin-Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb α-toxin that was lethal to host. We showed that Bb α-toxin interacted with BmGRK2. The data demonstrated that Bb α-toxin directly bound to BmGRK2 to promote death by affecting GPCR signaling pathways. This mechanism involved stimulation of Gαs, increase level of cAMP and activation of protein kinase A (PKA. Activated cAMP/PKA signal transduction altered downstream effectors that affected homeostasis and fundamental biological processes, disturbing the structural and functional integrity of cells, resulting in death. Preventing cAMP/PKA signaling transduction by inhibitions (NF449 or H-89 substantially reduced the pathogenicity of Bb α-toxin. The discovery of a toxin-induced host death specifically linked to GRK2 mediated signaling pathway suggested a new model for bacterial toxin action. Characterization of host genes whose expression and function are regulated by Bb α-toxin and GRK2 will offer a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases caused by pathogens that elevate cAMP.

  13. Signal Processing for Optical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    understanding and enhancing a number of important recent wavelet-based and DCT- based image coders. We show that Shapiro’s well-known EZW scheme, Said and...comparable to Shapiro’s EZW coder (J. M. Shapiro, "Embedded image coding using zerotrees of wavelet coefficients", IEEE Trans, on Signal Processing, v. 41

  14. 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside and AMP-activated protein kinase inhibit signalling through NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerelos, Marina; Mudge, Stuart J; Stapleton, David; Auwardt, Russell B; Fraser, Scott A; Chen, C-G; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2010-10-01

    Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is one of the most important pro-inflammatory mechanisms in disease. In this study, we show that 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR), an intermediate in nucleoside metabolism, inhibits signalling by NF-κB in three cell types, including bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). The block in the NF-κB signalling pathway occurred beyond degradation of IκB-α and movement of p65 into the nucleus of BAEC. There was, however, reduced binding of NF-κB from AICAR-treated cells to a κB-consensus oligonucleotide, suggesting that part of the mechanism was a reduction in NF-κB DNA-binding activity. Although AICAR is metabolized to ZMP and then adenosine, adenosine had no effect on activation of an NF-κB reporter. ZMP, however, activates the metabolic stress-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Transfection of active AMPK into BAEC reduced NF-κB reporter activity compared with a kinase-dead mutant, suggesting that part of the ability of AICAR to inhibit NF-κB signalling is due to activation of AMPK. Inhibition of NF-κB signalling may be important in the anti-inflammatory action of drugs such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate, which led to the accumulation of AICAR within target cells.

  15. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  16. cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway involved in the inhibitory effect of CNP on gastric motility in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ying-Lan; Sun, Qian; Huang, Xu; Jiang, Jing-Zhi; Zhang, Mo-Han; Piao, Li-Hua; Jin, Zheng; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2013-01-10

    In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-induced inhibitory effect on spontaneous contraction of gastric antral smooth muscle to clarify CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP downstream signal transduction pathway using organ bath and ELISA methods in rat. CNP significantly reduced the amplitude of the spontaneous contraction and increased the contents of cGMP and cAMP in the gastric antral smooth muscle tissue. In the presence of IBMX, a non-selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, the inhibitory effect of CNP on spontaneous contraction was significantly suppressed; however, the production of cGMP but not cAMP was still increased by CNP. EHNA, a PDE2 inhibitor, did not affect both CNP-induced inhibition of the contraction and CNP-induced increase of cGMP and cAMP generations in gastric smooth muscle tissue, while milrinone, a PDE3 inhibitor, similar to IBMX, attenuated the CNP-induced inhibitory effect on spontaneous contraction and increased the content of cGMP but not cAMP. The results suggest that cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway is also involved in the CNP-induced inhibition of gastric motility in rat.

  17. Interactions between the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and cyclic AMP signaling pathways regulate larval molting in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, K; Siddhartha, G; Joshi, R; Patel, S; Hasan, G

    2001-05-01

    Larval molting in Drosophila, as in other insects, is initiated by the coordinated release of the steroid hormone ecdysone, in response to neural signals, at precise stages during development. In this study we have analyzed, using genetic and molecular methods, the roles played by two major signaling pathways in the regulation of larval molting in Drosophila. Previous studies have shown that mutants for the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor gene (itpr) are larval lethals. In addition they exhibit delays in molting that can be rescued by exogenous feeding of 20-hydroxyecdysone. Here we show that mutants for adenylate cyclase (rut) synergize, during larval molting, with itpr mutant alleles, indicating that both cAMP and InsP(3) signaling pathways function in this process. The two pathways act in parallel to affect molting, as judged by phenotypes obtained through expression of dominant negative and dominant active forms of protein kinase A (PKA) in tissues that normally express the InsP(3) receptor. Furthermore, our studies predict the existence of feedback inhibition through protein kinase A on the InsP(3) receptor by increased levels of 20-hydroxyecdysone.

  18. Berberine regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and inhibits colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Saud, Shakir M; Lin, Hongsheng; Hou, Wei; Matter, Matthias S; Jia, Libin; Colburn, Nancy H; Young, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, has been linked to inflammation and obesity. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes and anti-tumor properties. In the azoxymethane initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) promoted colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, berberine treated mice showed a 60% reduction in tumor number (P = 0.009), a 48% reduction in tumors 4 mm (P = 0.02) compared to vehicle treated mice. Berberine also decreased AOM/DSS induced Ki-67 and COX-2 expression. In vitro analysis showed that in addition to its anti-proliferation activity, berberine also induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Berberine activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of metabolic pathways, and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of AMPK. Furthermore, 4E-binding protein-1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinases, downstream targets of mTOR, were down regulated by berberine treatment. Berberine did not affect Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) activity or the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Berberine inhibited Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, induced phosphorylation of p53 and increased caspase-3 cleavage in vitro. Berberine inhibition of mTOR activity and p53 phosphorylation was found to be AMPK dependent, while inhibition NF-κB was AMPK independent. In vivo, berberine also activated AMPK, inhibited mTOR and p65 phosphorylation and activated caspase-3 cleavage. Our data suggests that berberine suppresses colon epithelial proliferation and tumorigenesis via AMPK dependent inhibition of mTOR activity and AMPK independent inhibition of NF-κB.

  19. Novel phosphorylation of aquaporin-5 at its threonine 259 through cAMP signaling in salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Takahiro; Azlina, Ahmad; Javkhlan, Purevjav; Yao, Chenjuan; Akamatsu, Tetsuya; Hosoi, Kazuo

    2011-09-01

    Aquaporin-5 (AQP5), a water channel, plays key roles in salivary secretion. The novel phosphorylation of AQP5 was investigated by using human salivary gland (HSG) cells and mouse salivary glands. In the HSG cells stably transfected with a wild-type mouse AQP5 construct, a protein band immunoreactive with antibody against phosphorylated PKA substrate was detected in the AQP5 immunoprecipitated sample, and its intensity was enhanced by short-term treatment of the cells with 8-bromo-cAMP, forskolin, or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but not by that with A23187 calcium ionophore. Such enhancement was inhibited in the presence of H-89, a PKA inhibitor. An AQP5 mutant (AQP5-T259A) expressed by transfection of HSG cells was not recognized by anti-phosphorylated PKA substrate antibody, even when the cells were stimulated with the protein kinase activators. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescence studies using a specific antibody detecting AQP5 phosphorylated at its Thr259 demonstrated that AQP5 was rapidly and transiently phosphorylated at the apical membrane of acinar cells in the submandibular and parotid glands after administration of isoproterenol, but not pilocarpine. Furthermore, both AQP5 and AQP5-T259A were constitutively localized at the plasma membrane in HSG cells under the resting and forskolin-stimulated conditions. These results suggest that AQP5 is phosphorylated at its Thr259 by PKA through cAMP, but not Ca(2+), signaling pathways, and that this phosphorylation does not contribute to AQP5 trafficking in the salivary gland cells.

  20. Proteomic Study of the Brassinosteroid Signalling Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Plant growth is controlled by multiple environmental signals and endogenous hormones.In particular,brassinosteroid (BR) regulates a wide range of developmental processes throughout the life cycle of plants.BR acts through a receptor kinase signalling pathway,and BR signalling crosstalk with many other signalling pathways including light and gibberellin pathways as well as other receptor kinase pathways.My lab uses a combination of genetic,proteomic,and genomic approaches to elucidate not only the BR signaling pathway but also the global organization of the signaling network.We have successfully used proteomics to identify new components of the BR signalling pathway and to elucidated the mechanisms of signal transduction from the BRI1 receptor kinase to the BZR1 transcription factor.We have further uncovered mechanisms of crosstalk between different receptor kinase pathways,and we are dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying signalling crosstalk and specificity.Our recent proteomic analysis of BR-regulated nuclear proteins has identified a potential link for BR regulation of flowering through RNA splicing and epigenetic mechanisms.I will discuss strategies and potential pitfalls in using proteomics to study signal transduction in plants.

  1. Hedgehog signaling pathway and gastrointestinal stem cell signaling network (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-12-01

    Hedgehog, BMP/TGFbeta, FGF, WNT and Notch signaling pathways constitute the stem cell signaling network, which plays a key role in a variety of processes, such as embryogenesis, maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis, tissue repair during chronic persistent inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Sonic hedgehog (SHH), Indian hedgehog (IHH) and Desert hedgehog (DHH) bind to PTCH1/PTCH or PTCH2 receptor to release Smoothened (SMO) signal transducer from Patched-dependent suppression. SMO then activates STK36 serine/threonine kinase to stabilize GLI family members and to phosphorylate SUFU for nuclear accumulation of GLI. Hedgehog signaling activation leads to GLI-dependent transcriptional activation of target genes, such as GLI1, PTCH1, CCND2, FOXL1, JAG2 and SFRP1. GLI1-dependent positive feedback loop combined with PTCH1-dependent negative feedback loop gives rise to transient proliferation of Hedgehog target cells. Iguana homologs (DZIP1 and DZIP1L) and Costal-2 homologs (KIF7 and KIF27) are identified by comparative integromics. SHH-dependent parietal cell proliferation is implicated in gastric mucosal repair during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection. BMP-RUNX3 signaling induces IHH expression in surface differentiated epithelial cells of stomach and intestine. Hedgehog signals from epithelial cells then induces FOXL1-mediated BMP4 upregulation in mesenchymal cells. Hedgehog signaling is frequently activated in esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and pancreatic cancer due to transcriptional upregulation of Hedgehog ligands and epigenetic silencing of HHIP1/HHIP gene, encoding the Hedgehog inhibitor. However, Hedgehog signaling is rarely activated in colorectal cancer due to negative regulation by the canonical WNT signaling pathway. Hedgehog signaling molecules or targets, such as SHH, IHH, HHIP1, PTCH1 and GLI1, are applied as biomarkers for cancer diagnostics, prognostics and therapeutics. Small-molecule inhibitors for SMO or STK36 are suitable to be used for

  2. Signaling in large-scale neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rune W; Hounsgaard, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    We examine the recent finding that neurons in spinal motor circuits enter a high conductance state during functional network activity. The underlying concomitant increase in random inhibitory and excitatory synaptic activity leads to stochastic signal processing. The possible advantages of this m...

  3. Challenges for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders: Implications of the Ca(2+)/cAMP intracellular signalling interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Caricati-Neto, Afonso

    2016-10-01

    In 2013, we discovered that the entitled "calcium paradox" phenomenon, which means a paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by l-type Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs), used in antihypertensive therapy, is due to interaction between the intracellular signalling pathways mediated by Ca(2+) and cAMP (Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction). In 2015, we proposed that the pharmacological manipulation of this interaction could be a new therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by CCBs, several clinical studies have been demonstrating pleiotropic effects of CCBs, including neuroprotective effects. CCBs genuinely exhibit cognitive-enhancing abilities and reduce the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson´s disease and others. The molecular mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects remain under debate. Our recent discovery that the "calcium paradox" phenomenon is due to Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction may provide new insights for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including enhancement of current therapies mainly by reducing adverse effects, and improving effectiveness of modern medicines. Whether Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction is involved in CCBs pleiotropic effects also deserves special attention. Then, the pharmacological manipulation of the Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction could be a more efficient therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, in this review we summarize the current knowledge of this field, making new directions and future perspectives.

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomics to characterize signaling networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Blagoev, Blagoy

    2012-01-01

    and quantify thousands of phosphorylations, thus providing extensive overviews of the cellular signaling networks. As a result of these developments quantitative phosphoproteomics have been applied to study processes as diverse as immunology, stem cell biology and DNA damage. Here we review the developments......Reversible protein phosphorylation is involved in the regulation of most, if not all, major cellular processes via dynamic signal transduction pathways. During the last decade quantitative phosphoproteomics have evolved from a highly specialized area to a powerful and versatile platform...... for analyzing protein phosphorylation at a system-wide scale and has become the intuitive strategy for comprehensive characterization of signaling networks. Contemporary phosphoproteomics use highly optimized procedures for sample preparation, mass spectrometry and data analysis algorithms to identify...

  5. microRNA-208a in an early stage myocardial infarction rat model and the effect on cAMP-PKA signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Gao; Yan, Zhang; Li, Chuanchuan; Hou, Yuemei

    2016-08-01

    The expression level of microRNA-208a (miR-208a) in a rat model with myocardial infarction and the effect of cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in early stage of myocardial infarction in rats were investigated. The early myocardial infarction model was established in 12 male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligation of the anterior descending coronary artery, and 12 rats were selected as the control group (sham operation group). Reverse-transcription quantitative PCR was conducted to detect the expression levels of miR-208a in the myocardium of and the expression levels of miR‑208a in the serum of rats in the two groups. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the expression levels of cAMP-PKA protein in the rat tissues in the two groups. After stimulating high levels of miR‑208a expression in human myocardial cells (HCM), western blot analysis was used to detect the cAMP-PKA protein levels. The expression levels of miR‑208a in myocardial tissues in rats with myocardial infarction were significantly higher than those in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant (PcAMP-PKA protein in myocardial tissue in rats with chronic myocardial infarction was also significantly higher. Transfection of human myocardial cells with miR‑208a analogue significantly increased the cAMP-PKA protein levels in human myocardial cells. In conclusion, the over-expression of miR-208a in myocardial infarction tissue and the high levels of this miRNA in the serum, may be involved in the process of myocardial infarction by influencing the cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in myocardial cells.

  6. Synergy of cAMP and calcium signaling pathways in CFTR regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozoky, Zoltan; Ahmadi, Saumel; Milman, Tal; Kim, Tae Hun; Du, Kai; Di Paola, Michelle; Pasyk, Stan; Pekhletski, Roman; Keller, Jacob P; Bear, Christine E; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2017-03-14

    Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, leading to defective apical chloride transport. Patients also experience overactivation of inflammatory processes, including increased calcium signaling. Many investigations have described indirect effects of calcium signaling on CFTR or other calcium-activated chloride channels; here, we investigate the direct response of CFTR to calmodulin-mediated calcium signaling. We characterize an interaction between the regulatory region of CFTR and calmodulin, the major calcium signaling molecule, and report protein kinase A (PKA)-independent CFTR activation by calmodulin. We describe the competition between calmodulin binding and PKA phosphorylation and the differential effects of this competition for wild-type CFTR and the major F508del mutant, hinting at potential therapeutic strategies. Evidence of CFTR binding to isolated calmodulin domains/lobes suggests a mechanism for the role of CFTR as a molecular hub. Together, these data provide insights into how loss of active CFTR at the membrane can have additional consequences besides impaired chloride transport.

  7. GATA-Dependent Glutaminolysis Drives Appressorium Formation in Magnaporthe oryzae by Suppressing TOR Inhibition of cAMP/PKA Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Wilson, Richard A

    2015-04-01

    Fungal plant pathogens are persistent and global food security threats. To invade their hosts they often form highly specialized infection structures, known as appressoria. The cAMP/ PKA- and MAP kinase-signaling cascades have been functionally delineated as positive-acting pathways required for appressorium development. Negative-acting regulatory pathways that block appressorial development are not known. Here, we present the first detailed evidence that the conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway is a powerful inhibitor of appressorium formation by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. We determined TOR signaling was activated in an M. oryzae mutant strain lacking a functional copy of the GATA transcription factor-encoding gene ASD4. Δasd4 mutant strains could not form appressoria and expressed GLN1, a glutamine synthetase-encoding orthologue silenced in wild type. Inappropriate expression of GLN1 increased the intracellular steady-state levels of glutamine in Δasd4 mutant strains during axenic growth when compared to wild type. Deleting GLN1 lowered glutamine levels and promoted appressorium formation by Δasd4 strains. Furthermore, glutamine is an agonist of TOR. Treating Δasd4 mutant strains with the specific TOR kinase inhibitor rapamycin restored appressorium development. Rapamycin was also shown to induce appressorium formation by wild type and Δcpka mutant strains on non-inductive hydrophilic surfaces but had no effect on the MAP kinase mutant Δpmk1. When taken together, we implicate Asd4 in regulating intracellular glutamine levels in order to modulate TOR inhibition of appressorium formation downstream of cPKA. This study thus provides novel insight into the metabolic mechanisms that underpin the highly regulated process of appressorium development.

  8. GATA-Dependent Glutaminolysis Drives Appressorium Formation in Magnaporthe oryzae by Suppressing TOR Inhibition of cAMP/PKA Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Marroquin-Guzman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungal plant pathogens are persistent and global food security threats. To invade their hosts they often form highly specialized infection structures, known as appressoria. The cAMP/ PKA- and MAP kinase-signaling cascades have been functionally delineated as positive-acting pathways required for appressorium development. Negative-acting regulatory pathways that block appressorial development are not known. Here, we present the first detailed evidence that the conserved Target of Rapamycin (TOR signaling pathway is a powerful inhibitor of appressorium formation by the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. We determined TOR signaling was activated in an M. oryzae mutant strain lacking a functional copy of the GATA transcription factor-encoding gene ASD4. Δasd4 mutant strains could not form appressoria and expressed GLN1, a glutamine synthetase-encoding orthologue silenced in wild type. Inappropriate expression of GLN1 increased the intracellular steady-state levels of glutamine in Δasd4 mutant strains during axenic growth when compared to wild type. Deleting GLN1 lowered glutamine levels and promoted appressorium formation by Δasd4 strains. Furthermore, glutamine is an agonist of TOR. Treating Δasd4 mutant strains with the specific TOR kinase inhibitor rapamycin restored appressorium development. Rapamycin was also shown to induce appressorium formation by wild type and Δcpka mutant strains on non-inductive hydrophilic surfaces but had no effect on the MAP kinase mutant Δpmk1. When taken together, we implicate Asd4 in regulating intracellular glutamine levels in order to modulate TOR inhibition of appressorium formation downstream of cPKA. This study thus provides novel insight into the metabolic mechanisms that underpin the highly regulated process of appressorium development.

  9. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H-89 attenuates the bioluminescence signal produced by Renilla Luciferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie J Herbst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigations into the regulation and functional roles of kinases such as cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA increasingly rely on cellular assays. Currently, there are a number of bioluminescence-based assays, for example reporter gene assays, that allow the study of the regulation, activity, and functional effects of PKA in the cellular context. Additionally there are continuing efforts to engineer improved biosensors that are capable of detecting real-time PKA signaling dynamics in cells. These cell-based assays are often utilized to test the involvement of PKA-dependent processes by using H-89, a reversible competitive inhibitor of PKA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present here data to show that H-89, in addition to being a competitive PKA inhibitor, attenuates the bioluminescence signal produced by Renilla luciferase (RLuc variants in a population of cells and also in single cells. Using 10 microM of luciferase substrate and 10 microM H-89, we observed that the signal from RLuc and RLuc8, an eight-point mutation variant of RLuc, in cells was reduced to 50% (+/-15% and 54% (+/-14% of controls exposed to the vehicle alone, respectively. In vitro, we showed that H-89 decreased the RLuc8 bioluminescence signal but did not compete with coelenterazine-h for the RLuc8 active site, and also did not affect the activity of Firefly luciferase. By contrast, another competitive inhibitor of PKA, KT5720, did not affect the activity of RLuc8. SIGNIFICANCE: The identification and characterization of the adverse effect of H-89 on RLuc signal will help deconvolute data previously generated from RLuc-based assays looking at the functional effects of PKA signaling. In addition, for the current application and future development of bioluminscence assays, KT5720 is identified as a more suitable PKA inhibitor to be used in conjunction with RLuc-based assays. These principal findings also provide an important lesson to fully consider all of the potential

  10. Prostaglandin E2 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and function through cyclic AMP and EP2/EP4 receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniface, Katia; Bak-Jensen, Kristian S; Li, Ying; Blumenschein, Wendy M; McGeachy, Mandy J; McClanahan, Terrill K; McKenzie, Brent S; Kastelein, Robert A; Cua, Daniel J; de Waal Malefyt, René

    2009-03-16

    Prostaglandins, particularly prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), play an important role during inflammation. This is exemplified by the clinical use of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors, which interfere with PGE2 synthesis, as effective antiinflammatory drugs. Here, we show that PGE2 directly promotes differentiation and proinflammatory functions of human and murine IL-17-producing T helper (Th17) cells. In human purified naive T cells, PGE2 acts via prostaglandin receptor EP2- and EP4-mediated signaling and cyclic AMP pathways to up-regulate IL-23 and IL-1 receptor expression. Furthermore, PGE2 synergizes with IL-1beta and IL-23 to drive retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)-gammat, IL-17, IL-17F, CCL20, and CCR6 expression, which is consistent with the reported Th17 phenotype. While enhancing Th17 cytokine expression mainly through EP2, PGE2 differentially regulates interferon (IFN)-gamma production and inhibits production of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 in Th17 cells predominantly through EP4. Furthermore, PGE2 is required for IL-17 production in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Hence, the combination of inflammatory cytokines and noncytokine immunomodulators, such as PGE2, during differentiation and activation determines the ultimate phenotype of Th17 cells. These findings, together with the altered IL-12/IL-23 balance induced by PGE2 in dendritic cells, further highlight the crucial role of the inflammatory microenvironment in Th17 cell development and regulation.

  11. Mucin-like glycoprotein secretion is mediated by cyclic-AMP and protein kinase C signal transduction pathways in rat corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M; Endo, K; Nakata, K

    1998-05-01

    Ocular surface mucin is secreted from both goblet cells in the conjunctival epithelium and corneal epithelial cells. To clarify its mechanism of secretion in corneal epithelial cells, a rat cornea organ culture system was used to evaluate the second messenger roles of cyclic-AMP (cAMP), cyclic-GMP (cGMP) and protein kinase C (PKC) in modulating mucin-like glycoprotein secretion. Rat cornea sections (3 mm diameter) were cultured in TC-199 medium, and radiolabeled with sodium sulfate for 18 hr. After washing, the corneas were treated with various second messenger modulating agents for 30 min. The culture media were reacted with Dolichos biflorus (DBA)-lectin, and mucin-like glycoprotein was isolated. Then the radioactivity of DBA-binding mucin-like glycoprotein was isolated. Then the radioactivity of DBA-binding mucin-like glycoprotein was measured. There was a time-dependent increase in mucin-like glycoprotein was measured. There was a time-dependent increase in mucin-like glycoprotein secretion, whereas after corneal epithelial debridement the secretion was markedly inhibited by 81%. Mucin-like glycoprotein secretion was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner following elevation of cAMP levels by exposure to either forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Concomitant exposure to the cAMP dependent protein kinase inhibitor, KT5720 completely inhibited their stimulatory effects. Neither exposure to dibutyryl cGMP nor nitroprusside affected mucin-like glycoprotein secretion. Stimulation by PKC, phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) also increased mucin-like glycoprotein secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. The PKC inhibitor, calphostin C completely inhibited the stimulation by PDBu of mucine-like glycoprotein secretion. These results demonstrate that corneal epithelial cells secrete mucin-like glycoprotein, which is mediated by cAMP and PKC signal transduction pathways.

  12. Opposing needling promotes behavior recovery and exerts neuroprotection via the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway in transient MCAO rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIANG, YIJING; YANG, SHANLI; TAO, JING; LIN, ZHICHENG; YE, XIAOQIAN; YOU, YONGMEI; PENG, JUN; HONG, ZHENFENG; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A(PKA)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) signal transduction pathway triggered by γ-aminobutyric acid class B (GABAB) receptor activation is involved in neuroprotection against ischemia and behavioral recovery induced by opposing needling (ON). A total of 80 rats were randomly divided into four groups: A sham operation group, an ischemia group, an ON group and an ON group effectively inhibited by the GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP35384 (n=20/group). The behavior of the rats was assessed by their neurological deficit score, whereas the impairment of gait was examined using the CatWalk system. The volume of cerebral infarction was examined upon treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The expression levels of CREB, GABAB1 and GABAB2 were examined by western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC), cAMP and PKA in the serum was detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the present study, in comparison with other groups, the ON group exhibited a reduced score for the neurological deficit, the stride length and swing speed were improved, and the volume of infarction was reduced. However, these effects were reversed upon administration of CGP35384. Additionally, the expression levels of CREB, GABAB1 and GABAB2 were increased in the ON group. The levels of AC, cAMP and PKA in the serum were also increased in the ON group, whereas the addition of CGP35384 reversed these effects. The results of the present study demonstrated that ON markedly protected the brain against transient cerebral ischemic injury, and this effect was possibly mediated by the activation of the GABAB/cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway. These findings implied that ON may be a potential therapeutic method for treating stroke. PMID:26780954

  13. Expression profiling of cumulus cells reveals functional changes during ovulation and central roles of prostaglandin EP2 receptor in cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamba, Shigero; Yodoi, Rieko; Morimoto, Kazushi; Inazumi, Tomoaki; Sukeno, Mamiko; Segi-Nishida, Eri; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Narumiya, Shuh; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2010-06-01

    To understand the role of prostaglandin (PG) receptor EP2 (Ptger2) signaling in ovulation and fertilization, we investigated time-dependent expression profiles in wild-type (WT) and Ptger2(-/-) cumuli before and after ovulation by using microarrays. We prepared cumulus cells from mice just before and 3, 9 and 14 h after human chorionic gonadotropin injection. Key genes including cAMP-related and epidermal growth factor (EGF) genes, as well as extracellular matrix- (ECM-) related and chemokine genes were up-regulated in WT cumuli at 3 h and 14 h, respectively. Ptger2 deficiency differently affected the expression of many of the key genes at 3 h and 14 h. These results indicate that the gene expression profile of cumulus cells greatly differs before and after ovulation, and in each situation, PGE(2)-EP2 signaling plays a critical role in cAMP-regulated gene expression in the cumulus cells under physiological conditions.

  14. CNP-pGC-cGMP-PDE3-cAMP Signal Pathway Upregulated in Gastric Smooth Muscle of Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lan Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have shown that CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP is upregulated in the diabetic rats. The present study was designed to determine whether the upregulation of CNP-NPR-B/pGC-cGMP signal pathway affects cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway in diabetic gastric smooth muscle. The gastric smooth muscle motility was observed by using isometric measurement. PDEs expressions in diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue were observed by using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and RT-PCR methods. The results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of CNP on the spontaneous contraction of gastric antral circular smooth muscle was potentiated in STZ-induced diabetic rat. CNP-induced increase of cGMP and cAMP was much higher in diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue than in controls. The expression of PDE3 is downregulated while the levels of gene expression of PDE1, PDE2, PDE4, and PDE5 were not altered in the diabetic gastric smooth muscle tissue. The results suggest that the sensitivity of gastric smooth muscle to CNP is potentiated via activation of CNP-pGC-cGMP-PDE3-cAMP signal pathway in STZ-induced diabetic rats, which may be associated with diabetes-induced gastric motility disorder.

  15. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  16. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun-Ah [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Juhnn, Yong-Sung, E-mail: juhnn@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Cancer Research Center, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From

  17. Short-Chain Fatty Acids Inhibit Growth Hormone and Prolactin Gene Transcription via cAMP/PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Dairy Cow Anterior Pituitary Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Fa Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs play a key role in altering carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, influence endocrine pancreas activity, and as a precursor of ruminant milk fat. However, the effect and detailed mechanisms by which SCFAs mediate bovine growth hormone (GH and prolactin (PRL gene transcription remain unclear. In this study, we detected the effects of SCFAs (acetate, propionate, and butyrate on the activity of the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, GH, PRL, and Pit-1 gene transcription in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs. The results showed that SCFAs decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity decreased CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. Furthermore, PTX blocked SCFAs- inhibited cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway. These data showed that the inhibition of GH and PRL gene transcription induced by SCFAs is mediated by Gi activation and that propionate is more potent than acetate and butyrate in inhibiting GH and PRL gene transcription. In conclusion, this study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulation of SCFAs on bovine GH and PRL gene transcription in DCAPCs, which may serve as one of the factors that regulate pituitary function in accordance with dietary intake.

  18. Axon Regeneration Is Regulated by Ets-C/EBP Transcription Complexes Generated by Activation of the cAMP/Ca2+ Signaling Pathways.

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    Chun Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of specific neurons to regenerate their axons after injury is governed by cell-intrinsic regeneration pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways are important for axon regeneration. Axonal injury induces expression of the svh-2 gene encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, stimulation of which by the SVH-1 growth factor leads to activation of the JNK pathway. Here, we identify ETS-4 and CEBP-1, related to mammalian Ets and C/EBP, respectively, as transcriptional activators of svh-2 expression following axon injury. ETS-4 and CEBP-1 function downstream of the cAMP and Ca2+-p38 MAPK pathways, respectively. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of ETS-4 promotes its complex formation with CEBP-1. Furthermore, activation of both cAMP and Ca2+ signaling is required for activation of svh-2 expression. Thus, the cAMP/Ca2+ signaling pathways cooperatively activate the JNK pathway, which then promotes axon regeneration.

  19. Axon Regeneration Is Regulated by Ets-C/EBP Transcription Complexes Generated by Activation of the cAMP/Ca2+ Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Hisamoto, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-10-01

    The ability of specific neurons to regenerate their axons after injury is governed by cell-intrinsic regeneration pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways are important for axon regeneration. Axonal injury induces expression of the svh-2 gene encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, stimulation of which by the SVH-1 growth factor leads to activation of the JNK pathway. Here, we identify ETS-4 and CEBP-1, related to mammalian Ets and C/EBP, respectively, as transcriptional activators of svh-2 expression following axon injury. ETS-4 and CEBP-1 function downstream of the cAMP and Ca2+-p38 MAPK pathways, respectively. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of ETS-4 promotes its complex formation with CEBP-1. Furthermore, activation of both cAMP and Ca2+ signaling is required for activation of svh-2 expression. Thus, the cAMP/Ca2+ signaling pathways cooperatively activate the JNK pathway, which then promotes axon regeneration.

  20. Quantitative analysis of the dynamic signaling pathway involved in the cAMP mediated induction of l-carnitine biosynthesis in E. coli cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormiga, José; González-Alcón, Carlos; Sevilla, Angel; Cánovas, Manuel; Torres, Néstor V

    2010-04-01

    L-(-)-carnitine can be synthesized from waste bioprecursors in the form of crotonobetaine. Such biotransformation is carried out in E. coli by the enzymes encoded by operons regulated by the cAMP receptor proteins. Non-phosphorylated sugars, such as glycerol are used as energy and carbon source since glucose inhibits cAMP synthesis. Until now little attention has been paid to the regulatory signaling structure that operates during the transition from a glucose-consuming, non-l-carnitine producing steady state, to a glycerol-consuming l-carnitine producing steady state. In this work we aim to elucidate and quantify the underlying regulatory mechanisms operating in the abolition of the glucose inhibiting effect. For this purpose we make use of the systemic approach by integrating the available information and our own experimentally generated data to construct a mathematical model. The model is built using power-law representation and is used as a platform to make predictive simulations and to assess the consistency of the regulatory structure of the overall process. The model is subsequently checked for quality through stability and a special, dynamic sensitivity analysis. The results show that the model is able to deal with the observed system transient phase. The model is multi-hierarchical, comprising the metabolic, gene expression, signaling and bioreactor levels. It involves variables and parameters of a very different nature that develop in different time scales and orders of magnitude. Some of the most relevant conclusions obtained are: (i) the regulatory interactions among glucose, glycerol and cAMP metabolism are far stronger than those present in the l-carnitine transport, production and degradation processes; (ii) carnitine biosynthesis is very sensitive to the cAMP signaling system since it reacts at very low cAMP receptor concentrations, and (iii) ATP is a critical factor in the transient dynamics. All these model-derived observations have been

  1. Ontogeny of catecholamine and adenosine receptor-mediated cAMP signaling of embryonic red blood cells: role of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase 3 and hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, R; Blass, C; Götz, R; Dragon, S

    1999-12-15

    We have previously shown that the cAMP signaling pathway controls major aspects of embryonic red blood cell (RBC) function in avian embryos (Glombitza et al, Am J Physiol 271:R973, 1996; and Dragon et al, Am J Physiol 271:R982, 1996) that are important for adaptation of the RBC gas transport properties to the progressive hypercapnia and hypoxia of later stages of avian embryonic development. Data about the ontogeny of receptor-mediated cAMP signaling are lacking. We have analyzed the response of primitive and definitive chick embryo RBC harvested from day 3 to 18 of development towards forskolin, beta-adrenergic, and A2 receptor agonists. The results show a strong response of immature definitive and primitive RBC to adenosine A2 and beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, which is drastically reduced in the last stage of development, coincident with the appearance of mature, transcriptionally inactive RBC. Modulation of cGMP-inhibited phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) has a controlling influence on cAMP accumulation in definitive RBC. Under physiological conditions, PDE3 is inhibited due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Inhibition of sGC with the specific inhibitor ODQ decreases receptor-mediated stimulation of cAMP production; this effect is reversed by the PDE3 inhibitor milrinone. sGC is acitivated by nitric oxide (NO), but we found no evidence for production of NO by erythrocyte NO-synthase. However, embryonic hemoglobin releases NO in an oxygen-linked manner that may activate guanylyl cyclase.

  2. Neural Networks for Signal Processing and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselroth, Ted Daniel

    cortex by the application of lateral interactions during the learning phase. The organization of the mature network is compared to that found in the macaque monkey by several analytical tests. The capacity of the network to process images is investigated. By a method of reconstructing the input images in terms of V1 activities, the simulations show that images can be faithfully represented in V1 by the proposed network. The signal-to-noise ratio of the image is improved by the representation, and compression ratios of well over two-hundred are possible. Lateral interactions between V1 neurons sharpen their orientational tuning. We further study the dynamics of the processing, showing that the rate of decrease of the error of the reconstruction is maximized for the receptive fields used. Lastly, we employ a Fokker-Planck equation for a more detailed prediction of the error value vs. time. The Fokker-Planck equation for an underdamped system with a driving force is derived, yielding an energy-dependent diffusion coefficient which is the integral of the spectral densities of the force and the velocity of the system. The theory is applied to correlated noise activation and resonant activation. Simulation results for the error of the network vs time are compared to the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation.

  3. Collective Calcium Signaling of Defective Multicellular Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A communicating multicellular network processes environmental cues into collective cellular dynamics. We have previously demonstrated that, when excited by extracellular ATP, fibroblast monolayers generate correlated calcium dynamics modulated by both the stimuli and gap junction communication between the cells. However, just as a well-connected neural network may be compromised by abnormal neurons, a tissue monolayer can also be defective with cancer cells, which typically have down regulated gap junctions. To understand the collective cellular dynamics in a defective multicellular network we have studied the calcium signaling of co-cultured breast cancer cells and fibroblast cells in various concentrations of ATP delivered through microfluidic devices. Our results demonstrate that cancer cells respond faster, generate singular spikes, and are more synchronous across all stimuli concentrations. Additionally, fibroblast cells exhibit persistent calcium oscillations that increase in regularity with greater stimuli. To interpret these results we quantitatively analyzed the immunostaining of purigenic receptors and gap junction channels. The results confirm our hypothesis that collective dynamics are mainly determined by the availability of gap junction communications.

  4. The melatonin agonist ramelteon induces duration-dependent clock gene expression through cAMP signaling in pancreatic INS-1 β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Nishiyama

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure to melatonin improves glycemic control in animals. Although glucose metabolism is controlled by circadian clock genes, little is known about the role of melatonin signaling and its duration in the regulation of clock gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Activation of MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors inhibits cAMP signaling, which mediates clock gene expression. Therefore, this study investigated exposure duration-dependent alterations in cAMP element-binding protein (CREB phosphorylation and clock gene expression that occur during and after exposure to ramelteon, a selective melatonin agonist used to treat insomnia. In rat INS-1 cells, a pancreatic β-cell line endogenously expressing melatonin receptors, ramelteon persistently decreased CREB phosphorylation during the treatment period (2-14 h, whereas the subsequent washout induced an enhancement of forskolin-stimulated CREB phosphorylation in a duration- and concentration-dependent manner. This augmentation was blocked by forskolin or the melatonin receptor antagonist luzindole. Similarly, gene expression analyses of 7 clock genes revealed the duration dependency of the effects of ramelteon on Rev-erbα and Bmal1 expression through melatonin receptor-mediated cAMP signaling; longer exposure times (14 h resulted in greater increases in the expression and signaling of Rev-erbα, which is related to β-cell functions. Interestingly, this led to amplified oscillatory Rev-erbα and Bmal1 expression after agonist washout and forskolin stimulation. These results provide new insights into the duration-dependent effects of ramelteon on clock gene expression in INS-1 cells and may improve the understanding of its effect in vivo. The applicability of these results to pancreatic islets awaits further investigation.

  5. Magnetoencephalography from signals to dynamic cortical networks

    CERN Document Server

    Aine, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    "Magnetoencephalography (MEG) provides a time-accurate view into human brain function. The concerted action of neurons generates minute magnetic fields that can be detected---totally noninvasively---by sensitive multichannel magnetometers. The obtained millisecond accuracycomplements information obtained by other modern brain-imaging tools. Accurate timing is quintessential in normal brain function, often distorted in brain disorders. The noninvasiveness and time-sensitivityof MEG are great assets to developmental studies, as well. This multiauthored book covers an ambitiously wide range of MEG research from introductory to advanced level, from sensors to signals, and from focal sources to the dynamics of cortical networks. Written by active practioners of this multidisciplinary field, the book contains tutorials for newcomers and chapters of new challenging methods and emerging technologies to advanced MEG users. The reader will obtain a firm grasp of the possibilities of MEG in the study of audition, vision...

  6. Neural network-based sensor signal accelerator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, M. C.

    2000-10-16

    A strategy has been developed to computationally accelerate the response time of a generic electronic sensor. The strategy can be deployed as an algorithm in a control system or as a physical interface (on an embedded microcontroller) between a slower responding external sensor and a higher-speed control system. Optional code implementations are available to adjust algorithm performance when computational capability is limited. In one option, the actual sensor signal can be sampled at the slower rate with adaptive linear neural networks predicting the sensor's future output and interpolating intermediate synthetic output values. In another option, a synchronized collection of predictors sequentially controls the corresponding synthetic output voltage. Error is adaptively corrected in both options. The core strategy has been demonstrated with automotive oxygen sensor data. A prototype interface device is under construction. The response speed increase afforded by this strategy could greatly offset the cost of developing a replacement sensor with a faster physical response time.

  7. Non-raft adenylyl cyclase 2 defines a cAMP signaling compartment that selectively regulates IL-6 expression in airway smooth muscle cells: differential regulation of gene expression by AC isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Amy S; Birg, Anna V; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2014-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms differ in their tissue distribution, cellular localization, regulation, and protein interactions. Most cell types express multiple AC isoforms. We hypothesized that cAMP produced by different AC isoforms regulates unique cellular responses in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC). Overexpression of AC2, AC3, or AC6 had distinct effects on forskolin (Fsk)-induced expression of a number of known cAMP-responsive genes. These data show that different AC isoforms can differentially regulate gene expression. Most notable, overexpression and activation of AC2 enhanced interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression, but overexpression of AC3 or AC6 had no effect. IL-6 production by BSMC was induced by Fsk and select G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, though IL-6 levels did not directly correlate with global cAMP levels. Treatment with PKA selective 6-Bnz-cAMP or Epac selective 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP cAMP analogs revealed a predominant role for PKA in cAMP-mediated induction of IL-6. IL-6 promoter mutations demonstrated that AP-1 and CRE transcription sites were required for Fsk to stimulate IL-6 expression. Our present study defines an AC2 cAMP signaling compartment that specifically regulates IL-6 expression in BSMC via Epac and PKA and demonstrates that other AC isoforms are excluded from this pool.

  8. Autonomous and nonautonomous regulation of axis formation by antagonistic signaling via 7-span cAMP receptors and GSK3 in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, G T; Kimmel, A R

    1997-08-15

    Early during Dictyostelium development a fundamental cell-fate decision establishes the anteroposterior (prestalk/prespore) axis. Signaling via the 7-transmembrane cAMP receptor CAR4 is essential for creating and maintaining a normal pattern; car4-null alleles have decreased levels of prestalk-specific mRNAs but enhanced expression of prespore genes. car4- cells produce all of the signals required for prestalk differentiation but lack an extracellular factor necessary for prespore differentiation of wild-type cells. This secreted factor decreases the sensitivity of prespore cells to inhibition by the prestalk morphogen DIF-1. At the cell autonomous level, CAR4 is linked to intracellular circuits that activate prestalk but inhibit prespore differentiation. The autonomous action of CAR4 is antagonistic to the positive intracellular signals mediated by another cAMP receptor, CAR1 and/or CAR3. Additional data indicate that these CAR-mediated pathways converge at the serine/threonine protein kinase GSK3, suggesting that the anterior (prestalk)/posterior (prespore) axis of Dictyostelium is regulated by an ancient mechanism that is shared by the Wnt/Fz circuits for dorsoventral patterning during early Xenopus development and establishing Drosophila segment polarity.

  9. An interplay between 2 signaling pathways: Melatonin-cAMP and IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} signaling pathways control intraerythrocytic development of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuyama, Wakako [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Enomoto, Masahiro [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, M5G1L7 Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mossaad, Ehab [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Kawai, Satoru [Laboratory of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, Dokkyo Medical University, Mibu, Tochigi 321-0293 (Japan); Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko [Laboratory for Developmental Neurobiology, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kawazu, Shin-ichiro, E-mail: skawazu@obihiro.ac.jp [National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • A melatonin receptor antagonist blocked Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in P. falciparum and inhibited parasite growth. • P. falciparum development is controlled by Ca{sup 2+}- and cAMP-signaling pathways. • The cAMP-signaling pathway at ring form and late trophozoite stages governs parasite growth of P. falciparum. - Abstract: Plasmodium falciparum spends most of its asexual life cycle within human erythrocytes, where proliferation and maturation occur. Development into the mature forms of P. falciparum causes severe symptoms due to its distinctive sequestration capability. However, the physiological roles and the molecular mechanisms of signaling pathways that govern development are poorly understood. Our previous study showed that P. falciparum exhibits stage-specific spontaneous Calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in ring and early trophozoites, and the latter was essential for parasite development. In this study, we show that luzindole (LZ), a selective melatonin receptor antagonist, inhibits parasite growth. Analyses of development and morphology of LZ-treated P. falciparum revealed that LZ severely disrupted intraerythrocytic maturation, resulting in parasite death. When LZ was added at ring stage, the parasite could not undergo further development, whereas LZ added at the trophozoite stage inhibited development from early into late schizonts. Live-cell Ca{sup 2+} imaging showed that LZ treatment completely abolished Ca{sup 2+} oscillation in the ring forms while having little effect on early trophozoites. Further, the melatonin-induced cAMP increase observed at ring and late trophozoite stage was attenuated by LZ treatment. These suggest that a complex interplay between IP{sub 3}–Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signaling pathways is involved in intraerythrocytic development of P. falciparum.

  10. Cyclic AMP enhances TGFβ responses of breast cancer cells by upregulating TGFβ receptor I expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Oerlecke

    Full Text Available Cellular functions are regulated by complex networks of many different signaling pathways. The TGFβ and cAMP pathways are of particular importance in tumor progression. We analyzed the cross-talk between these pathways in breast cancer cells in 2D and 3D cultures. We found that cAMP potentiated TGFβ-dependent gene expression by enhancing Smad3 phosphorylation. Higher levels of total Smad3, as observed in 3D-cultured cells, blocked this effect. Two Smad3 regulating proteins, YAP (Yes-associated protein and TβRI (TGFβ receptor 1, were responsive to cAMP. While YAP had little effect on TGFβ-dependent expression and Smad3 phosphorylation, a constitutively active form of TβRI mimicked the cAMP effect on TGFβ signaling. In 3D-cultured cells, which show much higher levels of TβRI and cAMP, TβRI was unresponsive to cAMP. Upregulation of TβRI expression by cAMP was dependent on transcription. A proximal TβRI promoter fragment was moderately, but significantly activated by cAMP suggesting that cAMP increases TβRI expression at least partially by activating TβRI transcription. Neither the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB nor the TβRI-regulating transcription factor Six1 was required for the cAMP effect. An inhibitor of histone deacetylases alone or together with cAMP increased TβRI expression by a similar extent as cAMP alone suggesting that cAMP may exert its effect by interfering with histone acetylation. Along with an additive stimulatory effect of cAMP and TGFβ on p21 expression an additive inhibitory effect of these agents on proliferation was observed. Finally, we show that mesenchymal stem cells that interact with breast cancer cells can simultaneously activate the cAMP and TGFβ pathways. In summary, these data suggest that combined effects of cAMP and TGFβ, as e.g. induced by mesenchymal stem cells, involve the upregulation of TβRI expression on the transcriptional level, likely due to changes in histone acetylation

  11. Bicc1 links the regulation of cAMP signaling in polycystic kidneys to microRNA-induced gene silencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nathalie Piazzon; Charlotte Maisonneuve; Isabelle Guilleret; Samuel Rotman; Daniel B. Constam

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) promote cystic growth of renal tubules,at least in part by stimulating the accumulation of cAMP.How renal cAMP levels are regulated is incompletely understood.We show that cAMP and the expression of its synthetic enzyme adenylate cyclase-6 (AC6) are up-regulated in cystic kidneys of Bicc1-/-knockout mice.Bicc1,a protein comprising three K homology (KH) domains and a sterile alpha motif (SAM),is expressed in proximal tubules.The KH domains independently bind AC6 mRNA and recruit the miR-125a from Dicer,whereas the SAM domain enables silencing by Argonaute and TNRC6A/GW182.Bicc1 similarly induces silencing of the protein kinase inhibitor PKlα by miR-27a.Thus,Bicc1 is needed on these target mRNAs for silencing by specific miRNAs.The repression of AC6 by Bicc1 might explain why cysts in ADPKD patients preferentially arise from distal tubules.

