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Sample records for amp responsive element

  1. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W.; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2011-01-01

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes r...

  2. A new cAMP response element in the transcribed region of the human c-fos gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Härtig, E; Loncarević, I F; Büscher, M.; Herrlich, P; Rahmsdorf, H J

    1991-01-01

    In NIH 3T3 cells the c-fos gene is induced rapidly and transiently by cAMP. As shown by the analysis of 3T3 cells stably transfected with promoter mutants of the human c-fos gene this induction does not depend on the dyad symmetry element (position -320 to -300), but involves at least two other non-related sites: an element located around position -60 resembling the cAMP response element of the fibronectin and somatostatin genes (which has been described before), and an element located betwee...

  3. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  4. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction.

  5. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil, E-mail: hyunil74@hotmail.com; Lee, Zang Hee, E-mail: zang1959@snu.ac.kr

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  6. c-Jun represses the human insulin promoter activity that depends on multiple cAMP response elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, Nobuya; Seino, Yutaka; Imura, Hiroo (Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Maekawa, Toshio; Sudo, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Shunsuke (Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Tsukuba (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    Glucose is known to increase the cAMP concentration in pancreatic {beta} cells. To determine the mechanism by which cAMP augments insulin gene expression, the authors first identified the cAMP response elements (CREs) of human insulin gene. In DNase I footprint analysis, the bacterially synthesized CRE-binding protein, CRE-BP1, protected four sites: two sites in the region upstream from the insulin core promoter, one site in the first exon, and one site in the first intron. To examine the roles of those four sites, they constructed a series of DNA plasmids in which the wild-type and mutant insulin promoters were linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Studies of the transcriptional activity of these plasmids after transfection into hamster insulinoma (HIT) cells showed that these four sites contributed additively to the cAMP inducibility of the insulin promoter. Surprisingly, the c-jun protooncogene product (c-Jun) repressed the cAMP-induced activity of the insulin promoter in a cotransfection assay with the c-Jun expression plasmic. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the level of c-jun mRNA was dramatically increased by glucose deprivation in HIT cells. These results suggest that glucose deprivation in HIT cells. These results suggest that glucose may regulate expression of the human insulin gene through multiple CREs and c-Jun.

  7. A role for neuronal cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in brain responses to calorie restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Podda, Maria Vittoria; Ranieri, Sofia Chiatamone; Leone, Lucia; Toietta, Gabriele; McBurney, Michael W; Schütz, Günther; Riccio, Antonella; Grassi, Claudio; Galeotti, Tommaso; Pani, Giovambattista

    2012-01-10

    Calorie restriction delays brain senescence and prevents neurodegeneration, but critical regulators of these beneficial responses other than the NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase Sirtuin-1 (Sirt-1) are unknown. We report that effects of calorie restriction on neuronal plasticity, memory and social behavior are abolished in mice lacking cAMP responsive-element binding (CREB)-1 in the forebrain. Moreover, CREB deficiency drastically reduces the expression of Sirt-1 and the induction of genes relevant to neuronal metabolism and survival in the cortex and hippocampus of dietary-restricted animals. Biochemical studies reveal a complex interplay between CREB and Sirt-1: CREB directly regulates the transcription of the sirtuin in neuronal cells by binding to Sirt-1 chromatin; Sirt-1, in turn, is recruited by CREB to DNA and promotes CREB-dependent expression of target gene peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α and neuronal NO Synthase. Accordingly, expression of these CREB targets is markedly reduced in the brain of Sirt KO mice that are, like CREB-deficient mice, poorly responsive to calorie restriction. Thus, the above circuitry, modulated by nutrient availability, links energy metabolism with neurotrophin signaling, participates in brain adaptation to nutrient restriction, and is potentially relevant to accelerated brain aging by overnutrition and diabetes. PMID:22190495

  8. Estrogen induction of the cyclin D1 promoter: Involvement of a cAMP response-like element

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbah, Michele; Courilleau, Delphine; Mester, Jan; Redeuilh, Gerard

    1999-01-01

    Estrogens induce cell proliferation in target tissues by stimulating progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Induction of cyclin D1 expression is a critical feature of the mitogenic action of estrogen. We have determined a region between −96 and −29 in the cyclin D1 promoter that confers regulation by estrogens in the human mammary carcinoma cells MCF-7. This region encompasses a unique known transcription factor binding site with a sequence of a potential cAMP response element (C...

  9. cAMP response element binding protein (CREB activates transcription via two distinct genetic elements of the human glucose-6-phosphatase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Luisa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase catalyzes the dephosphorylation of glucose-6-phosphatase to glucose, the final step in the gluconeogenic and glycogenolytic pathways. Expression of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene is induced by glucocorticoids and elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. The effect of cAMP in regulating glucose-6-phosphatase gene transcription was corroborated by the identification of two genetic motifs CRE1 and CRE2 in the human and murine glucose-6-phosphatase gene promoter that resemble cAMP response elements (CRE. Results The cAMP response element is a point of convergence for many extracellular and intracellular signals, including cAMP, calcium, and neurotrophins. The major CRE binding protein CREB, a member of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP family of transcription factors, requires phosphorylation to become a biologically active transcriptional activator. Since unphosphorylated CREB is transcriptionally silent simple overexpression studies cannot be performed to test the biological role of CRE-like sequences of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. The use of a constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein allowed us to uncouple the investigation of target genes of CREB from the variety of signaling pathways that lead to an activation of CREB. Here, we show that this constitutively active CREB2/CREB fusion protein strikingly enhanced reporter gene transcription mediated by either CRE1 or CRE2 derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Likewise, reporter gene transcription was enhanced following expression of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA in the nucleus of transfected cells. In contrast, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2, known to compete with CREB for binding to the canonical CRE sequence 5'-TGACGTCA-3', did not transactivate reporter genes containing CRE1, CRE2, or both CREs derived from the glucose-6-phosphatase gene. Conclusions Using a constitutively active CREB2

  10. Enhanced phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein in Brain of mice following repetitive hypoxic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning (I/HPC) is a phenomenon of endogenous protection that renders Brain tolerant to sustained ischemia/hypoxia. This profound protection induced by I/HPC makes it an attractive target for developing potential clinical therapeutic approaches. However, the molecular mechanism of I/HPC is unclear. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), a selective nuclear transcriptional factor, plays a key role in the neuronal functions. Phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-133 may facilitate its transcriptional activity in response to various stresses. In the current study, we observed the changes in CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) and protein expression in Brain of auto-hypoxia-induced HPC mice by using Western blot analysis. We found that the levels of phosphorylated CREB (Ser-133), but not protein expression of CREB, increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of mice after repetitive hypoxic exposure (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group), when compared to that of the normoxic (H0, n = 6) or hypoxic exposure once group (H1, n = 6). In addition, a significant enhancement (p < 0.05) of CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) could also be found in the nuclear extracts from the whole hippocampus of hypoxic preconditioned mice (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group). These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB might be involved in the development of cerebral hypoxic preconditioning

  11. Hippocampal expression of synaptic structural proteins and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein in a rat model of vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhao; Zhiyong Li; Yali Wang; Qiuxia Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a rat model of vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral hy-poperfusion through permanent ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries. At 60 days after mod-eling, escape latency and swimming path length during hidden-platform acquisition training in Morris water maze significantly increased in the model group. In addition, the number of accurate crossings over the original platform significantly decreased, hippocampal CA1 synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 expression significantly decreased, cAMP response element-binding protein expression remained unchanged, and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein expression significantly decreased. Results suggested that abnormal expression of hippo-campal synaptic structural protein and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation played a role in cognitive impairment following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

  12. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  13. cAMP response element binding protein is required for differentiation of respiratory epithelium during murine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Daniel Bird

    Full Text Available The cAMP response element binding protein 1 (Creb1 transcription factor regulates cellular gene expression in response to elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. Creb1(-/- fetal mice are phenotypically smaller than wildtype littermates, predominantly die in utero and do not survive after birth due to respiratory failure. We have further investigated the respiratory defect of Creb1(-/- fetal mice during development. Lungs of Creb1(-/- fetal mice were pale in colour and smaller than wildtype controls in proportion to their reduced body size. Creb1(-/- lungs also did not mature morphologically beyond E16.5 with little or no expansion of airway luminal spaces, a phenotype also observed with the Creb1(-/- lung on a Crem(-/- genetic background. Creb1 was highly expressed throughout the lung at all stages examined, however activation of Creb1 was detected primarily in distal lung epithelium. Cell differentiation of E17.5 Creb1(-/- lung distal epithelium was analysed by electron microscopy and showed markedly reduced numbers of type-I and type-II alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, immunomarkers for specific lineages of proximal epithelium including ciliated, non-ciliated (Clara, and neuroendocrine cells showed delayed onset of expression in the Creb1(-/- lung. Finally, gene expression analyses of the E17.5 Creb1(-/- lung using whole genome microarray and qPCR collectively identified respiratory marker gene profiles and provide potential novel Creb1-regulated genes. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial role for Creb1 activity for the development and differentiation of the conducting and distal lung epithelium.

  14. Long-Term Memory for Place Learning Is Facilitated by Expression of cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightwell, Jennifer J.; Smith, Clayton A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Colombo, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that the hippocampus is necessary for consolidation of long-term spatial memory in rodents. We reported previously that rats using a place strategy to solve a cross maze task showed sustained phosphorylation of hippocampus cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor implicated in…

  15. Spatial Memory in the Morris Water Maze and Activation of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) Protein within the Mouse Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porte, Yves; Buhot, Marie Christine; Mons, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of learning-induced cAMP response element-binding protein activation/phosphorylation (pCREB) in mice trained in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined pCREB immunoreactivity (pCREB-ir) in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 and related brain structures. During the…

  16. Expression of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) in bladder afferent pathways in VIP-/- mice with cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced cystitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorthe G; Studeny, Simon; May, Victor;

    2008-01-01

    The expression of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) with and without cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced cystitis (150 mg/kg, i.p; 48 h) was determined in VIP(-/-) and wild-type (WT) mice. p-CREB immunoreactivity (IR) was determined in bladder...

  17. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) par ticipates in the heat-inducible expression of humanhsp90β gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Human heat shock protein 90β gene (hsp90β)is a constitutively expressed heat shock gene existing in most of cell types tested that can be further induced by heat shock. Chloramphenical acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter plasmids driven by different regulatory fragments of hsp90β gene were constructed and transfected into Jurkat cells to explore the role of a cAMP response element (CRE) in the upstream of the gene. Results show that, in comparison with the wild type construct, a severe reduction (~2/3) in the increased folds of promoter activity induced by heat shock at 42C for 1 b was observed in a construct with CRE-containing frag ment (-173/-91bp) deleted. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed that phosphorylated CRE-binding protein (CREB) in the nuclear extract of heat shocked Jur kat cells is specifically bound to the fragment. Additionally,both of the phosphorylation on CREB and the activity of protein kinase A (PKA) were found in Jurkat cells to be en hanced with extending time of heat shock treatment. Our results indicate that in addition to the intronic HSE/HSF pathway, phosphorylated CREB also participates in the heat shock induced expression of human hsp90β gene via its in teraction with CRE which may be regulated by PKA-sig haling pathway.

  18. Hypoxia induces phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein by a novel signaling mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1998-07-31

    To investigate signaling mechanisms by which hypoxia regulates gene expression, we examined the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in PC12 cells. Exposure to physiological levels of hypoxia (5% O2, approximately 50 mm Hg) rapidly induced a persistent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133, an event that is required for CREB-mediated transcriptional activation. Hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of CREB was more robust than that induced by any other stimulus tested, including forskolin, depolarization, and osmotic stress. Furthermore, this effect was not mediated by any of the previously known signaling pathways that lead to phosphorylation of CREB, including protein kinase A, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, ribosomal S6 kinase-2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase-2. Hypoxic activation of a CRE-containing reporter (derived from the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene) was attenuated markedly by mutation of the CRE. Thus, a physiological reduction in O2 levels induces a functional phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:9677418

  19. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Molecules that modulate our mood?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Nair; V A Vaidya

    2006-09-01

    Depression is the major psychiatric ailment of our times, afflicting ∼20% of the population. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology of this complex disorder is not well understood. In addition, although antidepressants have been in existence for the past several decades, the mechanisms that underlie their therapeutic effects remain elusive. Building evidence implicates a role for the plasticity of specific neuro-circuitry in both the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Damage to limbic regions is thought to contribute to the etiology of depression and antidepressants have been reported to reverse such damage and promote adaptive plasticity. The molecular pathways that contribute to the damage associated with depression and antidepressant-mediated plasticity are a major focus of scientific enquiry. The transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, CREB and BDNF have emerged as molecules that may play an important role in modulating mood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of CREB and BDNF in depression and as targets/mediators of antidepressant action.

  20. CaMKIIδ-dependent inhibition of cAMP-response element-binding protein activity in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Sun, Li-Yan; Singer, Diane V; Ginnan, Roman; Singer, Harold A

    2013-11-22

    One transcription factor mediator of Ca(2+)-signals is cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). CREB expression and/or activity negatively correlates with vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell proliferation and migration. Multifunctional Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, including CaMKII, have been demonstrated to regulate CREB activity through both positive and negative phosphorylation events in vitro, but the function of CaMKII as a proximal regulator of CREB in intact cell systems, including VSM, is not clear. In this study, we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches to determine the function of CaMKIIδ in regulating CREB phosphorylation, localization, and activity in VSM. Overexpression of constitutively active CaMKIIδ specifically increased CREB phosphorylation on Ser(142) and silencing CaMKIIδ expression by siRNA or blocking endogenous CaMKII activity with KN93 abolished thrombin- or ionomycin-induced CREB phosphorylation on Ser(142) without affecting Ser(133) phosphorylation. CREB-Ser(142) phosphorylation correlated with transient nucleocytoplasmic translocation of CREB. Thrombin-induced CREB promoter activity, CREB binding to Sik1 and Rgs2 promoters, and Sik1/Rgs2 transcription were enhanced by a kinase-negative CaMKIIδ2 (K43A) mutant and inhibited by a constitutively active (T287D) mutant. Taken together, these studies establish negative regulation of CREB activity by endogenous CaMKIIδ-dependent CREB-Ser(142) phosphorylation and suggest a potential mechanism for CaMKIIδ/CREB signaling in modulating proliferation and migration in VSM cells. PMID:24106266

  1. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated disruption of hippocampal cAMP response element binding protein levels impairs consolidation of memory for water maze training

    OpenAIRE

    Guzowski, John F.; McGaugh, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Extensive evidence suggests that long term memory (LTM) formation is dependent on the activation of neuronal second messenger systems and requires protein synthesis. The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is a constitutively expressed regulatory transcription factor that couples changes in second messenger levels to changes in cellular transcription. Several recent studies suggest that CREB and related transcription factors regulate gene expression necessary for neuronal plasticity ...

  2. Metabolite Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP): ROLE OF AMP AS AN ALLOSTERIC INHIBITOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Jung, Hunmin; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Pawlosky, Robert; Takeshima, Tomomi; Lee, Wan-Ru; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Laxman, Sunil; Wynn, R Max; Tu, Benjamin P; MacMillan, John B; De Brabander, Jef K; Veech, Richard L; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2016-05-13

    The carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that plays an essential role in converting excess carbohydrate to fat storage in the liver. In response to glucose levels, ChREBP is regulated by nuclear/cytosol trafficking via interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, CRM-1 (exportin-1 or XPO-1), or importins. Nuclear localization of ChREBP was rapidly inhibited when incubated in branched-chain α-ketoacids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide. Here, we discovered that protein-free extracts of high fat-fed livers contained, in addition to ketone bodies, a new metabolite, identified as AMP, which specifically activates the interaction between ChREBP and 14-3-3. The crystal structure showed that AMP binds directly to the N terminus of ChREBP-α2 helix. Our results suggest that AMP inhibits the nuclear localization of ChREBP through an allosteric activation of ChREBP/14-3-3 interactions and not by activation of AMPK. AMP and ketone bodies together can therefore inhibit lipogenesis by restricting localization of ChREBP to the cytoplasm during periods of ketosis. PMID:26984404

  3. A CYCLIC-AMP RESPONSE ELEMENT IS INVOLVED IN RETINOIC ACID-DEPENDENT RAR-BETA-2 PROMOTER ACTIVATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KRUYT, FAE; FOLKERS, G; VANDENBRINK, CE; VANDERSAAG, PT; Kruyt, Frank

    1992-01-01

    Activation of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) beta2 promoter is known to be mediated by a RA response element located in the proximity of the TATA-box. By deletion studies in P19 embryonal carcinoma cells we have analyzed the RARbeta2 promoter for the presence of additional regulatory elements. We

  4. Repression of protein kinase C and stimulation of cyclic AMP response elements by fumonisin, a fungal encoded toxin which is a carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Dickman, M; Henderson, G; Jones, C

    1995-04-15

    Fusarium moniliforme (FM) is a major fungal pathogen of corn and is involved with stalk rot disease. FM is widely spread throughout the world, including the United States. Most strains of FM produce several mycotoxins, the most prominent of which is called fumonisin. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that ingestion of fumonisin correlates with a higher incidence of esophageal cancer in Southern and Northern Africa and China. Furthermore, fumonisin causes a neurodegenerative disease in horses, induces hepatic cancer in rats, and induces pulmonary edema in swine. Considering that high levels of fumonisin have been detected in healthy and diseased corn grown in the United States, fumonisin may pose a health threat to humans and livestock animals. Structurally, fumonisin resembles sphingolipids which are present in the membranes of animal and plant cells. At the present time, very little is known concerning the mechanism by which fumonisin elicits its carcinogenic effect. Our studies indicate that fumonisin represses expression of protein kinase C and AP-1-dependent transcription. In contrast, fumonisin stimulated a simple promoter containing a single cyclic AMP response element. Since fumonisin did not alter protein kinase A activity, it appears that cyclic AMP response element activation was independent of protein kinase A. It is hypothesized that the ability of fumonisin to alter signal transduction pathways plays a role in carcinogenesis.

  5. Repression of protein kinase C and stimulation of cyclic AMP response elements by fumonisin, a fungal encoded toxin which is a carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Dickman, M; Henderson, G; Jones, C

    1995-04-15

    Fusarium moniliforme (FM) is a major fungal pathogen of corn and is involved with stalk rot disease. FM is widely spread throughout the world, including the United States. Most strains of FM produce several mycotoxins, the most prominent of which is called fumonisin. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that ingestion of fumonisin correlates with a higher incidence of esophageal cancer in Southern and Northern Africa and China. Furthermore, fumonisin causes a neurodegenerative disease in horses, induces hepatic cancer in rats, and induces pulmonary edema in swine. Considering that high levels of fumonisin have been detected in healthy and diseased corn grown in the United States, fumonisin may pose a health threat to humans and livestock animals. Structurally, fumonisin resembles sphingolipids which are present in the membranes of animal and plant cells. At the present time, very little is known concerning the mechanism by which fumonisin elicits its carcinogenic effect. Our studies indicate that fumonisin represses expression of protein kinase C and AP-1-dependent transcription. In contrast, fumonisin stimulated a simple promoter containing a single cyclic AMP response element. Since fumonisin did not alter protein kinase A activity, it appears that cyclic AMP response element activation was independent of protein kinase A. It is hypothesized that the ability of fumonisin to alter signal transduction pathways plays a role in carcinogenesis. PMID:7712470

  6. Drosophila salt-inducible kinase (SIK) regulates starvation resistance through cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sekyu; Kim, Wonho; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2011-01-28

    Salt-inducible kinase (SIK), one of the AMP-activated kinase (AMPK)-related kinases, has been suggested to play important functions in glucose homeostasis by inhibiting the cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC). To examine the role of SIK in vivo, we generated Drosophila SIK mutant and found that the mutant flies have higher amounts of lipid and glycogen stores and are resistant to starvation. Interestingly, SIK transcripts are highly enriched in the brain, and we found that neuron-specific expression of exogenous SIK fully rescued lipid and glycogen storage phenotypes as well as starvation resistance of the mutant. Using genetic and biochemical analyses, we demonstrated that CRTC Ser-157 phosphorylation by SIK is critical for inhibiting CRTC activity in vivo. Furthermore, double mutants of SIK and CRTC became sensitive to starvation, and the Ser-157 phosphomimetic mutation of CRTC reduced lipid and glycogen levels in the SIK mutant, suggesting that CRTC mediates the effects of SIK signaling. Collectively, our results strongly support the importance of the SIK-CRTC signaling axis that functions in the brain to maintain energy homeostasis in Drosophila.

  7. Nesfatin-1 induces the phosphorylation levels of cAMP response element-binding protein for intracellular signaling in a neural cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Ishida

    Full Text Available Nesfatin-1 is a novel anorexic peptide that reduces the food intake of rodents when administered either intraventricularly or intraperitoneally. However, the molecular mechanism of intracellular signaling via Nesfatin-1 is yet to be resolved. In the current study, we investigated the ability of different neuronal cell lines to respond to Nesfatin-1 and further elucidated the signal transduction pathway of Nesfatin-1. To achieve this, we transfected several cell lines with various combinations of reporter vectors containing different kinds of response elements and performed reporter assays with Nesfatin-1, its active midsegment encoding 30 amino acid residues (M30 and M30-derived mutants. Notably, we found that both Nesfatin-1 as well as M30, significantly increased cAMP response element (CRE reporter activity in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line, NB41A3. An antagonist of Melanocortin 3/4 receptor, SHU9119, aborted the promoter activity, and a mutant M30, which exerts no anorexic effect in vivo did not induce the CRE reporter activity in NB41A3 cells. Western blotting analyses revealed that Nesfatin-1 and M30 significantly increased the phosphorylation levels of CRE-binding protein (CREB, without altering the intracellular cAMP levels. Further, our study showed that a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase inhibitor and an L-type Calcium (Ca(2+ channel blocker abolished the M30-induced CREB phosphorylation. Furthermore, the radio-receptor assay revealed that (125I-Nesfatin-1 binds in a saturable fashion to the membrane fractions of the mouse hypothalamus and NB41A3 cells, with Kd values of 0.79 nM and 0.17 nM, respectively. Collectively, our findings indicate the presence of a Nesfatin-1-specific receptor on the cell surface of NB41A3 cells and mouse hypothalamus. Our study highlights that Nesfatin-1, via its receptor, induces the phosphorylation of CREB, thus activating the intracellular signaling cascade in neurons.

  8. Changes of phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein in rat nucleus accumbens after chronic ethanol intake: naloxone reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJing; LIYue-Hua; YUANXiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the changes in the expression and phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein(CREB) in the rat nucleus accumbens after chronic ethanol intake and its withdrawal. METHODS: Ethanol wasgiven in drinking water at the concentration of 6 % (v/v), for one month. Changes in the levels of CREB andphospho-CREB (p-CREB) protein in the nucleus accumbens were measured by immunohistochemistry methods.RESULTS: Ethanol given to rats in drinking water decreased the level of p-CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens(-75 %) at the time of exposure to ethanol. The decrement of p-CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens remainedat 24 h (-35 %) and 72 h (-28 %) of ethanol withdrawal, which recovered toward control level after 7 d of ethanolwithdrawal. However, chronic ethanol, as well as ethanol withdrawal failed to produce any significant alteration inthe level of CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens. Naloxone (alone) treatment of rats had no effect on the levelsof CREB and p-CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens. However, when naloxone was administered concurrentlywith ethanol treatment, it antagonized the down-regulation of p-CREB protein in the nucleus accumbens (142 %) ofrats exposed to ethanol. CONCLUSION: A long-term intake of ethanol solution down-regulates the phosphoryla-tion of CREB in the nucleus accumbens, and those changes can be reversed by naloxone, which may be one kindof the molecular mechanisms associated with ethano1 dependence.

  9. Pin1 associates with and induces translocation of CRTC2 to the cytosol, thereby suppressing cAMP-responsive element transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Ono, Hiraku; Fujishiro, Midori; Horike, Nanao; Yoneda, Masayasu; Ohno, Haruya; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Kamata, Hideaki; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Nishimura, Fusanori; Katagiri, Hideki; Oka, Yoshitomo; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Kurihara, Hiroki; Uchida, Takafumi; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2010-10-22

    Pin1 is a unique regulator, which catalyzes the conversion of a specific phospho-Ser/Thr-Pro-containing motif in target proteins. Herein, we identified CRTC2 as a Pin1-binding protein by overexpressing Pin1 with Myc and FLAG tags in mouse livers and subsequent purification of the complex containing Pin1. The association between Pin1 and CRTC2 was observed not only in overexpression experiments but also endogenously in the mouse liver. Interestingly, Ser(136) in the nuclear localization signal of CRTC2 was shown to be involved in the association with Pin1. Pin1 overexpression in HepG2 cells attenuated forskolin-induced nuclear localization of CRTC2 and cAMP-responsive element (CRE) transcriptional activity, whereas gene knockdown of Pin1 by siRNA enhanced both. Pin1 also associated with CRTC1, leading to their cytosol localization, essentially similar to the action of CRTC2. Furthermore, it was shown that CRTC2 associated with Pin1 did not bind to CREB. Taken together, these observations indicate the association of Pin1 with CRTC2 to decrease the nuclear CBP·CRTC·CREB complex. Indeed, adenoviral gene transfer of Pin1 into diabetic mice improved hyperglycemia in conjunction with normalizing phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA expression levels, which is regulated by CRE transcriptional activity. In conclusion, Pin1 regulates CRE transcriptional activity, by associating with CRTC1 or CRTC2.

  10. Aldose Reductase Regulates Microglia/Macrophages Polarization Through the cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein After Spinal Cord Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Bian, Ganlan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Ling; Yu, Caiyong; Liu, Fangfang; Xue, Qian; Chung, Sookja K; Song, Bing; Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory reactions are the most critical pathological processes occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Activated microglia/macrophages have either detrimental or beneficial effects on neural regeneration based on their functional polarized M1/M2 subsets. However, the mechanism of microglia/macrophage polarization to M1/M2 at the injured spinal cord environment remains unknown. In this study, wild-type (WT) or aldose reductase (AR)-knockout (KO) mice were subjected to SCI by a spinal crush injury model. The expression pattern of AR, behavior tests for locomotor activity, and lesion size were assessed at between 4 h and 28 days after SCI. We found that the expression of AR is upregulated in microglia/macrophages after SCI in WT mice. In AR KO mice, SCI led to smaller injury lesion areas compared to WT. AR deficiency-induced microglia/macrophages induce the M2 rather than the M1 response and promote locomotion recovery after SCI in mice. In the in vitro experiments, microglia cell lines (N9 or BV2) were treated with the AR inhibitor (ARI) fidarestat. AR inhibition caused 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) accumulation, which induced the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) to promote Arg1 expression. KG501, the specific inhibitor of phosphorylated CREB, could cancel the upregulation of Arg1 by ARI or HNE stimulation. Our results suggest that AR works as a switch which can regulate microglia by polarizing cells to either the M1 or the M2 phenotype under M1 stimulation based on its states of activity. We suggest that inhibiting AR may be a promising therapeutic method for SCI in the future.

  11. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  12. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-01

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  13. Long-term memory of visually cued fear conditioning: roles of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J B; Anderson, K L; Altmann, S L; Itzhak, Y

    2011-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) has a role in late-phase long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term memory (LTM) formation. Our recent studies implicated NO signaling in contextual and auditory cued fear conditioning. The present study investigated the role of NO signaling in visually cued fear conditioning. First, visually cued fear conditioning was investigated in wild-type (WT) and nNOS knockout (KO) mice. Second, the effects of pharmacological modulators of NO signaling on the acquisition of visually cued fear conditioning were investigated. Third, plasma levels of corticosterone were measured to determine a relationship between physiological and behavioral responses to fear conditioning. Fourth, levels of extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK1/2) and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, downstream of NO signaling, were determined in the amygdala as potential correlates of fear learning. Mice underwent single or multiple (4) spaced trainings that consisted of a visual cue (blinking light) paired with footshock. WT mice acquired cued and contextual LTM following single and multiple trainings. nNOS KO mice acquired neither cued nor contextual LTM following a single training; however, multiple trainings improved contextual but not cued LTM. The selective nNOS inhibitor S-methyl-thiocitrulline (SMTC) impaired cued and contextual LTM in WT mice. The NO donor molsidomine recovered contextual LTM but had no effect on cued LTM in nNOS KO mice. Re-exposure to the visual cue 24 h posttraining elicited freezing response and a marked increase in plasma corticosterone levels in WT but not nNOS KO mice. The expression of CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) was significantly higher in naive nNOS KO mice than in WT counterparts, and pharmacological modulators of NO had significant effects on levels of CREB phosphorylation and expression. These findings suggest that visual cue-dependent LTM is impaired in nNOS KO

  14. Role of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-regulated transcription coactivator 3 (CRTC3) in the initiation of mitochondrial biogenesis and stress response in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Tin Aung; Lou, Huan; Ji, Cheng; Win, Sanda; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2011-06-24

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. PGC-1α expression is under the control of the transcription factor, cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). In searching for candidate transcription factors that mediate mitochondrial stress-initiated mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis, we assessed the effect of silencing CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTC). CRTC isoforms are co-activators of CREB-regulated transcription by a CREB phosphorylation-independent pathway. Using cultured HepG2 cells and primary mouse hepatocytes, we determined that mitochondrial stress imposed by the complex I inhibitor rotenone elicited mitochondrial biogenesis, which was dependent on an induction of PGC-1α, which was inhibited by silencing PGC-1α. PGC-1α induction in response to rotenone was inhibited by silencing the expression of CRTC3, which blocked downstream mitochondria biogenesis. In contrast, silencing CRTC2 did not affect the induction of this pathway in response to rotenone. Thus, CRTC3 plays a selective role in mitochondrial biogenesis in response to rotenone.

  15. cAMP反应元件结合蛋白在中枢神经系统疾病中的作用%The role of cAMP response element binding protein in central nervous system diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲玲; 王力娜; 崔丽丽; 杨蕊; 李敏; 杜炜; 张祥建

    2010-01-01

    The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is expressed widely in the central nervous system. It is involved extensively in the pathophysiological processes, such as the cell structure, signal transduction, genetic transcription, synaptic transmission, and metabolism by regulating its downstream genes transcription. CREB is not only involved in the process of normal development of the brain, but also closely correlated with the central nervous system diseases, including ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease and drug addiction.%cAMP反应元件结合蛋白(cAMP-response element-binding protein,CREB)在中枢神经系统表达广泛,通过对其下游基冈的转录调控,广泛参与细胞结构、信号转导、基因转录、突触传递以及代谢等病理牛理学过程.CREB不仅参与脑的正常发育过程,而且还与缺血性卒中、阿尔茨海默病、亨廷顿病和药物成瘾等中枢神经系统疾病密切相关.

  16. Reactive oxygen species decrease cAMP response element binding protein expression in cardiomyocytes via a protein kinase D1-dependent mechanism that does not require Ser133 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgen, Nazira; Guo, Jianfen; Gertsberg, Zoya; Danilo, Peter; Rosen, Michael R; Steinberg, Susan F

    2009-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) exert pleiotropic effects on a wide array of signaling proteins that regulate cellular growth and apoptosis. This study shows that long-term treatment with a low concentration of H2O2 leads to the activation of signaling pathways involving extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ribosomal protein S6 kinase, and protein kinase D (PKD) that increase cAMP binding response element protein (CREB) phosphorylation at Ser(133) in cardiomyocytes. Although CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation typically mediates cAMP-dependent increases in CREB target gene expression, the H2O2-dependent increase in CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation is accompanied by a decrease in CREB protein abundance and no change in Cre-luciferase reporter activity. Mutagenesis studies indicate that H2O2 decreases CREB protein abundance via a mechanism that does not require CREB-Ser(133) phosphorylation. Rather, the H2O2-dependent decrease in CREB protein is prevented by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin, by inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase or protein kinase C activity, or by adenoviral-mediated delivery of a small interfering RNA that decreases PKD1 expression. A PKD1-dependent mechanism that links oxidative stress to decreased CREB protein abundance is predicted to contribute to the pathogenesis of heart failure by influencing cardiac growth and apoptosis responses.

  17. Surface expression of GABAA receptors is transcriptionally controlled by the interplay of cAMP-response element-binding protein and its binding partner inducible cAMP early repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinghui; Lund, Ingrid V; Gravielle, Maria C; Farb, David H; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R; Russek, Shelley J

    2008-04-01

    The regulated expression of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABA(A)R) subunit genes plays a critical role in neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis. It is also associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Changes in GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit gene (GABRA1) expression have been reported in animal models of epilepsy, alcohol abuse, withdrawal, and stress. Understanding the genetic mechanism behind such changes in alpha subunit expression will lead to a better understanding of the role that signal transduction plays in control over GABA(A)R function and brings with it the promise of providing new therapeutic tools for the prevention or cure of a variety of neurological disorders. Here we show that activation of protein kinase C increases alpha1 subunit levels via phosphorylation of CREB (pCREB) that is bound to the GABRA1 promoter (GABRA1p). In contrast, activation of protein kinase A decreases levels of alpha1 even in the presence of pCREB. Decrease of alpha1 is dependent upon the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) as directly demonstrated by ICER-induced down-regulation of endogenous alpha1-containing GABA(A)Rs at the cell surface of cortical neurons. Taken together with the fact that there are less alpha1gamma2-containing GABA(A)Rs in neurons after protein kinase A stimulation and that activation of endogenous dopamine receptors down-regulates alpha1 subunit mRNA levels subsequent to induction of ICER, our studies identify a transcriptional mechanism for regulating the cell surface expression of alpha1-containing GABA(A)Rs that is dependent upon the formation of CREB heterodimers. PMID:18180303

  18. The selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist ORG 34116 decreases immobility time in the forced swim test and affects cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Cornelius G; Bilang-Bleuel, Alicia; De Carli, Sonja; Linthorst, Astrid C E; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2005-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonists can block the retention of the immobility response in the forced swimming test. Recently, we showed that forced swimming evokes a distinct spatiotemporal pattern of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and neocortex. In the present study, we found that chronic treatment of rats with the selective GR antagonist ORG 34116 decreased the immobility time in the forced swim test, increased baseline levels of phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) in the DG and neocortex and affected the forced swimming-induced changes in P-CREB levels in a time- and site-specific manner. Overall, we observed that, in control rats, forced swimming evoked increases in P-CREB levels in the DG and neocortex, whereas in ORG 34116-treated animals a major dephosphorylation of P-CREB was observed. These observations underscore an important role of GRs in the control of the phosphorylation state of CREB which seems to be of significance for the immobility response in the forced swim test and extend the molecular mechanism of action of GRs in the brain.

  19. cAMP response element binding protein1 is essential for activation of steroyl co-enzyme a desaturase 1 (Scd1 in mouse lung type II epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Antony

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein 1 (Creb1 is a transcription factor that mediates cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP signalling in many tissues. Creb1(-/- mice die at birth due to respiratory failure and previous genome-wide microarray analysis of E17.5 Creb1(-/- fetal mouse lung identified important Creb1-regulated gene targets during lung development. The lipogenic enzymes stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1 and fatty acid synthase (Fasn showed highly reduced gene expression in Creb1(-/- lungs. We therefore hypothesized that Creb1 plays a crucial role in the transcriptional regulation of genes involved in pulmonary lipid biosynthetic pathways during lung development. In this study we confirmed that Scd1 and Fasn mRNA levels were down regulated in the E17.5 Creb1(-/- mouse lung while the lipogenic-associated transcription factors SrebpF1, C/ebpα and Pparγ were increased. In vivo studies using germline (Creb1(-/- and lung epithelial-specific (Creb1(EpiΔ/Δ Creb1 knockout mice showed strongly reduced Scd1, but not Fasn gene expression and protein levels in lung epithelial cells. In vitro studies using mouse MLE-15 epithelial cells showed that forskolin-mediated activation of Creb1 increased both Scd1 gene expression and protein synthesis. Additionally, MLE15 cells transfected with a dominant-negative ACreb vector blocked forskolin-mediated stimulation of Scd1 gene expression. Lipid profiling in MLE15 cells showed that dominant-negative ACreb suppressed forskolin-induced desaturation of ether linked lipids to produce plasmalogens, as well as levels of phosphatidylethanolamine, ceramide and lysophosphatidylcholine. Taken together these results demonstrate that Creb1 is essential for the induction and maintenance of Scd1 in developing fetal mouse lung epithelial cells.

  20. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional...

  1. Cyclic AMP enhances TGFβ responses of breast cancer cells by upregulating TGFβ receptor I expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Oerlecke

    Full Text Available Cellular functions are regulated by complex networks of many different signaling pathways. The TGFβ and cAMP pathways are of particular importance in tumor progression. We analyzed the cross-talk between these pathways in breast cancer cells in 2D and 3D cultures. We found that cAMP potentiated TGFβ-dependent gene expression by enhancing Smad3 phosphorylation. Higher levels of total Smad3, as observed in 3D-cultured cells, blocked this effect. Two Smad3 regulating proteins, YAP (Yes-associated protein and TβRI (TGFβ receptor 1, were responsive to cAMP. While YAP had little effect on TGFβ-dependent expression and Smad3 phosphorylation, a constitutively active form of TβRI mimicked the cAMP effect on TGFβ signaling. In 3D-cultured cells, which show much higher levels of TβRI and cAMP, TβRI was unresponsive to cAMP. Upregulation of TβRI expression by cAMP was dependent on transcription. A proximal TβRI promoter fragment was moderately, but significantly activated by cAMP suggesting that cAMP increases TβRI expression at least partially by activating TβRI transcription. Neither the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB nor the TβRI-regulating transcription factor Six1 was required for the cAMP effect. An inhibitor of histone deacetylases alone or together with cAMP increased TβRI expression by a similar extent as cAMP alone suggesting that cAMP may exert its effect by interfering with histone acetylation. Along with an additive stimulatory effect of cAMP and TGFβ on p21 expression an additive inhibitory effect of these agents on proliferation was observed. Finally, we show that mesenchymal stem cells that interact with breast cancer cells can simultaneously activate the cAMP and TGFβ pathways. In summary, these data suggest that combined effects of cAMP and TGFβ, as e.g. induced by mesenchymal stem cells, involve the upregulation of TβRI expression on the transcriptional level, likely due to changes in histone acetylation

  2. Regulation of cyclic AMP response-element binding-protein (CREB) by Gq/11-protein-coupled receptors in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rosethorne, Elizabeth M; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R.A. John

    2008-01-01

    Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells have been used to investigate mechanisms involved in CREB phosphorylation after activation of two endogenously expressed Gq/11-protein-coupled receptors, the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) and B2 bradykinin receptors. Stimulation with either methacholine or bradykinin resulted in maximal increases in CREB phosphorylation within 1 min, with either a rapid subsequent decrease (bradykinin) to basal levels, or a sustained response (methacholine). Inhibitor st...

  3. Minocycline upregulates cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus of cerebral ischemia rats and improves behavioral deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhao,1 Ming Xiao,2 Wenbo He,3 Zhiyou Cai3 1Department of Neurology, the Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Anatomy, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Neurology, Renmin Hospital, Hubei University of Medicine, Shiyan Renmin Hospital, Shiyan, Hubei Province, People’s Republic of China Background and purpose: The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB plays an important role in the mechanism of cognitive impairment and is also pivotal in the switch from short-term to long-term memory. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF seems a promising avenue in the treatment of cerebral ischemia injury since this neurotrophin could stimulate structural plasticity and repair cognitive impairment. Several findings have displayed that the dysregulation of the CREB–BDNF cascade has been involved in cognitive impairment. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cerebral ischemia on learning and memory as well as on the levels of CREB, phosphorylated CREB (pCREB, and BDNF, and to determine the effect of minocycline on CREB, pCREB, BDNF, and behavioral functional recovery after cerebral ischemia. Methods: The animal model was established by permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries. Behavior was evaluated 5 days before decapitation with Morris water maze and open-field task. Four days after permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, minocycline was administered by douche via the stomach for 4 weeks. CREB and pCREB were examined by Western blotting, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. BDNF was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Results: The model rats after minocycline treatment swam shorter distances than control rats before finding the platform (P=0.0007. The number of times the

  4. Effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on hippocampal and parietal cortical neuronal cAMP-response element-binding protein expression in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunyu Qu; Xuesong Xing; Jin Zang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) is a key modulator of various signaling pathways. CREB activation initiates a series of intracellular signaling pathways that promote neuronal survival. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the regulatory effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on cerebral neuronal CREB expression following ischemia/reperfusion injury. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An immunohistochemical detection experiment was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Shenyang Medical College, between October 2006 and April 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 60 healthy, adult, Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: sham-operated (n=12), ischemia/reperfusion (n=24), and bFGF-treated (n=24). Rabbit anti-rat CREB (1: 100) and biotin labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG were purchased from the Wuhan Boster Company, China. MetaMorph-evolution MPS. 0-BX51 microscopy imaging system was provided by China Medical University, China. METHODS: Rat models of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury were developed using the suture method for right middle cerebral artery occlusion. Two-hour ischemia was followed by reperfusion. Rats from the bFGF-treated and ischemia/reperfusion groups were intraperitoneally administered endogenous bFGF (500 IU/mL, 2 000 IU/kg) or an equal amount of physiological saline. Rats from the sham-operated group underwent a similar surgical procedure, without induction of ischemia/reperfusion injury and drug administration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: After 48-hour reperfusion, hippocampal and parietal cortical neuronal CREB expression was detected by immunohistochemistry, and the absorbance of hippocampal CREB-positive products was determined using MetaMorph-evolutionMP5.0-BX51 microscopy imaging system. RESULTS: The sham-operated group exhibited noticeable CREB expression in hippocampal and parietal cortical neurons. In the ischemia/reperfusion group, the CREB expression was discrete and neurons were poorly arranged. The bFGF-treated group

  5. Construction of cAMP Responsive Element-Containing Luciferase Re-porter Vectors%cAMP反应元件萤光素酶报告基因载体的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓芸; 于金梅; 卓仁恭; 张康; 郑建全

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To construct luciferase reporter vectors containing cAMP responsive elements(CRE). Meth-ods: Using a luciferase reporter plasmid including gal4 sites as template, we used PCR technique to delete the gal4 sites and to add 4 CRE into the original plasmid. Then the vector pCRE-luc was achieved. Next, to mea-sure its luciferase activity, the vector was cotransfected with a G-protein couple receptor(GPCR) into human em-bryonic kidney 293(HEK293) cells. To verify whether the activity of CRE was associated with Gs pathway, inhibi-tor of protein kinase A(PKA) was applied. Results: The activity of pCRE-luc is directly associated with the acti-vating degree of GPCR, and depends on the Gs signal pathway. Conclusion: The CRE luciferase reporter vector, which can be used to measure the activity of Gs protein coupled receptors, was successfully constructed. Our re-search will provide basis for high-throughput screening drugs related to GPCR targets.%目的:构建含有cAMP反应元件(CRE)的萤光素酶报告基因载体。方法:以含有gal4位点的萤光素酶报告基因质粒为模板,利用PCR方法,在去除gal4位点的同时,连入4个CRE元件得到pCRE-luc;将该载体与G蛋白偶联受体(GPCR)共转染人胚肾细胞HEK293,测定萤光素酶活性;应用蛋白激酶A(PKA)抑制剂确认CRE的活性是否与Gs通路相关。结果:pCRE-luc的活性直接相关于GPCR的激活程度,并依赖Gs信号通路。结论:CRE萤光素酶报告基因载体构建成功,可用于检测Gs偶联GPCR的活性,为基于GPCR的高通量药物筛选奠定了基础。

  6. 丙泊酚对大鼠海马cAMP效应元件结合蛋白磷酸化和cAMP效应元件结合蛋白mRNA表达水平的影响%Effects of propofol on cyclic AMP response element binding protein phosphorylation and cyclic AMP response element binding protein mRNA expression in hippocampus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张英; 吴新海; 郑利民

    2011-01-01

    Objective to investigate the effects of propofol on cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and CREB mRNA expression in hippocampus of rats. Methods Sixty -four male Sprague -Dawley (SD) rats weighting 250 g-280 g were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=32) with Randomization Adviser 1.0 software: normal saline treated (Group S) and propofol treated (Group P). Animals of both groups underwent a continuous multiple -trial inhibitory avoidance training. The times of trial needed for each animal to attain the learning criterion( 100 seconds) were recorded. Each animal was given intraperitoneal propofol 9 mg/kg or normal saline 2 ml/kg at 15 min before training. The memory retention was tested at 1, 3 and 24 h( n=8, at each time point) after the training session and the memory latency was recorded. Animals were sacrificed at 15 min after reagent administration (T0) and after the memory testing (T1~3). Hippocampus was obtained to determine the phosphorylation of CRKB (pCREB) and CREB mRNA expression. Results The times of trials required for the rats to learn the task in Group S and Group P is 1 (0.25) and 3 (1.25), respectively. Learning ability was significantly impaired in rats of Group P(P<0.01 ). Rats of Group S had a median retention latency more than 300 s at each memory testing. The median retention latency of rats in Group P at T1, T2and T3 was 319( 144) s, 131( 114) s and 56(30) s, respectively. Compared with group S, there was a decrease of CREB phosphorylation expression at T0-3 in Group P (P<0.01). The CREB mRNA expression in Group P was decreased at T3 (P<0.01). Conclusion Propofol can inhibit CREB phosphorylation, and downregulate CREB mRNA expression in hippocampus of rats.%目的 探讨丙泊酚对大鼠海马cAMP效应元件结合蛋白(cAMP response element binding protein,CREB)磷酸化和CREB mRNA表达水平的影响.方法 成年雄性SD大鼠64只,体重250 g~280 g,采用RandA1.0随机分组软件

  7. Evidences for involvement of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses to Verticillium toxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing JIANG; Ling Wen FAN; Wei Hua WU

    2005-01-01

    Although there were reports suggesting the involvement of endogenous cAMP in plant defense signaling cascades,there is no direct evidence supporting this notion yet and the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the present study, we have used pathogenic fungi Verticillium dahliae and Arabidopsis plants as a model system of plant-microb interaction to demonstrate the function of endogenous cAMP in Arabidopsis defense responses. Both V. dahliae inoculation and Verticillium toxins injection induced typical "wilt" symptoms in Arabidopsis seedlings. When either 8-Br-AMP (a membrane permeable cAMP analogue) or salicylic acid (SA) was applied to Arabidopsis, the plants became resistant to V. dahliae toxins. However, addition of 8-Br-AMP did not increase the resistance of Arabidopsis transgenic plants deficient in SA to the toxins, suggesting that cAMP might act upstream of SA in plant defense signaling pathway.Indeed, 8-Br-cAMP and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, significantly stimulated the endogenous SA level in plants, whereas DDA, an inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase dramatically reduced toxin-induced SA increase. Both the endogenous cAMP and SA increased significantly in Arabidopsis seedlings treated with toxins. Furthermore, transcription level of pathogenesis-related protein 1 gene (PR1) was strongly induced by both 8-Br-cAMP and the toxin treatment. Taken together, our data demonstrate that endogenous cAMP is involved in plant defense responses against Verticilliumsecreted toxins by regulating the production of the known signal SA in plant defense pathway.

  8. Proteomic signatures implicate cAMP in light and temperature responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Thomas, Ludivine

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, are increasingly recognized as important signaling molecules in a number of physiological responses in higher plants. Here we used proteomics to identify cAMP-dependent protein signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana and identify a number of differentially expressed proteins with a role in light- and temperature-dependent responses, notably photosystem II subunit P-1, plasma membrane associated cation-binding protein and chaperonin 60 β. Based on these proteomics results we conclude that, much like in cyanobacteria, algae and fungi, cAMP may have a role in light signaling and the regulation of photosynthesis as well as responses to temperature and we speculate that ACs could act as light and/or temperature sensors in higher plants. Biological significance: This current study is significant since it presents the first proteomic response to cAMP, a novel and key second messenger in plants. It will be relevant to researchers in plant physiology and in particular those with an interest in second messengers and their role in biotic and abiotic stress responses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  9. c-di-AMP Secreted by Intracellular Listeria monocytogenes Activates a Host Type I Interferon Response

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, Joshua J.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Daniel A Portnoy

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, are detected in the cytosol of host immune cells. Induction of this host response is often dependent on microbial secretion systems, and in L. monocytogenes, is dependent on multi-drug efflux pumps (MDRs). Using L. monocytogenes mutants that over-expressed MDRs, we identified cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) as a secreted molecule able to trigger the cytosolic host response. Over-expression of the di-adenylate cycla...

  10. Relationship between Adaptation of the Folic Acid and the cAMP Mediated cGMP Response in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1983-01-01

    Chemotactic stimulation of post-vegetative Dictyostelium cells with folic acid or aggregative cells with cAMP results in a fast transient cGMP response which peaks at 10 s; basal levels are recovered in about 30-40 s. Stimulation with folic acid or cAMP rapidly desensitizes the cells for equal or lo

  11. Responsiveness of glycogen breakdown to cyclic AMP in perfused liver from rats with insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vardanega-Peicher

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The responsiveness of glycogen breakdown to cAMP was investigated in isolated perfused liver from male Wistar fed rats (200-220 g with insulin-induced hypoglycemia. The activation of glycogenolysis by 3 µM cAMP was decreased (P<0.05 in livers from rats with hypoglycemia induced by the administration of insulin or during the direct infusion of insulin into the isolated liver. The direct effect of insulin on glycogen catabolism promoted by 3 µM cAMP occurred as early as 3 min after starting insulin infusion. In contrast, the cAMP agonists resistant to phosphodiesterases, 8Br-cAMP and 6MB-cAMP, used at the same concentration as cAMP, i.e., 3 µM, did not modify the effect of insulin. The data suggest that the decreased hepatic responsiveness of glycogen breakdown during insulin-induced hypoglycemia is a direct effect of insulin decreasing the intracellular levels of cAMP.

  12. Integrating Environmentally Responsive Elements in Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Heiselberg, Per; Andresen, Inger; Perino, Marco; van der Aa, Ad

    2006-01-01

    Significant improvement have been achieved on efficiency improvements of specific building elements like the building envelope and building equipment and services and whilst most building elements still offer opportunities for efficiency improvements, the greatest future potential lie with technologies that promote the integration of responsive building elements and building services in integrated building concepts. In order to address some of these issues an international research effort, IE...

  13. Differential control by IHF and cAMP of two oppositely oriented genes, hpt and gcd, in Escherichia coli: significance of their partially overlapping regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izu, H; Ito, S; Elias, M D; Yamada, M

    2002-01-01

    The hpt gene, which encodes hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase, is located next to, but transcribed in the opposite direction to, the gcd gene, which codes for a membrane-bound glucose dehydrogenase, at 3.1 min on the Escherichia coli genome. In their promoter-operator region, putative regulatory elements for integration host factor (IHF) and for the complex comprising 3', 5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP) and its receptor protein (CRP) are present, and they overlap the promoters for hpt and gcd, respectively. The involvement of IHF and cAMP-CRP, as well as the corresponding putative cis-acting elements, in the expression of the two genes was investigated by using lacZ operon fusions. In an adenylate cyclase-deficient strain, addition of cAMP increased the expression of hpt and reduced the expression of gcd. In agreement with this observation, the introduction of mutations into the putative binding element for the cAMP-CRP complex enhanced the expression of gcd. In contrast, mutations introduced into the putative IHF-binding elements increased the level of hpt expression. Similar results were obtained with IHF-defective strains. Thus, the expression of the two genes is regulated in a mutually exclusive manner. Additional experiments with mutations at the -10 sequence of the gcd promoter suggest that the binding of RNA polymerase to the hpt promoter interferes with the interaction of RNA polymerase with the gcd promoter, and vice versa.

  14. Can packaging elements elicit consumers’ emotional responses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Lewis; Corsi, Armando; Lockshin, Larry;

    Emotion has been an important concept in many areas of consumer research such as judgment, decision-making and advertising. Little research has been done on emotion in packaging adopting the physiological measures used in other areas. This paper draws on past studies in advertising that measure...... emotional responses toward image, colour and font, and apply them to packaging research. The study tests the extent at which packaging can elicit consumers’ spontaneous emotional response for each of those three elements, by using skin conductance, facial electromyography (EMG) and selfassessment scales....... The results show that packaging can elicit an emotional response via different elements. The paper also raises concerns about the accuracy of using selfreport measures of emotional responses to packaging research....

  15. Ca2+ participates in α1B-adrenoceptor-mediated cAMP response in HEK293 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao SONG; Yun-fang LI; Er-dan DONG; Qi-de HAN; You-yi ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the α1B-adrenoceptor (α1B-AR)-mediated cAMP response and underlying mechanisms in HEK293 cells. Methods: Full-length cDNA encoding α1B-AR was transfected into HEK293 cells using the calcium phosphate precipitation method, and α1B-AR expression and cAMP accumulation were determined by using the saturation radioligand binding assay and ion-exchange chromatography, respectively. Results: Under agonist stimulation, α1B-AR mediated cAMP synthesis in HEK293 cells, and blockade by PLC-PKC or tyrosine kinase did not reduce cAMP accumulation induced by NE. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin(PTX) had little effect on basal cAMP accumulation as well as norepinephrine(NE)-stimulated cAMP accumulation. In addition, pretreatment with cholera toxin(CTX) neither mimicked nor blocked the effect induced by NE. The extracellular Ca2+ chelator egtazic acid (EGTA), nonselective Ca2+ channel blocker CdC12 and calmodulin (CaM) inhibitor W-7 significantly reduced NE-induced cAMP accumulation from 1.59%±0.47% to 1.00%±0.31%, 0.78%±0.23%, and 0.90%±0.40%,respectively. Conclusion: By coupling with a PTX-insensitive G protein, α1B-AR promotes Ca2+ influx via receptor-dependent Ca2+ channels, then Ca2+ is linked to CaM to form a Ca2+-CaM complex, which stimulates adenylyl cyclase (AC),thereby increasing the cAMP production in HEK293 cell lines.

  16. Cyclic AMP efflux inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Dominique R.; Smagley, Yelena; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark B.; Evangelisti, Annette; Matlawska-Wasowska, Ksenia; Winter, Stuart S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Chigaev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic evasion is a hallmark of cancer. We propose that some cancers may evade cell death by regulating 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is associated with pro-apoptotic signaling. We hypothesize that leukemic cells possess mechanisms that efflux cAMP from the cytoplasm, thus protecting them from apoptosis. Accordingly, cAMP efflux inhibition should result in: cAMP accumulation, activation of cAMP-dependent downstream signaling, viability loss, and apoptosis. We developed a novel assay to assess cAMP efflux and performed screens to identify inhibitors. In an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model, several identified compounds reduced cAMP efflux, appropriately modulated pathways that are responsive to cAMP elevation (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation, and deactivation of Very Late Antigen-4 integrin), and induced mitochondrial depolarization and caspase activation. Blocking adenylyl cyclase activity was sufficient to reduce effects of the most potent compounds. These compounds also decreased cAMP efflux and viability of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines and primary patient samples, but not of normal primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our data suggest that cAMP efflux is a functional feature that could be therapeutically targeted in leukemia. Furthermore, because some of the identified drugs are currently used for treating other illnesses, this work creates an opportunity for repurposing. PMID:27129155

  17. Mobile genetic elements related to the diffusion of plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases or carbapenemases from Enterobacteriaceae: findings from a multicenter study in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, L; Miró, E; Juan, C; Gómez, L; Bou, G; González-López, J J; Martínez-Martínez, L; Aracil, B; Conejo, M C; Oliver, A; Navarro, F

    2015-09-01

    We examined the genetic context of 74 acquired ampC genes and 17 carbapenemase genes from 85 of 640 Enterobacteriaceae isolates collected in 2009. Using S1 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization, 37 of 74 bla AmpC genes were located on large plasmids of different sizes belonging to six incompatibility groups. We used sequencing and PCR mapping to investigate the regions flanking the acquired ampC genes. The bla CMY-2-like genes were associated with ISEcp1; the surrounding bla DHA genes were similar to Klebsiella pneumoniae plasmid pTN60013 associated with IS26 and the psp and sap operons; and the bla ACC-1 genes were associated with IS26 elements inserted into ISEcp1. All of the carbapenemase genes (bla VIM-1, bla IMP-22, and bla IMP-28) were located in class 1 integrons. Therefore, although plasmids are the main cause of the rapid dissemination of ampC genes among Enterobacteriaceae, we need to be aware that other mobile genetic elements, such as insertion sequences, transposons, or integrons, can be involved in the mobilization of these genes of chromosomal origin. Additionally, three new integrons (In846 to In848) are described in this study. PMID:26077249

  18. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yang

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998, Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531, the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819, PprA (dra0346, and RecN (dr1447, are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways.

  19. Evolution of the iron-responsive element

    OpenAIRE

    Piccinelli, Paul; Samuelsson, Tore

    2007-01-01

    An RNA hairpin structure referred to as the iron-responsive element (IRE) and iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) are key players in the control of iron metabolism in animal cells. They regulate translation initiation or mRNA stability, and the IRE is found in a variety of mRNAs, such as those encoding ferritin, transferrin receptor (Tfr), erythroid aminolevulinic acid synthase (eALAS), mitochondrial aconitase (mACO), ferroportin, and divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1). We have studied the evolu...

  20. Integrating Responsive Building Elements in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Matthias; Amato, Alex; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    energy strategies to develop guidelines and procedures for estimation of environmental performance of responsive building elements and integrated building concepts This paper introduces the ideas of this collaborative work and discusses its usefulness for Hong Kong and China. Special focus was put......There is a global need for a more sustainable building development. About 50% of energy is used in buildings indicating that buildings provide a considerable potential for operational energy savings. Studies were conducted with the following objectives: to perform a state-of-the-art review...

  1. cAMP-synthesis in a medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line: response to adrenergic agents and prostaglandines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, P R; Goretzki, P E; Keck, E

    1999-01-01

    Calcitonin secretion by C-cells is mediated through intracellular 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcium signaling. Calcitonin release stimulation tests may take advantage of both signaling cascades in screening for medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC). To elucidate the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase system we have determined cAMP levels of a calcitonin-expressing MTC cell line (RG) after exposure to adrenergic agents and prostaglandines. In early passages (20-30) cAMP concentrations were significantly elevated in RG cells after exposure to beta-adrenergic agents and prostaglandines E1 and E2. In advanced passages (60-80) the beta-adrenergic response was no longer detectable and adrenergic receptors were uncoupled from the adenylyl cyclase complex; while the effect of prostaglandines E1 and E2 remained unaffected. Preincubation with dexamethasone, in a process requiring protein new synthesis, re-established the adrenergic response in later passages, indicating that RG cells dedifferentiated in culture over time. Our in vitro findings suggest that MTC cell dedifferentiation may be accompanied by adrenergic receptor-uncoupling from the adenylate cyclase system and that this process may be reversed by dexamethasone incubation.

  2. The plasma cyclic-AMP response to noise in humans and rats—short-term exposure to various noise levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, M.; Dodo, H.; Ishii, F.; Yoneda, J.; Yamazaki, S.; Goto, H.

    1988-12-01

    Rats were exposed to short-term noise which was found to activate the hypothalamohypophyseal-adrenal system and result in a decrease of adrenal ascorbic acid (AAA) and an increase of serum corticosterone (SCS). The threshold limit value lay between 60 and 70 dB(A). To characterize better the effect of noise on the human hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal system, a large group of subjects was exposed to short-term noise at 85 dB(A) and higher, and tested for levels of adrenocortical steroid (cortisol) and anterior pituitary hormones such as ACTH, growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL). Results in humans showed hyperfunction of the hypothalamo-pituitary system. However, as the responses in rats and humans differed, a further experiment was performed using C-AMP, a second messenger mediating many of the effects of a variety of hormones. Plasma C-AMP in humans and rats increased significantly after exposure to noise greater than 70 dB(A). We suggest that plasma C-AMP could be useful as a sensitive index for noise-related stress in the daily living environment of humans and rats.