  12. RMOD: a tool for regulatory motif detection in signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinki Kim

    Full Text Available Regulatory motifs are patterns of activation and inhibition that appear repeatedly in various signaling networks and that show specific regulatory properties. However, the network structures of regulatory motifs are highly diverse and complex, rendering their identification difficult. Here, we present a RMOD, a web-based system for the identification of regulatory motifs and their properties in signaling networks. RMOD finds various network structures of regulatory motifs by compressing the signaling network and detecting the compressed forms of regulatory motifs. To apply it into a large-scale signaling network, it adopts a new subgraph search algorithm using a novel data structure called path-tree, which is a tree structure composed of isomorphic graphs of query regulatory motifs. This algorithm was evaluated using various sizes of signaling networks generated from the integration of various human signaling pathways and it showed that the speed and scalability of this algorithm outperforms those of other algorithms. RMOD includes interactive analysis and auxiliary tools that make it possible to manipulate the whole processes from building signaling network and query regulatory motifs to analyzing regulatory motifs with graphical illustration and summarized descriptions. As a result, RMOD provides an integrated view of the regulatory motifs and mechanism underlying their regulatory motif activities within the signaling network. RMOD is freely accessible online at the following URL: http://pks.kaist.ac.kr/rmod.

  13. A common signaling pathway is activated in erythroid cells expressing high levels of fetal hemoglobin: a potential role for cAMP-elevating agents in β-globin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuta T

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tohru Ikuta,1 Yuichi Kuroyanagi,1 Nadine Odo,1 Siyang Liu21Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, 2Department of Physiology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USABackground: Although erythroid cells prepared from fetal liver, cord blood, or blood from β-thalassemia patients are known to express fetal hemoglobin at high levels, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We previously showed that cyclic nucleotides such as cAMP and cGMP induce fetal hemoglobin expression in primary erythroid cells. Here we report that cAMP signaling contributes to high-level fetal hemoglobin expression in erythroid cells prepared from cord blood and β-thalassemia.Methods: The status of the cAMP signaling pathway was investigated using primary erythroid cells prepared from cord blood and the mononuclear cells of patients with β-thalassemia; erythroid cells from adult bone marrow mononuclear cells served as the control.Results: We found that intracellular cAMP levels were higher in erythroid cells from cord blood and β-thalassemia than from adult bone marrow. Protein kinase A activity levels and cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation were higher in erythroid cells from cord blood or β-thalassemia than in adult bone marrow progenitors. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play a role in fetal hemoglobin expression, were not consistently activated in cord blood or β-thalassemia erythroid cells. When cAMP signaling was activated in adult erythroid cells, fetal hemoglobin was induced at high levels and associated with reduced expression of BCL11A, a silencer of the β-globin gene.Conclusion: These results suggest that activated cAMP signaling may be a common mechanism among erythroid cells with high fetal hemoglobin levels, in part because of downregulation of BCL11A. Activation of the cAMP signaling pathway with cAMP-elevating agents may prove to be an important signaling mechanism to

  14. Network modeling reveals prevalent negative regulatory relationships between signaling sectors in Arabidopsis immune signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanao Sato

    Full Text Available Biological signaling processes may be mediated by complex networks in which network components and network sectors interact with each other in complex ways. Studies of complex networks benefit from approaches in which the roles of individual components are considered in the context of the network. The plant immune signaling network, which controls inducible responses to pathogen attack, is such a complex network. We studied the Arabidopsis immune signaling network upon challenge with a strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae expressing the effector protein AvrRpt2 (Pto DC3000 AvrRpt2. This bacterial strain feeds multiple inputs into the signaling network, allowing many parts of the network to be activated at once. mRNA profiles for 571 immune response genes of 22 Arabidopsis immunity mutants and wild type were collected 6 hours after inoculation with Pto DC3000 AvrRpt2. The mRNA profiles were analyzed as detailed descriptions of changes in the network state resulting from the genetic perturbations. Regulatory relationships among the genes corresponding to the mutations were inferred by recursively applying a non-linear dimensionality reduction procedure to the mRNA profile data. The resulting static network model accurately predicted 23 of 25 regulatory relationships reported in the literature, suggesting that predictions of novel regulatory relationships are also accurate. The network model revealed two striking features: (i the components of the network are highly interconnected; and (ii negative regulatory relationships are common between signaling sectors. Complex regulatory relationships, including a novel negative regulatory relationship between the early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered signaling sectors and the salicylic acid sector, were further validated. We propose that prevalent negative regulatory relationships among the signaling sectors make the plant immune signaling network a "sector

  15. At immature mossy-fiber-CA3 synapses, correlated presynaptic and postsynaptic activity persistently enhances GABA release and network excitability via BDNF and cAMP-dependent PKA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, Sudhir; Mohajerani, Majid H; Cherubini, Enrico

    2009-02-25

    In the adult rat hippocampus, the axons of granule cells in the dentate gyrus, the mossy fibers (MF), form excitatory glutamatergic synapses with CA3 principal cells. In neonates, MF release into their targets mainly GABA, which at this developmental stage is depolarizing. Here we tested the hypothesis that, at immature MF-CA3 synapses, correlated presynaptic [single fiber-evoked GABA(A)-mediated postsynaptic potentials (GPSPs)] and postsynaptic activity (back propagating action potentials) may exert a critical control on synaptic efficacy. This form of plasticity, called spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), is a Hebbian type form of learning extensively studied at the level of glutamatergic synapses. Depending on the relative timing, pairing postsynaptic spiking and single MF-GPSPs induced bidirectional changes in synaptic efficacy. In case of positive pairing, spike-timing-dependent-long-term potentiation (STD-LTP) was associated with a persistent increase in GPSP slope and in the probability of cell firing. The transduction pathway involved a rise of calcium in the postsynaptic cell and the combined activity of cAMP-dependent PKA (protein kinase A) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Retrograde signaling via BDNF and presynaptic TrkB receptors led to a persistent increase in GABA release. In "presynaptically" silent neurons, the enhanced probability of GABA release induced by the pairing protocol, unsilenced these synapses. Shifting E(GABA) from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with bumetanide failed to modify synaptic strength. Thus, STD-LTP of GPSPs provides a reliable way to convey information from granule cells to the CA3 associative network at a time when glutamatergic synapses are still poorly developed.

  16. Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide evokes antitumor activity via cAMP-PKA mediated apoptotic pathway and down-regulation of Ca(2+)/PKC signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shenshen; Nie, Shaoping; Huang, Danfei; Huang, Jianqin; Feng, Yanling; Xie, Mingyong

    2014-06-01

    Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1) has been commonly suggested as a candidate for prevention and therapy of cancer. We investigated the antitumor effect and the underlying molecular mechanisms of PSG-1. The results showed that PSG-1 inhibited tumor growth and resulted in tumor cell apoptosis in vivo. Here, the data revealed that PSG-1 caused a markedly increase in cAMP and PKA activities, rather than cGMP and PKC. Moreover, the treatment of PSG-1 induced a dramatic increase in the protein level of PKA. In contrast, the expression of PKC and intracellular [Ca(2+)]i were inhibited. Our study also revealed that treatment with PSG-1 increased the spleen and thymus weights, lymphocyte proliferation and macrophage phagocytic activity in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, we conclude that PSG-1 could inhibit the tumor growth, possibly in part by enhancing the induction of apoptosis through cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and down-regulation of Ca(2+)/PKC signal pathway, activating host immune function in S180-bearing mice.

  17. Defining a Modular Signalling Network from the Fly Interactome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacq Bernard

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signalling pathways relay information by transmitting signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effectors that eventually activate the transcription of target genes. Since signalling pathways involve several types of molecular interactions including protein-protein interactions, we postulated that investigating their organization in the context of the global protein-protein interaction network could provide a new integrated view of signalling mechanisms. Results Using a graph-theory based method to analyse the fly protein-protein interaction network, we found that each signalling pathway is organized in two to three different signalling modules. These modules contain canonical proteins of the signalling pathways, known regulators as well as other proteins thereby predicted to participate to the signalling mechanisms. Connections between the signalling modules are prominent as compared to the other network's modules and interactions within and between signalling modules are among the more central routes of the interaction network. Conclusion Altogether, these modules form an interactome sub-network devoted to signalling with particular topological properties: modularity, density and centrality. This finding reflects the integration of the signalling system into cell functioning and its important role connecting and coordinating different biological processes at the level of the interactome.

  18. AMP N1-Oxide, a Unique Compound of Royal Jelly, Induces Neurite Outgrowth from PC12 Vells via Signaling by Protein Kinase A Independent of that by Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Hattori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier we identified adenosine monophosphate (AMP N1-oxide as a unique compound of royal jelly (RJ that induces neurite outgrowth (neuritegenesis from cultured rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells via the adenosine A2A receptor. Now, we found that AMP N1-oxide stimulated the phosphorylation of not only mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK but also that of cAMP/calcium-response element-binding protein (CREB in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of MAPK activation by a MEK inhibitor, PD98059, did not influence the AMP N1-oxide-induced neuritegenesis, whereas that of protein kinase A (PKA by a selective inhibitor, KT5720, significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. AMP N1-oxide also had the activity of suppressing the growth of PC12 cells, which correlated well with the neurite outgrowth-promoting activity. KT5720 restored the growth of AMP N1-oxide-treated PC12 cells. It is well known that nerve growth factor suppresses proliferation of PC12 cells before causing stimulation of neuronal differentiation. Thus, AMP N1-oxide elicited neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells, as evidenced by generation of neurites, and inhibited cell growth through adenosine A2A receptor-mediated PKA signaling, which may be responsible for characteristic actions of RJ.

  19. Neural network signal understanding for instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pau, L. F.; Johansen, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    A report is presented on the use of neural signal interpretation theory and techniques for the purpose of classifying the shapes of a set of instrumentation signals, in order to calibrate devices, diagnose anomalies, generate tuning/settings, and interpret the measurement results. Neural signal......, and an explanation facility designed to help neural signal understanding is described. The results are compared to those obtained with a knowledge-based signal interpretation system using the same instrument and data...

  20. Intelligent sensor networks the integration of sensor networks, signal processing and machine learning

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Although governments worldwide have invested significantly in intelligent sensor network research and applications, few books cover intelligent sensor networks from a machine learning and signal processing perspective. Filling this void, Intelligent Sensor Networks: The Integration of Sensor Networks, Signal Processing and Machine Learning focuses on the close integration of sensing, networking, and smart signal processing via machine learning. Based on the world-class research of award-winning authors, the book provides a firm grounding in the fundamentals of intelligent sensor networks, incl

  1. Network modules help the identification of key transport routes, signaling pathways in cellular and other networks

    CERN Document Server

    Palotai, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Complex systems are successfully reduced to interacting elements via the network concept. Transport plays a key role in the survival of networks. For example the specialized signaling cascades of cellular networks filter noise and efficiently adapt the network structure to new stimuli. However, our general understanding of transport mechanisms and signaling pathways in complex systems is yet limited. Here we summarize the key network structures involved in transport, list the solutions available to overloaded systems for relaxing their load and outline a possible method for the computational determination of signaling pathways. We highlight that in addition to hubs, bridges and the network skeleton, the overlapping modular structure is also essential in network transport. Moreover, by locating network elements in the space of overlapping network modules and evaluating their distance in this "module space", it may be possible to approximate signaling pathways computationally, which, in turn could serve the ide...

  2. [Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on defecation and VIP-cAMP-PKA-AQP3 signaling pathway 
in rats with constipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongxue; Wang, Yujin; Zhang, Hong; Yan, Shuguang; Wang, Bin; Xie, Pei

    2016-11-28

    目的:观察血管活性肠肽(vasoactive intestinal peptide,VIP)对便秘大鼠肠道水液代谢、环磷酸腺苷-蛋白激酶A信号通路(cyclic AMP protein kinase A signaling pathway,cAMP-PKA)和水通道蛋白3(water channel protein 3,AQP3)的影响,探讨VIP治疗便秘的作用及机制。方法:45只健康成年Sprague-Dawley大鼠随机分为空白对照组、模型组、模型+
VIP组。给药4周后,墨汁灌胃法检测大鼠首粒黑便排出时间;根据大鼠粪便干湿重计算粪便含水率;HE染色观察各组大鼠结肠组织形态学变化;Western 印迹检测各组大鼠结肠组织中 VIP和AQP3蛋白表达水平;定量即时聚合酶链锁反应(quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction,qPCR)检测各组大鼠结肠组织中cAMP,PKA和AQP3 mRNA的表达水平。结果:与空白对照组比较,模型组大鼠首粒黑便出现时间延长,粪便含水率明显减少(均PCAMP,PKA和AQP3 mRNA相对表达水平升高(均PcAMP-PKA-AQP3信号通路有关。.

  3. Motor Skill Learning Is Associated with Phase-Dependent Modifications in the Striatal cAMP/PKA/DARPP-32 Signaling Pathway in Rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qian

    Full Text Available Abundant evidence points to a key role of dopamine in motor skill learning, although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we used a skilled-reaching paradigm to first examine changes in the expression of the plasticity-related gene Arc to map activity in cortico-striatal circuitry during different phases of motor skill learning in young animals. In the early phase, Arc mRNA was significantly induced in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, cingulate cortex, primary motor cortex, and striatum. In the late phase, expression of Arc did not change in most regions, except in the mPFC and dorsal striatum. In the second series of experiments, we studied the learning-induced changes in the phosphorylation state of dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, 32k Da (DARPP-32. Western blot analysis of the phosphorylation state of DARPP-32 and its downstream target cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB in the striatum revealed that the early, but not late, phase of motor skill learning was associated with increased levels of phospho-Thr34-DARPP-32 and phospho-Ser133-CREB. Finally, we used the DARPP-32 knock-in mice with a point mutation in the Thr34 regulatory site (i.e., protein kinase A site to test the significance of this pathway in motor skill learning. In accordance with our hypothesis, inhibition of DARPP-32 activity at the Thr34 regulatory site strongly attenuated the motor learning rate and skilled reaching performance of mice. These findings suggest that the cAMP/PKA/DARPP-32 signaling pathway is critically involved in the acquisition of novel motor skills, and also demonstrate a dynamic shift in the contribution of cortico-striatal circuitry during different phases of motor skill learning.

  4. p-Hydroxylcinnamaldehyde induces the differentiation of oesophageal carcinoma cells via the cAMP-RhoA-MAPK signalling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ming; Zhao, Lian-mei; Yang, Xing-xiao; Shan, Ya-nan; Cui, Wen-xuan; Chen, Liang; Shan, Bao-en

    2016-01-01

    p-Hydroxylcinnamaldehyde (CMSP) has been identified as an inhibitor of the growth of various cancer cells. However, its function in oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to characterize the differentiation effects of CMSP, as well as its mechanism in the differentiation of ESCC Kyse30 and TE-13 cells. The function of CMSP in the viability, colony formation, migration and invasion of Kyse30 and TE-13 cells was determined by MTS, colony-formation, wound healing and transwell assays. Western blotting and pull-down assays were used to investigate the effect of CMSP on the expression level of malignant markers of ESCC, as well as the activity of MAPKs, RhoA and GTP-RhoA in Kyse30 and TE-13 cells. We found that CMSP could inhibit proliferation and migration and induce Kyse30 and TE-13 cell differentiation, characterized by dendrite-like outgrowth, decreased expression of tumour-associated antigens, as well as the decreased expression of malignant markers. Furthermore, increased cAMP, p-P38 and decreased activities of ERK, JNK and GTP-RhoA, were detected after treatment with CMSP. These results indicated that CMSP induced the differentiation of Kyse30 and TE-13 cells through mediating the cAMP-RhoA-MAPK axis, which might provide new potential strategies for ESCC treatment. PMID:27501997

  5. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for novel object learning and extinction of contextual memory: role of cAMP signaling in primary cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenshan; Phan, Trongha; Storm, Daniel R

    2011-04-13

    Although primary cilia are found on neurons throughout the brain, their physiological function remains elusive. Human ciliopathies are associated with cognition defects, and transgenic mice lacking proteins expressed in primary cilia exhibit defects in learning and memory. Recently, it was reported that mice lacking the G-protein-coupling receptor somatostatin receptor-3 (SSTR3), a protein expressed predominately in the primary cilia of neurons, have defective memory for novel object recognition and lower cAMP levels in the brain. Since SSTR3 is coupled to regulation of adenylyl cyclase, this suggests that adenylyl cyclase activity in primary cilia of CNS neurons may be critical for some forms of learning and memory. Because the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is expressed in primary cilia of hippocampal neurons, we examined AC3(-/-) mice for several forms of learning and memory. Here, we report that AC3(-/-) mice show no short-term memory for novel objects and fail to exhibit extinction of contextual fear conditioning. They also show impaired learning and memory for temporally dissociative passive avoidance. Since AC3 is exclusively expressed in primary cilia, we conclude that cAMP signals generated within primary cilia contribute to some forms of learning and memory, including extinction of contextual fear conditioning.

  6. Synergism between cAMP and PPARγ Signalling in the Initiation of UCP1 Gene Expression in HIB1B Brown Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Y. Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression of the brown adipocyte-specific gene, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1, is increased by both PPARγ stimulation and cAMP activation through their ability to stimulate the expression of the PPAR coactivator PGC1α. In HIB1B brown preadipocytes, combination of the PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone, and the cAMP stimulator forskolin synergistically increased UCP1 mRNA expression, but PGC1α expression was only increased additively by the two drugs. The PPARγ antagonist, GW9662, and the PKA inhibitor, H89, both inhibited UCP1 expression stimulated by rosiglitazone and forskolin but PGC1α expression was not altered to the same extent. Reporter studies demonstrated that combined rosiglitazone and forskolin synergistically activated transcription from a full length 3.1 kbp UCP1 luciferase promoter construct, but the response was only additive and much reduced when a minimal 260 bp proximal UCP1 promoter was examined. Rosiglitazone and forskolin in combination were able to synergistically stimulate promoters comprising of tandem repeats of either PPREs or CREs. We conclude that rosiglitazone and forskolin act together to synergistically activate the UCP1 promoter directly rather than by increasing PGC1α expression and by a mechanism involving cross-talk between the signalling systems regulating the CRE and PPRE on the promoters.

  7. Effects of fucoidan on insulin stimulation and pancreatic protection via the cAMP signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoming; Yu, Jinfeng; Ma, Zhi; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Fengjie

    2015-09-01

    cAMP, significantly increased fucoidan‑induced insulin secretion, whereas treatment with an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, which decreases the generation of cAMP, significantly decreased fucoidan‑induced insulin secretion. In conclusion, these data indicated that fucoidan may stimulate insulin secretion and provide pancreatic protection via the cAMP signaling pathway, in vivo and in vitro.

  8. Bio-inspired signal transduction with heterogeneous networks of nanoscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Javier; Manzanares, José A.; Mafé, Salvador

    2012-02-01

    Networks of single-electron transistors mimic some of the essential properties of neuron populations, because weak electrical signals trigger network oscillations with a frequency proportional to the input signal. Input potentials representing the pixel gray level of a grayscale image can then be converted into rhythms and the image can be recovered from these rhythms. Networks of non-identical nanoscillators complete the noisy transduction more reliably than identical ones. These results are important for signal processing schemes and could support recent studies suggesting that neuronal variability enhances the processing of biological information.

  9. Interleukin-7 Receptor Signaling Network: An Integrated Systems Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Megan J. Palmer; Vinay S. Mahajan; Lily C. Trajman; Darrell J. Irvine; Douglas A.Lauffenburger; Jianzhu Chen

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is an essential cytokine for the development and homeostatic maintenance of T and B lymphocytes. Binding of IL-7 to its cognate receptor, the IL-7 receptor (IL-7R), activates multiple pathways that regulate lymphocyte survival, glucose uptake, proliferation and differentiation. There has been much interest in understanding how IL-7 receptor signaling is modulated at multiple interconnected network levels. This review examines how the strength of the signal through the IL-7 receptor is modulated in T and B cells, including the use of shared receptor components, signaling crosstaik, shared interaction domains, feedback loops, integrated gene regulation, muitimerization and ligand competition. We discuss how these network control mechanisms could integrate to govern the properties of IL-7R signaling in lymphocytes in health and disease. Analysis of IL-7receptor signaling at a network level in a systematic manner will allow for a comprehensive approach to understanding the impact of multiple signaling pathways on lymphocyte biology.

  10. Reciprocal roles of angiotensin II and Angiotensin II Receptors Blockade (ARB) in regulating Cbfa1/RANKL via cAMP signaling pathway: possible mechanism for hypertension-related osteoporosis and antagonistic effect of ARB on hypertension-related osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiao-Xu; Zhou, Yi; Li, Ji-Yao

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Animal and epidemiological studies demonstrate that high blood pressure is associated with increased calcium loss, elevated parathyroid hormone, and increased calcium movement from bone. However, the mechanism responsible for hypertension-related osteoporosis remains elusive. Recent epidemiological studies indicate the benefits of Angiotensin II Receptors Blockade (ARB) on decreasing fracture risks. Since receptors for angiotensin II, the targets of ARB, are expressed in both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, we postulated that angiotensin II plays an important role in hypertension-related osteoporosis. Cbfa1 and RANKL, the important factors for maintaining bone homeostasis and key mediators in controlling osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, are both regulated by cAMP-dependent signaling. Angiotensin II along with factors such as LDL, HDL, NO and homocysteine that are commonly altered both in hypertension and osteoporosis, can down-regulate the expression of Cbfa1 but up-regulate RANKL expression via the cAMP signaling pathway. We thus hypothesized that, by altering the ratio of Cbfa1/RANKL expression via the cAMP-dependent pathway, angiotensin II differently regulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation leading to enhanced bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Since ARB can antagonize the adverse effect of angiotensin II on bone by lowering cAMP levels and modifying other downstream targets, including LDL, HDL, NO and Cbfa1/RANKL, we propose the hypothesis that the antagonistic effects of ARB may also be exerted via cAMP signaling pathway.

  11. Information routing driven by background chatter in a signaling network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núria Domedel-Puig

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Living systems are capable of processing multiple sources of information simultaneously. This is true even at the cellular level, where not only coexisting signals stimulate the cell, but also the presence of fluctuating conditions is significant. When information is received by a cell signaling network via one specific input, the existence of other stimuli can provide a background activity -or chatter- that may affect signal transmission through the network and, therefore, the response of the cell. Here we study the modulation of information processing by chatter in the signaling network of a human cell, specifically, in a Boolean model of the signal transduction network of a fibroblast. We observe that the level of external chatter shapes the response of the system to information carrying signals in a nontrivial manner, modulates the activity levels of the network outputs, and effectively determines the paths of information flow. Our results show that the interactions and node dynamics, far from being random, confer versatility to the signaling network and allow transitions between different information-processing scenarios.

  12. Non-linear dimensionality reduction of signaling networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivakhno Sergii

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems wide modeling and analysis of signaling networks is essential for understanding complex cellular behaviors, such as the biphasic responses to different combinations of cytokines and growth factors. For example, tumor necrosis factor (TNF can act as a proapoptotic or prosurvival factor depending on its concentration, the current state of signaling network and the presence of other cytokines. To understand combinatorial regulation in such systems, new computational approaches are required that can take into account non-linear interactions in signaling networks and provide tools for clustering, visualization and predictive modeling. Results Here we extended and applied an unsupervised non-linear dimensionality reduction approach, Isomap, to find clusters of similar treatment conditions in two cell signaling networks: (I apoptosis signaling network in human epithelial cancer cells treated with different combinations of TNF, epidermal growth factor (EGF and insulin and (II combination of signal transduction pathways stimulated by 21 different ligands based on AfCS double ligand screen data. For the analysis of the apoptosis signaling network we used the Cytokine compendium dataset where activity and concentration of 19 intracellular signaling molecules were measured to characterise apoptotic response to TNF, EGF and insulin. By projecting the original 19-dimensional space of intracellular signals into a low-dimensional space, Isomap was able to reconstruct clusters corresponding to different cytokine treatments that were identified with graph-based clustering. In comparison, Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Partial Least Squares – Discriminant analysis (PLS-DA were unable to find biologically meaningful clusters. We also showed that by using Isomap components for supervised classification with k-nearest neighbor (k-NN and quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA, apoptosis intensity can be predicted for different

  13. The critical roles of cyclic AMP/cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in platelet physiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong YAN; Suping LI; Kesheng DAI

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are the primary players in both thrombosis and hemostasis.Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are important signaling molecules in the regulation of platelet function,such as adhesion,aggregation,and secretion.Elevation of intracellular cAMP,which induces the activation of PKA,results in the inhibition of platelet function.Thus,tight control of the intracellular cAMP/PKA signaling pathway has great implications for platelet-dependent hemostasis and effective cardiovascular therapy.In this review,we summarize the PKA substrates and their contributions to platelet function,especially the advancing understanding of the cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling pathway in platelet physiology.In addition,we suggest the possibility that cAMP/PKA is involved in the platelet procoagulant process and receptor ectodomain shedding.

  14. Interactions between the Sonic Hedgehog signaling pathway and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in LKB1 transfected breast cancer cells%转染LKB1基因乳腺癌细胞与胚胎发育信号通路及cAMP/PKA通路的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成小林; 李正东; 蒋蓓琦; 庄志刚; 庄传经

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interactions between the LKB1 tumor suppressor,the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathway and the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Methods The LKB1 gene was reintroduced into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells which were lack of LKB1. And then two groups were classified-MDA-MB-231 group (231 group) and LKB1 transfected MDA-MB-231 group CLKB1 group).The cells in each group were treated with the SHH signaling inhibitor cyclopamine at different concentration levels (0,5 x 10~6,1 x 10~5 and 2 x 10"5 mol/L), respectively. The levels of SHH, Smo genes mRNA and protein expressions related to the SHH signaling pathway were detected with the methods of RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Meanwhile, the activities of cAMP and PKA were determined with corresponding kits . Results After treated with different concentration of SHHsignaling inhibitor cyclopamine, SHH, Smo genes mRNA and protein expressions related to the SHH signaling pathway in LKB1 group were significantly inhibited in comparison with those in 231 group. The inhibition effect was positively correlated to the concentration of cyclopamine, which reached the highest when the concentration of cyclopamine was 1 x 10"5 mol/L. Above this concentration, the inhibition effect remained unaffected. Meanwhile, the values of PKA and cAMP in 231 group and LKB1 group both increased as cyclopamine concentration increased,and these values simultaneously achieved maxima when the concentration of cyclopamine was 1 x 10~5mol/L. Further increase of cyclopamine concentration to 2 x 10~5mol/L did not lead to any raise of PKA or cAMP values. Under the treatment with the same concentration of cyclopamine, higher values of PKA and cAMP were found in LKB1 group compared with 231 group. Conclusions In breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, the SHH signaling pathway is inhibited,under the synergetic affection of the LKBl tumor suppressor and the cyclopamine inhibitor, while the expression of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is

  15. An HD-domain phosphodiesterase mediates cooperative hydrolysis of c-di-AMP to affect bacterial growth and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Luo, Shukun; Pensinger, Daniel; Sauer, John-Demian; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide cyclic di-3′,5′- adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) was recently identified as an essential and widespread second messenger in bacterial signaling. Among c-di-AMP–producing bacteria, altered nucleotide levels result in several physiological defects and attenuated virulence. Thus, a detailed molecular understanding of c-di-AMP metabolism is of both fundamental and practical interest. Currently, c-di-AMP degradation is recognized solely among DHH-DHHA1 domain-containing phosphodiesterases. Using chemical proteomics, we identified the Listeria monocytogenes protein PgpH as a molecular target of c-di-AMP. Biochemical and structural studies revealed that the PgpH His-Asp (HD) domain bound c-di-AMP with high affinity and specifically hydrolyzed this nucleotide to 5′-pApA. PgpH hydrolysis activity was inhibited by ppGpp, indicating a cross-talk between c-di-AMP signaling and the stringent response. Genetic analyses supported coordinated regulation of c-di-AMP levels in and out of the host. Intriguingly, a L. monocytogenes mutant that lacks c-di-AMP phosphodiesterases exhibited elevated c-di-AMP levels, hyperinduced a host type-I IFN response, and was significantly attenuated for infection. Furthermore, PgpH homologs, which belong to the 7TMR-HD family, are widespread among hundreds of c-di-AMP synthesizing microorganisms. Thus, PgpH represents a broadly conserved class of c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase with possibly other physiological functions in this crucial signaling network. PMID:25583510

  16. Regulation of Dehydroepiandrosterone(DHEA) on cAMP/PKA Signalling System and cAMP-response Element Binding Protein (CREB) in Cultured Primary Chicken Hepatocytes%脱氢表雄酮(DHEA)对鸡胚原代肝细胞cAMP/PKA信号通路和cAMP反应元件结合蛋白(CREB)的影响与调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐雪; 马海田; 邹思湘

    2012-01-01

    Considerable research efforts have been expended to study the factors that are associated with fat deposition in poultry production. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, 3b-hydroxy-5-androsterone-17-one) is a steroidal compound that is secreted by the mammalian adrenal cortex gland. It is known to be a fat-reducing agent by activation of the steroid hormone receptors. In the present study, cultured primary chicken hepatocytes exposed to DHEA (0,0.01,0.1,1.0 10 and 100 μmol/L, respectively) dissolved in medium were left for 20 min for cAMP assay by RlA(radioimmunoassay) kit. We found that the levels of cAMP were significantly higher in 0.1~100 μmol/L DHEA groups(P0.05). As expected, a full stimulation was achieved at 20 μmol/L forskolin (f0.05). The results suggest that DHEA can activate the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and regulate lipid metabolism by enhancing CREB phosphorylation level, and provide a better understanding for improvements proposed for DHEA in decrease of body fat in broiler chickens.%控制肉鸡脂肪过多沉积是肉鸡生产中亟待解决的问题.脱氢表雄酮(dehydroepiandrosterone,DHEA)是人体分泌最为丰富的肾上腺类固醇激素,可经由类固醇激素受体介导发挥生理功能,降低机体生脂能力.本研究以鸡胚原代肝细胞为研究对象,选用含DHEA终浓度为0(对照)、0.01、0.1、1.0、10和100μmol/L的培养液孵育肝细胞20 min后收集细胞,放射免疫测定法(RIA)检测胞内cAMP水平.结果发现,0.1~100 μmol/L DHEA孵育肝细胞均可显著提高胞内cAMP水平(P<0.05),其中0.1 μmnol/L DHEA效果最为显著(P<0.01).0.1 μmol/L DHEA孵育肝细胞20 min或1h后收集细胞,RIA法分别检测胞内腺苷酸环化酶(adenylate cyclase,AC)和磷酸二酯酶(phosphodiesterase,PDE)活性,(γ-32P)ATP掺入法测定cAMP依赖性蛋白激酶A(protein kinase A,PKA)活性,Western blot法测定cAMP反应元件结合蛋白(cAMP-response element binding protein,CREB)磷酸化水平.结果显示,0

  17. Social multimedia signals a signal processing approach to social network phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Suman Deb

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive coverage of the state-of-the-art in understanding media popularity and trends in online social networks through social multimedia signals. With insights from the study of popularity and sharing patterns of online media, trend spread in social media, social network analysis for multimedia and visualizing diffusion of media in online social networks. In particular, the book will address the following important issues: Understanding social network phenomena from a signal processing point of view; The existence and popularity of multimedia as shared and social me

  18. Prophylactic Melatonin Attenuates Isoflurane-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Aged Rats through Hippocampal Melatonin Receptor 2 - cAMP Response Element Binding Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yajie; Ni, Cheng; Li, Zhengqian; Yang, Ning; Zhou, Yang; Rong, Xiaoying; Qian, Min; Chui, Dehua; Guo, Xiangyang

    2017-03-01

    Melatonin exerts many physiological effects via melatonin receptors, among which the melatonin-2 receptor (MT2 ) plays a critical role in circadian rhythm disorders, Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders. A melatonin replacement strategy has been tested previously, and MT2 was a critical target during the process. cAMP response element binding (CREB) is an essential transcription factor for memory formation and could be involved in MT2 signalling. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effects of prophylactic melatonin on inhaled anaesthetic isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment, and to determine whether the protective effects of melatonin are dependent on MT2 and downstream CREB signalling in the hippocampus of aged rats. The results showed that prophylactic melatonin attenuated isoflurane-induced decreases in plasma/hippocampal melatonin levels and cognitive impairment in aged rats. Furthermore, 4P-PDOT, a selective MT2 antagonist, blocked the protective effects of melatonin on isoflurane-induced decreases in both hippocampal MT2 expression and downstream CREB phosphorylation. And 4P-PDOT blocked the attenuation of melatonin on isoflurane-induced memory impairment. Collectively, the results suggest that the protective effects of prophylactic melatonin are dependent on hippocampal MT2 -CREB signalling, which could be a potential therapeutic target for anaesthetic-induced cognitive impairment.

  19. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Alleviates Extracellular Matrix Accumulation in High Glucose-Induced Renal Fibroblasts through mTOR Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Extracellular matrix accumulation contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. Although AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has been found to inhibit extracellular matrix synthesis by experiments in vivo and vitro, its role in alleviating the deposition of extracellular matrix in renal interstitial fibroblasts has not been well defined. Methods: Currently, we conducted this study to investigate the effects of AMPK on high glucose-induced extracellular matrix synthesis and involved intracellular signaling pathway by using western blot in the kidney fibroblast cell line (NRK-49f. Results: Collagen IV protein levels were significantly increased by high glucose in a time-dependent manner. This was associated with a decrease in Thr72 phosphorylation of AMPK and an increase in phosphorylation of mTOR on Ser2448. High glucose-induced extracellular matrix accumulation and mTOR activation were significantly inhibited by the co-treatment of rAAV-AMPKα1312 (encoding constitutively active AMPKα1 whereas activated by r-AAV-AMPKα1D157A (encoding dominant negative AMPKα1. In cultured renal fibroblasts, overexpression of AMPKα1D157A upregulated mTOR signaling and matrix synthesis, which were ameliorated by co-treatment with the inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin. Conclusion: Collectively, these findings indicate that AMPK exerts renoprotective effects by inhibiting the accumulation of extracellular matrix through mTOR signaling pathway.

  20. Cinnamon extract enhances glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myocytes by inducing LKB1-AMP-activated protein kinase signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shen

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that cinnamon extract (CE ameliorates type 1 diabetes induced by streptozotocin in rats through the up-regulation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 translocation in both muscle and adipose tissues. This present study was aimed at clarifying the detailed mechanism(s with which CE increases the glucose uptake in vivo and in cell culture systems using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and C2C12 myotubes in vitro. Specific inhibitors of key enzymes in insulin signaling and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling pathways, as well as small interference RNA, were used to examine the role of these kinases in the CE-induced glucose uptake. The results showed that CE stimulated the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. An AMPK inhibitor and LKB1 siRNA blocked the CE-induced glucose uptake. We also found for the first time that insulin suppressed AMPK activation in the adipocyte. To investigate the effect of CE on type 2 diabetes in vivo, we further performed oral glucose tolerance tests and insulin tolerance tests in type 2 diabetes model rats administered with CE. The CE improved glucose tolerance in oral glucose tolerance tests, but not insulin sensitivity in insulin tolerance test. In summary, these results indicate that CE ameliorates type 2 diabetes by inducing GLUT4 translocation via the AMPK signaling pathway. We also found insulin antagonistically regulates the activation of AMPK.

  1. L-4F Inhibits Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein-induced Inflammatory Adipokine Secretion via Cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A-CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β Signaling Pathway in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Zhu Xie

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: OxLDL induces C/EBPβ protein synthesis in a time-dependent manner and enhances MCP-1 secretion and expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. L-4F dose-dependently counterbalances the pro-inflammatory effect of oxLDL, and cyclic AMP/PKA-C/EBPβ signaling pathway may participate in it.

  2. Complex structure and biochemical characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP)-binding protein PstA, the founding member of a new signal transduction protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeotto, Ivan; Zhang, Yong; Mladenov, Miroslav G; Freemont, Paul S; Gründling, Angelika

    2015-01-30

    Signaling nucleotides are integral parts of signal transduction systems allowing bacteria to cope with and rapidly respond to changes in the environment. The Staphylococcus aureus PII-like signal transduction protein PstA was recently identified as a cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP)-binding protein. Here, we present the crystal structures of the apo- and c-di-AMP-bound PstA protein, which is trimeric in solution as well as in the crystals. The structures combined with detailed bioinformatics analysis revealed that the protein belongs to a new family of proteins with a similar core fold but with distinct features to classical PII proteins, which usually function in nitrogen metabolism pathways in bacteria. The complex structure revealed three identical c-di-AMP-binding sites per trimer with each binding site at a monomer-monomer interface. Although distinctly different from other cyclic-di-nucleotide-binding sites, as the half-binding sites are not symmetrical, the complex structure also highlighted common features for c-di-AMP-binding sites. A comparison between the apo and complex structures revealed a series of conformational changes that result in the ordering of two anti-parallel β-strands that protrude from each monomer and allowed us to propose a mechanism on how the PstA protein functions as a signaling transduction protein.

  3. The EEG Signal Prediction by Using Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Mohylova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The neural network is computational model based on the features abstraction of biological neural systems. The neural networks have many ways of usage in technical field. They have been applied successfully to speech recognition, image analysis and adaptive control, in order to construct software agents or autonomous robots. In this paper is described usage of neural networks for ECG signal prediction. The ECG signal prediction can be used for  automated detection of irregular heartbeat – extrasystole. The automated detection system of unexpected abnormalities is also described in this paper

  4. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway by adiponectin and insulin in mouse adipocytes: requirement of acyl-CoA synthetases FATP1 and Acsl1 and association with an elevation in AMP/ATP ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Sun, Lei; Ruderman, Neil; Lodish, Harvey

    2010-11-01

    Adiponectin activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in adipocytes, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that AMP, generated in activating fatty acids to their CoA derivatives, catalyzed by acyl-CoA synthetases, is involved in AMPK activation by adiponectin. Moreover, in adipocytes, insulin affects the subcellular localization of acyl-CoA synthetase FATP1. Thus, we also tested whether insulin activates AMPK in these cells and, if so, whether it activates through a similar mechanism. We examined these hypotheses by measuring the AMP/ATP ratio and AMPK activation on adiponectin and insulin stimulation and after knocking down acyl-CoA synthetases in adipocytes. We show that adiponectin activation of AMPK is accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Moreover, FATP1 and Acsl1, the 2 major acyl-CoA synthetase isoforms in adipocytes, are essential for AMPK activation by adiponectin. We also show that after 40 min. insulin activated AMPK in adipocytes, which was coupled with a 5-fold increase in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio. Knockdown studies show that FATP1 and Acsl1 are required for these processes, as well as for stimulation of long-chain fatty acid uptake by adiponection and insulin. These studies demonstrate that a change in cellular energy state is associated with AMPK activation by both adiponectin and insulin, which requires the activity of FATP1 and Acsl1.

  5. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  6. Amplified Signal Response by Neuronal Diversity on Complex Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Chuan-Sheng; CHEN Han-Shuang; ZHANG Ji-Qian

    2008-01-01

    The effect of diversity on dynamics of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons on complex networks is numerically investigated,where each neuron is subjected to an external subthreshold signal.With the diversity the network is a mixture of excitable and oscillatory neurons,and the diversity is determined by the variance of the system's parameter.The complex network is constructed by randomly adding long-range connections (shortcuts) on a nearest-neighbouring coupled one-dimensional chain.Numerical results show that external signals are maximally magnified at an intermediate value of the diversity,as in the case of well-known stochastic resonance.Furthermore,the effects of the number of shortcuts and coupled strength on the diversity-induced phenomena are also discussed.These findings exhibit that the diversity may play a constructive role in response to external signal,and highlight the importance of the diversity on such complex networks.

  7. Evidence for a modulation of neutral trehalase activity by Ca2+ and cAMP signaling pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza A.C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae neutral trehalase (encoded by NTH1 is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA and by an endogenous modulator protein. A yeast strain with knockouts of CMK1 and CMK2 genes (cmk1cmk2 and its isogenic control (CMK1CMK2 were used to investigate the role of CaM kinase II in the in vitro activation of neutral trehalase during growth on glucose. In the exponential growth phase, cmk1cmk2 cells exhibited basal trehalase activity and an activation ratio by PKA very similar to that found in CMK1CMK2 cells. At diauxie, even though both cells presented comparable basal trehalase activities, cmk1cmk2 cells showed reduced activation by PKA and lower total trehalase activity when compared to CMK1CMK2 cells. To determine if CaM kinase II regulates NTH1 expression or is involved in post-translational modulation of neutral trehalase activity, NTH1 promoter activity was evaluated using an NTH1-lacZ reporter gene. Similar ß-galactosidase activities were found for CMK1CMK2 and cmk1cmk2 cells, ruling out the role of CaM kinase II in NTH1 expression. Thus, CaM kinase II should act in concert with PKA on the activation of the cryptic form of neutral trehalase. A model for trehalase regulation by CaM kinase II is proposed whereby the target protein for Ca2+/CaM-dependent kinase II phosphorylation is not the neutral trehalase itself. The possible identity of this target protein with the recently identified trehalase-associated protein YLR270Wp is discussed.

  8. Timing and time signal distribution in digital communications networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Masami; Imaoka, Atushi

    1992-06-01

    The timing signal distribution characteristics of a digital communications network are evaluated to determine the Maximum Time Interval Error (MTIE) of the network; reference is made to the performance of network components such as transmission systems, slave clocks and timing distribution systems in intraoffices. The MTIE of each component is measured and used to determine the allowable MTIE of that component. The maximum number of slave node chains is shown to be 20. Time signal distribution performance is detailed. It is shown that time synchronization accuracy is of the order of submicroseconds between nodes separated by 2400 km over a two year period. For intra-office time signal distribution, the relative time accuracy is less than 3 nanoseconds using an 8 Mb/s round trip digital interface to connect a time signal supply in an office to dispersed equipment.

  9. Primary Cilia, Signaling Networks and Cell Migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veland, Iben Rønn

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based, sensory organelles that emerge from the centrosomal mother centriole to project from the surface of most quiescent cells in the human body. Ciliary entry is a tightly controlled process, involving diffusion barriers and gating complexes that maintain a unique...... this controls directional cell migration as a physiological response. The ciliary pocket is a membrane invagination with elevated activity of clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE). In paper I, we show that the primary cilium regulates TGF-β signaling and the ciliary pocket is a compartment for CDE...... on formation of the primary cilium and CDE at the pocket region. The ciliary protein Inversin functions as a molecular switch between canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling. In paper II, we show that Inversin and the primary cilium control Wnt signaling and are required for polarization and cell migration...

  10. Plasma membrane regulates Ras signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Tanmay Sanjeev; Muratcioglu, Serena; Marszalek, Richard; Jang, Hyunbum; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Nussinov, Ruth; Gaponenko, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Ras GTPases activate more than 20 signaling pathways, regulating such essential cellular functions as proliferation, survival, and migration. How Ras proteins control their signaling diversity is still a mystery. Several pieces of evidence suggest that the plasma membrane plays a critical role. Among these are: (1) selective recruitment of Ras and its effectors to particular localities allowing access to Ras regulators and effectors; (2) specific membrane-induced conformational changes promoting Ras functional diversity; and (3) oligomerization of membrane-anchored Ras to recruit and activate Raf. Taken together, the membrane does not only attract and retain Ras but also is a key regulator of Ras signaling. This can already be gleaned from the large variability in the sequences of Ras membrane targeting domains, suggesting that localization, environment and orientation are important factors in optimizing the function of Ras isoforms.

  11. Molecular Basis for the Mechanism of Constitutive CBP/p300 Coactivator Recruitment by CRTC1-MAML2 and Its Implications in cAMP Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael David; Kumar, Ganesan Senthil; Marcum, Ryan; Luo, Qianyi; Zhang, Yongbo; Radhakrishnan, Ishwar

    2015-09-01

    The cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a signal-dependent transcription factor that exerts its positive effects on gene transcription of a broad range of genes by recruiting coactivators, including CREB-binding protein (CBP), its paralog, p300, and the family of CRTC (CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivators) proteins. Whereas recruitment of CBP/p300 is dependent on CREB phosphorylation at Ser133, recruitment of CRTCs is not. Here we describe how both mechanisms could concurrently drive transcription of CREB targets in a subset of head and neck cancers featuring chromosomal translocations that fuse portions of CRTC1 and CRTC3 genes with that of the Mastermind-like transcriptional coactivator MAML2. We show that a peptide derived from transactivation domain 1 (TAD1) of MAML2 binds to the CBP KIX domain with micromolar affinity. An ∼20-residue segment within this peptide, conserved in MAML2 orthologs and paralogs, binds directly to a KIX surface previously shown to bind to MLL1. The 20-residue MAML2 segment shares sequence similarity with MLL1, especially at those positions in direct contact with KIX, and like MLL1, the segment is characterized by the presence of an ∼10-residue helix. Because CRTC1/3-MAML2 fusion proteins are constitutively nuclear, like CREB, our results suggest constitutive recruitment of CBP/p300 to CREB targets that could be further enhanced by signals that cause CREB Ser133 phosphorylation.

  12. Role of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC1) in breast cancer cell migration and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naveen; Gupta, Sonal; Dabral, Surbhi; Singh, Shailja; Sehrawat, Seema

    2017-02-16

    Despite the current progress in cancer research and therapy, breast cancer remains the leading cause of mortality among half a million women worldwide. Migration and invasion of cancer cells are associated with prevalent tumor metastasis as well as high mortality. Extensive studies have powerfully established the role of prototypic second messenger cAMP and its two ubiquitously expressed intracellular cAMP receptors namely the classic protein kinaseA/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the more recently discovered exchange protein directly activated by cAMP/cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor (EPAC/cAMP-GEF) in cell migration, cell cycle regulation, and cell death. Herein, we performed the analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset to evaluate the essential role of cAMP molecular network in breast cancer. We report that EPAC1, PKA, and AKAP9 along with other molecular partners are amplified in breast cancer patients, indicating the importance of this signaling network. To evaluate the functional role of few of these proteins, we used pharmacological modulators and analyzed their effect on cell migration and cell death in breast cancer cells. Hence, we report that inhibition of EPAC1 activity using pharmacological modulators leads to inhibition of cell migration and induces cell death. Additionally, we also observed that the inhibition of EPAC1 resulted in disruption of its association with the microtubule cytoskeleton and delocalization of AKAP9 from the centrosome as analyzed by in vitro imaging. Finally, this study suggests for the first time the mechanistic insights of mode of action of a primary cAMP-dependent sensor, Exchange protein activated by cAMP 1 (EPAC1), via its interaction with A-kinase anchoring protein 9 (AKAP9). This study provides a new cell signaling cAMP-EPAC1-AKAP9 direction to the development of additional biotherapeutics for breast cancer.

  13. Autonomous Traffic Signal Control Model with Neural Network Analogy

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, T

    1997-01-01

    We propose here an autonomous traffic signal control model based on analogy with neural networks. In this model, the length of cycle time period of traffic lights at each signal is autonomously adapted. We find a self-organizing collective behavior of such a model through simulation on a one-dimensional lattice model road: traffic congestion is greatly diffused when traffic signals have such autonomous adaptability with suitably tuned parameters. We also find that effectiveness of the system emerges through interactions between units and shows a threshold transition as a function of proportion of adaptive signals in the model.

  14. Night/day changes in pineal expression of >600 genes: central role of adrenergic/cAMP signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Michael J; Coon, Steven L; Carter, John David;

    2009-01-01

    The pineal gland plays an essential role in vertebrate chronobiology by converting time into a hormonal signal, melatonin, which is always elevated at night. Here we have analyzed the rodent pineal transcriptome using Affymetrix GeneChip(R) technology to obtain a more complete description of pineal...

  15. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelraj, Ananthi Jebaseeli; Jayapal, Sundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6) is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node's mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO) in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node's mobility should be modified to support group nodes' mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point.

  16. Efficient Mobility Management Signalling in Network Mobility Supported PMIPV6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Jebaseeli Samuelraj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Proxy Mobile IPV6 (PMIPV6 is a network based mobility management protocol which supports node’s mobility without the contribution from the respective mobile node. PMIPV6 is initially designed to support individual node mobility and it should be enhanced to support mobile network movement. NEMO-BSP is an existing protocol to support network mobility (NEMO in PMIPV6 network. Due to the underlying differences in basic protocols, NEMO-BSP cannot be directly applied to PMIPV6 network. Mobility management signaling and data structures used for individual node’s mobility should be modified to support group nodes’ mobility management efficiently. Though a lot of research work is in progress to implement mobile network movement in PMIPV6, it is not yet standardized and each suffers with different shortcomings. This research work proposes modifications in NEMO-BSP and PMIPV6 to achieve NEMO support in PMIPV6. It mainly concentrates on optimizing the number and size of mobility signaling exchanged while mobile network or mobile network node changes its access point.

  17. Optical Performance Monitoring and Signal Optimization in Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Nordal

    2006-01-01

    -optical-electrical regeneration points decreases. This thesis evaluates the impact of signal degrading effects that are becoming of increasing concern in all-optical high-speed networks due to all-optical switching and higher bit-rates. Especially group-velocity-dispersion (GVD) and a number of nonlinear effects will require......The thesis studies performance monitoring for the next generation optical networks. The focus is on all-optical networks with bit-rates of 10 Gb/s or above. Next generation all-optical networks offer large challenges as the optical transmitted distance increases and the occurrence of electrical...... enhanced attention to avoid signal degradations. The requirements for optical performance monitoring features are discussed, and the thesis evaluates the advantages and necessity of increasing the level of performance monitoring parameters in the physical layer. In particular, methods for optical...

  18. The Cyclase-associated Protein CAP as Regulator of Cell Polarity and cAMP Signaling in Dictyostelium

    OpenAIRE

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-01-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and fo...

  19. 1st International Conference on Signal, Networks, Computing, and Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Durga; Nagar, Atulya; Sahoo, Manmath

    2016-01-01

    The book is a collection of high-quality peer-reviewed research papers presented in the first International Conference on Signal, Networks, Computing, and Systems (ICSNCS 2016) held at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India during February 25–27, 2016. The book is organized in to two volumes and primarily focuses on theory and applications in the broad areas of communication technology, computer science and information security. The book aims to bring together the latest scientific research works of academic scientists, professors, research scholars and students in the areas of signal, networks, computing and systems detailing the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted.

  20. An artificial network model for estimating the network structure underlying partially observed neuronal signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Misako; Namikawa, Jun; Chao, Zenas C; Nagasaka, Yasuo; Fujii, Naotaka; Nakamura, Kiyohiko; Tani, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Many previous studies have proposed methods for quantifying neuronal interactions. However, these methods evaluated the interactions between recorded signals in an isolated network. In this study, we present a novel approach for estimating interactions between observed neuronal signals by theorizing that those signals are observed from only a part of the network that also includes unobserved structures. We propose a variant of the recurrent network model that consists of both observable and unobservable units. The observable units represent recorded neuronal activity, and the unobservable units are introduced to represent activity from unobserved structures in the network. The network structures are characterized by connective weights, i.e., the interaction intensities between individual units, which are estimated from recorded signals. We applied this model to multi-channel brain signals recorded from monkeys, and obtained robust network structures with physiological relevance. Furthermore, the network exhibited common features that portrayed cortical dynamics as inversely correlated interactions between excitatory and inhibitory populations of neurons, which are consistent with the previous view of cortical local circuits. Our results suggest that the novel concept of incorporating an unobserved structure into network estimations has theoretical advantages and could provide insights into brain dynamics beyond what can be directly observed.

  1. Radar signal design problem with neural network processing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Krishnamohan Rao; P S Moharir

    2001-06-01

    Binary and ternary sequences with peaky autocorrelation, measured in terms of high discrimination and merit factor have been searched earlier, using optimization techniques. It is shown that the use of neural network processing of the return signal is much more advantageous. It opens up a new signal design problem, which is solved by an optimization technique called Hamming scan, for both binary and ternary sequences.

  2. VLSI Neural Networks Help To Compress Video Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wai-Chi; Sheu, Bing J.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced analog/digital electronic system for compression of video signals incorporates artificial neural networks. Performs motion-estimation and image-data-compression processing. Effectively eliminates temporal and spatial redundancies of sequences of video images; processes video image data, retaining only nonredundant parts to be transmitted, then transmits resulting data stream in form of efficient code. Reduces bandwidth and storage requirements for transmission and recording of video signal.

  3. The fidelity of dynamic signaling by noisy biomolecular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive G Bowsher

    Full Text Available Cells live in changing, dynamic environments. To understand cellular decision-making, we must therefore understand how fluctuating inputs are processed by noisy biomolecular networks. Here we present a general methodology for analyzing the fidelity with which different statistics of a fluctuating input are represented, or encoded, in the output of a signaling system over time. We identify two orthogonal sources of error that corrupt perfect representation of the signal: dynamical error, which occurs when the network responds on average to other features of the input trajectory as well as to the signal of interest, and mechanistic error, which occurs because biochemical reactions comprising the signaling mechanism are stochastic. Trade-offs between these two errors can determine the system's fidelity. By developing mathematical approaches to derive dynamics conditional on input trajectories we can show, for example, that increased biochemical noise (mechanistic error can improve fidelity and that both negative and positive feedback degrade fidelity, for standard models of genetic autoregulation. For a group of cells, the fidelity of the collective output exceeds that of an individual cell and negative feedback then typically becomes beneficial. We can also predict the dynamic signal for which a given system has highest fidelity and, conversely, how to modify the network design to maximize fidelity for a given dynamic signal. Our approach is general, has applications to both systems and synthetic biology, and will help underpin studies of cellular behavior in natural, dynamic environments.

  4. Gene transcriptional networks integrate microenvironmental signals in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2011-04-01

    A significant amount of evidence shows that microenvironmental signals generated from extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, soluble factors, and cell-cell adhesion complexes cooperate at the extra- and intracellular level. This synergetic action of microenvironmental cues is crucial for normal mammary gland development and breast malignancy. To explore how the microenvironmental genes coordinate in human breast cancer at the genome level, we have performed gene co-expression network analysis in three independent microarray datasets and identified two microenvironment networks in human breast cancer tissues. Network I represents crosstalk and cooperation of ECM microenvironment and soluble factors during breast malignancy. The correlated expression of cytokines, chemokines, and cell adhesion proteins in Network II implicates the coordinated action of these molecules in modulating the immune response in breast cancer tissues. These results suggest that microenvironmental cues are integrated with gene transcriptional networks to promote breast cancer development.

  5. Reconstruction and signal propagation analysis of the Syk signaling network in breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbach, Serge; Montcourrier, Philippe; Roy, Christian; Solassol, Jérôme; Freiss, Gilles; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2017-01-01

    The ability to build in-depth cell signaling networks from vast experimental data is a key objective of computational biology. The spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) protein, a well-characterized key player in immune cell signaling, was surprisingly first shown by our group to exhibit an onco-suppressive function in mammary epithelial cells and corroborated by many other studies, but the molecular mechanisms of this function remain largely unsolved. Based on existing proteomic data, we report here the generation of an interaction-based network of signaling pathways controlled by Syk in breast cancer cells. Pathway enrichment of the Syk targets previously identified by quantitative phospho-proteomics indicated that Syk is engaged in cell adhesion, motility, growth and death. Using the components and interactions of these pathways, we bootstrapped the reconstruction of a comprehensive network covering Syk signaling in breast cancer cells. To generate in silico hypotheses on Syk signaling propagation, we developed a method allowing to rank paths between Syk and its targets. We first annotated the network according to experimental datasets. We then combined shortest path computation with random walk processes to estimate the importance of individual interactions and selected biologically relevant pathways in the network. Molecular and cell biology experiments allowed to distinguish candidate mechanisms that underlie the impact of Syk on the regulation of cortactin and ezrin, both involved in actin-mediated cell adhesion and motility. The Syk network was further completed with the results of our biological validation experiments. The resulting Syk signaling sub-networks can be explored via an online visualization platform. PMID:28306714

  6. Cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside regulates fatty acid metabolism via an AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling pathway in human HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Honghui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatic metabolic derangements are key components in the development of fatty liver disease. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK plays a central role in controlling hepatic lipid metabolism through modulating the downstream acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC and carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT-1 pathway. In this study, cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside (Cy-3-g, a typical anthocyanin pigment was used to examine its effects on AMPK activation and fatty acid metabolism in human HepG2 hepatocytes. Results Anthocyanin Cy-3-g increased cellular AMPK activity in a calmodulin kinase kinase dependent manner. Furthermore, Cy-3-g substantially induced AMPK downstream target ACC phosphorylation and inactivation, and then decreased malonyl CoA contents, leading to stimulation of CPT-1 expression and significant increase of fatty acid oxidation in HepG2 cells. These effects of Cy-3-g are largely abolished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of AMPK. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Cy-3-g regulates hepatic lipid homeostasis via an AMPK-dependent signaling pathway. Targeting AMPK activation by anthocyanin may represent a promising approach for the prevention and treatment of obesity-related nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

  7. Topological peculiarities of mammalian networks with different functionalities: transcription, signal transduction and metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjorn Goemann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We have comparatively investigated three different mammalian networks - on transcription, signal transduction and metabolic processes - with respect to their common and individual topological traits. The networks have been constructed based on genome- wide data collected from human, mouse and rat. None of these three networks exhibits a pure power-law degree distribution and, therefore, could be considered scalefree. Rather, the degree distributions of all three networks were best fitted by mixed models of a power law with an exponential tail. The networks differ from one another in the quantitative parameters of the models. Moreover, the transcription network can also be very well approximated by an exponential law. The connectivity within each network is rather robust, as is seen when removing individual nodes and computing the values of their pairwise disconnectivity index (PDI, which characterizes the topological significance of each node v by the number of direct or indirect connections in the network that critically depend on the presence of v. The results evidence that the networks are not centralized: none of nodes globally controls the integrity of each network. Just a few vertices appeared to strongly affect the coherence of the networks. These nodes are characterized by a broad range of degrees, thereby indicating that the degree alone is not the decisive criteria of a node's importance. The networks reveal distinct architectures: The transcriptional network exhibits a hierarchical modularity, whereas the signaling network is mainly comprised of semi-autonomous modules. The metabolic network seems to be made by a more complex mixture of substructures. Thus, despite being encoded by the same genomes, the networks significantly differ from one another in their general architectural design. Altogether, our results indicate that the subsets of genes and relationships that constitute these networks have co-evolved very differently and

  8. Subsurface Event Detection and Classification Using Wireless Signal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhannad T. Suleiman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface environment sensing and monitoring applications such as detection of water intrusion or a landslide, which could significantly change the physical properties of the host soil, can be accomplished using a novel concept, Wireless Signal Networks (WSiNs. The wireless signal networks take advantage of the variations of radio signal strength on the distributed underground sensor nodes of WSiNs to monitor and characterize the sensed area. To characterize subsurface environments for event detection and classification, this paper provides a detailed list and experimental data of soil properties on how radio propagation is affected by soil properties in subsurface communication environments. Experiments demonstrated that calibrated wireless signal strength variations can be used as indicators to sense changes in the subsurface environment. The concept of WSiNs for the subsurface event detection is evaluated with applications such as detection of water intrusion, relative density change, and relative motion using actual underground sensor nodes. To classify geo-events using the measured signal strength as a main indicator of geo-events, we propose a window-based minimum distance classifier based on Bayesian decision theory. The window-based classifier for wireless signal networks has two steps: event detection and event classification. With the event detection, the window-based classifier classifies geo-events on the event occurring regions that are called a classification window. The proposed window-based classification method is evaluated with a water leakage experiment in which the data has been measured in laboratory experiments. In these experiments, the proposed detection and classification method based on wireless signal network can detect and classify subsurface events.

  9. On the distribution of signal phase in body area networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cotton, Simon L.; Dias, Ugo S.; Scanlon, William G.; Yacoub, Michel D.

    2010-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the distribution of the phase component of the complex received signal observed in practical experiments using body area networks. Two phase distributions, the recently proposed κ-μ and η-μ probability densities, which together encompass the most widely used fading mod

  10. A comprehensive map of the mTOR signaling network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Etienne; Ghosh, Samik; Matsuoka, Yukiko; Ashton-Beaucage, Dariel; Therrien, Marc; Lemieux, Sébastien; Perreault, Claude; Roux, Philippe P; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation. mTOR signaling is frequently dysregulated in oncogenic cells, and thus an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Using CellDesigner, a modeling support software for graphical notation, we present herein a comprehensive map of the mTOR signaling network, which includes 964 species connected by 777 reactions. The map complies with both the systems biology markup language (SBML) and graphical notation (SBGN) for computational analysis and graphical representation, respectively. As captured in the mTOR map, we review and discuss our current understanding of the mTOR signaling network and highlight the impact of mTOR feedback and crosstalk regulations on drug-based cancer therapy. This map is available on the Payao platform, a Web 2.0 based community-wide interactive process for creating more accurate and information-rich databases. Thus, this comprehensive map of the mTOR network will serve as a tool to facilitate systems-level study of up-to-date mTOR network components and signaling events toward the discovery of novel regulatory processes and therapeutic strategies for cancer. PMID:21179025

  11. Network regulation of calcium signal in stomatal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu-xia SHEN; Gen-xuan WANG; Zhi-qiang LIU; Hao ZHANG; Mu-qing QIU; Xing-zheng ZHAO; Yi GAN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Each cell is the production of multiple signal transduction programs involving the expression of thousands of genes. This study aims to gain insights into the gene regulation mechanisms of stomatal development and will investigate the relationships among some signaling transduction pathways. Methods: Nail enamel printing was conducted to observe the stomatal indices of wild type and 10 mutants (plant hormone mutants, Pi-starvation induced CaM mutants and Pi-starvation-response mutant) in Arabidopsis, and their stomatal indices were analyzed by ANOVA. We analyzed the stomatal indices of 10 Arabidopsis mutants were analyzed by a model PRGE (potential relative effect of genes) to research relations among these genes. Results: In wild type and 10 mutants, the stomatal index didn't differ with respect to location on the lower epidermis. Compared with wild type, the stomatal indices of 10 mutants all decreased significantly. Moreover, significant changes and interactions might exist between some mutant genes. Conclusion: It was the stomatal intensity in Arabidopsis might be highly sensitive to most mutations in genome. While the effect of many gene mutations on the stomatal index might be negative, we also could assume the stomatal development was regulated by a signal network in which one signal transduction change might influence the stomatal development more or less, and the architecture might be reticulate. Furthermore, we could speculate that calcium was a hub in stomatal development signal regulation network, and other signal transduction pathways regulated stomtal development by influencing or being influenced by calcium signal transduction pathways.

  12. Noise Filtering and Prediction in Biological Signaling Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hathcock, David; Weisenberger, Casey; Ilker, Efe; Hinczewski, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Information transmission in biological signaling circuits has often been described using the metaphor of a noise filter. Cellular systems need accurate, real-time data about their environmental conditions, but the biochemical reaction networks that propagate, amplify, and process signals work with noisy representations of that data. Biology must implement strategies that not only filter the noise, but also predict the current state of the environment based on information delayed due to the finite speed of chemical signaling. The idea of a biochemical noise filter is actually more than just a metaphor: we describe recent work that has made an explicit mathematical connection between signaling fidelity in cellular circuits and the classic theories of optimal noise filtering and prediction that began with Wiener, Kolmogorov, Shannon, and Bode. This theoretical framework provides a versatile tool, allowing us to derive analytical bounds on the maximum mutual information between the environmental signal and the re...

  13. Phosphoproteomics-based systems analysis of signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko eKozuka-Hata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction systems coordinate complex cellular information to regulate biological events such as cell proliferation and differentiation. Although the accumulating evidence on widespread association of signaling molecules has revealed essential contribution of phosphorylation-dependent interaction networks to cellular regulation, their dynamic behavior is mostly yet to be analyzed. Recent technological advances regarding mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics have enabled us to describe the comprehensive status of phosphorylated molecules in a time-resolved manner. Computational analyses based on the phosphoproteome dynamics accelerate generation of novel methodologies for mathematical analysis of cellular signaling. Phosphoproteomics-based numerical modeling can be used to evaluate regulatory network elements from a statistical point of view. Integration with transcriptome dynamics also uncovers regulatory hubs at the transcriptional level. These omics-based computational methodologies, which have firstly been applied to representative signaling systems such as the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway, have now opened up a gate for systems analysis of signaling networks involved in immune response and cancer.

  14. Reverse engineering GTPase programming languages with reconstituted signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Scott M

    2016-07-02

    The Ras superfamily GTPases represent one of the most prolific signaling currencies used in Eukaryotes. With these remarkable molecules, evolution has built GTPase networks that control diverse cellular processes such as growth, morphology, motility and trafficking. (1-4) Our knowledge of the individual players that underlie the function of these networks is deep; decades of biochemical and structural data has provided a mechanistic understanding of the molecules that turn GTPases ON and OFF, as well as how those GTPase states signal by controlling the assembly of downstream effectors. However, we know less about how these different activities work together as a system to specify complex dynamic signaling outcomes. Decoding this molecular "programming language" would help us understand how different species and cell types have used the same GTPase machinery in different ways to accomplish different tasks, and would also provide new insights as to how mutations to these networks can cause disease. We recently developed a bead-based microscopy assay to watch reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems at work under arbitrary configurations of regulators and effectors. (5) Here we highlight key observations and insights from this study and propose extensions to our method to further study this and other GTPase signaling systems.

  15. Novel links in the plant TOR kinase signaling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Sheen, Jen

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient and energy sensing and signaling mechanisms constitute the most ancient and fundamental regulatory networks to control growth and development in all life forms. The target of rapamycin (TOR) protein kinase is modulated by diverse nutrient, energy, hormone and stress inputs and plays a central role in regulating cell proliferation, growth, metabolism and stress responses from yeasts to plants and animals. Recent chemical, genetic, genomic and metabolomic analyses have enabled significant progress toward molecular understanding of the TOR signaling network in multicellular plants. This review discusses the applications of new chemical tools to probe plant TOR functions and highlights recent findings and predictions on TOR-mediate biological processes. Special focus is placed on novel and evolutionarily conserved TOR kinase effectors as positive and negative signaling regulators that control transcription, translation and metabolism to support cell proliferation, growth and maintenance from embryogenesis to senescence in the plant system.

  16. Signal agnostic compressive sensing for Body Area Networks: comparison of signal reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Alexander J; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Compressive sensing is a lossy compression technique that is potentially very suitable for use in power constrained sensor nodes and Body Area Networks as the compression process has a low computational complexity. This paper investigates the reconstruction performance of compressive sensing when applied to EEG, ECG, EOG and EMG signals; establishing the performance of a signal agnostic compressive sensing strategy that could be used in a Body Area Network monitoring all of these. The results demonstrate that the EEG, ECG and EOG can all be reconstructed satisfactorily, although large inter- and intra- subject variations are present. EMG signals are not well reconstructed. Compressive sensing may therefore also find use as a novel method for the identification of EMG artefacts in other electro-physiological signals.

  17. The statistical mechanics of complex signaling networks: nerve growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K S; Hill, C C; Calero, G A; Myers, C R; Lee, K H; Sethna, J P; Cerione, R A

    2004-12-01

    The inherent complexity of cellular signaling networks and their importance to a wide range of cellular functions necessitates the development of modeling methods that can be applied toward making predictions and highlighting the appropriate experiments to test our understanding of how these systems are designed and function. We use methods of statistical mechanics to extract useful predictions for complex cellular signaling networks. A key difficulty with signaling models is that, while significant effort is being made to experimentally measure the rate constants for individual steps in these networks, many of the parameters required to describe their behavior remain unknown or at best represent estimates. To establish the usefulness of our approach, we have applied our methods toward modeling the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced differentiation of neuronal cells. In particular, we study the actions of NGF and mitogenic epidermal growth factor (EGF) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Through a network of intermediate signaling proteins, each of these growth factors stimulates extracellular regulated kinase (Erk) phosphorylation with distinct dynamical profiles. Using our modeling approach, we are able to predict the influence of specific signaling modules in determining the integrated cellular response to the two growth factors. Our methods also raise some interesting insights into the design and possible evolution of cellular systems, highlighting an inherent property of these systems that we call 'sloppiness.'

  18. Signalling network construction for modelling plant defence response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Miljkovic

    Full Text Available Plant defence signalling response against various pathogens, including viruses, is a complex phenomenon. In resistant interaction a plant cell perceives the pathogen signal, transduces it within the cell and performs a reprogramming of the cell metabolism leading to the pathogen replication arrest. This work focuses on signalling pathways crucial for the plant defence response, i.e., the salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene signal transduction pathways, in the Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. The initial signalling network topology was constructed manually by defining the representation formalism, encoding the information from public databases and literature, and composing a pathway diagram. The manually constructed network structure consists of 175 components and 387 reactions. In order to complement the network topology with possibly missing relations, a new approach to automated information extraction from biological literature was developed. This approach, named Bio3graph, allows for automated extraction of biological relations from the literature, resulting in a set of (component1, reaction, component2 triplets and composing a graph structure which can be visualised, compared to the manually constructed topology and examined by the experts. Using a plant defence response vocabulary of components and reaction types, Bio3graph was applied to a set of 9,586 relevant full text articles, resulting in 137 newly detected reactions between the components. Finally, the manually constructed topology and the new reactions were merged to form a network structure consisting of 175 components and 524 reactions. The resulting pathway diagram of plant defence signalling represents a valuable source for further computational modelling and interpretation of omics data. The developed Bio3graph approach, implemented as an executable language processing and graph visualisation workflow, is publically available at http://ropot.ijs.si/bio3graph/and can be

  19. Signal Transduction Pathways of TNAP: Molecular Network Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Négyessy, László; Györffy, Balázs; Hanics, János; Bányai, Mihály; Fonta, Caroline; Bazsó, Fülöp

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of evidence pointing on the involvement of tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) in brain function and diseases like epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease, our understanding about the role of TNAP in the regulation of neurotransmission is severely limited. The aim of our study was to integrate the fragmented knowledge into a comprehensive view regarding neuronal functions of TNAP using objective tools. As a model we used the signal transduction molecular network of a pyramidal neuron after complementing with TNAP related data and performed the analysis using graph theoretic tools. The analyses show that TNAP is in the crossroad of numerous pathways and therefore is one of the key players of the neuronal signal transduction network. Through many of its connections, most notably with molecules of the purinergic system, TNAP serves as a controller by funnelling signal flow towards a subset of molecules. TNAP also appears as the source of signal to be spread via interactions with molecules involved among others in neurodegeneration. Cluster analyses identified TNAP as part of the second messenger signalling cascade. However, TNAP also forms connections with other functional groups involved in neuronal signal transduction. The results indicate the distinct ways of involvement of TNAP in multiple neuronal functions and diseases.

  20. Traffic analysis and signal processing in optical packet switched networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelde, Tina

    2002-01-01

    Gbit/s demultiplexing and 2x10 to 20 Gbit/s multiplexing. Lastly, the IWC’s capabilities as an optical logic gate for enabling more complex signal processing are demonstrated and four applications hereof are discussed. Logic OR and AND are verified in full at 10 Gbit/s using PRBS sequences coupled......This thesis focuses on functionalities that are important for the realisation of future all-optical packet switched networks, and which may be implemented using the interferometric wavelength converter. The European IST research project DAVID, with the aim of demonstrating the feasibility of a Tbit....../s optical packet switched network exploiting the best of optics and electronics, is used as a thread throughout the thesis. An overview of the DAVID network architecture is given, focussing on the MAN and WAN architecture as well as the MPLS-based network hierarchy. Subsequently, the traffic performance...

  1. Brain Network Analysis from High-Resolution EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vico Fallani, Fabrizio; Babiloni, Fabio

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the detection of the functional connectivity in the brain from different neuroelectromagnetic and hemodynamic signals recorded by several neuro-imaging devices such as the functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner, electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) apparatus. Many methods have been proposed and discussed in the literature with the aim of estimating the functional relationships among different cerebral structures. However, the necessity of an objective comprehension of the network composed by the functional links of different brain regions is assuming an essential role in the Neuroscience. Consequently, there is a wide interest in the development and validation of mathematical tools that are appropriate to spot significant features that could describe concisely the structure of the estimated cerebral networks. The extraction of salient characteristics from brain connectivity patterns is an open challenging topic, since often the estimated cerebral networks have a relative large size and complex structure. Recently, it was realized that the functional connectivity networks estimated from actual brain-imaging technologies (MEG, fMRI and EEG) can be analyzed by means of the graph theory. Since a graph is a mathematical representation of a network, which is essentially reduced to nodes and connections between them, the use of a theoretical graph approach seems relevant and useful as firstly demonstrated on a set of anatomical brain networks. In those studies, the authors have employed two characteristic measures, the average shortest path L and the clustering index C, to extract respectively the global and local properties of the network structure. They have found that anatomical brain networks exhibit many local connections (i.e. a high C) and few random long distance connections (i.e. a low L). These values identify a particular model that interpolate between a regular

  2. Detection of cyclic di-AMP using a competitive ELISA with a unique pneumococcal cyclic di-AMP binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Adam J.; Zhang, Yang; Metzger, Dennis W.; Bai, Guangchun

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is a signaling molecule that has been shown to play important roles in bacterial physiology and infections. Currently, c-di-AMP detection and quantification relies mostly on the use of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantification of c-di-AMP was developed, which utilizes a novel pneumococcal c-di-AMP binding protein (CabP) and a newly commercialized c-di-AMP derivative. With this new method, c-di-AMP concentrations in biological samples can be quickly and accurately quantified. Furthermore, this assay is much more efficient than current methods as it requires less overall cost and training while processing many samples at once. Therefore, this assay can be extensively used in research into c-di-AMP signaling. PMID:25239824

  3. Cumulative signal transmission in nonlinear reaction-diffusion networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego A Oyarzún

    Full Text Available Quantifying signal transmission in biochemical systems is key to uncover the mechanisms that cells use to control their responses to environmental stimuli. In this work we use the time-integral of chemical species as a measure of a network's ability to cumulatively transmit signals encoded in spatiotemporal concentrations. We identify a class of nonlinear reaction-diffusion networks in which the time-integrals of some species can be computed analytically. The derived time-integrals do not require knowledge of the solution of the reaction-diffusion equation, and we provide a simple graphical test to check if a given network belongs to the proposed class. The formulae for the time-integrals reveal how the kinetic parameters shape signal transmission in a network under spatiotemporal stimuli. We use these to show that a canonical complex-formation mechanism behaves as a spatial low-pass filter, the bandwidth of which is inversely proportional to the diffusion length of the ligand.

  4. Signal Processing in Periodically Forced Gradient Frequency Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Chul; Large, Edward W

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory instability at the Hopf bifurcation is a dynamical phenomenon that has been suggested to characterize active non-linear processes observed in the auditory system. Networks of oscillators poised near Hopf bifurcation points and tuned to tonotopically distributed frequencies have been used as models of auditory processing at various levels, but systematic investigation of the dynamical properties of such oscillatory networks is still lacking. Here we provide a dynamical systems analysis of a canonical model for gradient frequency neural networks driven by a periodic signal. We use linear stability analysis to identify various driven behaviors of canonical oscillators for all possible ranges of model and forcing parameters. The analysis shows that canonical oscillators exhibit qualitatively different sets of driven states and transitions for different regimes of model parameters. We classify the parameter regimes into four main categories based on their distinct signal processing capabilities. This analysis will lead to deeper understanding of the diverse behaviors of neural systems under periodic forcing and can inform the design of oscillatory network models of auditory signal processing.

  5. Nonlinear Silicon Photonic Signal Processing Devices for Future Optical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Lacava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a review on silicon-based nonlinear devices for all optical nonlinear processing of complex telecommunication signals. We discuss some recent developments achieved by our research group, through extensive collaborations with academic partners across Europe, on optical signal processing using silicon-germanium and amorphous silicon based waveguides as well as novel materials such as silicon rich silicon nitride and tantalum pentoxide. We review the performance of four wave mixing wavelength conversion applied on complex signals such as Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK, Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK, 16-Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM and 64-QAM that dramatically enhance the telecom signal spectral efficiency, paving the way to next generation terabit all-optical networks.

  6. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling: How complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Kolodkin (Alexey); F.J. Bruggeman (Frank); N. Plant (Nick); M.J. Moné (Martijn); B.M. Bakker (Barbara); M.J. Campbell (Moray); J.P.T.M. van Leeuwen (Hans); C. Carlberg (Carsten); J.L. Snoep (Jacky); H.V. Westerhoff (Hans)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of design aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic

  7. Design principles of nuclear receptor signaling : how complex networking improves signal transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolodkin, Alexey N.; Bruggeman, Frank J.; Plant, Nick; Mone, Martijn J.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Campbell, Moray J.; van Leeuwen, Johannes P. T. M.; Carlberg, Carsten; Snoep, Jacky L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2010-01-01

    The topology of nuclear receptor (NR) signaling is captured in a systems biological graphical notation. This enables us to identify a number of 'design' aspects of the topology of these networks that might appear unnecessarily complex or even functionally paradoxical. In realistic kinetic models of

  8. Image and signal processing for networked eHealth applications

    CERN Document Server

    Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2006-01-01

    E-health is closely related with networks and telecommunications when dealing with applications of collecting or transferring medical data from distant locations for performing remote medical collaborations and diagnosis. In this book we provide an overview of the fields of image and signal processing for networked and distributed e-health applications and their supporting technologies. The book is structured in 10 chapters, starting the discussion from the lower end, that of acquisition and processing of biosignals and medical images and ending in complex virtual reality systems and technique

  9. Oral curcumin has anti-arthritic efficacy through somatostatin generation via cAMP/PKA and Ca(2+)/CaMKII signaling pathways in the small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dou, Yannong; Zhao, Di; Wang, Ting; Bian, Difei; Tong, Bei; Xia, Ying; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) has been proven to be clinically effective in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) therapy, but its low oral bioavailability eclipses existent evidence that attempts to explain the underlying mechanism. Small intestine, the only organ exposed to a relatively high concentration of CUR, is the main site that generates gut hormones which are involved in the pathogenesis of RA. This study aims at addressing the hypothesis that one or more gut hormones serve as an intermediary agent for the anti-arthritic action of CUR. The protein and mRNA levels of gut hormones in CUR-treated rats were analyzed by ELISA and RT-PCR. Somatostatin (SOM) depletor and receptor antagonist were used to verify the key role of SOM in CUR-mediated anti-arthritic effect. The mechanisms underlying CUR-induced upregulation of SOM levels were explored by cellular experiments and immunohistochemical staining. The data showed that oral administration of CUR (100 mg/kg) for consecutive two weeks in adjuvant-induced arthritis rats still exhibited an extremely low plasma exposure despite of a dramatic amelioration of arthritis symptoms. When injected intraperitoneally, CUR lost anti-arthritic effect in rats, suggesting that it functions in an intestine-dependent manner. CUR elevated SOM levels in intestines and sera, and SOM depletor and non-selective SOM receptor antagonist could abolish the inhibitory effect of CUR on arthritis. Immunohistochemical assay demonstrated that CUR markedly increased the number of SOM-positive cells in both duodenum and jejunum. In vitro experiments demonstrated that CUR could augment SOM secretion from intestinal endocrine cells, and this effect could be hampered by either MEK1/2 or Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII) inhibitor. In summary, oral administration of CUR exhibits anti-arthritic effect through augmenting SOM secretion from the endocrine cells in small intestines via cAMP/PKA and Ca(2+)/CaMKII signaling pathways.

  10. Cordycepin inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α production via activating amp-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Li; Xu, Ying; Shen, Jie

    2014-07-08

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is elevated during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease (KD), which damages vascular endothelial cells to cause systemic vasculitis. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of cordycepin on TNFα expression in both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages and ex vivo cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of KD patients. We found that cordycepin significantly suppressed LPS-induced TNFα expression and production in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs)). Meanwhile, cordycepin alleviated TNFα production in KD patients' PBMCs. PBMCs from healthy controls had a much lower level of basal TNF-α content than that of KD patients. LPS-induced TNF-α production in healthy controls' PBMCs was also inhibited by cordycepin. For the mechanism study, we discovered that cordycepin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling in both KD patients' PBMCs and LPS-stimulated macrophages, which mediated cordycepin-induced inhibition against TNFα production. AMPK inhibition by its inhibitor (compound C) or by siRNA depletion alleviated cordycepin's effect on TNFα production. Further, we found that cordycepin inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation in LPS-stimulate RAW 264.7 cells or healthy controls' PBMCs. PBMCs of KD patients showed higher basal level of ROS and NF-κB activation, which was also inhibited by cordycepin co-treatment. In conclusion, our data showed that cordycepin inhibited TNFα production, which was associated with AMPK activation as well as ROS and NF-κB inhibition. The results of this study should have significant translational relevance in managing this devastating disease.

  11. Cordycepin Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-Induced Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF-α Production via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Li Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α is elevated during the acute phase of Kawasaki disease (KD, which damages vascular endothelial cells to cause systemic vasculitis. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of cordycepin on TNFα expression in both lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated macrophages and ex vivo cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of KD patients. We found that cordycepin significantly suppressed LPS-induced TNFα expression and production in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs. Meanwhile, cordycepin alleviated TNFα production in KD patients’ PBMCs. PBMCs from healthy controls had a much lower level of basal TNF-α content than that of KD patients. LPS-induced TNF-α production in healthy controls’ PBMCs was also inhibited by cordycepin. For the mechanism study, we discovered that cordycepin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling in both KD patients’ PBMCs and LPS-stimulated macrophages, which mediated cordycepin-induced inhibition against TNFα production. AMPK inhibition by its inhibitor (compound C or by siRNA depletion alleviated cordycepin’s effect on TNFα production. Further, we found that cordycepin inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS production and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulate RAW 264.7 cells or healthy controls’ PBMCs. PBMCs of KD patients showed higher basal level of ROS and NF-κB activation, which was also inhibited by cordycepin co-treatment. In conclusion, our data showed that cordycepin inhibited TNFα production, which was associated with AMPK activation as well as ROS and NF-κB inhibition. The results of this study should have significant translational relevance in managing this devastating disease.

  12. Distributed Signal Processing for Wireless EEG Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Inspired by ongoing evolutions in the field of wireless body area networks (WBANs), this tutorial paper presents a conceptual and exploratory study of wireless electroencephalography (EEG) sensor networks (WESNs), with an emphasis on distributed signal processing aspects. A WESN is conceived as a modular neuromonitoring platform for high-density EEG recordings, in which each node is equipped with an electrode array, a signal processing unit, and facilities for wireless communication. We first address the advantages of such a modular approach, and we explain how distributed signal processing algorithms make WESNs more power-efficient, in particular by avoiding data centralization. We provide an overview of distributed signal processing algorithms that are potentially applicable in WESNs, and for illustration purposes, we also provide a more detailed case study of a distributed eye blink artifact removal algorithm. Finally, we study the power efficiency of these distributed algorithms in comparison to their centralized counterparts in which all the raw sensor signals are centralized in a near-end or far-end fusion center.

  13. Application of the minimum fuel neural network to music signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harbo, Anders La-Cour

    2004-01-01

    Finding an optimal representation of a signal in an over-complete dictionary is often quite difficult. Since general results in this field are not very application friendly it truly helps to specify the framework as much as possible. We investigate the method Minimum Fuel Neural Network (MFNN......) for finding sparse representations of music signals. This method is a set of two ordinary differential equations. We argue that the most important parameter for optimal use of this method is the discretization step size, and we demonstrate that this can be a priori determined. This significantly speeds up...

  14. Discovery of a cAMP deaminase that quenches cyclic AMP-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Alissa M; Feng, Youjun; Raushel, Frank M; Cronan, John E

    2013-12-20

    An enzyme of unknown function within the amidohydrolase superfamily was discovered to catalyze the hydrolysis of the universal second messenger, cyclic-3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The enzyme, which we have named CadD, is encoded by the human pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans. Although CadD is annotated as an adenosine deaminase, the protein specifically deaminates cAMP to cyclic-3',5'-inosine monophosphate (cIMP) with a kcat/Km of 2.7 ± 0.4 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and has no activity on adenosine, adenine, or 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP). This is the first identification of a deaminase specific for cAMP. Expression of CadD in Escherichia coli mimics the loss of adenylate cyclase in that it blocks growth on carbon sources that require the cAMP-CRP transcriptional activator complex for expression of the cognate genes. The cIMP reaction product cannot replace cAMP as the ligand for CRP binding to DNA in vitro and cIMP is a very poor competitor of cAMP activation of CRP for DNA binding. Transcriptional analyses indicate that CadD expression represses expression of several cAMP-CRP dependent genes. CadD adds a new activity to the cAMP metabolic network and may be a useful tool in intracellular study of cAMP-dependent processes.

  15. Internal signal stochastic resonance of a synthetic gene network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Zhiwei; HOU; Zhonghuai; XIN; Houwen

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics behavior of a synthetic gene network controlled by random noise is investigated using a model proposed recently. The phenomena of noise induced oscillation (NIO) of the protein concentrations and internal signal stochastic resonance (SR) are studied by computer simulation. We also find that there exists an optimal noise intensity that can most favor the occurrence of effective oscillation (EO). Finally we discuss the potential constructive roles of SR on gene expression systems.

  16. G protein-cAMP signaling pathway mediated by PGA3 plays different roles in regulating the expressions of amylases and cellulases in Penicillium decumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yibo; Liu, Guodong; Li, Zhonghai; Qin, Yuqi; Qu, Yinbo; Song, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins) have been extensively investigated for their regulatory functions in morphogenesis and development in filamentous fungi. In addition, G proteins were also shown to be involved in the regulation of cellulase expression in some fungi. Here, we report the different regulatory effects of PGA3, a group III G protein α subunit, on the expressions of amylases and cellulases in Penicillium decumbens. Deletion of pga3 resulted in impaired amylase production and significantly decreased transcription of the major amylase gene amy15A. Supplementation of exogenous cAMP or its analog dibutyryl-cAMP restored amylase production in Δpga3 strain, suggesting an essential role of PGA3 in amylase synthesis via controlling cAMP level. On the other hand, the transcription of major cellulase gene cel7A-2 increased, nevertheless cellulase activity in the medium was not affected, in Δpga3. The above regulatory effects of PGA3 are carbon source-independent, and are achieved, at least, by cAMP-mediated regulation of the expression level of transcription factor AmyR. The functions of PGA3 revealed by gene deletion were partially supported by the analysis of the mutant carrying dominantly-activated PGA3. The results provided new insights into the understanding of the physiological functions of G protein-cAMP pathway in filamentous fungi.

  17. A signaling network in phenylephrine-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jayoung; Yanagihara, Yutaka; Kikugawa, Tadahiko; Ji, Mihee; Tanji, Nozomu; Masayoshi, Yokoyama; Freeman, Michael R

    2009-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown etiology characterized by prostatic enlargement and coinciding with distinctive alterations in tissue histomorphology. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of BPH, we conducted a DNA microarray study using a previously described animal model in which chronic alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation by repeated administration of phenylephrine evokes histomorphological changes in the rat prostate that resemble human BPH. Bioinformatic tools were applied to microarray data obtained from prostate tissue to construct a network model of potentially relevant signal transduction pathways. Significant involvement of inflammatory pathways was demonstrable, including evidence for activation of a TGF-beta signaling cascade. The heterodimeric protein clusterin (apolipoprotein J) was also identified as a prominent node in the network. Responsiveness of TGF-beta signaling and clusterin gene and protein expression were confirmed independently of the microarray data, verifying some components of the model. This is the first attempt to develop a comprehensive molecular network for histological BPH induced by adrenergic activation. The study also implicated clusterin as a novel biochemical target for therapy.

  18. Learning and memory deficits consequent to reduction of the fragile X mental retardation protein result from metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated inhibition of cAMP signaling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Alexandros K; Semelidou, Ourania; Kotini, Andriana G; Anezaki, Maria; Skoulakis, Efthimios M C

    2012-09-19

    Loss of the RNA-binding fragile X protein [fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP)] results in a spectrum of cognitive deficits, the fragile X syndrome (FXS), while aging individuals with decreased protein levels present with a subset of these symptoms and tremor. The broad range of behavioral deficits likely reflects the ubiquitous distribution and multiple functions of the protein. FMRP loss is expected to affect multiple neuronal proteins and intracellular signaling pathways, whose identity and interactions are essential in understanding and ameliorating FXS symptoms. We used heterozygous mutants and targeted RNA interference-mediated abrogation in Drosophila to uncover molecular pathways affected by FMRP reduction. We present evidence that FMRP loss results in excess metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activity, attributable at least in part to elevation of the protein in affected neurons. Using high-resolution behavioral, genetic, and biochemical analyses, we present evidence that excess mGluR upon FMRP attenuation is linked to the cAMP decrement reported in patients and models, and underlies olfactory associative learning and memory deficits. Furthermore, our data indicate positive transcriptional regulation of the fly fmr1 gene by cAMP, via protein kinase A, likely through the transcription factor CREB. Because the human Fmr1 gene also contains CREB binding sites, the interaction of mGluR excess and cAMP signaling defects we present suggests novel combinatorial pharmaceutical approaches to symptom amelioration upon FMRP attenuation.

  19. Modeling of cortical signals using echo state networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hanying; Wang, Yongji; Huang, Jiangshuai

    2009-10-01

    Diverse modeling frameworks have been utilized with the ultimate goal of translating brain cortical signals into prediction of visible behavior. The inputs to these models are usually multidimensional neural recordings collected from relevant regions of a monkey's brain while the outputs are the associated behavior which is typically the 2-D or 3-D hand position of a primate. Here our task is to set up a proper model in order to figure out the move trajectories by input the neural signals which are simultaneously collected in the experiment. In this paper, we propose to use Echo State Networks (ESN) to map the neural firing activities into hand positions. ESN is a newly developed recurrent neural network(RNN) model. Besides its dynamic property and short term memory just as other recurrent neural networks have, it has a special echo state property which endows it with the ability to model nonlinear dynamic systems powerfully. What distinguished it from transitional recurrent neural networks most significantly is its special learning method. In this paper we train this net with a refined version of its typical training method and get a better model.

  20. Living ordered neural networks as model systems for signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villard, C.; Amblard, P. O.; Becq, G.; Gory-Fauré, S.; Brocard, J.; Roth, S.

    2007-06-01

    Neural circuit architecture is a fundamental characteristic of the brain, and how architecture is bound to biological functions is still an open question. Some neuronal geometries seen in the retina or the cochlea are intriguing: information is processed in parallel by several entities like in "pooling" networks which have recently drawn the attention of signal processing scientists. These systems indeed exhibit the noise-enhanced processing effect, which is also actively discussed in the neuroscience community at the neuron scale. The aim of our project is to use in-vitro ordered neuron networks as living paradigms to test ideas coming from the computational science. The different technological bolts that have to be solved are enumerated and the first results are presented. A neuron is a polarised cell, with an excitatory axon and a receiving dendritic tree. We present how soma confinement and axon differentiation can be induced by surface functionalization techniques. The recording of large neuron networks, ordered or not, is also detailed and biological signals shown. The main difficulty to access neural noise in the case of weakly connected networks grown on micro electrode arrays is explained. This open the door to a new detection technology suitable for sub-cellular analysis and stimulation, whose development will constitute the next step of this project.

  1. Exogenous and endogenous ghrelin counteracts GLP-1 action to stimulate cAMP signaling and insulin secretion in islet β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damdindorj, Boldbaatar; Dezaki, Katsuya; Kurashina, Tomoyuki; Sone, Hideyuki; Rita, Rauza; Kakei, Masafumi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2012-07-30

    We studied interactive effects of insulinotropic GLP-1 and insulinostatic ghrelin on rat pancreatic islets. GLP-1 potentiated glucose-induced insulin release and cAMP production in isolated islets and [Ca(2+)](i) increases in single β-cells, and these potentiations were attenuated by ghrelin. Ghrelin suppressed [Ca(2+)](i) responses to an adenylate cyclase activator forskolin. Moreover, GLP-1-induced insulin release and cAMP production were markedly enhanced by [D-lys(3)]-GHRP-6, a ghrelin receptor antagonist, in isolated islets. These results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous islet-derived ghrelin counteracts glucose-dependent GLP-1 action to increase cAMP production, [Ca(2+)](i) and insulin release in islet β-cells, positioning ghrelin as a modulator of insulinotropic GLP-1.

  2. Phosphoinositide pathway and the signal transduction network in neural development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenza Rita Lo Vasco

    2012-01-01

    The development of the nervous system is under the strict control of a number of signal transduction pathways,often interconnected.Among them,the phosphoinositide (PI) pathway and the related phospholipase C (PI-PLC) family of enzymes have been attracting much attention.Besides their well-known role in the regulation of intracellular calcium levels,PI-PLC enzymes interact with a number of molecules belonging to further signal transduction pathways,contributing to a specific and complex network in the developing nervous system.In this review,the connections of PI signalling with further transduction pathways acting during neural development are discussed,with special regard to the role of the PI-PLC family of enzymes.