  3. Reduced lipolysis response to adipose afferent reflex involved in impaired activation of adrenoceptor-cAMP-PKA-hormone sensitive lipase pathway in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Lei; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Ren, Xing-Sheng; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Chemical stimulation of white adipose tissue (WAT) causes adipose afferent reflex (AAR) and sympathetic activation. This study is to investigate the effects of AAR on lipolysis and the mechanisms of attenuated lipolysis response to enhanced AAR in obesity. Obesity was caused by high-fat diet for 12 weeks in rats. AAR was induced by injection of capsaicin into inguinal WAT or electrical stimulation of epididymal WAT afferent nerve. AAR caused sympathetic activation, which was enhanced in obesity rats. AAR increased cAMP levels and PKA activity, promoted hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and perilipin phosphorylation, and increased lipolysis in WAT, which were attenuated in obesity rats. PKA activity, cAMP, perilipin and β-adrenoceptor levels were reduced, while HSL was upregulated in adipocytes from obesity rats. In primary adipocytes, isoproterenol increased cAMP levels and PKA activity, promoted HSL and perilipin phosphorylation, and increased lipolysis, which were attenuated in obesity rats. The attenuated effects of isoproterenol in adipocytes from obesity rats were prevented by a cAMP analogue dbcAMP. The results indicate that reduced lipolysis response to enhanced AAR in obesity is attributed to the impaired activation of β-adrenoceptor-cAMP-PKA-HSL pathway. Increased cAMP level in adipocytes rectifies the attenuated lipolysis in obesity. PMID:27694818

  4. PKA and cAMP/CNG Channels Independently Regulate the Cholinergic Ca2+-Response of Drosophila Mushroom Body Neurons1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavot, Pierre; Carbognin, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The mushroom bodies (MBs), one of the main structures in the adult insect brain, play a critical role in olfactory learning and memory. Though historical genes such as dunce and rutabaga, which regulate the level of cAMP, were identified more than 30 years ago, their in vivo effects on cellular and physiological mechanisms and particularly on the Ca2+-responses still remain largely unknown. In this work, performed in Drosophila, we took advantage of in vivo bioluminescence imaging, which allowed real-time monitoring of the entire MBs (both the calyx/cell-bodies and the lobes) simultaneously. We imaged neuronal Ca2+-activity continuously, over a long time period, and characterized the nicotine-evoked Ca2+-response. Using both genetics and pharmacological approaches to interfere with different components of the cAMP signaling pathway, we first show that the Ca2+-response is proportional to the levels of cAMP. Second, we reveal that an acute change in cAMP levels is sufficient to trigger a Ca2+-response. Third, genetic manipulation of protein kinase A (PKA), a direct effector of cAMP, suggests that cAMP also has PKA-independent effects through the cyclic nucleotide-gated Ca2+-channel (CNG). Finally, the disruption of calmodulin, one of the main regulators of the rutabaga adenylate cyclase (AC), yields different effects in the calyx/cell-bodies and in the lobes, suggesting a differential and regionalized regulation of AC. Our results provide insights into the complex Ca2+-response in the MBs, leading to the conclusion that cAMP modulates the Ca2+-responses through both PKA-dependent and -independent mechanisms, the latter through CNG-channels. PMID:26464971

  5. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  6. Neuromodulatory effect of Gαs- or Gαq-coupled G-protein-coupled receptor on NMDA receptor selectively activates the NMDA receptor/Ca2+/calcineurin/cAMP response element-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 1 pathway to effectively induce brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Mamoru; Tabuchi, Akiko; Kuwana, Yuki; Watanabe, Shinjiro; Inoue, Minami; Takasaki, Ichiro; Izumi, Hironori; Tanaka, Ayumi; Inoue, Ran; Mori, Hisashi; Komatsu, Hidetoshi; Takemori, Hiroshi; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Bito, Haruhiko; Tsuda, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    Although coordinated molecular signaling through excitatory and modulatory neurotransmissions is critical for the induction of immediate early genes (IEGs), which lead to effective changes in synaptic plasticity, the intracellular mechanisms responsible remain obscure. Here we measured the expression of IEGs and used bioluminescence imaging to visualize the expression of Bdnf when GPCRs, major neuromodulator receptors, were stimulated. Stimulation of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-specific receptor (PAC1), a Gαs/q-protein-coupled GPCR, with PACAP selectively activated the calcineurin (CN) pathway that is controlled by calcium signals evoked via NMDAR. This signaling pathway then induced the expression of Bdnf and CN-dependent IEGs through the nuclear translocation of CREB-regulated transcriptional coactivator 1 (CRTC1). Intracerebroventricular injection of PACAP and intraperitoneal administration of MK801 in mice demonstrated that functional interactions between PAC1 and NMDAR induced the expression of Bdnf in the brain. Coactivation of NMDAR and PAC1 synergistically induced the expression of Bdnf attributable to selective activation of the CN pathway. This CN pathway-controlled expression of Bdnf was also induced by stimulating other Gαs- or Gαq-coupled GPCRs, such as dopamine D1, adrenaline β, CRF, and neurotensin receptors, either with their cognate agonists or by direct stimulation of the protein kinase A (PKA)/PKC pathway with chemical activators. Thus, the GPCR-induced expression of IEGs in coordination with NMDAR might occur via the selective activation of the CN/CRTC1/CREB pathway under simultaneous excitatory and modulatory synaptic transmissions in neurons if either the Gαs/adenylate cyclase/PKA or Gαq/PLC/PKC-mediated pathway is activated.

  7. Delineating the core regulatory elements crucial for directed cell migration by examining folic-acid-mediated responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Kamalakkannan; Wright, Gus A; Hames, Nicole; Housman, Max; Roberts, Alayna; Aufderheide, Karl J; Janetopoulos, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum shows chemotaxis towards folic acid (FA) throughout vegetative growth, and towards cAMP during development. We determined the spatiotemporal localization of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules and investigated the FA-mediated responses in a number of signaling mutants to further our understanding of the core regulatory elements that are crucial for cell migration. Proteins enriched in the pseudopods during chemotaxis also relocalize transiently to the plasma membrane during uniform FA stimulation. In contrast, proteins that are absent from the pseudopods during migration redistribute transiently from the PM to the cytosol when cells are globally stimulated with FA. These chemotactic responses to FA were also examined in cells lacking the GTPases Ras C and G. Although Ras and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity were significantly decreased in Ras G and Ras C/G nulls, these mutants still migrated towards FA, indicating that other pathways must support FA-mediated chemotaxis. We also examined the spatial movements of PTEN in response to uniform FA and cAMP stimulation in phospholipase C (PLC) null cells. The lack of PLC strongly influences the localization of PTEN in response to FA, but not cAMP. In addition, we compared the gradient-sensing behavior of polarized cells migrating towards cAMP to that of unpolarized cells migrating towards FA. The majority of polarized cells make U-turns when the cAMP gradient is switched from the front of the cell to the rear. Conversely, unpolarized cells immediately extend pseudopods towards the new FA source. We also observed that plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] levels oscillate in unpolarized cells treated with Latrunculin-A, whereas polarized cells had stable plasma membrane PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 responses toward the chemoattractant gradient source. Results were similar for cells that were starved for 4 hours, with a mixture of polarized and unpolarized cells responding

  8. Involvement of a cyclic-AMP pathway in group I metabotropic glutamate receptor responses in neonatal rat cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, H; de Barry, J; Muller, H; Heitz, M P; Gombos, G; Mutel, V

    1997-09-10

    3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), (S)-3-hydroxyphenylglycine and (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (S-4C3HPG) stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in neonatal rat cortical slices, but with lower maximal effect, in comparison with 2S,1'S,2'S-2-(2'-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG I) or (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclo-pentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD). DHPG, 1S,3R-ACPD, and S-4C3HPG also evoked a rapidly desensitizing increase in [Ca2+]i in cortical layers of neonatal brain slices. (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolyl-phenylglycine (MTPG), and (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphono-phenylglycine (MPPG) inhibited the increase of phosphoinositide hydrolysis elicited by 1S,3R-ACPD but not that by R,S-DHPG. In contrast, the selective group II receptor agonist (1S,2S,5R,6S)-2-amino-bicyclo-[3.1.0]-hexane-2,6-dicarboxylate (LY 354740) potentiated the response of R,S-DHPG. Finally, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP, a membrane permeant analogue of cAMP, reversed the stimulatory effect of 1S,3R-ACPD and S-4C3HPG on phosphoinositide hydrolysis and [Ca2+]i mobilization, without affecting the response induced by R,S-DHPG. These data suggest that, in neonatal rat cortex, the activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors potentiates the phosphoinositide hydrolysis and [Ca2+]i responses mediated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:9369360

  9. Prediction of nuclear hormone receptor response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelin, Albin; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2005-03-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) class of transcription factors controls critical regulatory events in key developmental processes, homeostasis maintenance, and medically important diseases and conditions. Identification of the members of a regulon controlled by a NR could provide an accelerated understanding of development and disease. New bioinformatics methods for the analysis of regulatory sequences are required to address the complex properties associated with known regulatory elements targeted by the receptors because the standard methods for binding site prediction fail to reflect the diverse target site configurations. We have constructed a flexible Hidden Markov Model framework capable of predicting NHR binding sites. The model allows for variable spacing and orientation of half-sites. In a genome-scale analysis enabled by the model, we show that NRs in Fugu rubripes have a significant cross-regulatory potential. The model is implemented in a web interface, freely available for academic researchers, available at http://mordor.cgb.ki.se/NHR-scan. PMID:15563547

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  11. Changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana Proteome Implicate cAMP in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses and Changes in Energy Metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Alqurashi, May

    2016-06-01

    The second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is increasingly recognized as having many different roles in plant responses to environmental stimuli. To gain further insights into these roles, Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was treated with 100 nM of cell permeant 8-bromo-cAMP for 5 or 10 min. Here, applying mass spectrometry and comparative proteomics, 20 proteins were identified as differentially expressed and we noted a specific bias in proteins with a role in abiotic stress, particularly cold and salinity, biotic stress as well as proteins with a role in glycolysis. These findings suggest that cAMP is sufficient to elicit specific stress responses that may in turn induce complex changes to cellular energy homeostasis.

  12. Response Surface Stochastic Finite Element Method of Composite Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Deyong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Response Surface Method (RSM has been applied to structural reliability problems successfully in many areas. Finite Element Method (FEM is one of the most widely used computational methods, which permit the analysis and design of large-scale engineering systems. In order to obtain a reliability analysis method of composite structure with satisfactory accuracy and computational efficiency, RSM and FEM were combined by secondary development of ABAQUS. Response Surface Stochastic Finite Element Method (RSSFEM which can solve the reliability problems of composite structure was developed. The numerical accuracy and the computational efficiency of the developed method were demonstrated by comparison with Monte-Carlo Stochastic Finite Element Method (MCSFEM.

  13. Finite Element Model Updating Using Response Surface Method

    CERN Document Server

    Marwala, Tshilidzi

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes the response surface method for finite element model updating. The response surface method is implemented by approximating the finite element model surface response equation by a multi-layer perceptron. The updated parameters of the finite element model were calculated using genetic algorithm by optimizing the surface response equation. The proposed method was compared to the existing methods that use simulated annealing or genetic algorithm together with a full finite element model for finite element model updating. The proposed method was tested on an unsymmetri-cal H-shaped structure. It was observed that the proposed method gave the updated natural frequen-cies and mode shapes that were of the same order of accuracy as those given by simulated annealing and genetic algorithm. Furthermore, it was observed that the response surface method achieved these results at a computational speed that was more than 2.5 times as fast as the genetic algorithm and a full finite element model and 24 ti...

  14. Human cellular differences in cAMP - CREB signaling correlate with light-dependent melatonin suppression and bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaspar, Ludmila; van de Werken, Maan; Johansson, Anne-Sophie; Moriggi, Ermanno; Owe-Larsson, Bjorn; Kocks, Janwillem W. H.; Lundkvist, Gabriella B.; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.; Brown, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Various lines of evidence suggest a mechanistic role for altered cAMP-CREB (cAMP response element - binding protein) signaling in depressive and affective disorders. However, the establishment and validation of human inter-individual differences in this and other major signaling pathways has proven

  15. A mouse model for the Carney complex tumor syndrome develops neoplasia in cyclic AMP-responsive tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Lawrence S; Kusewitt, Donna F; Matyakhina, Ludmila; Towns, William H; Carney, J Aidan; Westphal, Heiner; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2005-06-01

    Carney complex is an autosomal dominant neoplasia syndrome characterized by spotty skin pigmentation, myxomatosis, endocrine tumors, and schwannomas. This condition may be caused by inactivating mutations in PRKAR1A, the gene encoding the type 1A regulatory subunit of protein kinase A. To better understand the mechanism by which PRKAR1A mutations cause disease, we have developed conventional and conditional null alleles for Prkar1a in the mouse. Prkar1a(+/-) mice developed nonpigmented schwannomas and fibro-osseous bone lesions beginning at approximately 6 months of age. Although genotype-specific cardiac and adrenal lesions were not seen, benign and malignant thyroid neoplasias were observed in older mice. This spectrum of tumors overlaps that seen in Carney complex patients, confirming the validity of this mouse model. Genetic analysis indicated that allelic loss occurred in a subset of tumor cells, suggesting that complete loss of Prkar1a plays a key role in tumorigenesis. Similarly, tissue-specific ablation of Prkar1a from a subset of facial neural crest cells caused the formation of schwannomas with divergent differentiation. These observations confirm the identity of PRKAR1A as a tumor suppressor gene with specific importance to cyclic AMP-responsive tissues and suggest that these mice may be valuable tools not only for understanding endocrine tumorigenesis but also for understanding inherited predispositions for schwannoma formation. PMID:15930266

  16. Regulation of the Dictyostelium glycogen phosphorylase 2 gene by cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucic, J F; Selmin, O; Rutherford, C L

    1993-01-01

    A crucial developmental event in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, is glycogen degradation. The enzyme that catalyzes this degradation, glycogen phosphorylase 2 (gp-2), is developmentally regulated and cAMP appears to be involved in this regulation. We have examined several aspects of the cAMP regulation of gp-2. We show that addition of exogenous cAMP to aggregation competent amoebae induced the appearance of gp-2 mRNA. The induction of gp-2 mRNA occurred within 1 and 1.5 h after the initial exposure to cAMP. Exposure to exogenous cAMP concentrations as low as 1.0 microM could induce gp-2 mRNA. We also examined the molecular mechanism through which cAMP induction of gp-2 occurs. Induction of gp-2 appears to result from a mechanism that does not require intracellular cAMP signaling, and may occur directly through a cAMP binding protein without the requirement of any intracellular signalling. We also examined the promoter region of the gp-2 gene for cis-acting elements that are involved in the cAMP regulation of gp-2. A series of deletions of the promoter were fused to a luciferase reporter gene and then analyzed for cAMP responsiveness. The results indicated that a region from -258 nucleotides to the transcriptional start site is sufficient for essentially full activity and appears to carry all necessary cis-acting sites for cAMP induction. Further deletion of 58 nucleotides from the 5' end, results in fivefold less activity in the presence of cAMP. Deletion of the next 104 nucleotides eliminates the cAMP response entirely. PMID:8222346

  17. Finite Element Vibration and Dynamic Response Analysis of Engineering Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mackerle

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography lists references to papers, conference proceedings, and theses/dissertations dealing with finite element vibration and dynamic response analysis of engineering structures that were published from 1994 to 1998. It contains 539 citations. The following types of structures are included: basic structural systems; ground structures; ocean and coastal structures; mobile structures; and containment structures.

  18. Finite element estimation of acoustical response functions in HID lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Bernd; Wolff, Marcus [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Production, School of Engineering and Computer Science, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Berliner Tor 21, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Hirsch, John; Antonis, Piet [Philips Lighting BV, Lightlabs, Mathildelaan 1, 5600 JM Eindhoven (Netherlands); Bhosle, Sounil [Universite de Toulouse (United States); Barrientos, Ricardo Valdivia, E-mail: bernd.baumann@haw-hamburg.d [National Nuclear Research Institute, Highway Mexico-Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, CP 52750 (Mexico)

    2009-11-21

    High intensity discharge lamps can experience flickering and even destruction when operated at high frequency alternating current. The cause of these problems has been identified as acoustic resonances inside the lamp's arc tube. Here, a finite element approach for the calculation of the acoustic response function is described. The developed model does not include the plasma dynamics.

  19. Elements of a national emergency response system for nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to suggest elements for a general emergency response system, employed at a national level, to detect, evaluate and assess the consequences of a radiological atmospheric release occurring within or outside of national boundaries. These elements are focused on the total aspect of emergency response ranging from providing an initial alarm to a total assessment of the environmental and health effects. Elements of the emergency response system are described in such a way that existing resources can be directly applied if appropriate; if not, newly developed or an expansion of existing resources can be employed. The major thrust of this paper is toward a philosophical discussion and general description of resources that would be required to implementation. If the major features of this proposal system are judged desirable for implementation, then the next level of detail can be added. The philosophy underlying this paper is preparedness - preparedness through planning, awareness and the application of technology. More specifically, it is establishment of reasonable guidelines including the definition of reference and protective action levels for public exposure to accidents involving nuclear material; education of the public, government officials and the news media; and the application of models and measurements coupled to computer systems to address a series of questions related to emergency planning, response and assessment. It is the role of a proven national emergency response system to provide reliable, quality-controlled information to decision makers for the management of environmental crises

  20. The μ opioid agonist morphine modulates potentiation of capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 responses through a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts-Thomson Sarah J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1 is critical in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Several receptors including G-protein coupled prostaglandin receptors have been reported to functionally interact with the TRPV1 through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA pathway to potentiate TRPV1-mediated capsaicin responses. Such regulation may have significance in inflammatory pain. However, few functional receptor interactions that inhibit PKA-mediated potentiation of TRPV1 responses have been described. Results In the present studies we investigated the hypothesis that the μ opioid receptor (MOP agonist morphine can modulate forskolin-potentiated capsaicin responses through a cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with TRPV1 and MOP, and calcium (Ca2+ responses to injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin were monitored in Fluo-3-loaded cells. Pre-treatment with morphine did not inhibit unpotentiated capsaicin-induced Ca2+ responses but significantly altered capsaicin responses potentiated by forskolin. TRPV1-mediated Ca2+ responses potentiated by the direct PKA activator 8-Br-cAMP and the PKC activator Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetatewere not modulated by morphine. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that the TRPV1 and MOP are co-expressed on cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion neurones, pointing towards the existence of a functional relationship between the G-protein coupled MOP and nociceptive TRPV1. Conclusion The results presented here indicate that the opioid receptor agonist morphine acts via inhibition of adenylate cyclase to inhibit PKA-potentiated TRPV1 responses. Targeting of peripheral opioid receptors may therefore have therapeutic potential as an intervention to prevent potentiation of TRPV1 responses through the PKA pathway in inflammation.

  1. Linked decreases in Liver Kinase B1 and AMP-activated protein kinase activity modulate matrix catabolic responses to biomechanical injury in chondrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Petursson, Freyr; Husa, Matt; June, Ron; Lotz, Martin; Terkeltaub, Robert; Liu-Bryan, Ru

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) maintains cultured chondrocyte matrix homeostasis in response to inflammatory cytokines. AMPK activity is decreased in human knee osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes. Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) is one of the upstream activators of AMPK. Hence, we examined the relationship between LKB1 and AMPK activity in OA and aging cartilages, and in chondrocytes subjected to inflammatory cytokine treatment and biomechanical compression injury, and p...

  2. The relationship between some beta-adrenergic mediated responses and plasma concentrations of adrenaline and cyclic AMP in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, E K; Myhre, John Gabriel; Larsen, S;

    1990-01-01

    concentrations at low adrenaline infusion rates was prevented, whereas a small increase in cyclic AMP was found at high adrenaline infusion rates, probably owing to incomplete beta-receptor blockade. Likewise, the adrenaline-induced increments in blood substrates (glucose, lactate, glycerol and beta......To test the hypothesis that increments in plasma cyclic AMP during beta-adrenergic stimulation reflect integrated second messenger function of the tissues activated by the agonist, graded adrenaline infusion resulting in plasma adrenaline concentrations within the physiological range was performed...... hydroxybutyric acid) were significantly reduced but not completely prevented by beta-blockade. We conclude that an altered relationship between beta-agonist concentrations and plasma cyclic AMP may provide evidence for the existence of differences in beta-adrenergic sensitivity in man....

  3. cAMP and EPAC are key players in the regulation of the signal transduction pathway involved in the α-hemolysin autophagic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Mestre

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla is the S. aureus-secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus-containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell.

  4. Parallel finite element modeling of earthquake ground response and liquefaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinchi Lu(陆金池); Jun Peng(彭军); Ahmed Elgamal; Zhaohui Yang(杨朝晖); Kincho H. Law

    2004-01-01

    Parallel computing is a promising approach to alleviate the computational demand in conducting large-scale finite element analyses. This paper presents a numerical modeling approach for earthquake ground response and liquefaction using the parallel nonlinear finite element program, ParCYCLIC, designed for distributed-memory message-passing parallel computer systems. In ParCYCLIC, finite elements are employed within an incremental plasticity, coupled solid-fluid formulation. A constitutive model calibrated by physical tests represents the salient characteristics of sand liquefaction and associated accumulation of shear deformations. Key elements of the computational strategy employed in ParCYCLIC include the development of a parallel sparse direct solver, the deployment of an automatic domain decomposer, and the use of the Multilevel Nested Dissection algorithm for ordering of the finite element nodes. Simulation results of centrifuge test models using ParCYCLIC are presented. Performance results from grid models and geotechnical simulations show that ParCYCLIC is efficiently scalable to a large number of processors.

  5. CRP-cyclic AMP dependent inhibition of the xylene-responsive σ(54-promoter Pu in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available The expression of σ(54-dependent Pseudomonas putida Pu promoter is activated by XylR activator when cells are exposed to a variety of aromatic inducers. In this study, the transcriptional activation of the P. putida Pu promoter was recreated in the heterologous host Escherichia coli. Here we show that the cAMP receptor protein (CRP, a well-known carbon utilization regulator, had an inhibitory effect on the expression of Pu promoter in a cAMP-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect was not activator specific. In vivo KMnO4 and DMS footprinting analysis indicated that CRP-cAMP poised the RNA polymerase at Pu promoter, inhibiting the isomerization step of the transcription initiation even in the presence of an activator. Therefore, the presence of PTS-sugar, which eliminates cAMP, could activate the poised RNA polymerase at Pu promoter to transcribe. Moreover, the activation region 1 (AR1 of CRP, which interacts directly with the αCTD (C-terminal domain of α-subunit of RNA polymerase, was found essential for the CRP-mediated inhibition at Pu promoter. A model for the above observations is discussed.

  6. Bronchial responsiveness to adenosine 5 '-monophosphate (AMP) and methacholine differ in their relationship with airway allergy and baseline FEV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Meer, G; Heederik, D; Postma, DS

    2002-01-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and inflammation are central hallmarks of asthma. Studies in patients with asthma suggest that BHR to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) is a better marker of bronchial inflammation than BHR to methacholine. The association between markers of airway inflammation and

  7. ZAP-70 and p72syk are signaling response elements through MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanner, S B; Grosmaire, L S; Blake, J;

    1995-01-01

    -activated human T-cells. In both tonsillar B-lymphocytes and B-cell leukemia lines, p72syk was rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine residues following HLA-DR cross-linking. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p72syk induced through ligation of either the B-cell antigen receptor or class II molecules was potently inhibited...... intracellular calcium. Similar responses have been observed in B-cells following stimulation of MHC class II molecules, including the increased production of intracellular cAMP. In this report, we demonstrate that the ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase is a responsive signaling element following cross-linking of HLA-DR in...... antibody induced receptor ligation, bacterial superantigen (SEA and SEB) treatment of HLA-DR+ T-cells stimulated ZAP-70 tyrosine phosphorylation, consistent with class II transmembrane signaling by ligation of HLA-DR and V beta in cis. Modulation of the TCR/CD3 led to abrogation of class II induced ZAP-70...

  8. Spectral response of multi-element silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, B.A.; Rossington, C.S.; Chapman, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Multi-element silicon strip detectors, in conjunction with integrated circuit pulse-processing electronics, offer an attractive alternative to conventional lithium-drifted silicon Si(Li) and high purity germanium detectors (HPGe) for high count rate, low noise synchrotron x-ray fluorescence applications. One of the major differences between the segmented Si detectors and the commercially available single-element Si(Li) or HPGe detectors is that hundreds of elements can be fabricated on a single Si substrate using standard silicon processing technologies. The segmentation of the detector substrate into many small elements results in very low noise performance at or near, room temperature, and the count rate of the detector is increased many-fold due to the multiplication in the total number of detectors. Traditionally, a single channel of detector with electronics can handle {approximately}100 kHz count rates while maintaining good energy resolution; the segmented detectors can operate at greater than MHz count rates merely due to the multiplication in the number of channels. One of the most critical aspects in the development of the segmented detectors is characterizing the charge sharing and charge loss that occur between the individual detector strips, and determining how these affect the spectral response of the detectors.

  9. Design Process for Integrated Concepts with Responsive Building Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aa, Van der A.; Heiselberg, Per

    2008-01-01

    An integrated building concept is a prerequisite to come to an energy efficient building with a good and healthy IAQ indoor comfort. A design process that defines the targets and boundary conditions in the very first stage of the design and guarantees them until the building is finished and used...... is needed. The hard question is however: how to make the right choice of the combination of individual measures from building components and building services elements. Within the framework of IEA-ECBCS Annex 44 research has been conducted about the design process for integrated building concepts...... with responsive building elements. The (Dutch) Toolkit Sustainable Residential Buildings is one of the examples of tools for an integrated design process....

  10. Non-coding RNA LINC00473 mediates decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells in response to cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Huan; Deng, Wen-Bo; Liu, Yue-Fang; Liang, Yu-Xiang; Fan, Zong-Min; Gu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Ji-Long; Sha, Ai-Guo; Diao, Hong-Lu; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Decidualization is an essential step in the establishment of pregnancy. However, the functional contributions of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (LincRNAs) to decidualization have not been explored. To explore the regulation and role of LincRNAs during human decidualization, human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) are induced to undergo in vitro decidualization by treating with estradiol-17β, db-cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate. LINC00473 (LINC473) expression is highly induced in HESCs after decidual stimulus. We found that cAMP-PKA pathway regulates the expression of LINC473 through IL-11-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation. RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of LINC473 inhibits in vitro decidualization. These results suggested that LINC473 might be functionally required for human decidualization. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of LincRNA during human decidualization. PMID:26947914

  11. Non-coding RNA LINC00473 mediates decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells in response to cAMP signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao-Huan; Deng, Wen-Bo; Liu, Yue-Fang; Liang, Yu-Xiang; Fan, Zong-Min; Gu, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Ji-Long; Sha, Ai-Guo; Diao, Hong-Lu; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Decidualization is an essential step in the establishment of pregnancy. However, the functional contributions of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (LincRNAs) to decidualization have not been explored. To explore the regulation and role of LincRNAs during human decidualization, human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs) are induced to undergo in vitro decidualization by treating with estradiol-17β, db-cAMP and medroxyprogesterone acetate. LINC00473 (LINC473) expression is highly induced in HESCs after decidual stimulus. We found that cAMP-PKA pathway regulates the expression of LINC473 through IL-11-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation. RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of LINC473 inhibits in vitro decidualization. These results suggested that LINC473 might be functionally required for human decidualization. This is the first report demonstrating the presence of LincRNA during human decidualization. PMID:26947914

  12. Skeletal Muscle AMP-activated Protein Kinase Is Essential for the Metabolic Response to Exercise in Vivo*

    OpenAIRE

    Lee-Young, Robert S; Griffee, Susan R.; Lynes, Sara E.; Bracy, Deanna P.; Julio E Ayala; McGuinness, Owen P.; Wasserman, David H.

    2009-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been postulated as a super-metabolic regulator, thought to exert numerous effects on skeletal muscle function, metabolism, and enzymatic signaling. Despite these assertions, little is known regarding the direct role(s) of AMPK in vivo, and results obtained in vitro or in situ are conflicting. Using a chronically catheterized mouse model (carotid artery and jugular vein), we show that AMPK regulates skeletal muscle metabolism in vivo at several levels, w...

  13. Responses of plasma cyclic AMP, serum immunoreactive insulin, C-peptide immunoreactivity and blood sugar levels to glucagon in patients with liver diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimamura,Junnosuke

    1985-10-01

    Full Text Available Levels of plasma cyclic AMP, serum immunoreactive insulin (IRI, serum c-peptide immunoreactivity (CPR and blood sugar (BS were determined 0, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after a glucagon injection (0.01 mg per kg body weight in normal controls, patients with acute hepatitis and liver cirrhosis. Plasma cyclic AMP responses to glucagon in liver disease patients varied widely in peak value, and only in patients with fulminant hepatitis and decompensated liver cirrhosis with poor prognosis was the response suppressed. The peak response of BS was found significantly later in liver cirrhosis patients than in normal controls. IRI and CPR responses to glucagon were lower in acute hepatitis patients than in normal controls and liver cirrhosis patients. IRI levels and their sum were also lower in acute hepatitis patients, although CPR levels were not significantly different. Thus, the ratio of the sum of CPR from 0 to 60 min to that of IRI was significantly higher in acute hepatitis, indicating impaired pancreatic secretion of insulin to glucagon stimulation as well as increased uptake of insulin by the liver in acute hepatitis.

  14. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies of slow responses to serotonin and dopamine of snail identified neurons. Mediating role of the cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research thesis, the electrophysiological study of slow incoming currents induced in some identified neurons of the Helix aspersa snail by serotonin and dopamine shows that they are associated with a decrease of a potassium conductance involved in the modulation of the action potential duration. By means of enzymatic tests performed on a single cell, and of electrophysiological experiments, the author shows that the cyclic AMP is an intracellular mediator involved in the genesis of these slow responses. Moreover, the obtained results show that serotonin and dopamine act by binding to specific receptors, and that these receptors activate the adenylate-cyclase through a GTP binding protein

  15. DNA-Mediated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motani, Kou; Ito, Shinji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-05-15

    Cytoplasmic DNA activates cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) to produce cyclic 2'-5'3'-5'GMP-AMP dinucleotide (2'5 'cGAMP). The binding of 2'5'cGAMP to an adaptor protein, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), activates a transcription factor, IFN regulatory factor 3, leading to the induction of IFN and chemokine gene expression. In this study, we found that the 2'5'cGAMP-dependent STING activation induced highly upregulated CXCL10 gene expression. Formation of a distinct STING dimer, which was detected by native PAGE, was induced by 2'5'cGAMP, but not 3'-5'3'-5'cGAMP. Analysis of DNase II(-/-) mice, which constitutively produce IFN-β and CXCL10, showed the accumulation of 2'5'cGAMP in their fetal livers and spleens, suggesting that the undigested DNA accumulating in DNase II(-/-) cells may have leaked from the lysosomes into the cytoplasm. The DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts produced 2'5'cGAMP in a cGAS-dependent manner during apoptotic cell engulfment. However, cGAS deficiency did not impair the STING-dependent upregulation of CXCL10 in DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that was induced by apoptotic cell engulfment or DNA lipofection. These results suggest the involvement of a cGAS-independent additional DNA sensor(s) that induces the STING-dependent activation of innate immunity.

  16. CREB modulates calcium signaling in cAMP-induced bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linxia; Liu, Li; Thompson, Ryan; Chan, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Calcium signaling has a versatile role in many important cellular functions. Despite its importance, regulation of calcium signaling in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) has not been explored extensively. Our previous study revealed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) enabled BMSCs to generate calcium signal upon stimulation by dopamine, KCl and glutamate. Concurrently, cAMP transiently activated the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in BMSCs. Activity of CREB can be modulated by the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase signaling pathway, however, whether the calcium signaling observed in cAMP-induced BMSCs requires CREB has not been investigated. In an effort to uncover the role of CREB in the generation of calcium signaling in response to modulators such as dopamine and KCl, we knocked down CREB activity in BMSCs. Our study indicated that BMSCs, but not its close relative fibroblasts, are responsive to dopamine and KCl after cAMP treatment. Calcium signal elicited by dopamine depends, in part, on calcium influx whereas that elicited by KCl depends completely on calcium influx. Knock-down of CREB activity significantly reduced or abolished the cAMP-induced calcium response, and reintroducing a constitutively active CREB partially restored the calcium response.

  17. Vibration Response of Multi Storey Building Using Finite Element Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chik, T. N. T.; Zakaria, M. F.; Remali, M. A.; Yusoff, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Interaction between building, type of foundation and the geotechnical parameter of ground may trigger a significant effect on the building. In general, stiffer foundations resulted in higher natural frequencies of the building-soil system and higher input frequencies are often associated with other ground. Usually, vibrations transmitted to the buildings by ground borne are often noticeable and can be felt. It might affect the building and become worse if the vibration level is not controlled. UTHM building is prone to the ground borne vibration due to closed distance from the main road, and the construction activities adjacent to the buildings. This paper investigates the natural frequency and vibration mode of multi storey office building with the presence of foundation system and comparison between both systems. Finite element modelling (FEM) package software of LUSAS is used to perform the vibration analysis of the building. The building is modelled based on the original plan with the foundation system on the structure model. The FEM results indicated that the structure which modelled with rigid base have high natural frequency compare to the structure with foundation system. These maybe due to soil structure interaction and also the damping of the system which related to the amount of energy dissipated through the foundation soil. Thus, this paper suggested that modelling with soil is necessary to demonstrate the soil influence towards vibration response to the structure.

  18. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Molecules that modulate our mood?

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, A.; Vaidya, V A

    2006-01-01

    Depression is the major psychiatric ailment of our times, afflicting ~20% of the population. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology of this complex disorder is not well understood. In addition, although antidepressants have been in existence for the past several decades, the mechanisms that underlie their therapeutic effects remain elusive. Building evidence implicates a role for the plasticity of specific neuro-circuitry in both the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Damage to...

  19. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiku, Hitoshi, E-mail: shiku@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Takeda, Michiaki; Murata, Tatsuya [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Akiba, Uichi; Hamada, Fumio [Graduate School of Engineering and Resource Science, Akita University, 1-1 Tegata gakuen-machi, Akita 010-8502 (Japan); Matsue, Tomokazu, E-mail: matsue@bioinfo.che.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-11-604 Aramaki-Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2009-04-27

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or {kappa}B (binding site for NF{kappa}B (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4 x 4 array of circles of diameter 300 {mu}m by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL{sup -1} dexamethasone, 10 ng mL{sup -1} forskolin, or 100 ng mL{sup -1} TNF-{alpha} (tumor necrosis factor {alpha}) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNF{kappa}B-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5 x 10{sup 4} cells per well.

  20. State-of-the-art Review : Vol. 2A. Responsive Building Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blümel, Ernst; Haghighat, Fariborz; Li, Yuguo;

    This report resumes and presents the activity done in Subtask A of IEA-ECBCS Annex 44 “Integrating Environmentally Responsive Elements in Buildings” concerning the state of the art review of Responsive Building Elements. It is based on the contributions from the participating countries. The publi...

  1. Modeling Reader's Emotional State Response on Document's Typographic Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Tsonos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of an experimental study towards modeling the reader's emotional state variations induced by the typographic elements in electronic documents. Based on the dimensional theory of emotions we investigate how typographic elements, like font style (bold, italics, bold-italics and font (type, size, color and background color, affect the reader's emotional states, namely, Pleasure, Arousal, and Dominance (PAD. An experimental procedure was implemented conforming to International Affective Picture System guidelines and incorporating the Self-Assessment Manikin test. Thirty students participated in the experiment. The stimulus was a short paragraph of text for which any content, emotion, and/or domain dependent information was excluded. The Analysis of Variance revealed the dependency of (a all the three emotional dimensions on font size and font/background color combinations and (b the Pleasure dimension on font type and font style. We introduce a set of mapping rules showing how PAD vary on the discrete values of font style and font type elements. Moreover, we introduce a set of equations describing the PAD dimensions' dependency on font size. This novel model can contribute to the automated reader's emotional state extraction in order, for example, to enhance the acoustic rendition of the documents, utilizing text-to-speech synthesis.

  2. Finite-element impact response of debonded composite turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sudip; Karmakar, Amit

    2014-02-01

    This paper investigates on the transient behavior of debonded composite pretwisted rotating shallow conical shells which could be idealized as turbine blades subjected to low velocity normal impact using finite-element method. Lagrange's equation of motion is used to derive the dynamic equilibrium equation and the moderate rotational speeds are considered neglecting the Coriolis effect. An eight-noded isoparametric plate bending element is employed in the finite element formulation incorporating rotary inertia and effects of transverse shear deformation based on Mindlin's theory. The modified Hertzian contact law which accounts for permanent indentation is utilized to compute the impact parameters. The time-dependent equations are solved by using Newmark's time integration scheme. Parametric studies are performed to investigate the effects of triggering parameters like angle of twist, rotational speed, laminate configuration and location of debonding considering low velocity normal impact at the center of eight-layered graphite-epoxy composite cantilevered conical shells with bending stiff ([0o2/{±} 30o]s), torsion stiff ([45°/-45°/-45°/45°]s) and cross-ply ([0°/90°/0°/90°]s) laminate configurations.

  3. Integrated AMP-PAN, TRUEX, and SREX Flowsheet Test to Remove Cesium, Surrogate Actinide Elements, and Strontium from INEEL Tank Waste Using Sorbent Columns and Centrifugal Contactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Ronald Scott; Law, Jack Douglas; Todd, Terry Allen; Wood, D. J.; Garn, Troy Gerry; Wade, Earlen Lawrence

    2000-02-01

    Three unit operations for the removal of selected fission products, actinides, and RCRA metals (mercury and lead) have been successfully integrated and tested for extended run times with simulated INEEL acidic tank waste. The unit operations were ion exchange for Cs removal, followed by TRUEX solvent extraction for Eu (actinide surrogate), Hg, and Re (Tc surrogate) removal, and subsequent SREX solvent extraction for Sr and Pb removal. Approximately 45 L of simulated INTEC tank waste was first processed through three ion exchange columns in series for selective Cs removal. The columns were packed with a composite ammonium molybdophosphate-polyacrylonitrile (AMP-PAN) sorbent. The experimental breakthrough data were in excellent agreement with modeling predictions based on data obtained with much smaller columns. The third column (220 cm3) was used for polishing and Cs removal after breakthrough of the up-stream columns. The Cs removal was >99.83% in the ion exchange system without interference from other species. Most of the effluent from the ion exchange (IX) system was immediately processed through a TRUEX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove europium (americium surrogate), mercury and rhenium (technetium surrogate) from the simulated waste. The TRUEX flowsheet test was performed utilizing 23 stages of 3.3-cm centrifugal contactors. Greater than 99.999% of the Eu, 96.3% of the Hg, and 56% of the Re were extracted from the simulated feed and recovered in the strip and wash streams. Over the course of the test, there was no detectable build-up of any components in the TRUEX solvent. The raffinate from the TRUEX test was stored and subsequently processed several weeks later through a SREX solvent extraction flowsheet to remove strontium, lead, and Re (Tc surrogate) from the simulated waste. The SREX flowsheet test was performed using the same centrifugal contactors used in the TRUEX test after reconfiguration and the addition of three stages. Approximately 99.9% of

  4. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Lisse, Thomas S.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as “vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins”, behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vi...

  5. Ecological responsibility of business as public-private partnership element

    OpenAIRE

    I.M. Potravniy; V.V. Gassiy

    2011-01-01

    In the article the questions of social and ecological responsibility of business are considered within the public-private partnership mechanism framework. Methods of the ecological significant project economic regulation are shown in wildlife management and environment protection sphere.

  6. The role of cAMP in synaptic homeostasis in response to environmental temperature challenges and hyperexcitability mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eUeda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis is the ability of physiological systems to regain functional balance following environment or experimental insults and synaptic homeostasis has been demonstrated in various species following genetic or pharmacological disruptions. Among environmental challenges, homeostatic responses to temperature extremes are critical to animal survival under natural conditions. We previously reported that axon terminal arborization in Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions is enhanced at elevated temperatures; however, the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials (EJPs remains unaltered despite the increase in synaptic bouton numbers. Here we determine the cellular basis of this homeostatic adjustment in larvae reared at high temperature (HT, 29 ˚C. We found that synaptic current focally recorded from individual synaptic boutons was unaffected by rearing temperature (30 ˚C. However, HT rearing decreased the quantal size (amplitude of spontaneous miniature EJPs, or mEJPs, which compensates for the increased number of synaptic releasing sites to retain a normal EJP size. The quantal size decrease is accounted for by a decrease in input resistance of the postsynaptic muscle fiber, indicating an increase in membrane area that matches the synaptic growth at HT. Interestingly, a mutation in rutabaga (rut encoding adenylyl cyclase (AC exhibited no obvious changes in quantal size or input resistance of postsynaptic muscle cells after HT rearing, suggesting an important role for rut AC in temperature-induced synaptic homeostasis in Drosophila. This extends our previous finding of rut-dependent synaptic homeostasis in hyperexcitable mutants, e.g. slowpoke (slo. In slo larvae, the lack of BK channel function is partially ameliorated by upregulation of presynaptic Sh IA current to limit excessive transmitter release in addition to postsynaptic glutamate receptor recomposition that reduces the quantal size.

  7. Ecological responsibility of business as public-private partnership element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Potravniy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article the questions of social and ecological responsibility of business are considered within the public-private partnership mechanism framework. Methods of the ecological significant project economic regulation are shown in wildlife management and environment protection sphere.

  8. Social responsibility as an obligatory element of the institutional system

    OpenAIRE

    Filippova, Irina; Sumcov, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The institute of social responsibility is considered as mandatory addition of market and state institutes, since it reduces the transaction costs of the socio-economic system by eliminating discrimination in the relations. One of the most important missions of the state is the formation and development of the mechanisms of social control.

  9. Moral Responsibility: The Missing Element in Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasillopulos, Christopher; Denney, Morgan

    2013-01-01

    We intend to deepen the understanding of leadership in general and educational leadership in particular by an analysis of Chester Barnard's (1938) concept of executive responsibility. By so doing we believe that we will reveal how an educational leader can foster the environment in which competent teachers can optimize their students' learning…

  10. Actin induction during PMA and cAMP-dependent signal pathway activation in Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, D; del Carmen Dominguez-Robles, M; Villegas-Sepúlveda, N; Meza, I

    2000-10-01

    Activation of PKC or cAMP-dependent signalling pathways in Entamoeba histolytica triggers the phosphorylation of proteins involved in actin rearrangements necessary for adhesion and locomotion. Analogous motifs to SRE and CRE sequences--known to respond to PMA and cAMP--were identified within the 5' regulatory region (5'RR) of one of the parasite actin genes. These sequences could be involved in the actin transcriptional upregulation reported during signalling. To test this hypothesis, a plasmid containing the 5'RR of the actin gene fused to the bacterial neomycin gene (neo) was used for stable transfection. Expression of neo and endogenous actin was measured after stimulation of transfected amoebae by PMA and dcAMP. It was found that both compounds induced neo and actin expression and showed a co-operative effect in the induction of neo. Induction by PMA or dcAMP failed if the directing amoebic 5'RR lacked SRE and CRE motifs. Transfection of amoebae with plasmid constructs, containing either progressive deletions of the actin 5'RR or site-directed mutations of the SRE and CRE-like motifs, corroborated that these sequences and a co-ordinated participation of PKC- and PKA-activated transcription factors are responsible for the increments in neo and actin mRNAs. In vivo, these PMA and cAMP-response elements could play an important role in regulating actin expression and organization in signalling processes activated during tissue invasion.

  11. Nuclease-Resistant c-di-AMP Derivatives That Differentially Recognize RNA and Protein Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Robert E; Torgerson, Chad D; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Strobel, Scott A

    2016-02-16

    The ability of bacteria to sense environmental cues and adapt is essential for their survival. The use of second-messenger signaling molecules to translate these cues into a physiological response is a common mechanism employed by bacteria. The second messenger 3'-5'-cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) has been linked to a diverse set of biological processes involved in maintaining cell viability and homeostasis, as well as pathogenicity. A complex network of both protein and RNA receptors inside the cell activates specific pathways and mediates phenotypic outputs in response to c-di-AMP. Structural analysis of these RNA and protein receptors has revealed the different recognition elements employed by these effectors to bind the same small molecule. Herein, using a series of c-di-AMP analogues, we probed the interactions made with a riboswitch and a phosphodiesterase protein to identify the features important for c-di-AMP binding and recognition. We found that the ydaO riboswitch binds c-di-AMP in two discrete sites with near identical affinity and a Hill coefficient of 1.6. The ydaO riboswitch distinguishes between c-di-AMP and structurally related second messengers by discriminating against an amine at the C2 position more than a carbonyl at the C6 position. We also identified phosphate-modified analogues that bind both the ydaO RNA and GdpP protein with high affinity, whereas symmetrically modified ribose analogues exhibited a substantial decrease in ydaO affinity but retained high affinity for GdpP. These ligand modifications resulted in increased resistance to enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis by the GdpP enzyme. Together, these data suggest that these c-di-AMP analogues could be useful as chemical tools to specifically target subsections of second-messenger signaling pathways. PMID:26789423

  12. Adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP receptor protein modulate stress resistance and virulence capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Grant T; Norton, J Paul; Bower, Jean M; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    In many bacteria, the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) interacts with the transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP), forming active cAMP-CRP complexes that can control a multitude of cellular activities, including expanded carbon source utilization, stress response pathways, and virulence. Here, we assessed the role of cAMP-CRP as a regulator of stress resistance and virulence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the principal cause of urinary tract infections worldwide. Deletion of genes encoding either CRP or CyaA, the enzyme responsible for cAMP synthesis, attenuates the ability of UPEC to colonize the bladder in a mouse infection model, dependent on intact innate host defenses. UPEC mutants lacking cAMP-CRP grow normally in the presence of glucose but are unable to utilize alternate carbon sources like amino acids, the primary nutrients available to UPEC within the urinary tract. Relative to the wild-type UPEC isolate, the cyaA and crp deletion mutants are sensitive to nitrosative stress and the superoxide generator methyl viologen but remarkably resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and acid stress. In the mutant strains, H(2)O(2) resistance correlates with elevated catalase activity attributable in part to enhanced translation of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Acid resistance was promoted by both RpoS-independent and RpoS-dependent mechanisms, including expression of the RpoS-regulated DNA-binding ferritin-like protein Dps. We conclude that balanced input from many cAMP-CRP-responsive elements, including RpoS, is critical to the ability of UPEC to handle the nutrient limitations and severe environmental stresses present within the mammalian urinary tract.

  13. The alpha2-5'AMP-activated protein kinase is a site 2 glycogen synthase kinase in skeletal muscle and is responsive to glucose loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sebastian B; Nielsen, Jakob N.; Birk, Jesper Bratz;

    2004-01-01

    The 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a potential antidiabetic drug target. Here we show that the pharmacological activation of AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-1-beta-4-carboxamide ribofuranoside (AICAR) leads to inactivation of glycogen synthase (GS) and phosphorylation of GS at Ser 7 (site 2). ...

  14. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  15. Vibration response mechanism of faulty outer race rolling element bearings for quantitative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lingli; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Feibin; Zhang, Jianyu; Lee, Seungchul

    2016-03-01

    For the quantitative fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings, a nonlinear vibration model for fault severity assessment of rolling element bearings is established in this study. The outer race defect size parameter is introduced into the dynamic model, and vibration response signals of rolling element bearings under different fault sizes are simulated. The signals are analyzed quantitatively to observe the relationship between vibration responses and fault sizes. The impact points when the ball rolls onto and away from the defect are identified from the vibration response signals. Next, the impact characteristic that reflects the fault severity in rolling element bearings is obtained from the time interval between two impact points. When the width of the bearing fault is small, the signals are presented as clear single impact. The signals gradually become double impacts with increasing size of defects. The vibration signals of a rolling element bearings test rig are measured for different outer race fault sizes. The experimental results agree well with the results from simulations. These results are useful for understanding the vibration response mechanism of rolling element bearings under various degrees of fault severity.

  16. Phosphodiesterase 4 and compartmentalization of cyclic AMP signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ZhengChao; SHI FangXiong

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), as a second messenger, plays a critical role in cellular signaling transduction. However, it is not clear how this apparently identical cAMP signal induces divergent physiological responses. The potential explanation that cAMP signaling is compartmentalized was proposed by Buxton and Brunton twenty years ago. Compartmentalization of cAMP signaling allows spatially distinct pools of protein kinase A (PKA) to be differently activated. Research on cAMP signaling has regained impetus in many fields of life sciences due to the progress in understanding cAMP signaling complexity and functional diversity. The cAMP/PKA signaling compartments are maintained by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) which bind PKA and other signaling proteins, and by PDEs which hydrolyse cAMP and thus terminate PKA activity. PDE4 enzymes belong to PDE superfamily and stand at a crossroad that allows them to integrate various signaling pathways with that of cAMP in spatially distinct compartments. In the current review, the nomenclature, taxonomy and gene expression of PDE4, and the system and region of its effect are described. In addition, the idiographic molecules, mechanisms, and regulation models of PDE4 are summarized. Furthermore, the important roles PDE4 plays in the maturation of rat granulosa cells and cAMP signaling compartmentalization are discussed.

  17. IP{sub 3}-dependent intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenting; Tingare, Asmita; Ng, David Chi-Heng [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Johnson, Hong W.; Schell, Michael J. [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda (United States); Lord, Rebecca L. [Department of Biology, University of York (United Kingdom); Chawla, Sangeeta, E-mail: sangeeta.chawla@york.ac.uk [Department of Pharmacology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Department of Biology, University of York (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP-induced c-fos expression in hippocampal neurons requires a submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The submembraneous Ca{sup 2+} pool derives from intracellular ER stores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes inhibits cAMP-induced c-fos expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SRE-mediated and CRE-mediated gene expression is sensitive to IP{sub 3}-metabolizing enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release is required for cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of TORC1. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP are widely used in concert by neurons to relay signals from the synapse to the nucleus, where synaptic activity modulates gene expression required for synaptic plasticity. Neurons utilize different transcriptional regulators to integrate information encoded in the spatiotemporal dynamics and magnitude of Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals, including some that are Ca{sup 2+}-responsive, some that are cAMP-responsive and some that detect coincident Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP signals. Because Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP can influence each other's amplitude and spatiotemporal characteristics, we investigated how cAMP acts to regulate gene expression when increases in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} are buffered. We show here that cAMP-mobilizing stimuli are unable to induce expression of the immediate early gene c-fos in hippocampal neurons in the presence of the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} buffer BAPTA-AM. Expression of enzymes that attenuate intracellular IP{sub 3} levels also inhibited cAMP-dependent c-fos induction. Synaptic activity induces c-fos transcription through two cis regulatory DNA elements - the CRE and the SRE. We show here that in response to cAMP both CRE-mediated and SRE-mediated induction of a luciferase reporter gene is attenuated by IP{sub 3} metabolizing enzymes. Furthermore, cAMP-induced nuclear translocation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 was inhibited

  18. Effects of segregation of primary alloying elements on the creep response in magnesium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Y.D.; Dieringa, H.; Hort, N.;

    2008-01-01

    The segregation of primary alloying elements deteriorates the high temperature creep resistance of magnesium alloys. Annealing at high temperatures alleviating their segregations can improve the creep resistance. Present investigation on the effect of segregation of primary alloying elements...... on the creep response may provide some useful information about how to improve the creep resistance of magnesium alloys in the future. (c) 2008 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  19. Response of removable epoxy foam exposed to fire using an element death model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Michael L.

    2004-09-01

    Response of removable epoxy foam (REF) to high heat fluxes is described using a decomposition chemistry model [1] in conjunction with a finite element heat conduction code [2] that supports chemical kinetics and dynamic radiation enclosures. The chemistry model [1] describes the temporal transformation of virgin foam into carbonaceous residue by considering breakdown of the foam polymer structure, desorption of gases not associated with the foam polymer, mass transport of decomposition products from the reaction site to the bulk gas, and phase equilibrium. The finite element foam response model considers the spatial behavior of the foam by using measured and predicted thermophysical properties in combination with the decomposition chemistry model. Foam elements are removed from the computational domain when the condensed mass fractions of the foam elements are close to zero. Element removal, referred to as element death, creates a space within the metal confinement causing radiation to be the dominant mode of heat transfer between the surface of the remaining foam elements and the interior walls of the confining metal skin. Predictions were compared to front locations extrapolated from radiographs of foam cylinders enclosed in metal containers that were heated with quartz lamps [3,4]. The effects of the maximum temperature of the metal container, density of the foam, the foam orientation, venting of the decomposition products, pressurization of the metal container, and the presence or absence of embedded components are discussed.

  20. Finite element analysis of dynamic response and structure borne noise of gearbox

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wen; LIN Teng-jiao; LI Run-fang; DU Xue-song

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic finite element method combined with finite element mixed formula for contact problem is used to analyze the dynamic characteristics of gear system. Considering the stiffness excitation, error excitation and meshing shock excitation, the dynamic finite element model is established for the entire gear system which includes gears, shafts, bearings and gearbox housing. By the software of I-DEAS, the natural frequency, normal mode, dynamic time-domain response, frequency-domain response and one-third octave velocity grade structure borne noise of gear system are studied by the method of theoretical modal analysis and dynamic response analysis. The maximum values of vibration and structure borne noise are occurred at the mesh frequency of output grade gearing.

  1. Timing is critical for effective glucocorticoid receptor mediated repression of the cAMP-induced CRH gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siem van der Laan

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid negative feedback of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is mediated in part by direct repression of gene transcription in glucocorticoid receptor (GR expressing cells. We have investigated the cross talk between the two main signaling pathways involved in activation and repression of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH mRNA expression: cyclic AMP (cAMP and GR. We report that in the At-T20 cell-line the glucocorticoid-mediated repression of the cAMP-induced human CRH proximal promoter activity depends on the relative timing of activation of both signaling pathways. Activation of the GR prior to or in conjunction with cAMP signaling results in an effective repression of the cAMP-induced transcription of the CRH gene. In contrast, activation of the GR 10 minutes after onset of cAMP treatment, results in a significant loss of GR-mediated repression. In addition, translocation of ligand-activated GR to the nucleus was found as early as 10 minutes after glucocorticoid treatment. Interestingly, while both signaling cascades counteract each other on the CRH proximal promoter, they synergize on a synthetic promoter containing 'positive' response elements. Since the order of activation of both signaling pathways may vary considerably in vivo, we conclude that a critical time-window exists for effective repression of the CRH gene by glucocorticoids.

  2. Directed evolution of the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein at the cAMP pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekara, Sanjiva M; Hicks, Matt N; Park, Jin; Brooks, Cory L; Serate, Jose; Saunders, Cameron V; Grover, Simranjeet K; Goto, Joy J; Lee, Jin-Won; Youn, Hwan

    2015-10-30

    The Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) requires cAMP binding to undergo a conformational change for DNA binding and transcriptional regulation. Two CRP residues, Thr(127) and Ser(128), are known to play important roles in cAMP binding through hydrogen bonding and in the cAMP-induced conformational change, but the connection between the two is not completely clear. Here, we simultaneously randomized the codons for these two residues and selected CRP mutants displaying high CRP activity in a cAMP-producing E. coli. Many different CRP mutants satisfied the screening condition for high CRP activity, including those that cannot form any hydrogen bonds with the incoming cAMP at the two positions. In vitro DNA-binding analysis confirmed that these selected CRP mutants indeed display high CRP activity in response to cAMP. These results indicate that the hydrogen bonding ability of the Thr(127) and Ser(128) residues is not critical for the cAMP-induced CRP activation. However, the hydrogen bonding ability of Thr(127) and Ser(128) was found to be important in attaining high cAMP affinity. Computational analysis revealed that most natural cAMP-sensing CRP homologs have Thr/Ser, Thr/Thr, or Thr/Asn at positions 127 and 128. All of these pairs are excellent hydrogen bonding partners and they do not elevate CRP activity in the absence of cAMP. Taken together, our analyses suggest that CRP evolved to have hydrogen bonding residues at the cAMP pocket residues 127 and 128 for performing dual functions: preserving high cAMP affinity and keeping CRP inactive in the absence of cAMP.

  3. AMP language reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a program for symbolic calculations named AMP (Algebraic Manipulation Program) is described. Its main features are: high speed heart for usual algebraic calculations; conversational capability; derivation, substitutions, matricial calculus, expansions, non commutative algebrae...; possibility to define new symbols and associated rules; possibility to create and use external libraries; written for IBM/370 like computers

  4. Characterization of a retinoic acid responsive element isolated by whole genome PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-Giomi, M P; Gaub, M P; Chambon, P; Abarzúa, P

    1992-01-01

    We have used whole PCR in an attempt to isolate novel retinoic acid (RA) responsive genes. We cloned several small genomic fragments from total human DNA containing putative retinoic acid responsive elements (RAREs) selected by direct binding to the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha). We report here that an oligonucleotide containing a sequence from one of the cloned human DNA fragments, and referred to as alpha 1, functions as an authentic RARE. It is shown that both RAR alpha and RAR ...

  5. Application of ADINA fluid element for transient response analysis of fluid-structure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressure propagation and Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) in 3D space were simulated by general purpose finite element program ADINA using the displacement-based fluid element which presumes inviscid and compressible fluid with no net flow. Numerical transient solution was compared with the measured data of an FSI experiment and was found to fairly agree with the measured. In the next step, post analysis was conducted for a blowdown experiment performed with a 1/7 scaled reactor pressure vessel and a flexible core barrel and the code performance was found to be satisfactory. It is concluded that the transient response of the core internal structure of a PWR during the initial stage of LOCA can be analyzed by the displacement-based finite fluid element and the structural element. (orig.)

  6. Simulation of Electromagnetic Wave Logging Response in Deviated Wells Based on Vector Finite Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Wei-Guo; CHU Zhao-Tan; ZHAO Xiao-Qing; FAN Yu-Xiu; SONG Ruo-Long; HAN Wei

    2009-01-01

    The vector finite element method of tetrahedral elements is used to model 3D electromagnetic wave logging response. The tangential component of the vector field at the mesh edges is used as a degree of freedom to overcome the shortcomings of node-based finite element methods. The algorithm can simulate inhomogeneous media with arbitrary distribution of conductivity and magnetic permeability. The electromagnetic response of well logging tools are studied in dipping bed layers with the borehole and invasion included. In order to simulate realistic logging tools, we take the transmitter antennas consisting of circular wire loops instead of magnetic dipoles. We also investigate the apparent resistivity of inhomogeneous formation for different dip angles.

  7. Pounding Effects on the Earthquake Response of Adjacent Reinforced Concrete Structures Strengthened by Cable Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liolios Angelos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A numerical approach for estimating the effects of pounding (seismic interaction on the response of adjacent Civil Engineering structures is presented. Emphasis is given to reinforced concrete (RC frames of existing buildings which are seismically strengthened by cable-elements. A double discretization, in space by the Finite Element Method and in time by a direct incremental approach is used. The unilateral behaviours of both, the cable-elements and the interfaces contact-constraints, are taken strictly into account and result to inequality constitutive conditions. So, in each time-step, a non-convex linear complementarity problem is solved. It is found that pounding and cable strengthening have significant effects on the earthquake response and, hence, on the seismic upgrading of existing adjacent RC structures.

  8. Responses of trace elements to aerobic maximal exercise in elite sportsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otag, Aynur; Hazar, Muhsin; Otag, Ilhan; Gürkan, Alper Cenk; Okan, Ilyas

    2014-05-01

    Trace elements are chemical elements needed in minute quantities for the proper growth, development, and physiology of the organism. In biochemistry, a trace element is also referred to as a micronutrient. Trace elements, such as nickel, cadmium, aluminum, silver, chromium, molybdenum, germanium, tin, titanium, tungsten, scandium, are found naturally in the environment and human exposure derives from a variety of sources, including air, drinking water and food. The Purpose of this study was investigated the effect of aerobic maximal intensity endurance exercise on serum trace elements as well-trained individuals of 28 wrestlers (age (year) 19.64±1.13, weight (Kg) 70.07 ± 15.69, height (cm) 176.97 ± 6.69) during and after a 2000 meter Ergometer test protocol was used to perform aerobic (75 %) maximal endurance exercise. Trace element serum levels were analyzed from blood samples taken before, immediately after and one hour after the exercise. While an increase was detected in Chromium (Cr), Nickel (Ni), Molybdenum (Mo) and Titanium (Ti) serum levels immediately after the exercise, a decrease was detected in Aluminum (Al), Scandium (Sc) and Tungsten (W) serum levels. Except for aluminum, the trace elements we worked on showed statistically meaningful responses (P sportsman performance but also in terms of future healthy life plans and clinically. PMID:24762350

  9. Development of Finite Element Response Model for Mechanistic - Empirical Design of Flexible Pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujtaba A. AHMED

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this work is to present a finite element method (FEM-based program of the M-E design on MATLAB protocol. The response output generated at critical locations are presented. The results were then compared with those from a locally available program called ‘NEMPADS’ and a reasonable comparison were achieved.

  10. A three element etched track neutron dosemeter with good angular and energy response characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A weakness of all single element etched track neutron dosemeters is that the sensitivity falls off too rapidly with increasing angle of incidence. This can lead to significant errors in practical situations. A possible solution is to incorporate in a single dosemeter one or more planar etched track detectors set at an angle to the body surface so that the sensitivity to obliquely incident neutrons is enhanced. The response of a dosemeter in which three planar elements are set in a pyramid structure is investigated. Relationships are developed which allow the response to be estimated for any given direction of incidence and any given angle between face and base of the pyramid. The results indicate that the response is close to that required to measure Hp(10) for any given direction of neutron incidence if the angle between face and base is between 30o and 40o. (author)

  11. Dynamic Stationary Response of Reinforced Plates by the Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Facundo Sanches

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A direct version of the boundary element method (BEM is developed to model the stationary dynamic response of reinforced plate structures, such as reinforced panels in buildings, automobiles, and airplanes. The dynamic stationary fundamental solutions of thin plates and plane stress state are used to transform the governing partial differential equations into boundary integral equations (BIEs. Two sets of uncoupled BIEs are formulated, respectively, for the in-plane state (membrane and for the out-of-plane state (bending. These uncoupled systems are joined to form a macro-element, in which membrane and bending effects are present. The association of these macro-elements is able to simulate thin-walled structures, including reinforced plate structures. In the present formulation, the BIE is discretized by continuous and/or discontinuous linear elements. Four displacement integral equations are written for every boundary node. Modal data, that is, natural frequencies and the corresponding mode shapes of reinforced plates, are obtained from information contained in the frequency response functions (FRFs. A specific example is presented to illustrate the versatility of the proposed methodology. Different configurations of the reinforcements are used to simulate simply supported and clamped boundary conditions for the plate structures. The procedure is validated by comparison with results determined by the finite element method (FEM.