  3. Sweet Taste Receptor Signaling Network: Possible Implication for Cognitive Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menizibeya O. Welcome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet taste receptors are transmembrane protein network specialized in the transmission of information from special “sweet” molecules into the intracellular domain. These receptors can sense the taste of a range of molecules and transmit the information downstream to several acceptors, modulate cell specific functions and metabolism, and mediate cell-to-cell coupling through paracrine mechanism. Recent reports indicate that sweet taste receptors are widely distributed in the body and serves specific function relative to their localization. Due to their pleiotropic signaling properties and multisubstrate ligand affinity, sweet taste receptors are able to cooperatively bind multiple substances and mediate signaling by other receptors. Based on increasing evidence about the role of these receptors in the initiation and control of absorption and metabolism, and the pivotal role of metabolic (glucose regulation in the central nervous system functioning, we propose a possible implication of sweet taste receptor signaling in modulating cognitive functioning.

  4. Rapid Exact Signal Scanning With Deep Convolutional Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Markus; Gritschneder, Franz

    2017-03-01

    A rigorous formulation of the dynamics of a signal processing scheme aimed at dense signal scanning without any loss in accuracy is introduced and analyzed. Related methods proposed in the recent past lack a satisfactory analysis of whether they actually fulfill any exactness constraints. This is improved through an exact characterization of the requirements for a sound sliding window approach. The tools developed in this paper are especially beneficial if Convolutional Neural Networks are employed, but can also be used as a more general framework to validate related approaches to signal scanning. The proposed theory helps to eliminate redundant computations and renders special case treatment unnecessary, resulting in a dramatic boost in efficiency particularly on massively parallel processors. This is demonstrated both theoretically in a computational complexity analysis and empirically on modern parallel processors.

  5. Computational models of signalling networks for non-linear control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente, Luis A; Lones, Michael A; Turner, Alexander P; Stepney, Susan; Caves, Leo S; Tyrrell, Andy M

    2013-05-01

    Artificial signalling networks (ASNs) are a computational approach inspired by the signalling processes inside cells that decode outside environmental information. Using evolutionary algorithms to induce complex behaviours, we show how chaotic dynamics in a conservative dynamical system can be controlled. Such dynamics are of particular interest as they mimic the inherent complexity of non-linear physical systems in the real world. Considering the main biological interpretations of cellular signalling, in which complex behaviours and robust cellular responses emerge from the interaction of multiple pathways, we introduce two ASN representations: a stand-alone ASN and a coupled ASN. In particular we note how sophisticated cellular communication mechanisms can lead to effective controllers, where complicated problems can be divided into smaller and independent tasks.

  6. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acencio, Marcio Luis; Bovolenta, Luiz Augusto; Camilo, Esther; Lemke, Ney

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI). This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved in cancer research

  7. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Luis Acencio

    Full Text Available Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI. This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved

  8. Analysis on Design of Kohonen-network System Based on Classification of Complex Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The key methods of detection and classification of the electroencephalogram(EEG) used in recent years are introduced . Taking EEG for example, the design plan of Kohonen neural network system based on detection and classification of complex signals is proposed, and both the network design and signal processing are analyzed, including pre-processing of signals, extraction of signal features, classification of signal and network topology, etc.

  9. Fully Connected Neural Networks Ensemble with Signal Strength Clustering for Indoor Localization in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The paper introduces a method which improves localization accuracy of the signal strength fingerprinting approach. According to the proposed method, entire localization area is divided into regions by clustering the fingerprint database. For each region a prototype of the received signal strength is determined and a dedicated artificial neural network (ANN) is trained by using only those fingerprints that belong to this region (cluster). Final estimation of the location is obtained by fusion ...

  10. NT2 derived neuronal and astrocytic network signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Hill

    Full Text Available A major focus of stem cell research is the generation of neurons that may then be implanted to treat neurodegenerative diseases. However, a picture is emerging where astrocytes are partners to neurons in sustaining and modulating brain function. We therefore investigated the functional properties of NT2 derived astrocytes and neurons using electrophysiological and calcium imaging approaches. NT2 neurons (NT2Ns expressed sodium dependent action potentials, as well as responses to depolarisation and the neurotransmitter glutamate. NT2Ns exhibited spontaneous and coordinated calcium elevations in clusters and in extended processes, indicating local and long distance signalling. Tetrodotoxin sensitive network activity could also be evoked by electrical stimulation. Similarly, NT2 astrocytes (NT2As exhibited morphology and functional properties consistent with this glial cell type. NT2As responded to neuronal activity and to exogenously applied neurotransmitters with calcium elevations, and in contrast to neurons, also exhibited spontaneous rhythmic calcium oscillations. NT2As also generated propagating calcium waves that were gap junction and purinergic signalling dependent. Our results show that NT2 derived astrocytes exhibit appropriate functionality and that NT2N networks interact with NT2A networks in co-culture. These findings underline the utility of such cultures to investigate human brain cell type signalling under controlled conditions. Furthermore, since stem cell derived neuron function and survival is of great importance therapeutically, our findings suggest that the presence of complementary astrocytes may be valuable in supporting stem cell derived neuronal networks. Indeed, this also supports the intriguing possibility of selective therapeutic replacement of astrocytes in diseases where these cells are either lost or lose functionality.

  11. DMPD: The interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18163952 The interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. Li H... The interferon signaling network and transcription factor C/EBP-beta. PubmedID 18163952 Title The interferon signaling network

  12. Identification of melanoma biomarkers based on network modules by integrating the human signaling network with microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyun Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Melanoma is a leading cause of cancer death. Thus, accurate prognostic biomarkers that will assist rational treatment planning need to be identified. Methods: Microarray analysis of melanoma and normal tissue samples was performed to identify differentially expressed modules (DEMs from the signaling network and ultimately detect molecular markers to support histological examination. Network motifs were extracted from the human signaling network. Then, significant expression-correlation differential modules were identified by comparing the network module expression-correlation differential scores under normal and disease conditions using the gene expression datasets. Finally, we obtained DEMs by the Wilcoxon rank test and considered the average gene expression level in these modules as the classification features for diagnosing melanoma. Results: In total, 99 functional DEMs were identified from the signaling network and gene expression profiles. The area under the curve scores for cancer module genes, melanoma module genes, and whole network modules are 92.4%, 90.44%, and 88.45%, respectively. The classification efficiency rates for nonmodule features are 71.04% and 79.38%, which correspond to the features of cancer genes and melanoma cancer genes, respectively. Finally, we acquired six significant molecular biomarkers, namely, module 10 (CALM3, Ca 2+ , PKC, PDGFRA, phospholipase-g, PIB5PA, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, module 14 (SRC, Src homology 2 domain-containing [SHC], SAM68, GIT1, transcription factor-4, CBLB, GRB2, VAV2, LCK, YES, PTCH2, downstream of tyrosine kinase [DOK], and KIT, module 16 (ELK3, p85beta, SHC, ZFYVE9, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, CITED1, SH3KBP1, HCK, DOK, and KIT, module 45 (RB, CCND3, CCNA2, CDK4, and CDK6, module 75 (PCNA, CDK4, and CCND1, and module 114 (PSD93, NMDAR, and FYN. Conclusion: We explored the gene expression profile and signaling network in a global view and identified DEMs that can be used as

  13. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    as a direct result of elevated c-di-GMP content. Overproduction of c-di-GMP causes a decrease in the transcription of virulence factor genes that are regulated by the global virulence regulator Vfr. The low level of Vfr-dependent transcription is caused by a low level of its coactivator, cyclic AMP (c...

  14. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Cho; Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Park, Jae-Ho

    2015-12-10

    Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC), has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST) has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca(2+) and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca(2+) and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca(2+) and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  15. Limonin, a Component of Dictamni Radicis Cortex, Inhibits Eugenol-Induced Calcium and cAMP Levels and PKA/CREB Signaling Pathway in Non-Neuronal 3T3-L1 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo Cho Yoon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Limonin, one of the major components in dictamni radicis cortex (DRC, has been shown to play various biological roles in cancer, inflammation, and obesity in many different cell types and tissues. Recently, the odorant-induced signal transduction pathway (OST has gained attention not only because of its function in the perception of smell but also because of its numerous physiological functions in non-neuronal cells. However, little is known about the effects of limonin and DRC on the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells. We investigated odorant-stimulated increases in Ca2+ and cAMP, major second messengers in the OST pathway, in non-neuronal 3T3-L1 cells pretreated with limonin and ethanol extracts of DRC. Limonin and the extracts significantly decreased eugenol-induced Ca2+ and cAMP levels and upregulated phosphorylation of CREB and PKA. Our results demonstrated that limonin and DRC extract inhibit the OST pathway in non-neuronal cells by modulating Ca2+ and cAMP levels and phosphorylation of CREB.

  16. RECEIVED SIGNAL STRENGTH INDICATION MODELING IN INDOOR WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Taira Procopio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify mathematical models that represent the relation between Received Signal Strength Indication (RSSI and objects in an indoor Wireless Sensor Network (WSN. Using the Least Squares Method, four linear models have been identified: The first one relates uplink RSSI and objects; the second one relates downlink RSSI and objects; the third one relates uplink RSSI and obstacles and the fourth one relates downlink RSSI and obstacles. The obtained results, characterized by small residual values, attest the validation of all four models.

  17. Fault Tolerant Neural Network for ECG Signal Classification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MERAH, M.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to apply a new robust hardware Artificial Neural Network (ANN for ECG classification systems. This ANN includes a penalization criterion which makes the performances in terms of robustness. Specifically, in this method, the ANN weights are normalized using the auto-prune method. Simulations performed on the MIT ? BIH ECG signals, have shown that significant robustness improvements are obtained regarding potential hardware artificial neuron failures. Moreover, we show that the proposed design achieves better generalization performances, compared to the standard back-propagation algorithm.

  18. TNF-alpha/IFN-gamma-induced iNOS expression increased by prostaglandin E2 in rat primary astrocytes via EP2-evoked cAMP/PKA and intracellular calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Han-Yun; Mak, Oi-Tong; Yang, Chung-Shi; Liu, Yu-Peng; Fang, Kuan-Ming; Tzeng, Shun-Fen

    2007-01-15

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glia in the central nervous system (CNS), produce a large amount of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in response to proinflammatory mediators after CNS injury. However, it is unclear whether PGE(2) has a regulatory role in astrocytic activity under the inflamed condition. In the present work, we showed that PGE(2) increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) production by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma (T/I) in astrocytes. Pharmacological and RNA interference approaches further indicated the involvement of the receptor EP2 in PGE(2)-induced iNOS upregulation in T/I-treated astrocytes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and gel mobility shift assays also demonstrated that PGE(2) increased iNOS transcription through EP2-induced cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. Consistently, the effect of EP2 was significantly attenuated by the PKA inhibitor KT-5720 and partially suppressed by the inhibitor (SB203580) of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), which serves as one of the downstream components of the PKA-dependent pathway. Interestingly, EP2-mediated PKA signaling appeared to increase intracellular Ca(2+) release through inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor activation, which might in turn stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) activation to promote iNOS production in T/I-primed astrocytes. By analyzing the expression of astrocytic glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), we found that PGE(2) alone only triggered the EP2-induced cAMP/PKA/p38MAPK signaling pathway in astrocytes. Collectively, PGE(2) may enhance T/I-induced astrocytic activation by augmenting iNOS/NO production through EP2-mediated cross-talk between cAMP/PKA and IP3/Ca(2+) signaling pathways.

  19. Supra-normal stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors in the prelimbic cortex blocks behavioral expression of both aversive and rewarding associative memories through a cyclic-AMP-dependent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Nicole M; Bechard, Melanie; Ahmad, Tasha; Laviolette, Steven R

    2013-04-01

    Dopamine (DA) receptor transmission through either D(1) or D(2)-like subtypes is involved critically in the processing of emotional information within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However the functional role of specific DA D(1)-like receptor transmission in the expression of emotionally salient associative memories (either aversive or rewarding) is not currently understood. Here we demonstrate that specific activation of DA D(1) receptors in the prelimbic (PLC) division of the mPFC causes a transient block in the behavioral expression of both aversive and rewarding associative memories. We report that intra-PLC microinfusions of a selective D(1) receptor agonist block the spontaneous expression of an associative olfactory fear memory, without altering the stability of the original memory trace. Furthermore, using an unbiased place conditioning procedure (CPP), intra-PLC D(1) receptor activation blocks the spontaneous expression of an associative morphine (5 mg/kg; i.p.) reward memory, while leaving morphine-primed memory expression intact. Interestingly, both intra-PLC D(1)-receptor mediated block of either fear-related or reward-related associative memories were dependent upon downstream cyclic-AMP (cAMP) signaling as both effects were rescued by co-administration of a cAMP signaling inhibitor. The blockade of both rewarding and aversive associative memories is mediated through a D(1)-specific signaling pathway, as neither forms of spontaneous memory expression were blocked by intra-PLC microinfusions of a D(2)-like receptor agonist. Our results demonstrate that the spontaneous expression of either rewarding or aversive emotionally salient memories shares a common, D(1)-receptor mediated substrate within the mPFC.

  20. Security Enhancement of Wireless Sensor Networks Using Signal Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaegeun Moon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Various wireless technologies, such as RF, Bluetooth, and Zigbee, have been applied to sensor communications. However, the applications of Bluetooth-based wireless sensor networks (WSN have a security issue. In one pairing process during Bluetooth communication, which is known as simple secure pairing (SSP, the devices are required to specify I/O capability or user interference to prevent man-in-the-middle (MITM attacks. This study proposes an enhanced SSP in which a nonce to be transferred is converted to a corresponding signal interval. The quantization level, which is used to interpret physical signal intervals, is renewed at every connection by the transferred nonce and applied to the next nonce exchange so that the same signal intervals can represent different numbers. Even if attackers eavesdrop on the signals, they cannot understand what is being transferred because they cannot determine the quantization level. Furthermore, the proposed model does not require exchanging passkeys as data, and the devices are secure in the case of using a fixed PIN. Subsequently, the new quantization level is calculated automatically whenever the same devices attempt to connect with each other. Therefore, the pairing process can be protected from MITM attacks and be convenient for users.

  1. Security Enhancement of Wireless Sensor Networks Using Signal Intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jaegeun; Jung, Im Y; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2017-04-02

    Various wireless technologies, such as RF, Bluetooth, and Zigbee, have been applied to sensor communications. However, the applications of Bluetooth-based wireless sensor networks (WSN) have a security issue. In one pairing process during Bluetooth communication, which is known as simple secure pairing (SSP), the devices are required to specify I/O capability or user interference to prevent man-in-the-middle (MITM) attacks. This study proposes an enhanced SSP in which a nonce to be transferred is converted to a corresponding signal interval. The quantization level, which is used to interpret physical signal intervals, is renewed at every connection by the transferred nonce and applied to the next nonce exchange so that the same signal intervals can represent different numbers. Even if attackers eavesdrop on the signals, they cannot understand what is being transferred because they cannot determine the quantization level. Furthermore, the proposed model does not require exchanging passkeys as data, and the devices are secure in the case of using a fixed PIN. Subsequently, the new quantization level is calculated automatically whenever the same devices attempt to connect with each other. Therefore, the pairing process can be protected from MITM attacks and be convenient for users.

  2. Cyclic AMP efflux inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Dominique R.; Smagley, Yelena; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark B.; Evangelisti, Annette; Matlawska-Wasowska, Ksenia; Winter, Stuart S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Chigaev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic evasion is a hallmark of cancer. We propose that some cancers may evade cell death by regulating 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is associated with pro-apoptotic signaling. We hypothesize that leukemic cells possess mechanisms that efflux cAMP from the cytoplasm, thus protecting them from apoptosis. Accordingly, cAMP efflux inhibition should result in: cAMP accumulation, activation of cAMP-dependent downstream signaling, viability loss, and apoptosis. We developed a novel assay to assess cAMP efflux and performed screens to identify inhibitors. In an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model, several identified compounds reduced cAMP efflux, appropriately modulated pathways that are responsive to cAMP elevation (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation, and deactivation of Very Late Antigen-4 integrin), and induced mitochondrial depolarization and caspase activation. Blocking adenylyl cyclase activity was sufficient to reduce effects of the most potent compounds. These compounds also decreased cAMP efflux and viability of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines and primary patient samples, but not of normal primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our data suggest that cAMP efflux is a functional feature that could be therapeutically targeted in leukemia. Furthermore, because some of the identified drugs are currently used for treating other illnesses, this work creates an opportunity for repurposing. PMID:27129155

  3. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    Insulin and cAMP signalling are related to two opposite metabolic responses. Insulin secretion is elicited in response to food availability and trigger catabolic processes like lipogenesis and glycogen synthesis with a purpose of energy storage. On the other hand cAMP signalling is associated wit...

  4. Sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic beta-cells activates the calcium and cyclic AMP signaling systems and stimulates insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](c and cAMP ([cAMP](c were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca(2+](c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca(2+](c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca(2+](c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a G(q inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP](c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in beta-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca(2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  5. cAMP and EPAC are key players in the regulation of the signal transduction pathway involved in the α-hemolysin autophagic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Mestre

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla is the S. aureus-secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus-containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell.

  6. Control of cancer-related signal transduction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Reka

    2013-03-01

    Intra-cellular signaling networks are crucial to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis and for cell behavior (growth, survival, apoptosis, movement). Mutations or alterations in the expression of elements of cellular signaling networks can lead to incorrect behavioral decisions that could result in tumor development and/or the promotion of cell migration and metastasis. Thus, mitigation of the cascading effects of such dysregulations is an important control objective. My group at Penn State is collaborating with wet-bench biologists to develop and validate predictive models of various biological systems. Over the years we found that discrete dynamic modeling is very useful in molding qualitative interaction information into a predictive model. We recently demonstrated the effectiveness of network-based targeted manipulations on mitigating the disease T cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia. The root of this disease is the abnormal survival of T cells which, after successfully fighting an infection, should undergo programmed cell death. We synthesized the relevant network of within-T-cell interactions from the literature, integrated it with qualitative knowledge of the dysregulated (abnormal) states of several network components, and formulated a Boolean dynamic model. The model indicated that the system possesses a steady state corresponding to the normal cell death state and a T-LGL steady state corresponding to the abnormal survival state. For each node, we evaluated the restorative manipulation consisting of maintaining the node in the state that is the opposite of its T-LGL state, e.g. knocking it out if it is overexpressed in the T-LGL state. We found that such control of any of 15 nodes led to the disappearance of the T-LGL steady state, leaving cell death as the only potential outcome from any initial condition. In four additional cases the probability of reaching the T-LGL state decreased dramatically, thus these nodes are also possible control

  7. Automated Measurement and Signaling Systems for the Transactional Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Brown, Richard; Price, Phillip; Page, Janie; Granderson, Jessica; Riess, David; Czarnecki, Stephen; Ghatikar, Girish; Lanzisera, Steven

    2013-12-31

    The Transactional Network Project is a multi-lab activity funded by the US Department of Energy?s Building Technologies Office. The project team included staff from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The team designed, prototyped and tested a transactional network (TN) platform to support energy, operational and financial transactions between any networked entities (equipment, organizations, buildings, grid, etc.). PNNL was responsible for the development of the TN platform, with agents for this platform developed by each of the three labs. LBNL contributed applications to measure the whole-building electric load response to various changes in building operations, particularly energy efficiency improvements and demand response events. We also provide a demand response signaling agent and an agent for cost savings analysis. LBNL and PNNL demonstrated actual transactions between packaged rooftop units and the electric grid using the platform and selected agents. This document describes the agents and applications developed by the LBNL team, and associated tests of the applications.

  8. DAF-16/FoxO directly regulates an atypical AMP-activated protein kinase gamma isoform to mediate the effects of insulin/IGF-1 signaling on aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M A Tullet

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor controls growth, metabolism and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. The large number of genes that it regulates has been an obstacle to understanding its function. However, recent analysis of transcript and chromatin profiling implies that DAF-16 regulates relatively few genes directly, and that many of these encode other regulatory proteins. We have investigated the regulation by DAF-16 of genes encoding the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, which has α, β and γ subunits. C. elegans has 5 genes encoding putative AMP-binding regulatory γ subunits, aakg-1-5. aakg-4 and aakg-5 are closely related, atypical isoforms, with orthologs throughout the Chromadorea class of nematodes. We report that ∼75% of total γ subunit mRNA encodes these 2 divergent isoforms, which lack consensus AMP-binding residues, suggesting AMP-independent kinase activity. DAF-16 directly activates expression of aakg-4, reduction of which suppresses longevity in daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants. This implies that an increase in the activity of AMPK containing the AAKG-4 γ subunit caused by direct activation by DAF-16 slows aging in daf-2 mutants. Knock down of aakg-4 expression caused a transient decrease in activation of expression in multiple DAF-16 target genes. This, taken together with previous evidence that AMPK promotes DAF-16 activity, implies the action of these two metabolic regulators in a positive feedback loop that accelerates the induction of DAF-16 target gene expression. The AMPK β subunit, aakb-1, also proved to be up-regulated by DAF-16, but had no effect on lifespan. These findings reveal key features of the architecture of the gene-regulatory network centered on DAF-16, and raise the possibility that activation of AMP-independent AMPK in nutritionally replete daf-2 mutant adults slows aging in C. elegans. Evidence of activation of AMPK subunits in mammals suggests that such FoxO-AMPK interactions may be

  9. Modulatory effects of cAMP and PKC activation on gap junctional intercellular communication among thymic epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves-dos-Santos Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the effects of the signaling molecules, cyclic AMP (cAMP and protein-kinase C (PKC, on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC between thymic epithelial cells (TEC. Results Treatment with 8-Br-cAMP, a cAMP analog; or forskolin, which stimulates cAMP production, resulted in an increase in dye transfer between adjacent TEC, inducing a three-fold enhancement in the mean fluorescence of coupled cells, ascertained by flow cytometry after calcein transfer. These treatments also increased Cx43 mRNA expression, and stimulated Cx43 protein accumulation in regions of intercellular contacts. VIP, adenosine, and epinephrine which may also signal through cyclic nucleotides were tested. The first two molecules did not mimic the effects of 8-Br-cAMP, however epinephrine was able to increase GJIC suggesting that this molecule functions as an endogenous inter-TEC GJIC modulators. Stimulation of PKC by phorbol-myristate-acetate inhibited inter-TEC GJIC. Importantly, both the enhancing and the decreasing effects, respectively induced by cAMP and PKC, were observed in both mouse and human TEC preparations. Lastly, experiments using mouse thymocyte/TEC heterocellular co-cultures suggested that the presence of thymocytes does not affect the degree of inter-TEC GJIC. Conclusions Overall, our data indicate that cAMP and PKC intracellular pathways are involved in the homeostatic control of the gap junction-mediated communication in the thymic epithelium, exerting respectively a positive and negative role upon cell coupling. This control is phylogenetically conserved in the thymus, since it was seen in both mouse and human TEC preparations. Lastly, our work provides new clues for a better understanding of how the thymic epithelial network can work as a physiological syncytium.

  10. Pattern recognition for electroencephalographic signals based on continuous neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro-Ponce, M; Argüelles, A; Chairez, I

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the design and implementation of a pattern recognition algorithm to classify electroencephalographic (EEG) signals based on artificial neural networks (NN) described by ordinary differential equations (ODEs). The training method for this kind of continuous NN (CNN) was developed according to the Lyapunov theory stability analysis. A parallel structure with fixed weights was proposed to perform the classification stage. The pattern recognition efficiency was validated by two methods, a generalization-regularization and a k-fold cross validation (k=5). The classifier was applied on two different databases. The first one was made up by signals collected from patients suffering of epilepsy and it is divided in five different classes. The second database was made up by 90 single EEG trials, divided in three classes. Each class corresponds to a different visual evoked potential. The pattern recognition algorithm achieved a maximum correct classification percentage of 97.2% using the information of the entire database. This value was similar to some results previously reported when this database was used for testing pattern classification. However, these results were obtained when only two classes were considered for the testing. The result reported in this study used the whole set of signals (five different classes). In comparison with similar pattern recognition methods that even considered less number of classes, the proposed CNN proved to achieve the same or even better correct classification results.

  11. Computational study of noise in a large signal transduction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruohonen Keijo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biochemical systems are inherently noisy due to the discrete reaction events that occur in a random manner. Although noise is often perceived as a disturbing factor, the system might actually benefit from it. In order to understand the role of noise better, its quality must be studied in a quantitative manner. Computational analysis and modeling play an essential role in this demanding endeavor. Results We implemented a large nonlinear signal transduction network combining protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinase, phospholipase A2, and β isoform of phospholipase C networks. We simulated the network in 300 different cellular volumes using the exact Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm and analyzed the results in both the time and frequency domain. In order to perform simulations in a reasonable time, we used modern parallel computing techniques. The analysis revealed that time and frequency domain characteristics depend on the system volume. The simulation results also indicated that there are several kinds of noise processes in the network, all of them representing different kinds of low-frequency fluctuations. In the simulations, the power of noise decreased on all frequencies when the system volume was increased. Conclusions We concluded that basic frequency domain techniques can be applied to the analysis of simulation results produced by the Gillespie stochastic simulation algorithm. This approach is suited not only to the study of fluctuations but also to the study of pure noise processes. Noise seems to have an important role in biochemical systems and its properties can be numerically studied by simulating the reacting system in different cellular volumes. Parallel computing techniques make it possible to run massive simulations in hundreds of volumes and, as a result, accurate statistics can be obtained from computational studies.

  12. Caffeine inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells induced by acetaldehyde via adenosine A2A receptor mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK signal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Wang

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cell (HSC activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR. Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine's inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway.Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III.

  13. β-Hydroxybutyric Sodium Salt Inhibition of Growth Hormone and Prolactin Secretion via the cAMP/PKA/CREB and AMPK Signaling Pathways in Dairy Cow Anterior Pituitary Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Peng Fu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available β-hydroxybutyric acid (BHBA regulates the synthesis and secretion of growth hormone (GH and prolactin (PRL, but its mechanism is unknown. In this study, we detected the effects of BHBA on the activities of G protein signaling pathways, AMPK-α activity, GH, and PRL gene transcription, and GH and PRL secretion in dairy cow anterior pituitary cells (DCAPCs. The results showed that BHBA decreased intracellular cAMP levels and a subsequent reduction in protein kinase A (PKA activity. Inhibition of PKA activity reduced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting GH and PRL transcription and secretion. The effects of BHBA were attenuated by a specific Gαi inhibitor, pertussis toxin (PTX. In addition, intracellular BHBA uptake mediated by monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1 could trigger AMPK signaling and result in the decrease in GH and PRL mRNA translation in DCAPCs cultured under low-glucose and non-glucose condition when compared with the high-glucose group. This study identifies a biochemical mechanism for the regulatory action of BHBA on GH and PRL gene transcription, translation, and secretion in DCAPCs, which may be one of the factors that regulate pituitary function during the transition period in dairy cows.

  14. Signal Transduction at the Single-Cell Level: Approaches to Study the Dynamic Nature of Signaling Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handly, L Naomi; Yao, Jason; Wollman, Roy

    2016-09-25

    Signal transduction, or how cells interpret and react to external events, is a fundamental aspect of cellular function. Traditional study of signal transduction pathways involves mapping cellular signaling pathways at the population level. However, population-averaged readouts do not adequately illuminate the complex dynamics and heterogeneous responses found at the single-cell level. Recent technological advances that observe cellular response, computationally model signaling pathways, and experimentally manipulate cells now enable studying signal transduction at the single-cell level. These studies will enable deeper insights into the dynamic nature of signaling networks.

  15. Signal integration by chloroplast phosphorylation networks: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eSchoenberg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Forty years after the initial discovery of light-dependent protein phosphorylation at the thylakoid membrane system, we are now beginning to understand the roles of chloroplast phosphorylation networks in their function to decode and mediate information on the metabolic status of the organelle to long-term adaptations in plastid and nuclear gene expression. With the help of genetics and functional genomics tools, chloroplast kinases and several hundred phosphoproteins were identified that now await detailed functional characterization. The regulation and the target protein spectrum of some kinases are understood, but this information is fragmentary with respect to kinase and target protein crosstalk in a changing environment. In this review we will highlight the most recent advances in the field and discuss approaches that might lead to a comprehensive understanding of plastid signal integration by protein phosphorylation.

  16. Network coding based joint signaling and dynamic bandwidth allocation scheme for inter optical network unit communication in passive optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Pei; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2014-06-01

    As an innovative and promising technology, network coding has been introduced to passive optical networks (PON) in recent years to support inter optical network unit (ONU) communication, yet the signaling process and dynamic bandwidth allocation (DBA) in PON with network coding (NC-PON) still need further study. Thus, we propose a joint signaling and DBA scheme for efficiently supporting differentiated services of inter ONU communication in NC-PON. In the proposed joint scheme, the signaling process lays the foundation to fulfill network coding in PON, and it can not only avoid the potential threat to downstream security in previous schemes but also be suitable for the proposed hybrid dynamic bandwidth allocation (HDBA) scheme. In HDBA, a DBA cycle is divided into two sub-cycles for applying different coding, scheduling and bandwidth allocation strategies to differentiated classes of services. Besides, as network traffic load varies, the entire upstream transmission window for all REPORT messages slides accordingly, leaving the transmission time of one or two sub-cycles to overlap with the bandwidth allocation calculation time at the optical line terminal (the OLT), so that the upstream idle time can be efficiently eliminated. Performance evaluation results validate that compared with the existing two DBA algorithms deployed in NC-PON, HDBA demonstrates the best quality of service (QoS) support in terms of delay for all classes of services, especially guarantees the end-to-end delay bound of high class services. Specifically, HDBA can eliminate queuing delay and scheduling delay of high class services, reduce those of lower class services by at least 20%, and reduce the average end-to-end delay of all services over 50%. Moreover, HDBA also achieves the maximum delay fairness between coded and uncoded lower class services, and medium delay fairness for high class services.

  17. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) confers drug resistance against DNA damaging agents via PKAIA in CML cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ling-Yi; Kan, Wai-Ming

    2017-01-05

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates many vital functions such as metabolism, proliferation, differentiation and death. Depending on cell types and stimulators, cAMP could either promote or attenuate cell death. cAMP signal can be transduced by protein kinase A (PKA) and/or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC). In CML cells, cAMP may suppress their proliferation and enhance their differentiation. However, the role of cAMP on DNA damaging agent toxicity and the mechanism involved has not been studied. In this study, we studied the effect of cAMP on the sensitivity of CML cells to DNA damaging agents. We observed that forskolin (FSK) and dibutyryl-cAMP (DBcAMP) decreased cisplatin and etoposide-induced cell death in K562 cells. Moreover, PKA activator prevented K562 cells from DNA damaging agent-induced cell death while EPAC activator had no effect. Furthermore, we found that the PKA subtype, PKAIA, was involved in cAMP-attenuated resistance in K562 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that increased cAMP level confers CML cells to acquire a novel mechanism against DNA damaging agent toxicity via PKAIA. Thus, PKAIA inhibitor may be helpful in overcoming the resistance to DNA damaging agents in CML cells.

  18. Truncated Glucagon-like Peptide-1 and Exendin-4 α-Conotoxin pl14a Peptide Chimeras Maintain Potency and α-Helicity and Reveal Interactions Vital for cAMP Signaling in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedberg, Joakim E; Schroeder, Christina I; Mitchell, Justin M; Fairlie, David P; Edmonds, David J; Griffith, David A; Ruggeri, Roger B; Derksen, David R; Loria, Paula M; Price, David A; Liras, Spiros; Craik, David J

    2016-07-22

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) signaling through the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a key regulator of normal glucose metabolism, and exogenous GLP-1R agonist therapy is a promising avenue for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. To date, the development of therapeutic GLP-1R agonists has focused on producing drugs with an extended serum half-life. This has been achieved by engineering synthetic analogs of GLP-1 or the more stable exogenous GLP-1R agonist exendin-4 (Ex-4). These synthetic peptide hormones share the overall structure of GLP-1 and Ex-4, with a C-terminal helical segment and a flexible N-terminal tail. Although numerous studies have investigated the molecular determinants underpinning GLP-1 and Ex-4 binding and signaling through the GLP-1R, these have primarily focused on the length and composition of the N-terminal tail or on how to modulate the helicity of the full-length peptides. Here, we investigate the effect of C-terminal truncation in GLP-1 and Ex-4 on the cAMP pathway. To ensure helical C-terminal regions in the truncated peptides, we produced a series of chimeric peptides combining the N-terminal portion of GLP-1 or Ex-4 and the C-terminal segment of the helix-promoting peptide α-conotoxin pl14a. The helicity and structures of the chimeric peptides were confirmed using circular dichroism and NMR, respectively. We found no direct correlation between the fractional helicity and potency in signaling via the cAMP pathway. Rather, the most important feature for efficient receptor binding and signaling was the C-terminal helical segment (residues 22-27) directing the binding of Phe(22) into a hydrophobic pocket on the GLP-1R.

  19. Integrated Strategies to Gain a Systems-Level View of Dynamic Signaling Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Robert H; Zhang, Jin

    2017-01-01

    In order to survive and function properly in the face of an ever changing environment, cells must be able to sense changes in their surroundings and respond accordingly. Cells process information about their environment through complex signaling networks composed of many discrete signaling molecules. Individual pathways within these networks are often tightly integrated and highly dynamic, allowing cells to respond to a given stimulus (or, as is typically the case under physiological conditions, a combination of stimuli) in a specific and appropriate manner. However, due to the size and complexity of many cellular signaling networks, it is often difficult to predict how cellular signaling networks will respond under a particular set of conditions. Indeed, crosstalk between individual signaling pathways may lead to responses that are nonintuitive (or even counterintuitive) based on examination of the individual pathways in isolation. Therefore, to gain a more comprehensive view of cell signaling processes, it is important to understand how signaling networks behave at the systems level. This requires integrated strategies that combine quantitative experimental data with computational models. In this chapter, we first examine some of the progress that has recently been made toward understanding the systems-level regulation of cellular signaling networks, with a particular emphasis on phosphorylation-dependent signaling networks. We then discuss how genetically targetable fluorescent biosensors are being used together with computational models to gain unique insights into the spatiotemporal regulation of signaling networks within single, living cells.

  20. Elevated dopamine D2 receptor in prefrontal cortex of CUMS rats is associated with downregulated cAMP-independent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Yang, Jing-mo; Hu, Ting-ting; Xu, Ting-juan; Xu, Wei-ping; Wei, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Because depression is associated with significant morbidity and functional disability, it is important to reveal the mechanism of action. A variety of studies have suggested the involvement of dopaminergic receptors in the pathophysiological mechanism of non-stress-associated depression-like behavior in rodents. Nevertheless, controversy exists about whether chronic stress acts on dopaminergic receptors in the prefrontal cortex. Thus, we investigated the level of dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2) and the possible mechanisms involved in a chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rat model of depression. The results showed CUMS-induced, depression-like symptoms in the rat, characterized by reduced sucrose consumption and body mass, and increased duration of immobility in a forced swimming test. Moreover, chronic stress upregulated the expression of DRD2 but downregulated protein kinase A (PKA), transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) in the prefrontal cortex, as demonstrated by Western blot. Notably, in the rat model of depression, decreased cyclic adenine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and PKA activity were present at the same time, which is consistent with clinical findings in depressed patients. Our findings suggested that dopaminergic system dysfunction could play a central role in stress-related disorders such as depression.

  1. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.;

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  2. Molecular modifications by regulating cAMP signaling and oxidant-antioxidant defence mechanisms, produce antidepressant-like effect: A possible mechanism of etazolate aftermaths of impact accelerated traumatic brain injury in rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Ankur; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Bhatt, Shvetank; Pandey, Dilip

    2016-12-14

    decreases in antioxidant enzymes markers level were observed. However, no significant change was observed in serum CORT level. Chronic ETZ (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated TBI-induced behavioral deficits and restored the TBI induced derangements in molecular and biochemical markers. This study indicates that ETZ modulates cAMP signaling and oxidative/antioxidant markers in the TBI model suggesting its prospect as a potential candidate for the pharmacotherapy of depression.

  3. Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Private integrated services network - Inter-exchange signalling protocol - Path replacement additional network feature

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Private integrated services network - Inter-exchange signalling protocol - Path replacement additional network feature

  4. Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Private Integrated Services Network - Inter-exchange signalling protocol - Call interception additional network feature

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Information technology - Telecommunications and information exchange between systems - Private Integrated Services Network - Inter-exchange signalling protocol - Call interception additional network feature

  5. Identifying Driver Nodes in the Human Signaling Network Using Structural Controllability Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueming; Pan, Linqiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling governs the basic cellular activities and coordinates the actions in cell. Abnormal regulations in cell signaling processing are responsible for many human diseases, such as diabetes and cancers. With the accumulation of massive data related to human cell signaling, it is feasible to obtain a human signaling network. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis to biological networks. In this work, we apply structural controllability to a human signaling network and detect driver nodes, providing a systematic analysis of the role of different proteins in controlling the human signaling network. We find that the proteins in the upstream of the signaling information flow and the low in-degree proteins play a crucial role in controlling the human signaling network. Interestingly, inputting different control signals on the regulators of the cancer-associated genes could cost less than controlling the cancer-associated genes directly in order to control the whole human signaling network in the sense that less drive nodes are needed. This research provides a fresh perspective for controlling the human cell signaling system.

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  7. Loss of Kv3.1 tonotopicity and alterations in cAMP response element-binding protein signaling in central auditory neurons of hearing impaired mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hehn, Christian A A; Bhattacharjee, Arin; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2004-02-25

    The promoter for the kv3.1 potassium channel gene is regulated by a Ca2+-cAMP responsive element, which binds the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Kv3.1 is expressed in a tonotopic gradient within the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) of the auditory brainstem, where Kv3.1 levels are highest at the medial end, which corresponds to high auditory frequencies. We have compared the levels of Kv3.1, CREB, and the phosphorylated form of CREB (pCREB) in a mouse strain that maintains good hearing throughout life, CBA/J (CBA), with one that suffers early cochlear hair cell loss, C57BL/6 (BL/6). A gradient of Kv3.1 immunoreactivity in the MNTB was detected in both young (6 week) and older (8 month) CBA mice. Although no gradient of CREB was detected, pCREB-immunopositive cells were grouped together in distinct clusters along the tonotopic axis. The same pattern of Kv3.1, CREB, and pCREB localization was also found in young BL/6 mice at a time (6 weeks) when hearing is normal. In contrast, at 8 months, when hearing is impaired, the gradient of Kv3.1 was abolished. Moreover, in the older BL/6 mice there was a decrease in CREB expression along the tonotopic axis, and the pattern of pCREB labeling appeared random, with no discrete clusters of pCREB-positive cells along the tonotopic axis. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that ongoing activity in auditory brainstem neurons is necessary for the maintenance of Kv3.1 tonotopicity through the CREB pathway.

  8. The Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24

    Increased deployment of new technologies, e.g., renewable generation and electric vehicles, is rapidly transforming electrical power networks by crossing previously distinct spatiotemporal scales and invalidating many traditional approaches for designing, analyzing, and operating power grids. This trend is expected to accelerate over the coming years, bringing the disruptive challenge of complexity, but also opportunities to deliver unprecedented efficiency and reliability. Our Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS) Center will discover, enable, and solve emerging mathematics challenges arising in power systems and, more generally, in complex engineered networks. We will develop foundational applied mathematics resulting in rigorous algorithms and simulation toolboxes for modern and future engineered networks. The AMPS Center deconstruction/reconstruction approach 'deconstructs' complex networks into sub-problems within non-separable spatiotemporal scales, a missing step in 20th century modeling of engineered networks. These sub-problems are addressed within the appropriate AMPS foundational pillar - complex systems, control theory, and optimization theory - and merged or 'reconstructed' at their boundaries into more general mathematical descriptions of complex engineered networks where important new questions are formulated and attacked. These two steps, iterated multiple times, will bridge the growing chasm between the legacy power grid and its future as a complex engineered network.

  9. 47 CFR 73.4157 - Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....4157 Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. See Public Notice, FCC 79-387... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Network signals which adversely affect affiliate broadcast service. 73.4157 Section 73.4157 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS...

  10. A system of recurrent neural networks for modularising, parameterising and dynamic analysis of cell signalling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinghe, S; Ling, H

    2017-02-04

    In this paper, we show how to extend our previously proposed novel continuous time Recurrent Neural Networks (RNN) approach that retains the advantage of continuous dynamics offered by Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE) while enabling parameter estimation through adaptation, to larger signalling networks using a modular approach. Specifically, the signalling network is decomposed into several sub-models based on important temporal events in the network. Each sub-model is represented by the proposed RNN and trained using data generated from the corresponding ODE model. Trained sub-models are assembled into a whole system RNN which is then subjected to systems dynamics and sensitivity analyses. The concept is illustrated by application to G1/S transition in cell cycle using Iwamoto et al. (2008) ODE model. We decomposed the G1/S network into 3 sub-models: (i) E2F transcription factor release; (ii) E2F and CycE positive feedback loop for elevating cyclin levels; and (iii) E2F and CycA negative feedback to degrade E2F. The trained sub-models accurately represented system dynamics and parameters were in good agreement with the ODE model. The whole system RNN however revealed couple of parameters contributing to compounding errors due to feedback and required refinement to sub-model 2. These related to the reversible reaction between CycE/CDK2 and p27, its inhibitor. The revised whole system RNN model very accurately matched dynamics of the ODE system. Local sensitivity analysis of the whole system model further revealed the most dominant influence of the above two parameters in perturbing G1/S transition, giving support to a recent hypothesis that the release of inhibitor p27 from Cyc/CDK complex triggers cell cycle stage transition. To make the model useful in a practical setting, we modified each RNN sub-model with a time relay switch to facilitate larger interval input data (≈20min) (original model used data for 30s or less) and retrained them that produced

  11. Robust Clustering of Acoustic Emission Signals Using Neural Networks and Signal Subspace Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Zhiqiang

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission-based techniques are being used for the nondestructive inspection of mechanical systems. For reliable automatic fault monitoring related to the generation and propagation of cracks, it is important to identify the transient crack-related signals in the presence of strong time-varying noise and other interference. A prominent difficulty is the inability to differentiate events due to crack growth from noise of various origins. This work presents a novel algorithm for automatic clustering and separation of acoustic emission (AE events based on multiple features extracted from the experimental data. The algorithm consists of two steps. In the first step, the noise is separated from the events of interest and subsequently removed using a combination of covariance analysis, principal component analysis (PCA, and differential time delay estimates. The second step processes the remaining data using a self-organizing map (SOM neural network, which outputs the noise and AE signals into separate neurons. To improve the efficiency of classification, the short-time Fourier transform (STFT is applied to retain the time-frequency features of the remaining events, reducing the dimension of the data. The algorithm is verified with two sets of data, and a correct classification ratio over 95% is achieved.

  12. "cAMP sponge": a buffer for cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Lefkimmiatis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIbeta of protein kinase A (PKA. Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named "cAMP sponge" was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. CONCLUSIONS: This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events.

  13. Network dynamics for optimal compressive-sensing input-signal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barranca, Victor J; Kovačič, Gregor; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2014-10-01

    By using compressive sensing (CS) theory, a broad class of static signals can be reconstructed through a sequence of very few measurements in the framework of a linear system. For networks with nonlinear and time-evolving dynamics, is it similarly possible to recover an unknown input signal from only a small number of network output measurements? We address this question for pulse-coupled networks and investigate the network dynamics necessary for successful input signal recovery. Determining the specific network characteristics that correspond to a minimal input reconstruction error, we are able to achieve high-quality signal reconstructions with few measurements of network output. Using various measures to characterize dynamical properties of network output, we determine that networks with highly variable and aperiodic output can successfully encode network input information with high fidelity and achieve the most accurate CS input reconstructions. For time-varying inputs, we also find that high-quality reconstructions are achievable by measuring network output over a relatively short time window. Even when network inputs change with time, the same optimal choice of network characteristics and corresponding dynamics apply as in the case of static inputs.

  14. Prolonged in vivo administration of testosterone-enanthate, the widely used and abused anabolic androgenic steroid, disturbs prolactin and cAMP signaling in Leydig cells of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelic, Maja M; Stojkov, Natasa J; Radovic, Sava M; Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Janjic, Marija M; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2015-05-01

    This study was designed to systematically analyze and define the effects of 1-day, 2-weeks, 10-weeks intramuscular administration of testosterone-enanthate, widely used and abused anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS), on main regulators of steroidogenesis and steroidogenic genes expression in testosterone-producing Leydig cells of adult rats. The results showed that prolonged (10-weeks) intramuscular administration of testosterone-enanthate, in clinically relevant dose, significantly increased prolactin, but decreased Prlr2 and Gnrhr in pituitary of adult rat. The levels of testosterone, Insl3, cAMP and mitochondrial membrane potential of Leydig cells were significantly reduced. This was followed by decreased expression of some steroidogenic enzymes and regulatory proteins such as Lhcgr, Prlr1/2, Tspo, Star, Cyp11a1, Cyp17a1, Dax1. Oppositely, Hsd3b1/2, Hsd3b5, Hsd17b4, Ar, Arr19 increased. In the same cells, transcriptional milieu of cAMP signaling elements was disturbed with remarkable up-regulation of PRKA (the main regulator of steroidogenesis). Increased prolactin together with stimulated transcription of Jak2/Jak3 could account for increased Hsd3b1/2 and Hsd3b5 in Leydig cells following 10-weeks in vivo treatment with testosterone-enanthate. In vitro studies revealed that testosterone is capable to increase level of Prlr1, Prlr2, Hsd3b1/2, Hsd3b5 in Leydig cells. Accordingly, testosterone-induced changes in prolactin receptor signaling together with up-regulation of PRKA, Hsd3b1/2, Hsd3b5, Ar in Leydig cells, could be the possible mechanism that contribute to the establishment of a new adaptive response to maintain homeostasis and prevent loss of steroidogenic function. Presented data provide new molecular insights into the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and mammalian reproduction and are important in terms of wide use and abuse of AASs and human reproductive health.

  15. LWT Based Sensor Node Signal Processing in Vehicle Surveillance Distributed Sensor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Daehyun; Hwang, Chansik

    Previous vehicle surveillance researches on distributed sensor network focused on overcoming power limitation and communication bandwidth constraints in sensor node. In spite of this constraints, vehicle surveillance sensor node must have signal compression, feature extraction, target localization, noise cancellation and collaborative signal processing with low computation and communication energy dissipation. In this paper, we introduce an algorithm for light-weight wireless sensor node signal processing based on lifting scheme wavelet analysis feature extraction in distributed sensor network.

  16. The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain The alterations in biochemical signaling of hippocampal network activity in the autism brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田允; 黄继云; 王锐; 陶蓉蓉; 卢应梅; 廖美华; 陆楠楠; 李静; 芦博; 韩峰

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impaired social interaction and communication. However, the role of synaptic dysfunction during development of autism remains unclear. In the present study, we address the alterations of biochemical signaling in hippocampal network following induction of the autism in experimental animals. Here, the an- imal disease model and DNA array being used to investigate the differences in transcriptome or- ganization between autistic and normal brain by gene co--expression network analysis.

  17. Simultaneous multichannel signal transfers via chaos in a recurrent neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soma, Ken-ichiro; Mori, Ryota; Sato, Ryuichi; Furumai, Noriyuki; Nara, Shigetoshi

    2015-05-01

    We propose neural network model that demonstrates the phenomenon of signal transfer between separated neuron groups via other chaotic neurons that show no apparent correlations with the input signal. The model is a recurrent neural network in which it is supposed that synchronous behavior between small groups of input and output neurons has been learned as fragments of high-dimensional memory patterns, and depletion of neural connections results in chaotic wandering dynamics. Computer experiments show that when a strong oscillatory signal is applied to an input group in the chaotic regime, the signal is successfully transferred to the corresponding output group, although no correlation is observed between the input signal and the intermediary neurons. Signal transfer is also observed when multiple signals are applied simultaneously to separate input groups belonging to different memory attractors. In this sense simultaneous multichannel communications are realized, and the chaotic neural dynamics acts as a signal transfer medium in which the signal appears to be hidden.

  18. Genetic and logic networks with the signal-inhibitor-activator structure are dynamically robust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fangting; TAN Ning

    2006-01-01

    The proteins, DNA and RNA interaction networks govern various biological functions in living cells, these networks should be dynamically robust in the intracellular and environmental fluctuations. Here, we use Boolean network to study the robust structure of both genetic and logic networks. First, SOS network in bacteria E. coli, which regulates cell survival and repair after DNA damage, is shown to be dynamically robust. Comparing with cell cycle network in budding yeast and flagella network in E. coli, we find the signal-inhibitor-activator (SIA) structure in transcription regulatory networks. Second, under the dynamical rule that inhibition is much stronger than activation, we have searched 3-node non-self-loop logical networks that are dynamically robust, and that if the attractive basin of a final attractor is as large as seven, and the final attractor has only one active node, then the active node acts as inhibitor, and the SIA and signal-inhibitor (SI) structures are fundamental architectures of robust networks. SIA and SI networks with dynamic robustness against environment uncertainties may be selected and maintained over the course of evolution, rather than blind trial-error testing and be ing an accidental consequence of particular evolutionary history. SIA network can perform a more complex process than SI network, andSIA might be used to design robust artificial genetic network. Our results provide dynamical support for why the inhibitors and SIA/SI structures are frequently employed in cellular regulatory networks.

  19. An Approach to High-Order Cumulants Used to Detect Multifrequency Signals in Telephone Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In accordance with the detecting process of multi-frequency signals between the offices in telephone networks, and in contrast with the autocorrelation method used to handle the multi-frequency signals, a fast,inexpensive and unbiased of cumulants estimation method is adopted in detecting signals. This detecting method is better for resisting noise performance and more practical than the autocorrelation method.

  20. 慢性束缚应激对大鼠体质量、血清皮质酮和前额叶皮质cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF通路的影响%Effect of chronic restraint stress on body weight,serum corticosterone concentration and cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling activity in prefrontal cortex in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟珊珊; 刘洪文

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨慢性束缚应激对大鼠体质量、血清皮质酮水平和前额叶皮质cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF通路的影响.方法 将30只雄性SD大鼠随机分为对照组、慢性束缚应激1周组和慢性束缚应激2周组,每组各10只.比较应激前后大鼠体质量和血清皮质酮水平的变化,放免法观察应激前后大鼠前额叶皮质环磷腺苷(cAMP)含量,试剂盒测定cAMP依赖蛋白激酶(protein kinase,PKA)活性和脑源性神经营养因子(brain derived neurophic factor,BDNF)表达水平,用蛋白免疫印迹技术观察cAMP反应元件结合蛋白质(p-CREB)水平变化.结果 慢性束缚应激组大鼠在应激1周和应激2周的体质量增长[分别为(35±11)g和(23±8)g]均低于对照组[分别为(59±16)g和(68±14)g](P<0.05).束缚应激1周组和束缚应激2周组大鼠血清皮质醇浓度分别为(356.78±112.21)ng/ml、(558.49±98.32)ng/ml,均高于对照组(198.21±101.35)ng/ml(P<0.05,P<0.01).束缚应激1周组和束缚应激2周组大鼠前额叶皮质的cAMP含量、PKA活性、p-CREB和BDNF表达水平低于对照组(P<0.01).结论 慢性束缚应激抑制大鼠体质量的增长,引起血清皮质酮水平增高和前额叶皮质cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF信号通路被抑制.%To observe effect of chronic restraint stress on body weight,scrum corticostcronc concentration and cAMP-PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling activity in prcfrontai cortex in the rat. Methods Thirty male SD rats were randomly divided into control group (n = 10), 1 week and 2 weeks (n= 10) restraint stress groups. Before and after restraint stress, body weight and scrum corticostcronc concentration were examined, radio-immunity method Pep TagR detecting system, and western blotting were used to assess cAMP contcrt. PKA activity and the level of p-CREDB in prcfrontai cortex. Results The body weight gains on the first (35 + ll)g and second stressed weeks (23 I: 8)g were significantly lower in restraint stress groups than in controls group (59 ± 16)g and (68

  1. Stochastic effects as a force to increase the complexity of signaling networks

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-29

    Cellular signaling networks are complex and appear to include many nonfunctional elements. Recently, it was suggested that nonfunctional interactions of proteins cause signaling noise, which, perhaps, shapes the signal transduction mechanism. However, the conditions under which molecular noise influences cellular information processing remain unclear. Here, we explore a large number of simple biological models of varying network sizes to understand the architectural conditions under which the interactions of signaling proteins can exhibit specific stochastic effects - called deviant effects - in which the average behavior of a biological system is substantially altered in the presence of molecular noise. We find that a small fraction of these networks does exhibit deviant effects and shares a common architectural feature whereas most of the networks show only insignificant levels of deviations. Interestingly, addition of seemingly unimportant interactions into protein networks gives rise to deviant effects.

  2. Discovery of intramolecular signal transduction network based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Wei Ma

    Full Text Available A novel approach to reveal intramolecular signal transduction network is proposed in this work. To this end, a new algorithm of network construction is developed, which is based on a new protein dynamics model of energy dissipation. A key feature of this approach is that direction information is specified after inferring protein residue-residue interaction network involved in the process of signal transduction. This enables fundamental analysis of the regulation hierarchy and identification of regulation hubs of the signaling network. A well-studied allosteric enzyme, E. coli aspartokinase III, is used as a model system to demonstrate the new method. Comparison with experimental results shows that the new approach is able to predict all the sites that have been experimentally proved to desensitize allosteric regulation of the enzyme. In addition, the signal transduction network shows a clear preference for specific structural regions, secondary structural types and residue conservation. Occurrence of super-hubs in the network indicates that allosteric regulation tends to gather residues with high connection ability to collectively facilitate the signaling process. Furthermore, a new parameter of propagation coefficient is defined to determine the propagation capability of residues within a signal transduction network. In conclusion, the new approach is useful for fundamental understanding of the process of intramolecular signal transduction and thus has significant impact on rational design of novel allosteric proteins.

  3. Maximum entropy reconstructions of dynamic signaling networks from quantitative proteomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locasale, Jason W; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2009-08-26

    Advances in mass spectrometry among other technologies have allowed for quantitative, reproducible, proteome-wide measurements of levels of phosphorylation as signals propagate through complex networks in response to external stimuli under different conditions. However, computational approaches to infer elements of the signaling network strictly from the quantitative aspects of proteomics data are not well established. We considered a method using the principle of maximum entropy to infer a network of interacting phosphotyrosine sites from pairwise correlations in a mass spectrometry data set and derive a phosphorylation-dependent interaction network solely from quantitative proteomics data. We first investigated the applicability of this approach by using a simulation of a model biochemical signaling network whose dynamics are governed by a large set of coupled differential equations. We found that in a simulated signaling system, the method detects interactions with significant accuracy. We then analyzed a growth factor mediated signaling network in a human mammary epithelial cell line that we inferred from mass spectrometry data and observe a biologically interpretable, small-world structure of signaling nodes, as well as a catalog of predictions regarding the interactions among previously uncharacterized phosphotyrosine sites. For example, the calculation places a recently identified tumor suppressor pathway through ARHGEF7 and Scribble, in the context of growth factor signaling. Our findings suggest that maximum entropy derived network models are an important tool for interpreting quantitative proteomics data.

  4. Nonlinear signaling on biological networks: The role of stochasticity and spectral clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Hernandez, Gonzalo; Myers, Jesse; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Shiferaw, Yohannes

    2017-03-01

    Signal transduction within biological cells is governed by networks of interacting proteins. Communication between these proteins is mediated by signaling molecules which bind to receptors and induce stochastic transitions between different conformational states. Signaling is typically a cooperative process which requires the occurrence of multiple binding events so that reaction rates have a nonlinear dependence on the amount of signaling molecule. It is this nonlinearity that endows biological signaling networks with robust switchlike properties which are critical to their biological function. In this study we investigate how the properties of these signaling systems depend on the network architecture. Our main result is that these nonlinear networks exhibit bistability where the network activity can switch between states that correspond to a low and high activity level. We show that this bistable regime emerges at a critical coupling strength that is determined by the spectral structure of the network. In particular, the set of nodes that correspond to large components of the leading eigenvector of the adjacency matrix determines the onset of bistability. Above this transition the eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix determine a hierarchy of clusters, defined by its spectral properties, which are activated sequentially with increasing network activity. We argue further that the onset of bistability occurs either continuously or discontinuously depending upon whether the leading eigenvector is localized or delocalized. Finally, we show that at low network coupling stochastic transitions to the active branch are also driven by the set of nodes that contribute more strongly to the leading eigenvector. However, at high coupling, transitions are insensitive to network structure since the network can be activated by stochastic transitions of a few nodes. Thus this work identifies important features of biological signaling networks that may underlie their biological

  5. Digital Signal Processing and Control for the Study of Gene Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to the digital revolution, digital signal processing and control has been widely used in many areas of science and engineering today. It provides practical and powerful tools to model, simulate, analyze, design, measure, and control complex and dynamic systems such as robots and aircrafts. Gene networks are also complex dynamic systems which can be studied via digital signal processing and control. Unlike conventional computational methods, this approach is capable of not only modeling but also controlling gene networks since the experimental environment is mostly digital today. The overall aim of this article is to introduce digital signal processing and control as a useful tool for the study of gene networks.

  6. Digital Signal Processing and Control for the Study of Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Jun

    2016-04-22

    Thanks to the digital revolution, digital signal processing and control has been widely used in many areas of science and engineering today. It provides practical and powerful tools to model, simulate, analyze, design, measure, and control complex and dynamic systems such as robots and aircrafts. Gene networks are also complex dynamic systems which can be studied via digital signal processing and control. Unlike conventional computational methods, this approach is capable of not only modeling but also controlling gene networks since the experimental environment is mostly digital today. The overall aim of this article is to introduce digital signal processing and control as a useful tool for the study of gene networks.

  7. Synchronization transmission of spatiotemporal chaotic signal in the uncertain time-varying network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Ling; Chen, Liansong; Han, Changhui; Ge, Lianjun; Gao, Liyu

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a new method is presented for the synchronization transmission of spatiotemporal chaotic signal in the uncertain time-varying network. By designing a special function to construct the Lyapunov function of the network, it is sure that the uncertain time-varying network can effectively synchronize the spatiotemporal chaotic signal generated by the synchronization target. At the same time, we also design the identification laws of uncertain parameters and the adaptive laws of the time-varying coupling matrix elements. Especially in our work, the nodes of the uncertain time-varying network and the synchronization target are different. Obviously, this research has the reference value for the application fields.

  8. Studies on the signal amplification in weighted and unweighted small-world networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Jianjun; Ma, Fuqiu

    2017-02-01

    Weighted and unweighted networks composed of coupled bistable oscillators with small-world topology are investigated under the co-presence of a weak signal and multiplicative Gaussian white noise. As the noise intensity is adjusted to one or two optimal values, the temporal periodicity of the output of the system reaches the maximum, indicating the occurrence of stochastic resonance (SR) or stochastic bi-resonance (SBR). The resonance behavior is strongly-dependent on the coupling strength in both networks. At a weak coupling, SR more likely takes place; whereas at a strong coupling, SBR is prone to occur. Compared with unweighted networks, the span of coupling strength for SBR is narrower in weighted networks. In addition, the weak signal cannot be amplified so effectively in the weighted networks as in the unweighted networks, attributing to the weakening effect of the link weight on the coupling between oscillators and the heterogeneity of the whole network connectivity caused by the weight distribution.

  9. Robustness analysis of EGFR signaling network with a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiufen; Liu, Minzhong; Pan, Zishu

    2008-01-01

    Robustness, the ability to maintain performance in the face of perturbations and uncertainty, is believed to be a necessary property of biological systems. In this paper, we address the issue of robustness in an important signal transduction network--epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) network. First, we analyze the robustness in the EGFR signaling network using all rate constants against the Gauss variation which was described as "the reference parameter set" in the previous study [Kholodenko, B.N., Demin, O.V., Moehren, G., Hoek, J.B., 1999. Quantification of short term signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor. J. Biol. Chem. 274, 30169-30181]. The simulation results show that signal time, signal duration and signal amplitude of the EGRR signaling network are relatively not robust against the simultaneous variation of the reference parameter set. Second, robustness is quantified using some statistical quantities. Finally, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA) is presented to search reaction rate constants which optimize the robustness of network and compared with the NSGA-II, which is a representation of a class of modern multi-objective evolutionary algorithms. Our simulation results demonstrate that signal time, signal duration and signal amplitude of the four key components--the most downstream variable in each of the pathways: R-Sh-G-S, R-PLP, R-G-S and the phosphorylated receptor RP in EGRR signaling network for the optimized parameter sets have better robustness than those for the reference parameter set and the NSGA-II. These results can provide valuable insight into experimental designs and the dynamics of the signal-response relationship between the dimerized and activated EGFR and the activation of downstream proteins.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Signaling: Integrating Cyclic Nucleotides into the Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Alexander McArdle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is the primary regulator of mammalian reproductive function in both males and females. It acts via G-protein coupled receptors on gonadotropes to stimulate synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropin hormones luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. These receptors couple primarily via G-proteins of the Gq/11 family, driving activation of phospholipase C and mediating GnRH effects on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion. There is also good evidence that GnRH causes activation of other heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gs and Gi with consequent effects on cyclic AMP production, as well as for effects on the soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases that generate cGMP. Here we provide an overview of these pathways. We emphasise mechanisms underpinning pulsatile hormone signaling and the possible interplay of GnRH and autocrine or paracrine regulatory mechanisms in control of cyclic nucleotide signaling.

  11. Iterative Learning Control Approach for Signaling Split in Urban Traffic Networks with Macroscopic Fundamental Diagrams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent analysis of field experiments in cities revealed that a macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD relating network outflow and network vehicle accumulation exists in the urban traffic networks. It has been further confirmed that an MFD is well defined if the network has regular network topology and homogeneous spatial distribution of vehicle accumulation. However, many real urban networks have different levels of heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of vehicle accumulation. In order to improve the mobility in heterogeneously congested networks, we propose an iterative learning control approach for signaling split, which aims at distributing the accumulation in the networks as homogeneously as possible and ensuring the networks have a larger outflow. The asymptotic convergence of the proposed approach is proved by rigorous analysis and the effectiveness is further demonstrated by extensive simulations.

  12. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  13. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  14. Experimental and computational tools for analysis of signaling networks in primary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoof, Erwin M; Linding, Rune

    2014-01-01

    Cellular information processing in signaling networks forms the basis of responses to environmental stimuli. At any given time, cells receive multiple simultaneous input cues, which are processed and integrated to determine cellular responses such as migration, proliferation, apoptosis, or differ...

  15. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation-Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Forest M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks.

  16. Signaling networks converge on TORC1-SREBP activity to promote endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Sanchez-Alvarez

    Full Text Available The function and capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is determined by multiple processes ranging from the local regulation of peptide translation, translocation, and folding, to global changes in lipid composition. ER homeostasis thus requires complex interactions amongst numerous cellular components. However, describing the networks that maintain ER function during changes in cell behavior and environmental fluctuations has, to date, proven difficult. Here we perform a systems-level analysis of ER homeostasis, and find that although signaling networks that regulate ER function have a largely modular architecture, the TORC1-SREBP signaling axis is a central node that integrates signals emanating from different sub-networks. TORC1-SREBP promotes ER homeostasis by regulating phospholipid biosynthesis and driving changes in ER morphology. In particular, our network model shows TORC1-SREBP serves to integrate signals promoting growth and G1-S progression in order to maintain ER function during cell proliferation.

  17. Construction of cell type-specific logic models of signaling networks using CellNOpt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melody K; Melas, Ioannis; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models are useful tools for understanding protein signaling networks because they provide an integrated view of pharmacological and toxicological processes at the molecular level. Here we describe an approach previously introduced based on logic modeling to generate cell-specific, mechanistic and predictive models of signal transduction. Models are derived from a network encoding prior knowledge that is trained to signaling data, and can be either binary (based on Boolean logic) or quantitative (using a recently developed formalism, constrained fuzzy logic). The approach is implemented in the freely available tool CellNetOptimizer (CellNOpt). We explain the process CellNOpt uses to train a prior knowledge network to data and illustrate its application with a toy example as well as a realistic case describing signaling networks in the HepG2 liver cancer cell line.

  18. Research on the Wire Network Signal Prediction Based on the Improved NNARX Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zipeng; Fan, Tao; Wang, Shuqing

    It is difficult to obtain accurately the wire net signal of power system's high voltage power transmission lines in the process of monitoring and repairing. In order to solve this problem, the signal measured in remote substation or laboratory is employed to make multipoint prediction to gain the needed data. But, the obtained power grid frequency signal is delay. In order to solve the problem, an improved NNARX network which can predict frequency signal based on multi-point data collected by remote substation PMU is describes in this paper. As the error curved surface of the NNARX network is more complicated, this paper uses L-M algorithm to train the network. The result of the simulation shows that the NNARX network has preferable predication performance which provides accurate real time data for field testing and maintenance.

  19. Proceedings of the IEEE 2003 Neural Networks for Signal Processing Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    This proceeding contains refereed papers presented at the thirteenth IEEE Workshop on Neural Networks for Signal Processing (NNSP’2003), held at the Atria-Mercure Conference Center, Toulouse, France, September 17-19, 2003. The Neural Networks for Signal Processing Technical Committee of the IEEE...... Signal Processing Society organized the workshop with sponsorship of the Signal Processing Society and the co-operation of the IEEE Neural Networks Society. The IEEE Press published the previous twelve volumes of the NNSP Workshop proceedings in a hardbound volume. This year, the bound volume...... is to be published by IEEE following the workshop, and we are pleased to inaugurate a new CDROM electronic format, which maintains the same standard as the printed version and facilitates the reading and searching of the papers. In recent years, the field of neural networks has matured considerably in both...

  20. Model-based design of self-Adapting networked signal processing systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira Filho, J.A. de; Papp, Z.; Djapic, R.; Oostveen, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes a model based approach for architecture design of runtime reconfigurable, large-scale, networked signal processing applications. A graph based modeling formalism is introduced to describe all relevant aspects of the design (functional, concurrency, hardware, communication, energy

  1. Inferring signalling networks from longitudinal data using sampling based approaches in the R-package 'ddepn'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ulrike

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network inference from high-throughput data has become an important means of current analysis of biological systems. For instance, in cancer research, the functional relationships of cancer related proteins, summarised into signalling networks are of central interest for the identification of pathways that influence tumour development. Cancer cell lines can be used as model systems to study the cellular response to drug treatments in a time-resolved way. Based on these kind of data, modelling approaches for the signalling relationships are needed, that allow to generate hypotheses on potential interference points in the networks. Results We present the R-package 'ddepn' that implements our recent approach on network reconstruction from longitudinal data generated after external perturbation of network components. We extend our approach by two novel methods: a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for sampling network structures with two edge types (activation and inhibition and an extension of a prior model that penalises deviances from a given reference network while incorporating these two types of edges. Further, as alternative prior we include a model that learns signalling networks with the scale-free property. Conclusions The package 'ddepn' is freely available on R-Forge and CRAN http://ddepn.r-forge.r-project.org, http://cran.r-project.org. It allows to conveniently perform network inference from longitudinal high-throughput data using two different sampling based network structure search algorithms.

  2. Analysis of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signalling network with heparin as coreceptor: evidence for the expansion of the core FGFR signalling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruoyan; Rudd, Timothy R; Hughes, Ashley J; Siligardi, Giuliano; Fernig, David G; Yates, Edwin A

    2013-05-01

    The evolution of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-FGF receptor (FGFR) signalling system has closely followed that of multicellular organisms. The abilities of nine FGFs (FGF-1 to FGF-9; examples of FGF subfamilies 1, 4, 7, 8, and 9) and seven FGFRs or isoforms (FGFR1b, FGFR1c, FGFR2b, FGFR2c, FGFR3b, FGFR3c, and FGFR4) to support signalling in the presence of heparin, a proxy for the cellular heparan sulfate coreceptor, were assembled into a network. A connection between two FGFRs was defined as their mutual ability to signal with a particular FGF. The network contained a core of four receptors (FGFR1c, FGFR2c, FGFR3c, and FGFR4) with complete connectivity and high redundancy. Analysis of the wider network indicated that neither FGF-3 nor FGF-7 was well connected to this core of four receptors, and that divergence of a precursor of FGF subgroups 1, 4 and 9 from FGF subgroup 8 may have allowed expansion from a three-member FGFR core signalling system to the four-member core network. This increases by four-fold the number of possible signalling combinations. Synchrotron radiation CD spectra of the FGFs with heparin revealed no overall common structural change, suggesting the existence of distinct heparin-binding sites throughout the FGFs. The approach provides a potential method of identifying agents capable of influencing particular FGF-FGFR combinations, or areas of the signalling network, for experimental or therapeutic purposes.

  3. A methodology for the structural and functional analysis of signaling and regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeoni Luca

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural analysis of cellular interaction networks contributes to a deeper understanding of network-wide interdependencies, causal relationships, and basic functional capabilities. While the structural analysis of metabolic networks is a well-established field, similar methodologies have been scarcely developed and applied to signaling and regulatory networks. Results We propose formalisms and methods, relying on adapted and partially newly introduced approaches, which facilitate a structural analysis of signaling and regulatory networks with focus on functional aspects. We use two different formalisms to represent and analyze interaction networks: interaction graphs and (logical interaction hypergraphs. We show that, in interaction graphs, the determination of feedback cycles and of all the signaling paths between any pair of species is equivalent to the computation of elementary modes known from metabolic networks. Knowledge on the set of signaling paths and feedback loops facilitates the computation of intervention strategies and the classification of compounds into activators, inhibitors, ambivalent factors, and non-affecting factors with respect to a certain species. In some cases, qualitative effects induced by perturbations can be unambiguously predicted from the network scheme. Interaction graphs however, are not able to capture AND relationships which do frequently occur in interaction networks. The consequent logical concatenation of all the arcs pointing into a species leads to Boolean networks. For a Boolean representation of cellular interaction networks we propose a formalism based on logical (or signed interaction hypergraphs, which facilitates in particular a logical steady state analysis (LSSA. LSSA enables studies on the logical processing of signals and the identification of optimal intervention points (targets in cellular networks. LSSA also reveals network regions whose parametrization and initial

  4. Techniques for labeling of optical signals in bust switched networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Koonen, A. M. J.; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2003-01-01

    multiplexed (WDM) networks due to its single forwarding algorithm, thus yielding low latency, and it enables scaling to terabit rates. Moreover, LOBS is compatible with the general multiprotocol label switching (GMPLS) framework for a unified control plane. We present a review on techniques for labeling......We present a review of significant issues related to labeled optical burst switched (LOBS) networks and technologies enabling future optical internet networks. Labeled optical burst switching provides a quick and efficient forwarding mechanism of IP packets/bursts over wavelength division...

  5. Molecular Signaling Networks That Choreograph Epimorphic Fin Regeneration in Zebrafish – A Mini-Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tal, Tamara L; Franzosa, Jill A.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    This short review provides a current synopsis of caudal fin regeneration in zebrafish with an emphasis on the molecular signaling networks that dictate epimorphic regeneration. At the outset, the fundamentals of caudal fin architecture and the stages of epimorphic regeneration are described. This is followed by a detailed look at the main networks implicated in fin regeneration, namely the Wnt, fibroblast growth factor, activin-βA, retinoic acid and hedgehog signaling pathways. Throughout thi...

  6. Sensor selection for received signal strength-based source localization in wireless sensor networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Generally, localization is a nonlinear problem, while linearization is used to simplify this problem. Reasonable approximations could be achieved when signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is large enough. Energy is a critical resource in wireless sensor networks, and system lifetime needs to be prolonged through the use of energy efficient strategies during system operation. In this paper, a closed-form solution for received signal strength (RSS)-based source localization in wireless sensor network (WSN) is obtained...

  7. Control of bacterial exoelectrogenesis by c-AMP-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Phillips, Grace E; Stav, Shira; Lünse, Christina E; McCown, Phillip J; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-28

    Major changes in bacterial physiology including biofilm and spore formation involve signaling by the cyclic dinucleotides c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Recently, another second messenger dinucleotide, c-AMP-GMP, was found to control chemotaxis and colonization by Vibrio cholerae. We have identified a superregulon of genes controlled by c-AMP-GMP in numerous Deltaproteobacteria, including Geobacter species that use extracellular insoluble metal oxides as terminal electron acceptors. This exoelectrogenic process has been studied for its possible utility in energy production and bioremediation. Many genes involved in adhesion, pilin formation, and others that are important for exoelectrogenesis are controlled by members of a variant riboswitch class that selectively bind c-AMP-GMP. These RNAs constitute, to our knowledge, the first known specific receptors for c-AMP-GMP and reveal that this molecule is used by many bacteria to control specialized physiological processes.

  8. Knowledge representation model for systems-level analysis of signal transduction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Yup; Zimmer, Ralf; Lee, Sang-Yup; Hanisch, Daniel; Park, Sunwon

    2004-01-01

    A Petri-net based model for knowledge representation has been developed to describe as explicitly and formally as possible the molecular mechanisms of cell signaling and their pathological implications. A conceptual framework has been established for reconstructing and analyzing signal transduction networks on the basis of the formal representation. Such a conceptual framework renders it possible to qualitatively understand the cell signaling behavior at systems-level. The mechanisms of the complex signaling network are explored by applying the established framework to the signal transduction induced by potent proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha The corresponding expert-knowledge network is constructed to evaluate its mechanisms in detail. This strategy should be useful in drug target discovery and its validation.

  9. Efficient Signal-Time Coding Design and its Application in Wireless Gaussian Relay Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Pingyi; Letaief, Khaled Ben

    2009-01-01

    Signal-time coding, which combines the traditional encoding/modulation mode in the signal domain with signal pulse phase modulation in the time domain, was proposed to improve the information flow rate in relay networks. In this paper, we mainly focus on the efficient signal-time coding design. We first derive an explicit iterative algorithm to estimate the maximum number of available codes given the code length of signal-time coding, and then present an iterative construction method of codebooks. It is shown that compared with conventional computer search, the proposed iterative construction method can reduce the complexity greatly. Numerical results will also indicate that the new constructed codebook is optimal in terms of coding rate. To minimize the buffer size needed to store the codebook while keeping a relatively high efficiency, we shall propose a combinatorial construction method. We will then consider applications in wireless Gaussian relay networks. It will be shown that in the three node network ...

  10. Computationally efficient locally-recurrent neural networks for online signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, A; Shim, I

    1999-01-01

    A general class of computationally efficient locally recurrent networks (CERN) is described for real-time adaptive signal processing. The structure of the CERN is based on linear-in-the- parameters single-hidden-layered feedforward neural networks such as the radial basis function (RBF) network, the Volterra neural network (VNN) and the functionally expanded neural network (FENN), adapted to employ local output feedback. The corresponding learning algorithms are derived and key structural and computational complexity comparisons are made between the CERN and conventional recurrent neural networks. Two case studies are performed involving the real- time adaptive nonlinear prediction of real-world chaotic, highly non- stationary laser time series and an actual speech signal, which show that a recurrent FENN based adaptive CERN predictor can significantly outperform the corresponding feedforward FENN and conventionally employed linear adaptive filtering models. (13 refs).

  11. Discrimination of Cylinders with Different Wall Thicknesses using Neural Networks and Simulated Dolphin Sonar Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Au, Whitlow; Larsen, Jan;

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a method integrating neural networks into a system for recognizing underwater objects. The system is based on a combination of simulated dolphin sonar signals, simulated auditory filters and artificial neural networks. The system is tested on a cylinder wall thickness...

  12. [Principles of design of neural-network analog-to-digital converters of bioelectric signals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loktiukhin, V N; Chelebaev, S V

    2007-01-01

    A design principle and a procedure for synthesis of neural-network analog-to-digital converters of bioelectric signals are suggested. An example of implementation of an FPGA-based neural-network converter for classification of bioparameters is presented.

  13. Dynamical patterns of calcium signaling in a functional model of neuron-astrocyte networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D.E.; Koreshkov, R.N.; Brazhe, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a functional mathematical model for neuron-astrocyte networks. The model incorporates elements of the tripartite synapse and the spatial branching structure of coupled astrocytes. We consider glutamate-induced calcium signaling as a specific mode of excitability and transmission...... in astrocytic-neuronal networks. We reproduce local and global dynamical patterns observed experimentally....

  14. Frequency Sensitivity of Signal Detection in Scale-Free Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fa-Ming; LIU Zong-Hua

    2009-01-01

    @@ It has been recently reported that scale-free topology favors the detection of a weak signal because of the higher amplification at the hub node than that at other nodes [Phys. Ref. E 78 (2008)046111]. We investigate the corresponding synchronization behaviors and find that the favorite detection depends not only on the coupling and noise strengths but also on the frequency of the external signal. We reveal theoretically and numerically that the amplification effect of the hub node will decrease monotonously with the externai frequency, which is useful to understand the high sensitivity of animal visual and auditory systems to weak external signals.

  15. Urban Traffic Signal System Control Structural Optimization Based on Network Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced urban traffic signal control systems such as SCOOT and SCATS normally coordinate traffic network using multilevel hierarchical control mechanism. In this mechanism, several key intersections will be selected from traffic signal network and the network will be divided into different control subareas. Traditionally, key intersection selection and control subareas division are executed according to dynamic traffic counts and link length between intersections, which largely rely on traffic engineers’ experience. However, it omits important inherent characteristics of traffic network topology. In this paper, we will apply network analysis approach into these two aspects for traffic system control structure optimization. Firstly, the modified C-means clustering algorithm will be proposed to assess the importance of intersections in traffic network and furthermore determine the key intersections based on three indexes instead of merely on traffic counts in traditional methods. Secondly, the improved network community discovery method will be used to give more reasonable evidence in traffic control subarea division. Finally, to test the effectiveness of network analysis approach, a hardware-in-loop simulation environment composed of regional traffic control system, microsimulation software and signal controller hardware, will be built. Both traditional method and proposed approach will be implemented on simulation test bed to evaluate traffic operation performance indexes, for example, travel time, stop times, delay and average vehicle speed. Simulation results show that the proposed network analysis approach can improve the traffic control system operation performance effectively.

  16. Adaptive classification of temporal signals in fixed-weights recurrent neural networks: an existence proof

    CERN Document Server

    Tyukin, Ivan; van Leeuwen, Cees

    2007-01-01

    We address the important theoretical question why a recurrent neural network with fixed weights can adaptively classify time-varied signals in the presence of additive noise and parametric perturbations. We provide a mathematical proof assuming that unknown parameters are allowed to enter the signal nonlinearly and the noise amplitude is sufficiently small.

  17. Reconstruction of the temporal signaling network in Salmonella-infected human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gungor eBudak

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen that usually infects its host through food sources. Translocation of the pathogen proteins into the host cells leads to changes in the signaling mechanism either by activating or inhibiting the host proteins. Using high-throughput ‘omic’ technologies, changes in the signaling components can be quantified at different levels; however, experimental hits are usually incomplete to represent the whole signaling system as some driver proteins stay hidden within the experimental data. Given that the bacterial infection modifies the response network of the host, more coherent view of the underlying biological processes and the signaling networks can be obtained by using a network modeling approach based on the reverse engineering principles in which a confident region from the protein interactome is found by inferring hits from the omic experiments. In this work, we have used a published temporal phosphoproteomic dataset of Salmonella-infected human cells and reconstructed the temporal signaling network of the human host by integrating the interactome and the phosphoproteomic datasets. We have combined two well-established network modeling frameworks, the Prize-collecting Steiner Forest (PCSF approach and the Integer Linear Programming (ILP based edge inference approach. The resulting network conserves the information on temporality, direction of interactions, while revealing hidden entities in the signaling, such as the SNARE binding, mTOR signaling, immune response, cytoskeleton organization, and apoptosis pathways. Targets of the Salmonella effectors in the host cells such as CDC42, RHOA, 14-3-3δ, Syntaxin family, Oxysterol-binding proteins were included in the reconstructed signaling network although they were not present in the initial phosphoproteomic data. We believe that integrated approaches have a high potential for the identification of clinical targets in infectious diseases, especially in the

  18. Therapeutics Targeting FGF Signaling Network in Human Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Masaru

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling through its receptors, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, or FGFR4, regulates cell fate, angiogenesis, immunity, and metabolism. Dysregulated FGF signaling causes human diseases, such as breast cancer, chondrodysplasia, gastric cancer, lung cancer, and X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Recombinant FGFs are pro-FGF signaling therapeutics for tissue and/or wound repair, whereas FGF analogs and gene therapy are under development for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoarthritis. FGF traps, anti-FGF/FGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and small-molecule FGFR inhibitors are anti-FGF signaling therapeutics under development for the treatment of cancer, chondrodysplasia, and rickets. Here, I discuss the benefit-risk and cost-effectiveness issues of precision medicine targeting FGFRs, ALK, EGFR, and FLT3. FGFR-targeted therapy should be optimized for cancer treatment, focusing on genomic tests and recurrence.

  19. A TDoA Localization Scheme for Underwater Sensor Networks with Use of Multilinear Chirp Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the multipath, Doppler, and other effects, the node location signals have high probability of access collision in the underwater acoustic sensor networks (UW-ASNs, and therefore, it causes the signal lost and the access block; therefore, it constrains the networks performance. In this paper, we take the multilinear chirp (MLC signals as the location signal to improve the anticollision ability. In order to increase the detection efficiency of MLC, we propose a fast efficient detection method called mixing change rate-fractional Fourier transform (MCR-FrFT. This method transforms the combined rates of MLC into symmetry triangle rates and then separates the multiuser signals based on the transformed rates by using FrFT. Theoretical derivation and simulation results show that the proposed method can detect the locations signals, estimate the time difference of arrival (TDoA, reduce the multiple access interference, and improve the location performance.

  20. A Network Map of FGF-1/FGFR Signaling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Raju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor-1 (FGF-1 is a well characterized growth factor among the 22 members of the FGF superfamily in humans. It binds to all the four known FGF receptors and regulates a plethora of functions including cell growth, proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival in different cell types. FGF-1 is involved in the regulation of diverse physiological processes such as development, angiogenesis, wound healing, adipogenesis, and neurogenesis. Deregulation of FGF-1 signaling is not only implicated in tumorigenesis but also is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. Given the biomedical significance of FGFs and the fact that individual FGFs have different roles in diverse physiological processes, the analysis of signaling pathways induced by the binding of specific FGFs to their cognate receptors demands more focused efforts. Currently, there are no resources in the public domain that facilitate the analysis of signaling pathways induced by individual FGFs in the FGF/FGFR signaling system. Towards this, we have developed a resource of signaling reactions triggered by FGF-1/FGFR system in various cell types/tissues. The pathway data and the reaction map are made available for download in different community standard data exchange formats through NetPath and NetSlim signaling pathway resources.

  1. Estimation of azimuth and slowness of teleseismic signals recorded by a local seismic network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    靳平; 潘常周

    2002-01-01

    A new method that is applicable to local seismic networks to estimate the azimuth and slowness of teleseismic signals is introduced in the paper. The method is based on the correlation between the arrival times and station positions. The analyzed results indicate that the azimuth and slowness of teleseismic signals can be accurately estimated by the method. Average errors for azimuth and slowness measurements obtained by this method using data of Xi(an Digital Telemetry Seismic Network are 2.0o and 0.34 s/(o), respectively. The conclusions drawn from this study indicate that this method may be very useful to interpret teleseismic records of local seismic networks.

  2. Effects of DAG-PKC signaling pathway on cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in anti-inflammatory effects of CCK-8%CCK-8抗炎作用中DAG-PKC信号通路对cAMP-PKA信号通路的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高维娟; 许顺江; 丛斌; 李淑瑾; 马春玲

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨CCK-8抗炎作用中DAG-PKC信号通路对cAMP-PKA信号通路的影响.方法 分离纯化大鼠PIMs,分别用LPS、CCK、LPS+CCK、PMA、SC-3088、LPS+PMA、LPS+SC-3088、CCK+PMA、CCK+SC-3088、LPS+CCK+PMA、LPS+CCK+SC-3088孵育一定时间,采用125I-cAMP放射免疫分析法测定细胞内cAMP含量,用放射激酶法测定PKA活性.结果 单独应用PMA和SC-3088孵育大鼠PIMs,细胞内cAMP含量和PKA活性与正常对照组相比无明显变化(P>0.05).PMA可升高LPS作用下的细胞内cAMP含量和PKA活性(P<0.01),SC-3088则可使LPS作用下的细胞内cAMP含量和PKA活性降低(P<0.01).分别应用PMA、SC-3088与CCK共同孵育,则CCK+PMA组细胞内cAMP含量和PKA活性高于单独应用CCK组(P<0.01),CCK+SC-3088组则降低(P<0.01).与LPS+CCK组相比,PMA+LPS+CCK组细胞内cAMP含量和PKA活性升高(P<0.01),而SC-3088+LPS+CCK组细胞内cAMP含量和PKA活性降低(P<0.01).结论 在LPS诱导的大鼠PIMs,CCK-8可通过激活cAMP-PKA信号通路发挥抗炎作用;DAG-PKC信号通路的活化对cAMP-PKA信号通路有正性调节作用.

  3. Modeling Signal Transduction Networks: A comparison of two Stochastic Kinetic Simulation Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettigrew, Michel F.; Resat, Haluk

    2005-09-15

    Simulations of a scalable four compartment reaction model based on the well known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal transduction system are used to compare two stochastic algorithms ? StochSim and the Gibson-Gillespie. It is concluded that the Gibson-Gillespie is the algorithm of choice for most realistic cases with the possible exception of signal transduction networks characterized by a moderate number (< 100) of complex types, each with a very small population, but with a high degree of connectivity amongst the complex types. Keywords: Signal transduction networks, Stochastic simulation, StochSim, Gillespie

  4. Neural network committees for finger joint angle estimation from surface EMG signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Narender P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In virtual reality (VR systems, the user's finger and hand positions are sensed and used to control the virtual environments. Direct biocontrol of VR environments using surface electromyography (SEMG signals may be more synergistic and unconstraining to the user. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a technique to predict the finger joint angle from the surface EMG measurements of the extensor muscle using neural network models. Methodology SEMG together with the actual joint angle measurements were obtained while the subject was performing flexion-extension rotation of the index finger at three speeds. Several neural networks were trained to predict the joint angle from the parameters extracted from the SEMG signals. The best networks were selected to form six committees. The neural network committees were evaluated using data from new subjects. Results There was hysteresis in the measured SMEG signals during the flexion-extension cycle. However, neural network committees were able to predict the joint angle with reasonable accuracy. RMS errors ranged from 0.085 ± 0.036 for fast speed finger-extension to 0.147 ± 0.026 for slow speed finger extension, and from 0.098 ± 0.023 for the fast speed finger flexion to 0.163 ± 0.054 for slow speed finger flexion. Conclusion Although hysteresis was observed in the measured SEMG signals, the committees of neural networks were able to predict the finger joint angle from SEMG signals.

  5. Kinome-wide Decoding of Network-Attacking Mutations Rewiring Cancer Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin M; Simpson, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire pathological phenotypes through accumulation of mutations that perturb signaling networks. However, global analysis of these events is currently limited. Here, we identify six types of network-attacking mutations (NAMs), including changes in kinase and SH2 modulation, network...... and experimentally validated several NAMs, including PKCγ M501I and PKD1 D665N, which encode specificity switches analogous to the appearance of kinases de novo within the kinome. We discover mutant molecular logic gates, a drift toward phospho-threonine signaling, weakening of phosphorylation motifs, and kinase......-inactivating hotspots in cancer. Our method pinpoints functional NAMs, scales with the complexity of cancer genomes and cell signaling, and may enhance our capability to therapeutically target tumor-specific networks....

  6. Determination of Signaling Pathways in Proteins through Network Theory: Importance of the Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Andre A S T; Ortiz, Vanessa

    2014-04-08

    Network theory methods are being increasingly applied to proteins to investigate complex biological phenomena. Residues that are important for signaling processes can be identified by their condition as critical nodes in a protein structure network. This analysis involves modeling the protein as a graph in which each residue is represented as a node and edges are drawn between nodes that are deemed connected. In this paper, we show that the results obtained from this type of network analysis (i.e., signaling pathways, key residues for signal transmission, etc.) are profoundly affected by the topology of the network, with normally used determination of network edges by geometrical cutoff schemes giving rise to substantial statistical errors. We propose a method of determining protein structure networks by calculating inter-residue interaction energies and show that it gives an accurate and reliable description of the signal-propagation properties of a known allosteric enzyme. We also show that including covalent interactions in the network topology is essential for accurate results to be obtained.

  7. Signaling-based path-segment protection in mesh optical networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yueming Lu; Chao Zou; Qiushi Wang; Yuefeng Ji

    2011-01-01

    Path protections have become increasingly important for current mesh optical networks because fast restorations in generalized multiprotocol label switching (GMPLS) networks are uncertain. However, setting up additional disjoint paths to protect connections leads to more path setup blocking and signaling collisions. We analyze signaling collisions, path blocking and blocking probability, as well as calculate node-to-node blocking probabilities. A signaling-based path-segment protection (PSP) is proposed, which integrates segment protections and path protections as well as enhances the performance of path protections and ring protections. The setup of PSP connections causes less blocking probability than the setup of path protection connections in the simulations.%Path protections have become increasingly important for current mesh optical networks because fast restorations in generalized multiprotocol label switching (GMPLS) networks are uncertain.However,setting up additional disjoint paths to protect connections leads to more path setup blocking and signaling collisions.We analyze signaling collisions,path blocking and blocking probability,as well as calculate node-to-node blocking probabilities.A signaling-based path-segment protection (PSP) is proposed,which integrates segment protections and path protections as well as enhances the performance of path protections and ring protections.The setup of PSP connections causes less blocking probability than the setup of path protection connections in the simulations.Recently,with the emergence of new protection and restoration methods,mesh topologies have gradually replaced ring topologies,especially in optical transport networks (OTNs)[1],automatically switched optical networks (ASONs)[2],generalized multiprotocol label switching (GMPLS) protocol networks[3,4],and packet transport networks (PTNs)[5].However,fast restoration methods currently face some challenges in China.

  8. Inactivation of Multidrug Resistance Proteins Disrupts Both Cellular Extrusion and Intracellular Degradation of cAMP

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Moses; Rich, Thomas C.; Scheitrum, Colleen; Conti, Marco; Richter, Wito

    2011-01-01

    In addition to xenobiotics and several other endogenous metabolites, multidrug-resistance proteins (MRPs) extrude the second-messenger cAMP from various cells. Pharmacological and/or genetic inactivation of MRPs has been shown to augment intracellular cAMP signaling, an effect assumed to be a direct consequence of the blockade of cAMP extrusion. Here we provide evidence that the augmented intracellular cAMP levels are not due exclusively to the prevention of cAMP efflux because MRP inactivati...

  9. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  10. Vertical Handoff with Predictive Received Signal Strength in Next Generation Wireless Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Madaan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the last few decades, tremendous innovations and inventions have been observed in every field, but especially in wireless network technology. The prevailing demand curves and trends in this particular area of communication show the importance of real-time multimedia applications over several networks with guaranteed quality of service (QoS. The Next Generation Wireless Network (NGWN consists of heterogeneous wireless networks that will grant high data rate and bandwidth to mobile users. The primary aim of Next Generation Wireless Network (NGWN is to conceal heterogeneities and to achieve convergence of diverse networks to provide seamless mobility. So that mobile user can move freely between networks without losing the connection or changing the setting at any moment. When the mobile user moves between different networks, there is a requirement to handover the channel, from one network to another by considering its services, features and user preferences. Channel handover between two different networks is done with the help of vertical handoff (VHO. In a heterogeneous environment, numerous technologies co-exist with their unique characteristics. Therefore, it is very difficult to design efficient handoff decision algorithm. The poorly designed handoff algorithm tends to increase the traffic load and, thereby tend to dramatic decrease in quality of service. A mobile node equipped with multiple network interfaces will be able to access heterogeneous wireless access network. But the availability of alternatives give rise to a problem of unnecessary handoff. To avoid this, we have proposed a decision algorithm based on predictive received signal strength, hysteresis margin and dwell time to select an optimum target network. The handoff policies are designed using received signal strength (RSS, available bandwidth, service cost, user preference, type of application and network condition to reduce the number of handoffs, decision delay

  11. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eBOULARAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors’ signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability.

  12. Towards the systematic discovery of signal transduction networks using phosphorylation dynamics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yachie Nozomu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation is a ubiquitous and fundamental regulatory mechanism that controls signal transduction in living cells. The number of identified phosphoproteins and their phosphosites is rapidly increasing as a result of recent mass spectrometry-based approaches. Results We analyzed time-course phosphoproteome data obtained previously by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry with the stable isotope labeling using amino acids in cell culture (SILAC method. This provides the relative phosphorylation activities of digested peptides at each of five time points after stimulating HeLa cells with epidermal growth factor (EGF. We initially calculated the correlations between the phosphorylation dynamics patterns of every pair of peptides and connected the strongly correlated pairs to construct a network. We found that peptides extracted from the same intracellular fraction (nucleus vs. cytoplasm tended to be close together within this phosphorylation dynamics-based network. The network was then analyzed using graph theory and compared with five known signal-transduction pathways. The dynamics-based network was correlated with known signaling pathways in the NetPath and Phospho.ELM databases, and especially with the EGF receptor (EGFR signaling pathway. Although the phosphorylation patterns of many proteins were drastically changed by the EGF stimulation, our results suggest that only EGFR signaling transduction was both strongly activated and precisely controlled. Conclusions The construction of a phosphorylation dynamics-based network provides a useful overview of condition-specific intracellular signal transduction using quantitative time-course phosphoproteome data under specific experimental conditions. Detailed prediction of signal transduction based on phosphoproteome dynamics remains challenging. However, since the phosphorylation profiles of kinase-substrate pairs on the specific pathway were localized in the dynamics

  13. Decoding signalling networks by mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Mann, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    -wide characterization of signalling events at the levels of post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions and changes in protein expression. This technology delivers accurate and unbiased information about the quantitative changes of thousands of proteins and their modifications in response to any...