  12. Low-power laser irradiation suppresses inflammatory response of human adipose-derived stem cells by modulating intracellular cyclic AMP level and NF-κB activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyun-Yi Wu

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based tissue regeneration is a promising therapeutic strategy for treating damaged tissues. However, the inflammatory microenvironment that exists at a local injury site might restrict reconstruction. Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI has been widely applied to retard the inflammatory reaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of LPLI on human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs in an inflammatory environment. We showed that the hADSCs expressed Toll-like Receptors (TLR 1, TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and TLR6 and that lipopolysaccharide (LPS significantly induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2, Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, and Interleukin-8 (IL-8. LPLI markedly inhibited LPS-induced, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression at an optimal dose of 8 J/cm². The inhibitory effect triggered by LPLI might occur through an increase in the intracellular level of cyclic AMP (cAMP, which acts to down-regulate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB transcriptional activity. These data collectively provide insight for further investigations of the potential application of anti-inflammatory treatment followed by stem cell therapy.

  13. Preferential hydrophobic interactions are responsible for a preference of D-amino acids in the aminoacylation of 5'-AMP with hydrophobic amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C. Jr; Wickramasinghe, N. S.; Sabatini, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of aminoacyl AMP to model reactions at the 3' terminus of aminoacyl tRNA for the purpose of understanding the origin of protein synthesis. The present studies relate to the D, L preference in the esterification of 5'-AMP. All N-acetyl amino acids we studied showed faster reaction of the D-isomer, with a generally decreasing preference for D-isomer as the hydrophobicity of the amino acid decreased. The beta-branched amino acids, Ile and Val, showed an extreme preference for D-isomer. Ac-Leu, the gamma-branched amino acid, showed a slightly low D/L ratio relative to its hydrophobicity. The molecular basis for these preferences for D-isomer is understandable in the light of our previous studies and seems to be due to preferential hydrophobic interaction of the D-isomer with adenine. The preference for hydrophobic D-amino acids can be decreased by addition of an organic solvent to the reaction medium. Conversely, peptidylation with Ac-PhePhe shows a preference for the LL isomer over the DD isomer.

  14. Endothelial responses of magnesium and other alloying elements in magnesium-based stent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable tailored magnesium (Mg) alloys are some of the most promising scaffolds for cardiovascular stents. During the course of degradation after implantation, all the alloying elements in the scaffold will be released to the surrounding vascular tissues. However, fundamental questions regarding the toxicity of alloying elements towards vascular cells, the maximum amount of each element that could be used in alloy design, or how each of the alloying elements affects vascular cellular activity and gene expression, are still not fully answered. This work systematically addressed these questions by revealing how application of different alloying elements commonly used in Mg stent materials influences several indices of human endothelial cell health, i.e., viability, proliferations, cytoskeletal reorganizations, migration, and the gene expression profile. The overall cell viability and proliferation showed a decreasing trend with increasing concentrations of the ions, and the half maximal effective concentrations (EC50) for each element were determined. When applied at a low concentration of around 10 mM, Mg had no adverse effects but improved cell proliferation and migration instead. Mg ions also altered endothelial gene expression significantly in a dose dependent manner. Most of the changed genes are related to angiogenesis and the cell adhesion signaling pathways. Findings from this work provide useful information on maximum safe doses of these ions for endothelial cells, endothelial responses towards these metal ions, and some guidance for future Mg stent design. PMID:25363018

  15. Creating Diversified Response Profiles from a Single Quenchometric Sensor Element by Using Phase-Resolved Luminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Tehan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i can become highly non-linear; (ii yield negative going responses; (iii can be biphasic; and (iv can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions.

  16. Creating Diversified Response Profiles from a Single Quenchometric Sensor Element by Using Phase-Resolved Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehan, Elizabeth C.; Bukowski, Rachel M.; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Titus, Albert H.; Cartwright, Alexander N.; Bright, Frank V.

    2015-01-01

    We report a new strategy for generating a continuum of response profiles from a single luminescence-based sensor element by using phase-resolved detection. This strategy yields reliable responses that depend in a predictable manner on changes in the luminescent reporter lifetime in the presence of the target analyte, the excitation modulation frequency, and the detector (lock-in amplifier) phase angle. In the traditional steady-state mode, the sensor that we evaluate exhibits a linear, positive going response to changes in the target analyte concentration. Under phase-resolved conditions the analyte-dependent response profiles: (i) can become highly non-linear; (ii) yield negative going responses; (iii) can be biphasic; and (iv) can exhibit super sensitivity (e.g., sensitivities up to 300 fold greater in comparison to steady-state conditions). PMID:25569752

  17. Transcriptional regulation of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase gene expression by cyclic AMP in C6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravel, M; Gao, E; Hervouet-Zeiber, C; Parsons, V; Braun, P E

    2000-11-01

    -2) binding site. It is interesting that mutagenesis of this region resulted in a significant reduction in transcriptional responses to cAMP, implying a possible role for the AP-2 factor in the expression of CNP1. In addition, we have shown that putative binding sites for activator protein-4 and nuclear factor-1 adjacent to the AP-2 site are required for efficient induction of CNP1 expression by cAMP. Taken together, our results show that the cAMP-dependent accumulation of CNP1 mRNA appears to depend on the synergistic interaction of several regulatory elements. PMID:11032883

  18. Finite element model updating of a RC building considering seismic response trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, F.; Omenzetter, P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a study on the seismic response trends evaluation and finite element model updating of a reinforced concrete building monitored for a period of more than two years. The three story reinforced concrete building is instrumented with five tri-axial accelerometers and a free-field tri-axial accelerometer. The time domain N4SID system identification technique was used to obtain the frequencies and damping ratios considering flexible base models taking into account the soil-structure-interaction using 50 earthquakes. Trends of variation of seismic response were developed by correlating the peak response acceleration at the roof level with identified frequencies and damping ratios. A general trend of decreasing frequencies was observed with increased level of shaking. To simulate the varying behavior of the building with response levels, a series of three dimensional finite element models were calibrated considering several points on the developed frequency-response amplitude trend lines as targets for updating. To incorporate real in-situ conditions, soil underneath the foundation and around the building was modeled using spring elements and nonstructural components (claddings and partitions) were also included. Sensitivity based model updating technique was applied taking into account concrete, soil and cladding stiffness as updating parameters. It was concluded from the investigation that knowledge of the variation of seismic response of buildings is necessary to better understand their behavior during earthquakes, and also that the participation of soil and non-structural components is significant towards the seismic response of the building and these should be considered in models to simulate the real behavior.

  19. An Extended Finite Element Method Formulation for Modeling the Response of Polycrystalline Materials to Dynamic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas E.

    2007-12-01

    The eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) is a finite-element based discretization technique developed originally to model dynamic crack propagation [1]. Since that time the method has been used for modeling physics ranging from static meso-scale material failure to dendrite growth. Here we adapt the recent advances of Vitali and Benson [2] and Song et al. [3] to model dynamic loading of a polycrystalline material. We use demonstration problems to examine the method's efficacy for modeling the dynamic response of polycrystalline materials at the meso-scale. Specifically, we use the X-FEM to model grain boundaries. This approach allows us to i) eliminate ad-hoc mixture rules for multi-material elements and ii) avoid explicitly meshing grain boundaries.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is produced by skeletal muscle cells in response to contraction and enhances fat oxidation via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, V B; Åström, Maj-Brit; Chan, M H S;

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is produced in skeletal muscle, but its functional significance is unknown. We aimed to determine the signalling processes and metabolic actions of BDNF. METHODS: We first examined whether exercise induced BDNF expression in humans. Next, C2......C12 skeletal muscle cells were electrically stimulated to mimic contraction. L6 myotubes and isolated rat extensor digitorum longus muscles were treated with BDNF and phosphorylation of the proteins AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (Thr(172)) and acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase beta (ACCbeta) (Ser......(79)) were analysed, as was fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Finally, we electroporated a Bdnf vector into the tibialis cranialis muscle of mice. RESULTS: BDNF mRNA and protein expression were increased in human skeletal muscle after exercise, but muscle-derived BDNF appeared not to be released...

  1. Effects of friction on the unconfined compressive response of articular cartilage: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, R L; Suh, J K; Mow, V C

    1990-05-01

    A finite element analysis is used to study a previously unresolved issue of the effects of platen-specimen friction on the response of the unconfined compression test; effects of platen permeability are also determined. The finite element formulation is based on the linear KLM biphasic model for articular cartilage and other hydrated soft tissues. A Galerkin weighted residual method is applied to both the solid phase and the fluid phase, and the continuity equation for the intrinsically incompressible binary mixture is introduced via a penalty method. The solid phase displacements and fluid phase velocities are interpolated for each element in terms of unknown nodal values, producing a system of first order differential equations which are solved using a standard numerical finite difference technique. An axisymmetric element of quadrilateral cross-section is developed and applied to the mechanical test problem of a cylindrical specimen of soft tissue in unconfined compression. These studies show that interfacial friction plays a major role in the unconfined compression response of articular cartilage specimens with small thickness to diameter ratios. PMID:2345443

  2. Mineral elements of subtropical tree seedlings in response to elevated carbon dioxide and nitrogen addition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjuan Huang

    Full Text Available Mineral elements in plants have been strongly affected by increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and nitrogen (N deposition due to human activities. However, such understanding is largely limited to N and phosphorus in grassland. Using open-top chambers, we examined the concentrations of potassium (K, calcium (Ca, magnesium (Mg, aluminum (Al, copper (Cu and manganese (Mn in the leaves and roots of the seedlings of five subtropical tree species in response to elevated CO2 (ca. 700 μmol CO2 mol(-1 and N addition (100 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1 from 2005 to 2009. These mineral elements in the roots responded more strongly to elevated CO2 and N addition than those in the leaves. Elevated CO2 did not consistently decrease the concentrations of plant mineral elements, with increases in K, Al, Cu and Mn in some tree species. N addition decreased K and had no influence on Cu in the five tree species. Given the shifts in plant mineral elements, Schima superba and Castanopsis hystrix were less responsive to elevated CO2 and N addition alone, respectively. Our results indicate that plant stoichiometry would be altered by increasing CO2 and N deposition, and K would likely become a limiting nutrient under increasing N deposition in subtropics.

  3. Verification of Advective Bar Elements Implemented in the Aria Thermal Response Code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Brantley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A verification effort was undertaken to evaluate the implementation of the new advective bar capability in the Aria thermal response code. Several approaches to the verification process were taken : a mesh refinement study to demonstrate solution convergence in the fluid and the solid, visually examining the mapping of the advective bar element nodes to the surrounding surfaces, and a comparison of solutions produced using the advective bars for simple geometries with solutions from commercial CFD software . The mesh refinement study has shown solution convergence for simple pipe flow in both temperature and velocity . Guidelines were provided to achieve appropriate meshes between the advective bar elements and the surrounding volume. Simulations of pipe flow using advective bars elements in Aria have been compared to simulations using the commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent (r) and provided comparable solutions in temperature and velocity supporting proper implementation of the new capability. Verification of Advective Bar Elements iv Acknowledgements A special thanks goes to Dean Dobranich for his guidance and expertise through all stages of this effort . His advice and feedback was instrumental to its completion. Thanks also goes to Sam Subia and Tolu Okusanya for helping to plan many of the verification activities performed in this document. Thank you to Sam, Justin Lamb and Victor Brunini for their assistance in resolving issues encountered with running the advective bar element model. Finally, thanks goes to Dean, Sam, and Adam Hetzler for reviewing the document and providing very valuable comments.

  4. An extended finite element formulation for modeling the response of polycrystalline materials to shock loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Joshua; Voth, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    The eXtended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) is a finite element based discretization technique developed originally to model dynamic crack propagation [1]. Since that time the method has been used for modeling physics ranging from static mesoscale material failure to dendrite growth. Here we adapt the recent advances of Benson et al. [2] and Belytchko et al. [3] to model shock loading of polycrystalline material. Through several demonstration problems we evaluate the method for modeling the shock response of polycrystalline materials at the mesoscale. Specifically, we use the X-FEM to model grain boundaries. This approach allows us to i) eliminate ad-hoc mixture rules for multi-material elements and ii) avoid explicitly meshing grain boundaries. ([1] N. Moes, J. Dolbow, J and T. Belytschko, 1999,``A finite element method for crack growth without remeshing,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 46, 131-150. [2] E. Vitali, and D. J. Benson, 2006, ``An extended finite element formulation for contact in multi-material arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian calculations,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 67, 1420-1444. [3] J-H Song, P. M. A. Areias and T. Belytschko, 2006, ``A method for dynamic crack and shear band propagation with phantom nodes,'' International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering, 67, 868-893.)

  5. cAMP receptor protein (CRP) downregulates Klebsiella pneumoniae nif promoters in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In enteric bacteria, in response to the PTS system, the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) mediates the glucose effect, via regulating s70-dependent catabolic genes at transcriptional level. In this study, it is observed that the nitrogen fixation capacity of Klebsiella pneumoniae varies strongly when cells are grown on different carbohydrates, and this carbon effect occurs at the level of nif gene expression. Here we show that CRP can repress s54-dependent nif promoters (nifB, nifE, nifF, nifH, nifJ, nifLA and nifU), in a cAMP dependent fashion, in closed related E. coli background. Sequence analysis of these nif promoters indicates that there is no direct correlation between the fold of CRP-cAMP-mediated inhibition and the upstream cis elements at the promoters. In addition, the crp gene of K. pneumoniae has been isolated and sequenced, which is structural and functional highly homologous to that of E. coli. This suggests that CRP-cAMP-mediated inhibition on the nif promoters could be the reason for carbon effect on nitrogen fixation and thus has its physiological significance. A novel regulatory linkage between carbon metabolism and nitrogen fixation is proposed.

  6. Finite element response sensitivity and reliability analysis of Soil-Foundation-Structure-Interaction (SFSI) systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Quan

    2008-01-01

    Performance-based earthquake engineering (PBEE) has emerged as a powerful method of analysis and design philosophy in earthquake engineering and is leading the way to a new generation of seismic design guidelines. PBEE requires a comprehensive understanding of the earthquake response of Soil-Foundation-Structure-Interaction (SFSI) systems when damage occurs in the structural system during the earthquake. In the context of PBEE, this research combines finite element (FE) modeling and seismic r...

  7. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the...

  8. What type of controlling investors impact on which elements of corporate social responsibility?

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, William; Rodionova, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    Using a large sample of 3541 companies drawn from 30 countries over a period from 2002 to 2010, we analysed the impact of strategic shareholdings on different elements of corporate social responsibility (CSR). We find that total strategic or closely held equity holdings adversely affect the environmental, social and governance scores provided by ASSET4. However, this effect is largely driven by entrenched and undiversified holdings such as family and corporate cross-holdings, whereas diversif...

  9. Finite element simulation for mechanical response of surface mounted solder joints under different temperature cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马鑫; 钱乙余

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear finite element simulation for mechanical response of surface mounted solder joint under different temperature cycling was carried out. Seven sets of parameters were used in order to evaluate the influence of temperature cycling profile parameters. The results show that temperature cycling history has significant effect on the stress response of the solder joint. Based on the concept of relative damage stress proposed by the authors, it is found that enough high temperature holding time is necessary for designing the temperature cycling profile in accelerated thermal fatigue test.

  10. Isolation of transcription factors binding auxin response elements using a yeast one-hybrid system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI; Mei(齐眉); HUANG; Meijuan(黄美娟); CHEN; Fan(陈凡)

    2002-01-01

    Plant hormones play an important role during higher plant embryogenesis. Auxin is central to the development of vascular tissues, formation of lateral and adventitious roots, control of apical dominance, and tropic responses. Auxin response element (AuxRE), present in the promoters of many auxin-induced genes, can confer auxin responsiveness. Using carrot somatic embryo under specific developmental phase, a cDNA expression library was constructed. Several plasmids were recombined containing the tetramer of AuxRE as a bait. After screening by a yeast one-hy- brid system, one positive clone was confirmed and characterized. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that AxRF1 protein expressed in yeast cell could bind AuxRE in vitro. It suggests that AxRF1 participates in regulation of the expression of auxin responsive gene during carrot somatic embryogenesis.

  11. Three-dimensional dynamic response modelling for floating nuclear power plants using finite element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modelling technique which can be used to obtain the dynamic response of a floating nuclear plant (FNP) moored in an artificial basin is presented. Hydrodynamic effects of the seawater in the basin have a significant impact on the response of the FNP and must be included. A three dimensional model of the platform and mooring system (using beam elements) is used, with the hydrodynamic effects represented by added mass and damping. For an essentially square plant in close proximity to the site structures, the three dimensional nature of the basin must be considered in evaluating the added mass and damping. A method for estimating these effects from planer finite element analyses is developed. The accuracy of the planar finite element model in obtaining two-dimensional added mass and damping is shown through comparison with existing the documented results. In addition, a comparison is shown for open ocean added mass and damping with a three-dimensional solution using velocity potential functions. It is concluded that the overall technique results in a reasonable and conservative calculation of the dynamic response of the floating nuclear plant. (orig./HP)

  12. Cyclic nucleotide Response Element Binding protein (CREB) activation promotes survival signal in human K562 erythroleukemia cells exposed to ionising radiation/etoposide combined treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anticancer therapy addresses the destruction of tumour cells which try to counteract the effect of drugs and/or ionising radiation. Thus the knowledge of the threshold over which the cells do not resist such agents could help in the setting up of therapy protocols. Since a key role was assigned to Cyclic nucleotide Response Element Binding protein (CREB) multigenic family (which is composed of several nuclear transcription factors involved in c-AMP signalling in cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, survival and adaptive response and in hematopoiesis and acute leukemias), attention was paid to the activation of Erk cascade and of the downstream kinases and transcription factors such as p90 RSK and CREB. K562 erythroleukemia cell survival to 1.5 Gy ionising radiation with or without etoposide treatment seemed to involve Erk phosphorylation which, regulating p90 RSK, should activate CREB. In parallel, p38 MAP kinase activity down-modulation, along with low caspase-3 activity, and no modification of Bax and Bcl2 levels, supported such evidence. Thus, endogenous CREB activation, triggering a potent survival signal in K562 cells exposed to 1.5 Gy with or without etoposide, led us to suggest that using specific inhibitors against CREB, such as modified phosphorothionate oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) corresponding to CREB-1 sequence, anticancer therapy efficacy could be improved. (author)

  13. Development of a Rapidly Deployed Department of Energy Emergency Response Element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to maintain a viable, timely, and fully documented response option capable of supporting the responsible Lead Federal Agency in the event of a radiological emergency impacting any state or US territory (e.g., CONUS). In addition, the DOE maintains a response option to support radiological emergencies outside the continental US (OCONUS). While the OCUNUS mission is not governed by the FREP, this response is operationally similar to that assigned to the DOE by the FREP. The DOE is prepared to alert, activate, and deploy radiological response teams to augment the Radiological Assistance Program and/or local responders. The Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (RMAC) is a phased response that integrates with the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in CONUS environments and represents a stand-alone DOE response for OCONUS environments. The FRMAC/RMAC Phase I was formally ''stood up'' as an operational element in April 1999. The FRMAC/RMAC Phase II proposed ''stand-up'' date is midyear 2000

  14. Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique for identifying nonlinear structural elements from frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Zheng, G. T.

    2016-02-01

    A simple and general Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness Mapping technique is proposed for identifying the parameters or the mathematical model of a nonlinear structural element with steady-state primary harmonic frequency response functions (FRFs). The Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness is defined as the complex ratio between the internal force and the displacement response of unknown element. Obtained with the test data of responses' frequencies and amplitudes, the real and imaginary part of Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness are plotted as discrete points in a three dimensional space over the displacement amplitude and the frequency, which are called the real and the imaginary Equivalent Dynamic Stiffness map, respectively. These points will form a repeatable surface as the Equivalent Dynamic stiffness is only a function of the corresponding data as derived in the paper. The mathematical model of the unknown element can then be obtained by surface-fitting these points with special functions selected by priori knowledge of the nonlinear type or with ordinary polynomials if the type of nonlinearity is not pre-known. An important merit of this technique is its capability of dealing with strong nonlinearities owning complicated frequency response behaviors such as jumps and breaks in resonance curves. In addition, this technique could also greatly simplify the test procedure. Besides there is no need to pre-identify the underlying linear parameters, the method uses the measured data of excitation forces and responses without requiring a strict control of the excitation force during the test. The proposed technique is demonstrated and validated with four classical single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) numerical examples and one experimental example. An application of this technique for identification of nonlinearity from multiple-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) systems is also illustrated.

  15. Heterogeneity of Calcium Channel/cAMP-Dependent Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrinsky, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    The major function of the voltage-gated calcium channels is to provide the Ca(2+) flux into the cell. L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav1) serve as voltage sensors that couple membrane depolarization to many intracellular processes. Electrical activity in excitable cells affects gene expression through signaling pathways involved in the excitation-transcription (E-T) coupling. E-T coupling starts with activation of the Cav1 channel and results in initiation of the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcription. In this review we discuss the new quantitative approaches to measuring E-T signaling events. We describe the use of wavelet transform to detect heterogeneity of transcriptional activation in nuclei. Furthermore, we discuss the properties of discovered microdomains of nuclear signaling associated with the E-T coupling and the basis of the frequency-dependent transcriptional regulation.

  16. Validation of an interferon stimulatory response element reporter gene assay for quantifying type I interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoski, S R; Xie, M; Hall, E B; Mercadante, P M; Spencer, T E; Lonergan, P; Ealy, A D

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to develop a virus-free, cell-based interferon (IFN) bioassay and determine the utility of this assay on biological samples that contained IFN-τ, the trophoblast-secreted maternal recognition of pregnancy factor in ruminants. Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells were transduced with lentiviral particles that contained a firefly luciferase reporter construct driven by an IFN stimulatory response element (ISRE). Stably transduced cells were selected with the use of puromycin resistance. A linear, dose-responsive response was detected with human IFN-α and ovine IFN-τ. Interferon activity was detected in conditioned media from bovine trophoblast cells and uterine flushes collected from sheep and cattle. Activity also was detected in media collected after individual or small group culture of in vitro-produced bovine blastocysts at day 8 to 10 after fertilization. In summary, this IFN stimulatory response element-reporter assay may be used as an alternative to virus-dependent, cytopathic assays. It contains a similar sensitivity to IFNs and can be completed in a shorter time than cytopathic assays and does not require heightened biosafety conditions after cell transduction.

  17. Analysis of Resonance Response Performance of C-Band Antenna Using Parasitic Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Zaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the resonance response improvement of a planar C-band (4–8 GHz antenna is proposed using parasitic element method. This parasitic element based method is validated for change in the active and parasitic antenna elements. A novel dual-band antenna for C-band application covering 5.7 GHz and 7.6 GHz is designed and fabricated. The antenna is composed of circular parasitic element with unequal microstrip lines at both sides and a rectangular partial ground plane. A fractional bandwidth of 13.5% has been achieved from 5.5 GHz to 6.3 GHz (WLAN band for the lower band. The upper band covers from 7.1 GHz to 8 GHz with a fractional bandwidth of 12%. A gain of 6.4 dBi is achieved at the lower frequency and 4 dBi is achieved at the upper frequency. The VSWR of the antenna is less than 2 at the resonance frequency.

  18. Two-Dimensional Finite Element Ablative Thermal Response Analysis of an Arcjet Stagnation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Laub, Bernard; Braun, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The finite element ablation and thermal response (FEAtR, hence forth called FEAR) design and analysis program simulates the one, two, or three-dimensional ablation, internal heat conduction, thermal decomposition, and pyrolysis gas flow of thermal protection system materials. As part of a code validation study, two-dimensional axisymmetric results from FEAR are compared to thermal response data obtained from an arc-jet stagnation test in this paper. The results from FEAR are also compared to the two-dimensional axisymmetric computations from the two-dimensional implicit thermal response and ablation program under the same arcjet conditions. The ablating material being used in this arcjet test is phenolic impregnated carbon ablator with an LI-2200 insulator as backup material. The test is performed at the NASA, Ames Research Center Interaction Heating Facility. Spatially distributed computational fluid dynamics solutions for the flow field around the test article are used for the surface boundary conditions.

  19. Inactivation of oncogenic cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4D by miR-139-5p in response to p53 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bo; Wang, Kebing; Liao, Jun-Ming; Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Peng; Zeng, Shelya X; He, Meifang; Chen, Lianzhou; He, Yulong; Li, Wen; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlights the important roles of microRNAs in mediating p53’s tumor suppression functions. Here, we report miR-139-5p as another new p53 microRNA target. p53 induced the transcription of miR-139-5p, which in turn suppressed the protein levels of phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D), an oncogenic protein involved in multiple tumor promoting processes. Knockdown of p53 reversed these effects. Also, overexpression of miR-139-5p decreased PDE4D levels and increased cellular cAMP levels, leading to BIM-mediated cell growth arrest. Furthermore, our analysis of human colorectal tumor specimens revealed significant inverse correlation between the expression of miR-139-5p and that of PDE4D. Finally, overexpression of miR-139-5p suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors, accompanied by decrease in PDE4D and increase in BIM. These results demonstrate that p53 inactivates oncogenic PDE4D by inducing the expression of miR-139-5p. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15978.001 PMID:27383270

  20. Inactivation of oncogenic cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4D by miR-139-5p in response to p53 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bo; Wang, Kebing; Liao, Jun-Ming; Zhou, Xiang; Liao, Peng; Zeng, Shelya X; He, Meifang; Chen, Lianzhou; He, Yulong; Li, Wen; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence highlights the important roles of microRNAs in mediating p53's tumor suppression functions. Here, we report miR-139-5p as another new p53 microRNA target. p53 induced the transcription of miR-139-5p, which in turn suppressed the protein levels of phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D), an oncogenic protein involved in multiple tumor promoting processes. Knockdown of p53 reversed these effects. Also, overexpression of miR-139-5p decreased PDE4D levels and increased cellular cAMP levels, leading to BIM-mediated cell growth arrest. Furthermore, our analysis of human colorectal tumor specimens revealed significant inverse correlation between the expression of miR-139-5p and that of PDE4D. Finally, overexpression of miR-139-5p suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors, accompanied by decrease in PDE4D and increase in BIM. These results demonstrate that p53 inactivates oncogenic PDE4D by inducing the expression of miR-139-5p. PMID:27383270

  1. Surface Expression of GABAA Receptors Is Transcriptionally Controlled by the Interplay of cAMP-response Element-binding Protein and Its Binding Partner Inducible cAMP Early Repressor*

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Yinghui; Lund, Ingrid V.; Gravielle, Maria C.; Farb, David H.; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Russek, Shelley J.

    2008-01-01

    The regulated expression of type A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABAAR) subunit genes plays a critical role in neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis. It is also associated with a variety of neurological diseases. Changes in GABAA receptor α1 subunit gene (GABRA1) expression have been reported in animal models of epilepsy, alcohol abuse, withdrawal, and stress. Understanding the genetic mechanism behind such changes in α subunit expression will lead to a be...

  2. AN ENHANCED ELEMENT-FREE GALERKIN METHOD FOR DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF POROELASTIC SEABED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Lei-na; YU Xi-ping

    2009-01-01

    This study presents an effective numerical model for the dynamic response of poroelastic seabed under wave action with enhanced performance. The spatial discretization is based on the Element-Free Galerkin (EFG) method and the time integration based on the GN11 scheme. A stability strategy that adopts a smaller number of nodes for the pore water pressure compared with those for the displacements of the soil skeleton is suggested to resolve the similar difficulty as encountered in the finite element method for a problem with mixed formulation when the pore water is incompressible and the soil skeleton impervious. The accuracy of the numerical model is verified through applying it to a typical case with critical permeability. Good agreement between computational and analytical solutions is obtained.

  3. Identification of peroxisome-proliferator responsive element in the mouse HSL gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Hiroaki; Kobayashi, Yumie; Kanaya, Tomoka; Horino, Yoko

    2007-01-12

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis in adipose tissue. Several studies suggest that protein phosphorylation regulates the HSL enzymatic activity. On the other hand, the precise mechanism of the transcriptional regulation of the HSL gene remains to be elucidated. Here, we identified a functional peroxisome-proliferator responsive element (PPRE) in the mouse HSL promoter by reporter assay in CV-1 cells using serial deletion and point mutants of the 5'-flanking region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed that both peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPARgamma) and retinoid X receptor (RXRalpha) interacted with the region. Binding of the PPARgamma/RXRalpha heterodimer to the PPRE sequence was also confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These results indicate that the HSL gene is transcriptionally regulated by PPARgamma/RXRalpha heterodimer, and suggest that a cis-acting element regulates the HSL gene expression.

  4. Identification of two novel functional p53 responsive elements in the Herpes Simplex Virus-1 genome

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Kuta, Ryan; Armour, Courtney R.; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) genome reveals two candidate p53 responsive elements (p53RE), located in proximity to the replication origins oriL and oriS, referred to as p53RE-L and p53RE-S, respectively. The sequences of p53RE-L and p53RE-S conform to the p53 consensus site and are present in HSV-1 strains KOS, 17, and F. p53 binds to both elements in vitro and in virus-infected cells. Both p53RE-L and p53RE-S are capable of conferring p53-dependent transcriptional activatio...

  5. Finite element simulation of rate-dependent magneto-active polymer response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, K.; Kiefer, B.; Menzel, A.

    2016-10-01

    This contribution is concerned with the embedding of constitutive relations for magneto-active polymers (MAP) into finite element simulations. To this end, a recently suggested, calibrated, and validated material model for magneto-mechanically coupled and rate-dependent MAP response is briefly summarized in its continuous and algorithmic settings. Moreover, the strongly coupled field equations of finite deformation magneto-mechanics are reviewed. For the purpose of numerical simulation, a finite element model is then established based on the usual steps of weak form representation, discretization and consistent linearization. Two verifying inhomogeneous numerical examples are presented in which a classical ‘plate with a hole’ geometry is equipped with MAP properties and subjected to different types of time-varying mechanical and magnetic loading.

  6. Altered response hierarchy and increased T-cell breadth upon HIV-1 conserved element DNA vaccination in macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Kulkarni

    Full Text Available HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24(gag elements (CE induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55(gag increased both magnitude of CE responses and breadth of Gag immunity, demonstrating alteration of the hierarchy of epitope recognition in the presence of pre-existing CE-specific responses. Inclusion of a conserved element immunogen provides a novel and effective strategy to broaden responses against highly diverse pathogens by avoiding decoy epitopes, while focusing responses to critical viral elements for which few escape pathways exist.

  7. Differential interactions of promoter elements in stress responses of the Arabidopsis Adh gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolferus, R; Jacobs, M; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    1994-01-01

    The Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase, EC 1.1.1.1.) gene from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. can be induced by dehydration and cold, as well as by hypoxia. A 1-kb promoter fragment (CADH: -964 to +53) is sufficient to confer the stress induction and tissue-specific developmental expression characteristics of the Adh gene to a beta-glucuronidase reporter gene. Deletion mapping of the 5' end and site-specific mutagenesis identified four regions of the promoter essential for expression under the three stress conditions. Some sequence elements are important for response to all three stress treatments, whereas others are stress specific. The most critical region essential for expression of the Arabidopsis Adh promoter under all three environmental stresses (region IV: -172 to -141) contains sequences homologous to the GT motif (-160 to -152) and the GC motif (-147 to -144) of the maize Adh1 anaerobic responsive element. Region III (-235 to -172) contains two regions shown by R.J. Ferl and B.H. Laughner ([1989] Plant Mol Biol 12: 357-366) to bind regulatory proteins; mutation of the G-box-1 region (5'-CCACGTGG-3', -216 to -209) does not affect expression under uninduced or hypoxic conditions, but significantly reduces induction by cold stress and, to a lesser extent, by dehydration stress. Mutation of the other G-box-like sequence (G-box-2: 5'-CCAAGTGG-3', -193 to -182) does not change hypoxic response and affects cold and dehydration stress only slightly. G-box-2 mutations also promote high levels of expression under uninduced conditions. Deletion of region I (-964 to -510) results in increased expression under uninduced and all stress conditions, suggesting that this region contains a repressor binding site. Region II (-510 to -384) contains a positive regulatory element and is necessary for high expression levels under all treatments. PMID:7972489

  8. Effect of allergen-specific immunotherapy with purified Alt a1 on AMP responsiveness, exhaled nitric oxide and exhaled breath condensate pH: a randomized double blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prieto Luis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little information is available on the effect of allergen-specific immunotherapy on airway responsiveness and markers in exhaled air. The aims of this study were to assess the safety of immunotherapy with purified natural Alt a1 and its effect on airway responsiveness to direct and indirect bronchoconstrictor agents and markers in exhaled air. Methods This was a randomized double-blind trial. Subjects with allergic rhinitis with or without mild/moderate asthma sensitized to A alternata and who also had a positive skin prick test to Alt a1 were randomized to treatment with placebo (n = 18 or purified natural Alt a1 (n = 22 subcutaneously for 12 months. Bronchial responsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP and methacholine, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO, exhaled breath condensate (EBC pH, and serum Alt a1-specific IgG4 antibodies were measured at baseline and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Local and systemic adverse events were also registered. Results The mean (95% CI allergen-specific IgG4 value for the active treatment group increased from 0.07 μg/mL (0.03-0.11 at baseline to 1.21 μg/mL (0.69-1.73, P 4 value increased nonsignificantly from 0.09 μg/mL (0.06-0.12 at baseline to 0.13 μg/mL (0.07-0.18 at 6 months and to 0.11 μg/mL (0.07-0.15 at 12 months of treatment. Changes in the active treatment group were significantly higher than in the placebo group both at 6 months (P Conclusion Although allergen-specific immunotherapy with purified natural Alt a1 is well tolerated and induces an allergen-specific IgG4 response, treatment is not associated with changes in AMP or methacholine responsiveness or with significant improvements in markers of inflammation in exhaled air. These findings suggest dissociation between the immunotherapy-induced increase in IgG4 levels and its effect on airway responsiveness and inflammation.

  9. Spatially dependent burnup implementation into the nodal program based on the finite element response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a spatial burnup scheme and feedback effects has been implemented into the FERM ( 'Finite Element Response Matrix' )program. The spatially dependent neutronic parameters have been considered in three levels: zonewise calculation, assembly wise calculation and pointwise calculation. Flux and power distributions and the multiplication factor were calculated and compared with the results obtained by CITATIOn program. These comparisons showed that processing time in the Ferm code has been hundred of times shorter and no significant difference has been observed in the assembly average power distribution. (Author)

  10. On the structure of AP-4 responsive element in the LTR of Jembrana disease virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies with deletion and sequence analysis of JDV LTR showed that there is a putative AP-4 responsive element in LTR. By antisense transient assay and gel shifting assay, we for the first time demonstrated that AP-4 modulated JDV gene expression by binding DNA directly to bovine cells. The results, derived from site-directed mutagenesis experiments, suggest that the six base pairs of AP-4 binding site (CAGCTG) have different effects on JDV gene expression. When the first two base pairs changed to GC, JDV gene expression is severely decreased.

  11. Finite element model validation of bridge based on structural health monitoring—Part I: Response surface-based finite element model updating

    OpenAIRE

    Zhouhong Zong; Xiaosong Lin; Jie Niu

    2015-01-01

    In the engineering practice, merging statistical analysis into structural evaluation and assessment is a tendency in the future. As a combination of mathematical and statistical techniques, response surface (RS) methodology has been successfully applied to design optimization, response prediction and model validation. With the aid of RS methodology, these two serial papers present a finite element (FE) model updating and validation method for bridge structures based on structural health monit...

  12. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  13. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuloaga, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), Víctor Lamas 1290, PO Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Valdés, J.A., E-mail: jvaldes@unab.cl [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), Víctor Lamas 1290, PO Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  14. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  15. Exchange factors directly activated by cAMP mediate melanocortin 4 receptor-induced gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glas, Evi; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Gs protein-coupled receptors regulate many vital body functions by activation of cAMP response elements (CRE) via cAMP-dependent kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of the CRE binding protein (CREB). Melanocortin 4 receptors (MC4R) are prototypical Gs-coupled receptors that orchestrate the hypothalamic control of food-intake and metabolism. Remarkably, the significance of PKA for MC4R-induced CRE-dependent transcription in hypothalamic cells has not been rigorously interrogated yet. In two hypothalamic cell lines, we observed that blocking PKA activity had only weak or no effects on reporter gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of exchange factors directly activated by cAMP-1/2 (EPAC-1/2) mitigated MC4R-induced CRE reporter activation and mRNA induction of the CREB-dependent genes c-fos and thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Furthermore, we provide first evidence that extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 (ERK-1/2) activated by EPACs and not PKA are the elusive CREB kinases responsible for MC4R-induced CREB/CRE activation in hypothalamic cells. Overall, these data emphasize the pivotal role of EPACs rather than PKA in hypothalamic gene expression elicited by a prototypical Gs-coupled receptor. PMID:27612207

  16. Taste signaling elements expressed in gut enteroendocrine cells regulate nutrient-responsive secretion of gut hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokrashvili, Zaza; Mosinger, Bedrich; Margolskee, Robert F

    2009-09-01

    Many of the receptors and downstream signaling elements involved in taste detection and transduction are also expressed in enteroendocrine cells where they underlie the chemosensory functions of the gut. In one well-known example of gastrointestinal chemosensation (the "incretin effect"), it is known that glucose that is given orally, but not systemically, induces secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (the incretin hormones), which in turn regulate appetite, insulin secretion, and gut motility. Duodenal L cells express sweet taste receptors, the taste G protein gustducin, and several other taste transduction elements. Knockout mice that lack gustducin or the sweet taste receptor subunit T1r3 have deficiencies in secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and in the regulation of plasma concentrations of insulin and glucose in response to orally ingested carbohydrate-ie, their incretin effect is dysfunctional. Isolated small intestine and intestinal villi from gustducin null mice displayed markedly defective glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion in response to glucose, indicating that this is a local circuit of sugar detection by intestinal cells followed by hormone secretion from these same cells. Modulating hormone secretion from gut "taste cells" may provide novel treatments for obesity, diabetes, and malabsorption syndromes. PMID:19571229

  17. Characterization of a retinoic acid responsive element isolated by whole genome PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Giomi, M P; Gaub, M P; Chambon, P; Abarzúa, P

    1992-01-01

    We have used whole PCR in an attempt to isolate novel retinoic acid (RA) responsive genes. We cloned several small genomic fragments from total human DNA containing putative retinoic acid responsive elements (RAREs) selected by direct binding to the retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha). We report here that an oligonucleotide containing a sequence from one of the cloned human DNA fragments, and referred to as alpha 1, functions as an authentic RARE. It is shown that both RAR alpha and RAR beta produced in Cos cells as well as in vitro translated RAR alpha bind directly and sequence-specifically to the alpha 1RARE. By mutational analysis it is demonstrated that the alpha 1RARE consists of an imperfect direct repeat of the estrogen- and thyroid hormone-related AGGTCA half-site motif separated by a 5 bp spacer. The orientation and spacing of the half-site repeats are shown to play a critical role in RAR recognition. When cloned upstream of a TK-Luc reporter, the alpha 1RARE is shown to confer responsiveness to RA in an orientation-independent fashion in F9 and CV-1 cells. The magnitude of the RA response mediated by the alpha 1RARE differed in these cell lines. Images PMID:1320257

  18. Sleutelmag en amp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Rossouw

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available As die Heidelbergse Kategismus (Sondag 31 handel oor die sleutels van die Koninkryk, dan word die betrokkenheid van die ampte slegs per implikasie veronderstel. Meer eksplisiet word die amp en sleutelmag in die Nederlandse Geloofsbelydenis gekoppel; “ons glo dat hierdie ware kerk ooreenkomstig die geestelike bestuurswyse wat ons Here ons in sy Woord geleer het, geregeer moet word... hulle (moet sorg dra dat die ware godsdiens onderhou (word, die ware leer orals versprei, die oortreders op geestelike wyse vermaan en in toom gehou (word... (N.G.B. art. 30 en: “Ons glo verder dat die regeerders van die kerk, al is dit nuttig en goed om onder mekaar ’n bepaalde orde tot instandhouding van die liggaam van die kerk in te stel en te handhaaf, tog noukeurig moet oppas om nie af te wyk van wat Christus, ons enigste Meester, vir ons ingestel het nie... Ons aanvaar derhalwe slegs wat kan dien om eendrag en eenheid te bewaar en te bevorder, en om alles in gehoorsaamheid van God te onderhou. Daarvoor is nodig die ban en alles wat daarmee saamhang, toegepas ooreenkomstig die Woord van God” (N.G.B. art. 32.

  19. A Multi-Element Approach to Location Inference of Twitter: A Case for Emergency Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Laylavi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, Twitter has played a major role in real-world events—especially in the aftermath of disasters and catastrophic incidents, and has been increasingly becoming the first point of contact for users wishing to provide or seek information about such situations. The use of Twitter in emergency response and disaster management opens up avenues of research concerning different aspects of Twitter data quality, usefulness and credibility. A real challenge that has attracted substantial attention in the Twitter research community exists in the location inference of twitter data. Considering that less than 2% of tweets are geotagged, finding location inference methods that can go beyond the geotagging capability is undoubtedly the priority research area. This is especially true in terms of emergency response, where spatial aspects of information play an important role. This paper introduces a multi-elemental location inference method that puts the geotagging aside and tries to predict the location of tweets by exploiting the other inherently attached data elements. In this regard, textual content, users’ profile location and place labelling, as the main location-related elements, are taken into account. Location-name classes in three granularity levels are defined and employed to look up the location references from the location-associated elements. The inferred location of the finest granular level is assigned to a tweet, based on a novel location assignment rule. The location assigned by the location inference process is considered to be the inferred location of a tweet, and is compared with the geotagged coordinates as the ground truth of the study. The results show that this method is able to successfully infer the location of 87% of the tweets at the average distance error of 12.2 km and the median distance error of 4.5 km, which is a significant improvement compared with that of the current methods that can predict the location

  20. A Space-Time Finite Element Model for Design and Control Optimization of Nonlinear Dynamic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P. Moita

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A design and control sensitivity analysis and multicriteria optimization formulation is derived for flexible mechanical systems. This formulation is implemented in an optimum design code and it is applied to the nonlinear dynamic response. By extending the spatial domain to the space-time domain and treating the design variables as control variables that do not change with time, the design space is included in the control space. Thus, one can unify in one single formulation the problems of optimum design and optimal control. Structural dimensions as well as lumped damping and stiffness parameters plus control driven forces, are considered as decision variables. The dynamic response and its sensitivity with respect to the design and control variables are discretized via space-time finite elements, and are integrated at-once, as it is traditionally used for static response. The adjoint system approach is used to determine the design sensitivities. Design optimization numerical examples are performed. Nonlinear programming and optimality criteria may be used for the optimization process. A normalized weighted bound formulation is used to handle multicriteria problems.

  1. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Documentation and Development: The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System for the...

  2. Expression profiles of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their regulation by Relish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Li, Fuhua; Li, Shihao; Wen, Rong; Xiang, Jianhai

    2012-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), as key immune effectors, play important roles in the innate immune system of invertebrates. Different types of AMPs, including Penaeidin, Crustin, ALF (antilipopolysaccharide factor) have been identified in different penaeid shrimp; however, systematic analyses on the function of different AMPs in shrimp responsive to different types of bacteria are very limited. In this study, we analyzed the expression profiles of AMPs in the Chinese shrimps, Fenneropenaeus chinensis, simultaneously by real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) when shrimp were challenged with Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram-positive, G+) or Vibrio anguillarium (Gram-negative, G-). Different AMPs showed different expression profiles when shrimp were injected with one type of bacterium, and one AMP also showed different expression profiles when shrimp were challenged with different bacteria. Furthermore, the expression of these AMPs showed temporal expression profiles, suggesting that different AMPs function coordinately in bacteria-infected shrimp. An RNA interference approach was used to study the function of the Relish transcription factor in regulating the transcription of different AMPs. The current study showed that Relish could regulate the transcription of different AMPs in shrimp. Differential expression profiles of AMPs in shrimp injected with different types of bacteria indicated that a complicated antimicrobial response network existed in shrimp. These data contribute to our understanding of immunity in shrimp and may provide a strategy for the control of disease in shrimp.

  3. Finite element analysis of structural response of superconducting magnet for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the proposal Tokamak fusion reactor, the superconducting unit consists of an assembly of D-shaped magnets standing vertically and arranged in a toroidal configuration. Each magnet is a composite structure comprised of Nb-22%Ti and Nb-48%Ti, and stabilizing metals such as copper and aluminum or stainless steel held together by reinforced epoxies which also serve as insulators and spacers. The magnets are quite large, typically 15-20 meters in diameter with rectangular cross sections around 0.93x2m. Under static loading condition, the magnet is subjected to dead weight and large magnetic field forces, which may induce high stresses in the structure. Furthermore, additional stresses due to earthquake must also be considered for the design of the component. Both static and dynamic analyses of a typical field magnet have been performed by use of the finite element method. The magnet was assumed to be linearly elastic with equivalent homogeneous material properties. Various finite element models have been considered in order to better represent the structure for a particular loading case. For earthquake analysis, the magnet was assumed to be subjected to 50% of the El Centro 1940 earthquake and the dynamic response was obtained by the displacement spectrum analysis procedure. In the paper, numerical results are presented and the structure behavior of the magnet under static and dynamic loading conditions is discussed

  4. Identification and Validation of a Putative Polycomb Responsive Element in the Human Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Bengani

    Full Text Available Epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms that involve polycomb and trithorax group of proteins are well conserved across metazoans. The cis-acting elements interacting with these proteins, however, are poorly understood in mammals. In a directed search we identified a potential polycomb responsive element with 25 repeats of YY1 binding motifthatwe designate PRE-PIK3C2B as it occurs in the first intron of human PIK3C2B gene. It down regulates reporter gene expression in HEK cells and the repression is dependent on polycomb group of proteins (PcG. We demonstrate that PRE-PIK3C2B interacts directly with YY1 in vitro and recruits PRC2 complex in vivo. The localization of PcG proteins including YY1 to PRE-PIK3C2B in HEK cells is decreased on knock-down of either YY1 or SUZ12. Endogenous PRE-PIK3C2B shows bivalent marking having H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 for repressed and active state respectively. In transgenic Drosophila, PRE-PIK3C2B down regulates mini-white expression, exhibits variegation and pairing sensitive silencing (PSS, which has not been previously demonstrated for mammalian PRE. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that PRE-PIK3C2B functions as a site of interaction for polycomb proteins.

  5. Formation of a Polycomb-Domain in the Absence of Strong Polycomb Response Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Sandip; Mitra, Apratim; Cheng, Yuzhong; Pfeifer, Karl; Kassis, Judith A

    2016-07-01

    Polycomb group response elements (PREs) in Drosophila are DNA-elements that recruit Polycomb proteins (PcG) to chromatin and regulate gene expression. PREs are easily recognizable in the Drosophila genome as strong peaks of PcG-protein binding over discrete DNA fragments; many small but statistically significant PcG peaks are also observed in PcG domains. Surprisingly, in vivo deletion of the four characterized strong PREs from the PcG regulated invected-engrailed (inv-en) gene complex did not disrupt the formation of the H3K27me3 domain and did not affect inv-en expression in embryos or larvae suggesting the presence of redundant PcG recruitment mechanism. Further, the 3D-structure of the inv-en domain was only minimally altered by the deletion of the strong PREs. A reporter construct containing a 7.5kb en fragment that contains three weak peaks but no large PcG peaks forms an H3K27me3 domain and is PcG-regulated. Our data suggests a model for the recruitment of PcG-complexes to Drosophila genes via interactions with multiple, weak PREs spread throughout an H3K27me3 domain. PMID:27466807

  6. Application of finite element, global polynomial, and kriging response surfaces in Progressive Lattice Sampling designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ROMERO,VICENTE J.; SWILER,LAURA PAINTON; GIUNTA,ANTHONY A.

    2000-04-25

    This paper examines the modeling accuracy of finite element interpolation, kriging, and polynomial regression used in conjunction with the Progressive Lattice Sampling (PLS) incremental design-of-experiments approach. PLS is a paradigm for sampling a deterministic hypercubic parameter space by placing and incrementally adding samples in a manner intended to maximally reduce lack of knowledge in the parameter space. When combined with suitable interpolation methods, PLS is a formulation for progressive construction of response surface approximations (RSA) in which the RSA are efficiently upgradable, and upon upgrading, offer convergence information essential in estimating error introduced by the use of RSA in the problem. The three interpolation methods tried here are examined for performance in replicating an analytic test function as measured by several different indicators. The process described here provides a framework for future studies using other interpolation schemes, test functions, and measures of approximation quality.

  7. A novel human polycomb binding site acts as a functional polycomb response element in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Cuddapah

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins are key chromatin regulators implicated in multiple processes including embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation, and germ cell differentiation. The PcG proteins recognize target genomic loci through cis DNA sequences known as Polycomb Response Elements (PREs, which are well characterized in Drosophila. However, mammalian PREs have been elusive until two groups reported putative mammalian PREs recently. Consistent with the existence of mammalian PREs, here we report the identification and characterization of a potential PRE from human T cells. The putative human PRE has enriched binding of PcG proteins, and such binding is dependent on a key PcG component SUZ12. We demonstrate that the putative human PRE carries both genetic and molecular features of Drosophila PRE in transgenic flies, implying that not only the trans PcG proteins but also certain features of the cis PREs are conserved between mammals and Drosophila.

  8. Thyroid hormone response element half-site organization and its effect on thyroid hormone mediated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A Paquette

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH exerts its effects by binding to the thyroid hormone receptor (TR, which binds to TH response elements (TREs to regulate target gene expression. We investigated the relative ability of liganded homodimers TR and retinoid X receptor (RXR, and the heterodimer TR/RXR, to regulate gene expression for the TRE half-site organizations: direct repeat 4 (DR4, inverted repeat 0 (IR0 and everted repeat 6 (ER6. Luciferase reporter assays using a DR4 TRE suggest that both the TR homodimer and TR/RXR heterodimer regulate luciferase expression in the presence of their respective ligands. However, in the presence of the IR0 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR and RXR alone increased luciferase activity and there was no effect of TR alone. The presence of 9-cis-retinoic acid was necessary for luciferase expression, whereas TH treatment alone was insufficient. For the ER6 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR, TR alone and RXR alone (in the presence of their respective ligands all caused a significant increase in luciferase activity. When both ligands were present, transfection with both TR/RXR caused more activation. Finally, we investigated the efficacy of the TR-antagonist 1-850 in inhibiting transcription by TR or TR/RXR at DR4 and ER6 TREs. We found that 1-850 did not suppress luciferase activation in the presence of TR/RXR for the ER6 TRE, suggesting conformational changes of the ligand binding domain of the TR when bound to different TRE half-site organizations. Collectively, the findings indicate that there are fundamental differences between TRE configurations that affect nuclear receptor interactions with the response element and ability to bind ligands and antagonists.

  9. Thyroid Hormone Response Element Half-Site Organization and Its Effect on Thyroid Hormone Mediated Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Martin A.; Atlas, Ella; Wade, Mike G.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) exerts its effects by binding to the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), which binds to TH response elements (TREs) to regulate target gene expression. We investigated the relative ability of liganded homodimers TR and retinoid X receptor (RXR), and the heterodimer TR/RXR, to regulate gene expression for the TRE half-site organizations: direct repeat 4 (DR4), inverted repeat 0 (IR0) and everted repeat 6 (ER6). Luciferase reporter assays using a DR4 TRE suggest that both the TR homodimer and TR/RXR heterodimer regulate luciferase expression in the presence of their respective ligands. However, in the presence of the IR0 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR and RXR alone increased luciferase activity and there was no effect of TR alone. The presence of 9-cis-retinoic acid was necessary for luciferase expression, whereas TH treatment alone was insufficient. For the ER6 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR, TR alone and RXR alone (in the presence of their respective ligands) all caused a significant increase in luciferase activity. When both ligands were present, transfection with both TR/RXR caused more activation. Finally, we investigated the efficacy of the TR-antagonist 1–850 in inhibiting transcription by TR or TR/RXR at DR4 and ER6 TREs. We found that 1–850 did not suppress luciferase activation in the presence of TR/RXR for the ER6 TRE, suggesting conformational changes of the ligand binding domain of the TR when bound to different TRE half-site organizations. Collectively, the findings indicate that there are fundamental differences between TRE configurations that affect nuclear receptor interactions with the response element and ability to bind ligands and antagonists. PMID:24971931

  10. Glutathione Reductase/Glutathione Is Responsible for Cytotoxic Elemental Sulfur Tolerance via Polysulfide Shuttle in Fungi*

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimatani, Kanami; Fujita, Kensaku; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Fungi that can reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide are widely distributed, but the mechanism and physiological significance of the reaction have been poorly characterized. Here, we purified elemental sulfur-reductase (SR) and cloned its gene from the elemental sulfur-reducing fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We found that NADPH-glutathione reductase (GR) reduces elemental sulfur via glutathione as an intermediate. A loss-of-function mutant of the SR/GR gene generated less sulfide from elemental sulf...

  11. The FPIN2 code - an application of the finite element method to the analysis of the transient response of oxide and metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FPIN2 code simulates the thermal-mechanical response of fast reactor fuel pins to transient events. Temperatures of the fuel pin and coolant are calculated using a simple pin-in-a-pipe geometry. The mechanical analysis uses an implicit finite element formulation with linear shape functions which allow for general material behavior in the fuel and cladding including cracking and melting. This formulation provides a very convenient structure for implementing different models and improvements in algorithms. The paper summarizes the FPIN2 methodology and presents results for the transient response of both oxide and metallic fuel pins under similar overpower transients. (author)

  12. Multiple Facets of cAMP Signalling and Physiological Impact: cAMP Compartmentalization in the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Schmidt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelling, processes encompassed by increased airway smooth muscle mass, epithelial changes, goblet cell and submucosal gland hyperplasia. In addition to inflammatory cells, airway smooth muscle cells and (myofibroblasts, epithelial cells underpin a variety of key responses in the airways such as inflammatory cytokine release, airway remodelling, mucus hypersecretion and airway barrier function. Cigarette smoke, being next to environmental pollution the main cause of COPD, is believed to cause epithelial hyperpermeability by disrupting the barrier function. Here we will focus on the most recent progress on compartmentalized signalling by cAMP. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, cAMP-specific phospho-diesterases (PDEs maintain compartmentalized cAMP signalling. Intriguingly, spatially discrete cAMP-sensing signalling complexes seem also to involve distinct members of the A-kinase anchoring (AKAP superfamily and IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAPs. In this review, we will highlight the interaction between cAMP and the epithelial barrier to retain proper lung function and to alleviate COPD symptoms and focus on the possible molecular mechanisms involved in this process. Future studies should include the development of cAMP-sensing multiprotein complex specific disruptors and/or stabilizers to orchestrate cellular functions. Compartmentalized cAMP signalling regulates important cellular processes in the lung and may serve as a therapeutic target.

  13. Production, characterization, and selection of the heating elements for the response stabilization of the CUORE bolometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the critical issues while operating bolometric detectors over periods of time of 1 year or more consists of keeping their response stable within a 0.1% level, despite the unavoidable temperature fluctuations of the cryogenic set-up. By using an energy pulser, which periodically delivers a fixed amount of energy in the absorber, it is possible to stabilize the response of the bolometers. A stabilization technique using heating devices, made up of heavily doped semiconductor material (well above the metal-to-insulator transition), has been developed in the framework of the CUORE experiment. In this paper we describe in detail the procedure for the realization of the heating elements, based on silicon planar technology. We then report on the multi-step low temperature characterization (77 K, 4.2 K, 1.5 K, 35 mK) of the heaters. Finally, an example of achieved stabilization for a CUORE-like detector is reported. The ∼1500 heaters tested at ∼1.5K show less than 0.5% change in resistance between 30μV and 3 mV, and less than 1% change in value between 50 mK and 800 mK. In particular, the resistance change between 4.2 K and 1.5 K is less than 0.1%.

  14. Involvement of the sieve element cytoskeleton in electrical responses to cold shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafke, Jens B; Ehlers, Katrin; Föller, Jens; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Becker, Stefanie; van Bel, Aart J E

    2013-06-01

    This study dealt with the visualization of the sieve element (SE) cytoskeleton and its involvement in electrical responses to local cold shocks, exemplifying the role of the cytoskeleton in Ca(2+)-triggered signal cascades in SEs. High-affinity fluorescent phalloidin as well as immunocytochemistry using anti-actin antibodies demonstrated a fully developed parietal actin meshwork in SEs. The involvement of the cytoskeleton in electrical responses and forisome conformation changes as indicators of Ca(2+) influx was investigated by the application of cold shocks in the presence of diverse actin disruptors (latrunculin A and cytochalasin D). Under control conditions, cold shocks elicited a graded initial voltage transient, ΔV1, reduced by external La(3+) in keeping with the involvement of Ca(2+) channels, and a second voltage transient, ΔV2. Cytochalasin D had no effect on ΔV1, while ΔV1 was significantly reduced with 500 nm latrunculin A. Forisome dispersion was triggered by cold shocks of 4°C or greater, which was indicative of an all-or-none behavior. Forisome dispersion was suppressed by incubation with latrunculin A. In conclusion, the cytoskeleton controls cold shock-induced Ca(2+) influx into SEs, leading to forisome dispersion and sieve plate occlusion in fava bean (Vicia faba). PMID:23624858

  15. Involvement of the Sieve Element Cytoskeleton in Electrical Responses to Cold Shocks1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafke, Jens B.; Ehlers, Katrin; Föller, Jens; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Becker, Stefanie; van Bel, Aart J.E.

    2013-01-01

    This study dealt with the visualization of the sieve element (SE) cytoskeleton and its involvement in electrical responses to local cold shocks, exemplifying the role of the cytoskeleton in Ca2+-triggered signal cascades in SEs. High-affinity fluorescent phalloidin as well as immunocytochemistry using anti-actin antibodies demonstrated a fully developed parietal actin meshwork in SEs. The involvement of the cytoskeleton in electrical responses and forisome conformation changes as indicators of Ca2+ influx was investigated by the application of cold shocks in the presence of diverse actin disruptors (latrunculin A and cytochalasin D). Under control conditions, cold shocks elicited a graded initial voltage transient, ΔV1, reduced by external La3+ in keeping with the involvement of Ca2+ channels, and a second voltage transient, ΔV2. Cytochalasin D had no effect on ΔV1, while ΔV1 was significantly reduced with 500 nm latrunculin A. Forisome dispersion was triggered by cold shocks of 4°C or greater, which was indicative of an all-or-none behavior. Forisome dispersion was suppressed by incubation with latrunculin A. In conclusion, the cytoskeleton controls cold shock-induced Ca2+ influx into SEs, leading to forisome dispersion and sieve plate occlusion in fava bean (Vicia faba). PMID:23624858

  16. Seismic response of continuous span bridges through fiber-based finite element analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chiara Casarotti; Rui Pinho

    2006-01-01

    It is widely recognized that nonlinear time-history analysis constitutes the most accurate way to simulate the response of structures subjected to strong levels of seismic excitation. This analytical method is based on sound underlying principles and has the capability to reproduce the intrinsic inelastic dynamic behavior of structures. Nonetheless,comparisons with experimental results from large-scale testing of structures are still needed, in order to ensure adequate levels of confidence in this numerical methodology. The fiber modelling approach employed in the current endeavor inherently accounts for geometric nonlinearities and material inelasticity, without a need for calibration of plastic hinges mechanisms,typical in concentrated plasticity models. The resulting combination of analysis accuracy and modelling simplicity, allows thus to overcome the perhaps not fully justifiable sense of complexity associated to nonlinear dynamic analysis. The fiberbased modelling approach is employed in the framework of a finite element program downloaded from the Internet for seismic response analysis of framed structures. The reliability and accuracy of the program are demonstrated by numerically reproducing pseudo-dynamic tests on a four span continuous deck concrete bridge. Modelling assumptions are discussed,together with their implications on numerical results of the nonlinear time-history analyses, which were found to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Finite element modeling of human brain response to football helmet impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, T; Muthuswamy, J; Rajan, S D

    2016-10-01

    The football helmet is used to help mitigate the occurrence of impact-related traumatic (TBI) and minor traumatic brain injuries (mTBI) in the game of American football. While the current helmet design methodology may be adequate for reducing linear acceleration of the head and minimizing TBI, it however has had less effect in minimizing mTBI. The objectives of this study are (a) to develop and validate a coupled finite element (FE) model of a football helmet and the human body, and (b) to assess responses of different regions of the brain to two different impact conditions - frontal oblique and crown impact conditions. The FE helmet model was validated using experimental results of drop tests. Subsequently, the integrated helmet-human body FE model was used to assess the responses of different regions of the brain to impact loads. Strain-rate, strain, and stress measures in the corpus callosum, midbrain, and brain stem were assessed. Results show that maximum strain-rates of 27 and 19 s(-1) are observed in the brain-stem and mid-brain, respectively. This could potentially lead to axonal injuries and neuronal cell death during crown impact conditions. The developed experimental-numerical framework can be used in the study of other helmet-related impact conditions. PMID:26867124

  18. Quantifying crustal response to deep active intrusions with geodesy-based finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S. T.; Pritchard, M. E.; Elliott, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Altiplano-Puna Volcanic Complex (APVC, 21-24 S, 66-69 W) is a first order feature of the Central Andes Volcanic Arc. The APVC consists of over 10,000 km^3 of dacitic ignimbrites deposited in the late Miocene, making it one of the largest concentrations of silicic volcanism in the world. The persistent and intense magmatic flux in this region has likely contributed to the thickened crust (50-70 km), elevated geotherm (>50 C/km) and extensive partial melt (mass balance between source and sink reservoirs, and require physically realistic rheological parameters of the crust. Modeling is performed with Pylith finite element software on a cylindrical three dimensional domain with a radius of 300 km and depth of 200 km. Our models assume pressurization in a viscoelastic crust, and therefore describe crustal response rather than dynamic processes of fluid creation and motion. Surface deformation timescales are highly dependent on geothermal gradient and source pressurization history. While still inconclusive, the potential for an abrupt end to surface deformation has important implications for the characterization of creep versus relaxation processes occurring in response to deep intrusions. Ultimately, crustal scale numerical models provide a means to check petrologically-derived depths of fluid accumulation, in addition to theoretical estimates of softening that occurs with distributed partial melt. The specific models presented are tuned to the subsurface conditions of the APVC, but may be relevant to arc intrusions below the brittle-ductile transition elsewhere.

  19. Barley responses to combined waterlogging and salinity stress: separating effects of oxygen deprivation and elemental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanrong; Shabala, Lana; Zhou, Meixue; Zhang, Guoping; Shabala, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Salinity and waterlogging are two major factors affecting crop production around the world and often occur together (e.g., salt brought to the surface by rising water tables). While the physiological and molecular mechanisms of plant responses to each of these environmental constraints are studied in detail, the mechanisms underlying plant tolerance to their combined stress are much less understood. In this study, whole-plant physiological responses to individual/combined salinity and waterlogging stresses were studied using two barley varieties grown in either vermiculite (semi-hydroponics) or sandy loam. Two weeks of combined salinity and waterlogging treatment significantly decreased plant biomass, chlorophyll content, maximal quantum efficiency of PSII and water content (WC) in both varieties, while the percentage of chlorotic and necrotic leaves and leaf sap osmolality increased. The adverse effects of the combined stresses were much stronger in the waterlogging-sensitive variety Naso Nijo. Compared with salinity stress alone, the combined stress resulted in a 2-fold increase in leaf Na(+), but a 40% decrease in leaf K(+) content. Importantly, the effects of the combined stress were more pronounced in sandy loam compared with vermiculite and correlated with changes in the soil redox potential and accumulation of Mn and Fe in the waterlogged soils. It is concluded that hypoxia alone is not a major factor determining differential plant growth under adverse stress conditions, and that elemental toxicities resulting from changes in soil redox potential have a major impact on genotypic differences in plant physiological and agronomical responses. These results are further discussed in the context of plant breeding for waterlogging stress tolerance. PMID:23967003

  20. A wave finite element-based formulation for computing the forced response of structures involving rectangular flat shells

    OpenAIRE

    Mencik, Jean-Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    International audience The harmonic forced response of structures involving several noncoplanar rectangular flat shells is investigated by using the Wave Finite Element method. Such flat shells are connected along parallel edges where external excitation sources as well as mechanical impedances are likely to occur. Also, they can be connected to one or several coupling elements whose shapes and dynamics can be complex. The dynamic behavior of the connected shells is described by means of n...

  1. A new orphan member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that interacts with a subset of retinoic acid response elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Baes, M.; Gulick, T; Choi, H. S.; Martinoli, M G; Simha, D; Moore, D D

    1994-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a new orphan member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, called MB67, which is predominantly expressed in liver. MB67 binds and transactivates the retinoic acid response elements that control expression of the retinoic acid receptor beta 2 and alcohol dehydrogenase 3 genes, both of which consist of a direct repeat hexamers related to the consensus AGGTCA, separated by 5 bp. MB67 binds these elements as a heterodimer with the 9-cis-retinoic acid rec...

  2. Liver X receptor regulates hepatic nuclear O-GlcNAc signaling and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Fan, Qiong; Nørgaard, Rikke C;

    2015-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR)α and LXRβ play key roles in hepatic de novo lipogenesis through their regulation of lipogenic genes, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP). LXRs activate lipogenic gene transcription...... metabolic sensors upstream of ChREBP by modulating GK expression, nuclear O-GlcNAc signaling, and ChREBP expression and activity....

  3. Altered Response Hierarchy and Increased T-Cell Breadth upon HIV-1 Conserved Element DNA Vaccination in Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Viraj Kulkarni; Antonio Valentin; Margherita Rosati; Candido Alicea; Singh, Ashish K; Rashmi Jalah; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Sylvie Le Gall; Beatriz Mothe; Christian Brander; Morgane Rolland; Mullins, James I.; Pavlakis, George N.; Felber, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    HIV sequence diversity and potential decoy epitopes are hurdles in the development of an effective AIDS vaccine. A DNA vaccine candidate comprising of highly conserved p24(gag) elements (CE) induced robust immunity in all 10 vaccinated macaques, whereas full-length gag DNA vaccination elicited responses to these conserved elements in only 5 of 11 animals, targeting fewer CE per animal. Importantly, boosting CE-primed macaques with DNA expressing full-length p55(gag) increased both magnitude o...

  4. A chromatin insulator driving three-dimensional Polycomb response element (PRE) contacts and Polycomb association with the chromatin fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comet, Itys; Schuettengruber, Bernd; Sexton, Tom;

    2011-01-01

    to insulate genes from regulatory elements or to take part in long-distance interactions. Using a high-resolution chromatin conformation capture (H3C) method, we show that the Drosophila gypsy insulator behaves as a conformational chromatin border that is able to prohibit contacts between a Polycomb response...... element (PRE) and a distal promoter. On the other hand, two spaced gypsy elements form a chromatin loop that is able to bring an upstream PRE in contact with a downstream gene to mediate its repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) profiles of the Polycomb protein and its associated H3K27me3...

  5. Identification of a peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE)-like cis-element in mouse plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAI-1 is expressed and secreted by adipose tissue which may mediate the pathogenesis of obesity-associated cardiovascular complications. Evidence is presented in this report that PAI-1 is not expressed by preadipocyte, but significantly induced during 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation and the PAI-1 expression correlates with the induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). A peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE)-like cis-element (-206TCCCCCATGCCCT-194) is identified in the mouse PAI-1 gene promoter by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) combined with transient transfection experiments; the PPRE-like cis-element forms a specific DNA-protein complex only with adipocyte nuclear extracts, not with preadipocyte nuclear extracts; the DNA-protein complex can be totally competed away by non-labeled consensus PPRE, and can be supershifted with PPARγ antibody. Mutation of this PPRE-like cis-element can abolish the transactivation of mouse PAI-1 promoter mediated by PPARγ. Specific PPARγ ligand Pioglitazone can significantly induce the PAI-1 expression, and stimulate the secretion of PAI-1 into medium

  6. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chi Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and

  7. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    Subcellular compartmentation of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP has been widely proposed as a mechanism to explain unique receptor-dependent functional responses. How exactly compartmentation is achieved, however, has remained a mystery for more than 40 years. In this study, we developed computational and mathematical models to represent a subcellular sarcomeric space in a cardiac myocyte with varying detail. We then used these models to predict the contributions of various mechanisms that establish subcellular cAMP microdomains. We used the models to test the hypothesis that phosphodiesterases act as functional barriers to diffusion, creating discrete cAMP signaling domains. We also used the models to predict the effect of a range of experimentally measured diffusion rates on cAMP compartmentation. Finally, we modeled the anatomical structures in a cardiac myocyte diad, to predict the effects of anatomical diffusion barriers on cAMP compartmentation. When we incorporated experimentally informed model parameters to reconstruct an in silico subcellular sarcomeric space with spatially distinct cAMP production sites linked to caveloar domains, the models predict that under realistic conditions phosphodiesterases alone were insufficient to generate significant cAMP gradients. This prediction persisted even when combined with slow cAMP diffusion. When we additionally considered the effects of anatomic barriers to diffusion that are expected in the cardiac myocyte dyadic space, cAMP compartmentation did occur, but only when diffusion was slow. Our model simulations suggest that additional mechanisms likely contribute to cAMP gradients occurring in submicroscopic domains. The difference between the physiological and pathological effects resulting from the production of cAMP may be a function of appropriate compartmentation of cAMP signaling. Therefore, understanding the contribution of factors that are responsible for coordinating the spatial and temporal

  8. Expression profiles of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their regulation by Relish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dongdong; LI Fuhua; LI Shihao; WEN Rong; XIANG Jianhai

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs),as key immune effectors,play important roles in the innate immune system of invertebrates.Different types of AMPs,including Penaeidin,Crustin,ALF (antilipopolysaccharide factor) have been identified in different penaeid shrimp; however,systematic analyses on the function of different AMPs in shrimp responsive to different types of bacteria are very limited.In this study,we analyzed the expression profiles of AMPs in the Chinese shrimps,Fenneropenaeus chinensis,simultaneously by real-time RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) when shrimp were challenged with Micrococcus lysodeikticus (Gram-positive,G+) or Vibrio anguillarium (Gram-negative,G).Different AMPs showed different expression profiles when shrimp were injected with one type of bacterium,and one AMP also showed different expression profiles when shrimp were challenged with different bacteria.Furthermore,the expression of these AMPs showed temporal expression profiles,suggesting that different AMPs function coordinately in bacteria-infected shrimp.An RNA interference approach was used to study the function of the Relish transcription factor in regulating the transcription of different AM Ps.The current study showed that Relish could regulate the transcription of different AMPs in shrimp.Differential expression profiles of AMPs in shrimp injected with different types of bacteria indicated that a complicated antimicrobial response network existed in shrimp.These data contribute to our understanding of immunity in shrimp and may provide a strategy for the control of disease in shrimp.

  9. Icariin upregulates phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein levels in the hippocampus of the senescence- accelerated mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanwei Zhang; Ting Zhang; Keli Dong

    2012-01-01

    At 8 weeks after intragastric administration of icariin to senescence-accelerated mice (P8 strain), Morris water maze results showed that escape latency was shortened, and the number of platform crossings was increased. Immunohistochemical staining and western blot assay detected signifi-cantly increased levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein. These results suggest that icariin upregulates phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein levels and improves learning and memory functions in hippo-campus of the senescence-accelerated mouse.

  10. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yanyan [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xue, Peng [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Hou, Yongyong [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhang, Hao [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Hongzhi [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhou, Tong [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Qu, Weidong [Key Laboratory of the Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Teng, Weiping [The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E. [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Pi, Jingbo, E-mail: jingbopi@gmail.com [Institute for Chemical Safety Sciences, The Hamner Institutes for Health Sciences, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2013-12-15

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis.

  11. Isoniazid suppresses antioxidant response element activities and impairs adipogenesis in mouse and human preadipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transcriptional signaling through the antioxidant response element (ARE), orchestrated by the Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is a major cellular defense mechanism against oxidative or electrophilic stress. Here, we reported that isoniazid (INH), a widely used antitubercular drug, displays a substantial inhibitory property against ARE activities in diverse mouse and human cells. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, INH concentration-dependently suppressed the ARE-luciferase reporter activity and mRNA expression of various ARE-dependent antioxidant genes under basal and oxidative stressed conditions. In keeping with our previous findings that Nrf2-ARE plays a critical role in adipogenesis by regulating expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), suppression of ARE signaling by INH hampered adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells and human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs). Following adipogenesis induced by hormonal cocktails, INH-treated 3T3-L1 cells and ADSCs displayed significantly reduced levels of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of C/EBPα and PPARγ. Time-course studies in 3T3-L1 cells revealed that inhibition of adipogenesis by INH occurred in the early stage of terminal adipogenic differentiation, where reduced expression of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ was observed. To our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that INH suppresses ARE signaling and interrupts with the transcriptional network of adipogenesis, leading to impaired adipogenic differentiation. The inhibition of ARE signaling may be a potential underlying mechanism by which INH attenuates cellular antioxidant response contributing to various complications. - Highlights: • Isoniazid suppresses ARE-mediated transcriptional activity. • Isoniazid inhibits adipogenesis in preadipocytes. • Isoniazid suppresses adipogenic gene expression during adipogenesis

  12. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  13. VIP1 response elements mediate mitogen-activated protein kinase 3-induced stress gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Djamei, Armin; Teige, Markus; Hirt, Heribert

    2009-10-27

    The plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens transforms plant cells by delivering its T-DNA into the plant cell nucleus where it integrates into the plant genome and causes tumor formation. A key role of VirE2-interacting protein 1 (VIP1) in the nuclear import of T-DNA during Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been unravelled and VIP1 was shown to undergo nuclear localization upon phosphorylation by the mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. Here, we provide evidence that VIP1 encodes a functional bZIP transcription factor that stimulates stress-dependent gene expression by binding to VIP1 response elements (VREs), a DNA hexamer motif. VREs are overrepresented in promoters responding to activation of the MPK3 pathway such as Trxh8 and MYB44. Accordingly, plants overexpressing VIP1 accumulate high levels of Trxh8 and MYB44 transcripts, whereas stress-induced expression of these genes is impaired in mpk3 mutants. Trxh8 and MYB44 promoters are activated by VIP1 in a VRE-dependent manner. VIP1 strongly enhances expression from a synthetic promoter harboring multiple VRE copies and directly interacts with VREs in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays of the MYB44 promoter confirm that VIP1 binding to VREs is enhanced under conditions of MPK3 pathway stimulation. These results provide molecular insight into the cellular mechanism of target gene regulation by the MPK3 pathway. PMID:19820165

  14. Analysis of trace elements responsible for antioxidant protection by SRXFA method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of using the energy dispersion synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis (SRXFA) for control of blood plasma and liver trace element (TE) content in rats with hyperproduction of oxygen radicals and hair TE content in women with mammary hyperplasia and cancer are demonstrated. Our data show that activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in the blood and liver depends on the amount of TE incorporated into the structure of the active center of these enzymes, which are responsible for antioxidant protection. A decrease of activity of these enzymes is accompanied by an increase of production of free OH radicals in the tissues. Clinical data demonstrated that scalp hair of patients with oncological mammary pathology was characterized by a significant decrease of concentrations of selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) and by an increase of chromium (Cr). The Se deficit was more pronounced in patients with cancer than in those with mammary hyperplasia (p<0.05). The SRXFA method permits one to carry out a controllable correction of TE imbalance in many diseases whose development is caused by oxygen radical injury

  15. Bisphenol A activates the Nrf1/2-antioxidant response element pathway in HEK 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Enikanolaiye, Mutiat I; Chepelev, Leonid L; Almohaisen, Abdulrahman; Chen, Qixuan; Scoggan, Kylie A; Coughlan, Melanie C; Cao, Xu-Liang; Jin, Xiaolei; Willmore, William G

    2013-03-18

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins for baby bottles, liners of canned food, and many other consumer products. Previously, BPA has been shown to reduce the activity of several antioxidant enzymes, which may contribute to oxidative stress. However, the underlying mechanism of the BPA-mediated effect upon antioxidant enzyme activity is unknown. Antioxidant and phase II metabolizing enzymes protect cells from oxidative stress and are transcriptionally activated by Nrf1 and Nrf2 factors through their cis-regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). In this work, we have assessed the effect of BPA on the Nrf1/2-ARE pathway in cultured human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Surprisingly, glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays revealed that BPA application created a more reduced intracellular environment in cultured HEK 293 cells. Furthermore, BPA increased the transactivation activity of ectopic Nrf1 and Nrf2 and increased the expression of ARE-target genes ho-1 and nqo1 at high (100-200 μM) BPA concentrations only. Our study suggests that BPA activates the Nrf1/2-ARE pathway at high (>10 μM) micromolar concentrations. PMID:23360430

  16. A peroxisome proliferator response elements regulatory system in xenopus oocytes and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Jin; FAN Chun-lei; WO Xing-de; GAO Li-ping

    2005-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) is a kind of ligand-activated transcription factors binding to peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE), a specific recognition site. It is thought to play a critical role in glucose and lipid metabolism and in inflammation control. The aim of this study was to establish a new cellular model for the quick screening of lipid-lowering drugs, which may be effective as PPAR-γ ligands on the PPRE-mediated pathway regulatory system. Methods Two plasmids were constructed: pXOE-PPARγ, in which the human PPARγ gene was in the downstream of TFⅢA gene promoter, and pLXRN-PPRE-d2EGFP, in which the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene was subcloned into PPRE. The xenopus oocytes were injected with these two plamids, and consequently treated with prostaglandin E1, pioglitazone, and different kinds of lipid-lowering drugs. After 3 days, the oocytes were observed under a fluorescence microscope. To confirm the drug action,we injected pXOE-PPARγ plasmid into the oocytes, which then treated with prostaglandin E1and Hawthorn flavonoids. The mass of expressed lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the cells was determined by enzyme labeling linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Conclusions It is possible to establish a PPRE regulatory EGFP reporter system in xenopus oocytes to monitor the activity of PPARγ ligand. Hawthorn flavonoids can increase the expression of gene downsteam of PPRE by effect on the PPRE pathway regulatory system.

  17. Three-dimensional measurement of cAMP gradients using hyperspectral confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel; Favreau, Peter F.; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions over a wide range of timescales. Several lines of evidence have suggested that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform, and that cAMP compartmentalization is largely responsible for signaling specificity within the cAMP signaling pathway. However, to date, no studies have experimentally measured three dimensional (3D) cAMP distributions within cells. Here we use both 2D and 3D hyperspectral microscopy to visualize cAMP gradients in endothelial cells from the pulmonary microvasculature (PMVECs). cAMP levels were measured using a FRETbased cAMP sensor comprised of a cAMP binding domain from EPAC sandwiched between FRET donors and acceptors -- Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. Data were acquired using either a Nikon A1R spectral confocal microscope or custom spectral microscopy system. Analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from a single confocal slice or from summed images of all slices (2D analysis) indicated little or no cAMP gradients were formed within PMVECs under basal conditions or following agonist treatment. However, analysis of hyperspectral image stacks from 3D cellular geometries (z stacks) demonstrate marked cAMP gradients from the apical to basolateral membrane of PMVECs. These results strongly suggest that 2D imaging studies of cAMP compartmentalization -- whether epifluorescence or confocal microscopy -- may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity.

  18. Imaging cyclic AMP changes in pancreatic islets of transgenic reporter mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung Woul Kim

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP (cAMP and Ca(2+ are two ubiquitous second messengers in transduction pathways downstream of receptors for hormones, neurotransmitters and local signals. The availability of fluorescent Ca(2+ reporter dyes that are easily introduced into cells and tissues has facilitated analysis of the dynamics and spatial patterns for Ca(2+ signaling pathways. A similar dissection of the role of cAMP has lagged because indicator dyes do not exist. Genetically encoded reporters for cAMP are available but they must be introduced by transient transfection in cell culture, which limits their utility. We report here that we have produced a strain of transgenic mice in which an enhanced cAMP reporter is integrated in the genome and can be expressed in any targeted tissue and with tetracycline induction. We have expressed the cAMP reporter in beta-cells of pancreatic islets and conducted an analysis of intracellular cAMP levels in relation to glucose stimulation, Ca(2+ levels, and membrane depolarization. Pancreatic function in transgenic mice was normal. In induced transgenic islets, glucose evoked an increase in cAMP in beta-cells in a dose-dependent manner. The cAMP response is independent of (in fact, precedes the Ca(2+ influx that results from glucose stimulation of islets. Glucose-evoked cAMP responses are synchronous in cells throughout the islet and occur in 2 phases suggestive of the time course of insulin secretion. Insofar as cAMP in islets is known to potentiate insulin secretion, the novel transgenic mouse model will for the first time permit detailed analyses of cAMP signals in beta-cells within islets, i.e. in their native physiological context. Reporter expression in other tissues (such as the heart where cAMP plays a critical regulatory role, will permit novel biomedical approaches.

  19. The Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) for Seismic Response of Topographical Irregularities in Layered Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Zazueta, M. A.; Perton, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Sánchez-Alvaro, E.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic hazard assessment of extended developments, such as a dam, a bridge or a pipeline, needs the strong ground motion simulation taking into account the effects of surface geology. In many cases the incoming wave field can be obtained from attenuation relations or simulations for layered media using Discrete Wave Number (DWN). Sometimes there is a need to include in simulations the seismic source as well. A number of methods to solve these problems have been developed. Among them the Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods (FEM and FDM) are generally preferred because of the facility of use. Nevertheless, the analysis of realistic dynamic loading induced by earthquakes requires a thinner mesh of the entire domain to consider high frequencies. Consequently this may imply a high computational cost. The Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) can also be employed. Here it is used to study the response of a site to historical seismic activity. This method is particularly suited to model wave propagation through wide areas as it requires only the meshing of boundaries. Moreover, it is well suited to represent finely the diffraction that can occur on a fault. However, the IBEM has been applied mainly to simple geometrical configurations. In this communication significant refinements of the formulation are presented. Using IBEM we can simulate wave propagation in complex geometrical configurations such as a stratified medium crossed by thin faults or having a complex topography. Two main developments are here described; one integrates the DWN method inside the IBEM in order to represent the Green's functions of stratified media with relatively low computational cost but assuming unbounded parallel flat layers, and the other is the extension of IBEM to deal with multi-regions in contact which allows more versatility with a higher computational cost compared to the first one but still minor to an equivalent FEM formulation. The two approaches are fully

  20. Non-linear finite element analysis for prediction of seismic response of buildings considering soil-structure interaction

    OpenAIRE

    E. Çelebi; F. Göktepe; Karahan, N

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper focuses primarily on the numerical approach based on two-dimensional (2-D) finite element method for analysis of the seismic response of infinite soil-structure interaction (SSI) system. This study is performed by a series of different scenarios that involved comprehensive parametric analyses including the effects of realistic material properties of the underlying soil on the structural response quantities. Viscous artificial boundaries, simulating the process of w...

  1. Internal gastargets in AmPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaan, A. P.; Postma, O.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; van Leeuwen, E.; Doets, M.; Kraan, M.

    1997-05-01

    Internal gas targets in AmPS A.P. Kaan, O. Postma, J.F.J. van den Brand, E. van Leeuwen, M. Doets, M. Kra= an National Institute for Nuclear Physics and High Energy Physics; Kruislaan 409; 1098 SJ Amsterdam; Holland In the Amsterdam Puls Stretcher/storage ring AmPS(1 GeV electrons), we designed a set-up in order to accommodate a gas target with a density of 1016 mol/cm2. The storage cell needed for this purpose is a aluminium tube with a length of 40 cm, a diameter of 15 mm and a wall thickness of 25 =B5m. Three sets of conductance limiters on both sides of the target, combined with dry turbopumps are designed to be used as differential pumping stations. These limiters cause discontinuities in the beam path and must therefor be retractable and radio frequency compatible in both positions. Low =B5 materials must be used because of the depolarisation effects of changing magnetic fields. The calculations show that the flow resistance's are sufficient to reduce the load of the getter pumps to a level with which the lifetime of the pump elements remain acceptable. The design of the mechanics and the vacuum system will be explained. Recent results from the measurements after installation in combination with the influence on the lifetime on the beam will be presented

  2. Initial response and subsequent course of Crohn's disease treated with elemental diet or prednisolone.

    OpenAIRE

    Gorard, D A; Hunt, J. B.; Payne-James, J J; Palmer, K R; Rees, R. G.; Clark, M L; Farthing, M. J.; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D. B.

    1993-01-01

    Elemental diet is as effective as corticosteroids in the treatment of previously untreated Crohn's disease. It is unclear whether a poor nutritional state is a prerequisite for efficacy of elemental diet, whether previously treated patients respond as well, or how duration of remission using elemental diet compares with corticosteroid induced remission. Forty two patients with active Crohn's disease were stratified for nutritional state and randomised to receive Vivonex TEN 2.1 l/day for four...

  3. Widespread Alu repeat-driven expansion of consensus DR2 retinoic acid response elements during primate evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Tian-Tian

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear receptors are hormone-regulated transcription factors whose signaling controls numerous aspects of development and physiology. Many receptors recognize DNA hormone response elements formed by direct repeats of RGKTCA motifs separated by 1 to 5 bp (DR1-DR5. Although many known such response elements are conserved in the mouse and human genomes, it is unclear to which extent transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors has evolved specifically in primates. Results We have mapped the positions of all consensus DR-type hormone response elements in the human genome, and found that DR2 motifs, recognized by retinoic acid receptors (RARs, are heavily overrepresented (108,582 elements. 90% of these are present in Alu repeats, which also contain lesser numbers of other consensus DRs, including 50% of consensus DR4 motifs. Few DR2s are in potentially mobile AluY elements and the vast majority are also present in chimp and macaque. 95.5% of Alu-DR2s are distributed throughout subclasses of AluS repeats, and arose largely through deamination of a methylated CpG dinucleotide in a non-consensus motif present in AluS sequences. We find that Alu-DR2 motifs are located adjacent to numerous known retinoic acid target genes, and show by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in squamous carcinoma cells that several of these elements recruit RARs in vivo. These findings are supported by ChIP-on-chip data from retinoic acid-treated HL60 cells revealing RAR binding to several Alu-DR2 motifs. Conclusion These data provide strong support for the notion that Alu-mediated expansion of DR elements contributed to the evolution of gene regulation by RARs and other nuclear receptors in primates and humans.

  4. Profiling Environmental Chemicals for Activity in the Antioxidant Response Element Signaling Pathway Using a High-Throughput Screening Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1 ABSTRACT 2 3 BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety 4 of diseases ranging from cancer to neurodegeneration, highlighti.ng the need to identify 5 chemicals that can induce this effect. The antioxidant response element (ARE)...

  5. Profiling Environmental Chemicals in the Antioxidant Response Element Pathway using Quantitative High Throughput Screening (qHTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway plays an important role in the amelioration of oxidative stress, which can contribute to a number of diseases, including cancer. We screened 1408 NTP-provided substances in 1536-well qHTS format at concentrations ranging fr...

  6. HIV-1 p24(gag derived conserved element DNA vaccine increases the breadth of immune response in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Kulkarni

    Full Text Available Viral diversity is considered a major impediment to the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Despite this diversity, certain protein segments are nearly invariant across the known HIV-1 Group M sequences. We developed immunogens based on the highly conserved elements from the p24(gag region according to two principles: the immunogen must (i include strictly conserved elements of the virus that cannot mutate readily, and (ii exclude both HIV regions capable of mutating without limiting virus viability, and also immunodominant epitopes located in variable regions. We engineered two HIV-1 p24(gag DNA immunogens that express 7 highly Conserved Elements (CE of 12-24 amino acids in length and differ by only 1 amino acid in each CE ('toggle site', together covering >99% of the HIV-1 Group M sequences. Altering intracellular trafficking of the immunogens changed protein localization, stability, and also the nature of elicited immune responses. Immunization of C57BL/6 mice with p55(gag DNA induced poor, CD4(+ mediated cellular responses, to only 2 of the 7 CE; in contrast, vaccination with p24CE DNA induced cross-clade reactive, robust T cell responses to 4 of the 7 CE. The responses were multifunctional and composed of both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells with mature cytotoxic phenotype. These findings provide a method to increase immune response to universally conserved Gag epitopes, using the p24CE immunogen. p24CE DNA vaccination induced humoral immune responses similar in magnitude to those induced by p55(gag, which recognize the virus encoded p24(gag protein. The inclusion of DNA immunogens composed of conserved elements is a promising vaccine strategy to induce broader immunity by CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells to additional regions of Gag compared to vaccination with p55(gag DNA, achieving maximal cross-clade reactive cellular and humoral responses.

  7. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-01

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation. PMID:3000830

  8. Feasibility of using neural networks to unfold the response of multi-element TLD for mixed field dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant advances have been made in recent years to improve calibration methodology and dose calculation algorithm in the fields of TL dosimetry. This process was accelerated in the past decade particularly in the Republic of Korea by the need to meet mandatory national accreditation requirements. The objective of this study is to develop a new algorithm to replace the simplistic decision tree algorithms by the more sophisticated neural networks in hopes of achieving a higher degree of accuracy and precision in personnel dosimetry system. The original hypothesis of this work is that the spectral information of an X and γ-ray fields may be obtained by the analysis of the response of a multi-element system. In this study, a feed forward neural network using the error back-propagation method with Bayesian optimization was designed for the response unfolding procedure. The response functions of the single element to photons were calculated by application of a computational Monte-Carlo model for an energy range from 10 keV to 2 MeV with different spectral proportions. The training of the artificial neural network was based on the computation of responses of a four-element system for the back-propagation method. The validation of the proposed algorithm was investigated by unfolding the 10 computed responses for arbitrary mixed gamma fields and the spectra resulting from the unfolding procedure agree well with the original spectra. (author)

  9. RelA is a potent transcriptional activator of the CD28 response element within the interleukin 2 promoter.

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, J. H.; HORVATH, G; Subleski, J; Bruder, J.; P. Ghosh; Tan, T H

    1995-01-01

    T-cell activation requires two different signals. The T-cell receptor's recognition of a specific antigen on antigen-presenting cells provides one, and the second signal comes from costimulatory molecules such as CD28. In contrast, T cells that are stimulated with antigen in the absence of the CD28 costimulatory signal can become anergic (nonresponsive). The CD28 response element (CD28RE) has been identified as the DNA element mediating interleukin 2 (IL-2) gene activation by CD28 costimulati...

  10. Chemotaxis to cyclic AMP and folic acid is mediated by different G proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa

    1990-01-01

    Mutant Frigid A (fgdA) of Dictyostelium discoideum is defective in a functional Gα2 subunit of a G protein and is characterized by a complete blockade of the cyclic AMP-mediated sensory transduction steps, including cyclic AMP relay, chemotaxis and the cyclic GMP response. Folic acid-mediated transm

  11. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a common second messenger that mediates numerous biological responses. Intracellular cAMP levels are increased by activation of G(s)-coupled G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and decreased by activation of G(i)-coupled GPCRs via the adenylyl cyclase. Man...

  12. Initial response and subsequent course of Crohn's disease treated with elemental diet or prednisolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorard, D A; Hunt, J B; Payne-James, J J; Palmer, K R; Rees, R G; Clark, M L; Farthing, M J; Misiewicz, J J; Silk, D B

    1993-09-01

    Elemental diet is as effective as corticosteroids in the treatment of previously untreated Crohn's disease. It is unclear whether a poor nutritional state is a prerequisite for efficacy of elemental diet, whether previously treated patients respond as well, or how duration of remission using elemental diet compares with corticosteroid induced remission. Forty two patients with active Crohn's disease were stratified for nutritional state and randomised to receive Vivonex TEN 2.1 l/day for four weeks, or 0.75 mg prednisolone/kg/day for two weeks and subsequent reducing doses. Nine of 22 (41%) patients assigned to nutritional treatment were intolerant of the diet. Thirty patients completed four weeks treatment. Disease activity decreased on elemental diet from mean (SEM) 4.8 (0.9) to 1.7 (0.6), p < 0.05, and on prednisolone from 5.3 (0.5) to 1.9 (0.6), p < 0.05. For each treatment, nourished and malnourished patients responded similarly. Patients with longstanding disease responded as well as newly diagnosed patients. The probability of maintaining remission at six months was 0.67 after prednisolone, 0.28 after elemental diet, and at one year was 0.35 after prednisolone and 0.09 after elemental diet, p < 0.05. When tolerated, elemental diet is as effective in the short term as prednisolone in newly and previously diagnosed Crohn's disease, and its benefit is independent of nutritional state. The subsequent relapse rate after elemental diet induced remission, however, is greater than after treatment with prednisolone. PMID:8406153

  13. Modeling and assessment of the response of super-light elements to fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Campeanu, B.M.; Giraudo, M.;

    2013-01-01

    . The implementation of a three-dimensional Finite Element Model (FEM) of the SL-deck is described and modelling aspects are discussed with particular reference to the sensitivity of the model to the thermal properties of the strong and light concrete. The results of the investigation are compared with the outcomes...... of the fire performances of complex concrete elements and in the focus on modelling issues related to the handling of the uncertainties. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group....

  14. Modeling and assessment of the response of super-light elements to fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Campeanu, B.M.; Giraudo, M.;

    . The implementation of a three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the SL-deck is described and modelling aspects are discussed with particular reference to the sensitivity of the model to the thermal properties of the strong and light concrete. The results of the investigation are compared with the outcomes...... of the fire performances of complex concrete elements and in the focus on modelling issues related to the handling of the uncertainties....

  15. Finite element model validation of bridge based on structural health monitoring—Part I: Response surface-based finite element model updating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouhong Zong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the engineering practice, merging statistical analysis into structural evaluation and assessment is a tendency in the future. As a combination of mathematical and statistical techniques, response surface (RS methodology has been successfully applied to design optimization, response prediction and model validation. With the aid of RS methodology, these two serial papers present a finite element (FE model updating and validation method for bridge structures based on structural health monitoring. The key issues to implement such a model updating are discussed in this paper, such as design of experiment, parameter screening, construction of high-order polynomial response surface model, optimization methods and precision inspection of RS model. The proposed procedure is illustrated by a prestressed concrete continuous rigid-frame bridge monitored under operational conditions. The results from the updated FE model have been compared with those obtained from online health monitoring system. The real application to a full-size bridge has demonstrated that the FE model updating process is efficient and convenient. The updated FE model can relatively reflect the actual condition of Xiabaishi Bridge in the design space of parameters and can be further applied to FE model validation and damage identification.

  16. Atranorin and lecanoric acid antagonize TCDD-induced xenobiotic response element-driven activity, but not xenobiotic response element-independent activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Ken-Ichi; Tanabe, Hiroki; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Hidetoshi; Inoue, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that consist of fungi and photosynthetic symbionts (algae and/or cyanobacteria). Previous studies of their constituents suggested lichens produce many kinds of aromatic secondary metabolites, such as depsides, quinones, and dibenzofurans. In this study, we evaluated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonistic activity of 17 lichen substances and demonstrated that atranorin (1) and lecanoric acid (2), isolated from Parmotrema tinctorum Hale, showed an inhibitory effect on luciferase activity increased by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), using an XRE-driven pX4TK-Luc reporter gene assay. In addition, CYP1A1 mRNA and protein levels increased by TCDD were also suppressed by 1 and 2. Conversely, neither 1 nor 2 antagonized the suppressive effect of TCDD on interleukin (IL)-1β-induced acute-phase response (APR) gene expression. Thus, we concluded that 1 and 2 were selective AhR modulators that antagonize XRE-dependent activity, but not XRE-independent activity. However, 1 has different characteristics to 2 in that 1 alone showed a suppressive effect on IL-1β-induced APR gene expression in a similar fashion to TCDD. PMID:26979434

  17. SANTOS - a two-dimensional finite element program for the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, C.M.

    1997-07-01

    SANTOS is a finite element program designed to compute the quasistatic, large deformation, inelastic response of two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric solids. The code is derived from the transient dynamic code PRONTO 2D. The solution strategy used to compute the equilibrium states is based on a self-adaptive dynamic relaxation solution scheme, which is based on explicit central difference pseudo-time integration and artificial mass proportional damping. The element used in SANTOS is a uniform strain 4-node quadrilateral element with an hourglass control scheme to control the spurious deformation modes. Finite strain constitutive models for many common engineering materials are included. A robust master-slave contact algorithm for modeling sliding contact is implemented. An interface for coupling to an external code is also provided. 43 refs., 22 figs.

  18. First-principles study on the effect of alloying elements on the elastic deformation response in β-titanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouda, Mohammed K., E-mail: mohamed.kamal@ejust.edu.eg; Gepreel, Mohamed A. H. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology, Borg El Arab, Alexandria 21934 (Egypt); Nakamura, Koichi [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Egypt-Japan University of Science and Technology, Borg El Arab, Alexandria 21934 (Egypt); Center for the Promotion of Interdisciplinary Education and Research, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

    2015-06-07

    Theoretical deformation response of hypothetical β-titanium alloys was investigated using first-principles calculation technique under periodic boundary conditions. Simulation was carried out on hypothetical 54-atom supercell of Ti–X (X = Cr, Mn, Fe, Zr, Nb, Mo, Al, and Sn) binary alloys. The results showed that the strength of Ti increases by alloying, except for Cr. The most effective alloying elements are Nb, Zr, and Mo in the current simulation. The mechanism of bond breaking was revealed by studying the local structure around the alloying element atom with respect to volume change. Moreover, the effect of alloying elements on bulk modulus and admissible strain was investigated. It was found that Zr, Nb, and Mo have a significant effect to enhance the admissible strain of Ti without change in bulk modulus.

  19. Structural and functional characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa global regulator AmpR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caille, Olivier; Zincke, Diansy; Merighi, Massimo; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Kong, Kok-Fai; Silva-Herzog, Eugenia; Narasimhan, Giri; Schneper, Lisa; Lory, Stephen; Mathee, Kalai

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dreaded pathogen in many clinical settings. Its inherent and acquired antibiotic resistance thwarts therapy. In particular, derepression of the AmpC β-lactamase is a common mechanism of β-lactam resistance among clinical isolates. The inducible expression of ampC is controlled by the global LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) AmpR. In the present study, we investigated the genetic and structural elements that are important for ampC induction. Specifically, the ampC (PampC) and ampR (PampR) promoters and the AmpR protein were characterized. The transcription start sites (TSSs) of the divergent transcripts were mapped using 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR (RACE-PCR), and strong σ(54) and σ(70) consensus sequences were identified at PampR and PampC, respectively. Sigma factor RpoN was found to negatively regulate ampR expression, possibly through promoter blocking. Deletion mapping revealed that the minimal PampC extends 98 bp upstream of the TSS. Gel shifts using membrane fractions showed that AmpR binds to PampC in vitro whereas in vivo binding was demonstrated using chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR (ChIP-qPCR). Additionally, site-directed mutagenesis of the AmpR helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif identified residues critical for binding and function (Ser38 and Lys42) and critical for function but not binding (His39). Amino acids Gly102 and Asp135, previously implicated in the repression state of AmpR in the enterobacteria, were also shown to play a structural role in P. aeruginosa AmpR. Alkaline phosphatase fusion and shaving experiments suggest that AmpR is likely to be membrane associated. Lastly, an in vivo cross-linking study shows that AmpR dimerizes. In conclusion, a potential membrane-associated AmpR dimer regulates ampC expression by direct binding. PMID:25182487

  20. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  1. ¬cAMP promotes the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in vitro via modulation of voltage-gated calcium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme eLepski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs remain poorly understood. In this study we investigated the role of Ca2+ and cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the differentiation of NPCs extracted from the subventricular zone of E14.5 rat embryos. Patch clamp recordings revealed that increasing cAMP-signaling with Forskolin or IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine significantly facilitated neuronal functional maturation. A continuous application of IBMX to the differentiation medium substantially increased the functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels, as well as neuronal firing frequency. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents and in the amplitude of evoked glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic currents. The most prominent acute effect of applying IBMX was an increase in L-type Ca2+currents. Conversely, blocking L-type channels strongly inhibited dendritic outgrowth and synapse formation even in the presence of IBMX, indicating that voltage-gated Ca2+ influx plays a major role in neuronal differentiation. Finally, we found that nifedipine completely blocks IBMX-induced CREB phosphorylation (cAMP-response-element-binding protein, indicating that the activity of this important transcription factor equally depends on both enhanced cAMP and voltage-gated Ca2+-signaling. Taken together, these data indicate that the up-regulation of voltage-gated L-type Ca2+-channels and early electrical excitability are critical steps in the cAMP-dependent differentiation of SVZ-derived NPCs into functional neurons. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the acute effects of cAMP on voltage-gated Ca+2channels in NPC-derived developing neurons.

  2. HPRT-deficiency dysregulates cAMP-PKA signaling and phosphodiesterase 10A expression: mechanistic insight and potential target for Lesch-Nyhan Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiabe-Henri Guibinga

    Full Text Available Lesch-Nyhan Disease (LND is the result of mutations in the X-linked gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT. LND gives rise to severe neurological anomalies including mental retardation, dystonia, chorea, pyramidal signs and a compulsive and aggressive behavior to self injure. The neurological phenotype in LND has been shown to reflect aberrant dopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia, however there are little data correlating the defect in purine metabolism to the neural-related abnormalities. In the present studies, we find that HPRT-deficient neuronal cell lines have reduced CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein expression and intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP, which correlates with attenuated CREB-dependent transcriptional activity and a reduced phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA substrates such as synapsin (p-syn I. Of interest, we found increased expression of phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A in HPRT-deficient cell lines and that the PDE10 inhibitor papaverine and PDE10A siRNA restored cAMP/PKA signaling. Furthermore, reconstitution of HPRT expression in mutant cells partly increased cAMP signaling synapsin phosphorylation. In conclusion, our data show that HPRT-deficiency alters cAMP/PKA signaling pathway, which is in part due to the increased of PDE10A expression and activity. These findings suggest a mechanistic insight into the possible causes of LND and highlight PDE10A as a possible therapeutic target for this intractable neurological disease.

  3. Temperature, stress, and corrosive sensing apparatus utilizing harmonic response of magnetically soft sensor element (s)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Craig A. (Inventor); Ong, Keat Ghee (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A temperature sensing apparatus including a sensor element made of a magnetically soft material operatively arranged within a first and second time-varying interrogation magnetic field, the first time-varying magnetic field being generated at a frequency higher than that for the second magnetic field. A receiver, remote from the sensor element, is engaged to measure intensity of electromagnetic emissions from the sensor element to identify a relative maximum amplitude value for each of a plurality of higher-order harmonic frequency amplitudes so measured. A unit then determines a value for temperature (or other parameter of interst) using the relative maximum harmonic amplitude values identified. In other aspects of the invention, the focus is on an apparatus and technique for determining a value for of stress condition of a solid analyte and for determining a value for corrosion, using the relative maximum harmonic amplitude values identified. A magnetically hard element supporting a biasing field adjacent the magnetically soft sensor element can be included.

  4. Dopamine receptors modulate cytotoxicity of natural killer cells via cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter in the nervous system, has been shown to modulate immune function. We have previously reported that five subtypes of DA receptors, including D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R and D5R, are expressed in T lymphocytes and they are involved in regulation of T cells. However, roles of these DA receptor subtypes and their coupled signal-transduction pathway in modulation of natural killer (NK cells still remain to be clarified. The spleen of mice was harvested and NK cells were isolated and purified by negative selection using magnetic activated cell sorting. After NK cells were incubated with various drugs for 4 h, flow cytometry measured cytotoxicity of NK cells against YAC-1 lymphoma cells. NK cells expressed the five subtypes of DA receptors at mRNA and protein levels. Activation of D1-like receptors (including D1R and D5R with agonist SKF38393 enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity, but activation of D2-like receptors (including D2R, D3R and D4R with agonist quinpirole attenuated NK cells. Simultaneously, SKF38393 elevated D1R and D5R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding (CREB level in NK cells, while quinpirole reduced D3R and D4R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated CREB level in NK cells. These effects of SKF38393 were blocked by SCH23390, an antagonist of D1-like receptors, and quinpirole effects were abolished by haloperidol, an antagonist of D2-like receptors. In support these results, H89, an inhibitor of phosphokinase A (PKA, prevented the SKF38393-dependent enhancement of NK cells and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC, counteracted the quinpirole-dependent suppression of NK cells. These findings show that DA receptor subtypes are involved in modulation of NK cells and suggest that D1-like receptors facilitate NK cells by stimulating D1R/D5R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway and D2-like receptors suppress NK cells by inhibiting D3R/D4R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway. The

  5. Enhancement of DNA vaccine-induced immune responses by a 72-bp element from SV40 enhancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-shan; XU Jian-qing; HONG Kun-xue; SHAO Yi-ming; LIU Yong; LI Ding-feng; ZHANG Ran-ran; TANG Hai-li; ZHANG Yu-wei; HUANG Wei; LIU Ying; PENG Hong

    2007-01-01

    Background Although DNA vaccine is considered as the next generation of vaccine, most DNA vaccine candidates are still suffering from the relatively weak immunogenicity despite the increased dosage of plasmid DNA administered. In order to enhance the immune responses elicited by a codon-optimized HIV gag DNA vaccine, a modified plasmid vector pDRVI1.0 and a booster immunization with replicating Tiantan vaccinia (RTV) strain expressing the same gene were employed.Methods Vector pDRVI1.0 was constructed through inserting the 72-bp element from the SV40 enhancer, which was reported promoting nuclear transport of plasmid DNA, to the upstream of cytomegalovirus enhancer/promoter region of the plasmid vector pVR1012. Gene expression levels from expression plasmids based on pDRVI1.0 and pVR1012 were tested. Humoral and cellular immune responses induced by DNA vaccine alone or DNA prime-RTV boost regimen were determined in mice.Results It was shown that the 72-bp element significantly enhanced the gene expression level in non-dividing cells.gag-specific humoral and cellular immune responses induced by DNA vaccination were both significantly improved, while the Th1/Th2 balance was not obviously affected by the 72-bp element. RTV boosting further significantly enhanced DNA vaccine-primed antibody and T cell responses in a Th1-biased manner.Conclusions The 72-bp SV40 enhancer element should be included in the DNA vaccine vector and RTV strain is a very efficient live vector for boosting immunization.

  6. A negative retinoic acid response element in the rat oxytocin promoter restricts transcriptional stimulation by heterologous transactivation domains.

    OpenAIRE

    Lipkin, S. M.; Nelson, C. A.; Glass, C K; Rosenfeld, M G

    1992-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptors are ligand-dependent transcription factors that stimulate gene transcription from promoters containing retinoic acid or thyroid hormone response elements. We describe a high-affinity binding site from the rat oxytocin promoter that mediates negative transcriptional regulation by the retinoic acid receptor. To examine whether strong, constitutive transactivation domains would be capable of stimulating gene transcription when bound to this DNA binding site that normally ...

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-lactamase induction requires two permeases, AmpG and AmpP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneper Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Enterobacteriaceae, β-lactam antibiotic resistance involves murein recycling intermediates. Murein recycling is a complex process with discrete steps taking place in the periplasm and the cytoplasm. The AmpG permease is critical to this process as it transports N-acetylglucosamine anhydrous N-acetylmuramyl peptides across the inner membrane. In Pseudomonadaceae, this intrinsic mechanism remains to be elucidated. Since the mechanism involves two cellular compartments, the characterization of transporters is crucial to establish the link. Results Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has two ampG paralogs, PA4218 (ampP and PA4393 (ampG. Topology analysis using β-galactosidase and alkaline phosphatase fusions indicates ampP and ampG encode proteins which possess 10 and 14 transmembrane helices, respectively, that could potentially transport substrates. Both ampP and ampG are required for maximum expression of β-lactamase, but complementation and kinetic experiments suggest they act independently to play different roles. Mutation of ampG affects resistance to a subset of β-lactam antibiotics. Low-levels of β-lactamase induction occur independently of either ampP or ampG. Both ampG and ampP are the second members of two independent two-gene operons. Analysis of the ampG and ampP operon expression using β-galactosidase transcriptional fusions showed that in PAO1, ampG operon expression is β-lactam and ampR-independent, while ampP operon expression is β-lactam and ampR-dependent. β-lactam-dependent expression of the ampP operon and independent expression of the ampG operon is also dependent upon ampP. Conclusions In P. aeruginosa, β-lactamase induction occurs in at least three ways, induction at low β-lactam concentrations by an as yet uncharacterized pathway, at intermediate concentrations by an ampP and ampG dependent pathway, and at high concentrations where although both ampP and ampG play a role, ampG may be of greater

  8. A topology-motivated mixed finite element method for dynamic response of porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfian, Zahrasadat; Sivaselvan, Mettupalayam

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a numerical method for computing solutions to Biot's fully dynamic model of incompressible saturated porous media [Biot;1956]. Our spatial discretization scheme is based on the three-field formulation (u-w-p) and the coupling of a lowest order Raviart-Thomas mixed element [Raviart,Thomas;1977] for fluid variable fields (w, p ) and a nodal Galerkin finite element for skeleton variable field (u). These mixed spaces are constructed based on the natural topology of the v...

  9. Dis3- and exosome subunit-responsive 3 Prime mRNA instability elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiss, Daniel L.; Hou, Dezhi [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Gross, Robert H. [Dartmouth College, Department of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Center 343, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Andrulis, Erik D., E-mail: exa32@case.edu [Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Successful use of a novel RNA-specific bioinformatic tool, RNA SCOPE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identified novel 3 Prime UTR cis-acting element that destabilizes a reporter mRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Show exosome subunits are required for cis-acting element-mediated mRNA instability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Define precise sequence requirements of novel cis-acting element. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Show that microarray-defined exosome subunit-regulated mRNAs have novel element. -- Abstract: Eukaryotic RNA turnover is regulated in part by the exosome, a nuclear and cytoplasmic complex of ribonucleases (RNases) and RNA-binding proteins. The major RNase of the complex is thought to be Dis3, a multi-functional 3 Prime -5 Prime exoribonuclease and endoribonuclease. Although it is known that Dis3 and core exosome subunits are recruited to transcriptionally active genes and to messenger RNA (mRNA) substrates, this recruitment is thought to occur indirectly. We sought to discover cis-acting elements that recruit Dis3 or other exosome subunits. Using a bioinformatic tool called RNA SCOPE to screen the 3 Prime untranslated regions of up-regulated transcripts from our published Dis3 depletion-derived transcriptomic data set, we identified several motifs as candidate instability elements. Secondary screening using a luciferase reporter system revealed that one cassette-harboring four elements-destabilized the reporter transcript. RNAi-based depletion of Dis3, Rrp6, Rrp4, Rrp40, or Rrp46 diminished the efficacy of cassette-mediated destabilization. Truncation analysis of the cassette showed that two exosome subunit-sensitive elements (ESSEs) destabilized the reporter. Point-directed mutagenesis of ESSE abrogated the destabilization effect. An examination of the transcriptomic data from exosome subunit depletion-based microarrays revealed that mRNAs with ESSEs are found in every up-regulated mRNA data set but are

  10. AMP-Conjugated Quantum Dots: Low Immunotoxicity Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Liu, Lu; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2015-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are engineered nanoparticles that possess special optical and electronic properties and have shown great promise for future biomedical applications. In this work, adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), a small biocompatible molecular, was conjugated to organic QDs to produce hydrophilic AMP-QDs. Using macrophage J774A.1 as the cell model, AMP-QDs exhibited both prior imaging property and low toxicity, and more importantly, triggered limited innate immune responses in macrophage, indicating low immunotoxicity in vitro. Using BALB/c mice as the animal model, AMP-QDs were found to be detained in immune organs but did not evoke robust inflammation responses or obvious histopathological abnormalities, which reveals low immunotoxicity in vivo. This work suggests that AMP is an excellent surface ligand with low immunotoxicity, and potentially used in surface modification for more extensive nanoparticles.

  11. Bimodal responses of cells to trace elements: insights into their mechanism of action using a biospectroscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabjani, Valon; Hoti, Valmira; Pouran, Hamid M; Martin, Francis L; Zhang, Hao

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how organisms respond to trace elements is important because some are essential for normal bodily homeostasis, but can additionally be toxic at high concentrations. The inflection point for many of these elements is unknown and requires sensitive techniques capable of detecting subtle cellular changes as well as cytotoxic alterations. In this study, we treated human cells with arsenic (As), copper or selenium (Se) in a dose-response manner and used attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) microspectroscopy combined with computational analysis to examine cellular alterations. Cell cultures were treated with As(V), Cu(2+) or Se(IV) at concentrations ranging from 0.001 mg L(-1) to 1000 mg L(-1) and their effects were spectrochemically determined. Results show that As(V) and Cu(2+) induce bimodal dose-response effects on cells; this is in line with hormesis-driven responses. Lipids and proteins seem to be the main cell targets for all the elements tested; however, each compound produced a unique fingerprint of effect. Spectral biomarkers indicate that all test agents generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), which could either stimulate repair mechanisms or induce damage in cells. PMID:25048930

  12. Androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene and the effect of a SNP in an androgen response element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Helsen, Christine; Joniau, Steven; Claessens, Frank

    2013-12-01

    More than 50% of prostate cancers have undergone a genomic reorganization that juxtaposes the androgen-regulated promoter of TMPRSS2 and the protein coding parts of several ETS oncogenes. These gene fusions lead to prostate-specific and androgen-induced ETS expression and are associated with aggressive lesions, poor prognosis, and early-onset prostate cancer. In this study, we showed that an enhancer at 13 kb upstream of the TMPRSS2 transcription start site is crucial for the androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene when tested in bacterial artificial chromosomal vectors. Within this enhancer, we identified the exact androgen receptor binding sequence. This newly identified androgen response element is situated next to two binding sites for the pioneer factor GATA2, which were identified by DNase I footprinting. Both the androgen response element and the GATA-2 binding sites are involved in the enhancer activity. Importantly, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs8134378) within this androgen response element reduces binding and transactivation by the androgen receptor. The presence of this SNP might have implications on the expression and/or formation levels of TMPRSS2 fusions, because both have been shown to be influenced by androgens.

  13. Structure of a Thyroid Hormone Receptor DNA-Binding Domain Homodimer Bound to an Inverted Palindrome DNA Response Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yi; Young, Matthew A. (Michigan)

    2010-10-22

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR), as a member of the nuclear hormone receptor family, can recognize and bind different classes of DNA response element targets as either a monomer, a homooligomer, or a heterooligomer. We report here the first crystal structure of a homodimer TR DNA-binding domain (DBD) in complex with an inverted repeat class of thyroid response element (TRE). The structure shows a nearly symmetric structure of the TR DBD assembled on the F2 TRE where the base recognition contacts in the homodimer DNA complex are conserved relative to the previously published structure of a TR-9-cis-retinoic acid receptor heterodimer DNA complex. The new structure also reveals that the T-box region of the DBD can function as a structural hinge that enables a large degree of flexibility in the position of the C-terminal extension helix that connects the DBD to the ligand-binding domain. Although the isolated TR DBDs exist as monomers in solution, we have measured highly cooperative binding of the two TR DBD subunits onto the inverted repeat DNA sequence. This suggests that elements of the DBD can influence the specific TR oligomerization at target genes, and it is not just interactions between the ligand-binding domains that are responsible for TR oligomerization at target genes. Mutational analysis shows that intersubunit contacts at the DBD C terminus account for some, but not all, of the cooperative homodimer TR binding to the inverted repeat class TRE.

  14. Identification of two-component system elements downstream of AHK5 in the stomatal closure response of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mira-Rodado, Virtudes; Veerabagu, Manikandan; Witthöft, Janika; Teply, Julia; Harter, Klaus; Desikan, Radhika

    2012-11-01

    To optimize water use efficiency, plants regulate stomatal closure through a complex signaling process. Hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) is produced in response to several environmental stimuli, and has been identified as a key second messenger involved in the regulation of stomatal aperture. The Arabidopsis histidine kinase 5 (AHK5) has been shown to regulate stomatal closure in response to H₂O₂ and other stimuli that depend on H₂O₂. AHK5 is a member of the two-component system (TCS) in Arabidopsis. The plant TCS comprises three different protein types: the hybrid histidine kinases (HKs), the phosphotransfer proteins (HPs) and the response regulators (RRs). Here we determined TCS elements involved in H₂O₂- and ethylene-dependent stomatal closure downstream of AHK5. By yeast and in planta interaction assays and functional studies, AHP1, 2 and 5 as well as the response regulators ARR4 and ARR7 were identified acting downstream of AHK5 in the ethylene and H₂O₂ response pathways of guard cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that aspartate phosphorylation of ARR4 is only required for the H₂O₂- but not for the ethylene-induced stomatal closure response. Our data suggest the presence of a complex TCS signaling network comprising of at least AHK5, several AHPs and response regulators, which modulate stomatal closure in response to H₂O₂ and ethylene.

  15. Response to the Report of the Transfermium Working Group ''Discovery of the Transfermium Elements''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the opinion of the authors the report of the Transfermium Working Group (TWG) ''Discovery of the Transfermium Elements'' is riddled with errors of omission and commission. Many relevant references and much relevant data were omitted as a result of the selective use of references and data. There were only two members representing the International Union of Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) on the TWG ( and these were not nuclear chemists) while there were seven members representing the International Union of Applied Physics (IUPAP). Much of the experimental evidence is of a basically chemical nature and its proper evaluation would have benefited from the presence of more nuclear chemists on the TWG. Especially grievous is the rejection of the Berkeley claim to the 1955 discovery of element 101 which was based on a clear-cut chemical identification. Our most serious quarrel with the TWG report is their treatment of the discovery of element 104. It is clearly a waste of time and effort to reopen the cases of elements 102 and 103, which were discovered more than 30 years ago with the approval of the suggested names by the IUPAC according to the standards of that era. (Author)

  16. Small intestinal response to 'elemental' and 'complete' liquid feeds in the rat: effect of dietary bulk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxton, D G; Cynk, E U; Thompson, R P

    1987-06-01

    The effect of oral isocaloric feeding on small intestinal structure and function was studied in the rat. The liquid 'elemental' enteral feed Vivonex HN, the liquid 'complete' feed Ensure and the same liquid complete feed with 9% bulk Enrich were compared with solid chow containing 21% bulk (normal rat chow), all given for four weeks. Weight gain was significantly less in the group fed Vivonex HN than that of any other groups. The bulkless Vivonex HN and Ensure increased proximal jejunal mass compared to Enrich with 9% bulk or to normal rat chow. Jejunal mucosal DNA and protein levels also tended to be higher in Ensure and Vivonex HN fed animals, as was jejunal sugar absorption. In the terminal ileum, however, total weight was decreased by both elemental and complete feeds with and without bulk, but particularly by the elemental diet. Bulkless feeds therefore increase jejunal and reduce terminal ileal mass. The striking atrophy of the terminal ileum produced by the elemental diet may be important for its efficacy in treating inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:3040541

  17. Study on the synthesis of AMP derivatives for labeling with 153Sm and 166Ho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the synthesis method and characterization of AMP-( Aminomethylene phosphonic acid): (PDTMP; BDTMP; DMPDTMP). AMP is synthesized by the condensation of correlative diamine, phosphorous acid and formaldehyde using a modified Mannich reaction in the presence of hydrochloric acid. Recrystallization of the crude product from water yields white crystals of pure legend, and subsequently characterized using 1H-NMR, IR spectroscopy, melting point, crystal picture, element analysis, metal trace analysis. Synthesized AMP, when tagged with therapeutic radio nuclides such as 153Sm and 166Ho are quite good. Complexes with RC purity and labeling efficiency 20 - 98% and above could be prepared by ordinary reaction condition. (author)

  18. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zequn; Li, Shasha; Liu, Yunyi; Deng, Pengyi; Huang, Jianguo; He, Guangyuan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we confirmed that sesamin, an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil, is a novel skin-tanning compound. The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells. The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin. Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF). Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB), but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt. Moreover, sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway. Consistent with these results, sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89, a PKA inhibitor, but not by SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002, a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor. Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89. These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase, which was, in turn, due to the activation of cAMP signaling. PMID:21896570

  19. Sesamin induces melanogenesis by microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and tyrosinase up-regulation via cAMP signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zequn Jiang; Shasha Li; Yunyi Liu; Pengyi Deng; Jianguo Huang; Guangyuan He

    2011-01-01

    In this study,we confirmed that sesamin,an active lignan isolated from sesame seed and oil,is a novel skin-tanning compound.The melanin content and tyrosinase activity were increased by sesamin in a dose-dependent manner in B16 melanoma cells.The mRNA and protein levels of tyrosinase were also enhanced after the treatment with sesamin.Western blot analysis revealed that sesamin induced and sustained up-regulation of microphthalmiaassociated transcription factor (MITF).Sesamin could activate cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB),but it had no effect on the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or Akt.Moreover,sesamin activated protein kinase A (PKA) via a cAMP-dependent pathway.Consistent with these results,sesamin-mediated increase of melanin synthesis was reduced significantly by H-89,a PKA inhibitor,but not by SB203580,a p38 MAPK inhibitor or by LY294002,a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor.Sesamin-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and induction of MITF and tyrosinase expression were also inhibited by H-89.These findings indicated that sesamin could stimulate melanogenesis in B16 cells via the up-regulation of MITF and tyrosinase,which was,in turn,due to the activation of cAMP signaling.

  20. Piperine, a component of black pepper, decreases eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in non-chemosensory 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo Cho; Kim, Sung-Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Yang, Hye Jeong; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Park, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of an ethanol extract of black pepper and its constituent, piperine, on odorant-induced signal transduction in non-chemosensory cells. An ethanol extract of black pepper decreased eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in preadipocyte 3T3-L1 cells with no toxicity. Phosphorylation of CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) was down-regulated by the black pepper extract. The concentration (133.8 mg/g) and retention time (5.5 min) of piperine in the ethanol extract were quantified using UPLC-MS/MS. Pretreatment with piperine decreased eugenol-induced cAMP and calcium levels in 3T3-L1 cells. Piperine also decreased the phosphorylation of CREB, which is up-regulated by eugenol. These results suggest that piperine inhibits the eugenol-induced signal transduction pathway through modulation of cAMP and calcium levels and phosphorylation of CREB in non-chemosensory cells.