  14. Exploring signal transduction networks using mass spectrometry-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, L.A.T.

    2012-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics can be used to answer a diversity of biological questions. In this thesis, we describe the application of several MS-based proteomics approaches to get insight into several aspects of signal transduction. In Chapter 2, quantitative global phosphoproteomics are

  15. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  16. Integrated signaling networks in plant responses to sedentary endoparasitic nematodes: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijuan; Rashotte, Aaron M; Singh, Narendra K; Weaver, David B; Lawrence, Kathy S; Locy, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary plant endoparasitic nematodes can cause detrimental yield losses in crop plants making the study of detailed cellular, molecular, and whole plant responses to them a subject of importance. In response to invading nematodes and nematode-secreted effectors, plant susceptibility/resistance is mainly determined by the coordination of different signaling pathways including specific plant resistance genes or proteins, plant hormone synthesis and signaling pathways, as well as reactive oxygen signals that are generated in response to nematode attack. Crosstalk between various nematode resistance-related elements can be seen as an integrated signaling network regulated by transcription factors and small RNAs at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and/or translational levels. Ultimately, the outcome of this highly controlled signaling network determines the host plant susceptibility/resistance to nematodes.

  17. An inductive signalling network regulates mammalian tooth morphogenesis with implications for tooth regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Yu, M; Tian, W

    2013-10-01

    Sequential and reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, essential throughout such aspects of tooth morphogenesis as patterning, size and number of teeth, involves a well-ordered series of inductive and permissive signals that exert global control over cell proliferation, differentiation and organogenesis. In particular, growth factors, transcription factors and their corresponding receptors, as well as other soluble morphogens, make up a regulatory network at the molecular level that synergistically or antagonistically controls intra-/inter-cellular signal transduction during odontogenesis. This review summarizes recent advances in the study of crucial signalling pathways, for example of BMPs, Wnt, Notch, Shh and FGF, with emphasis on the potential integrated signalling network responsible for tooth formation. Our work probes into the complexity of these inductive signalling pathways to promote the understanding of tooth regeneration. Additionally, our study provides further insights into therapeutic strategies for various dental abnormalities in patterning and number, such as tooth agenesis and supernumerary teeth.

  18. Signaling and Transcriptional Networks in Heart Development and Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is the first functional organ, the first indicator of life. Its normal formation and function are essential for fetal life. Defects in heart formation lead to congenital heart defects, underscoring the finesse with which the heart is assembled. Understanding the reg-ulatory networks controlling heart development have led to significant insights into its lineage origins and morphogenesis and illuminated important aspects of mammalian embryology, while providing insights int...

  19. Creating and analyzing pathway and protein interaction compendia for modelling signal transduction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirouac Daniel C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the information-processing capabilities of signal transduction networks, how those networks are disrupted in disease, and rationally designing therapies to manipulate diseased states require systematic and accurate reconstruction of network topology. Data on networks central to human physiology, such as the inflammatory signalling networks analyzed here, are found in a multiplicity of on-line resources of pathway and interactome databases (Cancer CellMap, GeneGo, KEGG, NCI-Pathway Interactome Database (NCI-PID, PANTHER, Reactome, I2D, and STRING. We sought to determine whether these databases contain overlapping information and whether they can be used to construct high reliability prior knowledge networks for subsequent modeling of experimental data. Results We have assembled an ensemble network from multiple on-line sources representing a significant portion of all machine-readable and reconcilable human knowledge on proteins and protein interactions involved in inflammation. This ensemble network has many features expected of complex signalling networks assembled from high-throughput data: a power law distribution of both node degree and edge annotations, and topological features of a “bow tie” architecture in which diverse pathways converge on a highly conserved set of enzymatic cascades focused around PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK, JAK/STAT, NFκB, and apoptotic signaling. Individual pathways exhibit “fuzzy” modularity that is statistically significant but still involving a majority of “cross-talk” interactions. However, we find that the most widely used pathway databases are highly inconsistent with respect to the actual constituents and interactions in this network. Using a set of growth factor signalling networks as examples (epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta, tumor necrosis factor, and wingless, we find a multiplicity of network topologies in which receptors couple to downstream

  20. Type 1 Fimbriae, a Colonization Factor of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Are Controlled by the Metabolic Sensor CRP-cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Claudia M.; Åberg, Anna; Straseviçiene, Jurate; Emődy, Levente; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Balsalobre, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Type 1 fimbriae are a crucial factor for the virulence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli during the first steps of infection by mediating adhesion to epithelial cells. They are also required for the consequent colonization of the tissues and for invasion of the uroepithelium. Here, we studied the role of the specialized signal transduction system CRP-cAMP in the regulation of type 1 fimbriation. Although initially discovered by regulating carbohydrate metabolism, the CRP-cAMP complex controls a major regulatory network in Gram-negative bacteria, including a broad subset of genes spread into different functional categories of the cell. Our results indicate that CRP-cAMP plays a dual role in type 1 fimbriation, affecting both the phase variation process and fimA promoter activity, with an overall repressive outcome on fimbriation. The dissection of the regulatory pathway let us conclude that CRP-cAMP negatively affects FimB-mediated recombination by an indirect mechanism that requires DNA gyrase activity. Moreover, the underlying studies revealed that CRP-cAMP controls the expression of another global regulator in Gram-negative bacteria, the leucine-responsive protein Lrp. CRP-cAMP-mediated repression is limiting the switch from the non-fimbriated to the fimbriated state. Consistently, a drop in the intracellular concentration of cAMP due to altered physiological conditions (e.g. growth in presence of glucose) increases the percentage of fimbriated cells in the bacterial population. We also provide evidence that the repression of type 1 fimbriae by CRP-cAMP occurs during fast growth conditions (logarithmic phase) and is alleviated during slow growth (stationary phase), which is consistent with an involvement of type 1 fimbriae in the adaptation to stress conditions by promoting biofilm growth or entry into host cells. Our work suggests that the metabolic sensor CRP-cAMP plays a role in coupling the expression of type 1 fimbriae to environmental conditions, thereby

  1. DMPD: Glucocorticoids and the innate immune system: crosstalk with the toll-likereceptor signaling network. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17576036 Glucocorticoids and the innate immune system: crosstalk with the toll-likereceptor signaling networ...he toll-likereceptor signaling network. PubmedID 17576036 Title Glucocorticoids a...nd the innate immune system: crosstalk with the toll-likereceptor signaling network. Authors Chinenov Y, Rog

  2. PathFinder: mining signal transduction pathway segments from protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jiong

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Signal transduction pathway is the chain of processes by which a cell converts an extracellular signal into a response. In most unicellular organisms, the number of signal transduction pathways influences the number of ways the cell can react and respond to the environment. Discovering signal transduction pathways is an arduous problem, even with the use of systematic genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies. These techniques lead to an enormous amount of data and how to interpret and process this data becomes a challenging computational problem. Results In this study we present a new framework for identifying signaling pathways in protein-protein interaction networks. Our goal is to find biologically significant pathway segments in a given interaction network. Currently, protein-protein interaction data has excessive amount of noise, e.g., false positive and false negative interactions. First, we eliminate false positives in the protein-protein interaction network by integrating the network with microarray expression profiles, protein subcellular localization and sequence information. In addition, protein families are used to repair false negative interactions. Then the characteristics of known signal transduction pathways and their functional annotations are extracted in the form of association rules. Conclusion Given a pair of starting and ending proteins, our methodology returns candidate pathway segments between these two proteins with possible missing links (recovered false negatives. In our study, S. cerevisiae (yeast data is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  3. cAMP依赖性蛋白激酶信号传导通路在大鼠CRH性发热机制中的作用%The cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway is involved in the pyrogenic effect of CRH in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华东; 王彦平; 屈洋; 戚仁斌; 陆大祥; 李楚杰; 颜亮

    2001-01-01

    目的观察cAMP依赖性蛋白激酶信号传导通路在大鼠CRH性发热机制中的作用。 方法第三脑室注射促肾上腺皮质激素释放激素(CRH),腺苷酸环化酶抑制剂DDA或cAMP依赖性蛋白 激酶抑制剂Rp-cAMPS,测定大鼠结肠温度。用放射免疫分析法测定下丘脑cAMP含量,并用离体实验观 察CRH对下丘脑cAMP含量的影响。 结果第三脑室微量注射CRH(2.5μg,5.0μg,10μg)引起大鼠结肠温度和下丘脑cAMP水平明显升高,下 丘脑cAMP水平与大鼠2小时发热反应指数之间存在明显的正相关(r=0.994,P<0.01)。离体实验同样 观察到CRH可引起下丘脑cAMP水平明显升高。事先向第三脑室微量注射腺苷酸环化酶抑制剂DDA 30μg或cAMP依赖性蛋白激酶抑制剂Rp-cAMPs 15μg均显著抑制中枢注射CRH引起的发热反应。 结论这些结果证明,cAMP参与了大鼠CRH性发热的中枢机制,cAMP依赖性蛋白激酶可能在CRH性发 热机制中发挥重要作用,cAMP依赖性蛋白激酶信号传导通路可能介导中枢注射CRH对大鼠的致热作用。%To determine whether the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway is involved in the pyrogenic action of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) in rats. Methods Corticotropin releasing hormone, 2', 3 '-dideoxyadenosine (DDA) and adenosine-3', 5' (cyclic) monophosphorothionate, Rp-lsomer (Rp-cAMPS), were administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.). The colonic temperature was measured using a thermistor, and the content of cAMP in the hypothalamus was determined by radioimmunoassay. Hypethalemic incubation was used to assess the effects of CRH on the content of cAMP in the hypothalamus in vitro. Results Microinjection (i.c.v.) of CRH (2.5 μg, 5.0 μg and 10 μg) caused increases in colonic temperature and the hypothalemus cAMP level in conscious rats. CRH increased hypothalemus cAMP level in vitro. The pyrogenic effects of

  4. Three-dimensional measurement of cAMP gradients using hyperspectral confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter F.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions over a wide range of timescales. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform, and that cAMP compartmentalization is largely responsible for signaling specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. However, to date, no studies have experimentally measured three dimensional (3D) cAMP distributions within cells. Here we use both 2D and 3D hyperspectral microscopy to visualize cAMP gradients in endothelial cells from the pulmonary microvasculature (PMVECs). cAMP levels were measured using a FRETbased cAMP sensor comprised of a cAMP binding domain from EPAC sandwiched between FRET donors and acceptors -- Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. Data were acquired using either a Nikon A1R spectral confocal microscope or custom spectral microscopy system. Analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from a single confocal slice or from summed images of all slices (2D analysis) indicated little or no cAMP gradients were formed within PMVECs under basal conditions or following agonist treatment. However, analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from 3D cellular geometries (z stacks) demonstrate marked cAMP gradients from the apical to basolateral membrane of PMVECs. These results strongly suggest that 2D imaging studies of cAMP compartmentalization -- whether epifluorescence or confocal microscopy -- may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity.

  5. Intrinsic excitability state of local neuronal population modulates signal propagation in feed-forward neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruixue; Wang, Jiang; Yu, Haitao; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xilei; Qin, Yingmei; Wang, Haixu

    2015-04-01

    Reliable signal propagation across distributed brain areas is an essential requirement for cognitive function, and it has been investigated extensively in computational studies where feed-forward network (FFN) is taken as a generic model. But it is still unclear how distinct local network states, which are intrinsically generated by synaptic interactions within each layer, would affect the ability of FFN to transmit information. Here we investigate the impact of such network states on propagating transient synchrony (synfire) and firing rate by a combination of numerical simulations and analytical approach. Specifically, local network dynamics is attributed to the competition between excitatory and inhibitory neurons within each layer. Our results show that concomitant with different local network states, the performance of signal propagation differs dramatically. For both synfire propagation and firing rate propagation, there exists an optimal local excitability state, respectively, that optimizes the performance of signal propagation. Furthermore, we find that long-range connections strongly change the dependence of spiking activity propagation on local network state and propose that these two factors work jointly to determine information transmission across distributed networks. Finally, a simple mean field approach that bridges response properties of long-range connectivity and local subnetworks is utilized to reveal the underlying mechanism.

  6. Bioelectric signal classification using a recurrent probabilistic neural network with time-series discriminant component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hideaki; Shima, Keisuke; Shibanoki, Taro; Kurita, Yuichi; Tsuji, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a probabilistic neural network developed on the basis of time-series discriminant component analysis (TSDCA) that can be used to classify high-dimensional time-series patterns. TSDCA involves the compression of high-dimensional time series into a lower-dimensional space using a set of orthogonal transformations and the calculation of posterior probabilities based on a continuous-density hidden Markov model that incorporates a Gaussian mixture model expressed in the reduced-dimensional space. The analysis can be incorporated into a neural network so that parameters can be obtained appropriately as network coefficients according to backpropagation-through-time-based training algorithm. The network is considered to enable high-accuracy classification of high-dimensional time-series patterns and to reduce the computation time taken for network training. In the experiments conducted during the study, the validity of the proposed network was demonstrated for EEG signals.

  7. Plant gravitropic signal transduction: A network analysis leads to gene discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah

    Gravity plays a fundamental role in plant growth and development. Although a significant body of research has helped define the events of gravity perception, the role of the plant growth regulator auxin, and the mechanisms resulting in the gravity response, the events of signal transduction, those that link the biophysical action of perception to a biochemical signal that results in auxin redistribution, those that regulate the gravitropic effects on plant growth, remain, for the most part, a “black box.” Using a cold affect, dubbed the gravity persistent signal (GPS) response, we developed a mutant screen to specifically identify components of the signal transduction pathway. Cloning of the GPS genes have identified new proteins involved in gravitropic signaling. We have further exploited the GPS response using a multi-faceted approach including gene expression microarrays, proteomics analysis, and bioinformatics analysis and continued mutant analysis to identified additional genes, physiological and biochemical processes. Gene expression data provided the foundation of a regulatory network for gravitropic signaling. Based on these gene expression data and related data sets/information from the literature/repositories, we constructed a gravitropic signaling network for Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. To generate the network, both a dynamic Bayesian network approach and a time-lagged correlation coefficient approach were used. The dynamic Bayesian network added existing information of protein-protein interaction while the time-lagged correlation coefficient allowed incorporation of temporal regulation and thus could incorporate the time-course metric from the data set. Thus the methods complemented each other and provided us with a more comprehensive evaluation of connections. Each method generated a list of possible interactions associated with a statistical significance value. The two networks were then overlaid to generate a more rigorous, intersected

  8. Traffic signal synchronization in the saturated high-density grid road network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaojian; Lu, Jian; Wang, Wei; Zhirui, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Most existing traffic signal synchronization strategies do not perform well in the saturated high-density grid road network (HGRN). Traffic congestion often occurs in the saturated HGRN, and the mobility of the network is difficult to restore. In order to alleviate traffic congestion and to improve traffic efficiency in the network, the study proposes a regional traffic signal synchronization strategy, named the long green and long red (LGLR) traffic signal synchronization strategy. The essence of the strategy is to control the formation and dissipation of queues and to maximize the efficiency of traffic flows at signalized intersections in the saturated HGRN. With this strategy, the same signal control timing plan is used at all signalized intersections in the HGRN, and the straight phase of the control timing plan has a long green time and a long red time. Therefore, continuous traffic flows can be maintained when vehicles travel, and traffic congestion can be alleviated when vehicles stop. Using the strategy, the LGLR traffic signal synchronization model is developed, with the objective of minimizing the number of stops. Finally, the simulation is executed to analyze the performance of the model by comparing it to other models, and the superiority of the LGLR model is evident in terms of delay, number of stops, queue length, and overall performance in the saturated HGRN.

  9. Traffic Signal Synchronization in the Saturated High-Density Grid Road Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojian Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most existing traffic signal synchronization strategies do not perform well in the saturated high-density grid road network (HGRN. Traffic congestion often occurs in the saturated HGRN, and the mobility of the network is difficult to restore. In order to alleviate traffic congestion and to improve traffic efficiency in the network, the study proposes a regional traffic signal synchronization strategy, named the long green and long red (LGLR traffic signal synchronization strategy. The essence of the strategy is to control the formation and dissipation of queues and to maximize the efficiency of traffic flows at signalized intersections in the saturated HGRN. With this strategy, the same signal control timing plan is used at all signalized intersections in the HGRN, and the straight phase of the control timing plan has a long green time and a long red time. Therefore, continuous traffic flows can be maintained when vehicles travel, and traffic congestion can be alleviated when vehicles stop. Using the strategy, the LGLR traffic signal synchronization model is developed, with the objective of minimizing the number of stops. Finally, the simulation is executed to analyze the performance of the model by comparing it to other models, and the superiority of the LGLR model is evident in terms of delay, number of stops, queue length, and overall performance in the saturated HGRN.

  10. Multimodal signalling in the North American barn swallow: a phenotype network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Matthew R.; Shizuka, Daizaburo; Joseph, Maxwell B.; Hubbard, Joanna K.; Safran, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Complex signals, involving multiple components within and across modalities, are common in animal communication. However, decomposing complex signals into traits and their interactions remains a fundamental challenge for studies of phenotype evolution. We apply a novel phenotype network approach for studying complex signal evolution in the North American barn swallow (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster). We integrate model testing with correlation-based phenotype networks to infer the contributions of female mate choice and male–male competition to the evolution of barn swallow communication. Overall, the best predictors of mate choice were distinct from those for competition, while moderate functional overlap suggests males and females use some of the same traits to assess potential mates and rivals. We interpret model results in the context of a network of traits, and suggest this approach allows researchers a more nuanced view of trait clustering patterns that informs new hypotheses about the evolution of communication systems. PMID:26423842

  11. Multimodal signalling in the North American barn swallow: a phenotype network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Matthew R; Shizuka, Daizaburo; Joseph, Maxwell B; Hubbard, Joanna K; Safran, Rebecca J

    2015-10-01

    Complex signals, involving multiple components within and across modalities, are common in animal communication. However, decomposing complex signals into traits and their interactions remains a fundamental challenge for studies of phenotype evolution. We apply a novel phenotype network approach for studying complex signal evolution in the North American barn swallow (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster). We integrate model testing with correlation-based phenotype networks to infer the contributions of female mate choice and male-male competition to the evolution of barn swallow communication. Overall, the best predictors of mate choice were distinct from those for competition, while moderate functional overlap suggests males and females use some of the same traits to assess potential mates and rivals. We interpret model results in the context of a network of traits, and suggest this approach allows researchers a more nuanced view of trait clustering patterns that informs new hypotheses about the evolution of communication systems.

  12. Communication efficiency and congestion of signal traffic in large-scale brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišić, Bratislav; Sporns, Olaf; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2014-01-01

    The complex connectivity of the cerebral cortex suggests that inter-regional communication is a primary function. Using computational modeling, we show that anatomical connectivity may be a major determinant for global information flow in brain networks. A macaque brain network was implemented as a communication network in which signal units flowed between grey matter nodes along white matter paths. Compared to degree-matched surrogate networks, information flow on the macaque brain network was characterized by higher loss rates, faster transit times and lower throughput, suggesting that neural connectivity may be optimized for speed rather than fidelity. Much of global communication was mediated by a "rich club" of hub regions: a sub-graph comprised of high-degree nodes that are more densely interconnected with each other than predicted by chance. First, macaque communication patterns most closely resembled those observed for a synthetic rich club network, but were less similar to those seen in a synthetic small world network, suggesting that the former is a more fundamental feature of brain network topology. Second, rich club regions attracted the most signal traffic and likewise, connections between rich club regions carried more traffic than connections between non-rich club regions. Third, a number of rich club regions were significantly under-congested, suggesting that macaque connectivity actively shapes information flow, funneling traffic towards some nodes and away from others. Together, our results indicate a critical role of the rich club of hub nodes in dynamic aspects of global brain communication.

  13. Cilia and coordination of signaling networks during heart development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Karen; Veland, Iben Rønn; Pedersen, Lotte Bang;

    2014-01-01

    of developmental disorders and diseases called ciliopathies. Recent studies have indicated a major role of different populations of cilia, including nodal and cardiac primary cilia, in coordinating heart development, and defects in these cilia are associated with congenital heart diseases. Here, we present......Primary cilia are unique sensory organelles that coordinate a wide variety of different signaling pathways to control cellular processes during development and in tissue homeostasis. Defects in function or assembly of these antenna-like structures are therefore associated with a broad range...... an overview of the role of nodal and cardiac primary cilia in heart development....

  14. Reduced-Dimension Linear Transform Coding of Correlated Signals in Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Goela, Naveen

    2012-01-01

    A model, called the linear transform network (LTN), is proposed to analyze the compression and estimation of correlated signals transmitted over directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). An LTN is a DAG network with multiple source and receiver nodes. Source nodes transmit subspace projections of random correlated signals by applying reduced-dimension linear transforms. The subspace projections are linearly processed by multiple relays and routed to intended receivers. Each receiver applies a linear estimator to approximate a subset of the sources with minimum mean squared error (MSE) distortion. The model is extended to include noisy networks with power constraints on transmitters. A key task is to compute all local compression matrices and linear estimators in the network to minimize end-to-end distortion. The non-convex problem is solved iteratively within an optimization framework using constrained quadratic programs (QPs). The proposed algorithm recovers as special cases the regular and distributed Karhunen-Loeve ...

  15. Drastic disorded-induced reduction of signal amplification in scale-free networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chacón, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding information transmission across a network is a fundamental task for controlling and manipulating both biological and man-made information processing systems. Here, we show how topological resonant-like amplification effects in scale-free networks of signaling devices are drastically reduced when phase disorder in the external signals is considered. This is demonstrated theoretically by means of a star-like network of overdamped bistable systems, and confirmed numerically by simulations of scale-free networks of such systems. The taming effect of the phase disorder is found to be sensitive to the amplification's strength, while the topology-induced amplification mechanism is robust against this kind of quenched disorder in the sense that it does not significantly change the values of the coupling strength where amplification is maximum in its absence.

  16. Adaptive coded spreading OFDM signal for dynamic-λ optical access network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Zhang, Lijia; Xin, Xiangjun

    2015-12-01

    This paper proposes and experimentally demonstrates a novel adaptive coded spreading (ACS) orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal for dynamic distributed optical ring-based access network. The wavelength can be assigned to different remote nodes (RNs) according to the traffic demand of optical network unit (ONU). The ACS can provide dynamic spreading gain to different signals according to the split ratio or transmission length, which offers flexible power budget for the network. A 10×13.12 Gb/s OFDM access with ACS is successfully demonstrated over two RNs and 120 km transmission in the experiment. The demonstrated method may be viewed as one promising for future optical metro access network.

  17. Cisplatin ototoxicity involves cytokines and STAT6 signaling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Lee, Jeong-Han; Lyu, Ah-Ra; Ji, Hye-Min; Lee, Sang-Heon; Song, Jeho; Park, Sung-Joo; You, Yong-Ouk; Sul, Jeong-Dug; Park, Channy; Chung, Sang-Young; Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lim, David J; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil

    2011-06-01

    We herein investigated the role of the STAT signaling cascade in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cisplatin ototoxicity. A significant hearing impairment caused by cisplatin injection was observed in Balb/c (wild type, WT) and STAT4(-/-), but not in STAT6(-/-) mice. Moreover, the expression levels of the protein and mRNA of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, were markedly increased in the serum and cochlea of WT and STAT4(-/-), but not STAT6(-/-) mice. Organotypic culture revealed that the shape of stereocilia bundles and arrays of sensory hair cell layers in the organ of Corti from STAT6(-/-) mice were intact after treatment with cisplatin, whereas those from WT and STAT4(-/-) mice were highly distorted and disarrayed after the treatment. Cisplatin induced the phosphorylation of STAT6 in HEI-OC1 auditory cells, and the knockdown of STAT6 by STAT6-specific siRNA significantly protected HEI-OC1 auditory cells from cisplatin-induced cell death and inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production. We further demonstrated that IL-4 and IL-13 induced by cisplatin modulated the phosphorylation of STAT6 by binding with IL-4 receptor alpha and IL-13Rα1. These findings suggest that STAT6 signaling plays a pivotal role in cisplatin-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine production and ototoxicity.

  18. Cisplatin ototoxicity involves cytokines and STAT6 signaling network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyung-Jin Kim; Jeong-Dug Sul; Channy Park; Sang-Young Chung; Sung-Kyun Moon; David J Lim; Hong-Seob So; Raekil Park; Gi-Su Oh; Jeong-Han Lee; Ah-Ra Lyu; Hye-Min Ji; Sang-Heon Lee; Jeho Song; Sung-Joo Park; Yong-Ouk You

    2011-01-01

    We herein investigated the role of the STAT signaling cascade in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cisplatin ototoxicity. A significant hearing impairment caused by cisplatin injection was observed in Balb/c (wild type,WT) and STAT4-/-,but not in STAT6-/- mice. Moreover,the expression levels of the protein and mRNA of proinflammatory cytokines,including TNF-α,IL-1β,and IL-6,were markedly increased in the serum and cochlea of WT and STAT4+,but not STAT6-/- mice. Organotypic culture revealed that the shape of stereocilia bundles and arrays of sensory hair cell layers in the organ of Corti from STAT6-/- mice were intact after treatment with cisplatin,whereas those from WT and STAT4-/- mice were highly distorted and disarrayed after the treatment. Cisplatin induced the phosphorylation of STAT6 in HEI-OC1 auditory cells,and the knockdown of STAT6 by STAT6-specific siRNA significantly protected HEI-OC1 auditory cells from cisplatin-induced cell death and inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production. We further demonstrated that IL-4 and IL-13 induced by cisplatin modulated the phosphorylation of STAT6 by binding with IL-4 receptor alpha and IL-13Rα1. These findings suggest that STAT6 signaling plays a pivotal role in cisplatin-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine production and ototoxicity.

  19. Modulator and VCSEL-MSM smart pixels for parallel pipeline networking and signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-H.; Hoanca, Bogdan; Kuznia, C. B.; Pansatiankul, Dhawat E.; Zhang, Liping; Sawchuk, Alexander A.

    1999-07-01

    TRANslucent Smart Pixel Array (TRANSPAR) systems perform high performance parallel pipeline networking and signal processing based on optical propagation of 3D data packets. The TRANSPAR smart pixel devices use either self-electro- optic effect GaAs multiple quantum well modulators or CMOS- VCSEL-MSM (CMOS-Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser- Metal-Semiconductor-Metal) technology. The data packets transfer among high throughput photonic network nodes using multiple access/collision detection or token-ring protocols.

  20. Signaling and transcriptional networks in heart development and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, Benoit G

    2013-03-01

    The mammalian heart is the first functional organ, the first indicator of life. Its normal formation and function are essential for fetal life. Defects in heart formation lead to congenital heart defects, underscoring the finesse with which the heart is assembled. Understanding the regulatory networks controlling heart development have led to significant insights into its lineage origins and morphogenesis and illuminated important aspects of mammalian embryology, while providing insights into human congenital heart disease. The mammalian heart has very little regenerative potential, and thus, any damage to the heart is life threatening and permanent. Knowledge of the developing heart is important for effective strategies of cardiac regeneration, providing new hope for future treatments for heart disease. Although we still have an incomplete picture of the mechanisms controlling development of the mammalian heart, our current knowledge has important implications for embryology and better understanding of human heart disease.

  1. Molecular signaling networks in regulation of immunity and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Janne Marie; Jensen, Stina Rikke; Sørensen, Morten;

    the proinflammatory properties of common gut commensals. We are currently looking into the mechanisms behind the antiinflammatory effects of the microbial fermentation products with a specific interest in the complex interactions between enzymes catalyzing posttranslational modifications, transcription factors......The gut microbiota, host tissues, and the immune system form a complex network where extensive crosstalk and molecular interactions substantially impact the overall state of the system. Concomitantly, modulation of host immune function is recurrently a result of the interaction of complex...... and dynamic microbial communities with the immune cell compartment in the gut, and therefore the interaction between components from different gut bacteria can efficiently shape the phenotype of the immune response. A specialized antigenpresenting cell present at mucosal surfaces, the dendritic cell (DC...

  2. Neural network surface acoustic wave RF signal processor for digital modulation recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavalov, Dimitar; Kalinin, Victor

    2002-09-01

    An architecture of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) processor based on an artificial neural network is proposed for an automatic recognition of different types of digital passband modulation. Three feed-forward networks are trained to recognize filtered and unfiltered binary phase shift keying (BPSK) and quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) signals, as well as unfiltered BPSK, QPSK, and 16 quadrature amplitude (16QAM) signals. Performance of the processor in the presence of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) is simulated. The influence of second-order effects in SAW devices, phase, and amplitude errors on the performance of the processor also is studied.

  3. Neighbor Discovery in a Wireless Sensor Network: Multipacket Reception Capability and Physical-Layer Signal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, Jeongho

    2011-01-01

    In randomly deployed networks, such as sensor networks, an important problem for each node is to discover its \\textit{neighbor} nodes so that the connectivity amongst nodes can be established. In this paper, we consider this problem by incorporating the physical layer parameters in contrast to the most of the previous work which assumed a collision channel. Specifically, the pilot signals that nodes transmit are successfully decoded if the strength of the received signal relative to the interference is sufficiently high. Thus, each node must extract signal parameter information from the superposition of an unknown number of received signals. This problem falls naturally in the purview of random set theory (RST) which generalizes standard probability theory by assigning \\textit{sets}, rather than values, to random outcomes. The contributions in the paper are twofold: first, we introduce the realistic effect of physical layer considerations in the evaluation of the performance of \\textit{logical} discovery algo...

  4. Common corruption of the mTOR signaling network in human tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Suchithra; Manning, Brendan D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) is responsive to numerous extracellular and intracellular cues and, through the formation of two physically and functionally distinct complexes, plays a central role in the homeostatic control of cell growth, proliferation and survival. Through aberrant activation of mTOR signaling, the perception of cellular growth signals becomes disconnected from the processes promoting cell growth, and this underlies the pathophysiology of a number of genetic tumor syndromes and cancers. Here, we review the oncogenes and tumor suppressors comprising the regulatory network upstream of mTOR, highlight the human cancers in which mTOR is activated, and discuss how dysregulated mTOR signaling gives tumors a selective growth advantage. In addition, we discuss why activation of mTOR, as a consequence of distinct oncogenic events, results in diverse clinical outcomes, and how the complexity of the mTOR signaling network might dictate therapeutic approaches. PMID:19956179

  5. Research of Crossbar Switch of High Performance Network of Signal Processing System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The new type of embedded signal processing system based on the packet switched network is achieved. According to the application field and the characteristics of signal processing system, the RapidIO protocol is used to solve the high-speed interconnection of multi-digital signal processor (DSP). Based on this protocol, a kind of crossbar switch module which is used to interconnect multi-DSP in the system is introduced. A route strategy, some flow control rules and error control rules, which adapt to different RapidIO network topology are also introduced. Crossbar switch performance is analyzed in detail by the probability module. By researching the technique of crossbar switch and analyzing the system performance, it has a significant meaning for building the general signal processing system.

  6. [Study on signal transmission characteristics of meridian based on electrical network theory and experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Gong; Lü, Xiao-Ying; Gao, Jian-Yun; Wang, Yu-Hang; Huang, Cen-Yu; Chen, Yue-Lin; Xing, Li-Yang; Wang, Gui-Ying

    2011-08-01

    Study on features of acupoints with resistance test in the past half century is reviewed in this article. Mechanism and technology of the method are introduced as well as its shortcomings. The determination method of signal transmission along meridians with the combination of electrical network theories and practice is advanced. And the result of a series experiments on one meridian at the superficial part of the body are given as well. Thus, it is concluded that the signals of the point-in/point-out and the signals along a non-meridian path with the same distance are significantly different, which gives a verification of the feasibility of the method by using electrical network theories to set out characteristics of signal transmission along meridians dynamically.

  7. Low-frequency analog signal distribution on digital photonic networks by optical delta-sigma modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Atsushi; Kawanishi, Tetsuya

    2013-12-01

    We propose a delta-sigma modulation scheme for low- and medium-frequency signal transmission in a digital photonic network system. A 10-Gb/s-class optical transceiver with a delta-sigma modulator utilized as a high-speed analog-to-digital converter (ADC) provides a binary optical signal. On the signal reception side, a low-cost and slow-speed photonic receiver directly converts the binary signal into an analog signal at frequencies from several hundreds of kilohertz several tens of megahertz. Further, by using a clock and data recovery circuit at the receiver to reduce jitters, the single-sideband phase noise of the generated signals can be significantly reduced.

  8. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase α2 in Neutrophils Regulates Vascular Repair via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α and a Network of Proteins Affecting Metabolism and Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Malik, Randa; Zippel, Nina; Frömel, Timo; Heidler, Juliana; Zukunft, Sven; Walzog, Barbara; Ansari, Nariman; Pampaloni, Francesco; Wingert, Susanne; Rieger, Michael A.; Wittig, Ilka; Fisslthaler, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is stimulated by hypoxia, and although the AMPKα1 catalytic subunit has been implicated in angiogenesis, little is known about the role played by the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Objective: To determine the role of the AMPKα2 subunit in vascular repair. Methods and Results: Recovery of blood flow after femoral artery ligation was impaired (>80%) in AMPKα2−/− versus wild-type mice, a phenotype reproduced in mice lacking AMPKα2 in myeloid cells (AMPKα2ΔMC). Three days after ligation, neutrophil infiltration into ischemic limbs of AMPKα2ΔMC mice was lower than that in wild-type mice despite being higher after 24 hours. Neutrophil survival in ischemic tissue is required to attract monocytes that contribute to the angiogenic response. Indeed, apoptosis was increased in hypoxic neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice, fewer monocytes were recruited, and gene array analysis revealed attenuated expression of proangiogenic proteins in ischemic AMPKα2ΔMC hindlimbs. Many angiogenic growth factors are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induction was attenuated in AMPKα2-deficient cells and accompanied by its enhanced hydroxylation. Also, fewer proteins were regulated by hypoxia in neutrophils from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Mechanistically, isocitrate dehydrogenase expression and the production of α-ketoglutarate, which negatively regulate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, were attenuated in neutrophils from wild-type mice but remained elevated in cells from AMPKα2ΔMC mice. Conclusions: AMPKα2 regulates α-ketoglutarate generation, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stability, and neutrophil survival, which in turn determine further myeloid cell recruitment and repair potential. The activation of AMPKα2 in neutrophils is a decisive event in the initiation of vascular repair after ischemia. PMID:27777247

  9. Context-specificity in causal signaling networks revealed by phosphoprotein profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Steven M.; Nesser, Nicole K.; Johnson-Camacho, Katie; Jeffress, Mara; Johnson, Aimee; Boniface, Chris; Spencer, Simon E. F.; Lu, Yiling; Heiser, Laura M.; Lawrence, Yancey; Pande, Nupur T.; Korkola, James E.; Gray, Joe W.; Mills, Gordon B.; Mukherjee, Sach; Spellman, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Signaling networks downstream of receptor tyrosine kinases are among the most extensively studied biological networks, but new approaches are needed to elucidate causal relationships between network components and understand how such relationships are influenced by biological context and disease. Here, we investigate the context-specificity of signaling networks within a causal conceptual framework, using reverse-phase protein array time-course assays and network analysis approaches. We focus on a well-defined set of signaling proteins profiled under inhibition with five kinase inhibitors in 32 contexts—four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, UACC812, BT20, and BT549) under eight stimulus conditions. The data, spanning multiple pathways and comprising ~70,000 phosphoprotein and ~260,000 protein measurements, provide a wealth of testable, context-specific hypotheses, several of which we experimentally validate. Furthermore, the data provide a unique resource for computational methods development, permitting empirical assessment of causal network learning in a complex, mammalian setting. PMID:28017544

  10. Network Signaling Channel for Improving ZigBee Performance in Dynamic Cluster-Tree Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hämäläinen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available ZigBee is one of the most potential standardized technologies for wireless sensor networks (WSNs. Yet, sufficient energy-efficiency for the lowest power WSNs is achieved only in rather static networks. This severely limits the applicability of ZigBee in outdoor and mobile applications, where operation environment is harsh and link failures are common. This paper proposes a network channel beaconing (NCB algorithm for improving ZigBee performance in dynamic cluster-tree networks. NCB reduces the energy consumption of passive scans by dedicating one frequency channel for network beacon transmissions and by energy optimizing their transmission rate. According to an energy analysis, the power consumption of network maintenance operations reduces by 70%–76% in dynamic networks. In static networks, energy overhead is negligible. Moreover, the service time for data routing increases up to 37%. The performance of NCB is validated by ns-2 simulations. NCB can be implemented as an extension on MAC and NWK layers and it is fully compatible with ZigBee.

  11. A Neural Network Approach to Blind Estimation of PN Spreading Sequence in DS/SS Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tian-qi; ZHOU Zheng-zhong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new approach is proposed to estimate pseudo noise(PN) sequence in the lower SNR DS/SS signals blindly. This method utilizes the characteristics of self-organization, principal components analysis and extraction of unsupervised neural networks adequately, in addition to its higher-speed operation ability, successfully solve the difficult problem about PN sequence blind estimation. The theoretic analysis and experimental results show that this approach can work very well on lower SNR input signals.

  12. An RF-input outphasing power amplifier with RF signal decomposition network

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Taylor W.; Perreault, David J.

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an outphasing power amplifier that directly amplifies a modulated RF input. The approach eliminates the need for multiple costly IQ modulators and baseband signal component separation found in conventional outphasing power amplifier systems, which have previously required both an RF carrier input and a separate baseband input to synthesize a modulated RF output. A novel RF signal decomposition network enables direct RF-input / RF-output outphasing by directly synthesizing t...

  13. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Lisa; Pinheiro, Marco T; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G; Zeef, Leo A H; Donaldson, Ian J; Ashe, Hilary L

    2016-07-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates.

  14. Expression profiles of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their regulation by Relish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Li, Fuhua; Li, Shihao; Wen, Rong; Xiang, Jianhai

    2012-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), as key immune effectors, play important roles in the innate immune system of invertebrates. Different types of AMPs, including Penaeidin, Crustin, ALF (antilipopolysaccharide factor) have been identified in different penaeid shrimp; however, systematic analyses on the function of different AMPs in shrimp responsive to different types of bacteria are very limited. In this study, we analyzed the expression profiles of AMPs in the Chinese shrimps, Fenneropenaeus chinensis, simultaneously by real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) when shrimp were challenged with Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram-positive, G+) or Vibrio anguillarium (Gram-negative, G-). Different AMPs showed different expression profiles when shrimp were injected with one type of bacterium, and one AMP also showed different expression profiles when shrimp were challenged with different bacteria. Furthermore, the expression of these AMPs showed temporal expression profiles, suggesting that different AMPs function coordinately in bacteria-infected shrimp. An RNA interference approach was used to study the function of the Relish transcription factor in regulating the transcription of different AMPs. The current study showed that Relish could regulate the transcription of different AMPs in shrimp. Differential expression profiles of AMPs in shrimp injected with different types of bacteria indicated that a complicated antimicrobial response network existed in shrimp. These data contribute to our understanding of immunity in shrimp and may provide a strategy for the control of disease in shrimp.

  15. Quality-on-Demand Compression of EEG Signals for Telemedicine Applications Using Neural Network Predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sriraam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A telemedicine system using communication and information technology to deliver medical signals such as ECG, EEG for long distance medical services has become reality. In either the urgent treatment or ordinary healthcare, it is necessary to compress these signals for the efficient use of bandwidth. This paper discusses a quality on demand compression of EEG signals using neural network predictors for telemedicine applications. The objective is to obtain a greater compression gains at a low bit rate while preserving the clinical information content. A two-stage compression scheme with a predictor and an entropy encoder is used. The residue signals obtained after prediction is first thresholded using various levels of thresholds and are further quantized and then encoded using an arithmetic encoder. Three neural network models, single-layer and multi-layer perceptrons and Elman network are used and the results are compared with linear predictors such as FIR filters and AR modeling. The fidelity of the reconstructed EEG signal is assessed quantitatively using parameters such as PRD, SNR, cross correlation and power spectral density. It is found from the results that the quality of the reconstructed signal is preserved at a low PRD thereby yielding better compression results compared to results obtained using lossless scheme.

  16. Knowledge-guided fuzzy logic modeling to infer cellular signaling networks from proteomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Mishra, Shital Kumar; Zhou, Shuigeng; Zheng, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Modeling of signaling pathways is crucial for understanding and predicting cellular responses to drug treatments. However, canonical signaling pathways curated from literature are seldom context-specific and thus can hardly predict cell type-specific response to external perturbations; purely data-driven methods also have drawbacks such as limited biological interpretability. Therefore, hybrid methods that can integrate prior knowledge and real data for network inference are highly desirable. In this paper, we propose a knowledge-guided fuzzy logic network model to infer signaling pathways by exploiting both prior knowledge and time-series data. In particular, the dynamic time warping algorithm is employed to measure the goodness of fit between experimental and predicted data, so that our method can model temporally-ordered experimental observations. We evaluated the proposed method on a synthetic dataset and two real phosphoproteomic datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that our model can uncover drug-induced alterations in signaling pathways in cancer cells. Compared with existing hybrid models, our method can model feedback loops so that the dynamical mechanisms of signaling networks can be uncovered from time-series data. By calibrating generic models of signaling pathways against real data, our method supports precise predictions of context-specific anticancer drug effects, which is an important step towards precision medicine.

  17. Knowledge-guided fuzzy logic modeling to infer cellular signaling networks from proteomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Fan; Mishra, Shital Kumar; Zhou, Shuigeng; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of signaling pathways is crucial for understanding and predicting cellular responses to drug treatments. However, canonical signaling pathways curated from literature are seldom context-specific and thus can hardly predict cell type-specific response to external perturbations; purely data-driven methods also have drawbacks such as limited biological interpretability. Therefore, hybrid methods that can integrate prior knowledge and real data for network inference are highly desirable. In this paper, we propose a knowledge-guided fuzzy logic network model to infer signaling pathways by exploiting both prior knowledge and time-series data. In particular, the dynamic time warping algorithm is employed to measure the goodness of fit between experimental and predicted data, so that our method can model temporally-ordered experimental observations. We evaluated the proposed method on a synthetic dataset and two real phosphoproteomic datasets. The experimental results demonstrate that our model can uncover drug-induced alterations in signaling pathways in cancer cells. Compared with existing hybrid models, our method can model feedback loops so that the dynamical mechanisms of signaling networks can be uncovered from time-series data. By calibrating generic models of signaling pathways against real data, our method supports precise predictions of context-specific anticancer drug effects, which is an important step towards precision medicine. PMID:27774993

  18. Biological roles of cAMP: variations on a theme in the different kingdoms of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancedo, Juana M

    2013-08-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) plays a key regulatory role in most types of cells; however, the pathways controlled by cAMP may present important differences between organisms and between tissues within a specific organism. Changes in cAMP levels are caused by multiple triggers, most affecting adenylyl cyclases, the enzymes that synthesize cAMP. Adenylyl cyclases form a large and diverse family including soluble forms and others with one or more transmembrane domains. Regulatory mechanisms for the soluble adenylyl cyclases involve either interaction with diverse proteins, as happens in Escherichia coli or yeasts, or with calcium or bicarbonate ions, as occurs in mammalian cells. The transmembrane cyclases can be regulated by a variety of proteins, among which the α subunit and the βγ complex from G proteins coupled to membrane receptors are prominent. cAMP levels also are controlled by the activity of phosphodiesterases, enzymes that hydrolyze cAMP. Phosphodiesterases can be regulated by cAMP, cGMP or calcium-calmodulin or by phosphorylation by different protein kinases. Regulation through cAMP depends on its binding to diverse proteins, its proximal targets, this in turn causing changes in a variety of distal targets. Specifically, binding of cAMP to regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs) affects the activity of substrates of PKA, binding to exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac) regulates small GTPases, binding to transcription factors such as the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) or the virulence factor regulator (Vfr) modifies the rate of transcription of certain genes, while cAMP binding to ion channels modulates their activity directly. Further studies on cAMP signalling will have important implications, not only for advancing fundamental knowledge but also for identifying targets for the development of new therapeutic agents.

  19. CLASSIFICATIONS OF EEG SIGNALS FOR MENTAL TASKS USING ADAPTIVE RBF NETWORK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛建中; 郑崇勋; 闫相国

    2004-01-01

    Objective This paper presents classifications of mental tasks based on EEG signals using an adaptive Radial Basis Function (RBF) network with optimal centers and widths for the Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) schemes. Methods Initial centers and widths of the network are selected by a cluster estimation method based on the distribution of the training set. Using a conjugate gradient descent method, they are optimized during training phase according to a regularized error function considering the influence of their changes to output values. Results The optimizing process improves the performance of RBF network, and its best cognition rate of three task pairs over four subjects achieves 87.0%. Moreover, this network runs fast due to the fewer hidden layer neurons. Conclusion The adaptive RBF network with optimal centers and widths has high recognition rate and runs fast. It may be a promising classifier for on-line BCI scheme.

  20. Transduction motif analysis of gastric cancer based on a human signaling network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.; Li, D.Z.; Jiang, C.S.; Wang, W. [Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou, China, Department of Gastroenterology, Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Command, Fuzhou (China)

    2014-04-04

    To investigate signal regulation models of gastric cancer, databases and literature were used to construct the signaling network in humans. Topological characteristics of the network were analyzed by CytoScape. After marking gastric cancer-related genes extracted from the CancerResource, GeneRIF, and COSMIC databases, the FANMOD software was used for the mining of gastric cancer-related motifs in a network with three vertices. The significant motif difference method was adopted to identify significantly different motifs in the normal and cancer states. Finally, we conducted a series of analyses of the significantly different motifs, including gene ontology, function annotation of genes, and model classification. A human signaling network was constructed, with 1643 nodes and 5089 regulating interactions. The network was configured to have the characteristics of other biological networks. There were 57,942 motifs marked with gastric cancer-related genes out of a total of 69,492 motifs, and 264 motifs were selected as significantly different motifs by calculating the significant motif difference (SMD) scores. Genes in significantly different motifs were mainly enriched in functions associated with cancer genesis, such as regulation of cell death, amino acid phosphorylation of proteins, and intracellular signaling cascades. The top five significantly different motifs were mainly cascade and positive feedback types. Almost all genes in the five motifs were cancer related, including EPOR, MAPK14, BCL2L1, KRT18, PTPN6, CASP3, TGFBR2, AR, and CASP7. The development of cancer might be curbed by inhibiting signal transductions upstream and downstream of the selected motifs.

  1. Deciphering Signaling Pathway Networks to Understand the Molecular Mechanisms of Metformin Action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Sun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A drug exerts its effects typically through a signal transduction cascade, which is non-linear and involves intertwined networks of multiple signaling pathways. Construction of such a signaling pathway network (SPNetwork can enable identification of novel drug targets and deep understanding of drug action. However, it is challenging to synopsize critical components of these interwoven pathways into one network. To tackle this issue, we developed a novel computational framework, the Drug-specific Signaling Pathway Network (DSPathNet. The DSPathNet amalgamates the prior drug knowledge and drug-induced gene expression via random walk algorithms. Using the drug metformin, we illustrated this framework and obtained one metformin-specific SPNetwork containing 477 nodes and 1,366 edges. To evaluate this network, we performed the gene set enrichment analysis using the disease genes of type 2 diabetes (T2D and cancer, one T2D genome-wide association study (GWAS dataset, three cancer GWAS datasets, and one GWAS dataset of cancer patients with T2D on metformin. The results showed that the metformin network was significantly enriched with disease genes for both T2D and cancer, and that the network also included genes that may be associated with metformin-associated cancer survival. Furthermore, from the metformin SPNetwork and common genes to T2D and cancer, we generated a subnetwork to highlight the molecule crosstalk between T2D and cancer. The follow-up network analyses and literature mining revealed that seven genes (CDKN1A, ESR1, MAX, MYC, PPARGC1A, SP1, and STK11 and one novel MYC-centered pathway with CDKN1A, SP1, and STK11 might play important roles in metformin's antidiabetic and anticancer effects. Some results are supported by previous studies. In summary, our study 1 develops a novel framework to construct drug-specific signal transduction networks; 2 provides insights into the molecular mode of metformin; 3 serves a model for exploring

  2. Regulated expression of HCN channels and cAMP levels shape the properties of the h current in developing rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surges, Rainer; Brewster, Amy L; Bender, Roland A; Beck, Heinz; Feuerstein, Thomas J; Baram, Tallie Z

    2006-07-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h)) contributes to intrinsic properties and network responses of neurons. Its biophysical properties depend on the expression profiles of the underlying hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels and the presence of cyclic AMP (cAMP) that potently and differentially modulates I(h) conducted by HCN1, HCN2 and/or HCN4. Here, we studied the properties of I(h) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, the developmental evolution of the HCN-subunit isoforms that contribute to this current, and their interplay with age-dependent free cAMP concentrations, using electrophysiological, molecular and biochemical methods. I(h) amplitude increased progressively during the first four postnatal weeks, consistent with the observed overall increased expression of HCN channels. Activation kinetics of the current accelerated during this period, consonant with the quantitative reduction of mRNA and protein expression of the slow-kinetics HCN4 isoform and increased levels of HCN1. The sensitivity of I(h) to cAMP, and the contribution of the slow component to the overall I(h), decreased with age. These are likely a result of the developmentally regulated transition of the complement of HCN channel isoforms from cAMP sensitive to relatively cAMP insensitive. Thus, although hippocampal cAMP concentrations increased over twofold during the developmental period studied, the coordinated changes in expression of three HCN channel isoforms resulted in reduced effects of this signalling molecule on neuronal h currents.

  3. Towards convergence of wireless and wireline signal transport in broadband access networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Prince, Kamau; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2010-01-01

    Hybrid optical wireless access networks are to play an important role in the realization of the vision of delivery of broadband services to the end-user any time, anywhere and at affordable costs. We present results of experiments conducted over a field deployed optical fibre links we successfull...... demonstrated converged wireless and wireline signal transport over a common fibre infrastructure. The type of signal used in this field deployed experiments cover WiMax, Impulse-radio ultra-wideband (UWB) and coherent transmission of baseband QPSK and radio-over-fibre signals....

  4. Best Signal Quality in Cellular Networks: Asymptotic Properties and Applications to Mobility Management in Small Cell Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baccelli François

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The quickly increasing data traffic and the user demand for a full coverage of mobile services anywhere and anytime are leading mobile networking into a future of small cell networks. However, due to the high-density and randomness of small cell networks, there are several technical challenges. In this paper, we investigate two critical issues: best signal quality and mobility management. Under the assumptions that base stations are uniformly distributed in a ring-shaped region and that shadowings are lognormal, independent, and identically distributed, we prove that when the number of sites in the ring tends to infinity, then (i the maximum signal strength received at the center of the ring tends in distribution to a Gumbel distribution when properly renormalized, and (ii it is asymptotically independent of the interference. Using these properties, we derive the distribution of the best signal quality. Furthermore, an optimized random cell scanning scheme is proposed, based on the evaluation of the optimal number of sites to be scanned for maximizing the user data throughput.

  5. Epac and PKA: a tale of two intracellular cAMP receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Cheng; Zhenyu Ji; Tamara Tsalkova; Fang Mei

    2008-01-01

    cAMP-mediated signaling pathways regulate a multitude of important biological processes under both physiological and pathological conditions,including diabetes,heart failure and cancer.In eukaryotic cells,the effects of cAMP are mediated by two ubiquitously expressed intracellular cAMP receptors,the classic protein kinase A (PKA)/cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the recently discovered exchange protein directly activated by cAMP(Epac)/cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors.Like PKA,Epac contains an evolutionally conserved cAMP binding domain that acts as a molecular switch for sensing intracellular second messenger cAMP levels to control diverse biological functions.The existence of two families of cAMP effectors provides a mechanism for a more precise and integrated control of the cAMP signaling pathways in a spatial and temporal manner.Depending upon the specific cellular environments as well as their relative abundance,distrbution and localization,Epac and PKA may act independently,converge synergistically or oppose each other in regulating a specific cellular function.

  6. A network signal amplification strategy of ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical immunosensing carcinoembryonic antigen based on CdSe/melamine network as label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Yong; Kuang, Xuan; Wang, Zhiling; Wei, Qin

    2016-11-15

    Taking advantage of CdSe/melamine network as label and Au-TiO2 as substrate, this work developed a novel kind of signal amplification strategy for fabricating photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunoassay. The melamine, a star-shaped triamino molecule, was firstly used for readily capturing CdSe QDs and forming a CdSe/melamine network, which was formed through strong interactions between the carboxyl groups of TGA-stabilized CdSe QDs and the three amino groups of each melamine molecule. In this strategy, the primary antibody (Ab1) was immobilized onto Au-TiO2 substrate, which made the photoelectric conversion efficiency increase significantly. After the formed Ab2-CdSe/melamine network labels were captured onto the electrode surface via the specific antibody-antigen interaction, the photoelectric activity could be further enhanced via the interaction between the Au-TiO2 substrate and CdSe/melamine network. Due to this amplification of PEC signals and the special structure of the label, the fabricated PEC immunosensor was applied for sensitive and specific detection of cancer biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and displayed a wide linear range (0.005-1000ngmL(-1)) and low detection limit (5pgmL(-1)). In addition, the immunosensor was performed with good stability and reproducibility, and the results to analyze human serum samples were satisfactory.

  7. Activation of a Non-cAMP/PKA Signaling Pathway Downstream of the PTH/PTHrP Receptor Is Essential for a Sustained Hypophosphatemic Response to PTH Infusion in Male Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lige; Liu, Minlin; Segawa, Hiroko; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Bringhurst, F. Richard; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Jüppner, Harald

    2013-01-01

    PTH increases urinary Pi excretion by reducing expression of two renal cotransporters [NaPi-IIa (Npt2a) and NaPi-IIc (Npt2c)]. In contrast to acute transporter regulation that is cAMP/protein kinase A dependent, long-term effects require phospholipase C (PLC) signaling by the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PPR). To determine whether the latter pathway regulates Pi through Npt2a and/or Npt2c, wild-type mice (Wt) and animals expressing a mutant PPR incapable of PLC activation (DD) were tested in the absence of one (Npt2a−/− or Npt2c−/−) or both phosphate transporters (2a/2c-dko). PTH infusion for 8 days caused a rapid and persistent decrease in serum Pi in Wt mice, whereas serum Pi in DD mice fell only transiently for the first 2 days. Consistent with these findings, fractional Pi excretion index was increased initially in both animals, but this increase persisted only when the PPR Wt was present. The hypophosphatemic response to PTH infusion was impaired only slightly in PPR Wt/Npt2c−/− or DD/Npt2c−/− mice. Despite lower baselines, PTH infusion in PPR Wt/Npt2a−/− mice decreased serum Pi further, an effect that was attenuated in DD/Npt2a−/− mice. Continuous PTH had no effect on serum Pi in 2a/2c-dko mice. PTH administration increased serum 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 levels in Wt and DD mice and increased levels above the elevated baseline with ablation of either but not of both transporters. Continuous PTH elevated serum fibroblast growth factor 23 and blood Ca2+ equivalently in all groups of mice. Our data indicate that PLC signaling at the PPR contributes to the long-term effect of PTH on Pi homeostasis but not to the regulation of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3, fibroblast growth factor 23, or blood Ca2+. PMID:23515284

  8. Determination of outdoor signal propagation via visibility analysis in outdoor wireless networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Coşar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wireless networks on university campuses has gained importance in recent years. These networks in major areas such as university campuses, are faced with many problems during the planning, design and establishment. These problems are among the first that comes to mind, the physical properties of the campus and is selected according to the characteristics of network equipment. There is no doubt at all points of a wireless network set up in order to provide uninterrupted service and quality of the signal is expected to be good. However, it should be understood literally cannot meet these expectations. Therefore, to solve many problems to campus planning and design can be made to have acceptable signal distribution will have the appropriate use of and satisfaction with increasing effect. In this study, due to the start of construction on the North Campus of Hitit University, wireless signal spread using the current spread has been determined with the help of geographic information systems visibility analysis. An area of 56 hectares, with the total of 9 AP the acceptable signal distribution was obtained.

  9. A structured approach for the engineering of biochemical network models, illustrated for signalling pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breitling, Rainer; Gilbert, David; Heiner, Monika; Orton, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative models of biochemical networks (signal transduction cascades, metabolic pathways, gene regulatory circuits) are a central component of modern systems biology. Building and managing these complex models is a major challenge that can benefit from the application of formal methods adopted

  10. Comparing signaling networks between normal and transformed hepatocytes using discrete logical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Zhang, Mingsheng; Morris, Melody K; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Sorger, Peter K

    2011-08-15

    Substantial effort in recent years has been devoted to constructing and analyzing large-scale gene and protein networks on the basis of "omic" data and literature mining. These interaction graphs provide valuable insight into the topologies of complex biological networks but are rarely context specific and cannot be used to predict the responses of cell signaling proteins to specific ligands or drugs. Conversely, traditional approaches to analyzing cell signaling are narrow in scope and cannot easily make use of network-level data. Here, we combine network analysis and functional experimentation by using a hybrid approach in which graphs are converted into simple mathematical models that can be trained against biochemical data. Specifically, we created Boolean logic models of immediate-early signaling in liver cells by training a literature-based prior knowledge network against biochemical data obtained from primary human hepatocytes and 4 hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines exposed to combinations of cytokines and small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Distinct families of models were recovered for each cell type, and these families clustered topologically into normal and diseased sets.

  11. Reconstruction of cellular signal transduction networks using perturbation assays and linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Bettina; Kaderali, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Perturbation experiments for example using RNA interference (RNAi) offer an attractive way to elucidate gene function in a high throughput fashion. The placement of hit genes in their functional context and the inference of underlying networks from such data, however, are challenging tasks. One of the problems in network inference is the exponential number of possible network topologies for a given number of genes. Here, we introduce a novel mathematical approach to address this question. We formulate network inference as a linear optimization problem, which can be solved efficiently even for large-scale systems. We use simulated data to evaluate our approach, and show improved performance in particular on larger networks over state-of-the art methods. We achieve increased sensitivity and specificity, as well as a significant reduction in computing time. Furthermore, we show superior performance on noisy data. We then apply our approach to study the intracellular signaling of human primary nave CD4(+) T-cells, as well as ErbB signaling in trastuzumab resistant breast cancer cells. In both cases, our approach recovers known interactions and points to additional relevant processes. In ErbB signaling, our results predict an important role of negative and positive feedback in controlling the cell cycle progression.

  12. Rasd1 Modulates the Coactivator Function of NonO in the Cyclic AMP Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Shufen Angeline Ong; Jen Jen Tan; Wai Loon Tew; Ken-Shiung Chen

    2011-01-01

    All living organisms exhibit autonomous daily physiological and behavioural rhythms to help them synchronize with the environment. Entrainment of circadian rhythm is achieved via activation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. NonO (p54nrb) is a multifunctional protein involved in transcriptional activation of the cAMP pathway and is involved in circadian rhythm control. Rasd1 is a monomeric G protein implicated to play a pivotal role in potentiating b...

  13. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zippin, Jonathan H.; Farrell, Jeanne; Huron, David; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Hess, Kenneth C.; Fischman, Donald A.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation. PMID:14769862

  14. Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase defines a nuclear cAMP microdomain

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Bicarbonate-responsive “soluble” adenylyl cyclase resides, in part, inside the mammalian cell nucleus where it stimulates the activity of nuclear protein kinase A to phosphorylate the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The existence of this complete and functional, nuclear-localized cAMP pathway establishes that cAMP signals in intracellular microdomains and identifies an alternate pathway leading to CREB activation.

  15. Protein signaling networks from single cell fluctuations and information theory profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2011-05-18

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network.

  16. Molecular signaling networks that choreograph epimorphic fin regeneration in zebrafish - a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Tamara L; Franzosa, Jill A; Tanguay, Robert L

    2010-01-01

    This short review provides a current synopsis of caudal fin regeneration in zebrafish with an emphasis on the molecular signaling networks that dictate epimorphic regeneration. At the outset, the fundamentals of caudal fin architecture and the stages of epimorphic regeneration are described. This is followed by a detailed look at the main networks implicated in fin regeneration, namely the Wnt, fibroblast growth factor, activin-betaA, retinoic acid and hedgehog signaling pathways. Throughout this mini-review, these molecular networks are examined through the lens of wound healing, blastema formation or regenerative outgrowth, three of the main stages of epimorphic regeneration. Next, the emerging role of noncoding RNAs as regulators of regeneration and mechanisms of regenerative termination are discussed. Finally, the implications for future research and the broader field of regenerative medicine are examined.

  17. Protein Signaling Networks from Single Cell Fluctuations and Information Theory Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Shik; Remacle, F.; Fan, Rong; Hwang, Kiwook; Wei, Wei; Ahmad, Habib; Levine, R.D.; Heath, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Protein signaling networks among cells play critical roles in a host of pathophysiological processes, from inflammation to tumorigenesis. We report on an approach that integrates microfluidic cell handling, in situ protein secretion profiling, and information theory to determine an extracellular protein-signaling network and the role of perturbations. We assayed 12 proteins secreted from human macrophages that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide challenge, which emulates the macrophage-based innate immune responses against Gram-negative bacteria. We characterize the fluctuations in protein secretion of single cells, and of small cell colonies (n = 2, 3,···), as a function of colony size. Measuring the fluctuations permits a validation of the conditions required for the application of a quantitative version of the Le Chatelier's principle, as derived using information theory. This principle provides a quantitative prediction of the role of perturbations and allows a characterization of a protein-protein interaction network. PMID:21575571

  18. Yamanaka factors critically regulate the developmental signaling network in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaosong Liu; Jinyan Huang; Taotao Chen; Ying Wang; Shunmei Xin; Jian Li; Gang Pei; Jiuhong Kang

    2008-01-01

    Yamanaka factors (Oct3/4,Sox2,KIf4,c-Myc) are highly expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells,and their overexpression can induce pluripotency in both mouse and human somatic cells,indicating that these factors regulate the developmental signaling network necessary for ES cell pluripotency.However,systemic analysis of the signaling pathways regulated by Yamanaka factors has not yet been fully described.In this study,we identified the target promoters of endogenous Yamanaka factors on a whole genome scale using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation)-on-chip in E14.1 mouse ES cells,and we found that these four factors co-occupied 58 promoters.Interestingly,when Oct4 and Sox2 were analyzed as core factors,Kif4 functioned to enhance the core factors for development regulation,whereas c-Myc seemed to play a distinct role in regulating metabolism.The pathway analysis revealed that Yamanaka factors collectively regulate a developmental signaling network composed of 16 developmental signaling pathways,nine of which represent earlier unknown pathways in ES cells,including apoptosis and cellcycle pathways.We further analyzed data from a recent study examining Yamanaka factors in mouse ES cells.Interestingly,this analysis also revealed 16 developmental signaling pathways,of which 14 pathways overlap with the ones revealed by this study,despite that the target genes and the signaling pathways regulated by each individual Yamanaka factor differ significantly between these two datasets.We suggest that Yamanaka factors critically regulate a developmental signaling network composed of approximately a dozen crucial developmental signaling pathways to maintain the pluripotency of ES cells and probably also to induce pluripotent stem cells.

  19. Reconstruction of Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Insulin Signaling in Homo Sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliha Durmuş Tekir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the failure of synthesizing and secreting of insulin because of destroyed pancreatic β-cells. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is described by the decreased synthesis and secretion of insulin because of the defect in pancreatic β-cells as well as by the failure of responding to insulin because of malfunctioning of insulin signaling. In order to understand the signaling mechanisms of responding to insulin, it is necessary to identify all components in the insulin signaling network. Here, an interaction network consisting of proteins that have statistically high probability of being biologically related to insulin signaling in Homo sapiens was reconstructed by integrating Gene Ontology (GO annotations and interactome data. Furthermore, within this reconstructed network, interacting proteins which mediate the signal from insulin hormone to glucose transportation were identified using linear paths. The identification of key components functioning in insulin action on glucose metabolism is crucial for the efforts of preventing and treating type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Signaling and Gene Regulatory Networks Governing Definitive Endoderm Derivation From Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadnia, Abdulshakour; Yaqubi, Moein; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Neely, Eric; Fallahi, Hossein; Massumi, Mohammad

    2016-09-01

    The generation of definitive endoderm (DE) from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is a fundamental stage in the formation of highly organized visceral organs, such as the liver and pancreas. Currently, there is a need for a comprehensive study that illustrates the involvement of different signaling pathways and their interactions in the derivation of DE cells from PSCs. This study aimed to identify signaling pathways that have the greatest influence on DE formation using analyses of transcriptional profiles, protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions, and protein localization data. Using this approach, signaling networks involved in DE formation were constructed using systems biology and data mining tools, and the validity of the predicted networks was confirmed experimentally by measuring the mRNA levels of hub genes in several PSCs-derived DE cell lines. Based on our analyses, seven signaling pathways, including the BMP, ERK1-ERK2, FGF, TGF-beta, MAPK, Wnt, and PIP signaling pathways and their interactions, were found to play a role in the derivation of DE cells from PSCs. Lastly, the core gene regulatory network governing this differentiation process was constructed. The results of this study could improve our understanding surrounding the efficient generation of DE cells for the regeneration of visceral organs. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1994-2006, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Neuroblastoma tyrosine kinase signaling networks involve FYN and LYN in endosomes and lipid rafts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Palacios-Moreno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation plays a central role in creating a highly dynamic network of interacting proteins that reads and responds to signals from growth factors in the cellular microenvironment. Cells of the neural crest employ multiple signaling mechanisms to control migration and differentiation during development. It is known that defects in these mechanisms cause neuroblastoma, but how multiple signaling pathways interact to govern cell behavior is unknown. In a phosphoproteomic study of neuroblastoma cell lines and cell fractions, including endosomes and detergent-resistant membranes, 1622 phosphorylated proteins were detected, including more than half of the receptor tyrosine kinases in the human genome. Data were analyzed using a combination of graph theory and pattern recognition techniques that resolve data structure into networks that incorporate statistical relationships and protein-protein interaction data. Clusters of proteins in these networks are indicative of functional signaling pathways. The analysis indicates that receptor tyrosine kinases are functionally compartmentalized into distinct collaborative groups distinguished by activation and intracellular localization of SRC-family kinases, especially FYN and LYN. Changes in intracellular localization of activated FYN and LYN were observed in response to stimulation of the receptor tyrosine kinases, ALK and KIT. The results suggest a mechanism to distinguish signaling responses to activation of different receptors, or combinations of receptors, that govern the behavior of the neural crest, which gives rise to neuroblastoma.

  2. Data-driven quantification of the robustness and sensitivity of cell signaling networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Vieland, Veronica J.; Das, Jayajit

    2013-12-01

    Robustness and sensitivity of responses generated by cell signaling networks has been associated with survival and evolvability of organisms. However, existing methods analyzing robustness and sensitivity of signaling networks ignore the experimentally observed cell-to-cell variations of protein abundances and cell functions or contain ad hoc assumptions. We propose and apply a data-driven maximum entropy based method to quantify robustness and sensitivity of Escherichia coli (E. coli) chemotaxis signaling network. Our analysis correctly rank orders different models of E. coli chemotaxis based on their robustness and suggests that parameters regulating cell signaling are evolutionary selected to vary in individual cells according to their abilities to perturb cell functions. Furthermore, predictions from our approach regarding distribution of protein abundances and properties of chemotactic responses in individual cells based on cell population averaged data are in excellent agreement with their experimental counterparts. Our approach is general and can be used to evaluate robustness as well as generate predictions of single cell properties based on population averaged experimental data in a wide range of cell signaling systems.

  3. Systematic interactome mapping and genetic perturbation analysis of a C. elegans TGF-beta signaling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Muneesh; Hu, Patrick J; Ahn, Jin Sook; Ayivi-Guedehoussou, Nono; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Li, Siming; Milstein, Stuart; Armstrong, Chris M; Boxem, Mike; Butler, Maurice D; Busiguina, Svetlana; Rual, Jean-François; Ibarrola, Nieves; Chaklos, Sabrina T; Bertin, Nicolas; Vaglio, Philippe; Edgley, Mark L; King, Kevin V; Albert, Patrice S; Vandenhaute, Jean; Pandey, Akhilesh; Riddle, Donald L; Ruvkun, Gary; Vidal, Marc

    2004-02-27

    To initiate a system-level analysis of C. elegans DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling, we combined interactome mapping with single and double genetic perturbations. Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens starting with known DAF-7/TGF-beta pathway components defined a network of 71 interactions among 59 proteins. Coaffinity purification (co-AP) assays in mammalian cells confirmed the overall quality of this network. Systematic perturbations of the network using RNAi, both in wild-type and daf-7/TGF-beta pathway mutant animals, identified nine DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling modifiers, seven of which are conserved in humans. We show that one of these has functional homology to human SNO/SKI oncoproteins and that mutations at the corresponding genetic locus daf-5 confer defects in DAF-7/TGF-beta signaling. Our results reveal substantial molecular complexity in DAF-7/TGF-beta signal transduction. Integrating interactome maps with systematic genetic perturbations may be useful for developing a systems biology approach to this and other signaling modules.

  4. The Signal Extraction of Fetal Heart Rate Based on Wavelet Transform and BP Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-hong; ZHANG Bang-cheng; FU Hu-dai

    2005-01-01

    This paper briefly introduces the collection and recognition of biomedical signals, designs the method to collect FM signals. A detailed discussion on the system hardware, structure and functions is also given. Under LabWindows/CVI, the hardware and the driver do compatible, the hardware equipment work properly actively. The paper adopts multi threading technology for real-time analysis and makes use of latency time of CPU effectively, expedites program reflect speed, improves the program to perform efficiency. One threading is collecting data; the other threading is analyzing data. Using the method, it is broaden to analyze the signal in real-time. Wavelet transform to remove the main interference in the FM and by adding time-window to recognize with BP network; Finally the results of collecting signals and BP networks are discussed. 8 pregnant women' s signals of FM were collected successfully by using the sensor. The correct of BP network recognition is about 83.3% by using the above measure.

  5. Multitask learning of signaling and regulatory networks with application to studying human response to flu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Jain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructing regulatory and signaling response networks is one of the major goals of systems biology. While several successful methods have been suggested for this task, some integrating large and diverse datasets, these methods have so far been applied to reconstruct a single response network at a time, even when studying and modeling related conditions. To improve network reconstruction we developed MT-SDREM, a multi-task learning method which jointly models networks for several related conditions. In MT-SDREM, parameters are jointly constrained across the networks while still allowing for condition-specific pathways and regulation. We formulate the multi-task learning problem and discuss methods for optimizing the joint target function. We applied MT-SDREM to reconstruct dynamic human response networks for three flu strains: H1N1, H5N1 and H3N2. Our multi-task learning method was able to identify known and novel factors and genes, improving upon prior methods that model each condition independently. The MT-SDREM networks were also better at identifying proteins whose removal affects viral load indicating that joint learning can still lead to accurate, condition-specific, networks. Supporting website with MT-SDREM implementation: http://sb.cs.cmu.edu/mtsdrem.

  6. Digital Signal Processing for a Sliceable Transceiver for Optical Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saldaña Cercos, Silvia; Wagner, Christoph; Vegas Olmos, Juan José;

    2015-01-01

    Methods to upgrade the network infrastructure to cope with current traffic demands has attracted increasing research efforts. A promising alternative is signal slicing. Signal slicing aims at re-using low bandwidth equipment to satisfy high bandwidth traffic demands. This technique has been used......, a comprehensive DSP power consumption analysis for both WDM and TDM systems at 1 Gbps and 10 Gbps, discussing latency penalties for each approach. For 1 Gbps WDM system 278 pJ per information bit for 4 slices is reported at 105 ns latency penalties, whereas 3898.4 pJ per information bit at 183.5 µs latency...... penalty is reported for 10 Gbps. Power savings of the order of hundreds of Watts can be obtained when using signal slicing as an alternative to 10 Gbps implemented access networks....

  7. An application of mapping neural networks and a digital signal processor for cochlear neuroprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadák, J; Unbehauen, R

    1993-01-01

    Cochlear neuroprostheses strive to restore the sensation of hearing to patients with a profound sensorineural deafness. They exhibit a stimulation of the surviving auditory nerve neurons by electrical currents delivered through electrodes placed on or within the cochlea. The present article describes a new method for an efficient derivation of the required information from the incoming speech signal necessary for the implant stimulation. Also some realization aspects of the new approach are addressed. In the new strategy, a multilayer neural network is employed in the formant frequency estimation having some suitable speech signal descriptors as particular input signals. The proposed method allows us a fast formant frequency estimation necessary for the implant stimulation. With the developed strategy, the prosthesis can be adjusted to the environment which the patient is supposed to live in. Moreover, the neural network concept offers us an alternative for dealing with the areas of neural loss or "holes" in the frequency map of the patient's ear.

  8. Signal processing and neural network toolbox and its application to failure diagnosis and prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Fang; Wen, Fang; Willett, Peter K.; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Jordan, Eric H.

    2001-07-01

    Many systems are comprised of components equipped with self-testing capability; however, if the system is complex involving feedback and the self-testing itself may occasionally be faulty, tracing faults to a single or multiple causes is difficult. Moreover, many sensors are incapable of reliable decision-making on their own. In such cases, a signal processing front-end that can match inference needs will be very helpful. The work is concerned with providing an object-oriented simulation environment for signal processing and neural network-based fault diagnosis and prognosis. In the toolbox, we implemented a wide range of spectral and statistical manipulation methods such as filters, harmonic analyzers, transient detectors, and multi-resolution decomposition to extract features for failure events from data collected by data sensors. Then we evaluated multiple learning paradigms for general classification, diagnosis and prognosis. The network models evaluated include Restricted Coulomb Energy (RCE) Neural Network, Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ), Decision Trees (C4.5), Fuzzy Adaptive Resonance Theory (FuzzyArtmap), Linear Discriminant Rule (LDR), Quadratic Discriminant Rule (QDR), Radial Basis Functions (RBF), Multiple Layer Perceptrons (MLP) and Single Layer Perceptrons (SLP). Validation techniques, such as N-fold cross-validation and bootstrap techniques, are employed for evaluating the robustness of network models. The trained networks are evaluated for their performance using test data on the basis of percent error rates obtained via cross-validation, time efficiency, generalization ability to unseen faults. Finally, the usage of neural networks for the prediction of residual life of turbine blades with thermal barrier coatings is described and the results are shown. The neural network toolbox has also been applied to fault diagnosis in mixed-signal circuits.

  9. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  10. Network Organization and Evolution of Signaling Network in LTE Era%LTE时代信令网网络组织与演进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 陈凤莲

    2015-01-01

    Used in LTE network all IP network architecture, compared with 2G / 3G era to TDM network organization is completely different, LTE network between each element communication, 2G / 3G and LTE networks, ifxed telephone network exchange to realize. Signaling from the developing trend, diameter protocol will replace traditional SS7 protocol, become widely used in LTE network core network communication protocol, signaling network in the future development trend of IP, diameter signaling network long-term and SS7 signaling network coexist.%LTE网络采用全IP网络架构,对比2G/3G时代以TDM为主的网络组织完全不同,LTE网络内部各网元间通信、LTE网与2G/3G网、固定电话网等网间互通如何实现。从信令演进趋势看,Diameter协议将取代传统的SS7协议,成为LTE网络广泛应用的核心网网元间通信协议,未来信令网络的发展趋势为IP化,Diameter信令网将长期与SS7信令网共存。

  11. Nonlinear optical signal processing for high-speed, spectrally efficient fiber optic systems and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo

    The past decade has witnessed astounding boom in telecommunication network traffic. With the emergence of multimedia over Internet, the high-capacity optical transport systems have started to shift focus from the core network towards the end users. This trend leads to diverse optical networks with transparency and reconfigurability requirement. As single channel data rate continues to increase and channel spacing continues to shrink for high capacity, high spectral efficiency, the workload on conventional electronic signal processing elements in the router nodes continues to build up. Performing signal processing functions in the optical domain can potentially alleviate the speed bottleneck if the unique optical properties are efficiently leveraged to assist electronic processing methodologies. Ultra-high bandwidth capability along with the promise for multi-channel and format-transparent operation make optical signal processing an attractive technology which is expected to have great impact on future optical networks. For optical signal processing applications in fiber-optic network and systems, a laudable goal would be to explore the unique nonlinear optical processes in novel photonic devices. This dissertation investigates novel optical signal processing techniques through simulations and experimental demonstrations, analyzes limitations of these nonlinear processing elements and proposes techniques to enhance the system performance or designs for functional photonic modules. Two key signal-processing building blocks for future optical networks, namely slow-light-based tunable optical delay lines and SOA-based high-speed wavelength converters, are presented in the first part of the dissertation. Phase preserving and spectrally efficient slow light are experimentally demonstrated using advanced modulation formats. Functional and novel photonic modules, such as multi-channel synchronizer and variable-bit-rate optical time division multiplexer are designed and

  12. Robust signal recognition algorithm based on machine learning in heterogeneous networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaokai Liu; Rong Li; Chenglin Zhao; Pengbiao Wang

    2016-01-01

    There are various heterogeneous networks for terminals to deliver a better quality of service. Signal system recognition and classification contribute a lot to the process. However, in low signal to noise ratio (SNR) circumstances or under time-varying multipath channels, the majority of the existing algorithms for signal recognition are already facing limitations. In this series, we present a robust signal recogni-tion method based upon the original and latest updated ver-sion of the extreme learning machine (ELM) to help users to switch between networks. The ELM utilizes signal characte- ristics to distinguish systems. The superiority of this algorithm lies in the random choices of hidden nodes and in the fact that it determines the output weights analyticaly, which result in lower complexity. Theoreticaly, the algorithm tends to ofer a good generalization performance at an extremely fast speed of learning. Moreover, we implement the GSM/WCDMA/LTE mod-els in the Matlab environment by using the Simulink tools. The simulations reveal that the signals can be recognized suc-cessfuly to achieve a 95% accuracy in a low SNR (0 dB) environment in the time-varying multipath Rayleigh fading channel.

  13. Beyond 'furballs' and 'dumpling soups' - towards a molecular architecture of signaling complexes and networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewitzky, Marc; Simister, Philip C; Feller, Stephan M

    2012-08-14

    The molecular architectures of intracellular signaling networks are largely unknown. Understanding their design principles and mechanisms of processing information is essential to grasp the molecular basis of virtually all biological processes. This is particularly challenging for human pathologies like cancers, as essentially each tumor is a unique disease with vastly deranged signaling networks. However, even in normal cells we know almost nothing. A few 'signalosomes', like the COP9 and the TCR signaling complexes have been described, but detailed structural information on their architectures is largely lacking. Similarly, many growth factor receptors, for example EGF receptor, insulin receptor and c-Met, signal via huge protein complexes built on large platform proteins (Gab, Irs/Dok, p130Cas[BCAR1], Frs families etc.), which are structurally not well understood. Subsequent higher order processing events remain even more enigmatic. We discuss here methods that can be employed to study signaling architectures, and the importance of too often neglected features like macromolecular crowding, intrinsic disorder in proteins and the sophisticated cellular infrastructures, which need to be carefully considered in order to develop a more mature understanding of cellular signal processing.

  14. Fundamentals of Inter-cell Overhead Signaling in Heterogeneous Cellular Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Ping; Andrews, Jeffrey G

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneous base stations (e.g. picocells, microcells, femtocells and distributed antennas) will become increasingly essential for cellular network capacity and coverage. Up until now, little basic research has been done on the fundamentals of managing so much infrastructure -- much of it unplanned -- together with the carefully planned macro-cellular network. Inter-cell coordination is in principle an effective way of ensuring different infrastructure components behave in a way that increases, rather than decreases, the key quality of service (QoS) metrics. The success of such coordination depends heavily on how the overhead is shared, and the rate and delay of the overhead sharing. We develop a novel framework to quantify overhead signaling for inter-cell coordination, which is usually ignored in traditional 1-tier networks, and assumes even more importance in multi-tier heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs). We derive the overhead quality contour for general K-tier HCNs -- the achievable set of overhead...

  15. A comparative study of Macroscopic Fundamental Diagrams of urban road networks governed by different traffic signal systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lele; de Gier, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Using a stochastic cellular automaton model for urban traffic flow, we study and compare Macroscopic Fundamental Diagrams (MFDs) of arterial road networks governed by different types of adaptive traffic signal systems. In particular, we simulate realistic signal systems that include signal linking and adaptive cycle times, and compare their performance against a network using highly adaptive self-organizing traffic signals. We find that for networks with time- independent boundary conditions, well-defined stationary MFDs are observed, whose shape depends on the particular signal system used, and also on the level of heterogeneity in the system. We find that the spatial heterogeneity of both density and flow provide important indicators of network performance. We also study networks with time-dependent boundary conditions, containing morning and afternoon peaks. In this case, intricate hysteresis loops are observed in the MFDs which are strongly correlated with the density heterogeneity. Our results show that ...

  16. Effects of the Wireless Channel, Signal Compression and Network Architecture on Speech Quality in Voip Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    the connection. [11] With the advances of wireless communications and the increasing use of WiFi (Wireless Fidelity) and satellite networks, there...802.11, “Wireless LAN Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer Specifications,” ISO/IEC 802-11-1999, 1999. [38] S. McClure et al, Hacking

  17. Effects of iterative learning based signal control strategies on macroscopic fundamental diagrams of urban road networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Tian, Fuli; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-10-01

    Urban traffic flows are inherently repeated on a daily or weekly basis. This repeatability can help improve the traffic conditions if it is used properly by the control system. In this paper, we propose a novel iterative learning control (ILC) strategy for traffic signals of urban road networks using the repeatability feature of traffic flow. To improve the control robustness, the ILC strategy is further integrated with an error feedback control law in a complementary manner. Theoretical analysis indicates that the ILC-based traffic signal control methods can guarantee the asymptotic learning convergence, despite the presence of modeling uncertainties and exogenous disturbances. Finally, the impacts of the ILC-based signal control strategies on the network macroscopic fundamental diagram (MFD) are examined. The results show that the proposed ILC-based control strategies can homogenously distribute the network accumulation by controlling the vehicle numbers in each link to the desired levels under different traffic demands, which can result in the network with high capacity and mobility.

  18. High-throughput mathematical analysis identifies Turing networks for patterning with equally diffusing signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Luciano; Diego, Xavier; Sharpe, James; Müller, Patrick

    2016-04-08

    The Turing reaction-diffusion model explains how identical cells can self-organize to form spatial patterns. It has been suggested that extracellular signaling molecules with different diffusion coefficients underlie this model, but the contribution of cell-autonomous signaling components is largely unknown. We developed an automated mathematical analysis to derive a catalog of realistic Turing networks. This analysis reveals that in the presence of cell-autonomous factors, networks can form a pattern with equally diffusing signals and even for any combination of diffusion coefficients. We provide a software (available at http://www.RDNets.com) to explore these networks and to constrain topologies with qualitative and quantitative experimental data. We use the software to examine the self-organizing networks that control embryonic axis specification and digit patterning. Finally, we demonstrate how existing synthetic circuits can be extended with additional feedbacks to form Turing reaction-diffusion systems. Our study offers a new theoretical framework to understand multicellular pattern formation and enables the wide-spread use of mathematical biology to engineer synthetic patterning systems.

  19. Kinome-wide Decoding of Network-Attacking Mutations Rewiring Cancer Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin M.; Simpson, Craig D.; Longden, James; Miller, Chad J.; Lou, Hua Jane; Perryman, Lara; Cox, Thomas R.; Zivanovic, Nevena; Palmeri, Antonio; Wesolowska-Andersen, Agata; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Itamochi, Hiroaki; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Erler, Janine T.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Linding, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells acquire pathological phenotypes through accumulation of mutations that perturb signaling networks. However, global analysis of these events is currently limited. Here, we identify six types of network-attacking mutations (NAMs), including changes in kinase and SH2 modulation, network rewiring, and the genesis and extinction of phosphorylation sites. We developed a computational platform (ReKINect) to identify NAMs and systematically interpreted the exomes and quantitative (phospho-)proteomes of five ovarian cancer cell lines and the global cancer genome repository. We identified and experimentally validated several NAMs, including PKCγ M501I and PKD1 D665N, which encode specificity switches analogous to the appearance of kinases de novo within the kinome. We discover mutant molecular logic gates, a drift toward phospho-threonine signaling, weakening of phosphorylation motifs, and kinase-inactivating hotspots in cancer. Our method pinpoints functional NAMs, scales with the complexity of cancer genomes and cell signaling, and may enhance our capability to therapeutically target tumor-specific networks. PMID:26388441

  20. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-03-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains.

  1. A signal combining technique based on channel shortening for cooperative sensor networks

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Syed Imtiaz

    2010-06-01

    The cooperative relaying process needs proper coordination among the communicating and the relaying nodes. This coordination and the required capabilities may not be available in some wireless systems, e.g. wireless sensor networks where the nodes are equipped with very basic communication hardware. In this paper, we consider a scenario where the source node transmits its signal to the destination through multiple relays in an uncoordinated fashion. The destination can capture the multiple copies of the transmitted signal through a Rake receiver. We analyze a situation where the number of Rake fingers N is less than that of the relaying nodes L. In this case, the receiver can combine N strongest signals out of L. The remaining signals will be lost and act as interference to the desired signal components. To tackle this problem, we develop a novel signal combining technique based on channel shortening. This technique proposes a processing block before the Rake reception which compresses the energy of L signal components over N branches while keeping the noise level at its minimum. The proposed scheme saves the system resources and makes the received signal compatible to the available hardware. Simulation results show that it outperforms the selection combining scheme. ©2010 IEEE.

  2. Expression profiles of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their regulation by Relish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dongdong; LI Fuhua; LI Shihao; WEN Rong; XIANG Jianhai

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs),as key immune effectors,play important roles in the innate immune system of invertebrates.Different types of AMPs,including Penaeidin,Crustin,ALF (antilipopolysaccharide factor) have been identified in different penaeid shrimp; however,systematic analyses on the function of different AMPs in shrimp responsive to different types of bacteria are very limited.In this study,we analyzed the expression profiles of AMPs in the Chinese shrimps,Fenneropenaeus chinensis,simultaneously by real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) when shrimp were challenged with Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram-positive,G+) or Vibrio anguillarium (Gram-negative,G).Different AMPs showed different expression profiles when shrimp were injected with one type of bacterium,and one AMP also showed different expression profiles when shrimp were challenged with different bacteria.Furthermore,the expression of these AMPs showed temporal expression profiles,suggesting that different AMPs function coordinately in bacteria-infected shrimp.An RNA interference approach was used to study the function of the Relish transcription factor in regulating the transcription of different AM Ps.The current study showed that Relish could regulate the transcription of different AMPs in shrimp.Differential expression profiles of AMPs in shrimp injected with different types of bacteria indicated that a complicated antimicrobial response network existed in shrimp.These data contribute to our understanding of immunity in shrimp and may provide a strategy for the control of disease in shrimp.

  3. Cyclic AMP activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Peraldi, P; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated in response to a large variety of extracellular signals, including growth factors, hormones, and neurotransmitters, which activate distinct intracellular signaling pathways. Their activation by the cAMP-dependent pathway, however, has not been...... reported. In rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we demonstrate here a stimulation of the MAP kinase isozyme extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) following elevation of intracellular cAMP after exposure of the cells to isobutylmethylxanthine, cholera toxin, forskolin, or cAMP-analogues. cAMP acted...... synergistically with phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C, in the stimulation of ERK1. In accordance with this observation, the peptide neurotransmitter pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP38), which stimulates cAMP production as well as phosphatidylinositol breakdown in PC12...

  4. Modulation of cell signaling networks after CTLA4 blockade in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Comin-Anduix

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effects on cell signalling networks upon blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA4 using the monoclonal antibody tremelimumab were studied in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC samples from patients with metastatic melanoma. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL: Findings Intracellular flow cytometry was used to detect phosphorylated (p signaling molecules downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR and cytokine receptors. PBMC from tremelimumab-treated patients were characterized by increase in pp38, pSTAT1 and pSTAT3, and decrease in pLck, pERK1/2 and pSTAT5 levels. These changes were noted in CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes but also in CD14 monocytes. A divergent pattern of phosphorylation of Zap70, LAT, Akt and STAT6 was noted in patients with or without an objective tumor response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The administration of the CTLA4-blocking antibody tremelimumab to patients with metastatic melanoma influences signaling networks downstream of the TCR and cytokine receptors both in T cells and monocytes. The strong modulation of signaling networks in monocytes suggests that this cell subset may be involved in clinical responses to CTLA4 blockade. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov; Registration numbers NCT00090896 and NCT00471887.

  5. Human Age Recognition by Electrocardiogram Signal Based on Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Hirak

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this work is to make a neural network function approximation model to detect human age from the electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. The input vectors of the neural network are the Katz fractal dimension of the ECG signal, frequencies in the QRS complex, male or female (represented by numeric constant) and the average of successive R-R peak distance of a particular ECG signal. The QRS complex has been detected by short time Fourier transform algorithm. The successive R peak has been detected by, first cutting the signal into periods by auto-correlation method and then finding the absolute of the highest point in each period. The neural network used in this problem consists of two layers, with Sigmoid neuron in the input and linear neuron in the output layer. The result shows the mean of errors as -0.49, 1.03, 0.79 years and the standard deviation of errors as 1.81, 1.77, 2.70 years during training, cross validation and testing with unknown data sets, respectively.

  6. Plant morphogenesis, auxin, and the signal-trafficking network incompleteness theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl J. Niklas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Plant morphogenesis (the development of form and function requires signal-trafficking and cross-talking among all levels of organization to coordinate the operation of metabolic and genomic networked systems. Many if not all of these biological features can be rendered as logic circuits supervising the operation of one or more signal-activated metabolic or genome networks. This approach simplifies complex morphogenetic phenomena and allows for their aggregation into diagrams of larger, more "global" networked systems. This conceptualization is illustrated for morphogenesis in model plants such as maize (Zea mays and Thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana from an evolutionary perspective. The phytohormone indole-acetic acid (IAA is used as an example for a well-known signaling chemical and discussed in terms of the logic circuits and signal-activated sub-systems for hormone-mediated wall loosening and cell expansion as well as polar/lateral intercellular IAA transport. For each of these phenomena, a circuit/sub-system diagram highlights missing components, either in the logic circuit or in the sub-system it supervises, that must be identified experimentally if each of these basic phenomena is to be fully understood within a phylogen

  7. Extruded Bread Classification on the Basis of Acoustic Emission Signal With Application of Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świetlicka, Izabela; Muszyński, Siemowit; Marzec, Agata

    2015-04-01

    The presented work covers the problem of developing a method of extruded bread classification with the application of artificial neural networks. Extruded flat graham, corn, and rye breads differening in water activity were used. The breads were subjected to the compression test with simultaneous registration of acoustic signal. The amplitude-time records were analyzed both in time and frequency domains. Acoustic emission signal parameters: single energy, counts, amplitude, and duration acoustic emission were determined for the breads in four water activities: initial (0.362 for rye, 0.377 for corn, and 0.371 for graham bread), 0.432, 0.529, and 0.648. For classification and the clustering process, radial basis function, and self-organizing maps (Kohonen network) were used. Artificial neural networks were examined with respect to their ability to classify or to cluster samples according to the bread type, water activity value, and both of them. The best examination results were achieved by the radial basis function network in classification according to water activity (88%), while the self-organizing maps network yielded 81% during bread type clustering.

  8. RNAi screening reveals a large signaling network controlling the Golgi apparatus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Joanne; Goh, Germaine; Racine, Victor; Ng, Susanne; Kumar, Pankaj; Bard, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus has many important physiological functions, including sorting of secretory cargo and biosynthesis of complex glycans. These functions depend on the intricate and compartmentalized organization of the Golgi apparatus. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate Golgi architecture, we developed a quantitative morphological assay using three different Golgi compartment markers and quantitative image analysis, and performed a kinome- and phosphatome-wide RNAi screen in HeLa cells. Depletion of 159 signaling genes, nearly 20% of genes assayed, induced strong and varied perturbations in Golgi morphology. Using bioinformatics data, a large regulatory network could be constructed. Specific subnetworks are involved in phosphoinositides regulation, acto-myosin dynamics and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Most gene depletion also affected Golgi functions, in particular glycan biosynthesis, suggesting that signaling cascades can control glycosylation directly at the Golgi level. Our results provide a genetic overview of the signaling pathways that control the Golgi apparatus in human cells.