  1. 33 CFR Appendix D to Part 154 - Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... training (HAZWOPER). 1.2The training section of the plan need not be a detailed course syllabus, but it....6Familiarity with the contracting and ordering procedures to acquire oil spill removal organization resources... members in accordance with designated job responsibilities. 2.2.10Responsibilities and authority of...

  2. Active site coupling in PDE:PKA complexes promotes resetting of mammalian cAMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Srinath; Moorthy, Balakrishnan Shenbaga; Xin Xiang, Lim; Xin Shan, Lim; Bharatham, Kavitha; Tulsian, Nikhil Kumar; Mihalek, Ivana; Anand, Ganesh S

    2014-09-16

    Cyclic 3'5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent-protein kinase (PKA) signaling is a fundamental regulatory pathway for mediating cellular responses to hormonal stimuli. The pathway is activated by high-affinity association of cAMP with the regulatory subunit of PKA and signal termination is achieved upon cAMP dissociation from PKA. Although steps in the activation phase are well understood, little is known on how signal termination/resetting occurs. Due to the high affinity of cAMP to PKA (KD ∼ low nM), bound cAMP does not readily dissociate from PKA, thus begging the question of how tightly bound cAMP is released from PKA to reset its signaling state to respond to subsequent stimuli. It has been recently shown that phosphodiesterases (PDEs) can catalyze dissociation of bound cAMP and thereby play an active role in cAMP signal desensitization/termination. This is achieved through direct interactions with the regulatory subunit of PKA, thereby facilitating cAMP dissociation and hydrolysis. In this study, we have mapped direct interactions between a specific cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE8A) and a PKA regulatory subunit (RIα isoform) in mammalian cAMP signaling, by a combination of amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, peptide array, and computational docking. The interaction interface of the PDE8A:RIα complex, probed by peptide array and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, brings together regions spanning the phosphodiesterase active site and cAMP-binding sites of RIα. Computational docking combined with amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry provided a model for parallel dissociation of bound cAMP from the two tandem cAMP-binding domains of RIα. Active site coupling suggests a role for substrate channeling in the PDE-dependent dissociation and hydrolysis of cAMP bound to PKA. This is the first instance, to our knowledge, of PDEs directly interacting with a cAMP-receptor protein in a mammalian system, and

  3. A topology-motivated mixed finite element method for dynamic response of porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Lotfian, Zahrasadat

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a numerical method for computing solutions to Biot's fully dynamic model of incompressible saturated porous media [Biot;1956]. Our spatial discretization scheme is based on the three-field formulation (u-w-p) and the coupling of a lowest order Raviart-Thomas mixed element [Raviart,Thomas;1977] for fluid variable fields (w, p ) and a nodal Galerkin finite element for skeleton variable field (u). These mixed spaces are constructed based on the natural topology of the variables; hence, are physically compatible and able to exactly model the kind of continuity which is expected. The method automatically satisfies the well known LBB (inf-sup) stability condition and avoids locking that usually occurs in the numerical computations in the incompressible limit and very low hydraulic conductivity. In contrast to the majority of approaches, our three-field formulation can fully capture dynamic behavior of porous media even in high frequency loading phenomena with considerable fluid acceleratio...

  4. Small intestinal response to 'elemental' and 'complete' liquid feeds in the rat: effect of dietary bulk.

    OpenAIRE

    Maxton, D. G.; Cynk, E U; Thompson, R P

    1987-01-01

    The effect of oral isocaloric feeding on small intestinal structure and function was studied in the rat. The liquid 'elemental' enteral feed Vivonex HN, the liquid 'complete' feed Ensure and the same liquid complete feed with 9% bulk Enrich were compared with solid chow containing 21% bulk (normal rat chow), all given for four weeks. Weight gain was significantly less in the group fed Vivonex HN than that of any other groups. The bulkless Vivonex HN and Ensure increased proximal jejunal mass ...

  5. Thyroid hormone-regulated gene expression in juvenile mouse liver: identification of thyroid response elements using microarray profiling and in silico analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquette Martin A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of thyroid hormone signalling can alter growth, development and energy metabolism. Thyroid hormones exert their effects through interactions with thyroid receptors that directly bind thyroid response elements and can alter transcriptional activity of target genes. The effects of short-term thyroid hormone perturbation on hepatic mRNA transcription in juvenile mice were evaluated, with the goal of identifying genes containing active thyroid response elements. Thyroid hormone disruption was induced from postnatal day 12 to 15 by adding goitrogens to dams' drinking water (hypothyroid. A subgroup of thyroid hormone-disrupted pups received intraperitoneal injections of replacement thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (replacement. An additional group received only thyroid hormones four hours prior to sacrifice (hyperthyroid. Hepatic mRNA was extracted and hybridized to Agilent mouse microarrays. Results Transcriptional profiling enabled the identification of 28 genes that appeared to be under direct thyroid hormone-regulation. The regulatory regions of the genome adjacent to these genes were examined for half-site sequences that resemble known thyroid response elements. A bioinformatics search identified 33 thyroid response elements in the promoter regions of 13 different genes thought to be directly regulated by thyroid hormones. Thyroid response elements found in the promoter regions of Tor1a, 2310003H01Rik, Hect3d and Slc25a45 were further validated by confirming that the thyroid receptor is associated with these sequences in vivo and that it can bind directly to these sequences in vitro. Three different arrangements of thyroid response elements were identified. Some of these thyroid response elements were located far up-stream (> 7 kb of the transcription start site of the regulated gene. Conclusions Transcriptional profiling of thyroid hormone disrupted animals coupled with a novel bioinformatics search

  6. Identification of a specific assembly of the G protein Golf as a critical and regulated module of dopamine and adenosine-activated cAMP pathways in the striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis eHervé

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the principal neurons of striatum (medium spiny neurons, MSNs, cAMP pathway is primarily activated through the stimulation of dopamine D1 and adenosine A2A receptors, these receptors being mainly expressed in striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, respectively. Since cAMP signaling pathway could be altered in various physiological and pathological situations, including drug addiction and Parkinson’s disease, it is of crucial importance to identify the molecular components involved in the activation of this pathway. In MSNs, cAMP pathway activation is not dependent on the classical Gs GTP-binding protein but requires a specific G protein subunit heterotrimer containing Galpha-olf/beta2/gamma7 in particular association with adenylate cyclase type 5. This assembly forms an authentic functional signaling unit since loss of one of its members leads to defects of cAMP pathway activation in response to D1 or A2A receptor stimulation, inducing dramatic impairments of behavioral responses dependent on these receptors. Interestingly, D1 receptor-dependent cAMP signaling is modulated by the neuronal levels of Galpha-olf, indicating that Galpha-olf represents the rate-limiting step in this signaling cascade and could constitute a critical element for regulation of D1 receptor responses. In both Parkinsonian patients and several animal models of Parkinson’s disease, the lesion of dopamine neurons produces a prolonged elevation of Galpha-olf levels. This observation gives an explanation for the cAMP pathway hypersensitivity to D1 stimulation, occurring despite an unaltered D1 receptor density. In conclusion, alterations in the highly specialized assembly of Galpha-olf/beta2/gamma7 subunits can happen in pathological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, and it could have important functional consequences in relation to changes in D1 receptor signaling in the striatum.

  7. Yield and Mineral Element Concentration of Beetroot in Response to Nutrient Source in Hydroponic Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Egilla, Jonathan N.

    2009-01-01

    The yield and mineral element concentration of beetroot (Beta vulgaris ‘Bulls Blood’) was determined in a closed nutrient-recirculating ‘Nutrient Film Technique’ (NFT) hydroponic experiment. Seedlings were grown and harvested 42 days after transfer into NFT system (DAT), either with a commercial hydroponic fertilizer or a non-hydroponic soluble fertilizer containing in mg liter-1: 108 nitrogen (N) and 12 calcium (Ca) (N1Ca1), or 200 N and 66.7 Ca (N2Ca2), respectively. Nutrient source had no ...

  8. Impulse response of anistropic composite plates with a higher-order theory and finite element discretization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global safety of nuclear power plants is greatly affected by the resistance of internal and external plate and shell-type structures to dynamic loads caused by accidentally generated flying objects, such as parts of failed rotating equipment or ruptured piping, tornado missiles or impacting aircraft engines. This paper describes the development of a linear and nonlinear laminated plate dynamics computer program based on explicit time integration with a special mass matrix diagonalization scheme using a higher-order theory and Co finite elements. A Lagrangian approach is adopted for the geometric nonlinear analysis and the stress and strain descriptions used are those due to Piola-Kirchhoff and Green respectively

  9. Study of the Internal Mechanical response of an asphalt mixture by 3-D Discrete Element Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huan; Pettinari, Matteo; Hofko, Bernhard;

    2015-01-01

    and the reliability of which have been validated. The dynamic modulus of asphalt mixtures were predicted by conducting Discrete Element simulation under dynamic strain control loading. In order to reduce the calculation time, a method based on frequency–temperature superposition principle has been implemented....... The ball density effect on the internal stress distribution of the asphalt mixture model has been studied when using this method. Furthermore, the internal stresses under dynamic loading have been studied. The agreement between the predicted and the laboratory test results of the complex modulus shows...

  10. Quantitative analysis of polycomb response elements (PREs at identical genomic locations distinguishes contributions of PRE sequence and genomic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okulski Helena

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PREs are cis-regulatory elements essential for the regulation of several hundred developmentally important genes. However, the precise sequence requirements for PRE function are not fully understood, and it is also unclear whether these elements all function in a similar manner. Drosophila PRE reporter assays typically rely on random integration by P-element insertion, but PREs are extremely sensitive to genomic position. Results We adapted the ΦC31 site-specific integration tool to enable systematic quantitative comparison of PREs and sequence variants at identical genomic locations. In this adaptation, a miniwhite (mw reporter in combination with eye-pigment analysis gives a quantitative readout of PRE function. We compared the Hox PRE Frontabdominal-7 (Fab-7 with a PRE from the vestigial (vg gene at four landing sites. The analysis revealed that the Fab-7 and vg PREs have fundamentally different properties, both in terms of their interaction with the genomic environment at each site and their inherent silencing abilities. Furthermore, we used the ΦC31 tool to examine the effect of deletions and mutations in the vg PRE, identifying a 106 bp region containing a previously predicted motif (GTGT that is essential for silencing. Conclusions This analysis showed that different PREs have quantifiably different properties, and that changes in as few as four base pairs have profound effects on PRE function, thus illustrating the power and sensitivity of ΦC31 site-specific integration as a tool for the rapid and quantitative dissection of elements of PRE design.

  11. Aging response of the Ti-Nb system biomaterials with β-stabilizing elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of aging temperature and the contents of β-stabilizing elements on the composition of martensite α'' in two Ti-Nb alloys and the resulting mechanical properties were investigated for biomedical applications. The microstructures were examined by means of optical microscopy (OM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Vickers hardness, compressive elastic modulus and the yield strength have been measured. The results show that the decomposition mode of the martensite α'' in two studied alloys depends on aging treatment and the contents of β-stabilizing elements. Various microstructures such as α, (α + β) and (β + ω) phases were observed to precipitate in the studied alloys after the aging treatments performed at 523 K, 773 K, 883 K and 1023 K for 0.5 h, respectively. Afterwards, the Ti-24Nb-6Zr-7.5Sn-2Fe alloy was aged at 773 K for 1 h. The compressive elastic modulus and mechanical properties of the two alloys are found to be sensitive to the microstructural change caused by aging temperature. For the Ti-24Nb-6Zr-7.5Sn-2Fe alloy, after aging at 773 K for 1 h, its yield strength, compressive elastic modulus and Vickers hardness reach 846 MPa, 26 GPa and 398 HV, respectively. This aged alloy exhibits proper comprehensive mechanical property and strength-to-modulus ratio for biomedical implant applications.

  12. Non-linear finite element analysis for prediction of seismic response of buildings considering soil-structure interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Çelebi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper focuses primarily on the numerical approach based on two-dimensional (2-D finite element method for analysis of the seismic response of infinite soil-structure interaction (SSI system. This study is performed by a series of different scenarios that involved comprehensive parametric analyses including the effects of realistic material properties of the underlying soil on the structural response quantities. Viscous artificial boundaries, simulating the process of wave transmission along the truncated interface of the semi-infinite space, are adopted in the non-linear finite element formulation in the time domain along with Newmark's integration. The slenderness ratio of the superstructure and the local soil conditions as well as the characteristics of input excitations are important parameters for the numerical simulation in this research. The mechanical behavior of the underlying soil medium considered in this prediction model is simulated by an undrained elasto-plastic Mohr-Coulomb model under plane-strain conditions. To emphasize the important findings of this type of problems to civil engineers, systematic calculations with different controlling parameters are accomplished to evaluate directly the structural response of the vibrating soil-structure system. When the underlying soil becomes stiffer, the frequency content of the seismic motion has a major role in altering the seismic response. The sudden increase of the dynamic response is more pronounced for resonance case, when the frequency content of the seismic ground motion is close to that of the SSI system. The SSI effects under different seismic inputs are different for all considered soil conditions and structural types.

  13. Regulation of CYP3A4 by pregnane X receptor: The role of nuclear receptors competing for response element binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istrate, Monica A., E-mail: monicai@scripps.edu [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, Germany, and University of Tuebingen, Auerbachstr. 112, D-70376 Stuttgart (Germany); Nussler, Andreas K., E-mail: nuessler@uchir.me.tum.de [Department of Traumatology, Technical University Munich, Ismaningerstr. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Eichelbaum, Michel, E-mail: michel.eichelbaum@ikp-stuttgart.de [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, Germany, and University of Tuebingen, Auerbachstr. 112, D-70376 Stuttgart (Germany); Burk, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.burk@ikp-stuttgart.de [Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, Germany, and University of Tuebingen, Auerbachstr. 112, D-70376 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-03-19

    Induction of the major drug metabolizing enzyme CYP3A4 by xenobiotics contributes to the pronounced interindividual variability of its expression and often results in clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. It is mainly mediated by PXR, which regulates CYP3A4 expression by binding to several specific elements in the 5' upstream regulatory region of the gene. Induction itself shows a marked interindividual variability, whose underlying determinants are only partly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of nuclear receptor binding to PXR response elements in CYP3A4, as a potential non-genetic mechanism contributing to interindividual variability of induction. By in vitro DNA binding experiments, we showed that several nuclear receptors bind efficiently to the proximal promoter ER6 and distal xenobiotic-responsive enhancer module DR3 motifs. TR{alpha}1, TR{beta}1, COUP-TFI, and COUP-TFII further demonstrated dose-dependent repression of PXR-mediated CYP3A4 enhancer/promoter reporter activity in transient transfection in the presence and absence of the PXR inducer rifampin, while VDR showed this effect only in the absence of treatment. By combining functional in vitro characterization with hepatic expression analysis, we predict that TR{alpha}1, TR{beta}1, COUP-TFI, and COUP-TFII show a strong potential for the repression of PXR-mediated activation of CYP3A4 in vivo. In summary, our results demonstrate that nuclear receptor binding to PXR response elements interferes with PXR-mediated expression and induction of CYP3A4 and thereby contributes to the interindividual variability of induction.

  14. A common signaling pathway is activated in erythroid cells expressing high levels of fetal hemoglobin: a potential role for cAMP-elevating agents in β-globin disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuta T

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tohru Ikuta,1 Yuichi Kuroyanagi,1 Nadine Odo,1 Siyang Liu21Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine, 2Department of Physiology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USABackground: Although erythroid cells prepared from fetal liver, cord blood, or blood from β-thalassemia patients are known to express fetal hemoglobin at high levels, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We previously showed that cyclic nucleotides such as cAMP and cGMP induce fetal hemoglobin expression in primary erythroid cells. Here we report that cAMP signaling contributes to high-level fetal hemoglobin expression in erythroid cells prepared from cord blood and β-thalassemia.Methods: The status of the cAMP signaling pathway was investigated using primary erythroid cells prepared from cord blood and the mononuclear cells of patients with β-thalassemia; erythroid cells from adult bone marrow mononuclear cells served as the control.Results: We found that intracellular cAMP levels were higher in erythroid cells from cord blood and β-thalassemia than from adult bone marrow. Protein kinase A activity levels and cAMP-response element binding protein phosphorylation were higher in erythroid cells from cord blood or β-thalassemia than in adult bone marrow progenitors. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, which play a role in fetal hemoglobin expression, were not consistently activated in cord blood or β-thalassemia erythroid cells. When cAMP signaling was activated in adult erythroid cells, fetal hemoglobin was induced at high levels and associated with reduced expression of BCL11A, a silencer of the β-globin gene.Conclusion: These results suggest that activated cAMP signaling may be a common mechanism among erythroid cells with high fetal hemoglobin levels, in part because of downregulation of BCL11A. Activation of the cAMP signaling pathway with cAMP-elevating agents may prove to be an important signaling mechanism to

  15. A Bioinformatics Method for the Design of Live Attenuated Virus Vaccine Utilizing Host MicroRNA Response Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichadakul, Duangdao

    2016-01-01

    The host microRNA machinery has been employed to control viral replication. To improve safety for live attenuated virus vaccines, the binding sites of the host microRNAs, so-called microRNA response elements (MREs), were incorporated into the virus sequences. These MREs were typically designed for a specific host microRNA and virus sequence with the effectiveness evaluated by experimental trials. Here, we describe a computational flow that can be used to simultaneously design and prioritize the effective MREs in large-scale.

  16. cAMP/PKA signaling inhibits osteogenic differentiation and bone formation in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Mulder, Winfried; Steeghs, Ilse; van de Klundert, Christine; Fernandes, Hugo; Liu, Jun; Arends, Roel; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2009-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) activation induces in vitro osteogenesis and in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). To analyze the species-specific response of this phenomenon and to translate our findings into a clinical trial, suitable animal models and cell lines are desirable. In this report, we assessed whether PKA plays a similar proosteogenic role played by two commonly used PKA activators-N6,2'-O-dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) and 8-bromo cAMP (8b-cAMP)-in a number of model systems. To this end, we treated MC3T3-E1 cells, mouse calvarial osteoblasts, mouse MSCs, and rat MSCs with cAMP. We demonstrate that cAMP inhibits osteogenesis in rodent cell types, evidenced by inhibition of osteogenic markers such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin (BGLAP), and collagen type 1 (COL1A1). In support of this, ex vivo-cultured mouse calvaria exposed to db-cAMP showed a reduction in bone volume. Interestingly, cAMP even stimulated adipogenic differentiation in rat MSCs. Taken together, our data demonstrate that cAMP inhibits osteogenesis in vitro and bone formation ex vivo in rodent models in contrast to our earlier findings in hMSCs. The species discrepancy in response to various osteogenic signals is a critical need to be tested in clinically relevant models to translate the fundamental findings in lower species level to clinical applications. PMID:19231969

  17. Targeting brain tumor cAMP: the case for sex-specific therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Warrington

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between cyclic adenosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP levels and brain tumor biology has been evident for nearly as long as cAMP and its synthetase, adenylate cyclase (ADCY have been known. The importance of the pathway in brain tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in vitro and in multiple animal models. Recently, we provided human validation for a cooperating oncogenic role for cAMP in brain tumorigenesis when we found that SNPs in ADCY8 were correlated with glioma (brain tumor risk in individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Together, these studies provide a strong rationale for targeting cAMP in brain tumor therapy. However, the cAMP pathway is well known to be sexually dimorphic, and SNPs in ADCY8 affected glioma risk in a sex-specific fashion, elevating the risk for females while protecting males. The cAMP pathway can be targeted at multiple levels in the regulation of its synthesis and degradation. Sex differences in response to drugs that target cAMP regulators indicate that successful targeting of the cAMP pathway for brain tumor patients is likely to require matching specific mechanisms of drug action with patient sex.

  18. Identification and Characterization of iron-responsive regulatory elements in Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000) is a model bacterial pathogen of tomato and Arabidopsis thaliana. This bacterium must sense and respond to a variety of environmental signals and understanding how the bacterium integrates these signals into a physiological response is central to our u...

  19. 33 CFR Appendix C to Part 155 - Training Elements for Oil Spill Response Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... supervise shore-based response resources. 2.2.14Actions to take, in accordance with designated job... receive the necessary worker safety training (HAZWOPER). 1.2The training section of the plan need not be a... organization resources. 2.2.9Familiarity with the Area Contingency Plans. 2.2.10Familiarity with...

  20. Identification of hookworm DAF-16/FOXO response elements and direct gene targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The infective stage of the parasitic nematode hookworm is developmentally arrested in the environment and needs to infect a specific host to complete its life cycle. The canine hookworm (Ancylostoma caninum is an excellent model for investigating human hookworm infections. The transcription factor of A. caninum, Ac-DAF-16, which has a characteristic fork head or "winged helix" DNA binding domain (DBD, has been implicated in the resumption of hookworm development in the host. However, the precise roles of Ac-DAF-16 in hookworm parasitism and its downstream targets are unknown. In the present study, we combined molecular techniques and bioinformatics to identify a group of Ac-DAF-16 binding sites and target genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The DNA binding domain of Ac-DAF-16 was used to select genomic fragments by in vitro genomic selection. Twenty four bound genomic fragments were analyzed for the presence of the DAF-16 family binding element (DBE and possible alternative Ac-DAF-16 bind motifs. The 22 genes linked to these genomic fragments were identified using bioinformatics tools and defined as candidate direct gene targets of Ac-DAF-16. Their developmental stage-specific expression patterns were examined. Also, a new putative DAF-16 binding element was identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that Ac-DAF-16 is involved in diverse biological processes throughout hookworm development. Further investigation of these target genes will provide insights into the molecular basis by which Ac-DAF-16 regulates its downstream gene network in hookworm infection.

  1. Potent activity of nobiletin-rich Citrus reticulata peel extract to facilitate cAMP/PKA/ERK/CREB signaling associated with learning and memory in cultured hippocampal neurons: identification of the substances responsible for the pharmacological action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahata, Ichiro; Yoshida, Masaaki; Sun, Wen; Nakajima, Akira; Lai, Yanxin; Osaka, Naoya; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro; Naganuma, Akira; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2013-10-01

    cAMP/PKA/ERK/CREB signaling linked to CRE-mediated transcription is crucial for learning and memory. We originally found nobiletin as a natural compound that stimulates this intracellular signaling and exhibits anti-dementia action in animals. Citrus reticulata or C. unshiu peels are employed as "chinpi" and include a small amount of nobiletin. We here provide the first evidence for beneficial pharmacological actions on the cAMP/PKA/ERK/CREB cascade of extracts from nobiletin-rich C.reticulata peels designated as Nchinpi, the nobiletin content of which was 0.83 ± 0.13% of the dry weight or 16-fold higher than that of standard chinpi extracts. Nchinpi extracts potently facilitated CRE-mediated transcription in cultured hippocampal neurons, whereas the standard chinpi extracts showed no such activity. Also, the Nchinpi extract, but not the standard chinpi extract, stimulated PKA/ERK/CREB signaling. Interestingly, treatment with the Nchinpi extract at the concentration corresponding to approximately 5 μM nobiletin more potently facilitated CRE-mediated transcriptional activity than did 30 μM nobiletin alone. Consistently, sinensetin, tangeretin, 6-demethoxynobiletin, and 6-demethoxytangeretin were also identified as bioactive substances in Nchinpi that facilitated the CRE-mediated transcription. Purified sinensetin enhanced the transcription to a greater degree than nobiletin. Furthermore, samples reconstituted with the four purified compounds and nobiletin in the ratio of each constituent's content in the extract showed activity almost equal to that of the Nchinpi extract to stimulate CRE-mediated transcription. These findings suggest that above four compounds and nobiletin in the Nchinpi extract mainly cooperated to facilitate potently CRE-mediated transcription linked to the upstream cAMP/PKA/ERK/CREB pathway in hippocampal neurons. PMID:23588349

  2. Identification of a Gene Sharing a Promoter and Peroxisome Proliferator-Response Elements With Acyl-CoA Oxidase Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mst. Hasina Akter

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many mammalian genes are clustered on the genomes, and hence the genes in the same cluster can be regulated through a common regulatory element. We indeed showed previously that the perilipin/PEX11α gene pair is transactivated tissue-selectively by PPARγ and PPARα, respectively, through a common binding site. In the present study, we identified a gene, named GSPA, neighboring a canonical PPAR target, acyl-CoA oxidase (AOX gene. GSPA expression was induced by a peroxisome proliferator, Wy14,643, in the liver of wild-type mice, but not PPARα-null mice. GSPA and AOX share the promoter and two peroxisome proliferator-response elements. GSPA mRNA was also found in the heart and skeletal muscle, as well as 3T3-L1 cells. GSPA encodes a protein of 161 amino acids that is enriched in 3T3-L1 cells. Even other gene pairs might be regulated through common sequence elements, and conversely it would be interesting how each gene is aptly regulated in clusters.

  3. Reactor elements properties response during a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four computer algorithms have been introduced to solve for the reactor different materials response subjected to LOCA conditions, they were developed with the intent of producing a simple, accurate and efficient prediction schemes. A general overview of the solution procedures design and working of each of four algorithms are presented, followed by short description of the nature of solution and calculated results. These algorithms are: 1. ZIRCP to give the cladding material properties response under normal and transient conditions. 2. FCGAPP to give the fuel- cladding gas-gap conductivity. 3. NFUEIP to solve the temperature dependent of nuclear fuel properties during normal and transient conditions. 4. TSDATP has been developed to solve for the thermodynamic and transport properties of water and steam over a large range of temperature and pressure. 14 fig

  4. Simplified Boundary Element Method for Kinematic Response of Single Piles in Two-Layer Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Fayun Liang; Haibing Chen; Wei Dong Guo

    2013-01-01

    A simple approach is formulated to predict the elastic, kinematic pile bending during harmonic or transient excitation for a circular pile (rather than a simplified thin strip). The kinematic response of a pile embedded in two-layer soil is resolved in the frequency domain caused by the upward propagation of shear waves from the underlying bedrock. The simplified approach is generally valid to nonhomogeneous soil profiles, in light of the good comparison with the dynamic FE method and BDWF so...

  5. A Novel Heme-responsive Element Mediates Transcriptional Regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Jason; Hamza, Iqbal

    2010-01-01

    Hemes are prosthetic groups that participate in diverse biochemical pathways across phylogeny. Although heme can also regulate broad physiological processes by directly modulating gene expression in Metazoa, the regulatory pathways for sensing and responding to heme are not well defined. Caenorhabditis elegans is a heme auxotroph and relies solely on environmental heme for sustenance. Worms respond to heme availability by regulating heme-responsive genes such as hrg-1, an intestinal heme tran...

  6. Elements That Regulate the DNA Damage Response of Proteins Defective in Cockayne Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M

    2016-01-16

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a premature aging disorder characterized by developmental defects, multisystem progressive degeneration and sensitivity to ultraviolet light. CS is divided into two primary complementation groups, A and B, with the CSA and CSB proteins presumably functioning in DNA repair and transcription. Using laser microirradiation and confocal microscopy, we characterized the nature and regulation of the CS protein response to oxidative DNA damage, double-strand breaks (DSBs), angelicin monoadducts and trioxsalen interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Our data indicate that CSB recruitment is influenced by the type of DNA damage and is most rapid and robust as follows: ICLs>DSBs>monoadducts>oxidative lesions. Transcription inhibition reduced accumulation of CSB at sites of monoadducts and ICLs, but it did not affect recruitment to (although slightly affected retention at) oxidative damage. Inhibition of histone deacetylation altered the dynamics of CSB assembly, suggesting a role for chromatin status in the response to DNA damage, whereas the proteasome inhibitor MG132 had no effect. The C-terminus of CSB and, in particular, its ubiquitin-binding domain were critical to recruitment, while the N-terminus and a functional ATPase domain played a minor role at best in facilitating protein accumulation. Although the absence of CSA had no effect on CSB recruitment, CSA itself localized at sites of ICLs, DSBs and monoadducts but not at oxidative lesions. Our results reveal molecular components of the CS protein response and point to a major involvement of complex lesions in the pathology of CS.

  7. Micoses superficiais e os elementos da resposta imune Superficial mycosis and the immune response elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Ricardo Criado

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available As micoses superficiais são prevalentes em todo o mundo, geralmente ocasionadas por dermatófitos e restritas à camada córnea. A resposta imunológica do hospedeiro às infecções dos fungos dermatófitos depende basicamente das defesas do hospedeiro a metabólitos do fungo, da virulência da cepa ou da espécie infectante e da localização anatômica da infecção. Serão revistos alguns dos fatores da defesa imunológica do hospedeiro que influenciam na eficácia da resposta imune. Em especial, a participação dos receptores de padrão de reconhecimento (PRRs, tais como os receptores toll-like ou os da família lectina (DC-SIGN e dectin-2, que participam da resposta imune inata, conferindo-lhe especificidade e definindo o padrão da resposta imune como um todo. O predomínio celular ou humoral da resposta imune definirá o quadro clínico e o prognóstico da infecção, levando à cura ou cronicidadeSuperficial mycoses are prevalent worldwide. They are often caused by dermatophytes and restricted to the stratum corneum. The host's immune response against infections caused by dermatophytes basically depends on the host's defense against metabolites of the fungi, virulence of the infecting strain or species and anatomical site of the infection. We will review some of the factors of the host's immune defense that influence the efficacy of the immune response. We will particularly review the role of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, such as toll-like receptors or lectin receptors (DCSIGN and Dectin 2, which participate in the innate immune response, bringing specificity to the immune response and setting its pattern. The predominance of a cellular or humoral immune response determines the clinical manifestations and the prognosis of the infection, leading to healing or chronicity

  8. The AzTEC Mathematics Project (AMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gae R.

    The AzTEC Mathematics Project (AMP) is a statewide partnership among Arizona's Regents universities and state community colleges, partner school districts, and economic communities. AzTec is committed to preparing highly qualified K-12 mathematics and science teachers. AMP targeted Native American teachers and teachers of Native American students…

  9. Molecular cloning and expression of the carbohydrate response element binding protein gene and related genes involved in hepatic lipogenesis during post-hatch development of broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) are known to be key regulators of glucose metabolism and lipid synthesis in mammals. Responding to changes in the level of glucose (ChREBP) and insulin (SREBP-1c), these two transcripti...

  10. Identification of Regulatory Mutations in SERPINC1 Affecting Vitamin D Response Elements Associated with Antithrombin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toderici, Mara; de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Padilla, José; Miñano, Antonia; Antón, Ana Isabel; Iniesta, Juan Antonio; Herranz, María Teresa; Fernández, Nuria; Vicente, Vicente; Corral, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Antithrombin is a crucial anticoagulant serpin whose even moderate deficiency significantly increases the risk of thrombosis. Most cases with antithrombin deficiency carried genetic defects affecting exons or flanking regions of SERPINC1.We aimed to identify regulatory mutations inSERPINC1 through sequencing the promoter, intron 1 and 2 of this gene in 23 patients with antithrombin deficiency but without known genetic defects. Three cases with moderate antithrombin deficiency (63–78%) carried potential regulatory mutations. One located 200 bp before the initiation ATG and two in intron 1. These mutations disrupted two out of five potential vitamin D receptor elements (VDRE) identified in SERPINC1 with different software. One genetic defect, c.42-1060_-1057dupTTGA, was a new low prevalent polymorphism (MAF: 0.01) with functional consequences on plasma antithrombin levels. The relevance of the vitamin D pathway on the regulation of SERPINC1 was confirmed in a cell model. Incubation of HepG2 with paricalcitol, a vitamin D analog, increased dose-dependently the levels of SERPINC1transcripts and antithrombin released to the conditioned medium. This study shows further evidence of the transcriptional regulation of SERPINC1 by vitamin D and first describes the functional and pathological relevance of mutations affecting VDRE of this gene. Our study opens new perspectives in the search of new genetic defects involved in antithrombin deficiency and the risk of thrombosis as well as in the design of new antithrombotic treatments. PMID:27003919

  11. Explicit incremental-update algorithm for modeling crystal elasto-viscoplastic response in finite element simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-wei; YANG He; SUN Zhi-chao

    2006-01-01

    Computational stability and efficiency are the key problems for numerical modeling of crystal plasticity,which will limit its development and application in finite element (FE) simulation evidently. Since implicit iterative algorithms are inefficient and have difficulty to determine initial values,an explicit incremental-update algorithm for the elasto-viscoplastic constitutive relation was developed in the intermediate frame by using the second Piola-Kirchoff (P-K) stress and Green stain. The increment of stress and slip resistance were solved by a calculation loop of linear equations sets. The reorientation of the crystal as well as the elastic strain can be obtained from a polar decomposition of the elastic deformation gradient. User material subroutine VUMAT was developed to combine crystal elasto-viscoplastic constitutive model with ABAQUS/Explicit. Numerical studies were performed on a cubic upset model with OFHC material (FCC crystal). The comparison of the numerical results with those obtained by implicit iterative algorithm and those from experiments demonstrates that the explicit algorithm is reliable. Furthermore,the effect rules of material anisotropy,rate sensitivity coefficient (RSC) and loading speeds on the deformation were studied. The numerical studies indicate that the explicit algorithm is suitable and efficient for large deformation analyses where anisotropy due to texture is important.

  12. Opposing needling promotes behavior recovery and exerts neuroprotection via the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway in transient MCAO rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIANG, YIJING; YANG, SHANLI; TAO, JING; LIN, ZHICHENG; YE, XIAOQIAN; YOU, YONGMEI; PENG, JUN; HONG, ZHENFENG; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A(PKA)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) signal transduction pathway triggered by γ-aminobutyric acid class B (GABAB) receptor activation is involved in neuroprotection against ischemia and behavioral recovery induced by opposing needling (ON). A total of 80 rats were randomly divided into four groups: A sham operation group, an ischemia group, an ON group and an ON group effectively inhibited by the GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP35384 (n=20/group). The behavior of the rats was assessed by their neurological deficit score, whereas the impairment of gait was examined using the CatWalk system. The volume of cerebral infarction was examined upon treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The expression levels of CREB, GABAB1 and GABAB2 were examined by western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC), cAMP and PKA in the serum was detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the present study, in comparison with other groups, the ON group exhibited a reduced score for the neurological deficit, the stride length and swing speed were improved, and the volume of infarction was reduced. However, these effects were reversed upon administration of CGP35384. Additionally, the expression levels of CREB, GABAB1 and GABAB2 were increased in the ON group. The levels of AC, cAMP and PKA in the serum were also increased in the ON group, whereas the addition of CGP35384 reversed these effects. The results of the present study demonstrated that ON markedly protected the brain against transient cerebral ischemic injury, and this effect was possibly mediated by the activation of the GABAB/cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway. These findings implied that ON may be a potential therapeutic method for treating stroke. PMID:26780954

  13. Involvement of Phosphorylated "Apis Mellifera" CREB in Gating a Honeybee's Behavioral Response to an External Stimulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Katrin B.; Heufelder, Karin; Feige, Janina; Bauer, Paul; Dyck, Yan; Ehrhardt, Lea; Kühnemund, Johannes; Bergmann, Anja; Göbel, Josefine; Isecke, Marlene; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) is involved in neuronal plasticity. Phosphorylation activates CREB and an increased level of phosphorylated CREB is regarded as an indicator of CREB-dependent transcriptional activation. In honeybees ("Apis mellifera") we recently demonstrated a particular high…

  14. Intrasteric control of AMPK via the gamma1 subunit AMP allosteric regulatory site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julian; Chen, Zhi-Ping; Van Denderen, Bryce J W; Morton, Craig J; Parker, Michael W; Witters, Lee A; Stapleton, David; Kemp, Bruce E

    2004-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a alphabetagamma heterotrimer that is activated in response to both hormones and intracellular metabolic stress signals. AMPK is regulated by phosphorylation on the alpha subunit and by AMP allosteric control previously thought to be mediated by both alpha and gamma subunits. Here we present evidence that adjacent gamma subunit pairs of CBS repeat sequences (after Cystathionine Beta Synthase) form an AMP binding site related to, but distinct from the classical AMP binding site in phosphorylase, that can also bind ATP. The AMP binding site of the gamma(1) CBS1/CBS2 pair, modeled on the structures of the CBS sequences present in the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase crystal structure, contains three arginine residues 70, 152, and 171 and His151. The yeast gamma homolog, snf4 contains a His151Gly substitution, and when this is introduced into gamma(1), AMP allosteric control is substantially lost and explains why the yeast snf1p/snf4p complex is insensitive to AMP. Arg70 in gamma(1) corresponds to the site of mutation in human gamma(2) and pig gamma(3) genes previously identified to cause an unusual cardiac phenotype and glycogen storage disease, respectively. Mutation of any of AMP binding site Arg residues to Gln substantially abolishes AMP allosteric control in expressed AMPK holoenzyme. The Arg/Gln mutations also suppress the previously described inhibitory properties of ATP and render the enzyme constitutively active. We propose that ATP acts as an intrasteric inhibitor by bridging the alpha and gamma subunits and that AMP functions to derepress AMPK activity.

  15. cAMP-binding proteins in medullary tubules from rat kidney: effect of ADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gapstur, S.M.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Little is known of the regulatory steps in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) on the renal epithelium, subsequent to the cAMP generation. We studied cAMP-binding proteins in the medullary collecting tubule (MCT) and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (MTAL) microdissected from the rat kidney by use of photoaffinity labeling. Microdissected tubules were homogenized and photoaffinity labeled by incubation with 1 microM 32P-labeled 8-azido-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (N3-8-(32P)-cAMP); the incorporated 32P was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Both in MCT and MTAL preparations, the analyses showed incorporation of N3-8-(32P)cAMP into two bands (Mr = 49,000 and Mr = 55,000) that comigrated with standards of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits RI and RII. In MCT, most of the 32P (80%) was incorporated into RI, whereas in MTAL the 32P incorporated into RI and RII was equivalent. When freshly dissected MCT segments were incubated with 10(-12)-10(-6) M AVP, the subsequent photoaffinity labeling of RI with N3-8-(32P)cAMP was markedly diminished in a dose-dependent manner compared with controls. Our results suggest that cAMP binds in MCT and MTAL to regulatory subunits RI and RII of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, in MCT the dominant type of cAMP-dependent protein kinase appears to be type I. The outlined procedure is suitable to indirectly measure the occupancy of RI by endogenous cAMP generated in MCT cells in response to physiological levels (10(-12) M) of AVP.

  16. Emergence of Escherichia coli Producing Extended-Spectrum AmpC beta-lactamases (ESAC) in animals

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-YvesMADEC

    2014-01-01

    In both humans and animals, the spread of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBL)/AmpC producers has become a major issue, particularly due to the plasmidic dissemination of most of these genes. Besides, over-expression of the chromosomal ampC gene was largely reported in human and animal Enterobacteriaceae and, more recently, modifications within the coding region of the ampC gene [encoding Extended-spectrum AmpC β-lactamases (ESACs)] were shown to be responsible for an hydrolysis spectrum exp...

  17. Software Design Document for the AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip, Bobby [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL; Cochran, Bill [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the design of the AMP nuclear fuel performance code. It provides an overview of the decomposition into separable components, an overview of what those components will do, and the strategic basis for the design. The primary components of a computational physics code include a user interface, physics packages, material properties, mathematics solvers, and computational infrastructure. Some capability from established off-the-shelf (OTS) packages will be leveraged in the development of AMP, but the primary physics components will be entirely new. The material properties required by these physics operators include many highly non-linear properties, which will be replicated from FRAPCON and LIFE where applicable, as well as some computationally-intensive operations, such as gap conductance, which depends upon the plenum pressure. Because there is extensive capability in off-the-shelf leadership class computational solvers, AMP will leverage the Trilinos, PETSc, and SUNDIALS packages. The computational infrastructure includes a build system, mesh database, and other building blocks of a computational physics package. The user interface will be developed through a collaborative effort with the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Capability Transfer program element as much as possible and will be discussed in detail in a future document.

  18. The Dynamic Response of an Euler-Bernoulli Beam on an Elastic Foundation by Finite Element Analysis using the Exact Stiffness Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Soo; Kyum Kim, Moon

    2012-08-01

    In this study, finite element analysis of beam on elastic foundation, which received great attention of researchers due to its wide applications in engineering, is performed for estimating dynamic responses of shallow foundation using exact stiffness matrix. First, element stiffness matrix based on the closed solution of beam on elastic foundation is derived. Then, we performed static finite element analysis included exact stiffness matrix numerically, comparing results from the analysis with some exact analysis solutions well known for verification. Finally, dynamic finite element analysis is performed for a shallow foundation structure under rectangular pulse loading using trapezoidal method. The dynamic analysis results exist in the reasonable range comparing solution of single degree of freedom problem under a similar condition. The results show that finite element analysis using exact stiffness matrix is evaluated as a good tool of estimating the dynamic response of structures on elastic foundation.

  19. Explicit Finite Element Analysis of Dynamic Response of Protection Frame System Subjected to Impact Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan-Bo Meng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Height limit protection frame of railway bridges apply to the road crossing the railway bridge, its role is to ensure the safety of the railway bridge to prevent road motor vehicles to hit the bridge beam, causing beam damage and even endangering the safety of the railway lines. Therefore, it is necessary to do in-depth discussion of collision mechanism and failure mode of height limit protection frame of railway bridges under the impact of the over-high vehicle, in order to improve the survivability of protection frame to protect the safety of the railway bridge and rail transport. Some rules and characteristics were obtained by establishing collision model of height limit protection frame of railway bridges and the over-high vehicles using the software of ANSYS/LS-DYNA and studying the dynamic response of protection frame impact loading by the vehicle under the different parameters. Thus for the similar protection frame structure design, maintenance and damage assessment provide theoretical support.

  20. Genomic Regulation of the Response of an Agroecosystem to Elements of Global Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLucia, Evan, H.

    2011-06-03

    This document outlines some of the major accomplishments from this project: (1) New tools for analyzing and visualizing microarray data from soybean gene expression experiments; (2) Physiological, biochemical, and gene array evidence that acclimation of carbon metabolism to elevated CO{sub 2} is governed in significant part by changes in gene expression associated with respiratory metabolism; (3) Increased carbon assimilation in soybeans grown at elevated CO{sub 2} altered pools of carbohydrates and transcripts that control growth and expansion of young leaves; (4) Growth at elevated CO{sub 2} increases the abundance of transcripts controlling cell wall polysaccharide synthesis but not transcripts controlling lignin synthesis; (5) The total antioxidant capacity of soybeans varies among cultivars and in response to atmospheric change; (6) Accelerated leaf senescence at elevated O{sub 3} coincides with reduced abundance of transcripts controlling protein synthesis; (7) Growth under elevated CO{sub 2} increases the susceptibility of soybean to insect herbivores by increasing insect lifespan and fecundity through altered leaf chemistry and by defeating molecular induction of plant defenses; (8) Exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} alters flavonoid metabolism in soybean; (9) Exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} or O{sub 3} conferred resistance to soybean mosaic virus by cross inducing defense- and stress-related signaling pathways; and (10) Exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} accelerates decomposition by changing chemical and biotic properties of the soil.

  1. Validation of Shoulder Response of Human Body Finite-Element Model (GHBMC) Under Whole Body Lateral Impact Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwansik; Kim, Taewung; Panzer, Matthew B; Crandall, Jeff R

    2016-08-01

    In previous shoulder impact studies, the 50th-percentile male GHBMC human body finite-element model was shown to have good biofidelity regarding impact force, but under-predicted shoulder deflection by 80% compared to those observed in the experiment. The goal of this study was to validate the response of the GHBMC M50 model by focusing on three-dimensional shoulder kinematics under a whole-body lateral impact condition. Five modifications, focused on material properties and modeling techniques, were introduced into the model and a supplementary sensitivity analysis was done to determine the influence of each modification to the biomechanical response of the body. The modified model predicted substantially improved shoulder response and peak shoulder deflection within 10% of the observed experimental data, and showed good correlation in the scapula kinematics on sagittal and transverse planes. The improvement in the biofidelity of the shoulder region was mainly due to the modifications of material properties of muscle, the acromioclavicular joint, and the attachment region between the pectoralis major and ribs. Predictions of rib fracture and chest deflection were also improved because of these modifications. PMID:26753830

  2. Warmer amps for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    CERN is working together with an Italian company to develop superconducting cables that can function at temperatures of up to 25 K (-248°C). This will make it possible to move LHC magnet power supplies out of the tunnel, protecting them from exposure to the showers of very high-energy particles produced by the accelerator.   Figure 1: devices of this type, which measure approximately 10 metres in length, are inserted between the accelerating magnets at different points along the LHC. When it comes to consuming electricity, the magnets that steer particles through large accelerators can be characterised with just one word: greedy. For the LHC, the total current can reach 1.5 million amps. At the present time, this current is brought in via copper cables of up to 10 cm in diameter. In the tunnel, these cables connect the current leads - which provide the transition between the ambient-temperature cables and the magnets in their bath of superfluid helium - to the power supply. In the a...

  3. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase in regulation of skeletal muscle metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Dziewulska; Paweł Dobrzyń; Agnieszka Dobrzyń

    2010-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a conserved, ubiquitously expressed eukaryotic enzyme that is activated in response to increasing AMP level. Regulation of AMPK activity in skeletal muscle is coordinated by contraction and phosphorylation by upstream kinases and a growing number of hormones and cytokines. Once activated, AMPK turns on catabolic, ATP-generating pathways, and turns off ATP-consuming metabolic processes such as biosynthesis and proliferation. Activation of AMPK promotes gl...

  4. Cyclic AMP concentrations in dendritic cells induce and regulate Th2 immunity and allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jihyung; Kim, Tae Hoon; Murray, Fiona; Li, Xiangli; Choi, Sara S.; Broide, David H.; Corr, Maripat; Lee, Jongdae; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Insel, Paul A.; Raz, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Allergic asthma is characterized by Th2 type inflammation, leading to airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling. However, the mechanisms by which DC promote Th2 differentiation remain unclear. Herein we demonstrate that low cAMP levels in DC induce Th2-biased responses in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, mice with conditional deletion of Gnas in DC (GnasΔCD11c mice) develop spontaneous bronchial asthma that shares multiple similarities with human asthma. In contrast, increasing cAMP levels inh...

  5. Growth responses of selected freshwater algae to trace elements and scrubber ash slurry generated by coal-fired power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vocke, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    The development and implementation of standard toxicity tests is a necessity if consistent and reliable data are to be obtained for water quality criteria. The adapted EPA AAPBT is an ideal static algal toxicity test system. The algal test medium has a chemical composition similar to natural unpolluted waters of low ionic strength. It is appropriate to use MATC water quality criteria when assessing the potential impact of pollutants generated by coal-fired power stations because these energy-generated pollutants typically enter aquatic systems in small quantities over long periods. The MATC water quality criteria are estimates of trace element and SASE levels, based on the most sensitive alga investigated, that will not cause significant changes in naturally-functioning algal populations. These levels are 0.016f mg L/sup -1/ As(V), 0.001 mg L/sup -1/ Cd(II), 0.004 mg L/sup -1/ Hg(II), 0.006 mg L/sup -1/ Se(VI), and 0.344% SASE. To provide viable working water quality criteria, an extrapolation from the laboratory to the natural environment must be made. Therefore, those oxidation states of the trace elements were selected which are the dominant states occurring in natural, unpolluted, slightly alkaline freshwaters. It must be pointed out that these MATC values are based on algal responses to single toxicants and no allowance is made for synergistic, additive, or antagonistic relationships which could occur in natural aquatic systems. Additionally, natural chelation may influence toxicity. The highly toxic nature of potential pollutants from coal-fired generating plants emphasizes the need for minimizing stack effluent pollutants and retaining scrubber ash slurry for proper disposal in an effort to maintain trace elements in concentration ranges compatible with naturally-functioning ecosystems.

  6. Geogenic and Anthropogenic Moss Responsiveness to Element Distribution Around a Pb-Zn Mine, Toranica, Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovska, Svetlana; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Balabanova, Biljana

    2016-04-01

    Moss species (Homalothecium lutescens, Hypnum cupressiforme, Brachythecium glareosum, and Campthotecium lutescens) were used as suitable sampling media for biomonitoring the origin of heavy-metal pollution in the lead-zinc (Pb-Zn) mine "Toranica" near the Kriva Palanka town, Eastern Macedonia. The contents of 20 elements-silver (Ag), aluminum (Al), arsenic (As), barium (Ba), calcium (Ca), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), potassium (K), lithium (Li), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), sodium (Na), nickel (Ni), Pb, strontium (Sr), vanadium (V), and (Zn) were determined by atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. Data processing was applied with combinations of multivariate statistical methods: factor analysis, principal component analysis, and cluster analysis. Moss' responsiveness to the atmospheric distribution of the selected elements was investigated in correlation to the specific geology of the region (soil dusting). Lithogenic distribution was characterized with the distribution of three dominant geochemical associations: F1: Al-Li-V-Cr-Ni-Co, F2: Ba-Ca-Sr, and F3: Cd-Zn-Pb-Cu. Spatial distribution was constructed for visualization of the factor deposition. Furthermore, air distribution (passive biomonitoring) versus soil geochemistry of the analyzed elements was examined. Significant correlations were singled out for Pb, Zn, and Cd and for Mg(moss)/Na(soil). Characteristic lithological anomaly characterized the presence of the oldest geological volcanic rocks. Zone 1 (Pb-Zn mine surrounding) presents a unique area with hydrothermal action of Pb-Zn mineralization leading to polymetallic enrichments in soil. This phenomenon strongly affects the environment, which is a natural geochemical imprint in this unique area (described with the strong dominance of the geochemical association Cd-Zn-Pb-Cu). PMID:26888226

  7. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V

    2016-01-01

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors. PMID:27623747

  8. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V.

    2016-01-01

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors. PMID:27623747

  9. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V

    2016-09-14

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors.

  10. Sex differences, developmental changes, response to injury and cAMP regulation of the mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cytochrome p450scc, and aromatase in the olivocerebellar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavaque, Esteban; Mayen, Aurora; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Garcia-Segura, Luis M

    2006-02-15

    Compelling evidence has now demonstrated direct biological actions of sex steroids at the cerebellum. Likewise, the expression of key steroidogenic factors, such as the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc), and aromatase, at this neural site has been reported. Little is known, however, about the regulation of their genes in the cerebellum. Assessment of StAR, P450scc, and aromatase mRNAs in the cerebellum of male and female rats revealed that the expression of these genes is developmentally regulated, with the highest levels at early postnatal ages in both sexes and with significantly higher mRNA levels in postnatal males. Expression of these genes in the female remained unaltered after perinatal androgenization and along the estrous cycle. In contrast, damage of cerebellar afferent neurons of the inferior olivary nucleus evoked a significant increase in StAR, P450scc, and aromatase mRNA levels at this site, as well as a transient elevation in StAR mRNA at the cerebellum. Finally, enhancement of cAMP levels in cultured cerebellar neurons induced a significant increase in StAR and aromatase mRNA levels. In summary, we present herein novel evidence for the developmentally regulated and partially sexually dimorphic pattern of expression of StAR, P450scc, and aromatase genes in the rat cerebellum. These observations, together with the finding that the mRNA levels of these steroidogenic molecules are sensitive to injury and are regulated by intracellular cAMP, strongly suggest that local steroidogenesis is likely to play an important role during development and adaptation to neurodegenerative processes in the olivocerebellar system. PMID:16329132

  11. Development of a Finite Element Model of the Human Shoulder to Investigate the Mechanical Responses and Injuries in Side Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masami; Miki, Kazuo; Yang, King H.

    Previous studies in both fields of automotive safety and orthopedic surgery have hypothesized that immobilization of the shoulder caused by the shoulder injury could be related to multiple rib fractures, which are frequently life threatening. Therefore, for more effective occupant protection, it is important to understand the relationship between shoulder injury and multiple rib fractures in side impact. The purpose of this study is to develop a finite element model of the human shoulder in order to understand this relationship. The shoulder model included three bones (the humerus, scapula and clavicle) and major ligaments and muscles around the shoulder. The model also included approaches to represent bone fractures and joint dislocations. The relationships between shoulder injury and immobilization of the shoulder are discussed using model responses for lateral shoulder impact. It is also discussed how the injury can be related to multiple rib fractures.

  12. Fuzzy tandem repeats containing p53 response elements may define species-specific p53 target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Simeonova

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary forces that shape regulatory networks remain poorly understood. In mammals, the Rb pathway is a classic example of species-specific gene regulation, as a germline mutation in one Rb allele promotes retinoblastoma in humans, but not in mice. Here we show that p53 transactivates the Retinoblastoma-like 2 (Rbl2 gene to produce p130 in murine, but not human, cells. We found intronic fuzzy tandem repeats containing perfect p53 response elements to be important for this regulation. We next identified two other murine genes regulated by p53 via fuzzy tandem repeats: Ncoa1 and Klhl26. The repeats are poorly conserved in evolution, and the p53-dependent regulation of the murine genes is lost in humans. Our results indicate a role for the rapid evolution of tandem repeats in shaping differences in p53 regulatory networks between mammalian species.

  13. CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A METAL RESPONSIVE ELEMENT-CONTAINING FRAGMENT FROM THE WILSON DISEASE GENE LOCUS BY JUNCTION TRAPPING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢久永; 刘国仰; 王梅; 黄尚志; 罗会元

    1998-01-01

    All mammalian metallothionaln genes studied to dare have several metal responsive elements (MRE) with consensus sequences of TGCRCNC (R, purlne) in their regulatory region. MRE-11ke sequeaees were also found in many other metal-related genes. To see whether there is also such a sequence at the genetic locus (13q14. 3) d Wilstm disease, which is a genetic disorder d copper metabolisa''n, junction-trapping method baaed on the MRE sequence was used. A fragment containing MRE and MRE-like sequences from YAC 27D8 at the WND locus was successfully cloned and mapped back to the YAC by PC, R, Presence of such a sequence in the copper transporter gene at the W''D locus might imply that it has a possible interesting role in the regulation of WD gene expression.

  14. Activation of estrogen response elements is mediated both via estrogen and muscle contractions in rat skeletal muscle myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiik, A.; Hellsten, Ylva; Berthelson, P.;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the activation of estrogen response elements (EREs) by estrogen and muscle contractions in rat myotubes in culture and to assess whether the activation is dependent on the estrogen receptors (ERs). In addition, the effect of estrogen and contraction...... then differentiated into myotubes and subjected to either estrogen or electrical stimulation. Activation of the ERE sequence was determined by measurement of luciferase activity. The results show that both ERalpha and ERbeta are expressed in myotubes from rats. Both estrogen stimulation and muscle contraction...... increased (P muscle contraction. Use of ER antagonists showed that, whereas the estrogen-induced transactivation is mediated via ERs, the effect of muscle contraction...

  15. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zirong; Li, Jian-Liang; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A; Carper, Miranda B; Haura, Eric B; Schabath, Matthew B; Lu, Jianrong; Amelio, Antonio L; Cress, W Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J; Wu, Lizi

    2016-06-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC.

  16. P53 family members modulate the expression of PRODH, but not PRODH2, via intronic p53 response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Raimondi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 was previously shown to markedly up-regulate the expression of the PRODH gene, encoding the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH enzyme, which catalyzes the first step in proline degradation. Also PRODH2, which degrades 4-hydroxy-L-proline, a product of protein (e.g. collagen catabolism, was recently described as a p53 target. Here, we confirmed p53-dependent induction of endogenous PRODH in response to genotoxic damage in cell lines of different histological origin. We established that over-expression of TAp73β or TAp63β is sufficient to induce PRODH expression in p53-null cells and that PRODH expression parallels the modulation of endogenous p73 by genotoxic drugs in several cell lines. The p53, p63, and p73-dependent transcriptional activation was linked to specific intronic response elements (REs, among those predicted by bioinformatics tools and experimentally validated by a yeast-based transactivation assay. p53 occupancy measurements were validated in HCT116 and MCF7 human cell lines. Conversely, PRODH2 was not responsive to p63 nor p73 and, at best, could be considered a weak p53 target. In fact, minimal levels of PRODH2 transcript induction by genotoxic stress was observed exclusively in one of four p53 wild-type cell lines tested. Consistently, all predicted p53 REs in PRODH2 were poor matches to the p53 RE consensus and showed very weak responsiveness, only to p53, in the functional assay. Taken together, our results highlight that PRODH, but not PRODH2, expression is under the control of p53 family members, specifically p53 and p73. This supports a deeper link between proteins of the p53-family and metabolic pathways, as PRODH modulates the balance of proline and glutamate levels and those of their derivative alpha-keto-glutarate (α-KG under normal and pathological (tumor conditions.

  17. Expression of MUC17 is regulated by HIF1α-mediated hypoxic responses and requires a methylation-free hypoxia responsible element in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Kitamoto

    Full Text Available MUC17 is a type 1 membrane-bound glycoprotein that is mainly expressed in the digestive tract. Recent studies have demonstrated that the aberrant overexpression of MUC17 is correlated with the malignant potential of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs; however, the exact regulatory mechanism of MUC17 expression has yet to be identified. Here, we provide the first report of the MUC17 regulatory mechanism under hypoxia, an essential feature of the tumor microenvironment and a driving force of cancer progression. Our data revealed that MUC17 was significantly induced by hypoxic stimulation through a hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α-dependent pathway in some pancreatic cancer cells (e.g., AsPC1, whereas other pancreatic cancer cells (e.g., BxPC3 exhibited little response to hypoxia. Interestingly, these low-responsive cells have highly methylated CpG motifs within the hypoxia responsive element (HRE, 5'-RCGTG-3', a binding site for HIF1α. Thus, we investigated the demethylation effects of CpG at HRE on the hypoxic induction of MUC17. Treatment of low-responsive cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine followed by additional hypoxic incubation resulted in the restoration of hypoxic MUC17 induction. Furthermore, DNA methylation of HRE in pancreatic tissues from patients with PDACs showed higher hypomethylation status as compared to those from non-cancerous tissues, and hypomethylation was also correlated with MUC17 mRNA expression. Taken together, these findings suggested that the HIF1α-mediated hypoxic signal pathway contributes to MUC17 expression, and DNA methylation of HRE could be a determinant of the hypoxic inducibility of MUC17 in pancreatic cancer cells.

  18. Roles of Salicylic Acid-responsive Cis-acting Elements and W-boxes in Salicylic Acid Induction of VCH3 Promoter in Transgenic Tobaccos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Yan LI; Wei WEI; Yu LI

    2006-01-01

    A salicylic acid (SA)-inducible VCH3 promoter was recently identified from grapevine (Vitis amurensis) that contains two inverse SA-responsive cis-acting elements and four W-boxes. To further demonstrate the roles of these elements, four fragments with lengths from -1187, -892, -589, -276 to +7 bp were fused with the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene and transferred to Nicotiana tobacum,together with another four VCH3 promoter fragments with mutation in the two inverse SA-responsive elements. The functions of each promoter fragment were examined by analysis of GUS activity in the transgenic tobacco root treated with SA. Enhanced GUS activity was shown in the roots of transgenic tobaccos with the VCH3 (-1187)-GUS construct containing two SA-responsive cis-acting elements and four W-boxes. However, GUS activity directed by the VCH3 (-892)-GUS construct, containing one SA cisacting element and four W-boxes, was reduced by up to 35% compared with that in tobaccos transformed with the VCH3 (-1187)-GUS construct, indicating that the SA cis-acting element plays an important role in SA induction of the VCH3 promoter. Neither the m2VCH3 (-1187)-GUS nor the m VCH3 (-892)-GUSconstruct, with mutation on the SA-responsive elements, abolished the expression of GUS activity, demonstrating that the W-boxes in the VCH3 promoter are also involved in SA induction. Histochemical analysis of GUS activity directed by each of the eight VCH3 promoter fragments showed that GUS was expressed specifically in vascular tissue. It was concluded that both the SA-responsive cis-acting elements and the Wboxes are important for the SA induction of the VCH3 promoter. This promoter might have a potential use in plant genetic engineering.

  19. Hydroponics: A Versatile System to Study Nutrient Allocation and Plant Responses to Nutrient Availability and Exposure to Toxic Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nga T; McInturf, Samuel A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G

    2016-01-01

    Hydroponic systems have been utilized as one of the standard methods for plant biology research and are also used in commercial production for several crops, including lettuce and tomato. Within the plant research community, numerous hydroponic systems have been designed to study plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here we present a hydroponic protocol that can be easily implemented in laboratories interested in pursuing studies on plant mineral nutrition. This protocol describes the hydroponic system set up in detail and the preparation of plant material for successful experiments. Most of the materials described in this protocol can be found outside scientific supply companies, making the set up for hydroponic experiments less expensive and convenient. The use of a hydroponic growth system is most advantageous in situations where the nutrient media need to be well controlled and when intact roots need to be harvested for downstream applications. We also demonstrate how nutrient concentrations can be modified to induce plant responses to both essential nutrients and toxic non-essential elements. PMID:27500800

  20. Finite Element Modeling and Analysis of Nonlinear Impact and Frictional Motion Responses Including Fluid—Structure Coupling Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear three dimensional (3D single rack model and a nonlinear 3D whole pool multi-rack model are developed for the spent fuel storage racks of a nuclear power plant (NPP to determine impacts and frictional motion responses when subjected to 3D excitations from the supporting building floor. The submerged free standing rack system and surrounding water are coupled due to hydrodynamic fluid-structure interaction (FSI using potential theory. The models developed have features that allow consideration of geometric and material nonlinearities including (1 the impacts of fuel assemblies to rack cells, a rack to adjacent racks or pool walls, and rack support legs to the pool floor; (2 the hydrodynamic coupling of fuel assemblies with their storing racks, and of a rack with adjacent racks, pool walls, and the pool floor; and (3 the dynamic motion behavior of rocking, twisting, and frictional sliding of rack modules. Using these models 3D nonlinear time history dynamic analyses are performed per the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC criteria. Since few such modeling, analyses, and results using both the 3D single and whole pool multiple rack models are available in the literature, this paper emphasizes description of modeling and analysis techniques using the SOLVIA general purpose nonlinear finite element code. Typical response results with different Coulomb friction coefficients are presented and discussed.

  1. Hydroponics: A Versatile System to Study Nutrient Allocation and Plant Responses to Nutrient Availability and Exposure to Toxic Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nga T; McInturf, Samuel A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G

    2016-07-13

    Hydroponic systems have been utilized as one of the standard methods for plant biology research and are also used in commercial production for several crops, including lettuce and tomato. Within the plant research community, numerous hydroponic systems have been designed to study plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here we present a hydroponic protocol that can be easily implemented in laboratories interested in pursuing studies on plant mineral nutrition. This protocol describes the hydroponic system set up in detail and the preparation of plant material for successful experiments. Most of the materials described in this protocol can be found outside scientific supply companies, making the set up for hydroponic experiments less expensive and convenient. The use of a hydroponic growth system is most advantageous in situations where the nutrient media need to be well controlled and when intact roots need to be harvested for downstream applications. We also demonstrate how nutrient concentrations can be modified to induce plant responses to both essential nutrients and toxic non-essential elements.

  2. C++ Coding Standards for the AMP Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Thomas M [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL

    2009-09-01

    This document provides an initial starting point to define the C++ coding standards used by the AMP nuclear fuel performance integrated code project and a part of AMP's software development process. This document draws from the experiences, and documentation [1], of the developers of the Marmot Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Much of the software in AMP will be written in C++. The power of C++ can be abused easily, resulting in code that is difficult to understand and maintain. This document gives the practices that should be followed on the AMP project for all new code that is written. The intent is not to be onerous but to ensure that the code can be readily understood by the entire code team and serve as a basis for collectively defining a set of coding standards for use in future development efforts. At the end of the AMP development in fiscal year (FY) 2010, all developers will have experience with the benefits, restrictions, and limitations of the standards described and will collectively define a set of standards for future software development. External libraries that AMP uses do not have to meet these requirements, although we encourage external developers to follow these practices. For any code of which AMP takes ownership, the project will decide on any changes on a case-by-case basis. The practices that we are using in the AMP project have been in use in the Denovo project [2] for several years. The practices build on those given in References [3-5]; the practices given in these references should also be followed. Some of the practices given in this document can also be found in [6].

  3. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na/sup +/ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-09-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 ..mu..g/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37/sup 0/C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na/sup +/ influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na/sup +/ entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na/sup +/ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na/sup +/ during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na/sup +/ influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na/sup +/ transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP.

  4. Changes in nephrogenous cyclic AMP excretion and plasma cyclic AMP following treatment of hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naafs, M A; van der Velden, P C; Fischer, H R; Koorevaar, G; van Duin, S; Hackeng, W H; Schopman, W; Silberbusch, J

    1984-08-01

    Plasma cyclic AMP (PcAMP) concentration and the excretion of cyclic AMP/dl GF were estimated in 11 thyrotoxic patients before and after medical treatment. PcAMP concentrations were significantly higher during hyperthyroidism (2.30 +/- 0.69 vs 1.88 +/- 0.71 nmol/dl; P less than 0.05), and total urinary cyclic AMP (TcAMP) excretion showed no significant changes (3.24 +/- 0.64 vs 3.44 +/- 1.77 nmol/dl GF). Nephrogenous (NcAMP) excretion rose significantly (1.00 +/- 0.82 vs 1.68 +/- 1.31 mmol/dl GF; P less than 0.025). The increase in NcAMP excretion correlated significantly with the decrease in serum T3 levels (r = -0.46; P less than 0.05). Serum iPTH levels showed no significant change. Both the serum Ca, corrected for serum total protein and TmPO4/GFR declined after treatment (respectively 2.44 +/- 0.13 vs 2.33 +/- 0.08 mmol/l; P less than 0.05 and 1.18 +/- 0.29 vs 1.05 +/- 0.22 mmol/l; P less than 0.05). It is concluded that the rise in NcAMP excretion corroborates the concept of increasing parathyroid activity following the treatment of hyperthyroidism. PMID:6206676

  5. Diatom acclimation to elevated CO2 via cAMP signalling and coordinated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennon, Gwenn M. M.; Ashworth, Justin; Groussman, Ryan D.; Berthiaume, Chris; Morales, Rhonda L.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Orellana, Mónica V.; Armbrust, E. V.

    2015-08-01

    Diatoms are responsible for ~40% of marine primary productivity, fuelling the oceanic carbon cycle and contributing to natural carbon sequestration in the deep ocean. Diatoms rely on energetically expensive carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to fix carbon efficiently at modern levels of CO2 (refs , , ). How diatoms may respond over the short and long term to rising atmospheric CO2 remains an open question. Here we use nitrate-limited chemostats to show that the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana rapidly responds to increasing CO2 by differentially expressing gene clusters that regulate transcription and chromosome folding, and subsequently reduces transcription of photosynthesis and respiration gene clusters under steady-state elevated CO2. These results suggest that exposure to elevated CO2 first causes a shift in regulation, and then a metabolic rearrangement. Genes in one CO2-responsive cluster included CCM and photorespiration genes that share a putative cAMP-responsive cis-regulatory sequence, implying these genes are co-regulated in response to CO2, with cAMP as an intermediate messenger. We verified cAMP-induced downregulation of CCM gene δ-CA3 in nutrient-replete diatom cultures by inhibiting the hydrolysis of cAMP. These results indicate an important role for cAMP in downregulating CCM and photorespiration genes under elevated CO2 and provide insights into mechanisms of diatom acclimation in response to climate change.

  6. Persistent cAMP-signals triggered by internalized G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Calebiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are generally thought to signal to second messengers like cyclic AMP (cAMP from the cell surface and to become internalized upon repeated or prolonged stimulation. Once internalized, they are supposed to stop signaling to second messengers but may trigger nonclassical signals such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. Here, we show that a GPCR continues to stimulate cAMP production in a sustained manner after internalization. We generated transgenic mice with ubiquitous expression of a fluorescent sensor for cAMP and studied cAMP responses to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in native, 3-D thyroid follicles isolated from these mice. TSH stimulation caused internalization of the TSH receptors into a pre-Golgi compartment in close association with G-protein alpha(s-subunits and adenylyl cyclase III. Receptors internalized together with TSH and produced downstream cellular responses that were distinct from those triggered by cell surface receptors. These data suggest that classical paradigms of GPCR signaling may need revision, as they indicate that cAMP signaling by GPCRs may occur both at the cell surface and from intracellular sites, but with different consequences for the cell.

  7. Opposing roles of PKA and EPAC in the cAMP-dependent regulation of schwann cell proliferation and differentiation [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available In Schwann cells (SCs, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP not only induces differentiation into a myelinating SC-related phenotype, but also synergistically enhances the mitogenic action of growth factors such as neuregulin. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which cAMP exerts these apparently contradictory functions, we investigated the role of the two main effectors of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC, on the proliferation and differentiation of both isolated and axon-related SCs. For these studies, a variety of PKA and EPAC agonists and antagonists were used, including pathway-selective analogs of cAMP and pharmacological inhibitors. Our studies indicated that the activity of PKA rather than EPAC was required for the adjuvant effect of cAMP on S-phase entry, whereas the activity of EPAC rather than PKA was required for SC differentiation and myelin formation. Even though selective EPAC activation had an overall anti-proliferative effect in SCs, it failed to drive the expression of Krox-20, a master regulator of myelination, and that of myelin-specific proteins and lipids, suggesting that EPAC activation was insufficient to drive a full differentiating response. Interestingly, inhibition of EPAC activity resulted in a drastic impairment of SC differentiation and myelin formation but not Krox-20 expression, which indicates an independent mechanism of Krox-20 regulation in response to cAMP. In conclusion, our data supports the idea that the outcome of cAMP signaling in SCs depends on the particular set of effectors activated. Whereas the mitogenic action of cAMP relies exclusively on PKA activity, the differentiating action of cAMP requires a PKA-independent (non-canonical cAMP-specific pathway that is partially transduced by EPAC.

  8. Opposing roles of PKA and EPAC in the cAMP-dependent regulation of schwann cell proliferation and differentiation [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2013-01-01

    In Schwann cells (SCs), cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) not only induces differentiation into a myelinating SC-related phenotype, but also synergistically enhances the mitogenic action of growth factors such as neuregulin. To better understand the molecular mechanism by which cAMP exerts these apparently contradictory functions, we investigated the role of the two main effectors of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA) and the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC), on the proliferation and differentiation of both isolated and axon-related SCs. For these studies, a variety of PKA and EPAC agonists and antagonists were used, including pathway-selective analogs of cAMP and pharmacological inhibitors. Our studies indicated that the activity of PKA rather than EPAC was required for the adjuvant effect of cAMP on S-phase entry, whereas the activity of EPAC rather than PKA was required for SC differentiation and myelin formation. Even though selective EPAC activation had an overall anti-proliferative effect in SCs, it failed to drive the expression of Krox-20, a master regulator of myelination, and that of myelin-specific proteins and lipids, suggesting that EPAC activation was insufficient to drive a full differentiating response. Interestingly, inhibition of EPAC activity resulted in a drastic impairment of SC differentiation and myelin formation but not Krox-20 expression, which indicates an independent mechanism of Krox-20 regulation in response to cAMP. In conclusion, our data supports the idea that the outcome of cAMP signaling in SCs depends on the particular set of effectors activated. Whereas the mitogenic action of cAMP relies exclusively on PKA activity, the differentiating action of cAMP requires a PKA-independent (non-canonical) cAMP-specific pathway that is partially transduced by EPAC.

  9. An HD-domain phosphodiesterase mediates cooperative hydrolysis of c-di-AMP to affect bacterial growth and virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Luo, Shukun; Pensinger, Daniel; Sauer, John-Demian; Tong, Liang; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide cyclic di-3′,5′- adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) was recently identified as an essential and widespread second messenger in bacterial signaling. Among c-di-AMP–producing bacteria, altered nucleotide levels result in several physiological defects and attenuated virulence. Thus, a detailed molecular understanding of c-di-AMP metabolism is of both fundamental and practical interest. Currently, c-di-AMP degradation is recognized solely among DHH-DHHA1 domain-containing phosphodiesterases. Using chemical proteomics, we identified the Listeria monocytogenes protein PgpH as a molecular target of c-di-AMP. Biochemical and structural studies revealed that the PgpH His-Asp (HD) domain bound c-di-AMP with high affinity and specifically hydrolyzed this nucleotide to 5′-pApA. PgpH hydrolysis activity was inhibited by ppGpp, indicating a cross-talk between c-di-AMP signaling and the stringent response. Genetic analyses supported coordinated regulation of c-di-AMP levels in and out of the host. Intriguingly, a L. monocytogenes mutant that lacks c-di-AMP phosphodiesterases exhibited elevated c-di-AMP levels, hyperinduced a host type-I IFN response, and was significantly attenuated for infection. Furthermore, PgpH homologs, which belong to the 7TMR-HD family, are widespread among hundreds of c-di-AMP synthesizing microorganisms. Thus, PgpH represents a broadly conserved class of c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase with possibly other physiological functions in this crucial signaling network. PMID:25583510

  10. The Effect of Corporate Governance Elements on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Disclosure: An Empirical Evidence from Listed Companies at KSE Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Sadia Majeed; Tariq Aziz; Saba Saleem

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential effects of corporate governance (CG) elements on corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure. The annual reports of companies for the year 2007–2011 are examined to analyze the relationship between CG and CSR reporting. It considers the elements of CG such as board size, independent directors, foreign nationalities and women representation in the board, ownership concentration, institutional ownership, firm size and profitability....

  11. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 regulates IGFBP-1 gene transcription through the Thymine-rich Insulin Response Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquez Rodolfo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatic expression of several gene products involved in glucose metabolism, including phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1, is rapidly and completely inhibited by insulin. This inhibition is mediated through the regulation of a DNA element present in each of these gene promoters, that we call the Thymine-rich Insulin Response Element (TIRE. The insulin signalling pathway that results in the inhibition of these gene promoters requires the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase. However, the molecules that connect PI 3-kinase to these gene promoters are not yet fully defined. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3 is inhibited following activation of PI 3-kinase. We have shown previously that inhibitors of GSK-3 reduce the activity of two TIRE-containing gene promoters (PEPCK and G6Pase, whose products are required for gluconeogenesis. Results In this report we demonstrate that in H4IIE-C3 cells, four distinct classes of GSK-3 inhibitor mimic the effect of insulin on a third TIRE-containing gene, IGFBP-1. We identify the TIRE as the minimum requirement for inhibition by these agents, and demonstrate that the target of GSK-3 is unlikely to be the postulated TIRE-binding protein FOXO-1. Importantly, overexpression of GSK-3 in cells reduces the insulin regulation of TIRE activity as well as endogenous IGFBP-1 expression. Conclusions These results implicate GSK-3 as an intermediate in the pathway from the insulin receptor to the TIRE. Indeed, this is the first demonstration of an absolute requirement for GSK-3 inhibition in insulin regulation of gene transcription. These data support the potential use of GSK-3 inhibitors in the treatment of insulin resistant states such as Type 2 diabetes mellitus, but suggest that it will be important to identify all TIRE-containing genes to assess potential side effects of these agents.

  12. S-AMP for non-linear observation models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Winther, Ole; Fleury, Bernard H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we presented the S-AMP approach, an extension of approximate message passing (AMP), to be able to handle general invariant matrix ensembles. In this contribution we extend S-AMP to non-linear observation models. We obtain generalized AMP (GAMP) as the special case when the measurement...

  13. Brain Response to Primary Blast Wave Using Validated Finite Element Models of Human Head and Advanced Combat Helmet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Makwana, Rahul; Sharma, Sumit

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a “signature injury” in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH), a finite element (FE) study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27–0.66 MPa) from the Bowen’s lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen’s cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP) in the head ranged from 0.68 to 1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10–35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44%) was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%). The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence “iso-damage” curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen

  14. CFTR: a hub for kinases and crosstalk of cAMP and Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzelmann, Karl; Mehta, Anil

    2013-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The resulting disease is pleiotropic consistent with the idea that CFTR acts as a node within a network of signalling proteins. CFTR is not only a regulator of multiple transport proteins and controlled by numerous kinases but also participates in many signalling pathways that are disrupted after expression of its commonest mutant (F508del-CFTR). It operates in membrane compartments creating a scaffold for cytoskeletal elements, surface receptors, kinases and phosphodiesterases. CFTR is exposed to membrane-local second messengers such that a CFTR-interacting, low cellular energy sensor kinase (AMP- and ADP-activated kinase, AMPK) signals through a high energy phosphohistidine protein kinase (nucleoside diphosphate kinase, NDPK). CFTR also translocates a Ca(2+)-dependent adenylate cyclase to its proximity so that a rigid separation between cAMP-dependent and Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of Cl(-) transport becomes obsolete. In the presence of wild-type CFTR, parallel activation of CFTR and outwardly rectifying anoctamin 6 Cl(-) channels is observed, while the Ca(2+)-activated anoctamin 1 Cl(-) channel is inhibited. In contrast, in CF cells, CFTR is missing/mislocalized and the outwardly rectifying chloride channel is attenuated while Ca(2+)-dependent Cl(-) secretion (anoctamin 1) appears upregulated. Additionally, we consider the idea that F508del-CFTR when trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum augments IP3-mediated Ca(2+) release by providing a shunt pathway for Cl(-). CFTR and the IP3 receptor share the characteristic that they both assemble their partner proteins to increase the plasticity of their hub responses. In CF, the CFTR hub fails to form at the plasma membrane, with widespread detrimental consequences for cell signalling.

  15. Cloning and characterization of the dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 2A gene in Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B L; Zhang, X K; Li, Y Y; Li, D Y; Ma, M Y; Cai, D T; Wu, W H; Huang, B Q

    2016-08-05

    Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa is one of the most tolerant Cruciferae species to drought, and dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 2A (DREB2A) is involved in responses to salinity, heat, and particularly drought. In this study, a gene encoding EvDREB2A was cloned and characterized in E. vesicaria subsp sativa. The full-length EvDREB2A cDNA sequence contained a 388-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 348-bp 3'-UTR, and a 1002-bp open reading frame that encoded 334 amino acid residues. The theoretical isoelectric point of the EvDREB2A protein was 4.80 and the molecular weight was 37.64 kDa. The genomic sequence of EvDREB2A contained no introns. Analysis using SMART indicated that EvDREB2A contains a conserved AP2 domain, similar to other plant DREBs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that EvDREB2A and DREB2As from Brassica rapa, Eutrema salsugineum, Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Arachis hypogaea formed a small subgroup, which clustered with DREB2Bs from A. lyrata, A. thaliana, Camelina sativa, and B. rapa to form a larger subgroup. EvDREB2A is most closely related to B. rapa DREB2A, followed by DREB2As from E. salsugineum, A. thaliana, A. hypogaea, and A. lyrata. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that EvDREB2A expression was highest in the leaves, followed by the roots and hypocotyls, and was lowest in the flower buds. EvDREB2A could be used to improve drought tolerance in crops.

  16. Intrauterine growth restriction perturbs nucleosome depletion at a growth hormone-responsive element in the mouse IGF-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Robert A; Yost, Christian C; Yu, Xing; Wiedmeier, Julia E; Callaway, Christopher W; Brown, Ashley S; Lane, Robert H; Fung, Camille M

    2015-12-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common human pregnancy complication. IUGR offspring carry significant postnatal risk for early-onset metabolic syndrome, which is associated with persistent reduction in IGF-1 protein expression. We have previously shown that preadolescent IUGR male mice have decreased hepatic IGF-1 mRNA and circulating IGF-1 protein at postnatal day 21, the age when growth hormone (GH) normally upregulates hepatic IGF-1 expression. Here we studied nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation at a putative growth hormone-responsive element in intron 2 (in2GHRE) of the hepatic IGF-1 gene in normal, sham-operated, and IUGR mice. Nucleosome occupancy and CpG methylation were determined in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in liver at postnatal days 14, 21, and 42. For CpG methylation, additional time points out to 2 yr were analyzed. We confirmed the putative mouse in2GHRE was GH-responsive, and in normal mice, a single nucleosome was displaced from the hepatic in2GHRE by postnatal day 21, which exposed two STAT5b DNA binding sites. Nucleosome displacement correlated with developmentally programmed CpG demethylation. Finally, IUGR significantly altered the nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) at the in2GHRE of IGF-1 on postnatal day 21, with either complete absence of the NDR or with a shifted NDR exposing only one of two STAT5b DNA binding sites. An NDR shift was also seen in offspring of sham-operated mothers. We conclude that prenatal insult such as IUGR or anesthesia/surgery could perturb the proper formation of a well-positioned NDR at the mouse hepatic IGF-1 in2GHRE necessary for transitioning to an open chromatin state.

  17. Cloning and characterization of the dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 2A gene in Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B L; Zhang, X K; Li, Y Y; Li, D Y; Ma, M Y; Cai, D T; Wu, W H; Huang, B Q

    2016-01-01

    Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa is one of the most tolerant Cruciferae species to drought, and dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 2A (DREB2A) is involved in responses to salinity, heat, and particularly drought. In this study, a gene encoding EvDREB2A was cloned and characterized in E. vesicaria subsp sativa. The full-length EvDREB2A cDNA sequence contained a 388-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 348-bp 3'-UTR, and a 1002-bp open reading frame that encoded 334 amino acid residues. The theoretical isoelectric point of the EvDREB2A protein was 4.80 and the molecular weight was 37.64 kDa. The genomic sequence of EvDREB2A contained no introns. Analysis using SMART indicated that EvDREB2A contains a conserved AP2 domain, similar to other plant DREBs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that EvDREB2A and DREB2As from Brassica rapa, Eutrema salsugineum, Arabidopsis thaliana, Arabidopsis lyrata, and Arachis hypogaea formed a small subgroup, which clustered with DREB2Bs from A. lyrata, A. thaliana, Camelina sativa, and B. rapa to form a larger subgroup. EvDREB2A is most closely related to B. rapa DREB2A, followed by DREB2As from E. salsugineum, A. thaliana, A. hypogaea, and A. lyrata. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction indicated that EvDREB2A expression was highest in the leaves, followed by the roots and hypocotyls, and was lowest in the flower buds. EvDREB2A could be used to improve drought tolerance in crops. PMID:27525923

  18. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  19. Bile acid-activated nuclear receptor FXR suppresses apolipoprotein A-I transcription via a negative FXR response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudel, Thierry; Sturm, Ekkehard; Duez, Hélène; Torra, Inés Pineda; Sirvent, Audrey; Kosykh, Vladimir; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Dallongeville, Jean; Hum, Dean W.; Kuipers, Folkert; Staels, Bart

    2002-01-01

    Serum levels of HDL are inversely correlated with the risk of coronary heart disease. The anti-atherogenic effect of HDL is partially mediated by its major protein constituent apoA-I. In this study, we identify bile acids that are activators of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) as negative regulators of human apoA-I expression. Intrahepatocellular accumulation of bile acids, as seen in patients with progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis and biliary atresia, was associated with diminished apoA-I serum levels. In human apoA-I transgenic mice, treatment with the FXR agonist taurocholic acid strongly decreased serum concentrations and liver mRNA levels of human apoA-I, which was associated with reduced serum HDL levels. Incubation of human primary hepatocytes and hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells with bile acids resulted in a dose-dependent downregulation of apoA-I expression. Promoter mutation analysis and gel-shift experiments in HepG2 cells demonstrated that bile acid–activated FXR decreases human apoA-I promoter activity by a negative FXR response element mapped to the C site. FXR bound this site and repressed transcription in a manner independent of retinoid X receptor. The nonsteroidal synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 likewise decreased apoA-I mRNA levels and promoter activity in HepG2 cells. PMID:11927623

  20. Three-dimensional integral imaging displays using a quick-response encoded elemental image array: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, A.; Javidi, B.

    2016-06-01

    Quick-response (QR) codes are barcodes that can store information such as numeric data and hyperlinks. The QR code can be scanned using a QR code reader, such as those built into smartphone devices, revealing the information stored in the code. Moreover, the QR code is robust to noise, rotation, and illumination when scanning due to error correction built in the QR code design. Integral imaging is an imaging technique used to generate a three-dimensional (3D) scene by combining the information from two-dimensional (2D) elemental images (EIs) each with a different perspective of a scene. Transferring these 2D images in a secure manner can be difficult. In this work, we overview two methods to store and encrypt EIs in multiple QR codes. The first method uses run-length encoding with Huffman coding and the double-random-phase encryption (DRPE) to compress and encrypt an EI. This information is then stored in a QR code. An alternative compression scheme is to perform photon-counting on the EI prior to compression. Photon-counting is a non-linear transformation of data that creates redundant information thus improving image compression. The compressed data is encrypted using the DRPE. Once information is stored in the QR codes, it is scanned using a smartphone device. The information scanned is decompressed and decrypted and an EI is recovered. Once all EIs have been recovered, a 3D optical reconstruction is generated.

  1. Role of oxidative stress in disrupting the function of negative glucocorticoid response element in daily amphetamine-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Chen; Yu, Ching-Han; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Kuo, Dong-Yih

    2016-09-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH)-induced appetite suppression is associated with changes in hypothalamic reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidants, neuropeptides, and plasma glucocorticoid. This study explored whether ROS and glucocorticoid response element (GRE), which is the promoter site of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) gene, participated in neuropeptides-mediated appetite control. Rats were treated daily with AMPH for four days, and changes in food intake, plasma glucocorticoid and expression levels of hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), CRH, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were examined and compared. Results showed that food intake decreased and NPY gene down-regulated, while POMC, SOD, and CRH gene up-regulated during AMPH treatment. GR and GRE-DNA bindings were disrupted on Day 1 and Day 2 when glucocorticoid levels were still high. Pretreatment with GR inhibitor or ROS scavenger modulated mRNA levels in NPY, POMC, SOD and CRH in AMPH-treated rats. We suggest that disruptions of negative GRE (nGRE) on Day 1 and Day 2 are associated with an increase in oxidative stress during the regulation of NPY/POMC-mediated appetite control in AMPH-treated rats. These results advance the understanding of molecular mechanism in regulating AMPH-mediated appetite suppression. PMID:27235634

  2. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stisova, Viktorie [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie [Centre de Biophysique Moleculaire CNRS, rue Charles Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Davidkova, Marie, E-mail: davidkova@ujf.cas.c [Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Na Truhlarce 39/64, 18086 Praha 8 (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERalpha, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with gamma rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  3. Induction of electrophile-responsive element (EpRE)-mediated gene expression by tomato extracts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijsbers, Linda; van Eekelen, Henriëtte D L M; Nguyen, Thuy H; de Haan, Laura H J; van der Burg, Bart; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Bovy, Arnaud G

    2012-12-01

    The market for food products with additional health benefits is increasing rapidly and tools for identification of bio-functional characteristics of food items are essential. To facilitate the detection of beneficial effects of tomato on gene expression, methods to prepare tomato extracts suitable to test in the EpRE LUX assay and other cell-based reporter gene assays for health-related bioactivity mechanisms, were developed. An isoprenoid-containing chloroform extract of tomato fruit and most individual isoprenoids did not induce electrophile-responsive element (EpRE)-mediated gene expression. A semi-polar extract of tomato fruits, enzymatically hydrolysed to remove the glycosyl residues from the phenolic ingredients was able to induce EpRE-mediated luciferase expression at both mRNA and protein level, which might be partly due to the presence of quercetin, kaempferol, naringenin and naringenin chalcone. It was concluded that induction of EpRE-regulated genes, such as detoxifying phase II and antioxidant enzymes, may contribute to the beneficial health effects of tomato.

  4. Antiproliferative effect of a synthetic aptamer mimicking androgen response elements in the LNCaP cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhpayeh, S; Einizadeh, A R; Hejazi, Z; Boshtam, M; Shariati, L; Mirian, M; Darzi, L; Sojoudi, M; Khanahmad, H; Rezaei, A

    2016-08-01

    Prostate cancer usually develops to a hormone-refractory state that is irresponsive to conventional therapeutic approaches. Therefore, new methods for treating aggressive prostate cancer are under development. Because of the importance of androgen receptors (ARs) in the development of the hormone-refractory state and AR mechanism of action, this study was designed. A single-stranded DNA as an aptamer was designed that could mimic the hormone response element (HRE). The LNCaP cells as an AR-rich model were divided into three sets of triplicate groups: the test group was transfected with Aptamer Mimicking HRE (AMH), Mock received only transfection reagents (mock) and a negative control. All three sets received 0, 10 and 100 nM of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) separately. Data analysis showed hormone dependency of LNCaP cells in the negative control group upon treatment with 10 and 100 nM DHEA (compared with cells left untreated (P=0.001)). Transfection of AMH resulted in significant reduction of proliferation in the test group when compared with the negative control group with 10 (P=0.001) or 100 nM DHEA (P=0.02). AMH can form a hairpin structure at 37 °C and mimic the genomic HRE. Hence, it is capable of effectively competing with genomic HRE and interrupting the androgen signaling pathway in a prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP). PMID:27364573

  5. The expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator in rat sertoli cells following seminal extract administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmal, Muslim; Siregar, Tongku Nizwan; Wahyuni, Sri; Hamny; Nasution, Mustafa Kamal; Indriati, Wiwik; Panjaitan, Budianto; Aliza, Dwinna

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effect of seminal vesicle extract on cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM) expression in rat Sertoli cells. Materials and Methods: This study examined the expression of CREM on 20 male rats (Rattus norvegicus) at 4 months of age, weighing 250-300 g. The rats were divided into four groups: K0, KP1, KP2, and KP3. K0 group was injected with 0.2 ml normal saline; KP1 was injected with 25 mg cloprostenol (Prostavet C, Virbac S. A); KP2 and KP3 were injected with 0.2 and 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract, respectively. The treatments were conducted 5 times within 12-day interval. At the end of the study, the rats were euthanized by cervical dislocation; then, the testicles were necropsied and processed for histology observation using immunohistochemistry staining. Results: CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells was not altered by the administration of either 0.2 or 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract. Conclusion: The administration of seminal vesicle extract is unable to increase CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells. PMID:27733803

  6. The expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator in rat sertoli cells following seminal extract administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslim Akmal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to determine the effect of seminal vesicle extract on cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells. Materials and Methods: This study examined the expression of CREM on 20 male rats (Rattus norvegicus at 4 months of age, weighing 250-300 g. The rats were divided into four groups: K0, KP1, KP2, and KP3. K0 group was injected with 0.2 ml normal saline; KP1 was injected with 25 mg cloprostenol (Prostavet C, Virbac S. A; KP2 and KP3 were injected with 0.2 and 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract, respectively. The treatments were conducted 5 times within 12-day interval. At the end of the study, the rats were euthanized by cervical dislocation; then, the testicles were necropsied and processed for histology observation using immunohistochemistry staining. Results: CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells was not altered by the administration of either 0.2 or 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract. Conclusion: The administration of seminal vesicle extract is unable to increase CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells.

  7. Immunohistochemical Study of Nrf2-Antioxidant Response Element as Indicator of Oxidative Stress Induced by Cadmium in Developing Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Montes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In developing animals, Cadmium (Cd induces toxicity to many organs including brain. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are often implicated in Cd-inducedtoxicity and it has been clearly demonstrated that oxidative stress interferes with the expression of genes as well as transcriptional factors such as Nrf2-dependent Antioxidant Response Element (Nrf2-ARE. Cd-generated oxidative stress and elevated Nrf2 activity have been reported in vitro and in situ cells. In this study we evaluated the morphological changes and the expression pattern of Nrf2 and correlated them with the Cd concentrations in different ages of developing rats in heart, lung, kidney, liver, and brain. The Cd content in different organs of rats treated with the metal was increased in all ages assayed. Comparatively, lower Cd brain levels were found in rats intoxicated at the age of 12 days, then pups treated at 5, 10, or 15 days old, at the same metal dose. No evident changes, as a consequence of cadmium exposure, were evident in the morphological analysis in any of the ages assayed. However, Nrf2-ARE immunoreactivity was observed in 15-day-old rats exposed to Cd. Our results support that fully developed blood-brain barrier is an important protector against Cd entrance to brain and that Nrf2 increased expression is a part of protective mechanism against cadmium-induced toxicity.

  8. Loss of the anorexic response to systemic 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside administration despite reducing hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in insulin-deficient rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaio F Vitzel

    Full Text Available This study tested whether chronic systemic administration of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR could attenuate hyperphagia, reduce lean and fat mass losses, and improve whole-body energy homeostasis in insulin-deficient rats. Male Wistar rats were first rendered diabetic through streptozotocin (STZ administration and then intraperitoneally injected with AICAR for 7 consecutive days. Food and water intake, ambulatory activity, and energy expenditure were assessed at the end of the AICAR-treatment period. Blood was collected for circulating leptin measurement and the hypothalami were extracted for the determination of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 content, as well as the content and phosphorylation of AMP-kinase (AMPK, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3. Rats were thoroughly dissected for adiposity and lean body mass (LBM determinations. In non-diabetic rats, despite reducing adiposity, AICAR increased (∼1.7-fold circulating leptin and reduced hypothalamic SOCS3 content and food intake by 67% and 25%, respectively. The anorexic effect of AICAR was lost in diabetic rats, even though hypothalamic AMPK and ACC phosphorylation markedly decreased in these animals. Importantly, hypothalamic SOCS3 and STAT3 levels remained elevated and reduced, respectively, after treatment of insulin-deficient rats with AICAR. Diabetic rats were lethargic and displayed marked losses of fat and LBM. AICAR treatment increased ambulatory activity and whole-body energy expenditure while also attenuating diabetes-induced fat and LBM losses. In conclusion, AICAR did not reverse hyperphagia, but it promoted anti-catabolic effects on skeletal muscle and fat, enhanced spontaneous physical activity, and improved the ability of rats to cope with the diabetes-induced dysfunctional alterations in glucose metabolism and whole-body energy homeostasis.

  9. cAMP target sequences enhCRE and CNRE sense low-salt intake to increase human renin gene expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Michael; Harlander, Sabine; Neubauer, Björn; Gerl, Melanie; Germain, Stephane; Castrop, Hayo; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2011-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the role of cAMP target sequences enhancer cAMP response element (enhCRE) and cAMP and overlapping negative response element (CNRE) in the control of human renin gene (REN) in vivo. enhCRE and CNRE were silenced by mutations in a 12.2-kb human renin promoter fused to LacZ reporter gene. This construct was used to generate transgenic mice (RENMut-LacZ). The expression of the transgene was correctly targeted to the juxtaglomerular portions of renal afferent arterioles which express endogenous mouse renin. Therefore, enhCRE and CNRE do not seem to be relevant for the control of the cell-specific expression of the human renin gene. The β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (10 mg/kg/day, for 2 days) stimulated the endogenous renin, but not the LacZ mRNA expression. Treatment of RENMut-LacZ mice with the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (enalapril 10 mg/kg/day, for 7 days) or their crossing to angiotensin receptor type 1a knockout mice led to increased renin and LacZ mRNA levels. Renin expression was upregulated by low-salt diet (0.03% NaCl, for 10 days) and downregulated by high-salt diet (4% NaCl, for 10 days). In contrast, low-salt diet did not influence, while high-salt diet inhibited the expression of LacZ. In summary, enhCRE and CNRE appear to be necessary for the transactivation of the human renin gene through β-adrenoreceptors and by low-salt diet. Our data also suggest that different intracellular mechanisms mediate the effect of low- and high-salt intake on renin expression in vivo.

  10. Regulatory Action of Calcium Ion on Cyclic AMP-Enhanced Expression of Implantation-Related Factors in Human Endometrial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Kusama

    Full Text Available Decidualization of human endometrial stroma and gland development is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP, but the role of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-signaling in human endometrial stroma and glandular epithelia has not been well-characterized. The present study was designed to investigate the role of intracellular Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-decidualization and gland maturation events, which can be identified by the up-regulation of prolactin and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP1 in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs, and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and glandular epithelial EM-1 cells. Increases in decidual prolactin and IGFBP-1 transcript levels, induced by cAMP-elevating agents forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, were inhibited by Ca2+ influx into ESCs with Ca2+ ionophores (alamethicin, ionomycin in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibitors of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC, nifedipine and verapamil, enhanced the decidual gene expression. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ store, up-regulated prolactin and IGFBP-1 expression. Ca2+ ionophores decreased intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas nifedipine, verapamil or dantrolene increased cAMP concentrations in ESCs. In glandular epithelial cells, similar responses in COX2 expression and PGE2 production were found when intracellular cAMP levels were up-regulated by decreases in Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, a marked decrease in cytosolic Ca2+ levels caused the elevation of cAMP concentrations, resulting in enhanced expression of implantation-related factors including decidual markers. These findings suggest that fluctuation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations alters intracellular cAMP levels, which then regulate differentiation of endometrial stromal and glandular epithelial cells.

  11. Regulatory Action of Calcium Ion on Cyclic AMP-Enhanced Expression of Implantation-Related Factors in Human Endometrial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusama, Kazuya; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Tamura, Kazuhiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Isaka, Keiichi; Tachikawa, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Decidualization of human endometrial stroma and gland development is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP), but the role of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) on cAMP mediated-signaling in human endometrial stroma and glandular epithelia has not been well-characterized. The present study was designed to investigate the role of intracellular Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-decidualization and gland maturation events, which can be identified by the up-regulation of prolactin and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)1 in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and glandular epithelial EM-1 cells. Increases in decidual prolactin and IGFBP-1 transcript levels, induced by cAMP-elevating agents forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, were inhibited by Ca2+ influx into ESCs with Ca2+ ionophores (alamethicin, ionomycin) in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibitors of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC), nifedipine and verapamil, enhanced the decidual gene expression. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ store, up-regulated prolactin and IGFBP-1 expression. Ca2+ ionophores decreased intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas nifedipine, verapamil or dantrolene increased cAMP concentrations in ESCs. In glandular epithelial cells, similar responses in COX2 expression and PGE2 production were found when intracellular cAMP levels were up-regulated by decreases in Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, a marked decrease in cytosolic Ca2+ levels caused the elevation of cAMP concentrations, resulting in enhanced expression of implantation-related factors including decidual markers. These findings suggest that fluctuation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations alters intracellular cAMP levels, which then regulate differentiation of endometrial stromal and glandular epithelial cells. PMID:26161798

  12. Calcium-linked increase in coupled cAMP synthesis and hydrolysis is an early event in cholinergic and. beta. -adrenergic stimulation of parotid secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeg, M.A.; Graeff, R.M.; Walseth, T.F.; Goldberg, N.D. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The dynamics and compartmental characteristics of cAMP metabolism were examined by {sup 18}O labeling of cellular adenine nucleotide {alpha} phosphoryls in rat parotid gland stimulated to secrete with {beta}-adrenergic and cholinergic agents. The secretory response occurred in association with a rapidly increased rate of cAMP hydrolysis apparently coordinated with an equivalent increase in the rate of cAMP synthesis, since the cellular concentration of cAMP remained unchanged. The magnitude of this metabolic response was equivalent to the metabolism of 10-75 times the cellular content of cAMP within the first minute of stimulation. This increased metabolic rate occurred only during the early (1-3 min) period of stimulation, in what appeared to be an exclusive cellular compartment distinguished by a unique distribution of {sup 18}O among adenine nucleotide {alpha} phosphoryls. This {sup 18}O distribution contrasted with that produced by forskolin, which increased cellular cAMP concentration and elicited only a delayed response missing the early secretory component. The early acceleration of cAMP metabolism appeared linked to a stimulus-induced increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, since the Ca{sup 2+} ionophore ionomycin produced the same metabolic response in association with secretion. These observations suggest that cAMP metabolism is involved in stimulus-secretion coupling by a Ca{sup 2+}-linked mechanism different from that in which cAMP plays the role of a second messenger.

  13. cAMP stimulation of StAR expression and cholesterol metabolism is modulated by co-expression of labile suppressors of transcription and mRNA turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefcoate, Colin R; Lee, Jinwoo; Cherradi, Nadia; Takemori, Hiroshi; Duan, Haichuan

    2011-04-10

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein is generated in rodents from 1.6 kb and 3.5 kb mRNA formed by alternative polyadenylation. The zinc finger protein, TIS11B (also Znf36L1), is elevated by cAMP in adrenal cells in parallel with StAR mRNA. TIS11b selectively destabilizes the 3.5 kb mRNA through AU-rich sequences at the end of the 3'UTR. siRNA suppression shows that TIS11b surprisingly increases StAR protein and cholesterol metabolism. StAR transcription is directly activated by PKA phosphorylation. cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) protein 1 phosphorylation is a key step leading to recruitment of the co-activator, CREB binding protein (CBP). A second protein, CREB regulated transcription coactivator (TORC/CRTC), enhances this recruitment, but is inhibited by salt inducible kinase (SIK). Basal StAR transcription is constrained through this phosphorylation of TORC. PKA provides an alternative stimulation by phosphorylating SIK, which prevents TORC inactivation. PKA stimulation of StAR nuclear transcripts substantially precedes TORC recruitment to the StAR promoter, which may, therefore, mediate a later step in mRNA production. Inhibition of SIK by staurosporine elevates StAR transcription and TORC recruitment to maximum levels, but without CREB phosphorylation. TORC suppression by SIK evidently limits basal StAR transcription. Staurosporine and cAMP stimulate synergistically. SIK targets the phosphatase, PP2a (activation), and Type 2 histone de-acetylases (inhibition), which may each contribute to suppression. Staurosporine stimulation through SIK inhibition is repeated in cAMP stimulation of many steroidogenic genes regulated by steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) and CREB. TIS11b and SIK may combine to attenuate StAR expression when hormonal stimuli decline.

  14. cAMP signalling meets mitochondrial compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos

    2014-04-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles comprising at least three distinct areas, the OMM (outer mitochondrial membrane), the IMS (intermembrane space) and the mitochondrial matrix. Physical compartmentalization allows these organelles to host different functional domains and therefore participate in a variety of important cellular actions such as ATP synthesis and programmed cell death. In a surprising homology, it is now widely accepted that the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP uses the same stratagem, compartmentalization, in order to achieve the characteristic functional pleiotropy of its pathway. Accumulating evidence suggests that all the main mitochondrial compartments contain segregated cAMP cascades; however, the regulatory properties and functional significance of such domains are not fully understood and often remain controversial issues. The present mini-review discusses our current knowledge of how the marriage between mitochondrial and cAMP compartmentalization is achieved and its effects on the biology of the cell. PMID:24646228

  15. Blockade of beta-adrenoceptors enhances cAMP signal transduction in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the blockade of beta-adrenoceptors would enhance cAMP-mediated signal transduction processes in vivo. The administration of the membrane permeable cAMP analogue, 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP, 10 micromol/kg, i.v.) produced an increase in heart rate (+27 +/- 2%, P < 0.05), a fall in mean arterial blood pressure (-21 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) and falls in hindquarter (-12 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) and mesenteric (-32 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) vascular resistances in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. The beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol (1 mg/kg, i.v.) lowered heart rate (-12 +/- 3%, P < 0.05) but did not affect mean arterial blood pressure or vascular resistances. The tachycardia, hypotension and vasodilation produced by 8-CPT-cAMP were exaggerated after administration of propranolol (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). The nitric oxide-donor, sodium nitroprusside (2 microg/kg, i.v.), produced falls in mean arterial blood pressure and vascular resistances of similar magnitude to those produced by 8-CPT-cAMP. These sodium nitroprusside-induced responses were unaffected by propranolol (P < 0.05 for all comparisons). Sodium nitroprusside also produced a minor increase in heart rate (+5 +/- 1%, P < 0.05) which was abolished by propranolol. These findings suggest that 8-CPT-cAMP directly increases heart rate and that blockade of beta-adrenoceptors enhances the potency of cAMP within the heart and vasculature.

  16. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller;

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for c...

  17. Separation of effects of adenosine on energy metabolism from those on cyclic AMP in rat thymic lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordeen, S.K.; Young, D.A.

    1977-08-10

    In rat thymic lymphocytes incubated for 2 h without exogenous energy-providing substrate, adenosine may be substituted for glucose as a means of maximally restoring energy metabolism and those cellular functions whose rates are sensitive to small changes in the energy balance, such as protein synthesis and uridine utilization for RNA synthesis. Since effects of adenosine in thymocytes and other cells have frequently been attributed to changes in cyclic AMP, this report investigates its possible involvement in these glucose-like restorative actions of adenosine. Although the same range of doses of adenosine effective at raising cyclic AMP also elicit roughly parallel stimulations of protein synthesis and uridine utilization, further results dissociate the restorative actions from those on cyclic AMP. (a) Other purine nucleosides mimic the glucose-like actions of adenosine without increasing cyclic AMP; (b) conversely, prostaglandin E/sub 1/ mimics the cyclic AMP response without restoring energy metabolism or energy-dependent functions; and (c) potentiation of the cyclic AMP response, either by inhibiting phosphodiesterase or adenosine deaminase, does not enhance the restorative response to a range of doses of adenosine. Finally, cyclic AMP-mediated glycogenolysis cannot account for the glucose-like effects since addition of adenosine increases, not decreases, levels of glycogen.

  18. Potency of isothiocyanates to induce luciferase reporter gene expression via the electrophile-responsive element from murine glutathione S-transferase Ya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, M.; Boerboom, A.M.M.J.F.; Blankvoort, B.M.G.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Vaes, W.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Isothiocyanates are electrophiles that are able to induce phase II biotransformation enzyme gene expression via an electrophile-responsive element (EpRE) in the gene regulatory region. To study the potency of different isothiocyanates to induce the expression of EpRE-regulated genes, a Hepa-1c1c7 lu

  19. Multiprotein complex formation at the beta myosin heavy chain distal muscle CAT element correlates with slow muscle expression but not mechanical overload responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, D R; McCarthy, J J; Tsika, G L; Tsika, R W

    2001-01-12

    To examine the role of the beta-myosin heavy chain (betaMyHC) distal muscle CAT (MCAT) element in muscle fiber type-specific expression and mechanical overload (MOV) responsiveness, we conducted transgenic and in vitro experiments. In adult transgenic mice, mutation of the distal MCAT element led to significant reductions in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) specific activity measured in control soleus and plantaris muscles when compared with wild type transgene beta293WT but did not abolish MOV-induced CAT specific activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed the formation of a specific low migrating nuclear protein complex (LMC) at the betaMyHC MCAT element that was highly enriched only when using either MOV plantaris or control soleus nuclear extract. Scanning mutagenesis of the betaMyHC distal MCAT element revealed that only the nucleotides comprising the core MCAT element were essential for LMC formation. The proteins within the LMC when using either MOV plantaris or control soleus nuclear extracts were antigenically related to nominal transcription enhancer factor 1 (NTEF-1), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and Max. Only in vitro translated TEF-1 protein bound to the distal MCAT element, suggesting that this multiprotein complex is tethered to the DNA via TEF-1. Protein-protein interaction assays revealed interactions between nominal TEF-1, PARP, and Max. Our studies show that for transgene beta293 the distal MCAT element is not required for MOV responsiveness but suggest that a multiprotein complex likely comprised of nominal TEF-1, PARP, and Max forms at this element to contribute to basal slow fiber expression. PMID:11010974

  20. Effect of iron stress on Withania somnifera L.: antioxidant enzyme response and nutrient elemental uptake of in vitro grown plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Jyoti Ranjan; Behera, Sadhana; Keshari, Nitin; Ram, Shidharth Sankar; Bhar, Subhajit; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, Mathummal; Sahoo, Santi Lata

    2015-03-01

    In the present study the response of antioxidant enzyme activities and the level of expression of their corresponding genes on bioaccumulation of iron (Fe) were investigated. In vitro germinated Withania somnifera L. were grown in Murashige and Skoog's liquid medium with increasing concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM) of FeSO4 for 7 and 14 days. Root and leaf tissues analyzed for catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6), superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, EC 1.11.1.7), have shown an increase in content with respect to exposure time. Isoforms of CAT, SOD and GPX were separated using non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and observed that the isoenzymes were greatly affected by higher concentrations of Fe. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis performed by taking three pairs of genes of CAT (RsCat, Catalase1, Cat1) and SOD (SodCp, TaSOD1.2, MnSOD) to find out the differential expression of antioxidant genes under Fe excess. RsCat from CAT and MnSOD from SOD have exhibited high levels of gene expression under Fe stress, which was consistent with the changes of the activity assayed in solution after 7 days of treatment. Analysis by proton induced X-ray emission exhibited an increasing uptake of Fe in plants by suppressing and expressing of other nutrient elements. The results of the present study suggest that higher concentration of Fe causes disturbance in nutrient balance and induces oxidative stress in plant.

  1. Lagrangian three-dimensional finite-element formulation for the nonlinear fluid-structural response of reactor components. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulak, R. F.; Fiala, C.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the formulations used in the NEPTUNE code. Specifically, it describes the finite-element formulation of a three-dimensional hexahedral element for simulating the behavior of either fluid or solid continua. Since the newly developed hexahedral element and the original triangular plate element are finite elements, they are compatible in the sense that they can be combined arbitrarily to simulate complex reactor components in three-dimensional space. Because rate-type constitutive relations are used in conjunction with a velocity-strain tensor, the formulation is applicable to large deformation problems. This development can be used to simulate (1) the fluid adjacent to reactor components and (2) the concrete fill found in large reactor head closures.

  2. Radiographic element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic elements are disclosed having first and second silver halide emulsion layers comprised of a dispersing medium and radiation-sensitive silver halide grains, and a support interposed between said silver halide emulsion layers capable of transmitting radiation to which said second silver halide emulsion layer is responsive. These elements are characterized in that at least said first silver halide emulsion layer contains tabular silver halide grains and spectral sensitizing dye adsorbed to the surface of the grains. Crossover can be improved in relation to the imaging characteristics. (author)

  3. Seismic response trends evaluation via long term monitoring and finite element model updating of an RC building including soil-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, F.; Omenzetter, P.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a study on the seismic response trends evaluation and finite element model updating of a reinforced concrete building monitored for a period of more than two years. The three storey reinforced concrete building is instrumented with five tri-axial accelerometers and a free-field tri-axial accelerometer. The time domain N4SID system identification technique was used to obtain the frequencies and damping ratios considering flexible base models taking into account the soil-structure-interaction (SSI) using 50 earthquakes. Trends of variation of seismic response were developed by correlating the peak response acceleration at the roof level with identified frequencies and damping ratios. A general trend of decreasing frequencies was observed with increased level of shaking. To simulate the behavior of the building, a three dimensional finite element model (FEM) was developed. To incorporate real in-situ conditions, soil underneath the foundation and around the building was modeled using spring elements and non-structural components (claddings and partitions) were also included. The developed FEM was then calibrated using a sensitivity based model updating technique taking into account soil flexibility and non-structural components as updating parameters. It was concluded from the investigation that knowledge of the variation of seismic response of buildings is necessary to better understand their behavior during earthquakes, and also that the participation of soil and non-structural components is significant towards the seismic response of the building and these should be considered in models to simulate the real behavior.

  4. Sevoflurane effects on cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein, phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein, and Livin expression in the cortex and hippocampus of a vascular cognitive impairment rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wu; Ling Dan; Xianlin Zhu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuronal necrosis and apoptosis play important roles in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia and resulting cognitive impairment. However, inhibition of neuronal necrosis and apoptosis has been shown to attenuate cognitive impairment following cerebral ischemia.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of sevoflurane on cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB), phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), and Livin expression in the cortex and hippocampus of a rat model of vascular cognitive impairment.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled experiment was performed in the Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurology between June 2007 and July 2008.MATERIALS: Sevoflurane was provided by Abbott Laboratory, UK; Morris water maze was provided by Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China; goat anti-rat CREB, goat anti-rat pCREB and goat anti-rat Livin antibodies were provided by Biosource International, USA.METHODS: A total of 42 female, Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham operation, vascular cognitive impairment, and sevoflurane treatment. The vascular cognitive impairment rat model was established by permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, and 1.0 MAC sevoflurane was immediately administered by inhalation for 2 hours.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CREB, pCREB, and Livin expression was measured in the cortex and hippocampus by Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Behavior was evaluated with Morris water maze.RESULTS: CREB, pCREB, and Livin expression in the sevoflurane treatment group was significantly greater than the vascular cognitive impairment group (P<0.01). However, expression of CREB and pCREB was significantly less in the sevoflurane treatment and vascular cognitive impairment groups, compared with the sham operation group (P<0.01). Livin expression in the sevoflurane treatment and vascular cognitive impairment groups was significantly greater than the sham

  5. Interactions between Cs, Sr, and other nutrients and trace element accumulation in Amaranthus shoot in response to variety effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Qingnan; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Sha, Zhimin; Osaki, Mitsuru; Shinano, Takuro

    2015-03-01

    Aiming at clarifying the interactions between Cs, Sr, and other mineral elements in the genus Amaranthus, this study adopted 33 different varieties of Amaranthus and investigated the concentrations of 23 mineral elements in shoots grown in the fields of Iino in Fukushima prefecture. Significant varietal effects were detected for all elements except Se, and degree of interspecies variation was highly element dependent. Among 23 elements, amaranths were less sensitive to the accumulation of Cs and Sr than most other mineral elements to the species level. There are six elements showing significant correlation with Cs, positive correlations between As, Rb, Al, Fe, Ni, and Cs, and negative correlation between Ba and Cs. Significant correlations between Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn, B, Ba, Cd, and Sr were detected, and all of the coefficients were positive. Cs and Sr did not present significant correlation, but they were both significantly correlated with Ba. By principal component analysis (PCA), the first and second principal components (PC1 and PC2) accounted for 23.2 and 20.3% of the total variance and associated with Cs and Sr, respectively. Both of the two species took up more Cs by promoting the influx of elements positively correlated with Cs into shoot, but at the same time, Amaranthus hypochondriacus (L.) Mapes 847 decreased the K and Ba uptake and Amaranthus powellii (S. Wats) subsp. Powellii inhibited the accumulation of Rb, Sr, and significantly correlated elements of Sr in shoot. This study is the first to pave the way for comprehension on ionome in amaranth shoot at the variety level. The results of this research provide the ionomic basis for implementing countermeasures in the field against the translocation of Cs (and potentially Sr) toward crops and food. PMID:25660261

  6. cAMP signalling in mushroom bodies modulates temperature preference behaviour in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Tae; Bang, Sunhoe; Hyun, Seogang; Kang, Jongkyun; Jeong, Kyunghwa; Paik, Donggi; Chung, Jongkyeong; Kim, Jaeseob

    2008-08-01

    Homoiotherms, for example mammals, regulate their body temperature with physiological responses such as a change of metabolic rate and sweating. In contrast, the body temperature of poikilotherms, for example Drosophila, is the result of heat exchange with the surrounding environment as a result of the large ratio of surface area to volume of their bodies. Accordingly, these animals must instinctively move to places with an environmental temperature as close as possible to their genetically determined desired temperature. The temperature that Drosophila instinctively prefers has a function equivalent to the 'set point' temperature in mammals. Although various temperature-gated TRP channels have been discovered, molecular and cellular components in Drosophila brain responsible for determining the desired temperature remain unknown. We identified these components by performing a large-scale genetic screen of temperature preference behaviour (TPB) in Drosophila. In parallel, we mapped areas of the Drosophila brain controlling TPB by targeted inactivation of neurons with tetanus toxin and a potassium channel (Kir2.1) driven with various brain-specific GAL4s. Here we show that mushroom bodies (MBs) and the cyclic AMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway are essential for controlling TPB. Furthermore, targeted expression of cAMP-PKA pathway components in only the MB was sufficient to rescue abnormal TPB of the corresponding mutants. Preferred temperatures were affected by the level of cAMP and PKA activity in the MBs in various PKA pathway mutants. PMID:18594510

  7. Synergistic action of interleukin-6 and glucocorticoids is mediated by the interleukin-6 response element of the rat alpha 2 macroglobulin gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Hocke, G M; Barry, D.; Fey, G H

    1992-01-01

    One class of genes coding for the acute-phase proteins (acute-phase genes) is induced by interleukin 6 (IL-6) through the human transcription factor NF-IL-6 and its rat homolog IL-6-DBP/LAP. A second class, represented by the rat alpha 2 macroglobulin gene, utilizes a different IL-6 response element (IL-6-RE) and different DNA-binding proteins interacting with this element, the so-called IL-6-RE binding proteins (IL-6 RE-BPs). Human Hep3B and HepG2 hepatoma, U266 myeloma, and CESS lymphoblast...

  8. HIV-1 p24gag Derived Conserved Element DNA Vaccine Increases the Breadth of Immune Response in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Viraj Kulkarni; Margherita Rosati; Antonio Valentin; Brunda Ganneru; Singh, Ashish K; Jian Yan; Morgane Rolland; Candido Alicea; Rachel Kelly Beach; Gen-Mu Zhang; Sylvie Le Gall; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; David Heckerman; Beatriz Mothe

    2013-01-01

    Viral diversity is considered a major impediment to the development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Despite this diversity, certain protein segments are nearly invariant across the known HIV-1 Group M sequences. We developed immunogens based on the highly conserved elements from the p24(gag) region according to two principles: the immunogen must (i) include strictly conserved elements of the virus that cannot mutate readily, and (ii) exclude both HIV regions capable of mutating without limitin...

  9. cAMP/PKA/CREB/GLT1 signaling involved in the antidepressant-like effects of phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor (GEBR-7b in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xu Liu,1,2,* Haibiao Guo,1,* Mohammad Daud SOM Sayed,3,4,* Yang Lu,3,4,* Ting Yang,5,* Dongsheng Zhou,6 Zhongming Chen,6 Haitao Wang,1 Chuang Wang,3,4 Jiangping Xu1 1Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of New Drug Screening, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 2Department of Pharmacy, General Hospital of Chinese People’s Armed Police Forces, Beijing, 3Ningbo Key Laboratory of Behavioral Neuroscience, 4Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 5Department of Pediatrics, The Affiliated Hospital of Ningbo University, Ningbo, Zhejiang, 6Department of Geriatric Psychiatry, Ningbo Kangning Hospital, Ningbo, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: GEBR-7b, a potential phosphodiesterase 4D inhibitor, has been shown to have memory-enhancing effects in rodents. However, it is still unknown whether GEBR-7b also has the antidepressant-like effects in rats. Herein, we examined the potential of GEBR-7b to ­attenuate depression-like behaviors in the rat model of depression induced by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS. Next, we also investigated the alterations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA catalytic subunit (PKAca, cAMP response element-binding (CREB, and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1 levels produced by GEBR-7b in the rats model of depression.Methods: Effects of GEBR-7b on CUS (35 days-induced depression-like behaviors were examined by measuring immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST. Hippocampal cAMP levels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, whereas PKAca, phosphorylation of CREB (pCREB, CREB, and GLT1 in the hippocampus of rats were subjected to Western blot analysis.Results: CUS exposure caused a depression-like behavior evidenced by the increased immobility time in FST. Depression-like behavior induced by CUS was

  10. Vitamin D responsive elements within the HLA-DRB1 promoter region in Sardinian multiple sclerosis associated alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Cocco

    Full Text Available Vitamin D response elements (VDREs have been found in the promoter region of the MS-associated allele HLA-DRB1*15:01, suggesting that with low vitamin D availability VDREs are incapable of inducing *15:01 expression allowing in early life autoreactive T-cells to escape central thymic deletion. The Italian island of Sardinia exhibits a very high frequency of MS and high solar radiation exposure. We test the contribution of VDREs analysing the promoter region of the MS-associated DRB1 *04:05, *03:01, *13:01 and *15:01 and non-MS-associated *16:01, *01, *11, *07:01 alleles in a cohort of Sardinians (44 MS patients and 112 healthy subjects. Sequencing of the DRB1 promoter region revealed a homozygous canonical VDRE in all *15:01, *16:01, *11 and in 45/73 *03:01 and in heterozygous state in 28/73 *03:01 and all *01 alleles. A new mutated homozygous VDRE was found in all *13:03, *04:05 and *07:01 alleles. Functionality of mutated and canonical VDREs was assessed for its potential to modulate levels of DRB1 gene expression using an in vitro transactivation assay after stimulation with active vitamin D metabolite. Vitamin D failed to increase promoter activity of the *04:05 and *03:01 alleles carrying the new mutated VDRE, while the *16:01 and *03:01 alleles carrying the canonical VDRE sequence showed significantly increased transcriptional activity. The ability of VDR to bind the mutant VDRE in the DRB1 promoter was evaluated by EMSA. Efficient binding of VDR to the VDRE sequence found in the *16:01 and in the *15:01 allele reduced electrophoretic mobility when either an anti-VDR or an anti-RXR monoclonal antibody was added. Conversely, the Sardinian mutated VDRE sample showed very low affinity for the RXR/VDR heterodimer. These data seem to exclude a role of VDREs in the promoter region of the DRB1 gene in susceptibility to MS carried by DRB1* alleles in Sardinian patients.

  11. Super-resolution ultrasound imaging using a phase-coherent MUSIC method with compensation for the phase response of transducer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labyed, Yassin; Huang, Lianjie

    2013-06-01

    Time-reversal with multiple signal classification (TR-MUSIC) is an imaging method for locating point-like targets beyond the classic resolution limit. In the presence of noise, however, the super-resolution capability of TR-MUSIC is diminished. Recently a new method, phase-coherent MUSIC (PC-MUSIC), was developed. This algorithm modifies TR-MUSIC to make use of phase information from multiple frequencies to reduce noise effects and preserve the super resolution. PC-MUSIC however, ignores the phase response of the transducer elements. In this paper, we account for the phase response of the transducer elements in the derivation of the PC-MUSIC algorithm. Unfortunately, the phase response of the transducer elements may not be known beforehand. We develop an experimental method to estimate this response using measured signals scattered from a glass microsphere embedded in a tissue-mimicking phantom with a homogeneous background medium of a known sound speed. We use numerical simulations to illustrate that the maximum resolution achieved with PC-MUSIC is limited by the transducer bandwidth and the signal-to-noise ratio. We perform experiments on tissue-mimicking phantoms and compare images obtained with different imaging modalities, including X-ray mammography, synthetic-aperture ultrasound imaging, TR-MUSIC, and PC-MUSIC. We demonstrate the significantly improved resolving power of PC-MUSIC. PMID:25004469

  12. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  13. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  14. Multiple facets of cAMP signalling and physiological impact : cAMP compartmentalization in the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenburger, Anouk; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP) are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelli

  15. cAMP/PKA Signaling Inhibits Osteogenic Differentiation and Bone Formation in Rodent Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; Mulder, Winfried; Steeghs, Ilse; Klundert, van de Christine; Fernandes, Hugo; Liu, Jun; Arends, Roel; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) activation induces in vitro osteogenesis and in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). To analyze the species-specific response of this phenomenon and to translate our findings into a clinical trial, suitable

  16. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by LKB1 and CaMKK in adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gormand, Amélie; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer;

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cellular and whole body energy homeostasis. In adipose tissue, activation of AMPK has been demonstrated in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli. However, the upstream kinase that activates AMPK in adipocytes...

  17. Cyclic AMP activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Peraldi, P; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated in response to a large variety of extracellular signals, including growth factors, hormones, and neurotransmitters, which activate distinct intracellular signaling pathways. Their activation by the cAMP-dependent pathway, however, has not been...

  18. cAMP/PKA/CREB信号通路及相关调控蛋白PDE-4和ERK对学习记忆的影响%Influence of Learning and Memory on the Expression of Relevant Controlling Protein PDE-4 and Extracellular Signal Regulating Kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨夏

    2011-01-01

    In recent years,a lot of learning and memory tests which have been done with animals are all prompted that cAMP / PKA / CREB signaling pathway and the proteins are related to the process of learning and memory. PKA phosphorylates and activates cAMP response element hinding protein( CREB ). The latter is an important nucleoprotein , and it regulates the gene transcription of a promoter that has cAMP. It has heen confirmed that PDE-4 and ERK are cAMP /PKA/CREB signaling pathway regulatory protein. The cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway and its regulated protein : PDE-4 and ERK. and the relationship among them, and explore its impact on learning and memory were reviewed in this article.%近年来在动物身上进行了大量的学习记忆实验,均提示cAMP/PKA/CREB信号通路中的各蛋白均与学习记忆过程有关.环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)激活蛋白激酶A磷酸化并激活cAMP反应单元结合蛋白(CREB),后者是一种重要的核蛋白,其调节启动子中具有cAMP反应单元(CRE)的基因转录,这种核转录因子具有调节包括学习记忆在内的广泛的生物学功能.已有研究证实,PDE4和ERK为cAMP/PKA/CREB信号通路的调节蛋白.现对cAMP/PKA/CREB信号通路中的各蛋白及其调控蛋白PDE-4和ERK进行研究,阐述着三者之间的关系,并探讨其对学习记忆的影响.

  19. Farnesoid X receptor inhibits the transcriptional activity of carbohydrate response element binding protein in human hepatocytes. : Transrepression of ChREBP by FXR

    OpenAIRE

    Caron, Sandrine; Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the...

  20. An adenosine at position 27 in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activation response element is not critical for transcriptional or translational activation by Tat.

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchard, A. D.; Powell, R; Braddock, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1992-01-01

    Tat protein binds to the trans-activation response (TAR) element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNAs and activates gene expression at the level of transcription in mammalian cell lines and translation in Xenopus oocytes. Certain residues within TAR are important for Tat binding in vitro, including residue A-27, which appears to be able to be modified in a Tat-dependent manner in Xenopus oocytes (L. Sharmeen, B. Bass, N. Sonenberg, H. Weintraub, and M. Groudine, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. ...

  1. Sip4, a Snf1 kinase-dependent transcriptional activator, binds to the carbon source-responsive element of gluconeogenic genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Vincent, O.; Carlson, M

    1998-01-01

    The carbon source-responsive element (CSRE) mediates transcriptional activation of the gluconeogenic genes during growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on non-fermentable carbon sources. Previous studies have suggested that the Cat8 protein activates the expression of CSRE-binding factors. We show here that one of these factors is Sip4, a glucose-regulated C6 zinc cluster activator which was identified by its interaction with the Snf1 protein kinase. We present genetic evidence that Si...

  2. Model reduction and perturbation analysis of wave finite element formulations for computing the forced response of coupled elastic systems involving junctions with uncertain eigenfrequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Mencik, Jean-Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    International audience The wave finite element method is investigated for computing the low- and mid-frequency forced response of coupled elastic systems involving straight structures with junctions. The relevance of the method is discussed when a component mode synthesis procedure is used for modeling the junctions. A norm-wise selection criterion is proposed so as to reduce efficiently the number of junction modes retained in the wave-based formulations. Component-wise perturbation bound...

  3. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Regulation of glucose and fat metabolism in the liver by Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and impact of dietary influence

    OpenAIRE

    Elkatry, Haiam Omar Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Deregulationen in der Leberlipidsynthese sind häufig mit Adipositas und Diabetes Typ 2 verbunden und daher ist ein detailliertes Verständnis der beteiligten, regulierenden Stoffwechselwege sehr wichtig, um künftig potentielle therapeutische Targets zu identifizieren. Die Leber ist der wichtigste Ort für den Kohlenhydratstoffwechsel (Glykolyse und Glykogen-Synthese) sowie Triglycerid-Synthese (Lipogenese). Carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) wurden in die Regulation durch ...

  4. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de....... Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility....

  5. T3-induced liver AMP-activated protein kinase signaling: Redox dependency and upregulation of downstream targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla, Luis A; Fernández, Virginia; Cornejo, Pamela; Vargas, Romina; Morales, Paula; Ceballo, Juan; Fischer, Alvaro; Escudero, Nicolás; Escobar, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the redox dependency and promotion of downstream targets in thyroid hormone (T3)-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling as cellular energy sensor to limit metabolic stresses in the liver. METHODS: Fed male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single ip dose of 0.1 mg T3/kg or T3 vehicle (NaOH 0.1 N; controls) and studied at 8 or 24 h after treatment. Separate groups of animals received 500 mg N-acetylcysteine (NAC)/kg or saline ip 30 min prior T3. Measurements included plasma and liver 8-isoprostane and serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels (ELISA), hepatic levels of mRNAs (qPCR), proteins (Western blot), and phosphorylated AMPK (ELISA). RESULTS: T3 upregulates AMPK signaling, including the upstream kinases Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase-1, with T3-induced reactive oxygen species having a causal role due to its suppression by pretreatment with the antioxidant NAC. Accordingly, AMPK targets acetyl-CoA carboxylase and cyclic AMP response element binding protein are phosphorylated, with the concomitant carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (CPT-1α) activation and higher expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α and that of the fatty acid oxidation (FAO)-related enzymes CPT-1α, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, and acyl-CoA thioesterase 2. Under these conditions, T3 induced a significant increase in the serum levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, a surrogate marker for hepatic FAO. CONCLUSION: T3 administration activates liver AMPK signaling in a redox-dependent manner, leading to FAO enhancement as evidenced by the consequent ketogenic response, which may constitute a key molecular mechanism regulating energy dynamics to support T3 preconditioning against ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25516653

  6. Activation of the cAMP Pathway Induces RACK1-Dependent Binding of β-Actin to BDNF Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neasta, Jeremie; Fiorenza, Anna; He, Dao-Yao; Phamluong, Khanhky; Kiely, Patrick A.; Ron, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    RACK1 is a scaffolding protein that contributes to the specificity and propagation of several signaling cascades including the cAMP pathway. As such, RACK1 participates in numerous cellular functions ranging from cell migration and morphology to gene transcription. To obtain further insights on the mechanisms whereby RACK1 regulates cAMP-dependent processes, we set out to identify new binding partners of RACK1 during activation of the cAMP signaling using a proteomics strategy. We identified β-actin as a direct RACK1 binding partner and found that the association between β-actin and RACK1 is increased in response to the activation of the cAMP pathway. Furthermore, we show that cAMP-dependent increase in BDNF expression requires filamentous actin. We further report that β-actin associates with the BDNF promoter IV upon the activation of the cAMP pathway and present data to suggest that the association of β-actin with BDNF promoter IV is RACK1-dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that β-actin is a new RACK1 binding partner and that the RACK1 and β-actin association participate in the cAMP-dependent regulation of BDNF transcription. PMID:27505161

  7. A Novel Negative Fe-Deficiency-Responsive Element and a TGGCA-Type-Like FeRE Control the Expression of FTR1 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowen Fei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reported three Fe-deficiency-responsive elements (FEREs, FOX1, ATX1, and FEA1, all of which are positive regulatory elements in response to iron deficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here we describe FTR1, another iron regulated gene and mutational analysis of its promoter. Our results reveal that the FeREs of FTR1 distinguish itself from other iron response elements by containing both negative and positive regulatory regions. In FTR1, the −291/−236 region from the transcriptional start site is necessary and sufficient for Fe-deficiency-inducible expression. This region contains two positive FeREs with a TGGCA-like core sequence: the FtrFeRE1 (ATGCAGGCT at −287/−279 and the FtrFeRE2 (AAGCGATTGCCAGAGCGC at −253/−236. Furthermore, we identified a novel FERE, FtrFeRE3 (AGTAACTGTTAAGCC localized at −319/−292, which negatively influences the expression of FTR1.

  8. Adenylate Kinase and AMP Signaling Networks: Metabolic Monitoring, Signal Communication and Body Energy Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Terzic

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Adenylate kinase and downstream AMP signaling is an integrated metabolic monitoring system which reads the cellular energy state in order to tune and report signals to metabolic sensors. A network of adenylate kinase isoforms (AK1-AK7 are distributed throughout intracellular compartments, interstitial space and body fluids to regulate energetic and metabolic signaling circuits, securing efficient cell energy economy, signal communication and stress response. The dynamics of adenylate kinase-catalyzed phosphotransfer regulates multiple intracellular and extracellular energy-dependent and nucleotide signaling processes, including excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, cell and ciliary motility, nuclear transport, energetics of cell cycle, DNA synthesis and repair, and developmental programming. Metabolomic analyses indicate that cellular, interstitial and blood AMP levels are potential metabolic signals associated with vital functions including body energy sensing, sleep, hibernation and food intake. Either low or excess AMP signaling has been linked to human disease such as diabetes, obesity and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Recent studies indicate that derangements in adenylate kinase-mediated energetic signaling due to mutations in AK1, AK2 or AK7 isoforms are associated with hemolytic anemia, reticular dysgenesis and ciliary dyskinesia. Moreover, hormonal, food and antidiabetic drug actions are frequently coupled to alterations of cellular AMP levels and associated signaling. Thus, by monitoring energy state and generating and distributing AMP metabolic signals adenylate kinase represents a unique hub within the cellular homeostatic network.

  9. Involvement of the second messenger cAMP in gravity-signal transduction in physarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, I.; Rabien, H.; Ivanova, K.

    The aim of the investigation was to clarify, whether cellular signal processing following graviperception involves second messenger pathways. The test object was a most gravisensitive free-living ameboid cell, the myxomycete (acellular slime mold) Physarum polycephalum. It was demonstrated that the motor response is related to acceleration-dependent changes in the levels of the cellular second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Rotating Physarum plasmodia in the gravity field of the Earth about a horizontal axis increased their cAMP concentration. Depriving the cells for a few days of the acceleration stimulus (near weightlessness in a space experiment on STS-69) slightly lowered plasmodial cAMP levels. Thus, the results provide first indications that the acceleration-stimulus signal transduction chain of Physarum uses an ubiquitous second messenger pathway.

  10. The Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24

    Increased deployment of new technologies, e.g., renewable generation and electric vehicles, is rapidly transforming electrical power networks by crossing previously distinct spatiotemporal scales and invalidating many traditional approaches for designing, analyzing, and operating power grids. This trend is expected to accelerate over the coming years, bringing the disruptive challenge of complexity, but also opportunities to deliver unprecedented efficiency and reliability. Our Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS) Center will discover, enable, and solve emerging mathematics challenges arising in power systems and, more generally, in complex engineered networks. We will develop foundational applied mathematics resulting in rigorous algorithms and simulation toolboxes for modern and future engineered networks. The AMPS Center deconstruction/reconstruction approach 'deconstructs' complex networks into sub-problems within non-separable spatiotemporal scales, a missing step in 20th century modeling of engineered networks. These sub-problems are addressed within the appropriate AMPS foundational pillar - complex systems, control theory, and optimization theory - and merged or 'reconstructed' at their boundaries into more general mathematical descriptions of complex engineered networks where important new questions are formulated and attacked. These two steps, iterated multiple times, will bridge the growing chasm between the legacy power grid and its future as a complex engineered network.

  11. The Monge-Ampère equation

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez, Cristian E

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this monograph explores the Monge-Ampère equation and the latest advances in its study and applications. It provides an essentially self-contained systematic exposition of the theory of weak solutions, including regularity results by L. A. Caffarelli. The geometric aspects of this theory are stressed using techniques from harmonic analysis, such as covering lemmas and set decompositions. An effort is made to present complete proofs of all theorems, and examples and exercises are offered to further illustrate important concepts. Some of the topics considered include generalized solutions, non-divergence equations, cross sections, and convex solutions. New to this edition is a chapter on the linearized Monge-Ampère equation and a chapter on interior Hölder estimates for second derivatives. Bibliographic notes, updated and expanded from the first edition, are included at the end of every chapter for further reading on Monge-Ampère-type equations and their diverse applications in th...

  12. Bladder inflammatory transcriptome in response to tachykinins: Neurokinin 1 receptor-dependent genes and transcription regulatory elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dozmorov Igor

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tachykinins (TK, such as substance P, and their neurokinin receptors which are ubiquitously expressed in the human urinary tract, represent an endogenous system regulating bladder inflammatory, immune responses, and visceral hypersensitivity. Increasing evidence correlates alterations in the TK system with urinary tract diseases such as neurogenic bladders, outflow obstruction, idiopathic detrusor instability, and interstitial cystitis. However, despite promising effects in animal models, there seems to be no published clinical study showing that NK-receptor antagonists are an effective treatment of pain in general or urinary tract disorders, such as detrusor overactivity. In order to search for therapeutic targets that could block the tachykinin system, we set forth to determine the regulatory network downstream of NK1 receptor activation. First, NK1R-dependent transcripts were determined and used to query known databases for their respective transcription regulatory elements (TREs. Methods An expression analysis was performed using urinary bladders isolated from sensitized wild type (WT and NK1R-/- mice that were stimulated with saline, LPS, or antigen to provoke inflammation. Based on cDNA array results, NK1R-dependent genes were selected. PAINT software was used to query TRANSFAC database and to retrieve upstream TREs that were confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Results The regulatory network of TREs driving NK1R-dependent genes presented cRel in a central position driving 22% of all genes, followed by AP-1, NF-kappaB, v-Myb, CRE-BP1/c-Jun, USF, Pax-6, Efr-1, Egr-3, and AREB6. A comparison between NK1R-dependent and NK1R-independent genes revealed Nkx-2.5 as a unique discriminator. In the presence of NK1R, Nkx2-5 _01 was significantly correlated with 36 transcripts which included several candidates for mediating bladder development (FGF and inflammation (PAR-3, IL-1R, IL-6, α-NGF, TSP2. In the absence of

  13. S-AMP: Approximate Message Passing for General Matrix Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Winther, Ole; Fleury, Bernard H.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel iterative estimation algorithm for linear observation models called S-AMP. The fixed points of S-AMP are the stationary points of the exact Gibbs free energy under a set of (first- and second-) moment consistency constraints in the large system limit. S-AMP extends the...... approximate message-passing (AMP) algorithm to general matrix ensembles with a well-defined large system size limit. The generalization is based on the S-transform (in free probability) of the spectrum of the measurement matrix. Furthermore, we show that the optimality of S-AMP follows directly from its...

  14. Signatures of rare-earth elements in banded corals of Kalpeni atoll-Lakshadweep archipelago in response to monsoonal variations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.A.S.; Nath, B.N.; Balaram, V.

    Concentrations of rare-earth elements (REE) have been determined in seasonal bands of Porites species collected from the Lakshadweep lagoon. Total REE (REE) are very low (less than 3 ppm) in these corals. Seasonal variations in REE appear to have...

  15. Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltier, G.L.; Wright, M.S.; Hopkins, W.A.; Meyer, J.L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have elevated trace element concentrations in their tissues, but this relationship and its potential consequences are unclear for lotic organisms. To explore these patterns in a lotic environment, we transplanted Corbicula fluminea from a reference stream to a stream receiving CFPP discharge. We assessed trace element accumulation and glutathione concentration in clam tissue, shell growth, and condition index at five sites along a contamination gradient. Clams at the most upstream and contaminated site had the highest growth rate, condition index, glutathione concentrations, and concentrations of arsenic (7.85 {+-} 0.25 {mu} g/g (dry mass)), selenium (17.75 {+-} 0.80 {mu} g/g), and cadmium (7.28 {+-} 0.34 {mu} g/g). Mercury concentrations declined from 4.33 {+-} 0.83 to 0.81 {+-} 0.11 {mu} g/g (dry mass) in clams transplanted into the selenium-rich environment nearest the power plant, but this effect was not as evident at less impacted, downstream sites. Even though dilution of trace elements within modest distances from the power plant reduced bioaccumulation potential in clams, long-term loading of trace elements to downstream depositional regions (e.g., slow moving, silty areas) is likely significant.

  16. Infrared detector circuits using monolithic CMOS Op-Amps with InSb detectors in a transimpedance configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David S.

    1992-09-01

    As the emphasis in infrared detector research shifts toward larger and more complicated arrays the amount of time spent on simple single-element and small arrays is decreasing. One set of applications where discrete detectors and arrays are still finding use is in satellites. In addition, scanned imaging arrays based on single element detectors and small arrays are still being manufactured. Discussion here is for small arrays and single element detectors. One of the aspects of detector operation that always needs to be addressed is amplification. Often detectors are attached to amplifiers through rather long leads. Such systems are subject to unwanted microphonic response as a result of the motion of the leads relative to each other or to the ground plane. This sort of microphonic response can many times be eliminated through careful wiring and routing techniques, however, in some severe environments it is not possible to eliminate all microphonic response. A commonly used solution to this problem is to hybridize the detector with a JFET front end to reduce the effective output resistance of the detector circuit relative to the amplifier input. The TIA in such configurations is completed off the focal plane at room temperature. This means that half the circuit is operating at cryogenic temperatures while the other part is operating at room temperature some distance away. Ideally it would be more convenient, if not better, to include the amplifier on the focal plane with the detector. (Of course this hybridization is necessary for large two-dimensional arrays.) Data have been acquired to show some of the limitations and opportunities for such an approach. Typical bipolar operational amplifiers (OP-27, OP-37, LM108) will not operate well at cryogenic temperatures. CMOS operational amplifiers generally will operate at cryogenic temperatures but suffer from high front-end voltage noise. The TLC2201 from Texas Instruments is a CMOS op-amp manufactured for low voltage

  17. Listeria monocytogenes Multidrug Resistance Transporters and Cyclic Di-AMP, Which Contribute to Type I Interferon Induction, Play a Role in Cell Wall Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan Zeevi, Millie; Shafir, Nirit S.; Shaham, Shira; Friedman, Sivan; Sigal, Nadejda; Nir Paz, Ran; Boneca, Ivo G; Herskovits, Anat A.

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes activates a robust type I interferon response upon infection. This response is partially dependent on the multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter MdrM and relies on cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) secretion, yet the functions of MdrM and cyclic-di-AMP that lead to this response are unknown. Here we report that it is not MdrM alone but a cohort of MDR transporters that together contribute to type I interferon induction during infection. In a ...

  18. GCC box in Arabidopsis PDF1.2 promoter is an essential and sufficient cis-acting element in response to MeJA treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Haiwen; XIE Bingyan; LU Xiangyang; YANG Yuhong; HUANG Rongfeng

    2004-01-01

    The expression of Arabidopsis PDF1.2 gene is regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) and ethylene (ET). It also has been well documented that GCC box is an element responsive to ET,however, the responsive mechanism of JA in such plant defense gene expression is unclear. In this paper, the authors define the essential cis-acting element in PDF1.2 promoter responsive to methyl jasmonate (MeJA) through fragment deletions and site-directed mutageneses combining Agrobacterium-mediated transient reporter gene expression in tobacco leaves. Firstly, the MeJA inducible expression of PDF1.2 was confirmed by using the upstream -1.86 kb fragment of PDF1.2 gene. Secondly, the upstream -300--243 bp fragment of the promoter was evidenced to respond to MeJA. To further characterize this promoter region, three point mutations were introduced into the -300--243 bp fragment of the promoter. This result showed that the mutation of GCC box abolished MeJA induction, whereas the mutations of the G box-like and the imperfect palindrome sequence did not significantly decrease MeJA inducible effect, indicating that GCC box in PDF1.2 is essential for MeJA induction. The sufficient responsiveness to MeJA of this GCC box was further investigated by 4×GCC fused upstream to the CaMV 35S minimal promoter. This result suggested that the fused promoter was able to activate reporter gene expression in response to MeJA. Thus these results indicate that the GCC box in PDF1.2 is an essential and sufficient element to confer MeJA induction.

  19. PPARgamma-dependent regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 amplifies the stimulatory effect of cAMP on renin gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Michael; Schubert, Thomas; Schreiber, Andrea; Mayer, Sandra; Friedrich, Björn; Artunc, Ferruh; Todorov, Vladimir T

    2010-11-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays an important role in the regulation of renin gene expression. Nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is known to stimulate renin gene transcription acting through PPARγ-binding sequences in renin promoter. We show now that activation of PPARγ by unsaturated fatty acids or thiazolidinediones drastically augments the cAMP-dependent increase of renin mRNA in the human renin-producing cell line Calu-6. The underlying mechanism involves potentiation of agonist-induced cAMP increase and up-regulation of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6) gene expression. We identified a palindromic element with a 3-bp spacer (Pal3) in AC6 intron 1 (AC6Pal3). AC6Pal3 bound PPARγ and mediated trans-activation by PPARγ agonist. AC6 knockdown decreased basal renin mRNA level and attenuated the maximal PPARγ-dependent stimulation of the cAMP-induced renin gene expression. AC6Pal3 decoy oligonucleotide abrogated the PPARγ-dependent potentiation of cAMP-induced renin gene expression. Treatment of mice with PPARγ agonist increased AC6 mRNA kidney levels. Our data suggest that in addition to its direct effect on renin gene transcription, PPARγ "sensitizes" renin gene to cAMP via trans-activation of AC6 gene. AC6 has been identified as PPARγ target gene with a functional Pal3 sequence.

  20. cAMP dependent and independent regulation of thyroglobulin synthesis by two clones of the OVNIS 6H thyroid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1987-07-01

    The hormonal regulation of thyroglobulin synthesis has been studied using two independent clones of the OVNIS 6H cell line. Insulin, hydrocortisone and TSH were able to stimulate thyroglobulin synthesis, whereas transferrin, somatostatin and glycyl-histidyl-lysine were without effect. Insulin stimulated thyroglobulin synthesis without affecting cAMP production. Hydrocortisone, when combined with insulin was a stimulator too; this stimulation was not accompanied by an increase in cAMP. TSH alone was unable to stimulate either cAMP or thyroglobulin synthesis. The stimulatory effect of TSH on thyroglobulin synthesis took place only when combined with insulin or insulin plus hydrocortisone, and was mediated by cAMP. Consequently, insulin and hydrocortisone stimulated thyroglobulin synthesis by cAMP-independent mechanisms, whereas TSH acted via the cAMP system. Forskolin mimicked TSH effects on cAMP and thyroglobulin synthesis. Calf serum inhibited cAMP and thyroglobulin production. Optimal cAMP and thyroglobulin synthesis as well as TSH responsiveness were obtained in serum-free medium supplemented with 5 micrograms/ml insulin, 100 nM hydrocortisone and 1 mU/ml TSH. PMID:3040495

  1. Use of a questionnaire design as an element of nuclear energy generating enterprises social responsibility public audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the article we describe some issues concerning corporate social responsibility to a society from the point of view its influence on image of an enterprise. We present results of a social investigation regarding to evaluation of social responsibility of the 'South-Ukraine Nuclear Power Plant'

  2. ANALYSIS OF THE RESPONSE OF A LAMINATE TO IMPOSED FORCES USING CLASSICAL LAMINATION THEORY AND FINITE ELEMENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K.Chhapkhane

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The laminate is a two or more lamina bonded together to act as an integral structural element. The laminae are combined to create a laminate. Classical lamination theory consists of a collection of mechanics of materials type of stress and deformation hypothesis. By use of classical lamination theory we can consistently proceed directly from the basic building block, the lamina, to the end result, a structural laminate. The classical lamination theory is very important in analysis of laminate because it will predict the stresses, strains, forces and moments relationships with reasonable accuracy. The composite materials are widely used in military aircraft, civil aircraft, space and automobile applications. ANSYS 11software is used for analysis of composite laminate. First order shear stress deformation theory is used for the analysis of laminate in finite element technique.

  3. Cyclic AMP--dependent aggregation of Swiss 3T3 cells on a cellulose substratum (Cuprophan) and decreased cell membrane Rho A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, N; Nagel, M D

    2002-06-01

    Cell surface integrin receptors and Rho family GTPases function together to mediate adhesion-dependent events in cells. We have shown that the attachment of Swiss 3T3 cells to a cellulose substratum (Cuprophan, CU) activates adenylyl cyclase, which catalyses cyclic AMP (cAMP) production. CU adsorbs vitronectin poorly, prevents cell spreading and causes cells to aggregate. By contrast, spread cells on polystyrene (PS) contain low cAMP concentrations. We have now investigated the shift between integrin signalling-Rho A and the cAMP pathway. CU did not support the formation of focal contacts and stress fibres. The plasma membranes of cells on CU had less Rho A than those of cells on PS. Also, blocking vitronectin (VN) or fibronectin (FN)-integrin receptors with echistatin, which activates cAMP production, decreased Rho A in the plasma membrane of cells attached to PS. But adsorption of VN or FN onto CU, which limits the production of the cAMP, increased the cell membrane Rho A. Adding an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase PKA to the medium also increased the plasma membrane Rho A in aggregated cells attached to CU. These results highlight the importance of cAMP, generated by cell attachment to substratum, as a gating element in integrin-Rho A signalling. PMID:12013176

  4. Taste signaling elements expressed in gut enteroendocrine cells regulate nutrient-responsive secretion of gut hormones1234

    OpenAIRE

    Kokrashvili, Zaza; Mosinger, Bedrich; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the receptors and downstream signaling elements involved in taste detection and transduction are also expressed in enteroendocrine cells where they underlie the chemosensory functions of the gut. In one well-known example of gastrointestinal chemosensation (the “incretin effect”), it is known that glucose that is given orally, but not systemically, induces secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (the incretin hormones), which in turn regulate ...

  5. Optimal Design for Reactivity Ratio Estimation: A Comparison of Techniques for AMPS/Acrylamide and AMPS/Acrylic Acid Copolymerizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J. Scott

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble polymers of acrylamide (AAm and acrylic acid (AAc have significant potential in enhanced oil recovery, as well as in other specialty applications. To improve the shear strength of the polymer, a third comonomer, 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS, can be added to the pre-polymerization mixture. Copolymerization kinetics of AAm/AAc are well studied, but little is known about the other comonomer pairs (AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc. Hence, reactivity ratios for AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc copolymerization must be established first. A key aspect in the estimation of reliable reactivity ratios is design of experiments, which minimizes the number of experiments and provides increased information content (resulting in more precise parameter estimates. However, design of experiments is hardly ever used during copolymerization parameter estimation schemes. In the current work, copolymerization experiments for both AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc are designed using two optimal techniques (Tidwell-Mortimer and the error-in-variables-model (EVM. From these optimally designed experiments, accurate reactivity ratio estimates are determined for AMPS/AAm (rAMPS = 0.18, rAAm = 0.85 and AMPS/AAc (rAMPS = 0.19, rAAc = 0.86.

  6. Extended spectrum β-lactamases, carbapenemases and mobile genetic elements responsible for antibiotics resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Salabi, Allaaeddin; Walsh, Timothey R; Chouchani, Chedly

    2013-05-01

    Infectious diseases due to Gram-negative bacteria are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Antimicrobial agents represent one major therapeutic tools implicated to treat these infections. The misuse of antimicrobial agents has resulted in the emergence of resistant strains of Gram-negatives in particular Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenters; they have an effect not only on a human but on the public health when bacteria use the resistance mechanisms to spread in the hospital environment and to the community outside the hospitals by means of mobile genetic elements. Gram-negative bacteria have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobial agents. They have developed several mechanisms by which they can withstand to antimicrobials, these mechanisms include the production of Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases, furthermore, Gram-negative bacteria are now capable of spreading such resistance between members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenters using mobile genetic elements as vehicles for such resistance mechanisms rendering antibiotics useless. Therefore, addressing the issue of mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance is considered one of most urgent priorities. This review will help to illustrate different resistance mechanisms; ESBLs, carbapenemases encoded by genes carried by mobile genetic elements, which are used by Gram-negative bacteria to escape antimicrobial effect.

  7. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    infection give rise to rugose small colony variants (RSCVs), which are hyper-biofilm-forming mutants that commonly possess mutations that increase production of the biofilm-promoting secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). We show that RSCVs display a decreased production of acute virulence factors...... as a direct result of elevated c-di-GMP content. Overproduction of c-di-GMP causes a decrease in the transcription of virulence factor genes that are regulated by the global virulence regulator Vfr. The low level of Vfr-dependent transcription is caused by a low level of its coactivator, cyclic AMP (c......AMP), which is decreased in response to a high level of c-di-GMP. Mutations that cause reversion of the RSCV phenotype concomitantly reactivate Vfr-cAMP signaling. Attempts to uncover the mechanism underlying the observed c-di-GMP-mediated lowering of cAMP content provided evidence that it is not caused...

  8. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barott, K L; Helman, Y; Haramaty, L; Barron, M E; Hess, K C; Buck, J; Levin, L R; Tresguerres, M

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  9. Cyclic AMP in female mouse brain is altered by the adrenocorticotropic hormone(4-9) analogue organon 2766.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D R; Felt, B T; Murphy, S; Goldman, H

    1981-09-01

    Cyclic AMP content was determined in 12 brain regions of young adult female mice at 30 min and at 24 h following an intraperitoneal injection of the tri-substituted adrenocorticotropic hormone(4-9) [ACTH(4-9)] analogue Organon 2766 [ORG 2766]. Animals were killed by focused 3.5 kW microwave radiation applied for 350 ms. Unlike previously reported responses in male mice, at 30 min post-injection there were no detectable differences in cyclic AMP content between the placebo and ORG 2766-treated animals. By contrast, 24 h after injection, the content of cyclic AMP was changed significantly in 8 of the 12 brain regions examined: medulla-pons, septal area, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, and parietal and occipital cortices. In most of the regions examined, differences consisted of 50% or greater reductions of tissue cyclic AMP content. The changes were unrelated to the estrus cycle of these animals.

  10. A Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method for output-only element-level system identification and input estimation from earthquake response signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pioldi, Fabio; Rizzi, Egidio

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a new output-only element-level system identification and input estimation technique, towards the simultaneous identification of modal parameters, input excitation time history and structural features at the element-level by adopting earthquake-induced structural response signals. The method, named Full Dynamic Compound Inverse Method (FDCIM), releases strong assumptions of earlier element-level techniques, by working with a two-stage iterative algorithm. Jointly, a Statistical Average technique, a modification process and a parameter projection strategy are adopted at each stage to achieve stronger convergence for the identified estimates. The proposed method works in a deterministic way and is completely developed in State-Space form. Further, it does not require continuous- to discrete-time transformations and does not depend on initialization conditions. Synthetic earthquake-induced response signals from different shear-type buildings are generated to validate the implemented procedure, also with noise-corrupted cases. The achieved results provide a necessary condition to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed identification method.

  11. Elevated cAMP increases aquaporin-3 plasma membrane diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marlar, Saw; Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Koffman, Jennifer Skaarup;

    2014-01-01

    .05)]. Immunoelectron microscopy showed no obvious difference in AQP3-EGFP expression levels or localization in the plasma membrane upon forskolin stimulation. Thus AQP3-EGFP diffusion is altered upon increased cAMP, which may correspond to basolateral adaptations in response to the increased apical water readsorption......Regulated urine concentration takes place in the renal collecting duct upon arginine vasopressin (AVP) stimulation, where subapical vesicles containing aquaporin-2 (AQP2) are inserted into the apical membrane instantly increasing water reabsorption and urine concentration. The reabsorped water...... be short-term regulated via changes in protein-protein interactions, incorporation into lipid rafts, and/or changes in steady-state turnover, which could result in changes in the diffusion behavior of AQP3. Thus we measured AQP3 diffusion coefficients upon stimulation with the AVP mimic forskolin to reveal...

  12. Qushi Huayu Decoction Inhibits Hepatic Lipid Accumulation by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Qushi Huayu Decoction (QHD, a Chinese herbal formula, has been proven effective on alleviating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD in human and rats. The present study was conducted to investigate whether QHD could inhibit hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in vivo and in vitro. Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL model was duplicated with high-fat diet in rats and with free fatty acid (FFA in L02 cells. In in vivo experimental condition, QHD significantly decreased the accumulation of fatty droplets in livers, lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels in serum. Moreover, QHD supplementation reversed the HFD-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC and decreased hepatic nuclear protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1 and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP in the liver. In in vitro, QHD-containing serum decreased the cellular TG content and alleviated the accumulation of fatty droplets in L02 cells. QHD supplementation reversed the FFA-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC and decreased the hepatic nuclear protein expression of SREBP-1 and ChREBP. Overall results suggest that QHD has significant effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation via AMPK pathway in vivo and in vitro.

  13. Gene discovery and differential expression analysis of humoral immune response elements in female Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Female Culicoides sonorensis midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are vectors of pathogens that impact livestock and wildlife in the United States. Little is known about their molecular functioning, including components of their immune system. Because the insect immune response is involved ...

  14. Co-Chairs’ Summary of Technical Session 2A. Nuclear Forensic Capabilities as an Element of a National Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear forensic state of practice has shown improvement in response to lessons learned from, and recent experience in, nuclear forensic applications within the context of a broader national response plan to a nuclear security event. Once adopted, a nuclear forensic programme reflects the State’s experience with the nuclear fuel cycle and the threats posed by nuclear and other radioactive material out of regulatory control. The IAEA assists Member States through the development of implementing guidance to include recent revisions on nuclear forensics in support of investigations. Member States apply their own experience in nuclear forensic case studies within a national response plan to improve their own nuclear security infrastructure based on lessons learned and post-operational recommendations. Coordination and cooperation between law enforcement, forensic science and nuclear science is essential to ensure a viable national response plan

  15. Application of Response Surface Methodology for Modeling the effect of alloying elements on Mechanical Properties of Structural Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Abhinay Bhatt; Parappagoudar, Mahesh B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper an attempt has been made to establish the non-linear input-output relationships to model mechanical properties of structural steel with the help of Response Surface Methodology. Central composite design is utilized to conduct the experiments. Further, surface plots have been developed for response namely Yield strength, Ultimate tensile strength and Elongation. The experiments have been conducted as per central composite design where all process variables are ...

  16. Correlation between bone mineral density and serum trace elements in response to supervised aerobic training in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghadir AH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad H Alghadir,1 Sami A Gabr,1,2 Einas S Al-Eisa,1 Muaz H Alghadir3 1Rehabilitation Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt; 3Department of Orthopedics, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: Life style and physical activity play a pivotal role in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. The mechanism for better bone metabolism and improvement of physical disorders is not clear yet. Trace minerals such as Ca, Mn, Cu, and Zn are essential precursors for most vital biological process, especially those of bone health.Objective: The main target of this study was evaluating the effective role of supervised aerobic exercise for 1 hour/day, 3 days/week for 12 weeks in the functions of trace elements in bone health through measuring bone mineral density (BMD, osteoporosis (T-score, bone markers, and trace element concentrations in healthy subjects aged 30–60 years with age average of 41.2±4.9.Methods: A total of 100 healthy subjects (47 males, 53 females; age range 30–60 years were recruited for this study. Based on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA scan analysis, the participants were classified into three groups: normal (n=30, osteopenic (n=40, and osteoporotic (n=30. Following, 12 weeks of moderate aerobic exercise, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP, BMD, T-score, and trace elements such as Ca, Mn, Cu, and Zn were assessed at baseline and post-intervention.Results: Significant improvement in serum BAP level, T-score, and BMD were observed in all participants following 12 weeks of moderate exercise. Participants with osteopenia and osteoporosis showed significant increase in serum Ca and Mn, along with decrease in serum Cu and Zn levels following 12 weeks of aerobic training. In control group, the improvements in serum trace elements and body mass

  17. CacyBP/SIP as a regulator of transcriptional responses in brain cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Filipek, Anna; Hetman, Michal

    2014-01-01

    The Calcyclin-Binding Protein/Siah-1-Interacting Protein (CacyBP/SIP) is highly expressed in the brain and was shown to regulate the β-catenin-driven transcription in thymocytes. Therefore, it was investigated whether in brain cells CacyBP/SIP might play a role as a transcriptional regulator. In BDNF- or forskolin-stimulated rat primary cortical neurons, overexpression of CacyBP/SIP enhanced transcriptional activity of the cAMP-response element (CRE). In addition, overexpressed...

  18. A CREB-Sirt1-Hes1 Circuitry Mediates Neural Stem Cell Response to Glucose Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Fusco; Lucia Leone; Saviana Antonella Barbati; Daniela Samengo; Roberto Piacentini; Giuseppe Maulucci; Gabriele Toietta; Matteo Spinelli; Michael McBurney; Giovambattista Pani; Claudio Grassi

    2016-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis plays increasingly recognized roles in brain homeostasis and repair and is profoundly affected by energy balance and nutrients. We found that the expression of Hes-1 (hairy and enhancer of split 1) is modulated in neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs) by extracellular glucose through the coordinated action of CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein) and Sirt-1 (Sirtuin 1), two cellular nutrient sensors. Excess glucose reduced CREB-activated Hes-1 expression an...

  19. Radiographic element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic elements are disclosed comprised of first and second silver halide emulsion layers separated by an interposed support capable of transmitting radiation to which the second image portion is responsive. At least the first imaging portion contains a silver halide emulsion in which thin tubular silver halide grains of intermediate aspect ratios (from 5:1 to 8:1) are present. Spectral sensitizing dye is adsorbed to the surface of the tubular grains. Increased photographic speeds can be realized at comparable levels of crossover. (author)

  20. Interaction between cAMP and intracellular Ca(2+)-signaling pathways during odor-perception and adaptation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmu, Meena Sriti; Martin, Jean-René

    2016-09-01

    Binding of an odorant to olfactory receptors triggers cascades of second messenger systems in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). Biochemical studies indicate that the transduction mechanism at ORNs is mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and/or inositol,1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3)-signaling pathways in an odorant-dependent manner. However, the interaction between these two second messenger systems during olfactory perception or adaptation processes is much less understood. Here, we used interfering-RNAi to disrupt the level of cAMP alone or in combination with the InsP3-signaling pathway cellular targets, InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) or ryanodine receptor (RyR) in ORNs, and quantify at ORN axon terminals in the antennal lobe, the odor-induced Ca(2+)-response. In-vivo functional bioluminescence Ca(2+)-imaging indicates that a single 5s application of an odor increased Ca(2+)-transients at ORN axon terminals. However, compared to wild-type controls, the magnitude and duration of ORN Ca(2+)-response was significantly diminished in cAMP-defective flies. In a behavioral assay, perception of odorants was defective in flies with a disrupted cAMP level suggesting that the ability of flies to correctly detect an odor depends on cAMP. Simultaneous disruption of cAMP level and InsP3R or RyR further diminished the magnitude and duration of ORN response to odorants and affected the flies' ability to detect an odor. In conclusion, this study provides functional evidence that cAMP and InsP3-signaling pathways act in synergy to mediate odor processing within the ORN axon terminals, which is encoded in the magnitude and duration of ORN response. PMID:27212269

  1. Liver AMP/ATP ratio and fructokinase expression are related to gender differences in AMPK activity and glucose intolerance in rats ingesting liquid fructose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà, Laia; Roglans, Núria; Perna, Victoria; Sánchez, Rosa M; Vázquez-Carrera, Manuel; Alegret, Marta; Laguna, Juan C

    2011-08-01

    Women, but not men, show an association between fructose consumption and an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. As rats are considered a model for human fructose metabolism, we sought to determine whether such a gender-related difference is present in Sprague-Dawley rats and to analyze the molecular mechanism behind. Male and female Sprague-Dawley rats had free access to water or to a 10% w/v fructose solution for 14 days. Plasma analytes, liver triglycerides and enzyme activities and the expression of enzymes and transcription factors related to fatty acid metabolism, insulin signaling and glucose tolerance were determined. Fructose-fed rats had hypertriglyceridemia, steatosis and reduced fatty acid oxidation activity, although the metabolic pattern of fructose-fed female rats was different to that observed for male rats. Fructose-fed female, but not male rats, showed no change in plasma leptin; they had hyperinsulinemia, an altered glucose tolerance test and less liver insulin receptor substrate-2. Further, only fructose-fed female rats had increased adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase activity, resulting in a decreased expression of hepatic nuclear factor 4 and sterol response element binding protein 1. These differences were related to the fact that liver expression of the enzyme fructokinase, controlling fructose metabolism, was markedly induced by fructose ingestion in female, but not in male rats, resulting in a significant increase in the AMP/adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) ratio and, thus, AMP-activated protein kinase activation, in female rats only. The difference in fructokinase induction could explain the higher metabolic burden produced by fructose ingestion in the livers of female Sprague-Dawley rats.

  2. Response to the IUPAC/IUPAP Joint Working Party Second Report 'On the Discovery of Elements 110-118'

    CERN Document Server

    Marinov, A; Kolb, D; Newton, G W A

    2004-01-01

    Back in 1971 fission fragments were observed by us in Hg sources separated from two CERN W targets that were irradiated with 24 GeV protons. The masses of the fissioning species were measured and heavy masses like 272, 308 and 317-318 were found and interpreted as due to the superheavy element 112 with 160-161 neutrons and various molecules of it. Based on the measured mass of the produced superheavy nucleus cold fusion reactions like 88Sr + 184W -> 272(112) and 86Sr + 186W -> 272(112) were deduced. The ordinary heavy ion reaction 88Sr + 184W has been studied and characteristic X-rays of element 112 and a very high-energy alpha particle in coincidence with a fission fragment have been observed. The data have been studied by the TWG and they were concerned about the question of the reaction mechanism since very large fusion cross sections, in the region of a few mb, have been deduced in the secondary reaction experiments. This question can now be answered in view of our recent discovery of long-lived super- an...

  3. An exploratory study on the elements that might affect medical students' and residents' responsibility during clinical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemani, Omid; Iman, Mohammad Taghi; Moattari, Marzieh; Tabei, Seyed Ziaadin; Sharif, Farkhondeh; Khayyer, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    We are now more or less confronting a "challenge of responsibility" among both undergraduate and postgraduate medical students and some recent alumni from medical schools in Iran. This ethical problem calls for urgent etiologic and pathologic investigations into the problem itself and the issues involved. This study aimed to develop a thematic conceptual framework to study factors that might affect medical trainees' (MTs) observance of responsibility during clinical training. A qualitative descriptive methodology involving fifteen in-depth semi-structured interviews was used to collect the data. Interviews were conducted with both undergraduate and postgraduate MTs as well as clinical experts and experienced nurses. Interviews were audio-recorded and then transcribed. The data was analyzed using thematic content analysis. The framework derived from the data included two main themes, namely "contextual conditions" and "intervening conditions". Within each theme, participants recurrently described "individual" and "non-individual or system" based factors that played a role in medical trainees' observance of responsibility. Overall, contextual conditions provide MTs with a "primary or basic responsibility" which is then transformed into a "secondary or observed responsibility" under the influence of intervening conditions. In conclusion three measures were demonstrated to be very important in enhancing Iranian MTs' observance of responsibility: a) to make and implement stricter and more exact admission policies for medical colleges, b) to improve and revise the education system in its different dimensions such as management, structure, etc. based on regular and systematic evaluations, and c) to establish, apply and sustain higher standards throughout the educational environment. PMID:25512829

  4. Effects of p53 mutants derived from lung carcinomas on the p53-responsive element (p53RE) of the MDM2 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgoulis, V. G.; Zacharatos, P. V.; Manolis, E.; Ikonomopoulos, J. A.; Damalas, A.; Lamprinopoulos, C.; Rassidakis, G Z; Zoumpourlis, Vassilis; Kotsinas, A.; Rassidakis, A. N.; Halazonetis, T. D.; KITTAS, C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study represents a continuation of previous works in which we observed that lung carcinomas co-expressing MDM2 protein and p53 mutants (mt p53) exhibited more aggressive behaviour. In the above studies, we suggested a 'gain of function' mechanism of mt p53 proteins based on the fact that the MDM2 gene possesses a p53-responsive element (MDM2-p53RE). In this study, to prove our hypothesis, we selected 12 cases from a series of 51 bronchogenic carcinomas. In these 12 cases, we exami...

  5. A functional Rev-erb alpha responsive element located in the human Rev-erb alpha promoter mediates a repressing activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Adelmant, G; Bègue, A. (Alain); Stéhelin, D; Laudet, V

    1996-01-01

    Rev-erb alpha belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, which contains receptors for steroids, thyroid hormones, retinoic acid, and vitamin D, as well as "orphan" receptors. No ligand has been found for Rev-erb alpha to date, making it one of these orphan receptors. Similar to some other orphan receptors, Rev-erb alpha has been shown to bind DNA as a monomer on a specific sequence called a Rev-erb alpah responsive element (RevRE), but its transcriptional activity remains unclear. In this p...

  6. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    OpenAIRE

    Cédric eBOULARAN; Céline eGALES

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP) modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors’ signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefl...

  7. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    OpenAIRE

    Boularan, Cédric; Gales, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors' signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefl...

  8. Multiscale nonlinear frequency response analysis of single-layered graphene sheet under impulse and harmonic excitation using the atomistic finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomistic finite element method (AFEM) is a multiscale technique where a sequential mode is used to transfer information between two length scales to model and simulate nanostructures at the continuum level. This method is used in this paper to investigate the nonlinear frequency response of a single-layered graphene sheet (SLGS) for impulse and harmonic excitation. The multi-body interatomic Tersoff–Brenner (TB) potential is used to represent the energy between two adjacent carbon atoms. Based on the TB potential, the equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon–carbon bonds are derived which are consistent with the material constitutive relations. These properties are used further to derive the nonlinear material model (stress–strain curve) of carbon–carbon bonds based on the force–deflection curve using the multi-body interatomic Tersoff–Brenner potential. A square SLGS is considered and its nonlinear vibration characteristics under an impulse and harmonic excitation for bridged, cantilever and clamped boundary conditions are investigated using the derived nonlinear material model (NMM). Before using the proposed nonlinear material model, the derived equivalent geometric and elastic properties of carbon–carbon bond are validated using molecular dynamics simulation results. The geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities are included in the nonlinear frequency response analysis. The investigated results of the nonlinear frequency response analysis are compared with those of the linear frequency response analysis, and the effect of the nonlinear behavior of carbon–carbon bonds on the frequency response of SLGS is studied. (paper)

  9. Autoregulation of PhoP/PhoQ and positive regulation of the cyclic AMP receptor protein-cyclic AMP complex by PhoP in Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiquan; Wang, Li; Han, Yanping; Yan, Yanfeng; Tan, Yafang; Zhou, Lei; Cui, Yujun; Du, Zongmin; Wang, Xiaoyi; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Huiying; Song, Yajun; Zhang, Pingping; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2013-03-01

    Yersinia pestis is one of the most dangerous bacterial pathogens. PhoP and cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) are global regulators of Y. pestis, and they control two distinct regulons that contain multiple virulence-related genes. The PhoP regulator and its cognate sensor PhoQ constitute a two-component regulatory system. The regulatory activity of CRP is triggered only by binding to its cofactor cAMP, which is synthesized from ATP by adenylyl cyclase (encoded by cyaA). However, the association between the two regulatory systems PhoP/PhoQ and CRP-cAMP is still not understood for Y. pestis. In the present work, the four consecutive genes YPO1635, phoP, phoQ, and YPO1632 were found to constitute an operon, YPO1635-phoPQ-YPO1632, transcribed as a single primary RNA, whereas the last three genes comprised another operon, phoPQ-YPO1632, transcribed with two adjacent transcriptional starts. Through direct PhoP-target promoter association, the transcription of these two operons was stimulated and repressed by PhoP, respectively; thus, both positive autoregulation and negative autoregulation of PhoP/PhoQ were detected. In addition, PhoP acted as a direct transcriptional activator of crp and cyaA. The translational/transcriptional start sites, promoter -10 and -35 elements, PhoP sites, and PhoP box-like sequences were determined for these PhoP-dependent genes, providing a map of the PhoP-target promoter interaction. The CRP and PhoP regulons have evolved to merge into a single regulatory cascade in Y. pestis because of the direct regulatory association between PhoP/PhoQ and CRP-cAMP. PMID:23264579

  10. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boularan, Cédric; Gales, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors' signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability. PMID:26483685

  11. The Effect of Corporate Governance Elements on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR Disclosure: An Empirical Evidence from Listed Companies at KSE Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Majeed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential effects of corporate governance (CG elements on corporate social responsibility (CSR disclosure. The annual reports of companies for the year 2007–2011 are examined to analyze the relationship between CG and CSR reporting. It considers the elements of CG such as board size, independent directors, foreign nationalities and women representation in the board, ownership concentration, institutional ownership, firm size and profitability. The multiple regression technique is used to measure the impact of CG elements on companies’ CSR reporting. The results of the study demonstrate that overall CSR reporting by Pakistani companies are rather moderate however, the assortments of CSR items are really impressive. The study found positive and significant impact from board size, institutions ownership, ownership concentration and firm size on CSR reporting. The results also display contrary relationships between the women and foreign director’s representation in the board and CSR reporting. This study suggests that organizations should audit their CG activities related to CSR in order to prove themselves good corporate citizens to all stakeholders.

  12. Involvement of cAMP and protein kinase A in conidial differentiation by Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A A; Bindslev, L; Rouster, J; Rasmussen, S W; Oliver, R P; Gurr, S J

    1999-11-01

    Erysiphe graminis f. sp. hordei, the causal agent of barley powdery mildew, is an obligate biotroph. On arrival on the host, a primary germ tube (PGT) emerges from the conidium. An appressorial germ tube (AGT) then appears, forms an appressorium, and effects host penetration. Such developmental precision may be due to multiple, plant-derived signals and to endogenous tactile and chemical signals. The transduction mechanism remains obscure. The isolation of an expressed sequence tag (EST) homologue of the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) enabled the corresponding gene to be characterized and the transcript to be identified in conidia and in PGT and AGT stage spores. cAMP-dependent PKA activity was detected in ungerminated conidia. These data suggest that PKA and cAMP are involved in conidial development. To substantiate this we exploited the responses of developing conidia to various surfaces, including exposure to the host leaf (fully inductive to AGT formation), cellulose membrane (semi-inductive), and glass (non-inductive). Assessment of fungal development, following application of exogenous cAMP or cAMP analogues, revealed that, at different concentrations and on different surfaces, cAMP either promoted or inhibited conidial differentiation. Various PKA inhibitors were tested for their effect on PKA activity and conidial development. A negative correlation was established between PKA inhibition in vitro and fungal development in vivo. Taken collectively, these data suggest that PKA and cAMP play a role in conidial differentiation in this obligate, plant-pathogenic fungus. PMID:10550894

  13. Cyclic di-AMP Is Critical for Listeria monocytogenes Growth, Cell Wall Homeostasis, and Establishment of Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Chelsea E.; Whiteley, Aaron T.; Burke, Thomas P.; Sauer, John-Demian; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Woodward, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes infection leads to robust induction of an innate immune signaling pathway referred to as the cytosolic surveillance pathway (CSP), characterized by expression of beta interferon (IFN-β) and coregulated genes. We previously identified the IFN-β stimulatory ligand as secreted cyclic di-AMP. Synthesis of c-di-AMP in L. monocytogenes is catalyzed by the diadenylate cyclase DacA, and multidrug resistance transporters are necessary for secretion. To identify additional bacterial factors involved in L. monocytogenes detection by the CSP, we performed a forward genetic screen for mutants that induced altered levels of IFN-β. One mutant that stimulated elevated levels of IFN-β harbored a transposon insertion in the gene lmo0052. Lmo0052, renamed here PdeA, has homology to a cyclic di-AMP phosphodiesterase, GdpP (formerly YybT), of Bacillus subtilis and is able to degrade c-di-AMP to the linear dinucleotide pApA. Reduction of c-di-AMP levels by conditional depletion of the di-adenylate cyclase DacA or overexpression of PdeA led to marked decreases in growth rates, both in vitro and in macrophages. Additionally, mutants with altered levels of c-di-AMP had different susceptibilities to peptidoglycan-targeting antibiotics, suggesting that the molecule may be involved in regulating cell wall homeostasis. During intracellular infection, increases in c-di-AMP production led to hyperactivation of the CSP. Conditional depletion of dacA also led to increased IFN-β expression and a concomitant increase in host cell pyroptosis, a result of increased bacteriolysis and subsequent bacterial DNA release. These data suggest that c-di-AMP coordinates bacterial growth, cell wall stability, and responses to stress and plays a crucial role in the establishment of bacterial infection. PMID:23716572

  14. Analysis of the phonon-polariton response of silicon carbide microparticles and nanoparticles by use of the boundary element method

    OpenAIRE

    Rockstuhl, Carsten; Salt, Martin Guy; Herzig, Hans-Peter

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the small-particle phonon-polariton response of several microstructures that are made of silicon carbide (SiC). Phonon polaritons can be excited in a wavelength region between 10 and 12 µm. Simple structures such as elliptical cylinders support phonon polaritons at two wavelengths, which depend on the axis ratio of the particle. In particles with a more irregular shape such as rectangular or triangular cylinders, up to five phonon polaritons can be excited. Through comparison o...

  15. Neutron activation analysis for determination of selected trace elements responsible for immunity in foodstuffs and water in egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), magnesium (Mg), molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V) in 28 types of Egyptian common foodstuffs as well as drinking and irrigation water samples were determined using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The samples were collected from 74 sites over 13 governorates as well as the Nile river, wells and tap water in the regions of the Nile Delta, Sinai, the east and west desert, and north and south Egypt. These trace elements were chosen according to international references, which show the close relationship of their deficiencies to immunity-related diseases. Calculation values of daily uptake per capita were made with the results of analysis. The results, as calculated per 100 g dry weight, showed that some Egyptian foods are rich in Se including such fish (0.94 μg), sesame (0.88 μg), beef meat (0.48 μg), instant tea (0.42 μg), mushroom (0.34 μg) and eggs (0.3 μg), whereas the vegetables contained less than 0.3 μg. Also, soybean, cabbage, beef meat and eggs were rich in Zn (8.0, 3.0, 2.0, 2.0 mg, respectively). At the same time, vegetables and fruits can be considered major sources for Mg, Mo and V for Egyptians International Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). We calculated a notable shortage of Se and Zn in Egyptian meals, whereas Mg, Mo and V were present in large enough amounts to satisfy the RDA. Water analyses showed that drinking or irrigation water provided safe levels of trace elements in most of the governorates, except desert regions like Sinai especially in the case of Taba, Nuweiba, Dakhla and Paris oases in New Valley whose tap water offered little Se and Zn. Therefore, we conclude that supplementation of all Egyptian diets with Se and Zn is very important in preventing heart and immunity diseases especially for those who live in the desert and depend completely on well water for drinking and irrigation. Similar recommendations have-already been implemented in the USA, Finland and

  16. Characterization of Xanthomonas oryzae-Responsive cis-Acting Element in the Promoter of Rice Race-Specific Susceptibility Gene Xa13

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting Yuan; Xianghua Li; Jinghua Xiao; Shiping Wang

    2011-01-01

    The rice Xa13 gene,whose promoter harbors a UPT (up-regulated by transcription activator-like [TAL] effector) box,UPTPthXo1,plays a pivotal role in the race-specific pathogenicity caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. Oryzae (Xoo) strain PXO99. PXO99 causes rice disease by inducing Xa13. It is unknown,however,whether the UPTPthXo1 box is the only PXO99-responsive c/s-regulating elements in the activation of Xa13 expression. We analyzed the expression of a series of end- and site-truncated and site-mutated Xa 13 promoters in rice and the binding of PXO99 protein to the intact,partial,or site-mutated UPTPthXo1 boxes. In the Xa13 promoter,UPTPthXo1 box is the only Xoo-responsive cis-acting element that results in PXO99-induced Xa13 expression. The 5'-terminal second,third,and fourth nucleotides of the box are important for bacterial protein binding and gene activation;mutation of any one of these sites abolished PXO99-induced gene expression. Furthermore,the 3'-half of the UPTPthXo1 box is also required for protein binding and gene activation. These findings will enhance our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the interaction of rice and Xoo via UPT boxes and TAL effectors.

  17. Cloning of a DNA-binding protein that interacts with the ethylene-responsive enhancer element of the carnation GST1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, J M; Woodson, W R

    1996-07-01

    Ethylene transcriptionally activates a glutathione S-transferase gene (GST1) at the onset of the senescence program in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower petals. A 126 bp region of the GST1 promoter sequence has been identified as an ethylene-responsive enhancer element (ERE). In this paper, we demonstrate the ability of nuclear proteins from senescing petals to recognize a 22 bp sequence within the ERE (ERE oligonucleotide). Mutation of the ERE oligonucleotide sequence significantly alters the strength of this nuclear protein-DNA association. The wild-type ERE oligonucleotide sequence was used to isolate a cDNA clone encoding a sequence-specific DNA binding protein. Nucleotide sequencing and deduced amino acid sequence analysis of this cDNA predicted a 32 kDa protein which we have designated carnation ethylene-responsive element-binding protein-1 (CEBP-1). The mRNA expression pattern of CEBP-1 suggests that it is not transcriptionally regulated by ethylene. The amino acid sequence homology of CEBP-1 with other plant nucleic acid binding proteins indicates a conserved nucleic acid binding domain. Within this domain are two highly conserved RNA-binding motifs, RNP-1 and RNP-2. An acidic region and a putative nuclear localization signal are also identified.

  18. Identification of Nuclear Factor-κB Responsive Element within the Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Exon 1f-specific Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinghui LI; Guangyu LI; Chunyi LI; Yanyan ZHAO

    2007-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase gene (nNOS) is particularly complex as 12 distinct transcripts derived from different first exons are expressed in a tissue- and cellspecific manner. The exon 1f mRNA is relatively highly expressed in nervous system and relies upon exon 1f-specific promoter activity. Using conventional and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction,we found exon 1f mRNA was the major transcript of the nNOS gene in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. We analyzed a 1090 bp fragment of 1f promoter by TRANSFAC-TESS and Match softwares and luciferase assay, and found an important positive transcriptional regulation region that contained a putative nuclear factor (NF)-κB binding site. Subsequently, using electrophoresis mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we identified this site to be the NF-κB responsive element, a crucial positive regulator in the activation of the nNOS 1f promoter. Taken together, our study identified an NF-κB responsive element within nNOS 1f promoter and showed that it plays an important role in the transactivation of nNOS 1f mRNA, the major transcript of nNOS in SK-N-SH cells.

  19. Conserved elements in the nanos3 3'UTR of olive flounder are responsible for the selective retention of RNA in germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meijie; Tan, Xungang; Sui, Yulei; Jiao, Shuang; Wu, Zhihao; You, Feng

    2016-08-01

    In teleost fish, primordial germ cells (PGCs) are specified very early during embryogenesis and migrate to the site that gonads are formed. A previous study indicated that nanos3 is specifically expressed in PGCs, and the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of nanos3 is responsible for the localization of mRNA in these cells. In this study, we aimed to investigate the functional regions of nanos3 3'UTR in olive flounder using truncated and mutated nanos3 3'UTRs fused to chimeric RNAs and microinjected into fertilized zebrafish eggs. The results indicated that a 68-bp functional element in the nanos3 3'UTR of olive flounder played important roles in the protection and degradation of RNA. Within this element, a U-rich region was identified to be responsible for the protection of RNA in PGCs and two GCAC sites for the degradation of RNA in somatic cells. The first GCAC was located adjacently to the U-rich region and the second GCAC within the U-rich region. Overall, we concluded that the two GCACs were the binding sites of miR-430, a microRNA that suppresses translation, whereas the U-rich region was the binding site of Dnd, a protein that antagonizes the miR-430-mediated silencing of mRNA. PMID:27085583

  20. X-ray and finite element analysis of deformation response of closed-cell metal foam subjected to compressive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-lapse X-ray computed microtomography was employed to quantify the deformation behaviour of closed-cell aluminium foam. The specimen was incrementally loaded and tomographically scanned using a custom X-ray tomographic device to capture the deforming microstructure. Because of the very small thickness of the cell walls and the high ratio between pore size and cell wall thickness cone-beam reconstruction procedure was applied. A finite element (FE) model was developed based on the reconstructed three-dimensional data. The FE model was used for two purposes: i) the nodal points were used for tracking the displacements of the deforming structure, ii) verification of the material model for description of the foam's deformational behaviour. Digital volumetric correlation (DVC) algorithm was used on data obtained from the time-lapse tomography to provide a detailed description of the evolution of deformation in the complex structure of aluminium foam. The results from DVC demonstrate the possibility to use the complex microstructure of the aluminium foam as a random pattern for the correlation algorithm. The underlying FE model enables easy comparison between experimental results and results obtained from numerical simulations used for evaluation of proposed constitutive models.

  1. Soil solution chemistry and element fluxes in three European heathlands and their responses to warming and drought

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.K.; Tietema, A.; Williams, D.;

    2004-01-01

    chemistry measured below the organic soil layer and below the rooting zone and water fluxes estimated with hydrological models were combined to calculate element budgets. Remarkably high N leaching was observed at the NL heath with 18 and 6.4 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) of NO3-N and NH4-N leached from the control...... plots, respectively, indicating that this site is nitrogen saturated. increased soil temperature of +0.5degreesC in the heated plots almost doubled the concentrations and losses of NO3-N and DON at this site. Temperature also increased mobilization of N in the O horizon at the UK and DK heaths...... decreased because of a lower flux of water. Seepage water DOC and DON was highly significantly correlated at the UK site where losses of N were low, whereas losses of C and N were uncoupled at the NL site where atmospheric N input was greatest. Based on N budgets, calculations of the net change in the C...

  2. Synapse number and synaptic efficacy are regulated by presynaptic cAMP and protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munno, David W; Prince, David J; Syed, Naweed I

    2003-05-15

    The mechanisms by which neurons regulate the number and strength of synapses during development and synaptic plasticity have not yet been defined fully. This lack of fundamental knowledge in the fields of neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity can be attributed, in part, to compensatory mechanisms by which neurons accommodate for the loss of function in their synaptic partners. This is generally achieved either by scaling up neuronal transmitter release capabilities or by enhancing the postsynaptic responsiveness. Here, we demonstrate that regulation of synaptic strength and number between identified Lymnaea neurons visceral dorsal 4 (VD4, the presynaptic cell) and left pedal dorsal 1 (LPeD1, the postsynaptic cell) requires presynaptic activation of a cAMP-PKA-dependent signal. Experimental activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway resulted in reduced synaptic efficacy, whereas inhibition of the cAMP-PKA cascade permitted hyperinnervation and an overall enhancement of synaptic strength. Because synaptic transmission between VD4 and LPeD1 does not require a cAMP-PKA pathway, our data show that these messengers may play a novel role in regulating the synaptic efficacy during early synaptogenesis and plasticity.

  3. Decrease of concentration and colloidal fraction of organic carbon and trace elements in response to the anomalously hot summer 2010 in a humic boreal lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirokova, L.S. [Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Science, Naberezhnaya Severnoi Dviny, 23, Arkhangelsk, 163000 (Russian Federation); GET UMR 5563 CNRS, Université de Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Pokrovsky, O.S., E-mail: oleg@get.obs-mip.fr [Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Science, Naberezhnaya Severnoi Dviny, 23, Arkhangelsk, 163000 (Russian Federation); GET UMR 5563 CNRS, Université de Toulouse, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Moreva, O.Yu.; Chupakov, A.V.; Zabelina, S.A.; Klimov, S.I.; Shorina, N.V.; Vorobieva, T.Ya. [Institute of Ecological Problems of the North, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Science, Naberezhnaya Severnoi Dviny, 23, Arkhangelsk, 163000 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-01

    The colloidal distribution and size fractionation of organic carbon (OC), major elements and trace elements (TE) were studied in a seasonally stratified, organic-rich boreal lake, Lake Svyatoe, located in the European subarctic zone (NW Russia, Arkhangelsk region). This study took place over the course of 4 years in both winter and summer periods using an in situ dialysis technique (1 kDa, 10 kDa and 50 kDa) and traditional frontal filtration and ultrafiltration (5, 0.22 and 0.025 μm). We observed a systematic difference in dissolved elements and colloidal fractions between summer and winter periods with the highest proportion of organic and organo-ferric colloids (1 kDa–0.22 μm) observed during winter periods. The anomalously hot summer of 2010 in European Russia produced surface water temperatures of approximately 30 °C, which were 10° above the usual summer temperatures and brought about crucial changes in element speciation and size fractionation. In August 2010, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) decreased by more than 30% compared to normal period, while the relative proportion of organic colloids decreased from 70–80% to only 20–30% over the full depth of the water column. Similarly, the proportion of colloidal Fe decreased from 90–98% in most summers and winters to approximately 60–70% in August 2010. During this hot summer, measurable and significant (> 30% compared to other periods) decreases in the colloidal fractions of Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba, Al, Ti, Ni, As, V, Co, Y, all rare earth elements (REEs), Zr, Hf, Th and U were also observed. In addition, dissolved (< 0.22 μm) TE concentrations decreased by a factor of 2 to 6 compared to previously investigated periods. The three processes most likely responsible for such a crucial change in element biogeochemistry with elevated water temperature are 1) massive phytoplankton bloom, 2) enhanced mineralization (respiration) of allochthonous dissolved organic matter by heterotrophic

  4. Respuesta de trigo-soja en doble cultivo a la fertilización con azufre elemental pretratado Response of the double crop wheat-soybean to elemental sulfur fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Beatriz Tysko

    2006-12-01

    . The objective of this work was to determine the response of wheat to S fertilization and the effect of the residual S to the following soybean. Five field experiments on Molisolls were developed in Buenos Aires and Santa Fe provinces. The treatments were: 0, 24 and 40 kg S ha-1 applied as PES on wheat sowing time. At physiological maturity of both crops, yields and the S-SO4= soil level were determined. Significant response of wheat to SEP application was observed in 3 sites while no differences between treatments were detected in soybean. The wheat response indicated that the availability of PES was faster than usual for elemental sources of S. In soybean, instead, the availability of S to the crop from both soil mineralization and PES application was high enough to satisfy the requirements. We concluded that PES is a suitable source of S to wheat while its application in soybean will depend on the availability of S from mineralization of the soil organic matter.

  5. OsDREB4 Genes in Rice Encode AP2-Containing Proteins that Bind Specifically to the Dehydration-Responsive Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Hong TIAN; Xue-Ping LI; Hua-Lin ZHOU; Jin-Song ZHANG; Zhi-Zhong GONG; Shou-Yi CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Most dehydration-responsive element-binding (DREB) factors interact specifically with the dehydration-responsive element (DRE) and control the expression of many stress-inducible genes in Arabidopsis. In rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Lansheng), we cloned three DREB homologs: OsDREB1-1, OsDREB4- 1, and OsDREB4-2. The deduced amino acid sequences revealed that each protein contained a potential nuclear localization signal, an AP2 DNA-binding domain, and a possible acidic activation domain. The yeast one-hybrid assay indicated that both OsDREB4-1 and OsDREB4-2 proteins specifically bound to DRE and activated expression of the dual reporter genes of histidine (HIS3) and galactosidase (LacZ). In rice seedlings,expression of OsDREB4-1 was induced by dehydration and high salt, whereas OsDREB1-1 and OsDREB4-2 were expressed constitutively. Under normal growth conditions, OsDREB1-1 was expressed strongly in the leaf, sheath, and spike, was expressed relatively weak in the stem and only faintly expressed in the roots,whereas expression of transcripts of OsDREB4-1 and OsDREB4-2 was higher in the roots, stem, and spike,lower in the leaf, and undetectable in the sheath. Together, these results imply that expression of the OsDREB genes could be controlled by specific aspects of differentiation or development. Thus, OsDREB4-1 could function as a trans-acting factor in the DRE/DREB regulated stress-responsive pathway.

  6. 碳水化合物反应元件结合蛋白的研究进展%Research Progress on Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐慧; 付茂忠; 潘志雄; 王继文; 易军; 王淮; 易礼胜; 邓由飞; 甘佳; 俄木曲者

    2013-01-01

    Glycolipid metabolism is the foundation of the energy sources of normal growth and development in human and animals,directly affects the animal lipid traits,therefore it has become the breakthrough point of cultivating high quality livestock and poultry breed. Carbohydrate response element binding protein(ChREBP) plays an important role in regulation of animal glycolipid metabolism in recent years,especially in major site of glycolipid metabolism-liver. In this review,the author summarised the structure characteristics,tissue distributions,mechanism of glucose-responsive,biological functions,gene expression regulation of ChREBP,and it might provide theoretical basis for following research.%糖脂代谢是人和动物正常生长发育的能源基础,这将直接影响着动物的脂质性状,因此糖脂代谢目前已经成为培育优质畜禽品种的切入点.近年来,发现碳水化合物反应元件结合蛋白(carbohydrate response element binding protein,ChREBP)在调控动物糖脂代谢中具有重要的作用,特别在糖脂代谢的主要场所——肝脏中对糖脂代谢发挥着关键作用.作者就ChREBP的结构特征、组织分布、葡萄糖应答机制、生物学功能、表达调控等方面作一综述,以期为今后的研究提供理论依据.

  7. Antagonists of chemoattractants reveal separate receptors for cAMP, folic acid and pterin in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Konijn, Theo M.

    1982-01-01

    Adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP), folic acid and pterin are chemoattractants in the cellular slime molds. The cAMP analog, 3’-amino-cAMP, inhibits a chemotactic reaction to cAMP at a concentration at which the analog is chemotactically inactive. The antagonistic effect of 3’-amino-cAMP on the ch

  8. The Elements of Item Response Theory and its Framework in Analyzing Introductory Astronomy College Student Misconceptions. I. Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Favia, Andrej; Thorpe, Geoffrey L

    2013-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers that analyze college student beliefs in realms where common astronomy misconceptions are prevalent. Data was collected through administration of an inventory distributed at the end of an introductory college astronomy course. In this paper, we present the basic mathematics of item response theory (IRT), and then we use it to explore concepts related to galaxies. We show how IRT determines the difficulty of each galaxy topic under consideration. We find that the concept of galaxy spatial distribution presents the greatest challenge to students of all the galaxy topics. We also find and present the most logical sequence to teach galaxy topics as a function of the audience's age.

  9. Finite-strain large-deflection elastic-viscoplastic finite-element transient response analysis of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodal, J. J. A.; Witmer, E. A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of analysis for thin structures that incorporates finite strain, elastic-plastic, strain hardening, time dependent material behavior implemented with respect to a fixed configuration and is consistently valid for finite strains and finite rotations is developed. The theory is formulated systematically in a body fixed system of convected coordinates with materially embedded vectors that deform in common with continuum. Tensors are considered as linear vector functions and use is made of the dyadic representation. The kinematics of a deformable continuum is treated in detail, carefully defining precisely all quantities necessary for the analysis. The finite strain theory developed gives much better predictions and agreement with experiment than does the traditional small strain theory, and at practically no additional cost. This represents a very significant advance in the capability for the reliable prediction of nonlinear transient structural responses, including the reliable prediction of strains large enough to produce ductile metal rupture.

  10. Age-related changes in AMP-activated protein kinase after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fudong; Benashski, Sharon E; Persky, Rebecca; Xu, Yan; Li, Jun; McCullough, Louise D.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionary conserved energy sensor sensitive to changes in cellular AMP/ATP ratio which is activated by phosphorylation (pAMPK). pAMPK levels decrease in peripheral tissues with age, but whether this also occurs in the aged brain, and how this contributes to the ability of the aged brain to cope with ischemic stress is unknown. This study investigated the activation of AMPK and the response to AMPK inhibition after induced stroke...

  11. Transcriptional regulation induced by cAMP elevation in mouse Schwann cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Daniela; Zeis, Thomas; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    In peripheral nerves, Schwann cell development is regulated by a variety of signals. Some of the aspects of Schwann cell differentiation can be reproduced in vitro in response to forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator elevating intracellular cAMP levels. Herein, the effect of forskolin treatment was investigated by a comprehensive genome-wide expression study on primary mouse Schwann cell cultures. Additional to myelin-related genes, many so far unconsidered genes were ascertained to be mod...

  12. Nitric oxide switches on glycolysis through the AMP protein kinase and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Parra, Ángeles; Moncada, Salvador; Bolaños Hernández, Juan Pedro

    2004-01-01

    El óxido nítrico activa la glucolisis en los astrocitos a través de una cascada de señalización en la que interviene la AMP kinasa, que fosforila (y activa) la fosfofructokinasa-2, enzima responsable de la biosíntesis de fructosa-2, 6-bisfosfato, efector alostérico positivo de la fosfofructokinasa-1. Este mecanismo es citoprotector.

  13. Macromodeling of the A.C. Characteristics of CMOS Op-Amps

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Pradip; Visvanathan, V

    1993-01-01

    An analytical-knowledge-based statistical method is developed to derive macromodels for the highly nonlinear AC response functions of CMOS op-amp circuits. Simple circuit analysis is used to motivate the use of logarithmic transformations. By this transformation, linear models are fitted over a large domain of the independent variables (typically, transistor widths) with very few circuit simulations. From circuit analysis it is deduced that poles and zeroes are appropriate for empirical model...

  14. Metabolic Basis for Thyroid Hormone Liver Preconditioning: Upregulation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Videla, Luis A; Virginia Fernández; Pamela Cornejo; Romina Vargas

    2012-01-01

    The liver is a major organ responsible for most functions of cellular metabolism and a mediator between dietary and endogenous sources of energy for extrahepatic tissues. In this context, adenosine-monophosphate- (AMP-) activated protein kinase (AMPK) constitutes an intrahepatic energy sensor regulating physiological energy dynamics by limiting anabolism and stimulating catabolism, thus increasing ATP availability. This is achieved by mechanisms involving direct allosteric activation and reve...

  15. Control of bacterial exoelectrogenesis by c-AMP-GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Sudarsan, Narasimhan; Phillips, Grace E; Stav, Shira; Lünse, Christina E; McCown, Phillip J; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-28

    Major changes in bacterial physiology including biofilm and spore formation involve signaling by the cyclic dinucleotides c-di-GMP and c-di-AMP. Recently, another second messenger dinucleotide, c-AMP-GMP, was found to control chemotaxis and colonization by Vibrio cholerae. We have identified a superregulon of genes controlled by c-AMP-GMP in numerous Deltaproteobacteria, including Geobacter species that use extracellular insoluble metal oxides as terminal electron acceptors. This exoelectrogenic process has been studied for its possible utility in energy production and bioremediation. Many genes involved in adhesion, pilin formation, and others that are important for exoelectrogenesis are controlled by members of a variant riboswitch class that selectively bind c-AMP-GMP. These RNAs constitute, to our knowledge, the first known specific receptors for c-AMP-GMP and reveal that this molecule is used by many bacteria to control specialized physiological processes.

  16. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.;

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  17. cAMP elevators inhibit LPS-induced IL-12 p40 expression by interfering with phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; GUO; FENG; YI; BING; WANG; JIN; SONG; ZHANG; XING; YU; WANG; CHANG; LIN; LI; ZONG; LIANG; CHANG

    2002-01-01

    cAMP mediated signaling may play a suppressive role in immune response. We previously found thatthe cAMP-elevators (CTx and 8-Br-cAMP) inhibited IL-12, IL-la, IL-6 gene expression, but increasedthe transcriptional levels of IL-10 and IL-1Ra in LPS-treated murine peritoneal macrophages. The presentstudy examined a possible molecular mechanism involved in cAMP elevators-induced inhibition of IL-12 p40expression in response to LPS. Our data demonstrated that cAMP elevators downregulated IL-12 p40 mRNAexpression and IL-12 p70 production in murine peritoneal macrophages. Subsequent studies revealed thatcAMP-elevators blocked phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but did not affect the activity of NF-κB bindingto IL-12 promoter (-136/-112). This is the first report that cAMP elevators inhibit LPS-induced IL-12production by a mechanism that is associated, at least in part, with p38-dependent inhibition by cAMPsignaling pathways.

  18. The cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway is involved in the pyrogenic effect of CRH in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The primary action of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is stimulation of the synthesis and release of adrenocorticotropic hormone and β-endorphin from the pituitary in response to stress. In addition, a number of studies indicate that CRH exerts other physiological actions within the central nervous system which are independent of the pituitary. These include increased body temperature and thermogenesis. However, the intracellular mechanism responsible for pyrogenic action of CRH is still unclear. The purpose of these studies was to determine whether or not cAMP was involved in the pyrogenic action of CRH in the rat. Intracerebroventricular (icv) microinjection of CRH (2.5 μg, 5.0 μg, 10 μg) caused increases in colonic temperature and hypothalamus cAMP level in conscious rats. The pyrogenic effects of CRH were abolished or markedly inhibited by prior injection (icv) of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, 2,,3,-dideoxyadenosine (DDA, 30 μg) or an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, adenosine-3,,5,-(cyclic) monophosphorothionate (Rp-cAMPs, 15 μg). This is the first report demonstrating the pyrogenic effcet of centrally administration of CRH on the rat via the cAMP-mediated protein kinase signal transduction pathway.

  19. Glucagon regulates hepatic lipid metabolism via cAMP and Insig-2 signaling: implication for the pathogenesis of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai; Zhao, Miaoyun; Sud, Neetu; Christian, Patricia; Shen, Jing; Song, Yongyan; Pashaj, Anjeza; Zhang, Kezhong; Carr, Timothy; Su, Qiaozhu

    2016-01-01

    Insulin induced gene-2 (Insig-2) is an ER-resident protein that inhibits the activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). However, cellular factors that regulate Insig-2 expression have not yet been identified. Here we reported that cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein H (CREBH) positively regulates mRNA and protein expression of a liver specific isoform of Insig-2, Insig-2a, which in turn hinders SREBP-1c activation and inhibits hepatic de novo lipogenesis. CREBH binds to the evolutionally conserved CRE-BP binding elements located in the enhancer region of Insig-2a and upregulates its mRNA and protein expression. Metabolic hormone glucagon and nutritional fasting activated CREBH, which upregulated expression of Insig-2a in hepatocytes and inhibited SREBP-1c activation. In contrast, genetic depletion of CREBH decreased Insig-2a expression, leading to the activation of SREBP-1c and its downstream lipogenic target enzymes. Compromising CREBH-Insig-2 signaling by siRNA interference against Insig-2 also disrupted the inhibitory effect of this signaling pathway on hepatic de novo triglyceride synthesis. These actions resulted in the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes and systemic hyperlipidemia. Our study identified CREBH as the first cellular protein that regulates Insig-2a expression. Glucagon activated the CREBH-Insig-2a signaling pathway to inhibit hepatic de novo lipogenesis and prevent the onset of hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:27582413

  20. Glucagon regulates hepatic lipid metabolism via cAMP and Insig-2 signaling: implication for the pathogenesis of hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai; Zhao, Miaoyun; Sud, Neetu; Christian, Patricia; Shen, Jing; Song, Yongyan; Pashaj, Anjeza; Zhang, Kezhong; Carr, Timothy; Su, Qiaozhu

    2016-01-01

    Insulin induced gene-2 (Insig-2) is an ER-resident protein that inhibits the activation of sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). However, cellular factors that regulate Insig-2 expression have not yet been identified. Here we reported that cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein H (CREBH) positively regulates mRNA and protein expression of a liver specific isoform of Insig-2, Insig-2a, which in turn hinders SREBP-1c activation and inhibits hepatic de novo lipogenesis. CREBH binds to the evolutionally conserved CRE-BP binding elements located in the enhancer region of Insig-2a and upregulates its mRNA and protein expression. Metabolic hormone glucagon and nutritional fasting activated CREBH, which upregulated expression of Insig-2a in hepatocytes and inhibited SREBP-1c activation. In contrast, genetic depletion of CREBH decreased Insig-2a expression, leading to the activation of SREBP-1c and its downstream lipogenic target enzymes. Compromising CREBH-Insig-2 signaling by siRNA interference against Insig-2 also disrupted the inhibitory effect of this signaling pathway on hepatic de novo triglyceride synthesis. These actions resulted in the accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes and systemic hyperlipidemia. Our study identified CREBH as the first cellular protein that regulates Insig-2a expression. Glucagon activated the CREBH-Insig-2a signaling pathway to inhibit hepatic de novo lipogenesis and prevent the onset of hepatic steatosis and hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:27582413

  1. Transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the authors introduce this volume of historical and research papers on the transuranium elements by reviewing the period of discovery of elements 93 and beyond. Then the authors highlight the research achievements that focus on the unique properties of the 5f elements. Finally, the authors outline the technology and applications of transuranium elements and their radiobiology

  2. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  3. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Maite Rocío, E-mail: arana@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás, E-mail: gtocchetti@live.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Domizi, Pablo, E-mail: domizi@ibr-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Arias, Agostina, E-mail: agoarias@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo, E-mail: jprigalli@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Ruiz, María Laura, E-mail: ruiz@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  4. Inhibition of hormone-sensitive lipase gene expression by cAMP and phorbol esters in 3T3-F442A and BFC-1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plée-Gautier, E; Grober, J; Duplus, E; Langin, D; Forest, C

    1996-09-15

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyses the rate-limiting step in adipocyte lipolysis. Short-term hormonal regulation of HSL activity is well characterized, whereas little is known about the control of HSL gene expression. We have measured HSL mRNA content of 3T3-F442A and BFC-1 adipocytes in response to the cAMP analogue 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP) and to the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) by Northern blot, using a specific mouse cDNA fragment. Treatment of the cells for 12 or 6 h with, respectively, 0.5 mM 8-CPT-cAMP or 1 microM PMA produced a maximal decrease of about 60% in HSL mRNA. These effects were unaffected by the protein-synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, suggesting that cAMP and PMA actions were direct. The reduction in HSL mRNA was accompanied by a reduction in HSL total activity. The intracellular routes that cAMP and PMA follow for inducing such an effect seemed clearly independent. (i) After desensitization of the protein kinase C regulation pathway by a 24 h treatment of the cells with 1 microM PMA, PMA action was abolished whereas cAMP was still fully active. (ii) Treatment with saturating concentrations of both agents produced an additive effect. (iii) The synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone had no proper effect on HSL gene expression but potentiated cAMP action without affecting PMA action. cAMP inhibitory action on HSL is unexpected. Indeed, the second messenger of catecholamines is the main activator of HSL by phosphorylation. We envision that a long-term cAMP treatment of adipocytes induces a counter-regulatory process that reduces HSL content and, ultimately, limits fatty acid depletion from stored triacylglycerols.

  5. cAMP blocks MAPK activation and sclerotial development via Rap-1 in a PKA-independent manner in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changbin; Dickman, Martin B

    2005-01-01

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is a filamentous ascomycete phytopathogen able to infect an extremely wide range of cultivated plants. Our previous studies have shown that increases in cAMP levels result in the impairment of the development of the sclerotium, a highly differentiated structure important in the disease cycle of this fungus. cAMP also inhibits the activation of a S. sclerotiorum mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which we have previously shown to be required for sclerotial maturation; thus cAMP-mediated sclerotial inhibition is modulated through MAPK. However, the mechanism(s) by which cAMP inhibits MAPK remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that a protein kinase A (PKA)-independent signalling pathway probably mediates MAPK inhibition by cAMP. Expression of a dominant negative form of Ras, an upstream activator of the MAPK pathway, also inhibited sclerotial development and MAPK activation, suggesting that a conserved Ras/MAPK pathway is required for sclerotial development. Evidence from bacterial toxins that specifically inhibit the activity of small GTPases, suggested that Rap-1 or Ras is involved in cAMP action. The Rap-1 inhibitor, GGTI-298, restored MAPK activation in the presence of cAMP, further suggesting that Rap-1 is responsible for cAMP-dependent MAPK inhibition. Importantly, inhibition of Rap-1 is able to restore sclerotial development blocked by cAMP. Our results suggest a novel mechanism involving the requirement of Ras/MAPK pathway for sclerotial development that is negatively regulated by a PKA-independent cAMP signalling pathway. Cross-talk between these two pathways is mediated by Rap-1. PMID:15612936

  6. In vitro interaction of uterine estrogen receptor with the estrogen response element present in the 3'-flanking region of the murine c-fos protooncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, S M; Stancel, G M

    1994-01-01

    Estradiol treatment rapidly stimulates transcription of the c-fos protooncogene in the rodent uterus, and transfection analysis previously identified an estrogen response element (ERE) in the 3'-flanking region of the murine gene with the sequence GGTCAnnnCAGCC. We now report that endogenous estrogen receptor (ER) obtained from either mouse or rat uterus binds to this 3'-ERE. Unoccupied receptor, receptor occupied with estradiol and receptor occupied with the antiestrogen tamoxifen all bind to this element, and the binding of receptor exhibits strict sequence specificity. By using a competition binding assay, the affinity of the ER for the c-fos-ERE is estimated to be approximately an order of magnitude less than the affinity for the consensus ERE (GGTCAnnnTGACC) found in the Xenopus and chicken vitellogenin genes. Differences in the electrophoretic mobilities of the c-fos and vitellogenin EREs bound to the ER in band-shift assays also suggest subtle structural differences in the two complexes. Mutations in either half-site of the c-fos-ERE destroy ER binding, suggesting that the receptor binds to this sequence as either a homo- or heterodimer. The 3'-fos-ERE region exhibits some homologies to both AP1 and AP2 consensus sites, but neither AP1-like proteins present in uterine extracts nor recombinant AP2 bind this protooncogene sequence. The finding that the ERE present in the 3'-region of the murine c-fos gene interacts with receptors present in the mouse and rat uterus supports a role for this element in the physiological regulation of c-fos expression in the uterus by estrogens. PMID:8136308

  7. Beyond prometheus and Bakasura: Elements of an alternative to nuclear power in India's response to the energy-environment crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathai, Manu Verghese

    In India, as elsewhere, modern energy-society relations and economic development, metaphorically, Prometheus and the insatiable demon Bakasura, respectively, have produced unprecedented economic growth even as they have ushered in the "energy-environment crisis." Government efforts interpret the crisis as insufficiently advanced modernity. Resulting efforts to redress this crisis reaffirm more economic growth through modern energy-society relations and economic development. The civilian nuclear power renaissance in India, amidst rapidly accelerating economic growth and global climate change, is indicative. It presents the prospect of producing "abundant energy" and being "green" at the same time. This confidence in civilian nuclear power is questioned. It is investigated as proceeding from the modern discourse of "Cornucopianism" and its institutionalization as "modern megamachine organization of society." It is found that civilian nuclear power as energy policy is based on a presumption of overabundance as imperative for viable social and economic development; is predisposed to centralization and secrecy; its institutionalization limits deliberation on energy-society relations to technocratic terms; such deliberation is restrained to venues accessible only to the highest political office and technocratic elite; it fails to redress entrenched "energy injustice;" it embodies "modern technique" fostering the "displaced person" while eclipsing the "complete human personality." Overall, despite its green rhetoric, civilian nuclear power reaffirms the "politics of commodification" and refutes social and political arrangements for sustainability and equity. Alternatives are surveyed as strategies for resistance. They include the DEFENDUS approach for energy planning, the "Human Development and Capability Approach" and the "Sustainable Energy Utility." These alternatives and the synergy between them are offered as avenues to resist nuclear power as a response to the

  8. Study on the Influence of Different Interface Conditions on the Response of Finite Element Human Head Models under Occipital Impact Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aomura, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Satoshi; Ikoma, Takayuki

    The aim of the present study is to obtain a better understanding of skull-brain interface conditions and the influence of the neck region when the finite element human head model under impact loading is constructed. The three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of skin, skull, CSF and neck is constructed based on MRI and CT data. The material properties are adopted from the literature previously published and are homogeneous and isotropic. Next, a crash test is carried out by crashing an iron block impactor on the occipital region of the physical human head neck model in which water is filled and intracranial pressure and head acceleration are measured. The result of the numerical calculation is compared with the result of the experiment for verification of the computer model and good agreement is obtained. The result shows that the tied-type interface condition is preferable than the slide-type condition in order to represent the phenomenon in the physical model. The presence of the neck is important for analysis but the stiffness of the neck seldom affects the intracranial response.

  9. Predicting the Dynamic Crushing Response of a Composite Honeycomb Energy Absorber Using Solid-Element-Based Models in LS-DYNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical study that was performed as part of the development of an externally deployable energy absorber (DEA) concept. The concept consists of a composite honeycomb structure that can be stowed until needed to provide energy attenuation during a crash event, much like an external airbag system. One goal of the DEA development project was to generate a robust and reliable Finite Element Model (FEM) of the DEA that could be used to accurately predict its crush response under dynamic loading. The results of dynamic crush tests of 50-, 104-, and 68-cell DEA components are presented, and compared with simulation results from a solid-element FEM. Simulations of the FEM were performed in LS-DYNA(Registered TradeMark) to compare the capabilities of three different material models: MAT 63 (crushable foam), MAT 26 (honeycomb), and MAT 126 (modified honeycomb). These material models are evaluated to determine if they can be used to accurately predict both the uniform crushing and final compaction phases of the DEA for normal and off-axis loading conditions

  10. Genome-wide in silico identification of new conserved and functional retinoic acid receptor response elements (direct repeats separated by 5 bp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalevée, Sébastien; Anno, Yannick N; Chatagnon, Amandine; Samarut, Eric; Poch, Olivier; Laudet, Vincent; Benoit, Gerard; Lecompte, Odile; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2011-09-23

    The nuclear retinoic acid receptors interact with specific retinoic acid (RA) response elements (RAREs) located in the promoters of target genes to orchestrate transcriptional networks involved in cell growth and differentiation. Here we describe a genome-wide in silico analysis of consensus DR5 RAREs based on the recurrent RGKTSA motifs. More than 15,000 DR5 RAREs were identified and analyzed for their localization and conservation in vertebrates. We selected 138 elements located ±10 kb from transcription start sites and gene ends and conserved across more than 6 species. We also validated the functionality of these RAREs by analyzing their ability to bind retinoic acid receptors (ChIP sequencing experiments) as well as the RA regulation of the corresponding genes (RNA sequencing and quantitative real time PCR experiments). Such a strategy provided a global set of high confidence RAREs expanding the known experimentally validated RAREs repertoire associated to a series of new genes involved in cell signaling, development, and tumor suppression. Finally, the present work provides a valuable knowledge base for the analysis of a wider range of RA-target genes in different species. PMID:21803772

  11. Genome-wide in Silico Identification of New Conserved and Functional Retinoic Acid Receptor Response Elements (Direct Repeats Separated by 5 bp)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalevée, Sébastien; Anno, Yannick N.; Chatagnon, Amandine; Samarut, Eric; Poch, Olivier; Laudet, Vincent; Benoit, Gerard; Lecompte, Odile; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear retinoic acid receptors interact with specific retinoic acid (RA) response elements (RAREs) located in the promoters of target genes to orchestrate transcriptional networks involved in cell growth and differentiation. Here we describe a genome-wide in silico analysis of consensus DR5 RAREs based on the recurrent RGKTSA motifs. More than 15,000 DR5 RAREs were identified and analyzed for their localization and conservation in vertebrates. We selected 138 elements located ±10 kb from transcription start sites and gene ends and conserved across more than 6 species. We also validated the functionality of these RAREs by analyzing their ability to bind retinoic acid receptors (ChIP sequencing experiments) as well as the RA regulation of the corresponding genes (RNA sequencing and quantitative real time PCR experiments). Such a strategy provided a global set of high confidence RAREs expanding the known experimentally validated RAREs repertoire associated to a series of new genes involved in cell signaling, development, and tumor suppression. Finally, the present work provides a valuable knowledge base for the analysis of a wider range of RA-target genes in different species. PMID:21803772

  12. Tissue Factor Pathway & Shear Stress Responsive Element%组织因子凝血途径与切应力反应元件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨益民; 李黔宁; 应大君

    2006-01-01

    组织因子(tissue factor,TF)即凝血因子Ⅲ(coagulation factorⅢ),细胞表面抗原CD 142(CD 142 antigen),是凝血因子FⅦ/FⅦa的细胞膜表面受体,具有启动凝血和调控细胞内信号传导的作用.近年来发现组织因子凝血途径切应力反应元件(shear stress responsive element,SSRE)与血栓形成的发生、发展有密切关系.本文就TF切应力反应元件表达调控及其与血栓形成的关系作一综述.

  13. A Possible Mechanism of Zika Virus Associated Microcephaly: Imperative Role of Retinoic Acid Response Element (RARE) Consensus Sequence Repeats in the Viral Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Himanshu N; Pareek, Vikas; Raza, Khursheed; Dantham, Subrahamanyam; Kumar, Pavan; Mochan, Sankat; Faiq, Muneeb A

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the reports of microcephaly as a consistent outcome in the fetuses of pregnant women infected with ZIKV in Brazil, Zika virus (ZIKV)-microcephaly etiomechanistic relationship has recently been implicated. Researchers, however, are still struggling to establish an embryological basis for this interesting causal handcuff. The present study reveals robust evidence in favor of a plausible ZIKV-microcephaly cause-effect liaison. The rationale is based on: (1) sequence homology between ZIKV genome and the response element of an early neural tube developmental marker "retinoic acid" in human DNA and (2) comprehensive similarities between the details of brain defects in ZIKV-microcephaly and retinoic acid embryopathy. Retinoic acid is considered as the earliest factor for regulating anteroposterior axis of neural tube and positioning of structures in developing brain through retinoic acid response elements (RARE) consensus sequence (5'-AGGTCA-3') in promoter regions of retinoic acid-dependent genes. We screened genomic sequences of already reported virulent ZIKV strains (including those linked to microcephaly) and other viruses available in National Institute of Health genetic sequence database (GenBank) for the RARE consensus repeats and obtained results strongly bolstering our hypothesis that ZIKV strains associated with microcephaly may act through precipitation of dysregulation in retinoic acid-dependent genes by introducing extra stretches of RARE consensus sequence repeats in the genome of developing brain cells. Additional support to our hypothesis comes from our findings that screening of other viruses for RARE consensus sequence repeats is positive only for those known to display neurotropism and cause fetal brain defects (for which maternal-fetal transmission during developing stage may be required). The numbers of RARE sequence repeats appeared to match with the virulence of screened positive viruses. Although, bioinformatic evidence and embryological

  14. Decreased survival of mosquito cells after stable transfection with a Drosophila ecdysteroid response element: Possible involvement of a 40 kDa DNA binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitanjali Jayachandran

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Homologous transfection systems provide a useful tool for characterizing promoters and other regulatory elements from cloned genes. We have used cultured Aedes albopictus C7-10 mosquito cells to evaluate expression of 20-hydroxyecdysone-inducible genes. Although this cell line has previously been shown to synthesize components of the ecdysteroid receptor and ecdysone-inducible proteins, the well-characterized ecdysteroid response element (EcRE from the Drosophila hsp27 promoter failed to confer a substantial 20-hydroxyecdysone mediated induction in transfected mosquito cells. Recovery of stably transformed clones was also reduced in a DNA dependent manner when the EcREs were in the sense orientation, relative to control plasmids lacking the EcREs or containing an antisense construct. Finally, when tandem EcREs were placed within the hsp70 promoter, CAT activity was detected only after prolonged enzyme incubation, suggesting that the DNA interfered with cellular metabolism. In these constructs, we noted that the promoter DNA contained several potential binding sites for the activator protein-1 (AP-1 transcription factor, one of which lay between the tandem EcREs. On southwestern blots, a 40 kDa nuclear protein from C7-10 cells bound to DNA containing AP-1 sites. A DNA affinity column was used to partially purify the 40 kDa protein, and western analysis showed that the mosquito protein cross-reacted with a heterologous antibody to JUN. Likewise, mRNA from C7-10 cells cross-hybridized with the jun cDNA from Drosophila. These results suggest that like estrogen, 20-hydroxyecdysone interfaces with AP-1 as a co-activator protein that modulates the overall hormone response.

  15. A Possible Mechanism of Zika Virus Associated Microcephaly: Imperative Role of Retinoic Acid Response Element (RARE) Consensus Sequence Repeats in the Viral Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Himanshu N; Pareek, Vikas; Raza, Khursheed; Dantham, Subrahamanyam; Kumar, Pavan; Mochan, Sankat; Faiq, Muneeb A

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the reports of microcephaly as a consistent outcome in the fetuses of pregnant women infected with ZIKV in Brazil, Zika virus (ZIKV)-microcephaly etiomechanistic relationship has recently been implicated. Researchers, however, are still struggling to establish an embryological basis for this interesting causal handcuff. The present study reveals robust evidence in favor of a plausible ZIKV-microcephaly cause-effect liaison. The rationale is based on: (1) sequence homology between ZIKV genome and the response element of an early neural tube developmental marker "retinoic acid" in human DNA and (2) comprehensive similarities between the details of brain defects in ZIKV-microcephaly and retinoic acid embryopathy. Retinoic acid is considered as the earliest factor for regulating anteroposterior axis of neural tube and positioning of structures in developing brain through retinoic acid response elements (RARE) consensus sequence (5'-AGGTCA-3') in promoter regions of retinoic acid-dependent genes. We screened genomic sequences of already reported virulent ZIKV strains (including those linked to microcephaly) and other viruses available in National Institute of Health genetic sequence database (GenBank) for the RARE consensus repeats and obtained results strongly bolstering our hypothesis that ZIKV strains associated with microcephaly may act through precipitation of dysregulation in retinoic acid-dependent genes by introducing extra stretches of RARE consensus sequence repeats in the genome of developing brain cells. Additional support to our hypothesis comes from our findings that screening of other viruses for RARE consensus sequence repeats is positive only for those known to display neurotropism and cause fetal brain defects (for which maternal-fetal transmission during developing stage may be required). The numbers of RARE sequence repeats appeared to match with the virulence of screened positive viruses. Although, bioinformatic evidence and embryological

  16. Impact response and biomechanical analysis of the knee-thigh-hip complex in frontal impacts with a full human body finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jesse S; El-Jawahri, Raed; Barbat, Saeed; Rouhana, Stephen W; Prasad, Priya

    2008-11-01

    Changes in vehicle safety design technology and the increasing use of seat-belts and airbag restraint systems have gradually changed the relative proportion of lower extremity injuries. These changes in real world injuries have renewed interest and the need of further investigation into occupant injury mechanisms and biomechanical impact responses of the knee-thigh-hip complex during frontal impacts. This study uses a detailed finite element model of the human body to simulate occupant knee impacts experienced in frontal crashes. The human body model includes detailed anatomical features of the head, neck, shoulder, chest, thoracic and lumbar spine, abdomen, pelvis, and lower and upper extremities. The material properties used in the model for each anatomic part of the human body were obtained from test data reported in the literature. The human body model used in the current study has been previously validated in frontal and side impacts. It was further validated with cadaver knee-thigh-hip impact tests in the current study. The effects of impactor configuration and flexion angle of the knee on biomechanical impact responses of the knee-thigh-hip complex were studied using the validated human body finite element model. This study showed that the knee flexion angle and the impact direction and shape of the impactors affected the injury outcomes of the knee-thigh-hip complex significantly. The 60 degrees flexed knee impact showed the least impact force, knee pressure, femoral von Mises stress, and pelvic von Mises stress but largest relative displacements of the Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) and Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). The 90 degrees flexed knee impact resulted in a higher impact force, knee pressure, femoral von Mises stress, and pelvic von Mises stress; but smaller PCL and ACL displacements. Stress distributions of the patella, femur, and pelvis were also given for all the simulated conditions. PMID:19085174

  17. Functional Analysis of the Dioxin Response Elements (DREs of the Murine CYP1A1 Gene Promoter: Beyond the Core DRE Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaizhang Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD. When activated by dioxin, the cytosolic AhR protein complex translocates into the nucleus and dimerizes with the ARNT (Ah receptor nuclear translocator protein. The heteromeric ligand:AhR/Arnt complex then recognizes and binds to its specific DNA recognition site, the dioxin response element (DRE. DREs are located upstream of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1 and other AhR-responsive genes, and binding of the AhR complex stimulates their transcription. Although CYP1A1 expression has been used as the model system to define the biochemical and molecular mechanism of AhR action, there is still limited knowledge about the roles of each of the seven DREs located in the CYP1A1 promoter. These seven DREs are conserved in mouse, human and rat. Deletion analysis showed that a single DRE at -488 was enough to activate the transcription. Truncation analysis demonstrated that the DRE at site -981 has the highest transcriptional efficiency in response to TCDD. This result was verified by mutation analysis, suggesting that the conserved DRE at site -981 could represent a significant and universal AhR regulatory element for CYP1A1. The reversed substituted intolerant core sequence (5'-GCGTG-3' or 5'-CACGC-3' of seven DREs reduced the transcriptional efficiency, which illustrated that the adjacent sequences of DRE played a vital role in activating transcription. The core DRE sequence (5'-TNGCGTG-3' tends to show a higher transcriptional level than that of the core DRE sequence (5'-CACGCNA-3' triggered by TCDD. Furthermore, in the core DRE (5'-TNGCGTG-3' sequence, when “N” is thymine or cytosine (T or C, the transcription efficiency was stronger compared with that of the other nucleotides. The effects of DRE orientation, DRE adjacent sequences and

  18. ATTRIBUTION OF CONDUCT TO A STATE-THE SUBJECTIVE ELEMENT OF THE INTERNATIONAL RESPONSIBILITY OT THE STATE FOR INTERNATIONALLY WRONGFUL ACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELICIA MAXIM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish responsibility of states for internationally wrongful act, two elements are identified. First, the conduct in question must be attributable to the State under international law. Secondly, for responsibility to attach to the act of the State, the conduct must constitute a breach of an international legal obligation in force for that State at that time. For particular conduct to be characterized as an internationally wrongful act, it must first be attributable to the State. The State is a real organized entity, a legal person with full authority to act under international law. But to recognize this is not to deny the elementary fact that the State cannot act of itself. States can act only by and through their agents and representatives. In determining what constitutes an organ of a State for the purposes of responsibility, the internal law and practice of each State are of prime importance. The structure of the State and the functions of its organs are not, in general, governed by international law. It is a matter for each State to decide how its administration is to be structured and which functions are to be assumed by government. But while the State remains free to determine its internal structure and functions through its own law and practice, international law has a distinct role. Conduct is thereby attributed to the State as a subject of international law and not as a subject of internal law. The State as a subject of international law is held responsible for the conduct of all the organs, instrumentalities and officials which form part of its organization and act in that capacity, whether or not they have separate legal personality under its internal law.

  19. Studying mechanisms of cAMP and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase signaling in Leydig cell function with phosphoproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkowski, Martin; Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Suh, Hyong Won; Beavo, Joseph A; Ong, Shao-En

    2016-07-01

    Many cellular processes are modulated by cyclic AMP and nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) regulate this second messenger by catalyzing its breakdown. The major unique function of testicular Leydig cells is to produce testosterone in response to luteinizing hormone (LH). Treatment of Leydig cells with PDE inhibitors increases cAMP levels and the activity of its downstream effector, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), leading to a series of kinase-dependent signaling and transcription events that ultimately increase testosterone release. We have recently shown that PDE4B and PDE4C as well as PDE8A and PDE8B are expressed in rodent Leydig cells and that combined inhibition of PDE4 and PDE8 leads to dramatically increased steroid biosynthesis. Here we investigated the effect of PDE4 and PDE8 inhibition on the molecular mechanisms of cAMP actions in a mouse MA10 Leydig cell line model with SILAC mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics. We treated MA10 cells either with PDE4 family specific inhibitor (Rolipram) and PDE8 family specific inhibitor (PF-04957325) alone or in combination and quantified the resulting phosphorylation changes at five different time points between 0 and 180min. We identified 28,336 phosphosites from 4837 proteins and observed significant regulation of 749 sites in response to PDE4 and PDE8 inhibitor treatment. Of these, 132 phosphosites were consensus PKA sites. Our data strongly suggest that PDE4 and PDE8 inhibitors synergistically regulate phosphorylation of proteins required for many different cellular processes, including cell cycle progression, lipid and glucose metabolism, transcription, endocytosis and vesicle transport. Our data suggests that cAMP, PDE4 and PDE8 coordinate steroidogenesis by acting on not one rate-limiting step but rather multiple pathways. Moreover, the pools of cAMP controlled by these PDEs also coordinate many other metabolic processes that may be regulated to assure timely and sufficient testosterone secretion

  20. Organic contaminants, trace and major elements, and nutrients in water and sediment sampled in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Ludtke, Amy S.; Mueller, David K.; Scott, Jonathon C.

    2012-01-01

    geochemical evidence of Macondo-1 oil in post-landfall sediments and tarballs. For trace and major elements in water, analytical reporting levels for several elements were high and variable. No human-health benchmarks were exceeded, although these were available for only two elements. Aquatic-life benchmarks for trace elements were exceeded in 47 percent of water samples overall. The elements responsible for the most exceedances in post-landfall samples were boron, copper, and manganese. Benchmark exceedances in water could be substantially underestimated because some samples had reporting levels higher than the applicable benchmarks (such as cobalt, copper, lead and zinc) and some elements (such as boron and vanadium) were analyzed in samples from only one sampling period. For trace elements in whole sediment, empirical upper screening-value benchmarks were exceeded in 57 percent of post-landfall samples and 40 percent of pre-landfall samples, but there was no significant difference in the proportion of samples exceeding benchmarks between paired pre-landfall and post-landfall samples. Benchmark exceedance frequencies could be conservatively high because they are based on measurements of total trace-element concentrations in sediment. In the less than 63-micrometer sediment fraction, one or more trace or major elements were anthropogenically enriched relative to national baseline values for U.S. streams for all sediment samples except one. Sixteen percent of sediment samples exceeded upper screening-value benchmarks for, and were enriched in, one or more of the following elements: barium, vanadium, aluminum, manganese, arsenic, chromium, and cobalt. These samples were evenly divided between the sampling periods. Aquatic-life benchmarks were frequently exceeded along the Gulf of Mexico coast by trace elements in both water and sediment and by PAHs in sediment. For the most part, however, significant differences between pre-landfall and post-landfall samples were limited to

  1. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  2. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  3. p53 regulates the transcription of its Delta133p53 isoform through specific response elements contained within the TP53 P2 internal promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, V; Vijayakumar, V; Fernández-Cuesta, L; Hafsi, H; Sagne, C; Hautefeuille, A; Olivier, M; Hainaut, P

    2010-05-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress and regulates genes involved in senescence, apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Nine p53 isoforms have been described that may modulate suppressive functions of the canonical p53 protein. Among them, Delta133p53 lacks the 132 proximal residues and has been shown to modulate p53-induced apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. Delta133p53 is expressed from a specific mRNA, p53I4, driven by an alternative promoter P2 located between intron 1 and exon 5 of TP53 gene. Here, we report that the P2 promoter is regulated in a p53-dependent manner. Delta133p53 expression is increased in response to DNA damage by doxorubicin in p53 wild-type cell lines, but not in p53-mutated cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays using P2 promoter deletion constructs indicate that p53 binds functional response elements located within the P2 promoter. We also show that Delta133p53 does not bind specifically to p53 consensus DNA sequence in vitro, but competes with wild-type p53 in specific DNA-binding assays. Finally, we report that Delta133p53 counteracts p53-dependent growth suppression in clonogenic assays. These observations indicate that Delta133p53 is a novel target of p53 that may participate in a negative feedback loop controlling p53 function. PMID:20190805

  4. Explicit finite element method for calculation and analysis to the elasto-plastic dynamic response of fluid-saturated porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liang; DU Xiuli; ZHAO Chenggang; LI Liyun

    2007-01-01

    In order to describe the elasto-plastic dynamic response of fluid-saturated porous media,the incremental elasto-plastic wave propagation equations of fluid-saturated porous media are developed by the fundamental theory of continuum mechanics and appointing to the characteristic of fluid-saturated porous media.Then,the space discretization of these equations is performed to get their Galerkin formula.At last,the time discretization of this formula is carried out with the integral method which consists of central difference method and Newmark constant average acceleration method to get the explicit time integral formula for solving the wave propagation equations of porous media.On the basis of the integral formula mentioned above,the time-domain explicit finite element method is developed for calculation and analysis of the elasto-plastic dynamic response of fluid-saturated porous media.In this method,the decoupling technique is adopted and it does not need to solve simultaneous linear equations in each time step,so the computational effort and memory requirement can be reduced considerably by using this method.

  5. Dexamethasone-induced and estradiol-induced CREB activation and annexin 1 expression in CCRF-CEM lymphoblastic cells: evidence for the involvement of cAMP and p38 MAPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Castro-caldas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Annexin 1 (ANXA1, a member of the annexin family of calcium-binding and phospholipid-binding proteins, is a key mediator of the anti-inflammatory actions of steroid hormones. We have previously demonstrated that, in the human lymphoblastic CCRF-CEM cell line, both the synthetic glucocorticoid hormone, dexamethasone (Dex, and the estrogen hormone, 17β-estradiol (E2β, induce the synthesis of ANXA1, by a mechanism independent of the activation of their nuclear receptors. Recently, it was reported that the gene coding for ANXA1 contains a cAMP-responsive element (CRE. In this work, we investigated whether Dex and E2β were able to induce the activation of CRE binding proteins (CREB in the CCRF-CEM cells. Moreover, we studied the intracellular signalling pathways involved in CREB activation and ANXA1 synthesis in response to Dex and E2β; namely, the role of cAMP and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK.

  6. Circadian regulation of Limulus visual functions: A role for octopamine and cAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasbir S. DALAL, Barbara-Anne BATTELLE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this contribution is to review our current understanding of the source and biochemistry of the circadian efferent input to the eyes of the American horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus and the impact of this input on the structure, physiology and biochemistry of Limulus eyes. Special emphasis is given to the role of the biogenic amine octopamine and biochemical cascades it activates in the eyes. In addition to reviewing published data, we present new data showing that octopamine elevates cAMP levels in Limulus lateral eyes, and we partially characterize the pharmacology of the receptors involved in this response. We also present new data showing that octopamine regulates gene expression in Limulus lateral eyes by activating a cAMP cascade [Current Zoology 56 (5: 518–536, 2010].

  7. Associative conditioning analog selectively increases cAMP levels of tail sensory neurons in Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocorr, K A; Walters, E T; Byrne, J H

    1985-04-01

    Bilateral clusters of sensory neurons in the pleural ganglia of Aplysia contain cells involved in a defensive tail withdrawal reflex. These cells exhibit heterosynaptic facilitation in response to noxious skin stimulation that can be mimicked by the application of serotonin. Recently it has been shown that this facilitation can be selectively amplified by the application of a classical conditioning procedure to individual sensory neurons. We now report that an analog of this classical conditioning paradigm produces a selective amplification of the cAMP content of isolated sensory neuron clusters. The enhancement is achieved within a single trial and appears to be localized to the sensory neurons. These results indicate that a pairing-specific enhancement of cAMP levels may be a biochemical mechanism for associative neuronal modifications and perhaps learning.

  8. The NO/cGMP pathway inhibits transient cAMP signals through the activation of PDE2 in striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina ePolito

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The NO-cGMP signaling plays an important role in the regulation of striatal function although the mechanisms of action of cGMP specifically in medium spiny neurons (MSNs remain unclear. Using genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors, including a novel Epac-based sensor (EPAC-SH150 with increased sensitivity for cAMP, we analyze the cGMP response to NO and whether it affected cAMP/PKA signaling in MSNs. The Cygnet2 sensor for cGMP reported large responses to NO donors in both striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, and this cGMP signal was controlled partially by PDE2. At the level of cAMP brief forskolin stimulations produced transient cAMP signals which differed between D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons. NO inhibited these cAMP transients through cGMP-dependent PDE2 activation, an effect that was translated and magnified downstream of cAMP, at the level of PKA. PDE2 thus appears as a critical effector of NO which modulates the post-synaptic response of MSNs to dopaminergic transmission.

  9. Inhibition of human cAMP-phosphodiesterase as a mechanism of the spasmolytic effect of Matricaria recutita L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschi, Omar; Cero, Esther Dal; Galli, Germana V; Caruso, Donatella; Bosisio, Enrica; Dell'Agli, Mario

    2008-07-01

    Mechanisms underlying the spasmolytic activity of chamomile still remain unclear. Inhibition of cAMP- and cGMP-phosphodiesterases (PDE) is one of the mechanisms operated by spasmolytic drugs. In this study, the effect of chamomile on PDE was investigated. Human platelet cAMP-PDE and recombinant PDE5A1 were assayed in the presence of infusions prepared from sifted flowers and capitula. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis showed different compositions in infusions made with sifted flowers and capitula. Chamomile inhibited cAMP-PDE activity (IC50 = 17.9-40.5 microg/mL), while cGMP-PDE5 was less affected (-15% at 50 microg/mL). Among the individual compounds tested, only flavonoids showed an inhibitory effect (IC50 = 1.3-14.9 microM), contributing to around 39% of the infusion inhibition; other compounds responsible for cAMP-PDE inhibition still remain unknown. Although experimental evidence supporting the use of chamomile for gastrointestinal minor spasms dates back to the fifties, cAMP-PDE inhibition as a likely mechanism underlying the spasmolytic activity is reported for the first time. PMID:18553893

  10. An element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Iidzima, K.

    1983-03-30

    An anode of a light metal is used in the element, along with an electrolyte which consists of an ether solvent and an ionogenic additive in the form of a salt of dithiocarbamic acid. The element has good discharge characteristics.

  11. A Composite Element that Binds Basic Helix Loop Helix and Basic Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors Is Important for Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Regulation of the Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Hou, Melody Y.; Gregory, Susan J.; Kam, Kyung-Yoon; Xu, Shuyun; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2008-01-01

    Although FSH plays an essential role in controlling gametogenesis, the biology of FSHβ transcription remains poorly understood, but is known to involve the complex interplay of multiple endocrine factors including GnRH. We have identified a GnRH-responsive element within the rat FSHβ promoter containing an E-box and partial cAMP response element site that are bound by the basic helix loop helix transcription factor family members, upstream stimulating factor (USF)-1/USF-2, and the basic leucine zipper member, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), respectively. Expression studies with CREB, USF-1/USF-2, and activating protein-1 demonstrated that the USF transcription factors increased basal transcription, an effect not observed if the cognate binding site was mutated. Conversely, expression of a dominant negative CREB mutant or CREB knockdown attenuated induction by GnRH, whereas dominant negative Fos or USF had no effect on the GnRH response. GnRH stimulation specifically induced an increase in phosphorylated CREB occupation of the FSHβ promoter, leading to the recruitment of CREB-binding protein to enhance gene transcription. In conclusion, a composite element bound by both USF and CREB serves to integrate signals for basal and GnRH-stimulated transcription of the rat FSHβ gene. PMID:18550775

  12. Isolation of an inactive bovine heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase holoenzyme containing bound cAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovine heart Type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PK) was purified to homogeneity as determined by SDS-PAGE. The purification steps were DEAE-cellulose, ammonium sulfate precipitation, phenyl-Sepharose, alumina C-γ, and HPLC-DEAE. The last step resolved two distinct peaks of cAMP dependent kinase activity (activity ratios = 0.05 - 0.10) eluting at approximately 250 (Peak 1) and 275 (Peak 2) mM NaCl. When subjected to HPLC-gel permeation they had the same Stoke's radii. Linear sucrose gradients gave S/sub 20,w/ values of 7.73 S and 7.25 S for Peaks 1 and 2, respectively. It was determined by integrating the areas of scanned SDS-PAGE bands that regulatory and catalytic subunits were present in equimolar amounts in both Peaks 1 and 2. The ratios of equilibrium [3H] cAMP binding to kinase activity for the two peaks were the same. cAMP was present in trace amounts in Peak 1 but in stoichiometric amounts in Peak 2 (between 25 and 75 % saturation of cAMP binding sites). Although SDS-PAGE analysis ruled out conversions by proteolysis or autophosphorylation-dephosphorylation, Peak 1 could be partially converted to Peak 2 by the addition of subsaturating amounts of cAMP, 3H] cAMP binding and in kinase activation (as indicated by a larger Hill coefficient) of Peak 2 relative to Peak 1 also supported the presence of cAMP in Peak 2. In conclusion, two forms of inactive PK have been isolated, one of which is a ternary complex of PK holoenzyme and cAMP. This complex could represent a cellular form of the enzyme which is primed for activation

  13. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  14. Retinoic acid and cAMP inhibit rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation and enhance cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionta, M. [Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Alfenas MG (Brazil); Departamento de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo SP (Brazil); Rosa, M.C.; Almeida, R.B.; Freitas, V.M.; Rezende-Teixeira, P.; Machado-Santelli, G.M. [Departamento de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2012-05-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third highest cause of cancer death worldwide. In general, the disease is diagnosed at an advanced stage when potentially curative therapies are no longer feasible. For this reason, it is very important to develop new therapeutic approaches. Retinoic acid (RA) is a natural derivative of vitamin A that regulates important biological processes including cell proliferation and differentiation. In vitro studies have shown that RA is effective in inhibiting growth of HCC cells; however, responsiveness to treatment varies among different HCC cell lines. The objective of the present study was to determine if the combined use of RA (0.1 µM) and cAMP (1 mM), an important second messenger, improves the responsiveness of HCC cells to RA treatment. We evaluated the proliferative behavior of an HCC cell line (HTC) and the expression profile of genes related to cancer signaling pathway (ERK and GSK-3β) and liver differentiation [E-cadherin, connexin 26 (Cx26), and connexin 32 (Cx32)]. RA and cAMP were effective in inhibiting the proliferation of HTC cells independently of combined use. However, when a mixture of RA and cAMP was used, the signals concerning the degree of cell differentiation were increased. As demonstrated by Western blot, the treatment increased E-cadherin, Cx26, Cx32 and Ser9-GSK-3β (inactive form) expression while the expression of Cx43, Tyr216-GSK-3β (active form) and phosphorylated ERK decreased. Furthermore, telomerase activity was inhibited along treatment. Taken together, the results showed that the combined use of RA and cAMP is more effective in inducing differentiation of HTC cells.

  15. Control of calcium transport in the myocardium by the cyclic AMP-Protein kinase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, A M; Tada, M; Kirchberger, M A

    1975-01-01

    At least three mechanical changes characterize the response of cardiac muscle to agents that enhance cyclic AMP production. In common with other inotropic interventions, tension is augmented and the rate of tension rise is increased. The third response, acceleration of the rate of relaxation, is characteristic of the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. These mechanical effects can be attributed to changes in (1) the amount of Ca2+ released during systole, (2) the rate of Ca2+ release at the onset of systole, and (3) the rate at which Ca2+ is reaccumulated by the sarcoplasmic reticulum at the end of systole. The ability of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinases to phosphorylate the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum in vitro parallels stimulation of both Ca2+ transport and Ca2+-activated ATPase. The phosphoprotein formed in the presence of cyclic AMP and protein kinase has the chemical characteristics of a phosphoester, contains mostly phosphoserine, and has an electrophoretic mobility in SDS polyacrylamide gels that corresponds to a protein of 22,000 daltons. This 22,000-dalton protein, tentatively named phospholamban, thus differs from the acyl phosphooprotein formed by the Ca2+-transport ATPase, which as an apparent molecular weight of 90,000 to 100,000 daltons. Phospholamban has not been found in fast skeletal muscle, nor is Ca2+ transport accelerated by cyclic AMP and protein kinase in sarcoplasmic reticulum from these muslces which do not respond to beta-adrenergic agonists with accelerated relaxation. It thus appears likely that phosphorylation of phospholamban correlates both with an increased rate of Ca2+ transport by cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum in vitro and accelerated relaxation in the intact myocardium. Preliminary findings are consistent with the view that phosphorylation of phospholamban may be related to other actions on Ca2+ fluxes brought about by agents which activate adenylate cyclase in the myocardium, but these interpretations must remain

  16. Preliminary identification and analysis of point mutations corre-lated with response to interferon-α in hepatitis B virus post-transcriptional regulatory elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING Tong-jing; LUO Kang-xian; HOU Jin-lin

    2005-01-01

    Background It is still unclear whether viral genetic variability influences response to interferon(IFN)-α treatment. Recent reports suggest that IFN-α effects may be associated with hepatitis B virus(HBV) post-transcriptional regulation. This study was designed to explore the heterogeneity of HBV post-transcriptional regulatory elements (HPRE) and the relationship between the diversity of HPRE and the response to IFN-α treatment. Methods The HPRE sequences from 31 Chinese patients infected with HBV were determined by directly sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product, and comparing them to those from Caucasian patients. Subsequently, eukaryotic expression vectors containing HPRE at various points were constructed and transfected into HepG2 cells, which were then exposed to recombinant human cytokines. Results The T to C point mutation at nt 1504 and the C to T (G) at nt 1508 in HPRE were found in 21 and 19 patients with chronic hepatitis B, respectively; the C to T point mutation at nt 1509 was found in 17 patients. These point mutations did not exist in the HPRE of the Caucasian patients. The activity of the CAT gene obviously increased in the case of T to C point mutation at nt 1504, but did not change in the case of the C to T (G) mutations at nt 1508 and 1509. The activity of the CAT gene at these point mutations of HPRE could be inhibited by IFN-α/γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α except for the point mutations at nt 1508 of HPRE which may escape the suppression role of IFN-α on HPRE. Conclusions There are point mutations between the HPRE of Chinese and Caucasian HBV patients, which might be correlated with response to IFN-α. The variation of HPRE might affect the function of HPRE and influence the regulative function of IFN-α other than that of IFN-γ or TNF-α on HPRE.

  17. Conditions that alter intracellular cAMP levels affect expression of the cAMP phosphodiesterase gene in Dictyostelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, B B; Barclay, S L

    1990-01-01

    We examined expression of the Dictyostelium cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene under conditions that alter intracellular cAMP levels during in vitro differentiation of wild-type strain V12M2 and a sporogenous derivative, HB200. In control cultures, cellular PDE activity peaked at 6 hr and declined by 8 hr, while secreted PDE activity continued to increase through 8 hr. Lowering intracellular cAMP levels with caffeine or progesterone increased cellular and secreted PDE activities 2-fold, increa...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Cyclic AMP measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of endocrine disorders, including... and treatment of Graves' disease (a disorder of the thyroid) and in the differentiation of causes...

  19. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eBOULARAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors’ signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability.

  20. Amped Up! - Volume 1, No. 3, May/June 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-01

    Welcome to the latest issue of our bimonthly newsletter, Amped Up!, highlighting the initiatives, events and technologies in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy that influence change.