  9. From teratogens to potential therapeutics: natural inhibitors of the Hedgehog signaling network come of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovhannisyan, Amalya; Matz, Madlen; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2009-10-01

    Steroidal alkaloids from Veratrum californicum (Durand) are known to exert teratogenic effects (e.g., cyclopia, holoprosencephaly) by blocking the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, which plays a considerable role in embryonic development and organogenesis. Most surprisingly, recent studies demonstrate that this complex signaling network is active even in the healthy adult organism, where it seems to control important aspects of basic metabolism and interorgan homeostasis. Abnormal activation of Hh signaling, however, can lead to the development of different tumors, psoriasis, and other diseases. This review provides an overview of how the principle teratogenic and hazardous constituent of Veratrum californicum, cyclopamine, interferes with Hh signaling and can potentially serve as a beneficial therapeutic for different tumors and psoriasis.

  10. A probablistic neural network classification system for signal and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The Acoustical Heart Valve Analysis Package is a system for signal and image processing and classification. It is being developed in both Matlab and C, to provide an interactive, interpreted environment, and has been optimized for large scale matrix operations. It has been used successfully to classify acoustic signals from implanted prosthetic heart valves in human patients, and will be integrated into a commercial Heart Valve Screening Center. The system uses several standard signal processing algorithms, as well as supervised learning techniques using the probabilistic neural network (PNN). Although currently used for the acoustic heart valve application, the algorithms and modular design allow it to be used for other applications, as well. We will describe the signal classification system, and show results from a set of test valves.

  11. RBF neural network prediction on weak electrical signals in Aloe vera var. chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lanzhou; Zhao, Jiayin; Wang, Miao

    2008-10-01

    A Gaussian radial base function (RBF) neural network forecast on signals in the Aloe vera var. chinensis by the wavelet soft-threshold denoised as the time series and using the delayed input window chosen at 50, is set up to forecast backward. There was the maximum amplitude at 310.45μV, minimum -75.15μV, average value -2.69μV and Aloe vera var. chinensis respectively. The electrical signal in Aloe vera var. chinensis is a sort of weak, unstable and low frequency signals. A result showed that it is feasible to forecast plant electrical signals for the timing by the RBF. The forecast data can be used as the preferences for the intelligent autocontrol system based on the adaptive characteristic of plants to achieve the energy saving on the agricultural production in the plastic lookum or greenhouse.

  12. Acoustic Emission Signal Recognition of Different Rocks Using Wavelet Transform and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of rocks generate acoustic emission (AE signals with various frequencies and amplitudes. How to determine rock types by their AE characteristics in field monitoring is also useful to understand their mechanical behaviors. Different types of rock specimens (granulite, granite, limestone, and siltstone were subjected to uniaxial compression until failure, and their AE signals were recorded during their fracturing process. The wavelet transform was used to decompose the AE signals, and the artificial neural network (ANN was established to recognize the rock types and noise (artificial knock noise and electrical noise. The results show that different rocks had different rupture features and AE characteristics. The wavelet transform provided a powerful method to acquire the basic characteristics of the rock AE and the environmental noises, such as the energy spectrum and the peak frequency, and the ANN was proved to be a good method to recognize AE signals from different types of rocks and the environmental noises.

  13. Effects of Suanzaoren Decoction on cAMP-PKA-CREB Signaling Pathway in Hypothala mic Paraventricular Nuclear(PVN)Mediated by GABAB1 R in Aged rat with REM Sleep Depriva-tion%酸枣仁汤对GABAB 1 R介导快动眼睡眠剥夺老年大鼠下丘脑室旁核cAMP-PKA-CREB信号通路的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游秋云; 王平; 张舜波; 黄攀攀; 章程鹏

    2014-01-01

    Objective Observe the effect of Suanzao-Rentang on cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway in hypo-thalamic paraventricular nuclear(PVN)ofaged rat whose rapid eye movement sleep has been deprived.Methods Natural age24 month-old Wistar rats arerandomly divided into control group(isovolumetric saline),REM sleep deprivation elderly group(iso-volumetric saline),positive control group(estazolam 0.18 mg/(kg·d),Suanzao-Rentang low and high dose group(12.96,25.92 g/(kg·d).Each group isgiven intragastric administration for two weeks.After that,except for the control group,each group is made REM sleep deprivation 48hours production model of old rats with homemade improved multi-platform.Then,we use Immunohistochemistry for detecting changes of GABAB1R positive reactant in the rat PVN,enzyme-linked immunosorbent as-say and immunohistochemistry for detecting changes of cyclic adenosine monophosphate(cAMP)in part of PVN and cAMP re-sponse element binding protein(CREB)levels,as well as activity of homogenate phosphodiesterase(PDE)in PVN.Results Compared with the control group,the amountof positive reaction GABAB1 R in PVN sitessignificantly increases(P<0.01), cAMP and p-CREB levels significantly reduce,PDE activity significantly increases(P<0.01)in the REM sleep deprivation old rats;compared with the older group in which the ratesREM sleep hasbeen deprived,the positive reaction amountof GABAB1 R in PVN significantly reduces(P<0.01 ),cAMPbutp-CREB levels significantly increases,PDE activity significantly reduces(P<0.01)in Suanzao-Rentang low and high-dose group of rats.Conclusion The results show that Suanzao-Rentang possi-bly play a role in brain nerves by enhancing GABAB1 R expression whichactivates cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway.%目的:观察酸枣仁汤对快动眼睡眠被剥夺老年大鼠下丘脑室旁核(PVN)cAMP-PKA-CREB信号通路的影响。方法将自然衰老24月龄Wistar大鼠随机分成空白对照组(等容生理盐水),老年REM睡眠剥夺组

  14. Signaling network of dendritic cells in response to pathogens: a community-input supported knowledgebase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nudelman Irina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. Much research has focused on the signaling pathways triggered upon infection of dendritic cells by various pathogens. The high level of activity in the field makes it desirable to have a pathway-based resource to access the information in the literature. Current pathway diagrams lack either comprehensiveness, or an open-access editorial interface. Hence, there is a need for a dependable, expertly curated knowledgebase that integrates this information into a map of signaling networks. Description We have built a detailed diagram of the dendritic cell signaling network, with the goal of providing researchers with a valuable resource and a facile method for community input. Network construction has relied on comprehensive review of the literature and regular updates. The diagram includes detailed depictions of pathways activated downstream of different pathogen recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors. Initially assembled using CellDesigner software, it provides an annotated graphical representation of interactions stored in Systems Biology Mark-up Language. The network, which comprises 249 nodes and 213 edges, has been web-published through the Biological Pathway Publisher software suite. Nodes are annotated with PubMed references and gene-related information, and linked to a public wiki, providing a discussion forum for updates and corrections. To gain more insight into regulatory patterns of dendritic cell signaling, we analyzed the network using graph-theory methods: bifan, feedforward and multi-input convergence motifs were enriched. This emphasis on activating control mechanisms is consonant with a network that subserves persistent and coordinated responses to

  15. A novel conditional genetic system reveals that increasing neuronal cAMP enhances memory and retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isiegas, Carolina; McDonough, Conor; Huang, Ted; Havekes, Robbert; Fabian, Sara; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Hui; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Kim, Jae-Ick; Lee, Yong-Seok; Lee, Hye-Ryeon; Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Lee, Nuribalhae; Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Jeong-Sik; Son, Hyeon; Zhuo, Min; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Abel, Ted

    2008-01-01

    Consistent evidence from pharmacological and genetic studies shows that cAMP is a critical modulator of synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, the potential of the cAMP signaling pathway as a target for memory enhancement remains unclear because of contradictory findings from pharmacolog

  16. The Cyclic Nucleotide Specificity of Three cAMP Receptors in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Kimmel, Alan R.; Saxe III, Charles L.; Jastorff, Bernd; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1992-01-01

    cAMP receptors mediate signal transduction pathways during development in Dictyostelium. A cAMP receptor (cAR1) has been cloned and sequenced (Klein, P., Sun, T. J., Saxe, C. L., Kimmel, A. R., Johnson, R. L., and Devreotes, P. N. (1988) Science 241, 1467-1472) and recently several other cAR genes h

  17. Sleutelmag en amp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Rossouw

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available As die Heidelbergse Kategismus (Sondag 31 handel oor die sleutels van die Koninkryk, dan word die betrokkenheid van die ampte slegs per implikasie veronderstel. Meer eksplisiet word die amp en sleutelmag in die Nederlandse Geloofsbelydenis gekoppel; “ons glo dat hierdie ware kerk ooreenkomstig die geestelike bestuurswyse wat ons Here ons in sy Woord geleer het, geregeer moet word... hulle (moet sorg dra dat die ware godsdiens onderhou (word, die ware leer orals versprei, die oortreders op geestelike wyse vermaan en in toom gehou (word... (N.G.B. art. 30 en: “Ons glo verder dat die regeerders van die kerk, al is dit nuttig en goed om onder mekaar ’n bepaalde orde tot instandhouding van die liggaam van die kerk in te stel en te handhaaf, tog noukeurig moet oppas om nie af te wyk van wat Christus, ons enigste Meester, vir ons ingestel het nie... Ons aanvaar derhalwe slegs wat kan dien om eendrag en eenheid te bewaar en te bevorder, en om alles in gehoorsaamheid van God te onderhou. Daarvoor is nodig die ban en alles wat daarmee saamhang, toegepas ooreenkomstig die Woord van God” (N.G.B. art. 32.

  18. Information Feedback Strategies in a Signal Controlled Network with Overlapped Routes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Li-Jun; HUANG Hai-Jun; LIU Tian-Liang

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the effects of four different information feedback strategies on the dynamics of traffic, travel-ers' route choice and the resultant system performance in a signal controlled network with overlapped routes.Simulation results given by the cellular automaton model show that the system purpose-based mean velocity feedback strategy and the congestion coefficient feedback strategy have more advantages in improving network utilization efficiency and reducing travelers' travel times. The travel time feedback strategy and the individual purposed-based mean velocity feedback strategy behave slightly better to ensure user equity.

  19. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Documentation and Development: The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System for the...

  20. Transient epileptiform signaling during neuronal network development: regulation by external stimulation and bimodal GABAergic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham M; Lee, Sangmook; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2013-04-01

    A predominance of excitatory activity, with protracted appearance of inhibitory activity, accompanies cortical neuronal development. It is unclear whether or not inhibitory neuronal activity is solicited exclusively by excitatory neurons or whether the transient excitatory activity displayed by developing GABAergic neurons contributes to an excitatory threshold that fosters their conversion to inhibitory activity. We addressed this possibility by culturing murine embryonic neurons on multi-electrode arrays. A wave of individual 0.2-0.4 mV signals ("spikes") appeared between approx. 20-30 days in culture, then declined. A transient wave of high amplitude (>0.5 mV) epileptiform activity coincided with the developmental decline in spikes. Bursts (clusters of ≥3 low-amplitude spikes within 0.7s prior to returning to baseline) persisted following this decline. Addition of the GABAergic antagonist bicuculline initially had no effect on signaling, consistent with delayed development of GABAergic synapses. This was followed by a period in which bicuculline inhibited overall signaling, confirming that GABAergic neurons initially display excitatory activity in ex vivo networks. Following the transient developmental wave of epileptiform signaling, bicuculline induced a resurgence of epileptiform signaling, indicating that GABAergic neurons at this point displayed inhibitory activity. The appearance of transition after the developmental and decline of epileptiform activity, rather than immediately after the developmental decline in lower-amplitude spikes, suggests that the initial excitatory activity of GABAergic neurons contributes to their transition into inhibitory neurons, and that inhibitory GABAergic activity is essential for network development. Prior studies indicate that a minority (25%) of neurons in these cultures were GABAergic, suggesting that inhibitory neurons regulate multiple excitatory neurons. A similar robust increase in signaling following cessation of

  1. Simulation study on effects of signaling network structure on the developmental increase in complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keranen, Soile V.E.

    2003-04-02

    The developmental increase in structural complexity in multicellular life forms depends on local, often non-periodic differences in gene expression. These depend on a network of gene-gene interactions coded within the organismal genome. To better understand how genomic information generates complex expression patterns, I have modeled the pattern forming behavior of small artificial genomes in virtual blastoderm embryos. I varied several basic properties of these genomic signaling networks, such as the number of genes, the distributions of positive (inductive) and negative (repressive) interactions, and the strengths of gene-gene interactions, and analyzed their effects on developmental pattern formation. The results show how even simple genomes can generate complex non-periodic patterns under suitable conditions. They also show how the frequency of complex patterns depended on the numbers and relative arrangements of positive and negative interactions. For example, negative co-regulation of signaling pathway components increased the likelihood of (complex) patterns relative to differential negative regulation of the pathway components. Interestingly, neither quantitative differences either in strengths of signaling interactions nor multiple response thresholds to signal concentration (as in morphogen gradients) were essential for formation of multiple, spatially unique cell types. Thus, with combinatorial code of gene regulation and hierarchical signaling interactions, it is theoretically possible to organize metazoan embryogenesis with just a small fraction of the metazoan genome. Because even small networks can generate complex patterns when they contain a suitable set of connections, evolution of metazoan complexity may have depended more on selection for favourable configurations of signaling interactions than on the increase in numbers of regulatory genes.

  2. Hypoxia induces a phase transition within a kinase signaling network in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Shi, Qihui; Remacle, Francoise; Qin, Lidong; Shackelford, David B; Shin, Young Shik; Mischel, Paul S; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2013-04-09

    Hypoxia is a near-universal feature of cancer, promoting glycolysis, cellular proliferation, and angiogenesis. The molecular mechanisms of hypoxic signaling have been intensively studied, but the impact of changes in oxygen partial pressure (pO2) on the state of signaling networks is less clear. In a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cell model, we examined the response of signaling networks to targeted pathway inhibition between 21% and 1% pO2. We used a microchip technology that facilitates quantification of a panel of functional proteins from statistical numbers of single cells. We find that near 1.5% pO2, the signaling network associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1)--a critical component of hypoxic signaling and a compelling cancer drug target--is deregulated in a manner such that it will be unresponsive to mTOR kinase inhibitors near 1.5% pO2, but will respond at higher or lower pO2 values. These predictions were validated through experiments on bulk GBM cell line cultures and on neurosphere cultures of a human-origin GBM xenograft tumor. We attempt to understand this behavior through the use of a quantitative version of Le Chatelier's principle, as well as through a steady-state kinetic model of protein interactions, both of which indicate that hypoxia can influence mTORC1 signaling as a switch. The Le Chatelier approach also indicates that this switch may be thought of as a type of phase transition. Our analysis indicates that certain biologically complex cell behaviors may be understood using fundamental, thermodynamics-motivated principles.

  3. Distributed geolocation algorithm in mobile ad hoc networks using received signal strength differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shanzeng; Tang, Helen

    2012-05-01

    Future military wireless communication in a battlefield will be mobile ad hoc in nature. The ability to geolocate and track both friendly forces and enemies is very important in military command and control operations. However, current mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) have no capabilities to geolocate radio emitters that belong to enemy mobile ad hoc networks. This paper presents a distributed geolocation algorithm using received signal strength differences to geolocate enemy radio emitters by leveraging friendly force MANET infrastructure, and proposes a communication protocol for radio emitter geolocation applications. An enemy's radio emitter signal is detected, and its signal strength is measured by the nodes in a friendly mobile ad hoc network. The identity of the enemy radio emitter is extracted from the decoded message header of the medium access control layer. By correlating and associating the enemy's radio emitter identity with its received signal strength, the enemy radio emitter is identified. The enemy's radio emitter identity and its received signal strength are distributed and shared among friendly mobile ad hoc nodes. Using received signal strength differences, a master friendly node can calculate the enemy's radio emitter geolocation, and build a recognized MANET picture (RMP). This MANET picture is then distributed to all friendly nodes for effective command and control operations. An advantage of this method is that mobile ad hoc nodes do not need special RF antennas to geolocate the enemy radio emitter as conventional electronic warfare techniques do. MATLAB-based simulations are presented to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the proposed distributed geolocation algorithm under different MANET placements.

  4. dNSP: a biologically inspired dynamic Neural network approach to Signal Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Izquierdo, José Manuel; Ibarrola, Julio; Pinzolas, Miguel; Almonacid, Miguel

    2008-09-01

    The arriving order of data is one of the intrinsic properties of a signal. Therefore, techniques dealing with this temporal relation are required for identification and signal processing tasks. To perform a classification of the signal according with its temporal characteristics, it would be useful to find a feature vector in which the temporal attributes were embedded. The correlation and power density spectrum functions are suitable tools to manage this issue. These functions are usually defined with statistical formulation. On the other hand, in biology there can be found numerous processes in which signals are processed to give a feature vector; for example, the processing of sound by the auditory system. In this work, the dNSP (dynamic Neural Signal Processing) architecture is proposed. This architecture allows representing a time-varying signal by a spatial (thus statical) vector. Inspired by the aforementioned biological processes, the dNSP performs frequency decomposition using an analogical parallel algorithm carried out by simple processing units. The architecture has been developed under the paradigm of a multilayer neural network, where the different layers are composed by units whose activation functions have been extracted from the theory of Neural Dynamic [Grossberg, S. (1988). Nonlinear neural networks principles, mechanisms and architectures. Neural Networks, 1, 17-61]. A theoretical study of the behavior of the dynamic equations of the units and their relationship with some statistical functions allows establishing a parallelism between the unit activations and correlation and power density spectrum functions. To test the capabilities of the proposed approach, several testbeds have been employed, i.e. the frequencial study of mathematical functions. As a possible application of the architecture, a highly interesting problem in the field of automatic control is addressed: the recognition of a controlled DC motor operating state.

  5. Detecting and Predicting Muscle Fatigue during Typing By SEMG Signal Processing and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghoochani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Repetitive strain injuries are one of the most prevalent problems in occupational diseases. Repetition, vibration and bad postures of the extremities are physical risk factors related to work that can cause chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Repetitive work on a computer with low level contraction requires the posture to be maintained for a long time, which can cause muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue in shoulders and neck is one of the most prevalent problems reported with computer users especially during typing. Surface electromyography (SEMG signals are used for detecting muscle fatigue as a non-invasive method. Material and Methods: Nine healthy females volunteered for signal recoding during typing. EMG signals were recorded from the trapezius muscle, which is subjected to muscle fatigue during typing.  After signal analysis and feature extraction, detecting and predicting muscle fatigue was performed by using the MLP artificial neural network. Results: Recorded signals were analyzed in time and frequency domains for feature extraction. Results of classification showed that the MLP neural network can detect and predict muscle fatigue during typing with 80.79 % ± 1.04% accuracy. Conclusion: Intelligent classification and prediction of muscle fatigue can have many applications in human factors engineering (ergonomics, rehabilitation engineering and biofeedback equipment for mitigating the injuries of repetitive works.

  6. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-09-02

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown.

  7. Traffic Signals Control with Adaptive Fuzzy Controller in Urban Road Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; FAN Xiao-ping

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive fuzzy logic controller (AFC) is presented for the signal control of the urban traffic network.The AFC is composed of the signal control system-oriented control level and the signal controller-oriented fuzzy rules regulation level.The control level decides the signal tunings in an intersection with a fuzzy logic controller.The regulation level optimizes the fuzzy rules by the Adaptive Rule Module in AFC according to both the system performance index in current control period and the traffic flows in the last one.Consequently the system performances are improved.A weight coefficient controller (WCC) is also developed to describe the interactions of traffic flow among the adjacent intersections.So the AFC combined with the WCC can be applied in a road network for signal timings.Simulations of the AFC on a real traffic scenario have been conducted.Simulation results indicate that the adaptive controller for traffic control shows better performance than the actuated one.

  8. Uncovering signal transduction networks from high-throughput data by integer linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xing-Ming; Wang, Rui-Sheng; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2008-05-01

    Signal transduction is an important process that transmits signals from the outside of a cell to the inside to mediate sophisticated biological responses. Effective computational models to unravel such a process by taking advantage of high-throughput genomic and proteomic data are needed to understand the essential mechanisms underlying the signaling pathways. In this article, we propose a novel method for uncovering signal transduction networks (STNs) by integrating protein interaction with gene expression data. Specifically, we formulate STN identification problem as an integer linear programming (ILP) model, which can be actually solved by a relaxed linear programming algorithm and is flexible for handling various prior information without any restriction on the network structures. The numerical results on yeast MAPK signaling pathways demonstrate that the proposed ILP model is able to uncover STNs or pathways in an efficient and accurate manner. In particular, the prediction results are found to be in high agreement with current biological knowledge and available information in literature. In addition, the proposed model is simple to be interpreted and easy to be implemented even for a large-scale system.

  9. Genetic algorithm for the optimization of features and neural networks in ECG signals classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongqiang; Yuan, Danyang; Ma, Xiangdong; Cui, Dianyin; Cao, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Feature extraction and classification of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals are necessary for the automatic diagnosis of cardiac diseases. In this study, a novel method based on genetic algorithm-back propagation neural network (GA-BPNN) for classifying ECG signals with feature extraction using wavelet packet decomposition (WPD) is proposed. WPD combined with the statistical method is utilized to extract the effective features of ECG signals. The statistical features of the wavelet packet coefficients are calculated as the feature sets. GA is employed to decrease the dimensions of the feature sets and to optimize the weights and biases of the back propagation neural network (BPNN). Thereafter, the optimized BPNN classifier is applied to classify six types of ECG signals. In addition, an experimental platform is constructed for ECG signal acquisition to supply the ECG data for verifying the effectiveness of the proposed method. The GA-BPNN method with the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database achieved a dimension reduction of nearly 50% and produced good classification results with an accuracy of 97.78%. The experimental results based on the established acquisition platform indicated that the GA-BPNN method achieved a high classification accuracy of 99.33% and could be efficiently applied in the automatic identification of cardiac arrhythmias.

  10. Combining in silico evolution and nonlinear dimensionality reduction to redesign responses of signaling networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Aaron M.; Abel, Steven M.

    2016-12-01

    The rational design of network behavior is a central goal of synthetic biology. Here, we combine in silico evolution with nonlinear dimensionality reduction to redesign the responses of fixed-topology signaling networks and to characterize sets of kinetic parameters that underlie various input-output relations. We first consider the earliest part of the T cell receptor (TCR) signaling network and demonstrate that it can produce a variety of input-output relations (quantified as the level of TCR phosphorylation as a function of the characteristic TCR binding time). We utilize an evolutionary algorithm (EA) to identify sets of kinetic parameters that give rise to: (i) sigmoidal responses with the activation threshold varied over 6 orders of magnitude, (ii) a graded response, and (iii) an inverted response in which short TCR binding times lead to activation. We also consider a network with both positive and negative feedback and use the EA to evolve oscillatory responses with different periods in response to a change in input. For each targeted input-output relation, we conduct many independent runs of the EA and use nonlinear dimensionality reduction to embed the resulting data for each network in two dimensions. We then partition the results into groups and characterize constraints placed on the parameters by the different targeted response curves. Our approach provides a way (i) to guide the design of kinetic parameters of fixed-topology networks to generate novel input-output relations and (ii) to constrain ranges of biological parameters using experimental data. In the cases considered, the network topologies exhibit significant flexibility in generating alternative responses, with distinct patterns of kinetic rates emerging for different targeted responses.

  11. Wireless Body Area Network in a Ubiquitous Healthcare System for Physiological Signal Monitoring and Health Consulting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonyoung Jung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed a ubiquitous healthcare system consisted of aphysiological signal devices, a mobile system, a device provider system, a healthcare service provider system, a physician system, and a healthcare personal system. In this system, wireless body area network (WBAN such as ZigBee is used to communicate between physiological signal devices and the mobile system. WBAN device needs a specific function for ubiquitous healthcare application. We propose a scanning algorithm, dynamic discovery and installation, reliable data transmission, device access control, and a healthcare profile for ubiquitous healthcare system.

  12. Wireless Network of Collaborative Physiological Signal Devices in a U-Healthcare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joonyoung; Kim, Daeyoung

    We designed and implemented collaborative physiological signal devices in a u-healthcare(ubiquitous healthcare) system. In this system, wireless body area network (WBAN) such as ZigBee is used to communicate between physiological signal devices and the mobile system. WBAN device needs a specific function for ubiquitous healthcare application. We show several collaborative physiological devices and propose WBAN mechanism such as a fast scanning algorithm, a dynamic discovery and installation mechanism, a reliable data transmission, a device access control for security, and a healthcare profile for u-healthcare system.

  13. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    end-point assays for quantifying GPCR-mediated changes in intracellular cAMP levels exist. More recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensors that can quantify intracellular cAMP levels in real time have been developed. These FRET-based cAMP biosensors have been used...... primarily in single cell FRET microscopy to monitor and visualize changes in cAMP upon GPCR activation. Here, a similar cAMP biosensor with a more efficient mCerulean/mCitrine FRET pair is described for use in the 384-well plate format. After cloning and expression in HEK293 cells, the biosensor...... is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  14. Artificial neural network-based classification of body movements in ambulatory ECG signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darji, Sachin T; Kher, Rahul K

    2013-11-01

    Abstract Ambulatory ECG monitoring provides electrical activity of the heart when a person is involved in doing normal routine activities. Thus, the recorded ECG signal consists of cardiac signal along with motion artifacts introduced due to a person's body movements during routine activities. Detection of motion artifacts due to different physical activities might help in further cardiac diagnosis. Ambulatory ECG signal analysis for detection of various motion artifacts using adaptive filtering approach is addressed in this paper. We have used BIOPAC MP 36 system for acquiring ECG signal. The ECG signals of five healthy subjects (aged between 22-30 years) were recorded while the person performed various body movements like up and down movement of the left hand, up and down movement of the right hand, waist twisting movement while standing and change from sitting down on a chair to standing up movement in lead I configuration. An adaptive filter-based approach has been used to extract the motion artifact component from the ambulatory ECG signal. The features of motion artifact signal, extracted using Gabor transform, have been used to train the artificial neural network (ANN) for classifying body movements.

  15. AKAP18 contains a phosphoesterase domain that binds AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Matthew G; Smith, F Donelson; Scott, John D; Barford, David

    2008-02-01

    Protein kinase A anchoring proteins (AKAPs), defined by their capacity to target the cAMP-dependent protein kinase to distinct subcellular locations, function as molecular scaffolds mediating the assembly of multicomponent complexes to integrate and organise multiple signalling events. Despite their central importance in regulating cellular processes, little is known regarding their diverse structures and molecular mechanisms. Here, using bioinformatics and X-ray crystallography, we define a central domain of AKAP18 delta (AKAP18(CD)) as a member of the 2H phosphoesterase family. The domain features two conserved His-x-Thr motifs positioned at the base of a groove located between two lobes related by pseudo 2-fold symmetry. Nucleotide co-crystallisation screening revealed that this groove binds specifically to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (5'AMP) and cytosine 5'-monophosphate (5'CMP), with the affinity constant for AMP in the physiological concentration range. This is the first example of an AKAP capable of binding a small molecule. Our data generate two functional hypotheses for the AKAP18 central domain. It may act as a phosphoesterase, although we did not identify a substrate, or as an AMP sensor with the potential to couple intracellular AMP levels to PKA signalling events.

  16. Gene Expression Patterns Define Key Transcriptional Events InCell-Cycle Regulation By cAMP And Protein Kinase A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambon, Alexander C.; Zhang, Lingzhi; Minovitsky, Simon; Kanter, Joan R.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Salomonis, Nathan; Vranizan, Karen; Dubchak Inna,; Conklin, Bruce R.; Insel, Paul A.

    2005-06-01

    Although a substantial number of hormones and drugs increase cellular cAMP levels, the global impact of cAMP and its major effector mechanism, protein kinase A (PKA), on gene expression is not known. Here we show that treatment of murine wild-type S49 lymphoma cells for 24 h with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8-CPTcAMP), a PKA-selective cAMP analog, alters the expression of approx equal to 4,500 of approx. equal to 13,600 unique genes. By contrast, gene expression was unaltered in Kin- S49 cells (that lack PKA) incubated with 8-CPTcAMP. Changes in mRNA and protein expression of several cell cycle regulators accompanied cAMP-induced G1-phase cell-cycle arrest of wild-type S49 cells. Within 2h, 8-CPT-cAMP altered expression of 152 genes that contain evolutionarily conserved cAMP-response elements within 5 kb of transcriptional start sites, including the circadian clock gene Per1. Thus, cAMP through its activation of PKA produces extensive transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells. These transcriptional networks include a primary group of cAMP-response element-containing genes and secondary networks that include the circadian clock.

  17. A new cellular nonlinear network emulation on FPGA for EEG signal processing in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jens; Müller, Jan; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    For processing of EEG signals, we propose a new architecture for the hardware emulation of discrete-time Cellular Nonlinear Networks (DT-CNN). Our results show the importance of a high computational accuracy in EEG signal prediction that cannot be achieved with existing analogue VLSI circuits. The refined architecture of the processing elements and its resource schedule, the cellular network structure with local couplings, the FPGA-based embedded system containing the DT-CNN, and the data flow in the entire system will be discussed in detail. The proposed DT-CNN design has been implemented and tested on an Xilinx FPGA development platform. The embedded co-processor with a multi-threading kernel is utilised for control and pre-processing tasks and data exchange to the host via Ethernet. The performance of the implemented DT-CNN has been determined for a popular example and compared to that of a conventional computer.

  18. Cutting force signal pattern recognition using hybrid neural network in end milling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song-Tae SEONG; Ko-Tae JO; Young-Moon LEE

    2009-01-01

    Under certain cutting conditions in end milling, the signs of cutting forces change from positive to negative during a revolution of the tool. The change of force direction causes the cutting dynamics to be unstable which results in chatter vibration. Therefore, cutting force signal monitoring and classification are needed to determine the optimal cutting conditions and to improve the efficiency of cut. Artificial neural networks are powerful tools for solving highly complex and nonlinear problems. It can be divided into supervised and unsupervised learning machines based on the availability of a teacher. Hybrid neural network was introduced with both of functions of multilayer perceptron (MLP) trained with the back-propagation algorithm for monitoring and detecting abnormal state, and self organizing feature map (SOFM) for treating huge datum such as image processing and pattern recognition, for predicting and classifying cutting force signal patterns simultaneously. The validity of the results is verified with cutting experiments and simulation tests.

  19. Multiple vehicle signals separation based on particle filtering in wireless sensor network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Kai; Huang Qi; Wei Jianming; Liu Haitao

    2008-01-01

    A novel statistical method based on particle filtering is presented for multiple vehicle acoustic signals separation problem in wireless sensor network. The particle filtering method is able to deal with non-Gaussian and nonlinear models and non-stationary sources. Using some instantaneously mixed observations of several real-world vehicle acoustic signals, the proposed statistical method is compared with a conventional non-stationary Blind Source Separation algorithm and attractive simulation results are achieved. Moreover, considering the natural convenience to transmit particles between sensor nodes, the algorithm based on particle filtering is believed to have potential to enable the task of multiple vehicles recognition collaboratively performed by sensor nodes in distributed wireless sensor network.

  20. Artificial Neural Network based Body Posture Classification from EMG signal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar Tripathy

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available  This paper deals with the body posture Classification from EMG signal analysis using artificial neural network (ANN. The various statistical features extracted from each EMG signal corresponding to different muscles associated with the different body postures are framed using LABVIEW software. Further-more, these features are taken as the input towards the ANN classifier and thus the corresponding output for the respective classifier predicts the postures like Bowing, Handshaking, and Hugging. The performance of the classifier is determined by the classification rate (CR. The outcome of result indicates that the CR of Multilayer Feed Forward Neural Network (MFNN type of ANN is rounded up to a percentage of 71.02%.

  1. Bluetooth-based sensor networks for remotely monitoring the physiological signals of a patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Xiao, Hannan

    2009-11-01

    Integrating intelligent medical microsensors into a wireless communication network makes it possible to remotely collect physiological signals of a patient, release the patient from being tethered to monitoring medical instrumentations, and facilitate the patient's early hospital discharge. This can further improve life quality by providing continuous observation without the need of disrupting the patient's normal life, thus reducing the risk of infection significantly, and decreasing the cost of the hospital and the patient. This paper discusses the implementation issues, and describes the overall system architecture of our developed Bluetooth sensor network for patient monitoring and the corresponding heart activity sensors. It also presents our approach to developing the intelligent physiological sensor nodes involving integration of Bluetooth radio technology, hardware and software organization, and our solutions for onboard signal processing.

  2. Novel scheme enabling broadcast signal transmission in WDM passive optical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuejiao Ma; Chaoqin Gan

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a novel method for providing broadcast signal transmission in a wavelength division multiplex-ing passive optical network (WDM-PON).An unmodulated optical carrier for downstream transmission and a pair of unmodulated single-side band subcarriers are utilized for broadcast delivery and upstream transmission, respectively.System performance at 2.5-Gb/s downlupstream and 2.5-Gb/s broadcast trans-mission is also investigated.%We present a novel method for providing broadcast signal transmission in a wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (WDM-PON).An unmodulated optical carrier for downstream transmission and a pair of unmodulated single-side band subcarriers are utilized for broadcast delivery and upstream transmission, respectively.System performance at 2.5-Gb/s down/upstream and 2.5-Gb/s broadcast transmission is also investigated.

  3. Network Analysis of Neurodegenerative Disease Highlights a Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh-Phuong Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in the study of the molecular mechanisms altered in the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases (NDs, the etiology is still enigmatic and the distinctions between diseases are not always entirely clear. We present an efficient computational method based on protein-protein interaction network (PPI to model the functional network of NDs. The aim of this work is fourfold: (i reconstruction of a PPI network relating to the NDs, (ii construction of an association network between diseases based on proximity in the disease PPI network, (iii quantification of disease associations, and (iv inference of potential molecular mechanism involved in the diseases. The functional links of diseases not only showed overlap with the traditional classification in clinical settings, but also offered new insight into connections between diseases with limited clinical overlap. To gain an expanded view of the molecular mechanisms involved in NDs, both direct and indirect connector proteins were investigated. The method uncovered molecular relationships that are in common apparently distinct diseases and provided important insight into the molecular networks implicated in disease pathogenesis. In particular, the current analysis highlighted the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway as a potential candidate pathway to be targeted by therapy in neurodegeneration.

  4. International Conference on VLSI, Communication, Advanced Devices, Signals & Systems and Networking

    CERN Document Server

    Shirur, Yasha; Prasad, Rekha

    2013-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers presented by renowned researchers, keynote speakers and academicians in the International Conference on VLSI, Communication, Analog Designs, Signals and Systems, and Networking (VCASAN-2013), organized by B.N.M. Institute of Technology, Bangalore, India during July 17-19, 2013. The book provides global trends in cutting-edge technologies in electronics and communication engineering. The content of the book is useful to engineers, researchers and academicians as well as industry professionals.

  5. Advanced digital signal processing for short-haul and access network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Chi, Nan

    2016-02-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) has been proved to be a successful technology recently in high speed and high spectrum-efficiency optical short-haul and access network, which enables high performances based on digital equalizations and compensations. In this paper, we investigate advanced DSP at the transmitter and receiver side for signal pre-equalization and post-equalization in an optical access network. A novel DSP-based digital and optical pre-equalization scheme has been proposed for bandwidth-limited high speed short-distance communication system, which is based on the feedback of receiver-side adaptive equalizers, such as least-mean-squares (LMS) algorithm and constant or multi-modulus algorithms (CMA, MMA). Based on this scheme, we experimentally demonstrate 400GE on a single optical carrier based on the highest ETDM 120-GBaud PDM-PAM-4 signal, using one external modulator and coherent detection. A line rate of 480-Gb/s is achieved, which enables 20% forward-error correction (FEC) overhead to keep the 400-Gb/s net information rate. The performance after fiber transmission shows large margin for both short range and metro/regional networks. We also extend the advanced DSP for short haul optical access networks by using high order QAMs. We propose and demonstrate a high speed multi-band CAP-WDM-PON system on intensity modulation, direct detection and digital equalizations. A hybrid modified cascaded MMA post-equalization schemes are used to equalize the multi-band CAP-mQAM signals. Using this scheme, we successfully demonstrates 550Gb/s high capacity WDMPON system with 11 WDM channels, 55 sub-bands, and 10-Gb/s per user in the downstream over 40-km SMF.

  6. Neural network committees for finger joint angle estimation from surface EMG signals

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy Narender P; Shrirao Nikhil A; Kosuri Durga R

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In virtual reality (VR) systems, the user's finger and hand positions are sensed and used to control the virtual environments. Direct biocontrol of VR environments using surface electromyography (SEMG) signals may be more synergistic and unconstraining to the user. The purpose of the present investigation was to develop a technique to predict the finger joint angle from the surface EMG measurements of the extensor muscle using neural network models. Methodology SEMG togeth...

  7. Analysis of signaling networks distributed over intracellular compartments based on protein-protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    BackgroundBiological processes are usually distributed over various intracellular compartments. Proteins from diverse cellular compartments are often involved in similar signaling networks. However, the difference in the reaction rates between similar proteins among different compartments is usually quite high. We suggest that the estimation of frequency of intracompartmental as well as intercompartmental protein-protein interactions is an appropriate approach to predict the efficiency of a p...

  8. Control mechanism to prevent correlated message arrivals from degrading signaling no. 7 network performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosal, Haluk; Skoog, Ronald A.

    1994-04-01

    Signaling System No. 7 (SS7) is designed to provide a connection-less transfer of signaling messages of reasonable length. Customers having access to user signaling bearer capabilities as specified in the ANSI T1.623 and CCITT Q.931 standards can send bursts of correlated messages (e.g., by doing a file transfer that results in the segmentation of a block of data into a number of consecutive signaling messages) through SS7 networks. These message bursts with short interarrival times could have an adverse impact on the delay performance of the SS7 networks. A control mechanism, Credit Manager, is investigated in this paper to regulate incoming traffic to the SS7 network by imposing appropriate time separation between messages when the incoming stream is too bursty. The credit manager has a credit bank where credits accrue at a fixed rate up to a prespecified credit bank capacity. When a message arrives, the number of octets in that message is compared to the number of credits in the bank. If the number of credits is greater than or equal to the number of octets, then the message is accepted for transmission and the number of credits in the bank is decremented by the number of octets. If the number of credits is less than the number of octets, then the message is delayed until enough credits are accumulated. This paper presents simulation results showing delay performance of the SS7 ISUP and TCAP message traffic with a range of correlated message traffic, and control parameters of the credit manager (i.e., credit generation rate and bank capacity) are determined that ensure the traffic entering the SS7 network is acceptable. The results show that control parameters can be set so that for any incoming traffic stream there is no detrimental impact on the SS7 ISUP and TCAP message delay, and the credit manager accepts a wide range of traffic patterns without causing significant delay.

  9. AmpH, a bifunctional DD-endopeptidase and DD-carboxypeptidase of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Leiza, Silvia M; de Pedro, Miguel A; Ayala, Juan A

    2011-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, low-molecular-mass penicillin-binding proteins (LMM PBPs) are important for correct cell morphogenesis. These enzymes display DD-carboxypeptidase and/or dd-endopeptidase activities associated with maturation and remodeling of peptidoglycan (PG). AmpH has been classified as an AmpH-type class C LMM PBP, a group closely related to AmpC β-lactamases. AmpH has been associated with PG recycling, although its enzymatic activity remained uncharacterized until now. Construction and purification of His-tagged AmpH from E. coli permitted a detailed study of its enzymatic properties. The N-terminal export signal of AmpH is processed, but the protein remains membrane associated. The PBP nature of AmpH was demonstrated by its ability to bind the β-lactams Bocillin FL (a fluorescent penicillin) and cefmetazole. In vitro assays with AmpH and specific muropeptides demonstrated that AmpH is a bifunctional DD-endopeptidase and DD-carboxypeptidase. Indeed, the enzyme cleaved the cross-linked dimers tetrapentapeptide (D45) and tetratetrapeptide (D44) with efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) of 1,200 M(-1) s(-1) and 670 M(-1) s(-1), respectively, and removed the terminal D-alanine from muropeptides with a C-terminal D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptide. Both DD-peptidase activities were inhibited by 40 μM cefmetazole. AmpH also displayed a weak β-lactamase activity for nitrocefin of 1.4 × 10(-3) nmol/μg protein/min, 1/1,000 the rate obtained for AmpC under the same conditions. AmpH was also active on purified sacculi, exhibiting the bifunctional character that was seen with pure muropeptides. The wide substrate spectrum of the DD-peptidase activities associated with AmpH supports a role for this protein in PG remodeling or recycling.

  10. Nitric oxide:A potential key point of the signaling network leading to plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous signaling network of plants plays important roles in mediating the exogenous factor-induced biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.Nitric oxide (NO) has emerged as a key signaling molecule in plants recently.Numerous studies demonstrated that the main signaling molecules such as salicylic acid(SA),jasmonic acid (JA),reactive oxygen species(ROS),and NO were not only involved in regulating plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis but also interacted to form a complex signaling network by mutual inhibition and/or synergy.The recent progress in the signal network of plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis has been discussed in this paper.Furthermore,we propose a hypothetical model to show that NO might act as a potential molecular switch in the stgnaling network leading to plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis.

  11. Vestibular and Attractor Network Basis of the Head Direction Cell Signal in Subcortical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J Clark

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurate navigation depends on a network of neural systems that encode the moment-to-moment changes in an animal’s directional orientation and location in space. Within this navigation system are head direction (HD cells, which fire persistently when an animal’s head is pointed in a particular direction (Sharp et al., 2001a; Taube, 2007. HD cells are widely thought to underlie an animal’s sense of spatial orientation, and research over the last 25+ years has revealed that this robust spatial signal is widely distributed across subcortical and cortical limbic areas. Much of this work has been directed at understanding the functional organization of the HD cell circuitry, and precisely how this signal is generated from sensory and motor systems. The purpose of the present review is to summarize some of the recent studies arguing that the HD cell circuit is largely processed in a hierarchical fashion, following a pathway involving the dorsal tegmental nuclei → lateral mammillary nuclei → anterior thalamus → parahippocampal and retrosplenial cortical regions. We also review recent work identifying bursting cellular activity in the HD cell circuit after lesions of the vestibular system, and relate these observations to the long held view that attractor network mechanisms underlie HD signal generation. Finally, we summarize the work to date suggesting that this network architecture may reside within the tegmento-mammillary circuit.

  12. Effective Boolean dynamics analysis to identify functionally important genes in large-scale signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Hung-Cuong; Kwon, Yung-Keun

    2015-11-01

    Efficiently identifying functionally important genes in order to understand the minimal requirements of normal cellular development is challenging. To this end, a variety of structural measures have been proposed and their effectiveness has been investigated in recent literature; however, few studies have shown the effectiveness of dynamics-based measures. This led us to investigate a dynamic measure to identify functionally important genes, and the effectiveness of which was verified through application on two large-scale human signaling networks. We specifically consider Boolean sensitivity-based dynamics against an update-rule perturbation (BSU) as a dynamic measure. Through investigations on two large-scale human signaling networks, we found that genes with relatively high BSU values show slower evolutionary rate and higher proportions of essential genes and drug targets than other genes. Gene-ontology analysis showed clear differences between the former and latter groups of genes. Furthermore, we compare the identification accuracies of essential genes and drug targets via BSU and five well-known structural measures. Although BSU did not always show the best performance, it effectively identified the putative set of genes, which is significantly different from the results obtained via the structural measures. Most interestingly, BSU showed the highest synergy effect in identifying the functionally important genes in conjunction with other measures. Our results imply that Boolean-sensitive dynamics can be used as a measure to effectively identify functionally important genes in signaling networks.

  13. Wavelet-based neural network analysis of internal carotid arterial Doppler signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya; Güler, Inan

    2006-06-01

    In this study, internal carotid arterial Doppler signals recorded from 130 subjects, where 45 of them suffered from internal carotid artery stenosis, 44 of them suffered from internal carotid artery occlusion and the rest of them were healthy subjects, were classified using wavelet-based neural network. Wavelet-based neural network model, employing the multilayer perceptron, was used for analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals. Multi-layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to detect stenosis and occlusion in internal carotid arteries. In order to determine the MLPNN inputs, spectral analysis of the internal carotid arterial Doppler signals was performed using wavelet transform (WT). The MLPNN was trained, cross validated, and tested with training, cross validation, and testing sets, respectively. All these data sets were obtained from internal carotid arteries of healthy subjects, subjects suffering from internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion. The correct classification rate was 96% for healthy subjects, 96.15% for subjects having internal carotid artery stenosis and 96.30% for subjects having internal carotid artery occlusion. The classification results showed that the MLPNN trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was effective to detect internal carotid artery stenosis and occlusion.

  14. Wavelet-based neural network analysis of ophthalmic artery Doppler signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Nihal Fatma; Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2004-10-01

    In this study, ophthalmic artery Doppler signals were recorded from 115 subjects, 52 of whom had ophthalmic artery stenosis while the rest were healthy controls. Results were classified using a wavelet-based neural network. The wavelet-based neural network model, employing the multilayer perceptron, was used for analysis of ophthalmic artery Doppler signals. A multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to detect stenosis in ophthalmic arteries. In order to determine the MLPNN inputs, spectral analysis of ophthalmic artery Doppler signals was performed using wavelet transform. The MLPNN was trained, cross validated, and tested with training, cross validation, and testing sets, respectively. All data sets were obtained from ophthalmic arteries of healthy subjects and subjects suffering from ophthalmic artery stenosis. The correct classification rate was 97.22% for healthy subjects, and 96.77% for subjects having ophthalmic artery stenosis. The classification results showed that the MLPNN trained with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was effective to detect ophthalmic artery stenosis.

  15. Damage detection using the signal entropy of an ultrasonic sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, E.; Baltazar, A.; Loh, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic sensors used to propagate guided waves can potentially be implemented to inspect large areas in engineering structures. However, the inherent dispersion and noise of guided acoustic signals, multiple echoes in the structure, as well as a lack of an approximate or exact model, limit their use as a continuous structural health monitoring system. In this work, the implementation of a network of piezoelectric sensors randomly placed on a plate-like structure to detect and locate artificial damage is studied. A network of macro fiber composite (MFC) sensors working in a pitch-catch configuration was set on an aluminum thin plate 1.9 mm in thickness. Signals were analyzed in the time-scale domain using the discrete wavelet transform. The objectives of this work were threefold, namely to first develop a damage index based on the entropy distribution using short time wavelet entropy of the ultrasonic waves generated by a sensor network, second to determine the performance of an array of spare MFC sensors to detect artificial damage, and third to implement a time-of-arrival (TOA) algorithm on the gathered signals for damage location of an artificial circular discontinuity. Our preliminary test results show that the proposed methodology provides sufficient information for damage detection, which, once combined with the TOA algorithm, allows localization of the damage.

  16. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude