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Sample records for amorphous silicon pixel

  1. Performance improvement in amorphous silicon based uncooled microbolometers through pixel design and materials development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmera, Sameer; Brady, John; Hanson, Charles; Schimert, Tom; Syllaios, A. J.; Taylor, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometers have been established as a field-worthy technology for a broad range of applications where performance and form factor are paramount, such as soldier-borne systems. Recent developments in both bolometer materials and pixel design at L-3 in the 17μm pixel node have further advanced the state-of-the-art. Increasing the a-Si material temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) has the impact of improving NETD sensitivity without increasing thermal time constant (TTC), leading to an improvement in the NETD×TTC product. By tuning the amorphous silicon thin-film microstructure using hydrogen dilution during deposition, films with high TCR have been developed. The electrical properties of these films have been shown to be stable even after thermal cycling to temperatures greater than 300oC enabling wafer-level vacuum packaging currently performed at L-3 to reduce the size and weight of the vacuum packaged unit. Through appropriate selection of conditions during deposition, amorphous silicon of ~3.4% TCR has been integrated into the L-3 microbolometer manufacturing flow. By combining pixel design enhancements with improvements to amorphous silicon thin-film technology, L-3's amorphous silicon microbolometer technology will continue to provide the performance required to meet the needs to tomorrow's war-fighter.

  2. Amorphous silicon pixel layers with cesium iodide converters for medical radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, T.; Cho, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Goodman, C.A. [Air Techniques, Inc., Hicksville, NY (United States)] [and others

    1993-11-01

    We describe the properties of evaporated layers of Cesium Iodide (Thallium activated) deposited on substrates that enable easy coupling to amorphous silicon pixel arrays. The CsI(Tl) layers range in thickness from 65 to 220{mu}m. We used the two-boat evaporator system to deposit CsI(Tl) layers. This system ensures the formation of the scintillator film with homogenous thallium concentration which is essential for optimizing the scintillation light emission efficiency. The Tl concentration was kept to 0.1--0.2 mole percent for the highest light output. Temperature annealing can affect the microstructure as well as light output of the CsI(Tl) film. 200--300C temperature annealing can increase the light output by a factor of two. The amorphous silicon pixel arrays are p-i-n diodes approximately l{mu}m thick with transparent electrodes to enable them to detect the scintillation light produced by X-rays incident on the CsI(Tl). Digital radiography requires a good spatial resolution. This is accomplished by making the detector pixel size less then 50{mu}m. The light emission from the CsI(Tl) is collimated by techniques involving the deposition process on pattered substrates. We have measured MTF of greater than 12 line pairs per mm at the 10% level.

  3. Amorphous silicon pixel radiation detectors and associated thin film transistor electronics readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.; Mireshghi, A.

    1994-10-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin (1 {mu}m) and thick (>30 {mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. Deposition techniques using helium dilution, which produce samples with low stress are described. Pixel arrays for flux exposures can be readout by transistor, single diode or two diode switches. Polysilicon charge sensitive pixel amplifiers for single event detection are described. Various applications in nuclear, particle physics, x-ray medical imaging, neutron crystallography, and radionuclide chromatography are discussed.

  4. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  5. ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Manzari, V

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the innermost two layers of the 6-layer barrel Inner Tracking System (ITS). The SPD plays a key role in the determination of the position of the primary collision and in the reconstruction of the secondary vertices from particle decays.

  6. Conception and modelling of photo-detection pixels. PIN photodiodes conceived in amorphous silicon for particles detection; Conception et modelisation de pixels de photodetection: Photodiodes PIN en silicium amorphe en vue de leurs utilisations comme detecteurs de particules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negru, R

    2008-06-15

    The research done has revealed that the a-Si:H is a material ideally suited for the detection of particles, while being resistant to radiation. It also has a low manufacturing cost, is compatible with existing technology and can be deposited over large areas. Thus, despite the low local mobility of charges (30 cm{sup 2}/V/s), a-Si:H is a material of particular interest for manufacturing high-energy particle detection pixels. As a consequence of this, we have studied the feasibility of an experimental pixel stacked structure based on a-Si:H as a basic sensor element for an electromagnetic calorimeter. The structure of such a pixel consists of different components. First, a silicon PIN diode in a-Si:H is fabricated, followed by a bias resistor and a decoupling capacitor. Before such a structure is made and in order to optimize its design, it is essential to have an efficient behavioural model of the various components. Thus, our primary goal was to develop a two-dimensional physical model of the PIN diode using the SILVACO finite element calculation software. This a-Si:H PIN diode two-dimensional physical model allowed us to study the problem of crosstalk between pixels in a matrix structure of detectors. In particular, we concentrated on the leakage current and the current generated in the volume between neighbouring pixels. The successful implementation of this model in SPICE ensures its usefulness in other professional simulators and especially its integration into a complete electronic structure (PIN diode, bias resistor, decoupling capacity and low noise amplifier). Thanks to these modelling tools, we were able to simulate PIN diode structures in a-Si:H with different thicknesses and different dimensions. These simulations have allowed us to predict that the thicker structures are relevant to the design of the pixel detectors for high energy physics. Applications in astronomy, medical imaging and the analysis of the failure of silicon integrated circuits, can

  7. The ATLAS Silicon Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, M S; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Andreazza, A; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Musico, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Caccia, M; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Brandl, A; Gorfine, G; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, SC; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been developed. The design of the sensors is guided by the need to operate them in the severe LHC radiation environment at up to several hundred volts while maintaining a good signal-to-noise ratio, small cell size, and minimal multiple scattering. The ability to be operated under full bias for electrical characterization prior to the attachment of the readout integrated circuit electronics is also desired.

  8. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The bump-bonded silicon pixel detector, developed at CERN by the EP-MIC group, is shown here in its ceramic carrier. Both represent the ISPA-tube anode. The chip features between 1024 (called OMEGA-1) and 8196 (ALICE-1) active pixels.

  9. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  10. Electrical Characteristics of Silicon Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, I; Hoeferkamp, M; Mata-Bruni, V; Santistevan, G; Seidel, S C; Ciocio, A; Einsweiler, K F; Emes, J; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; McCormack, F; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Comes, G; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Klasen, V; Kühl, T; Meuser, S; Ockenfels, W; Raith, B; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Klaiber Lodewigs, Jonas M; Krasel, O; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Caso, Carlo; Cervetto, M; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Netchaeva, P; Osculati, B; Rossi, L; Charles, E; Fasching, D; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J-C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A; Valin, I; Andreazza, A; Caccia, M; Citterio, M; Lari, T; Meroni, C; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Vegni, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Richter, R H; Rohe, T; Boyd, GR; Skubic, P L; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Cauz, D; Cobal-Grassmann, M; D'Auria, S; De Lotto, B; del Papa, C; Grassmann, H; Santi, L; Becks, K H; Lenzen, G; Linder, C

    2001-01-01

    Prototype sensors for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector have been electrically characterized. The current and voltage characteristics, charge collection efficiencies, and resolutions have been examined. Devices were fabricated on oxygenated and standard detector-grade silicon wafers. Results from prototypes which examine p-stop and standard and moderated p-spray isolation are presented for a variety of geometrical options. Some of the comparisons relate unirradiated sensors with those that have received fluences relevant to LHC operation.

  11. Silicon buried channels for pixel detector cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boscardin, M., E-mail: boscardi@fbk.eu [Fondazione Bruno Kessler Trento, Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Conci, P.; Crivellari, M.; Ronchin, S. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler Trento, Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Bettarini, S. [Universitá di Pisa, L.go B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pisa, L.go B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bosi, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pisa, L.go B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    The support and cooling structures add important contributions to the thickness, in radiation length, of vertex detectors. In order to minimize the material budget of pixel sensors, we developed a new approach to integrate the cooling into the silicon devices. The microchannels are formed in silicon using isotropic SF{sub 6} plasma etching in a DRIE (deep reactive ion etcher) equipment. Due to their peculiar profiles, the channels can be sealed by a layer of a PECVD silicon oxide. We have realized on a silicon wafer microchannels with different geometries and hydraulic diameters. We describe the main fabrication steps of microchannels with focus on the channel definition. The experimental results are reported on the thermal characterization of several prototypes, using a mixture of glycol and water as a liquid coolant. The prototypes have shown high cooling efficiency and high-pressure breaking strength.

  12. ISPA (imaging silicon pixel array) experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    The ISPA tube is a position-sensitive photon detector. It belongs to the family of hybrid photon detectors (HPD), recently developed by CERN and INFN with leading photodetector firms. HPDs confront in a vacuum envelope a photocathode and a silicon detector. This can be a single diode or a pixelized detector. The electrons generated by the photocathode are efficiently detected by the silicon anode by applying a high-voltage difference between them. ISPA tube can be used in high-energy applications as well as bio-medical and imaging applications.

  13. Tritiated amorphous silicon for micropower applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kherani, N.P. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kosteski, T.; Zukotynski, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Shmayda, W.T. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-10-01

    The application of tritiated amorphous silicon as an intrinsic energy conversion semiconductor for radioluminescent structures and betavoltaic devices is presented. Theoretical analysis of the betavoltaic application shows an overall efficiency of 18% for tritiated amorphous silicon. This is equivalent to a 330 Ci intrinsic betavoltaic device producing 1 mW of power for 12 years. Photoluminescence studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a-Si:H, show emission in the infra-red with a maximum quantum efficiency of 7.2% at 50 K; this value drops by 3 orders of magnitude at a temperature of 300 K. Similar studies of hydrogenated amorphous carbon show emission in the visible with an estimated quantum efficiency of 1% at 300 K. These results suggest that tritiated amorphous carbon may be the more promising candidate for room temperature radioluminescence in the visible. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Raman Amplifier Based on Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ferrara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of stimulated Raman scattering in amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in Si-rich nitride/silicon superlattice structures (SRN/Si-SLs is reported. Using a 1427 nm continuous-wavelength pump laser, an amplification of Stokes signal up to 0.9 dB/cm at 1540.6 nm and a significant reduction in threshold power of about 40% with respect to silicon are experimentally demonstrated. Our results indicate that amorphous silicon nanoparticles are a great promise for Si-based Raman lasers.

  15. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Fadmar Osmic, FO

    2006-01-01

    The European Organization for Particle Physics (CERN) in Geneva is currently constructing the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which will allow the study of the subnuclear ranges of physics with an accuracy never achieved before. Within the LHC project, ALICE is to the study of strongly interacting matter at extreme densities and high temperatures. ALICE as many other modern High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments uses silicon pixel detectors for tracking close to the interaction point (IP). The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) will constitute the two innermost layers of ALICE, and will due to its high granularity provide precise tracking information. In heavy ion collisions, the track density could be as high as 80 tracks/cm2 in the first SPD layer. The SPD will provide tracking information at radii of 3.9 and 7.6 cm from the IP. It is a fundamental element for the study of the weak decays of the particles carrying heavy flavour, whose typical signature will be a secondary vertex separated from the primary verte...

  16. Silicon pixel R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)754303

    2016-01-01

    Challenging detector requirements are imposed by the physics goals at the future multi-TeV e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). A single point resolution of 3μm for the vertex detector and 7μm for the tracker is required. Moreover, the CLIC vertex detector and tracker need to be extremely light weighted with a material budget of 0.2 % X0 per layer in the ver- tex detector and 1-2%X0 in the tracker. A fast time slicing of 10ns is further required to suppress background from beam-beam interactions. A wide range of sensor and readout ASIC technologies are investigated within the CLIC silicon pixel R&D effort. Various hybrid planar sensor assemblies with a pixel size of 25x25μm2 and 55x55μm2 have been produced and characterised by laboratory measurements and during test-beam campaigns. Experimental and simulation results for thin (50μm-500μm) slim edge and active-edge planar, and High-Voltage CMOS sensors hybridised to various readout ASICs (Timepix, Timepix3, CLICpix) are presented.

  17. Silicon pixel R&D for CLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munker, M.

    2017-01-01

    Challenging detector requirements are imposed by the physics goals at the future multi-TeV e+ e‑ Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). A single point resolution of 3 μm for the vertex detector and 7 μm for the tracker is required. Moreover, the CLIC vertex detector and tracker need to be extremely light weighted with a material budget of 0.2% X0 per layer in the vertex detector and 1–2% X0 in the tracker. A fast time slicing of 10 ns is further required to suppress background from beam-beam interactions. A wide range of sensor and readout ASIC technologies are investigated within the CLIC silicon pixel R&D effort. Various hybrid planar sensor assemblies with a pixel size of 25×25 μm2 and 55×55 μm2 have been produced and characterised by laboratory measurements and during test-beam campaigns. Experimental and simulation results for thin (50 μm–500 μm) slim edge and active-edge planar, and High-Voltage CMOS sensors hybridised to various readout ASICs (Timepix, Timepix3, CLICpix) are presented.

  18. Towards upconversion for amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Wild, J.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijerink, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Condensed Matter and Interfaces, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Science, Technology and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    Upconversion of subbandgap light of thin film single junction amorphous silicon solar cells may enhance their performance in the near infrared (NIR). In this paper we report on the application of the NIR-vis upconverter {beta}-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}(18%) Er{sup 3+}(2%) at the back of an amorphous silicon solar cell in combination with a white back reflector and its response to infrared irradiation. Current-voltage measurements and spectral response measurements were done on experimental solar cells. An enhancement of 10 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} was measured under illumination with a 980 nm diode laser (10 mW). A part of this was due to defect absorption in localized states of the amorphous silicon. (author)

  19. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  20. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  1. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  2. Noise and degradation of amorphous silicon devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical noise measurements are reported on two devices of the disordered semiconductor hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The material is applied in sandwich structures and in thin-film transistors (TFTs). In a sandwich configuration of an intrinsic layer and two thin doped layers, the obse

  3. Amorphous silicon for thin-film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, Rudolf Emmanuel Isidore

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has considerable potential as a semiconducting material for large-area photoelectric and photovoltaic applications. Moreover, a-Si:H thin-film transistors (TFT’s) are very well suited as switching devices in addressable liquid crystal display panels and addres

  4. Nickel-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J A; Arce, R D; Buitrago, R H [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, S3000GLN Santa Fe (Argentina); Budini, N; Rinaldi, P, E-mail: jschmidt@intec.unl.edu.a [FIQ - UNL, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    The nickel-induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is used to obtain large grained polycrystalline silicon thin films on glass substrates. a-Si:H is deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at 200 deg. C, preparing intrinsic and slightly p-doped samples. Each sample was divided in several pieces, over which increasing Ni concentrations were sputtered. Two crystallization methods are compared, conventional furnace annealing (CFA) and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The crystallization was followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance measurements in the UV region. The large grain sizes obtained - larger than 100{mu}m for the samples crystallized by CFA - are very encouraging for the preparation of low-cost thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  5. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bosworth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using WxSi1−x, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (MoxSi1−x offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo83Si17. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz, there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  6. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  7. Full breast digital mammography with an amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector: Physical characteristics of a clinical prototype

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical prototype amorphous silicon-based flat panel imager for full-breast digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a thin thallium doped CsI scintillator on an amorphous silicon matrix of detector elements with a pixel pitch of 100 μm. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta were employed for this evaluation. The presampling MT...

  8. Performance of silicon pixel detectors at small track incidence angles

    CERN Document Server

    Viel, Simon; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    In order to enable the ATLAS experiment to successfully track charged particles produced in high-energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk), entirely composed of silicon pixel and strip detectors. An extension of the tracking coverage of ITk to very forward pseudorapidity values is proposed, using pixel modules placed in a long cylindrical layer around the beam pipe. The measurement of long pixel clusters, detected when charged particles cross the silicon sensor at small incidence angles, has potential to significantly improve the tracking efficiency, fake track rejection, and resolution of ITk in the very forward region. The performance of state-of-the-art pixel modules at small track incidence angles is studied using test beam data collected at SLAC and CERN, as well as simulated data.

  9. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Hung Tai; Chu-Hsuan Lin; Chih-Ming Wang; Chun-Chieh Lin

    2011-01-01

    Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si...

  10. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Michael A.; Raupp, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  11. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Marrs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  12. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Michael A; Raupp, Gregory B

    2016-07-26

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm² and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  13. Silicon pixel detector prototyping in SOI CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Roma; Bugiel, Szymon; Idzik, Marek; Kapusta, Piotr; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Turala, Michal

    2016-12-01

    The Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) CMOS is one of the most advanced and promising technology for monolithic pixel detectors design. The insulator layer that is implemented inside the silicon crystal allows to integrate sensors matrix and readout electronic on a single wafer. Moreover, the separation of electronic and substrate increases also the SOI circuits performance. The parasitic capacitances to substrate are significantly reduced, so the electronic systems are faster and consume much less power. The authors of this presentation are the members of international SOIPIX collaboration, that is developing SOI pixel detectors in 200 nm Lapis Fully-Depleted, Low-Leakage SOI CMOS. This work shows a set of advantages of SOI technology and presents possibilities for pixel detector design SOI CMOS. In particular, the preliminary results of a Cracow chip are presented.

  14. Three hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiodes stacked for an above integrated circuit colour sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidon, Pierre; Giffard, Benoit; Moussy, Norbert; Parrein, Pascale; Poupinet, Ludovic [CEA-LETI, MINATEC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-03-15

    We present theoretical simulation and experimental results of a new colour pixel structure. This pixel catches the light in three stacked amorphous silicon photodiodes encompassed between transparent electrodes. The optical structure has been simulated for signal optimisation. The thickness of each stacked layer is chosen in order to absorb the maximum of light and the three signals allow to linearly calculate the CIE colour coordinates 1 with minimum error and noise. The whole process is compatible with an above integrated circuit (IC) approach. Each photodiode is an n-i-p structure. For optical reason, the upper diode must be controlled down to 25 nm thickness. The first test pixel structure allows a good recovering of colour coordinates. The measured absorption spectrum of each photodiode is in good agreement with our simulations. This specific stack with three photodiodes per pixel totalises two times more signal than an above IC pixel under a standard Bayer pattern 2,3. In each square of this GretagMacbeth chart is the reference colour on the right and the experimentally measured colour on the left with three amorphous silicon photodiodes per pixel. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C. [School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  16. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  17. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  18. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si solar cell achieved an efficiency of 11.4%, while the efficiency of a typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was 9.0%. Furthermore, an efficiency of 11.7% was achieved by thickness optimization of the three-terminal solar cell.

  19. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold.

  20. Silicon Pixel Detectors for Synchrotron Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Graeme Douglas

    Recent advances in particle accelerators have increased the demands being placed on detectors. Novel detector designs are being implemented in many different areas including, for example, high luminosity experiments at the LHC or at next generation synchrotrons. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise some of these novel detectors. The first of the new detector types is called a 3D detector. This design was first proposed by Parker, Kenney and Segal (1997). In this design, doped electrodes are created that extend through the silicon substrate. When compared to a traditional photodiode with electrodes on the opposing surfaces, the 3D design can combine a reasonable detector thickness with a small electrode spacing resulting in fast charge collection and limited charge sharing. The small electrode spacing leads to the detectors having lower depletion voltages. This, combined with the fast collection time, makes 3D detectors a candidate for radiation hard applications. These applications include the upgra...

  1. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  2. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  3. Silicon heterojunction solar cell and crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meijun

    The rapid growth of photovoltaics in the past decade brings on the soaring price and demand for crystalline silicon. Hence it becomes necessary and also profitable to develop solar cells with over 20% efficiency, using thin (˜100mum) silicon wafers. In this respect, diffused junction cells are not the best choice, since the inescapable heating in the diffusion process not only makes it hard to handle thin wafers, but also reduces carriers' bulk lifetime and impairs the crystal quality of the substrate, which could lower cell efficiency. An alternative is the heterojunction cells, such as amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell, where the emitter layer can be grown at low temperature (solar cell, including the importance of intrinsic buffer layer; the discussion on the often observed anomalous "S"-shaped J-V curve (low fill factor) by using band diagram analysis; the surface passivation quality of intrinsic buffer and its relationship to the performance of front-junction SHJ cells. Although the a-Si:H is found to help to achieve high efficiency in c-Si heterojuntion solar cells, it also absorbs short wavelength (cells. Considering this, heterojunction with both a-Si:H emitter and base contact on the back side in an interdigitated pattern, i.e. interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell, is developed. This dissertation will show our progress in developing IBC-SHJ solar cells, including the structure design; device fabrication and characterization; two dimensional simulation by using simulator Sentaurus Device; some special features of IBC-SHJ solar cells; and performance of IBC-SHJ cells without and with back surface buffer layers. Another trend for solar cell industry is thin film solar cells, since they use less materials resulting in lower cost. Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) is one promising thin-film material. It has the potential advantages to not only retain the performance and stability of c

  4. Stability of deuterated amorphous silicon solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Munyeme, G; Van der Meer, L F G; Dijkhuis, J I; Van der Weg, W F; Schropp, R

    2004-01-01

    In order to elucidate the microscopic mechanism for the earlier observed enhanced stability of deuterated amorphous silicon solar cells we conducted a side by-side study of fully deuterated intrinsic layers on crystalline silicon substrates using the free-electron laser facility at Nieuwegein (FELIX) to resonantly excite the Si-D stretching vibration and measure the various relaxation channels available to these modes, and of p-i-n solar cells with identical intrinsic absorber layers on glass/TCO substrates to record the degradation and stabilization of solar cell parameters under prolonged light soaking treatments. From our comparative study it is shown that a-Si:D has a superior resistance against light-induced defect creation as compared to a-Si:H and that this can now be explained in the light of the 'H collision model' since the initial step in the process, the release of H, is more likely than that of D. Thus, a natural explanation for the stability as observed in a-Si:D solar cells is provided.

  5. 3D silicon pixel sensors: Recent test beam results

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, P; Sandaker, H; Korolkov, I; Barrera, C; Wermes, N; Borri, M; Grinstein, S; Troyano, I; Grenier, P; Devetak, E; Fleta, C; Kenney, C; Tsybychev, D; Nellist, C; Chmeissan, M; Su, D; DeWilde, B; Silverstein, D; Dorholt, O; Tsung, J; Sjoebaek, K; Stupak, J; Slaviec, T; Micelli, A; Helle, K; Bolle, E; Huegging, F; Kocian, M; Fazio, S; Balbuena, J; Dalla Betta, G F; La Rosa, A; Rivero, F; Mastroberardino, A; Hasi, J; Darbo, G; Boscardin, M; Da Via, C; Nordahl, P; Giordani, M; Jackson, P; Rohne, O; Gemme, C; Young, C

    2011-01-01

    The 3D silicon sensors aimed for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade have been tested with a high energy pion beam at the CERN SPS in 2009. Two types of sensor layouts were tested: full-3D assemblies fabricated in Stanford, where the electrodes penetrate the entire silicon wafer thickness, and modified-3D assemblies fabricated at FBK-irst with partially overlapping electrodes. In both cases three read-out electrodes are ganged together to form pixels of dimension 50 x 400 mu m(2). Data on the pulse height distribution, tracking efficiency and resolution were collected for various particle incident angles, with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field. Data from a planar sensor of the type presently used in the ATLAS detector were used at the same time to give comparison. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. 3D silicon pixel sensors: Recent test beam results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, P., E-mail: phansson@cern.c [University of Oslo (Norway); Balbuena, J.; Barrera, C. [CNM Barcelona (Spain); Bolle, E. [University of Oslo (Norway); Borri, M. [Torino University (Italy); Boscardin, M. [FBK Trento (Italy); Chmeissan, M. [IFAE Barcelona (Spain); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Universita di Trento and INFN Trento (Italy); Darbo, G. [INFN Genova (Italy); Da Via, C. [University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Devetak, E.; DeWilde, B. [Stony Brook University (United States); Su, D. [SLAC (United States); Dorholt, O. [University of Oslo (Norway); Fazio, S. [Calabria University (Italy); Fleta, C. [CNM Barcelona (Spain); Gemme, C. [INFN Genova (Italy); Giordani, M. [University of Udine and INFN Udine (Italy); Gjersdal, H. [University of Oslo (Norway); Grenier, P. [SLAC (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The 3D silicon sensors aimed for the ATLAS pixel detector upgrade have been tested with a high energy pion beam at the CERN SPS in 2009. Two types of sensor layouts were tested: full-3D assemblies fabricated in Stanford, where the electrodes penetrate the entire silicon wafer thickness, and modified-3D assemblies fabricated at FBK-irst with partially overlapping electrodes. In both cases three read-out electrodes are ganged together to form pixels of dimension 50x400{mu}m{sup 2}. Data on the pulse height distribution, tracking efficiency and resolution were collected for various particle incident angles, with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field. Data from a planar sensor of the type presently used in the ATLAS detector were used at the same time to give comparison.

  7. The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector Control and Calibration Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Calì, Ivan Amos; Manzari, Vito; Stefanini, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis was carried out in the Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) group of the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The SPD is the innermost part (two cylindrical layers of silicon pixel detec- tors) of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). During the last three years I have been strongly involved in the SPD hardware and software development, construction and commissioning. This thesis is focused on the design, development and commissioning of the SPD Control and Calibration Systems. I started this project from scratch. After a prototyping phase now a stable version of the control and calibration systems is operative. These systems allowed the detector sectors and half-barrels test, integration and commissioning as well as the SPD commissioning in the experiment. The integration of the systems with the ALICE Experiment Control System (ECS), DAQ and Trigger system has been accomplished and the SPD participated in the experimental December 2007 commissioning run. The complex...

  8. Descent of the Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) for ALICE Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) constitutes the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS) at radii of 3.9 cm and 7.6 cm, respectively. It is a fundamental element for the determination of the position of the primary vertex as well as for the measurement of the impact parameter of secondary tracks originating from the weak decays of strange, charm and beauty particles.

  9. ATLAS Inner Detector (Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker)

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Outreach

    2006-01-01

    To raise awareness of the basic functions of the Pixel Detector and Silicon Tracker in the ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN. This colorful 3D animation is an excerpt from the film "ATLAS-Episode II, The Particles Strike Back." Shot with a bug's eye view of the inside of the detector. The viewer is taken on a tour of the inner workings of the detector, seeing critical pieces of the detector and hearing short explanations of how each works.

  10. GigaTracker, a Thin and Fast Silicon Pixels Tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Velghe, Bob; Bonacini, Sandro; Ceccucci, Augusto; Kaplon, Jan; Kluge, Alexander; Mapelli, Alessandro; Morel, Michel; Noël, Jérôme; Noy, Matthew; Perktold, Lukas; Petagna, Paolo; Poltorak, Karolina; Riedler, Petra; Romagnoli, Giulia; Chiozzi, Stefano; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Gianoli, Alberto; Petrucci, Ferruccio; Wahl, Heinrich; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Jarron, Pierre; Marchetto, Flavio; Gil, Eduardo Cortina; Nuessle, Georg; Szilasi, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    GigaTracker, the NA62’s upstream spectrometer, plays a key role in the kinematically constrained background suppression for the study of the K + ! p + n ̄ n decay. It is made of three independent stations, each of which is a six by three cm 2 hybrid silicon pixels detector. To meet the NA62 physics goals, GigaTracker has to address challenging requirements. The hit time resolution must be better than 200 ps while keeping the total thickness of the sensor to less than 0.5 mm silicon equivalent. The 200 μm thick sensor is divided into 18000 300 μm 300 μm pixels bump-bounded to ten independent read-out chips. The chips use an end-of-column architecture and rely on time-over- threshold discriminators. A station can handle a crossing rate of 750 MHz. Microchannel cooling technology will be used to cool the assembly. It allows us to keep the sensor close to 0 C with 130 μm of silicon in the beam area. The sensor and read-out chip performance were validated using a 45 pixel demonstrator with a laser test setu...

  11. Nanocavity Shrinkage and Preferential Amorphization during Irradiation in Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xian-Fang; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2005-01-01

    @@ We model the recent experimental results and demonstrate that the internal shrinkage of nanocavities in silicon is intrinsically associated with preferential amorphization as induced by self-ion irradiation.

  12. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  13. Hydrogen effusion from tritiated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kherani, N. P.; Liu, B.; Virk, K.; Kosteski, T.; Gaspari, F.; Shmayda, W. T.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the effusion and outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) films are presented. The samples were grown by dc-saddle field glow discharge at various substrate temperatures between 150 and 300°C. The tracer property of radioactive tritium is used to detect tritium release. Tritium effusion measurements are performed in a nonvacuum ion chamber and are found to yield similar results as reported for standard high vacuum technique. The results suggest for decreasing substrate temperature the growth of material with an increasing concentration of voids. These data are corroborated by analysis of infrared absorption data in terms of microstructure parameters. For material of low substrate temperature (and high void concentration) tritium outgassing in air at room temperature was studied, and it was found that after 600h about 0.2% of the total hydrogen (hydrogen+tritium) content is released. Two rate limiting processes are identified. The first process, fast tritium outgassing with a time constant of 15h, seems to be related to surface desorption of tritiated water (HTO) with a free energy of desorption of 1.04eV. The second process, slow tritium outgassing with a time constant of 200-300h, appears to be limited by oxygen diffusivity in a growing oxide layer. This material of lowest H stability would lose half of the hydrogen after 60years.

  14. Detector performance of the ALICE silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Cavicchioli, C

    2011-01-01

    The ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). It consists of two barrel layers of hybrid silicon pixel detectors at radii of 39 and 76 mm. The physics targets of the ALICE experiment require that the material budget of the SPD is kept within approximate to 1\\%X(0) per layer. This has set some stringent constraints on the design and construction of the SPD. A unique feature of the ALICE SPD is that it is capable of providing a prompt trigger signal, called Fast-OR, which contributes to the L0 trigger decision. The pixel trigger system allows to apply a set of algorithms for the trigger selection, and its output is sent to the Central Trigger Processor (CTP). The detector has been installed in the experiment in summer 2007. During the first injection tests in June 2008 the SPD was able to record the very first sign of life of the LHC by registering secondary particles from the beam dumped upstream the ALICE experiment. In the following months the...

  15. Silicon Avalanche Pixel Sensor for High Precision Tracking

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ascenzo, N; Moon, C S; Morsani, F; Ratti, L; Saveliev, V; Navarro, A Savoy; Xie, Q

    2013-01-01

    The development of an innovative position sensitive pixelated sensor to detect and measure with high precision the coordinates of the ionizing particles is proposed. The silicon avalanche pixel sensors (APiX) is based on the vertical integration of avalanche pixels connected in pairs and operated in coincidence in fully digital mode and with the processing electronics embedded on the chip. The APiX sensor addresses the need to minimize the material budget and related multiple scattering effects in tracking systems requiring a high spatial resolution in the presence of a large occupancy. The expected operation of the new sensor features: low noise, low power consumption and suitable radiation tolerance. The APiX device provides on-chip digital information on the position of the coordinate of the impinging charged particle and can be seen as the building block of a modular system of pixelated arrays, implementing a sparsified readout. The technological challenges are the 3D integration of the device under CMOS ...

  16. Edge pixel response studies of edgeless silicon sensor technology for pixellated imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneuski, D.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Buttar, C.; Doonan, K.; Eklund, L.; Gimenez, E. N.; Hynds, D.; Kachkanov, S.; Kalliopuska, J.; McMullen, T.; O'Shea, V.; Tartoni, N.; Plackett, R.; Vahanen, S.; Wraight, K.

    2015-03-01

    Silicon sensor technologies with reduced dead area at the sensor's perimeter are under development at a number of institutes. Several fabrication methods for sensors which are sensitive close to the physical edge of the device are under investigation utilising techniques such as active-edges, passivated edges and current-terminating rings. Such technologies offer the goal of a seamlessly tiled detection surface with minimum dead space between the individual modules. In order to quantify the performance of different geometries and different bulk and implant types, characterisation of several sensors fabricated using active-edge technology were performed at the B16 beam line of the Diamond Light Source. The sensors were fabricated by VTT and bump-bonded to Timepix ROICs. They were 100 and 200 μ m thick sensors, with the last pixel-to-edge distance of either 50 or 100 μ m. The sensors were fabricated as either n-on-n or n-on-p type devices. Using 15 keV monochromatic X-rays with a beam spot of 2.5 μ m, the performance at the outer edge and corners pixels of the sensors was evaluated at three bias voltages. The results indicate a significant change in the charge collection properties between the edge and 5th (up to 275 μ m) from edge pixel for the 200 μ m thick n-on-n sensor. The edge pixel performance of the 100 μ m thick n-on-p sensors is affected only for the last two pixels (up to 110 μ m) subject to biasing conditions. Imaging characteristics of all sensor types investigated are stable over time and the non-uniformities can be minimised by flat-field corrections. The results from the synchrotron tests combined with lab measurements are presented along with an explanation of the observed effects.

  17. A beam monitor using silicon pixel sensors for hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Zou, Shuguang; Fan, Yan; Liu, Jun; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Dong; Kang, Huili; Sun, Daming; Yang, Ping; Pei, Hua; Huang, Guangming; Xu, Nu; Gao, Chaosong; Xiao, Le

    2017-03-01

    We report the design and test results of a beam monitor developed for online monitoring in hadron therapy. The beam monitor uses eight silicon pixel sensors, Topmetal-II-, as the anode array. Topmetal-II- is a charge sensor designed in a CMOS 0.35 μm technology. Each Topmetal-II- sensor has 72×72 pixels and the pixel size is 83×83 μm2. In our design, the beam passes through the beam monitor without hitting the electrodes, making the beam monitor especially suitable for monitoring heavy ion beams. This design also reduces radiation damage to the beam monitor itself. The beam monitor is tested with a carbon ion beam at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL). Results indicate that the beam monitor can measure position, incidence angle and intensity of the beam with a position resolution better than 20 μm, angular resolution about 0.5° and intensity statistical accuracy better than 2%.

  18. A Beam Monitor Using Silicon Pixel Sensors for Hadron Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhen; Fan, Yan; Liu, Jun; Sun, Xiangming; Wang, Dong; Kang, Huili; Sun, Daming; Yang, Ping; Pei, Hua; Huang, Guangming; Xu, Nu; Gao, Chaosong; Xiao, Le

    2016-01-01

    We report the design and test results of a beam monitor developed for online monitoring in hadron therapy. The beam monitor uses eight silicon pixel sensors, \\textit{Topmetal-${II}^-$}, as the anode array. \\textit{Topmetal-${II}^-$} is a charge sensor designed in a CMOS 0.35 $\\mu$m technology. Each \\textit{Topmetal-${II}^-$} sensor has $72\\times72$ pixels. Each pixel size is about $83\\times83$ $\\mu$m$^2$. In our design the beam passes through the beam monitor without hitting the electrodes, making the beam monitor especially suitable for monitoring heavy ion beams. This design also reduces radiation damage to the beam monitor itself. The beam monitor is tested at the Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) which provides a carbon ion beam. Results indicate that the beam monitor can measure position, incident angle and intensity of the beam with a position resolution better than 20 $\\mu$m, angular resolution about 0.5$^\\circ$ and intensity statistical accuracy better than 2$\\%$.

  19. Study of silicon pixel sensor for synchrotron radiation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Jie; Jia, Yun-Cong; Hu, Ling-Fei; Liu, Peng; Yin, Hua-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    The silicon pixel sensor (SPS) is one of the key components of hybrid pixel single-photon-counting detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray detection (SRD). In this paper, the design, fabrication, and characterization of SPSs for single beam X-ray photon detection is reported. The designed pixel sensor is a p+-in-n structure with guard-ring structures operated in full-depletion mode and is fabricated on 4-inch, N type, 320 μm thick, high-resistivity silicon wafers by a general Si planar process. To achieve high energy resolution of X-rays and obtain low dark current and high breakdown voltage as well as appropriate depletion voltage of the SPS, a series of technical optimizations of device structure and fabrication process are explored. With optimized device structure and fabrication process, excellent SPS characteristics with dark current of 2 nA/cm2, full depletion voltage 150 V are achieved. The fabricated SPSs are wire bonded to ASIC circuits and tested for the performance of X-ray response to the 1W2B synchrotron beam line of the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured S-curves for SRD demonstrate a high discrimination for different energy X-rays. The extracted energy resolution is high (10 keV) and the linear properties between input photo energy and the equivalent generator amplitude are well established. It confirmed that the fabricated SPSs have a good energy linearity and high count rate with the optimized technologies. The technology is expected to have a promising application in the development of a large scale SRD system for the Beijing Advanced Photon Source. Supported by Prefabrication Research of Beijing Advanced Photon Source (R&D for BAPS) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11335010)

  20. Amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O Thin Film Transistor Current-Scaling Pixel Electrode Circuit for Active-Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charlene; Abe, Katsumi; Fung, Tze-Ching; Kumomi, Hideya; Kanicki, Jerzy

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze application of amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistors (a-InGaZnO TFTs) to current-scaling pixel electrode circuit that could be used for 3-in. quarter video graphics array (QVGA) full color active-matrix organic light-emitting displays (AM-OLEDs). Simulation results, based on a-InGaZnO TFT and OLED experimental data, show that both device sizes and operational voltages can be reduced when compare to the same circuit using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFTs. Moreover, the a-InGaZnO TFT pixel circuit can compensate for the drive TFT threshold voltage variation (ΔVT) within acceptable operating error range.

  1. 160×120 uncooled amorphous silicon TEC-less detector with 25 μm pixel-pitch%像元间距为25 μm、160×120元无热电制冷器的非致冷非晶硅探测器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.L.Tissot

    2007-01-01

    介绍用非晶硅微型辐射热量计制成的160×120元非致冷红外焦平面阵列的特点和性能,该阵列集成在一个无铅芯片载体封装中,像素间距为25 μm,适合于大批量生产.25 μm像元结构得益于较小的热时间常数,该技术使我们能够设计出更高的热隔离性能,从而能以35 μm技术为基础开发出25 μm技术.通过采用新的像素设计和更进一步推动设计方法,在没有采用复杂昂贵的双层结构的前提下,保持了较高填充因子.从读出集成电路结构、封装、可操作性和光电性能入手对该探测器进行了介绍.为该探测器设计了一种新型集成读出电路.可以通过串行链接对增益、图像翻转和积分时间等高级功能进行操控,降低电气对接的数量.研制的小型无铅芯片载体封装便于大规模生产探测器,主要用途为便携式摄像机或头盔摄像机.%This paper reviews characteristics and performance of a 160×120 uncooled infrared focal plane array made from amorphous silicon microbolometers with a pixel-pitch of 25 μm,integrated in a LCC package compatible with mass production.The 25 μm pixel architecture profits from the low thermal time constant which characterizes our technology, to design a higher pixel thermal insulation and therefore to develop a 25 μm version from the well mastered 35 μm technology. Thanks to a new pixel design and by pushing the design rules even further, a high fill factor has been kept, without the use of complex, as well as expensive, two-level structure. The detector is described in terms of ROIC architecture, packaging, operability and electro-optical performances.A new read out integrated circuit structure has been designed for this detector. High level functions like gain, image flip and integration time could be operated through a serial link to minimize the number of electrical interconnections.A small LCC package has been developed enabling a mass production of

  2. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  3. Comprehensive modeling of ion-implant amorphization in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, K.R.C. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain) and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: g0202446@nus.edu.sg; Jaraiz, M. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Synopsys, Karl-Hammerschmidt Strasse 34, D-85609 Aschheim/Dornach (Germany); Rubio, J.E. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Castrillo, P. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pinacho, R. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Srinivasan, M.P. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Benistant, F. [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing. 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2005-12-05

    A physically based model has been developed to simulate the ion-implant induced damage accumulation up to amorphization in silicon. Based on damage structures known as amorphous pockets (AP), which are three-dimensional, irregularly shaped agglomerates of interstitials (I) and vacancies (V) surrounded by crystalline silicon, the model is able to reproduce a wide range of experimental observations of damage accumulation and amorphization with interdependent implantation parameters. Instead of recrystallizing the I's and V's instantaneously, the recrystallization rate of an AP containing nI and mV is a function of its effective size, defined as min(n, m), irrespective of its internal spatial configuration. The parameters used in the model were calibrated using the experimental silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature as a function of dose rate for C, Si, and Ge. The model is able to show the superlinear damage build-up with dose, the extent of amorphous layer and the superadditivity effect of polyatomic ions.

  4. Ab initio modelling of boron related defects in amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Tiago A.; Torres, Vitor J.B. [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-10-15

    We have modeled boron related point defects in amorphous silicon, using an ab initio method, the Density functional theory-pseudopotential code Aimpro. The boron atoms were embedded in 64 atom amorphous silicon cubic supercells. The calculations were performed using boron defects in 15 different supercells. These supercells were developed using a modified Wooten-Winer-Weaire bond switching mechanism. In average, the properties of the 15 supercells agree with the observed radial and bond angle distributions, as well the electronic and vibrational density of states and Raman spectra. In amorphous silicon it has been very hard to find real self-interstitials, since for almost all the tested configurations, the amorphous lattice relaxes overall. We found that substitutional boron prefers to be 4-fold coordinated. We find also an intrinsic hole-trap in the non-doped amorphous lattice, which may explain the low efficiency of boron doping. The local vibrational modes are, in average, higher than the correspondent crystalline values (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Supercontinuum generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safioui, Jassem; Leo, François; Kuyken, Bart; Gorza, Simon-Pierre; Selvaraja, Shankar Kumar; Baets, Roel; Emplit, Philippe; Roelkens, Gunther; Massar, Serge

    2014-02-10

    We report supercontinuum (SC) generation centered on the telecommunication C-band (1550 nm) in CMOS compatible hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides. A broadening of more than 550 nm is obtained in 1cm long waveguides of different widths using as pump picosecond pulses with on chip peak power as low as 4 W.

  6. Nanoscale Transformations in Metastable, Amorphous, Silicon-Rich Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Munde, Manveer Singh; Gao, David; Hudziak, Stephen; Chater, Richard J; Fearn, Sarah; McPhail, David; Bosman, Michel; Shluger, Alexander L; Kenyon, Anthony J

    2016-09-01

    Electrically biasing thin films of amorphous, substoichiometric silicon oxide drives surprisingly large structural changes, apparent as density variations, oxygen movement, and ultimately, emission of superoxide ions. Results from this fundamental study are directly relevant to materials that are increasingly used in a range of technologies, and demonstrate a surprising level of field-driven local reordering of a random oxide network.

  7. First-principles study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.; Groot, R.A. de; Wijs, G.A. de; Zeman, M.

    2009-01-01

    We use a molecular-dynamics simulation within density-functional theory to prepare realistic structures of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The procedure consists of heating a crystalline structure of Si64H8 to 2370 K, creating a liquid and subsequently cooling it down to room temperature. The effect

  8. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, N.A.; Fisher, R.F.; Asher, S.E.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1987-07-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy is used to study hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Core-level and plasma excitations were examined as a function of hydrogen content. This technique and its interpretation reveals a consistent picture of the electron excitations within this important material. The a-Si:H thin films were fabricated by rf sputtering. Their hydrogen concentrations ranged from 0% to 15%. Hydrogen content was determined by infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inspection of the silicon Auger-KLL peak confirmed the silicon core levels.

  9. Silicon nanoparticle optimization and integration into amorphous silicon via PECVD for use in photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafehn, Grant W.

    An alternative approach to traditional growth methods of nanocrystalline material is co-deposition by injection of separately synthesized silicon nanoparticles into amorphous silicon. Current methods of co-deposition of silicon nanoparticles and amorphous silicon via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition allow the two reactors' pressures to affect each other, leading to either poor amorphous silicon quality or uncontrollable nanoparticle size and deposition rate. In this thesis, a technique for greater control of stand-alone silicon nanoparticle size and quality grown was achieved by using a slit nozzle. The nozzle was used to separate the nanoparticle and amorphous reactors, allowing for the ability to control nanoparticle size, crystallinity, and deposition rate during co-deposition, while still allowing for high quality amorphous silicon growth. Changing the width of the nozzle allowed for control of the size of the nanoparticles from 10 to 4.5 nm in diameter, and allowed for the precursor gas flow rate, and thus deposition rate, to be changed with only a 6 % change in size estimated from luminescence emission wavelength. Co-deposited samples were grown within a broad range of flow rates for the silicon nanoparticle precursor gas, resulting in each sample having a different crystal fraction. FTIR, PL, Raman, and XRD were used to analyze their composition. The silicon nanoparticle synthesis was separately optimized to control size and crystallinity, and the influence of the nanoparticle process gases on amorphous silicon growth was also explored. Finally, COMSOL simulations were performed to support and possibly predict Si-NP growth variables that pertain to Si-NP size.

  10. Development and characterization of diamond and 3D-silicon pixel detectors with ATLAS-pixel readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathes, Markus

    2008-12-15

    Hybrid pixel detectors are used for particle tracking in the innermost layers of current high energy experiments like ATLAS. After the proposed luminosity upgrade of the LHC, they will have to survive very high radiation fluences of up to 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2} per life time. New sensor concepts and materials are required, which promise to be more radiation tolerant than the currently used planar silicon sensors. Most prominent candidates are so-called 3D-silicon and single crystal or poly-crystalline diamond sensors. Using the ATLAS pixel electronics different detector prototypes with a pixel geometry of 400 x 50 {mu}m{sup 2} have been built. In particular three devices have been studied in detail: a 3D-silicon and a single crystal diamond detector with an active area of about 1 cm{sup 2} and a poly-crystalline diamond detector of the same size as a current ATLAS pixel detector module (2 x 6 cm{sup 2}). To characterize the devices regarding their particle detection efficiency and spatial resolution, the charge collection inside a pixel cell as well as the charge sharing between adjacent pixels was studied using a high energy particle beam. (orig.)

  11. Novel Scheme of Amorphous/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Iuliis, S.; Geerligs, L.J. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Tucci, M.; Serenelli, L.; Salza, E. [ENEA Research Center Casaccia, Roma (Italy); De Cesare, G.; Caputo, D.; Ceccarelli, M. [University ' Sapienza' , Department of Electronic Engineering, Roma (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper we investigate in detail how the heterostructure concept can be implemented in an interdigitated back contact solar cell, in which both the emitters are formed on the back side of the c-Si wafer by amorphous/crystalline silicon heterostructure, and at the same time the grid-less front surface is passivated by a double layer of amorphous silicon and silicon nitride, which also provides an anti-reflection coating. The entire process, held at temperature below 300C, is photolithography-free, using a metallic self-aligned mask to create the interdigitated pattern, and we show that the alignment is feasible. An open-circuit voltage of 687 mV has been measured on a p-type monocrystalline silicon wafer. The mask-assisted deposition process does not influence the uniformity of the deposited amorphous silicon layers. Photocurrent limits factor has been investigated with the aid of one-dimensional modeling and quantum efficiency measurements. On the other hand several technological aspects that limit the fill factor and the short circuit current density still need improvements.

  12. Raman and ellipsometric characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced vapor deposition (PECVD) at different silane temperatures (Tg) before glow-discharge. The effect of Tg on the amorphous network and optoelectronic properties of the films has been investigated by Raman scattering spectra, ellipsometric transmittance spectra, and dark conductivity measurement, respectively. The results show that the increase in Tg leads to an improved ordering of amorphous network on the short and intermediate scales and an increase of both refractive index and absorption coefficient in a-Si:H thin films. It is indicated that the dark conductivity increases by two orders of magnitude when Tg is raised from room temperature (RT) to 433 K. The continuous ordering of amorphous network of a-Si:H thin films deposited at a higher Tg is the main cause for the increase of dark conductivity.

  13. High quality crystalline silicon surface passivation by combined intrinsic and n-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttauf, J.A.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Kielen, I.M.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Rath, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the influence of thermal annealing on the passivation quality of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces by intrinsic and n-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films. For temperatures up to 255 C, we find an increase in surface passivation quality, corresponding to a decreased da

  14. Amorphous silicon rich silicon nitride optical waveguides for high density integrated optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2004-01-01

    Amorphous silicon rich silicon nitride optical waveguides clad in silica are presented as a high-index contrast platform for high density integrated optics. Performance of different cross-sectional geometries have been measured and are presented with regards to bending loss and insertion loss...

  15. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells.

  16. Silicon pixel-detector R&D for CLIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, A.

    2016-11-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few μm, ultra-low mass (~ 0.2%X0 per layer for the vertex region and ~ 1%X0 per layer for the outer tracker), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ~ 10 ns time stamping capabilities. A highly granular all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system is under development, following an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and engineering constraints. For the vertex-detector region, hybrid pixel detectors with small pitch (25 μm) and analog readout are explored. For the outer tracking region, both hybrid concepts and fully integrated CMOS sensors are under consideration. The feasibility of ultra-thin sensor layers is validated with Timepix3 readout ASICs bump bonded to active edge planar sensors with 50 μm to 150 μm thickness. Prototypes of CLICpix readout ASICs implemented in 6525 nm CMOS technology with 25 μm pixel pitch have been produced. Hybridisation concepts have been developed for interconnecting these chips either through capacitive coupling to active HV-CMOS sensors or through bump-bonding to planar sensors. Recent R&D achievements include results from beam tests with all types of hybrid assemblies. Simulations based on Geant4 and TCAD are used to validate the experimental results and to assess and optimise the performance of various detector designs.

  17. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  18. Pyrolytic transformation from polydihydrosilane to hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Takashi, E-mail: mtakashi@jaist.ac.jp [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Matsuki, Yasuo [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Yokkaichi Research Center, JSR Corporation, 100 Kawajiri-cho, Yokkaichi, Mie, 510-8552 (Japan); Shimoda, Tatsuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 (Japan)

    2012-08-31

    The fabrication of thin film silicon devices based on solution processes rather than on conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest since cost reductions may result. Using a solution process, we coated substrates with polydihydrosilane solution and studied the pyrolytic transformation of the material into hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). From thermal gravimetry and differential thermal analysis data a significant reduction in weight of the material and a construction of Si-Si bonds are concluded for the pyrolysis temperature T{sub p} = 270 to 360 Degree-Sign C. The appearance of amorphous silicon phonon bands in Raman spectra for films prepared at T{sub p} {>=} 330 Degree-Sign C suggests the construction of a three-dimensional amorphous silicon network. Films prepared at T{sub p} {>=} 360 Degree-Sign C exhibit a hydrogen content near 10 at.% and an optical gap near 1.6 eV similar to device-grade vacuum processed a-Si:H. However, the infrared microstructure factor, the spin density, and the photosensitivity require significant improvements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fabricate hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films by a solution process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The a-Si:H films are prepared by pyrolytic transformation in polysilane solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate basic properties in relation to the pyrolysis temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman spectra, hydrogen content, and optical gap are similar to device-grade a-Si:H. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure factor, spin density, and photoconductivity show poor quality.

  19. Silicon pixel R&D for the CLIC detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hynds, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few microns, ultra-low mass (~0.2% X0 per layer for the vertex region and ~1% X0 per layer for the outer tracker), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ~10 ns time stamping capabilities. A highly granular all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system is under development, following an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and engineering constraints. For the vertex-detector region, hy- brid pixel detectors with small pitch (25 μm) and analogue readout are explored. For the outer tracking region,...

  20. Silicon pixel-detector R&D for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718101

    2016-01-01

    The physics aims at the future CLIC high-energy linear e+e- collider set very high precision requirements on the performance of the vertex and tracking detectors. Moreover, these detectors have to be well adapted to the experimental conditions, such as the time structure of the collisions and the presence of beam-induced backgrounds. The principal challenges are: a point resolution of a few μm, ultra-low mass (∼ 0.2% X${}_0$ per layer for the vertex region and ∼ 1 % X${}_0$ per layer for the outer tracker), very low power dissipation (compatible with air-flow cooling in the inner vertex region) and pulsed power operation, complemented with ∼ 10 ns time stamping capabilities. A highly granular all-silicon vertex and tracking detector system is under development, following an integrated approach addressing simultaneously the physics requirements and engineering constraints. For the vertex-detector region, hybrid pixel detectors with small pitch (25 μm) and analog readout are explored. For the outer trac...

  1. Excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on metallic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delachat, F.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Cayron, C.; Ducros, C.; Lerat, J.-F.; Emeraud, T.; Negru, R.; Huet, K.; Reydet, P.-L.

    2013-06-01

    An attempt has been made to achieve the crystallization of silicon thin film on metallic foils by long pulse duration excimer laser processing. Amorphous silicon thin films (100 nm) were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on a commercial metallic alloy (N42-FeNi made of 41 % of Ni) coated by a tantalum nitride (TaN) layer. The TaN coating acts as a barrier layer, preventing the diffusion of metallic impurities in the silicon thin film during the laser annealing. An energy density threshold of 0.3 J cm-2, necessary for surface melting and crystallization of the amorphous silicon, was predicted by a numerical simulation of laser-induced phase transitions and witnessed by Raman analysis. Beyond this fluence, the melt depth increases with the intensification of energy density. A complete crystallization of the layer is achieved for an energy density of 0.9 J cm-2. Scanning electron microscopy unveils the nanostructuring of the silicon after laser irradiation, while cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the crystallites' columnar growth.

  2. High thermal conductivity of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Feldman, J L; Cahill, D G; Crandall, R S; Bernstein, N; Photiadis, D M; Mehl, M J; Papaconstantopoulos, D A

    2009-01-23

    We measured the thermal conductivity kappa of an 80 microm thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon film prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition with the 3omega (80-300 K) and the time-domain thermo-reflectance (300 K) methods. The kappa is higher than any of the previous temperature dependent measurements and shows a strong phonon mean free path dependence. We also applied a Kubo based theory using a tight-binding method on three 1000 atom continuous random network models. The theory gives higher kappa for more ordered models, but not high enough to explain our results, even after extrapolating to lower frequencies with a Boltzmann approach. Our results show that this material is more ordered than any amorphous silicon previously studied.

  3. The reliability and stability of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D.E. [Solarex, Newtown, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Solarex is developing a manufacturing process for the commercial production of 8 ft{sup 2} multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules starting in 1996. The device structure used in these multijunction modules is: glass/textured tin oxide/p-i-n/p-i-n/ZnO/Al/EVA/Tedlar where the back junction of the tandem structure contains an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. As an interim step, 4 ft{sup 2} multijunction modules have been fabricated in a pilot production mode over the last several months. The distribution of initial conversion efficiencies for an engineering run of 67 modules (4 ft{sup 2}) is shown. Measurements recently performed at NREL indicate that the actual efficiencies are about 5% higher than those shown, and thus exhibit an average initial conversion efficiency of about 9.5%. The data indicates that the process is relatively robust since there were no modules with initial efficiencies less than 7.5%.

  4. Electrochemical degradation of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, G. R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    Techniques of module electrochemical corrosion research, developed during reliability studies of crystalline-silicon modules (C-Si), have been applied to this new investigation into amorphous-silicon (a-Si) module reliability. Amorphous-Si cells, encapsulated in the polymers polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), were exposed for more than 1200 hours in a controlled 85 C/85 percent RH environment, with a constant 500 volts applied between the cells and an aluminum frame. Plotting power output reduction versus charge transferred reveals that about 50 percent a-Si cell failures can be expected with the passage of 0.1 to 1.0 Coulomb/cm of cell-frame edge length; this threshold is somewhat less than that determined for C-Si modules.

  5. Infrared electroabsorption spectra in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyou, J.H.; Schiff, E.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    1999-07-01

    The authors report measurements of the infrared spectrum detected by modulating the reverse-bias voltage across amorphous silicon pin solar cells and Schottky barrier diodes. They find a band with a peak energy of 0.8 eV. The existence of this band has not, to their knowledge, been reported previously. The strength of the infrared band depends linearly upon applied bias, as opposed to the quadratic dependence for interband electroabsorption in amorphous silicon. The band's peak energy agrees fairly well with the known optical transition energies for dangling bond defects, but the linear dependence on bias and the magnitude of the signal are surprising if interpreted using an analogy to interband electroabsorption. A model based on absorption by defects near the n/i interface of the diodes accounts well for the infrared spectrum.

  6. Evolution of the potential-energy surface of amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Kallel, Houssem; Mousseau, Normand; Schiettekatte, François

    2010-01-01

    The link between the energy surface of bulk systems and their dynamical properties is generally difficult to establish. Using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), we follow the change in the barrier distribution of a model of amorphous silicon as a function of the degree of relaxation. We find that while the barrier-height distribution, calculated from the initial minimum, is a unique function that depends only on the level of distribution, the reverse-barrier height distributio...

  7. Amorphous Silicon 16—bit Array Photodetector①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGShaoqiang; XUZhongyang; 等

    1997-01-01

    An amorphous silicon 16-bit array photodetector with the a-SiC/a-Si heterojunction diode is presented.The fabrication processes of the device were studied systematically.By the optimum of the diode structure and the preparation procedures,the diode with Id<10-12A/mm2 and photocurrentIp≥0.35A/W has been obtained at the wavelength of 632nm.

  8. Optical characterization and density of states determination of silicon nanocrystals embedded in amorphous silicon based matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sebille, M.; Vasudevan, R. A.; Lancee, R. J.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Zeman, M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a non-destructive measurement and simple analysis method for obtaining the absorption coefficient of silicon nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in an amorphous matrix. This method enables us to pinpoint the contribution of silicon NCs to the absorption spectrum of NC containing films. The density of states (DOS) of the amorphous matrix is modelled using the standard model for amorphous silicon while the NCs are modelled using one Gaussian distribution for the occupied states and one for the unoccupied states. For laser annealed a-Si0.66O0.34:H films, our analysis shows a reduction of the NC band gap from approximately 2.34-2.08 eV indicating larger mean NC size for increasing annealing laser fluences, accompanied by a reduction in NC DOS distribution width from 0.28-0.26 eV, indicating a narrower size distribution.

  9. Two-phase electrochemical lithiation in amorphous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang Wei; He, Yu; Fan, Feifei; Liu, Xiao Hua; Xia, Shuman; Liu, Yang; Harris, C Thomas; Li, Hong; Huang, Jian Yu; Mao, Scott X; Zhu, Ting

    2013-02-13

    Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized portable electronics and will be a key to electrifying transport vehicles and delivering renewable electricity. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is being intensively studied as a high-capacity anode material for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. Its lithiation has been widely thought to occur through a single-phase mechanism with gentle Li profiles, thus offering a significant potential for mitigating pulverization and capacity fade. Here, we discover a surprising two-phase process of electrochemical lithiation in a-Si by using in situ transmission electron microscopy. The lithiation occurs by the movement of a sharp phase boundary between the a-Si reactant and an amorphous Li(x)Si (a-Li(x)Si, x ~ 2.5) product. Such a striking amorphous-amorphous interface exists until the remaining a-Si is consumed. Then a second step of lithiation sets in without a visible interface, resulting in the final product of a-Li(x)Si (x ~ 3.75). We show that the two-phase lithiation can be the fundamental mechanism underpinning the anomalous morphological change of microfabricated a-Si electrodes, i.e., from a disk shape to a dome shape. Our results represent a significant step toward the understanding of the electrochemically driven reaction and degradation in amorphous materials, which is critical to the development of microstructurally stable electrodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  10. The barrel sector assembly system of the ALICE silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Antinori, F; Cinausero, M; Dima, R; Fabris, D; Fioretto, E; Lunardon, M; Moretto, S; Pepato, Adriano; Prete, G; Scarlassara, F; Segato, G F; Soramel, F; Turrisi, R; Vannucci, L; Viesti, G

    2004-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector is the inner part of the ITS tracking system of the ALICE experiment at LHC. The 240 silicon modules, hosting almost 10 million pixel cells with dimension 50 . 425 mu m /sup 2/, have to be assembled on a carbon fiber support with micrometric precision. To reach this result, a dedicated high- precision computer-controlled tooling system has been developed at the INFN Padova. The assembly system and the mounting procedures are presented. (10 refs).

  11. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  12. IV and CV curves for irradiated prototype BTeV silicon pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria R. Coluccia et al.

    2002-07-16

    The authors present IV and CV curves for irradiated prototype n{sup +}/n/p{sup +} silicon pixel sensors, intended for use in the BTeV experiment at Fermilab. They tested pixel sensors from various vendors and with two pixel isolation layouts: p-stop and p-spray. Results are based on exposure with 200 MeV protons up to 6 x 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Beam test results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Appel, J A

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of the BTeV silicon pixel detector tests carried out in the MTest beam at Fermilab in 1999-2000. The pixel detector spatial resolution has been studied as a function of track inclination, sensor bias, and readout threshold.

  14. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Zou, Xingquan; Chi, Lingfei; Li, Qiang; Xiao, Tan

    2007-03-01

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO2 and active carbon at 1000 °C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 µm. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiOx nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  15. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ping; Zou Xingquan; Chi Lingfei; Li Qiang; Xiao Tan [Department of Physics, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China)

    2007-03-28

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO{sub 2} and active carbon at 1000 deg. C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 {mu}m. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiO{sub x} nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  16. Silicon nanocrystals on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films: Control of film properties and nanocrystals growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbe, Jeremy, E-mail: jeremy.barbe@hotmail.com [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Xie, Ling; Leifer, Klaus [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Faucherand, Pascal; Morin, Christine; Rapisarda, Dario; De Vito, Eric [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Makasheva, Kremena; Despax, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Perraud, Simon [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-11-01

    The present study demonstrates the growth of silicon nanocrystals on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films. Amorphous silicon carbide films [a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H (with x < 0.3)] were obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from a mixture of silane and methane diluted in hydrogen. The effect of varying the precursor gas-flow ratio on the film properties was investigated. In particular, a wide optical band gap (2.3 eV) was reached by using a high methane-to-silane flow ratio during the deposition of the a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H layer. The effect of short-time annealing at 700 Degree-Sign C on the composition and properties of the layer was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was observed that the silicon-to-carbon ratio in the layer remains unchanged after short-time annealing, but the reorganization of the film due to a large dehydrogenation leads to a higher density of SiC bonds. Moreover, the film remains amorphous after the performed short-time annealing. In a second part, it was shown that a high density (1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}) of silicon nanocrystals can be grown by low pressure chemical vapor deposition on a-Si{sub 0.8}C{sub 0.2} surfaces at 700 Degree-Sign C, from silane diluted in hydrogen. The influence of growth time and silane partial pressure on nanocrystals size and density was studied. It was also found that amorphous silicon carbide surfaces enhance silicon nanocrystal nucleation with respect to SiO{sub 2}, due to the differences in surface chemical properties. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silicon nanocrystals (Si-NC) growth on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma deposited amorphous silicon carbide films with well-controlled properties Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study on the thermal effect of 700 Degree-Sign C short-time annealing on the layer properties Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low pressure

  17. Enhanced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films using embedded silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Curtis Michael

    This thesis is concerned with the production of silicon thin films for photovoltaic applications. Much research has been carried out to find a stable, more efficient alternative to amorphous silicon, resulting in a number of various amorphous/crystalline mixed-phase film structures with properties superior to amorphous silicon. This thesis work details a completely new approach to mixed-phase film deposition, focusing on the fast crystallization of these films. The deposition of amorphous silicon films with embedded nanocrystals was carried out via a dual-plasma system. It is known that plasma conditions to produce high quality films are much different from those to produce particles. Hence the experimental system used here involved two separate plasmas to allow the optimum production of the crystalline nanoparticles and the amorphous film. Both plasmas use 13.56 MHz excitation voltage with diluted silane as the silicon precursor. The nanoparticle production reactor is a flow-through device that can be altered to control the size of the particles from around 5--30 nm average diameter. The film production reactor is a parallel-plate capacitively-coupled plasma system, into which the aerosol-suspended nanoparticles were injected. The nanocrystals could either be "co-deposited" simultaneously with the amorphous film, or be deposited separately in a layer-by-layer technique; both approaches are discussed in detail. Measurements of the film conductivity provide for the first time unambiguous evidence that the presence of nanocrystallites above 5 nm in the amorphous film have a direct impact on the electronic properties of co-deposited films. Further measurements of the film structure by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate clearly the effect of embedded nanocrystals on the annealed crystallization process; the immediate growth of the crystal seeds has been observed. Additionally, a newly discovered mechanism of film crystallization

  18. Interference filter with amorphous silicon layer and direct laser recording on it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutanov, A.; Sydyk uluu, Nurbek; Snimshikov, I.; Kazakbaeva, Z.

    2016-08-01

    The interference spectral filters with amorphous silicon layer deposited by magnetron sputtering on the reflective metal layer on a glass substrate are developed. Interference filter select from white light source components corresponding to quasimonochromatic wavelength with a narrow bandwidth. The thickness of the amorphous silicon layer determines the center wavelength of the pass band of the filter. It proposed to use interference filter with amorphous silicon layer for direct laser recoding on it. Results on direct laser recording on amorphous silicon layer of the interference filter by single-mode Blu Ray laser (X = 405 nm) with high contrast reflected image are demonstrated.

  19. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized.

  20. Recent developments in amorphous silicon-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneking, C.; Rech, B.; Foelsch, J.; Wagner, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Schicht- und Ionentechnik

    1996-03-01

    Two examples of recent advances in the field of thin-film, amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) pin solar cells are described: the improved understanding and control of the p/i interface, and the improvement of wide-bandgap a-Si:H material deposited at low substrate temperature as absorber layer for cells with high stabilized open-circuit voltage. Stacked a-Si:H/a-Si:H cells incorporating these concepts exhibit less than 10% (relative) efficiency degradation and show stabilized efficiencies as high as 9 to 10% (modules 8 to 9%). The use of low-gap a-Si:H and its alloys like a-SiGe:H as bottom cell absorber materials in multi-bandgap stacked cells offers additional possibilities. The combination of a-Si:H based top cells with thin-film crystalline silicon-based bottom cells appears as a promising new trend. It offers the perspective to pass significantly beyond the present landmark of 10% module efficiency reached by the technology utilizing exclusively amorphous silicon-based absorber layers, while keeping its advantages of potentially low-cost production. (orig.) 47 refs.

  1. FTIR study of silicon carbide amorphization by heavy ion irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Pluchery, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    We have measured at room temperature (RT) the Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) absorption spectra of ion-irradiated thin epitaxial films of cubic silicon carbide (3C–SiC) with 1.1 µm thickness on a 500 µm thick (1 0 0) silicon wafer substrate. Irradiations were carried out at RT with 2.3 MeV 28Si+ ions and 3.0 MeV 84Kr+ ions for various fluences in order to induce amorphization of the SiC film. Ion projected ranges were adjusted to be slightly larger than the film thickness so that the whole SiC layers were homogeneously damaged. FTIR spectra of virgin and irradiated samples were recorded for various incidence angles from normal incidence to Brewster’s angle. We show that the amorphization process in ion-irradiated 3C–SiC films can be monitored non-destructively by FTIR absorption spectroscopy without any major interference of the substrate. The compared evolutions of TO and LO peaks upon ion irradiation yield valuable information on the damage process. Complementary test experiments were also performed on virgin silicon nitride (Si3N4) self-standing films for similar conditions. Asymmetrical shapes were found for TO peaks of SiC, whereas Gaussian profiles are found for LO peaks. Skewed Gaussian profiles, with a standard deviation depending on wave number, were used to fit asymmetrical peaks for both materials. A new methodology for following the amorphization process is proposed on the basis of the evolution of fitted IR absorption peak parameters with ion fluence. Results are discussed with respect to Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling and Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  2. Comment on ``Electron drift mobility in doped amorphous silicon''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhof, H.; Silver, M.

    1989-05-01

    Experimental drift-mobility data obtained by different methods in doped amorphous silicon are compared. It is shown that the presence of a long-range random potential will lead to a modification of the drift mobility in one experiment while the corresponding values in other experiments are virtually unaffected. It is shown that this effect accounts for the apparent discrepancy between the results of these experiments rather than the shift of the mobility edge upon doping which was recently proposed by Street, Kakalios, and Hack [Phys. Rev. B 38, 5603 (1988)] in order to understand their data.

  3. Eigenmode Splitting in all Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Nitride Coupled Microcavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-Gao; HUANG Xin-Fan; CHEN Kun-Ji; QIAN Bo; CHEN San; DING Hong-Lin; LIU Sui; WANG Xiang; XU Jun; LI Wei

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride based coupled optical microcavity is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical calculation of the transmittance spectra of optical microcavity with one cavity and coupled microcavity with two-cavity is performed.The optical eigenmode splitting for coupled microcavity is found due to the interaction between the neighbouring localized cavities.Experimentally,the coupled cavity samples are prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition and characterized by photoluminescence measurements.It is found that the photoluminescence peak wavelength agrees well with the cavity mode in the calculated transmittance spectra.This eigenmode splitting is analogous to the electron state energy splitting in diatom molecules.

  4. Atomic structure of the amorphous nonstoichiometric silicon oxides and nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, V A [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-31

    In addition to amorphous SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, the two key dielectric film materials used in modern silicon devices, the fabrication technology of nonstoichiometric SiO{sub x}N{sub y}, SiN{sub x}, and SiO{sub x} compounds is currently under development. Varying the chemical composition of these compounds allows a wide range of control over their physical - specifically, optical and electrical - properties. The development of technology for synthesizing such films requires a detailed understanding of their atomic structure. Current views on the atomic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitrides and oxides are reviewed and summarized. (reviews of topical problems)

  5. Determining the Onset of Amorphization of Crystalline Silicon due to Hypervelocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, C. Shane; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2009-03-01

    Atomistic simulations were performed to study a hypervelocity impactor striking a silicon/silicon nitride interface with varying silicon substrate thicknesses. Visualization indicates that the crystalline silicon amorphizes upon impact. The objective of the present study is to determine where the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurrs. In the analysis, the silicon substrate is separated into sixty layers and for each layer the average z displacement is determined. Our results show that the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurs between layers 20 and 22 for an impactor traveling at 5 km/s. This corresponds to a depth of approximately 32 Angstroms into the silicon. More detailed analyses reveals that the z displacement is noticeably larger for the layers that do not have a silicon atom bonded beneath them compared to the ones that do.

  6. Experimental and Computer Modelling Studies of Metastability of Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munyeme, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    We present a combination of experimental and computer modelling studies of the light induced degradation in the performance of amorphous silicon based single junction solar cells. Of particular interest in this study is the degradation kinetics of different types of amorphous silicon single junction

  7. The Phase-1 upgrade of the CMS silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Menichelli, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The present CMS pixel detector will be replaced in the shutdown period 2016/17 by an upgraded version due to the following reasons: increased luminosity at reduced bunch spacing ( from 7 x 10 33 cm - 2 s - 1 at 50 ns bunch spacing to 2 x 10 34 cm - 2 s - 1 at 25 ns bunch spacing) in the LHC , and radiation damage effects that will significantly degrade the present detector. The new upgraded detector will have higher tracking efficiency and lower mass with four barrel layer and three forward/backward disks to provide higher hit pixel coverage out to pseudorapidities of ±2.5. In this paper we will describe the new pixel detector focus ing mostly on the barrel detector design, construction and expected performances

  8. Performance of silicon pixel detectors at small track incidence angles for the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Simon; Banerjee, Swagato; Brandt, Gerhard; Carney, Rebecca; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Hard, Andrew Straiton; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kashif, Lashkar; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Rieger, Julia; Wolf, Julian; Wu, Sau Lan; Yang, Hongtao

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable the ATLAS experiment to successfully track charged particles produced in high-energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk), entirely composed of silicon pixel and strip detectors. An extension of the tracking coverage of the ITk to very forward pseudorapidity values is proposed, using pixel modules placed in a long cylindrical layer around the beam pipe. The measurement of long pixel clusters, detected when charged particles cross the silicon sensor at small incidence angles, has potential to significantly improve the tracking efficiency, fake track rejection, and resolution of the ITk in the very forward region. The performance of state-of-the-art pixel modules at small track incidence angles is studied using test beam data collected at SLAC and CERN.

  9. Performance of Silicon Pixel Detectors at Small Track Incidence Angles for the ATLAS Inner Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Viel, Simon; The ATLAS collaboration; Brandt, Gerhard; Carney, Rebecca; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Hard, Andrew; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kashif, Lashkar; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Rieger, Julia; Wolf, Julian Choate; Wu, Sau Lan; Yang, Hongtao

    2015-01-01

    In order to enable the ATLAS experiment to successfully track charged particles produced in high-energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk), entirely composed of silicon pixel and strip detectors. An extension of the tracking coverage of the ITk to very forward pseudorapidity values is proposed, using pixel modules placed in a long cylindrical layer around the beam pipe. The measurement of long pixel clusters, detected when charged particles cross the silicon sensor at small incidence angles, has potential to significantly improve the tracking efficiency, fake track rejection, and resolution of the ITk in the very forward region. The performance of state-of-the-art pixel modules at small track incidence angles is studied using test beam data collected at SLAC and CERN.

  10. Similarities in the electrical conduction processes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, H; Ohki, Y; Seol, K S; Noma, T

    2003-01-01

    Electrical conduction at high fields was examined in a series of hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride films with different nitrogen contents deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. It was shown that the conduction is attributable to the Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission in the two materials. The energy depths of the PF sites and the dependences on the sample's chemical composition are quite similar for the two samples. It is considered that the PF sites in the two materials are identical.

  11. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  12. Electrical characterization of irradiated prototype silicon pixel sensors for BTeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Rita Coluccia et al.

    2002-11-13

    The pixel detector in the BteV experiment at the Tevatron (Fermi Laboratory) is an important detector component for high-resolution tracking and vertex identification. For this task the hybrid pixel detector has to work in a very harsh radiation environment with up to 10{sup 14} minimum ionizing particles/cm{sup 2}/year. Radiation hardness of prototype n{sup +}/n/p{sup +} silicon pixel sensors has been investigated. We present Electrical characterization curves for irradiated prototype n{sup +}/n/p{sup +} sensors, intended for use in the BTeV experiment. We tested pixel sensors from various vendors and with two pixel isolation techniques: p-stop and p-spray. Results are based on irradiation with 200 MeV protons up to 6 x 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Performance of silicon pixel detectors at small track incidence angles for the ATLAS Inner Tracker upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viel, Simon, E-mail: sviel@lbl.gov [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA, United States of America (United States); Banerjee, Swagato [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States of America (United States); Brandt, Gerhard; Carney, Rebecca; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA, United States of America (United States); Hard, Andrew Straiton; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kashif, Lashkar [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States of America (United States); Pranko, Aliaksandr [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA, United States of America (United States); Rieger, Julia [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA, United States of America (United States); II Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universität, Göttingen (Germany); Wolf, Julian [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA, United States of America (United States); Wu, Sau Lan; Yang, Hongtao [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States of America (United States)

    2016-09-21

    In order to enable the ATLAS experiment to successfully track charged particles produced in high-energy collisions at the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider, the current ATLAS Inner Detector will be replaced by the Inner Tracker (ITk), entirely composed of silicon pixel and strip detectors. An extension of the tracking coverage of the ITk to very forward pseudorapidity values is proposed, using pixel modules placed in a long cylindrical layer around the beam pipe. The measurement of long pixel clusters, detected when charged particles cross the silicon sensor at small incidence angles, has potential to significantly improve the tracking efficiency, fake track rejection, and resolution of the ITk in the very forward region. The performance of state-of-the-art pixel modules at small track incidence angles is studied using test beam data collected at SLAC and CERN. - Highlights: • Extended inner pixel barrel layers are proposed for the ATLAS ITk upgrade. • Test beam results at small track incidence angles validate this ATLAS ITk design. • Long pixel clusters are reconstructed with high efficiency at low threshold values. • Excellent angular resolution is achieved using pixel cluster length information.

  14. Properties of interfaces in amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olibet, Sara; Vallat-Sauvain, Evelyne; Fesquet, Luc; Damon-Lacoste, Jerome; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), IMT, Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Breguet 2, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Monachon, Christian; Hessler-Wyser, Aicha [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy (CIME), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-03-15

    To study recombination at the amorphous/crystalline Si (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterointerface, the amphoteric nature of silicon (Si) dangling bonds is taken into account. Modeling interface recombination measured on various test structures provides insight into the microscopic passivation mechanisms, yielding an excellent interface defect density reduction by intrinsic a-Si:H and tunable field-effect passivation by doped layers. The potential of this model's applicability to recombination at other Si heterointerfaces is demonstrated. Solar cell properties of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunctions are in good accordance with the microscopic interface properties revealed by modeling, that are, e.g., slight asymmetries in the neutral capture cross-sections and band offsets. The importance of atomically abrupt interfaces and the difficulties to obtain them on pyramidally textured c-Si is studied in combination with transmission electron microscopy. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Si-H bond dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, R. Jason; McGrane, Shawn D.

    2007-08-01

    The ultrafast structural dynamics of the Si-H bond in the rigid solvent environment of an amorphous silicon thin film is investigated using two-dimensional infrared four-wave mixing techniques. The two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) vibrational correlation spectrum resolves the homogeneous line shapes ( 4ps waiting times. The Si-H stretching mode anharmonic shift is determined to be 84cm-1 and decreases slightly with vibrational frequency. The 1→2 linewidth increases with vibrational frequency. Frequency dependent vibrational population times measured by transient grating spectroscopy are also reported. The narrow homogeneous line shape, large inhomogeneous broadening, and lack of spectral diffusion reported here present the ideal backdrop for using a 2DIR probe following electronic pumping to measure the transient structural dynamics implicated in the Staebler-Wronski degradation [Appl. Phys. Lett. 31, 292 (1977)] in a-Si:H based solar cells.

  16. Infrared analysis of thin films amorphous, hydrogenated carbon on silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, W; Schwarz-Selinger, T

    2000-01-01

    The infrared analysis of thin films on a thick substrate is discussed using the example of plasma-deposited, amorphous, hydrogenated carbon layers (a-C:H) on silicon substrates. The framework for the optical analysis of thin films is presented. The main characteristic of thin film optics is the occurrence of interference effects due to the coherent superposition of light multiply reflected at the various internal and external interfaces of the optical system. These interference effects lead to a sinusoidal variation of the transmitted and reflected intensity. As a consequence, the Lambert-Beer law is not applicable for the determination of the absorption coefficient of thin films. Furthermore, observable changes of the transmission and reflection spectra occur in the vicinity of strong absorption bands due to the Kramers-Kronig relation. For a sound data evaluation these effects have to be included in the analysis. To be able to extract the full information contained in a measured optical thin film spectrum, ...

  17. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Sensor Deposited on Integrated Circuit for Radiation Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Despeisse, M; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; Moraes, D; Nardulli, A; Powolny, F; Wyrsch, N

    2008-01-01

    Radiation detectors based on the deposition of a 10 to 30 mum thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) sensor directly on top of integrated circuits have been developed. The performance of this detector technology has been assessed for the first time in the context of particle detectors. Three different circuits were designed in a quarter micron CMOS technology for these studies. The so-called TFA (Thin-Film on ASIC) detectors obtained after deposition of a-Si:H sensors on the developed circuits are presented. High internal electric fields (104 to 105 V/cm) can be built in the a-Si:H sensor and overcome the low mobility of electrons and holes in this amorphous material. However, the deposited sensor's leakage current at such fields turns out to be an important parameter which limits the performance of a TFA detector. Its detailed study is presented as well as the detector's pixel segmentation. Signal induction by generated free carrier motion in the a-Si:H sensor has been characterized using a 660 nm pul...

  18. Characteristics of Disorder and Defect in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Nitride Thin Films Containing Silicon Nanograins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Wen-ge; YU Wei; ZHANG Jiang-yong; HAN Li; FU Guang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) thin films embedded with nano-structural silicon were prepared and the microstructures at the interface of silicon nano-grains/SiNx were identified by the optical absorption and Raman scattering measurements. Characterized by the exponential tail of optical absorption and the band-width of the Raman scattering TO mode, the disorder in the interface region increases with the gas flow ratio increasing. Besides, as reflected by the sub-gap absorption coefficients, the density of interface defect states decreases, which can be attributed to the structural mismatch in the interface region and also the changes of hydrogen content in the deposited films. Additional annealing treatment results in a significant increase of defects and degree of disorder, for which the hydrogen out-diffusion in the annealing process would be responsible.

  19. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulraheem, Yaser, E-mail: yaser.abdulraheem@kuniv.edu.kw [Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University. P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat (Kuwait); Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  20. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Abdulraheem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause

  1. The CMS Silicon Pixel detector for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Steinbrueck, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The LHC is planning an upgrade program which will bring the luminosity to about 5~$\\times10^{34}$~cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ in 2026, with the goal of an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity scenario, HL-LHC, will present new challenges of higher data rates and increased radiation. To maintain its physics potential in this harsh environment, the CMS detector will undergo a major upgrade program known as the Phase II upgrade. The new Phase II pixel detector will require a high bandwidth readout system and highly radiation tolerant sensors and on-detector ASICs. Several technologies for the sensors are being studied. Serial powering schemes are under consideration to accommodate significant constraints on the system. These prospective designs, as well as new layout geometries that include very forward pixel discs with acceptance extended from $\\vert\\eta\\vert<2.4$ to $\\vert\\eta\\vert<4$, are presented together with performance estimates.

  2. Electronic properties of intrinsic and doped amorphous silicon carbide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, M. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: mvetter@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ferre, R. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, I. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Orpella, A. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Puigdollers, J. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Andreu, J. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Alcubilla, R. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-07-26

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC{sub x} : H) films have shown excellent surface passivation of crystalline silicon. With the aim of large area deposition of these films the influence of the rf plasma power was investigated. It is found that homogenous deposition with effective surface recombination velocity lower than 100 cms{sup -1} is possible up to 6'' diameter in a simple parallel plate reactor by optimizing deposition parameters. For application in solar cell processes the conductivity of these a-SiC{sub x} : H films might become of importance since good surface passivation results from field-effect passivation which needs an insulating dielectric layer. Therefore, the temperature dependence of the dark dc conductivity of these films was investigated in the temperature range from - 20 to 260 deg. C. Two transition temperatures, T {sub s}{approx}80 deg. C and T {sub s}{approx}170 deg. C, were found where conductivity increases, resp. decreases over-exponential. From Arrhenius plots activation energy (E {sub a}) and conductivity pre-factor ({sigma} {sub 0}) were calculated for a large number of samples with different composition. A correlation between E {sub a} and {sigma} {sub 0} was found giving a Meyer-Neldel relation with a slope of 59 mV, corresponding to a material characteristic temperature T {sub m} = 400 deg. C, and an intercept at {sigma} {sub 00} = 0.1 {omega}{sup -1}cm{sup -1}.

  3. The specific heat of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Daniel Robert

    At low temperature, amorphous materials have low energy excitations that result in a heat capacity that is in excess of the Debye heat capacity calculated from the sound velocity. These excitations are ubiquitous to the glassy state and occur with roughly the same density for all glasses. The specific heat has a linear temperature dependence below 1K that has been described by the phenomenological two-level systems (TLS) model in addition to a T 3 temperature dependence which is in excess of the T3 Debye specific heat. It is still unknown what exact mechanism gives rise to the TLS but it is assumed that groups of atoms have configurations that are close in energy and, at low temperature, these atoms can change configurations by tunneling through the energy barrier separating them. It has been an open question as to whether tetrahedrally bonded materials, like amorphous silicon, can support TLS due to the over-constrained nature of their bonding. It is shown in this work that amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have specific heat CP in excess of the Debye specific heat which depends on the details of the growth process. There is a linear term that is due to TLS in addition to an excess T3 contribution. We find that the TLS density depends on number density of atoms in the a-Si film and that the presence of hydrogen in a-Si:H increases CP further. We suggest that regions of low density are sufficiently under-constrained to support tunneling between structural configurations at low temperature as described by the TLS model. The presence of H further lowers the energy barriers for the tunneling process resulting in an increase in TLS density in a-Si:H. The presence of H in a-Si:H network is found to be metastable. Annealing causes H to diffuse away from clustered regions which reduces the density of TLS. A low temperature anomaly is found in the a-Si:H films in their as prepared state that is of unknown origin but appears to take the

  4. Processing and characterization of a MEDIPIX2-compatible silicon sensor with 220 {mu}m pixel size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froejdh, Anna; Froejdh, Erik; Thungstroem, Goeran; Froejdh, Christer [Department of Information Technology and Media, Mid-Sweden University, SE-85170 Sundsvall (Sweden); Norlin, Boerje, E-mail: Borje.Norlin@miun.se [Department of Information Technology and Media, Mid-Sweden University, SE-85170 Sundsvall (Sweden)

    2011-05-15

    Pixellated silicon detectors with a pixel size of 220 {mu}m have been fabricated at Mid-Sweden University. The purpose was to make a detector compatible with the MEDIPIX2 readout chip with pixels large enough to avoid charge sharing to do spectral imaging. Two different guard ring structures have been tested to investigate leakage current and interpixel isolation in a sensor made on high resistivity silicon.

  5. Silicon sensors development for the CMS pixel system

    CERN Document Server

    Arndt, Kirk; Bortoletto, Daniela; Giolo, Kim; Horisberger, R P; Rohe, T; Roy, Amitava; Son Seung Hee

    2003-01-01

    The CMS experiment will operate at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A hybrid pixel detector located close to the interaction region of the colliding beams will provide high resolution tracking and vertex identification which will be crucial for b quark identification. Because of the radiation environment of the LHC, the performance of the sensors must be carefully evaluated up to a fluence of 6 multiplied by 10**1**4n//e//qcm **-**2. We expect that the sensors will be operated partially depleted during their operation at the LHC and we have implemented an n**+ on n sensor design. We have irradiated prototype sensors to a dose of 1 multiplied by 10 **1**5n //e//qcm**-**2. We present the results of our testing before and after irradiation.

  6. Silicon micro-fluidic cooling for NA62 GTK pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Romagnoli, G; Brunel, B; Catinaccio, A; Degrange, J; Mapelli, A; Morel, M; Noel, J; Petagna, P

    2015-01-01

    Silicon micro-channel cooling is being studied for efficient thermal management in application fields such as high power computing and 3D electronic integration. This concept has been introduced in 2010 for the thermal management of silicon pixel detectors in high energy physics experiments. Combining the versatility of standard micro-fabrication processes with the high thermal efficiency typical of micro-fluidics, it is possible to produce effective thermal management devices that are well adapted to different detector configurations. The production of very thin cooling devices in silicon enables a minimization of material of the tracking sensors and eliminates mechanical stresses due to the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion between detectors and cooling systems. The NA62 experiment at CERN will be the first high particle physics experiment that will install a micro-cooling system to perform the thermal management of the three detection planes of its Gigatracker pixel detector.

  7. Amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor active pixel sensor x-ray imager for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chumin; Kanicki, Jerzy, E-mail: kanicki@eecs.umich.edu [Solid-State Electronic Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The breast cancer detection rate for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is limited by the x-ray image quality. The limiting Nyquist frequency for current DBT systems is around 5 lp/mm, while the fine image details contained in the high spatial frequency region (>5 lp/mm) are lost. Also today the tomosynthesis patient dose is high (0.67–3.52 mGy). To address current issues, in this paper, for the first time, a high-resolution low-dose organic photodetector/amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin-film transistor (a-IGZO TFT) active pixel sensor (APS) x-ray imager is proposed for next generation DBT systems. Methods: The indirect x-ray detector is based on a combination of a novel low-cost organic photodiode (OPD) and a cesium iodide-based (CsI:Tl) scintillator. The proposed APS x-ray imager overcomes the difficulty of weak signal detection, when small pixel size and low exposure conditions are used, by an on-pixel signal amplification with a significant charge gain. The electrical performance of a-IGZO TFT APS pixel circuit is investigated by SPICE simulation using modified Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFT model. Finally, the noise, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and resolvability of the complete system are modeled using the cascaded system formalism. Results: The result demonstrates that a large charge gain of 31–122 is achieved for the proposed high-mobility (5–20 cm{sup 2}/V s) amorphous metal-oxide TFT APS. The charge gain is sufficient to eliminate the TFT thermal noise, flicker noise as well as the external readout circuit noise. Moreover, the low TFT (<10{sup −13} A) and OPD (<10{sup −8} A/cm{sup 2}) leakage currents can further reduce the APS noise. Cascaded system analysis shows that the proposed APS imager with a 75 μm pixel pitch can effectively resolve the Nyquist frequency of 6.67 lp/mm, which can be further improved to ∼10 lp/mm if the pixel pitch is reduced to 50 μm. Moreover, the

  8. Pre- and post-irradiation performance of FBK 3D silicon pixel detectors for CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krzywda, A., E-mail: akrzywda@purdue.edu [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Alagoz, E.; Bubna, M. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Obertino, M. [Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Solano, A. [Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Arndt, K. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Uplegger, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-5011 (United States); Betta, G.F. Dalla [TIFPA INFN and Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Trento, Via Sommarive 9, I-38123 Povo di Trento, TN (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Centro per Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento, Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Povo di Trento, TN (Italy); Ngadiuba, J. [Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Rivera, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-5011 (United States); Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Terzo, S. [Università di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Bortoletto, D. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Prosser, A.; Adreson, J.; Kwan, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-5011 (United States); Osipenkov, I. [Texas A and M University, Department of Physics, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Bolla, G. [Purdue University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); and others

    2014-11-01

    In preparation for the tenfold luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (the HL-LHC) around 2020, three-dimensional (3D) silicon pixel sensors are being developed as a radiation-hard candidate to replace the planar ones currently being used in the CMS pixel detector. This study examines an early batch of FBK sensors (named ATLAS08) of three 3D pixel geometries: 1E, 2E, and 4E, which respectively contain one, two, and four readout electrodes for each pixel, passing completely through the bulk. We present electrical characteristics and beam test performance results for each detector before and after irradiation. The maximum fluence applied is 3.5×10{sup 15} n {sub eq}/cm{sup 2}.

  9. On the effect of the amorphous silicon microstructure on the grain size of solid phase crystallized polycrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Kashish; Branca, Annalisa; Illiberi, Andrea; Creatore, Mariadriana; Sanden, Mauritius C.M. van de [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Tichelaar, Frans D. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    In this paper the effect of the microstructure of remote plasma-deposited amorphous silicon films on the grain size development in polycrystalline silicon upon solid-phase crystallization is reported. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films are deposited at different microstructure parameter values R* (which represents the distribution of SiH{sub x} bonds in amorphous silicon), at constant hydrogen content. Amorphous silicon films undergo a phase transformation during solid-phase crystallization and the process results in fully (poly-)crystallized films. An increase in amorphous film structural disorder (i.e., an increase in R*), leads to the development of larger grain sizes (in the range of 700-1100 nm). When the microstructure parameter is reduced, the grain size ranges between 100 and 450 nm. These results point to the microstructure parameter having a key role in controlling the grain size of the polycrystalline silicon films and thus the performance of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Design of a 16 gray scales 320×240 pixels OLED-on-silicon driving circuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Ran; Wang Xiaohui; Wang Wenbo; Du Huan; Han Zhengsheng

    2009-01-01

    A 320×240 pixel organic-light-emitting-diode-on-silicon (OLEDoS) driving circuit is implemented using the standard 0.5 μm CMOS process of CSMC. It gives 16 gray scales with integrated 4 bit D/A converters. A three-transistor voltage-programmed OLED pixel driver is proposed, which can realize the very small current driving required for the OLEDoS microdisplay. Both the D/A converter and the pixel driver are implemented with pMOS devices. The pass-transistor and capacitance in the OLED pixel driver can be used to sample the output of the D/A converter. An additional pMOS is added to OLED pixel driver, which is used to control the D/A converter operating only when one row is on. This can reduce the circuit's power consumption. This driving circuit can work properly in a frame frequency of 50 Hz, and the final layout of this circuit is given. The pixel area is 28.4×28.4 μm2 and the display area is 10.7×8.0 mm2 (the diagonal is about 13 mm). The measured pixel gray scale voltage shows that the function of the driver circuit is correct, and the power consumption of the chip is about 350 mW.

  11. Femtosecond Laser Crystallization of Boron-doped Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Rybalko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization of amorphous hydrogenated silicon films with femtosecond laser pulses is one of the promising ways to produce nanocrystalline silicon for photovoltaics. The structure of laser treated films is the most important factor determining materials' electric and photoelectric properties. In this work we investigated the effect of femtosecond laser irradiation of boron doped amorphous hydrogenated silicon films with different fluences on crystalline volume fraction and electrical properties of this material. A sharp increase of conductivity and essential decrease of activation energy of conductivity temperature dependences accompany the crystallization process. The results obtained are explained by increase of boron doping efficiency in crystalline phase of modified silicon film.

  12. Environmental life cycle assessment of roof-integrated flexible amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon solar cell laminate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Mohr; A. Meijer; M.A.J. Huijbregts; L. Reijnders

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an environmental life cycle assessment of a roof-integrated flexible solar cell laminate with tandem solar cells composed of amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon (a-Si/nc-Si). The a-Si/nc-Si cells are considered to have 10% conversion efficiency. Their expected service life

  13. Solution growth of microcrystalline silicon on amorphous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimburger, Robert

    2010-07-05

    This work deals with low-temperature solution growth of micro-crystalline silicon on glass. The task is motivated by the application in low-cost solar cells. As glass is an amorphous material, conventional epitaxy is not applicable. Therefore, growth is conducted in a two-step process. The first step aims at the spatial arrangement of silicon seed crystals on conductive coated glass substrates, which is realized by means of vapor-liquid-solid processing using indium as the solvent. Seed crystals are afterwards enlarged by applying a specially developed steady-state solution growth apparatus. This laboratory prototype mainly consists of a vertical stack of a silicon feeding source and the solvent (indium). The growth substrate can be dipped into the solution from the top. The system can be heated to a temperature below the softening point of the utilized glass substrate. A temperature gradient between feeding source and growth substrate promotes both, supersaturation and material transport by solvent convection. This setup offers advantages over conventional liquid phase epitaxy at low temperatures in terms of achievable layer thickness and required growth times. The need for convective solute transport to gain the desired thickness of at least 50 {mu}m is emphasized by equilibrium calculations in the binary system indium-silicon. Material transport and supersaturation conditions inside the utilized solution growth crucible are analyzed. It results that the solute can be transported from the lower feeding source to the growth substrate by applying an appropriate heating regime. These findings are interpreted by means of a hydrodynamic analysis of fluid flow and supporting FEM simulation. To ensure thermodynamic stability of all materials involved during steady-state solution growth, the ternary phase equilibrium between molybdenum, indium and silicon at 600 C was considered. Based on the obtained results, the use of molybdenum disilicide as conductive coating

  14. Research on high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, H.; Dolan, J.; Fricano, G.; Danginis, V.

    1987-02-01

    A study was undertaken of the optoelectronic properties of amorphous silicon-hydrogen thin films deposited from disilane at high deposition rates. The information derived from this study was used to fabricate amorphous silicon solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 7%. The intrinsic layer of these solar cells was deposited at 15 angstroms/second. Material properties investigated included dark conductivity, photoconductivity, minority carrier diffusion length, and density of states. The solar cells properties characterized were absolute quantum yield and simulated global AM 1.5 efficiencies. Investigations were undertaken utilizing optical and infrared spectroscopy to optimize the microstructures of the intrinsic amorphous silicon. That work was sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The information was used to optimize the intrinsic layer of amorphous silicon solar cells, resulting in AM 1.5 efficiencies exceeding 7%.

  15. A fax-machine amorphous silicon sensor for X-ray detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Barcala, J.M. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Chvatchkine, V. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ioudine, I. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Molinero, A. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Navarrete, J.J. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Yuste, C. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    Amorphous silicon detectors have been used, basically, as solar cells for energetics applications. As light detectors, linear sensors are used in fax and photocopier machines because they can be built with a large size, low price and have a high radiation hardness. Due to these performances, amorphous silicon detectors have been used as radiation detectors, and, presently, some groups are developing matrix amorphous silicon detectors with built-in electronics for medical X-ray applications. Our group has been working on the design and development of an X-ray image system based on a commercial fax linear amorphous silicon detector. The sensor scans the selected area and detects light produced by the X-ray in a scintillator placed on the sensor. Image-processing software produces a final image with better resolution and definition. (orig.).

  16. An overview of uncooled infrared sensors technology based on amorphous silicon and silicon germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, Roberto; Mireles, Jose Jr. [Technology and Engineering Institute, Ciudad Juarez University UACJ, Av. Del Charro 450N, 32310 Chihuahua (Mexico); Moreno, Mario; Torres, Alfonso; Kosarev, Andrey [National Institute for Astrophysics Optics and Electronics INAOE, Luis E. Erro 1, PO Box 51 and 216, 7200 Puebla (Mexico); Heredia, Aurelio [Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla, 21 sur 1103 Col. Santiago, 72160 Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-04-15

    At the present time there are commercially available large un-cooled micro-bolometer arrays (as large as 1024 x 768 pixels) for a variety of thermal imaging applications. Different thermo-sensing materials have been employed as thermo sensing elements as Vanadium Oxide (VO{sub x}), metals, and amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors. Those materials present good characteristics but also have some disadvantages. As a consequence none of the commercially available arrays contain optimum pixels with an optimum thermo-sensing material. This paper reviews the development of the un-cooled bolometer technology and the research achievements on this area, with special attention on the key factors that would lead to improve the pixels performance characteristics. The work considers the R and D of microbolometer arrays and the integration with MEMS and IC technologies. A comparative study with the state of the art and data reported in literature is presented. Finally, further directions of uncooled bolometer based in thin films materials are also discussed in this paper. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Novel silicon n-in-p pixel sensors for the future ATLAS upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Rosa, A., E-mail: alessandro.larosa@cern.ch [Section de Physique (DPNC), Université de Genève, 24 quai Ernest Ansermet, Genève 4, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Gallrapp, C. [CERN, Geneva 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Macchiolo, A.; Nisius, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Pernegger, H. [CERN, Geneva 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Richter, R.H. [Max-Planck-Institut Halbleiterlabor, Otto Hahn Ring 6, D-81739 München (Germany); Weigell, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut) Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards HL-LHC the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the inner detector with an all silicon system. The n-in-p silicon technology is a promising candidate for the pixel upgrade thanks to its radiation hardness and cost effectiveness that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. We present the characterization and performance of novel n-in-p planar pixel sensors produced by CiS (Germany) connected by bump bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. These results are obtained before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 10{sup 16}1-MeV n{sub eq}cm{sup −2}, and prove the operability of this kind of sensors in the harsh radiation environment foreseen for the pixel system at HL-LHC. We also present an overview of the new pixel production, which is on-going at CiS for sensors compatible with the new ATLAS readout chip FE-I4.

  18. Novel Silicon n-in-p Pixel Sensors for the future ATLAS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    La Rosa, A; Macchiolo, A; Nisius, R; Pernegger, H; Richter,R H; Weigell, P

    2013-01-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards HL-LHC the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all silicon system. The n-in-p silicon technology is a promising candidate for the pixel upgrade thanks to its radiation hardness and cost eectiveness, that allow for enlarging the area instrumented with pixel detectors. We present the characterization and performance of novel n-in-p planar pixel sensors produced by CiS (Germany) connected by bump bonding to the ATLAS readout chip FE-I3. These results are obtained before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 1016 1-MeV $n_{eq}cm^{-2}$, and prove the operability of this kind of sensors in the harsh radiation environment foreseen for the pixel system at HL-LHC. We also present an overview of the new pixel production, which is on-going at CiS for sensors compatible with the new ATLAS readout chip FE-I4.

  19. Optimization of large amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations of energetic impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samela, Juha, E-mail: juha.samela@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Norris, Scott A. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205 (United States); Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Aziz, Michael J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    A practical method to create optimized amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations is developed and tested. The method is based on the Wooten, Winer, and Weaire algorithm and combination of small optimized blocks to larger structures. The method makes possible to perform simulations of either very large cluster hypervelocity impacts on amorphous targets or small displacements induced by low energy ion impacts in silicon.

  20. Nickel-disilicide-assisted excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Yan-Ping; Shao Xi-Bin; Gao Feng-Li; Luo Wen-Sheng; Wu Yuan; Fu Guo-Zhu; Jing Hai; Ma Kai

    2006-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin film has been prepared by means of nickel-disilicide (NiSi2) assisted excimer laser crystallization (ELC). The process to prepare a sample includes two steps. One step consists of the formation of NiSi2 precipitates by heat-treating the dehydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si) coated with a thin layer of Ni. And the other step consists of the formation of poly-Si grains by means of ELC. According to the test results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), another grain growth model named two-interface grain growth has been proposed to contrast with the conventional Ni-metal-induced lateral crystallization (Ni-MILC) model and the ELC model. That is, an additional grain growth interface other than that in conventional ELC is formed, which consists of NiSi2 precipitates and a-Si.The processes for grain growth according to various excimer laser energy densities delivered to the a-Si film have been discussed. It is discovered that grains with needle shape and most of a uniform orientation are formed which grow up with NiSi2 precipitates as seeds. The reason for the formation of such grains which are different from that of Ni-MILCwithout migration of Ni atoms is not clear. Our model and analysis point out a method to prepare grains with needle shape and mostly of a uniform orientation. If such grains are utilized to make thin-film transistor, its characteristics may be improved.

  1. Assembly procedure of the module (half-stave) of the ALICE Silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Caselle, M; Antinori, F; Burns, M; Campbell, M; Chochula, P; Dinapoli, R; Elia, D; Formenti, F; Fini, R A; Ghidini, B; Kluge, A; Lenti, V; Manzari, V; Meddi, F; Morel, M; Navach, F; Nilsson, P; Pepato, Adriano; Riedler, P; Santoro, R; Stefanini, G; Viesti, G; Wyllie, K

    2004-01-01

    The Silicon Pixel Detector (SPD) forms the two innermost layers of the ALICE Inner Tracking System (ITS). The detector includes 1200 readout ASICs, each containing 8192 pixel cells, bump-bonded to Si sensor elements. The thickness of the readout chip and the sensor element is 150mum and 200mum, respectively. Low-mass solutions are implemented for the bus and the mechanical support. In this contribution, we describe the basic module (half-stave) of the two SPD layers and we give an overview of its assembly procedure.

  2. Laser assisted patterning of hydrogenated amorphous silicon for interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchi, S.; Desrues, T.; Souche, F.; Muñoz, D.; Lemiti, M.

    2012-10-01

    This work reports on the elaboration of a new industrial process based on laser selective ablation of dielectric layers for Interdigitated Back Contact Silicon Heterojunction (IBC Si-HJ) solar cells fabrication. Choice of the process is discussed and cells are processed to validate its performance. A pulsed green laser (515nm) with 10-20ns pulse duration is used for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers patterning steps, whereas metallization is made by screen printed. High Open-Circuit Voltage (Voc=699mV) and Fill Factor (FF=78.5%) values are obtained simultaneously on IBC Si-HJ cells, indicating a high surface passivation level and reduced resistive losses. An efficiency of 19% on non textured 26 cm² solar cells has been reached with this new industrial process.

  3. Extending the dynamic range of silicon photomultipliers without increasing pixel count

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Kurtis F., E-mail: kurtis.johnson@cern.c [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2010-09-21

    A silicon photomultiplier, sometimes called 'multipixel photon counter', which we here refer to as a 'SiPM', is a photo-sensitive device built from an avalanche photodiode array of pixels on a common silicon substrate, such that it can detect single photon events. The dimensions of a pixel may vary from 20 to 100 {mu}m and their density can be greater than 1000 per square millimeter. Each pixel in a SiPM operates in Geiger mode and is coupled to the output by a quenching resistor. Although each pixel operates in digital mode, the SiPM is an analog device because all the pixels are read in parallel, making it possible to generate signals within a dynamic range from a single photon to a large number of photons, ultimately limited by the number of pixels on the chip. In this note we describe a simple and general method of increasing the dynamic range of a SiPM beyond that one may naively assume from the shape of the cumulative distribution function of the SiPM response to the average number of photons per pixel. We show that by rendering the incoming flux of photons to be non-uniform in a prescribed manner, a significant increase in dynamic range is achievable. Such re-distribution of the incoming flux may be accomplished with simple, non-focusing lenses, prisms, interference films, mirrors or attenuating films. Almost any optically non-inert interceding device can increase the dynamic range of the SiPM.

  4. Carrier transport in amorphous silicon utilizing picosecond photoconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. M.

    1981-08-01

    The development of a high-speed electronic measurement capability permitted the direct observation of the transient photoresponse of amorphous silicon (a-Si) with a time resolution of approximately 10ps. This technique was used to measure the initial mobility of photogenerated (2.1eV) free carriers in three types of a-Si having widely different densities of structural defects (i.e., as prepared by: (1) RF glow discharge (a-Si:H); (2) chemical vapor deposition; and (3) evaporation in ultra-high vacuum). In all three types of a-Si, the same initial mobility of approximately 1 cu cm/Vs at room temperature was found. This result tends to confirm the often-made suggestion that the free carrier mobility is determined by the influence of shallow states associated with the disorder in the random atomic network, and is an intrinsic property of a-Si which is unaffected by the method of preparation. The rate of decay of the photocurrent correlates with the density of structural defects and varies from 4ps to 200ps for the three types of a-Si investigated. The initial mobility of a-Si:H was found to be thermally activated. The possible application of extended state transport controlled by multiple trapping and small polaron formation is discussed.

  5. Nanohole Structuring for Improved Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johlin, Eric; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-22

    While low hole mobilities limit the current collection and efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic devices, attempts to improve mobility of the material directly have stagnated. Herein, we explore a method of utilizing nanostructuring of a-Si:H devices to allow for improved hole collection in thick absorber layers. This is achieved by etching an array of 150 nm diameter holes into intrinsic a-Si:H and then coating the structured material with p-type a-Si:H and a conformal zinc oxide transparent conducting layer. The inclusion of these nanoholes yields relative power conversion efficiency (PCE) increases of ∼45%, from 7.2 to 10.4% PCE for small area devices. Comparisons of optical properties, time-of-flight mobility measurements, and internal quantum efficiency spectra indicate this efficiency is indeed likely occurring from an improved collection pathway provided by the nanostructuring of the devices. Finally, we estimate that through modest optimizations of the design and fabrication, PCEs of beyond 13% should be obtainable for similar devices.

  6. Effects of relaxation on the energy landscape of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Houssem; Mousseau, Normand; Schiettekatte, Francois

    2008-03-01

    Amorphous silicon is used in many devices around us, included as a thin-film transistor in most flat screens, it also serves as the reference for the study of disordered network systems. Recently, differential scanning calorimetry and nanocalorimetry measurements (DSC) ^1 have shown that the heat released as the temperature of the sample is raised following implantation, is temperature independent. To understand this behaviour, we characterize the energy landscape of model a-Si. Using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) with the modified Stillinger-Weber potential, we generate models at four levels of relaxation and identify the relaxation mechanisms by analysing 100 000 events for each model. We find that while the distribution of the activation barriers shifts to higher energy as the system is relaxed, the distribution of the relaxation energies is almost unchanged. The relation between these two phenomena is consistent with the DSC measurements. This work is supported, in part, by NSERC, FQRNT and the CRC Foundation. HK is grateful for a scholarship from the Tunisian Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Technology. ^1 R. Karmouch et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 075304 (2007)

  7. Experiment and Simulation Study on the Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaic Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on comparative study on two amorphous silicon photovoltaic walls (a-Si PV walls, the temperature distribution and the instant power were tested; and with EnergyPlus software, similar models of the walls were built to simulate annual power generation and air conditioning load. On typical sunshine day, the corresponding position temperature of nonventilated PV wall was generally 0.5~1.5°C higher than that of ventilated one, while the power generation was 0.2%~0.4% lower, which was consistent with the simulation results with a difference of 0.41% in annual energy output. As simulation results, in summer, comparing the PV walls with normal wall, the heat per unit area of these two photovoltaic walls was 5.25 kWh/m2 (nonventilated and 0.67 kWh/m2 (ventilated higher, respectively. But in winter the heat loss of nonventilated one was smaller, while ventilated PV wall was similar to normal wall. To annual energy consumption of heating and cooling, the building with ventilated PV wall and normal wall was also similar but slightly better than nonventilated one. Therefore, it is inferred that, at low latitudes, such as Zhuhai, China, air gap ventilation is suitable, while the length to thickness ratio of the air gap needs to be taken into account.

  8. Diffusion of Gold and Platinum in Amorphous Silicon

    CERN Multimedia

    Voss, T L

    2002-01-01

    By means of radiotracer experiments the diffusion of Au and Pt in radio-frequency-sputtered amorphous silicon (a-Si) was investigated. Specimens of a-Si with homogeneous doping concentrations of Au or Pt in the range 0$\\, - \\,$1,7~at.\\% were produced by co-sputtering of Si and Au or Pt, respectively. An additional tiny concentration of radioactive $^{195}$Au or $^{188}$Pt, about 10~at.ppm, was implanted at ISOLDE. The resulting Gaussian distribution of the implanted atoms served as a probe for measuring diffusion coefficients at various doping concentrations. It was found that for a given doping concentration the diffusion coefficients show Arrhenius-type temperature dependences, where the diffusion enthalpy and the pre-exponential factor depend on the doping concentration. From these results it was concluded that in a-Si Au and Pt undergo direct, interstitial-like diffusion that is retarded by temporary trapping of the radiotracer atoms at vacancy-type defects with different binding enthalpies. In the case o...

  9. Hot wire deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, A.H.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B.P.; Reedy, R.C. Jr.; Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper details the results of a study in which low H content, high deposition rate hot wire (HW) deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been incorporated into a substrate solar cell. The authors find that the treatment of the top surface of the HW i layer while it is being cooled from its high deposition temperature is crucial to device performance. They present data concerning these surface treatments, and correlate these treatments with Schottky device performance. The authors also present first generation HW n-i-p solar cell efficiency data, where a glow discharge (GD) {mu}c-Si(p) layer was added to complete the partial devices. No light trapping layer was used to increase the device Jsc. Their preliminary investigations have yielded efficiencies of up to 6.8% for a cell with a 4000 {Angstrom} thick HW i-layer, which degrade less than 10% after a 900 hour light soak. The authors suggest avenues for further improvement of their devices.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of PIN hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keya, Kimitaka; Torigoe, Yoshihiro; Toko, Susumu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced degradation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key issue for enhancing competitiveness in solar cell market. A-Si:H films with a lower density of Si-H2 bonds shows higher stability. Here we identified Si-H2 bonds in PIN a-Si:H solar cells fabricated by plasma CVD using Raman spectroscopy. A-Si:H solar cell has a structure of B-doped μc-SiC:H (12.5 nm)/ non-doped a-Si:H (250nm)/ P-doped μc-Si:H (40 nm) on glass substrates (Asahi-VU). By irradiating HeNe laser light from N-layer, peaks correspond to Si-H2 bonds (2100 cm-1) and Si-H bonds (2000 cm-1) have been identified in Raman scattering spectra. The intensity ratio of Si-H2 and Si-H ISiH2/ISiH is found to correlate well to light induced degradation of the cells Therefore, Raman spectroscopy is a promising method for studying origin of light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells.

  11. Progress in amorphous silicon solar cells produced by reactive sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, T. D.

    The photovoltaic properties of reactively sputtered amorphous silicon are reviewed and it is shown that efficient PIN solar cells can be fabricated by the method of sputtering. The photovoltaic properties of the intrinsic films correlate with their structural and compositional inhomogeneities. Hydrogen incorporation and small levels of phosphorus and boron impurities also affect the photovoltaic properties through reduction of residual dangling bond related defects and modification of their occupation. The optical and transport properties of the doped P and N-films were found to depend sensitively on the amount of hydrogen and boron or phosphorus incorporation into the films as well as on their degree of crystallinity. Combination of the best intrinsic and doped films leads to PIN solar cell structures generating J(sc) of 13 mA/sq cm and V(oc) of between 0.85 to 0.95 volts. The efficiency of these devices, 5 to 6 percent, is limited by the low FF, typically about 50 percent. As a further test to the potential of this technology efficient tandem solar cell structures were fabricated, and device design concepts, such as the incorporation of optically reflective back contacts were tested.

  12. Planar n{sup +}-in-n silicon pixel sensors for the ATLAS IBL upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goessling, C.; Klingenberg, R. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Muenstermann, D., E-mail: Daniel.Muenstermann@TU-Dortmund.de [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Rummler, A.; Troska, G.; Wittig, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2011-09-11

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC is planning to upgrade its pixel detector by the installation of a 4th pixel layer, the insertable b-layer IBL with a mean sensor radius of only 32 mm from the beam axis. Being very close to the beam, the radiation damage of the IBL sensors might be as high as 5x10{sup 15} n{sub eq} cm{sup -2} at their end-of-life. To investigate the radiation hardness and suitability of the current ATLAS pixel sensors for IBL fluences, n{sup +}-in-n silicon pixel sensors from the ATLAS Pixel production have been irradiated by reactor neutrons to the IBL design fluence and been tested with pions at the SPS and with electrons from a {sup 90}Sr source in the laboratory. The collected charge was found to exceed 10 000 electrons per MIP at 1 kV of bias voltage which is in agreement with data collected with strip sensors. With an expected threshold of 3000-4000 electrons, this result suggests that planar n{sup +}-in-n pixel sensors are radiation hard enough to be used as IBL sensor technology.

  13. Amorphization and reduction of thermal conductivity in porous silicon by irradiation with swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newby, Pascal J. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Institut Interdisciplinaire d' Innovation Technologique (3IT), Universite de Sherbrooke, CNRS UMI-LN2, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1K0A5 (Canada); Canut, Bruno; Bluet, Jean-Marie; Lysenko, Vladimir [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Gomes, Severine [Centre de Thermique de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, CETHIL-UMR5008, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Isaiev, Mykola; Burbelo, Roman [Faculty of Physics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 64/13, Volodymyrs' ka St., Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Termentzidis, Konstantinos [Laboratoire LEMTA, Universite de Lorraine-CNRS UMR 7563, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France); Chantrenne, Patrice [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, MATEIS-UMR CNRS 5510, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Frechette, Luc G. [Institut Interdisciplinaire d' Innovation Technologique (3IT), Universite de Sherbrooke, CNRS UMI-LN2, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1K0A5 (Canada)

    2013-07-07

    In this article, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanostructured porous silicon is reduced by amorphization and also that this amorphous phase in porous silicon can be created by swift (high-energy) heavy ion irradiation. Porous silicon samples with 41%-75% porosity are irradiated with 110 MeV uranium ions at six different fluences. Structural characterisation by micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM imaging show that swift heavy ion irradiation causes the creation of an amorphous phase in porous Si but without suppressing its porous structure. We demonstrate that the amorphization of porous silicon is caused by electronic-regime interactions, which is the first time such an effect is obtained in crystalline silicon with single-ion species. Furthermore, the impact on the thermal conductivity of porous silicon is studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning thermal microscopy. The creation of an amorphous phase in porous silicon leads to a reduction of its thermal conductivity, up to a factor of 3 compared to the non-irradiated sample. Therefore, this technique could be used to enhance the thermal insulation properties of porous Si. Finally, we show that this treatment can be combined with pre-oxidation at 300 Degree-Sign C, which is known to lower the thermal conductivity of porous Si, in order to obtain an even greater reduction.

  14. Preparation of fine silicon particles from amorphous silicon monoxide by the disproportionation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Mikito; Takei, Humihiko; Kikuchi, Masae; Uyeda, Chiaki

    2001-07-01

    Fine Si particles have been prepared by the disproportionation reaction of silicon monoxide (SiO), that is: 2SiO→Si+SiO 2. Amorphous powders of SiO are heated between 900°C and 1400°C in a flow of Ar and the obtained specimens are analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The treatments between 1000°C and 1300°C for more than 0.5 h result in origination of Si particles dispersed in amorphous oxide media. The particle size varies from 1-3 to 20-40 nm, depending on the heating temperature. Kinetic analyses of the reaction reveal that the activation energy is 1.1 eV (82.1 kJ mol -1). The specimens annealed above 1350°C changes into a mixture of Si and cristobalite, suggesting a solid state transformation in the surrounding oxides from the amorphous to crystalline states.

  15. A Medipix2-based imaging system for digital mammography with silicon pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bisogni, M G; Fantacci, M E; Mettivier, G; Montesi, M C; Novelli, M; Quattrocchi, M; Rosso, V; Russo, P; Stefanini, A

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present the first tests of a digital imaging system based on a silicon pixel detector bump-bonded to an integrated circuit operating in single photon counting mode. The X-rays sensor is a 300 mu m thick silicon, 14 by 14 mm/sup 2/, upon which a matrix of 256 * 256 pixels has been built. The read-out chip, named MEDIPIX2, has been developed at CERN within the MEDIPIX2 Collaboration and it is composed by a matrix of 256 * 256 cells, 55 * 55 mu m/sup 2/. The spatial resolution properties of the system have been assessed by measuring the square wave resolution function (SWRF) and first images of a standard mammographic phantom were acquired using a radiographic tube in the clinical irradiation condition. (5 refs).

  16. Realistic inversion of diffraction data for an amorphous solid: The case of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anup; Biswas, Parthapratim; Bhattarai, Bishal; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    We apply a method called "force-enhanced atomic refinement" (FEAR) to create a computer model of amorphous silicon (a -Si) based upon the highly precise x-ray diffraction experiments of Laaziri et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3460 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.3460]. The logic underlying our calculation is to estimate the structure of a real sample a -Si using experimental data and chemical information included in a nonbiased way, starting from random coordinates. The model is in close agreement with experiment and also sits at a suitable energy minimum according to density-functional calculations. In agreement with experiments, we find a small concentration of coordination defects that we discuss, including their electronic consequences. The gap states in the FEAR model are delocalized compared to a continuous random network model. The method is more efficient and accurate, in the sense of fitting the diffraction data, than conventional melt-quench methods. We compute the vibrational density of states and the specific heat, and we find that both compare favorably to experiments.

  17. Test Beam Results of 3D Silicon Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Grenier, P; Barbero, M; Bates, R; Bolle, E; Borri, M; Boscardin, M; Buttar, C; Capua, M; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cobal, M; Cristofoli, A; Dalla Betta, G F; Darbo, G; Da Via, C; Devetak, E; DeWilde, B; Di Girolamo, B; Dobos, D; Einsweiler, K; Esseni, D; Fazio, S; Fleta, C; Freestone, J; Gallrapp, C; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Gariano, G; Gemme, C; Giordani, M P; Gjersdal, H; Grinstein, S; Hansen, T; Hansen, T E; Hansson, P; Hasi, J; Helle, K; Hoeferkamp, M; Hugging, F; Jackson, P; Jakobs, K; Kalliopuska, J; Karagounis, M; Kenney, C; Köhler, M; Kocian, M; Kok, A; Kolya, S; Korokolov, I; Kostyukhin, V; Krüger, H; La Rosa, A; Lai, C H; Lietaer, N; Lozano, M; Mastroberardino, A; Micelli, A; Nellist, C; Oja, A; Oshea, V; Padilla, C; Palestri, P; Parker, S; Parzefall, U; Pater, J; Pellegrini, G; Pernegger, H; Piemonte, C; Pospisil, S; Povoli, M; Roe, S; Rohne, O; Ronchin, S; Rovani, A; Ruscino, E; Sandaker, H; Seidel, S; Selmi, L; Silverstein, D; Sjøbaek, K; Slavicek, T; Stapnes, S; Stugu, B; Stupak, J; Su, D; Susinno, G; Thompson, R; Tsung, J W; Tsybychev, D; Watts, S J; Wermes, N; Young, C; Zorzi, N

    2011-01-01

    Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable-B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC)) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS Inner Detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance.

  18. Test beam results of 3D silicon pixel sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, P., E-mail: grenier@slac.stanford.ed [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (United States); Alimonti, G. [INFN Sezione di Milano (Italy); Barbero, M. [Bonn University (Germany); Bates, R. [Glasgow University (United Kingdom); Bolle, E. [Oslo University (Norway); Borri, M. [University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Boscardin, M. [FBK-irst, Trento (Italy); Buttar, C. [Glasgow University (United Kingdom); Capua, M. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Cosenza and Universita della Calabria (Italy); Cavalli-Sforza, M. [IFAE Barcelona (Spain); Cobal, M.; Cristofoli, A. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Udine and Universita di Udine (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Trento and DISI Universita di Trento (Italy); Darbo, G. [INFN Sezione di Genova (Italy); Da Via, C. [University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Devetak, E.; DeWilde, B. [Stony Brook University (United States); Di Girolamo, B.; Dobos, D. [CERN (Switzerland); Einsweiler, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)

    2011-05-11

    Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS inner detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump-bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance.

  19. Test Beam Results of 3D Silicon Pixel Sensors for the ATLAS upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, P.; /SLAC; Alimonti, G.; /INFN, Milan; Barbero, M.; /Bonn U.; Bates, R.; /Glasgow U.; Bolle, E.; /Oslo U.; Borri, M.; /Manchester U.; Boscardin, M.; /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo; Buttar, C.; /Glasgow U.; Capua, M.; /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Cobal, M.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine; Cristofoli, A.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine; Dalla Betta, G.F.; /Trento U. /INFN, Trento; Darbo, G.; /INFN, Genoa; Da Via, C.; /Manchester U.; Devetak, E.; /SUNY, Stony Brook; DeWilde, B.; /SUNY, Stony Brook; Di Girolamo, B.; /CERN; Dobos, D.; /CERN; Einsweiler, K.; /LBL, Berkeley; Esseni, D.; /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Manchester U. /CERN /LBL, Berkeley /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Oslo U. /ICREA, Barcelona /Barcelona, IFAE /SINTEF, Oslo /SINTEF, Oslo /SLAC /SLAC /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Bonn U. /SLAC /Freiburg U. /SLAC /SINTEF, Oslo /Manchester U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Bonn U. /Bonn U. /CERN /Manchester U. /SINTEF, Oslo /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Manchester U. /VTT Electronics, Espoo /Glasgow U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /Hawaii U. /Freiburg U. /Manchester U. /Barcelona, Inst. Microelectron. /CERN /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /Prague, Tech. U. /Trento U. /INFN, Trento /CERN /Oslo U. /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Bergen U. /New Mexico U. /Udine U. /INFN, Udine /SLAC /Oslo U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Oslo U. /Bergen U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /SLAC /Calabria U. /INFN, Cosenza /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Manchester U. /Bonn U. /SLAC /Fond. Bruno Kessler, Povo

    2011-08-19

    Results on beam tests of 3D silicon pixel sensors aimed at the ATLAS Insertable-B-Layer and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) upgrades are presented. Measurements include charge collection, tracking efficiency and charge sharing between pixel cells, as a function of track incident angle, and were performed with and without a 1.6 T magnetic field oriented as the ATLAS Inner Detector solenoid field. Sensors were bump bonded to the front-end chip currently used in the ATLAS pixel detector. Full 3D sensors, with electrodes penetrating through the entire wafer thickness and active edge, and double-sided 3D sensors with partially overlapping bias and read-out electrodes were tested and showed comparable performance. Full and partial 3D pixel detectors have been tested, with and without a 1.6T magnetic field, in high energy pion beams at the CERN SPS North Area in 2009. Sensors characteristics have been measured as a function of the beam incident angle and compared to a regular planar pixel device. Overall full and partial 3D devices have similar behavior. Magnetic field has no sizeable effect on 3D performances. Due to electrode inefficiency 3D devices exhibit some loss of tracking efficiency for normal incident tracks but recover full efficiency with tilted tracks. As expected due to the electric field configuration 3D sensors have little charge sharing between cells.

  20. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Yimao, E-mail: yimao.wan@anu.edu.au; Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres [Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2015-12-07

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiN{sub x} stack, recombination current density J{sub 0} values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm{sup 2} are obtained on 10 Ω·cm n-type, 0.8 Ω·cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J{sub 0} on n-type 10 Ω·cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm{sup 2} when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  1. Full breast digital mammography with an amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector: physical characteristics of a clinical prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, S; Karellas, A; Suryanarayanan, S; Albagli, D; Han, S; Tkaczyk, E J; Landberg, C E; Opsahl-Ong, B; Granfors, P R; Levis, I; D'Orsi, C J; Hendrick, R E

    2000-03-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical prototype amorphous silicon-based flat panel imager for full-breast digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a thin thallium doped CsI scintillator on an amorphous silicon matrix of detector elements with a pixel pitch of 100 microm. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta were employed for this evaluation. The presampling MTF was found to be 0.73, 0.42, and 0.28 at 2, 4, and 5 cycles/mm, respectively. The measured DQE of the current prototype utilizing a 28 kVp, Mo-Mo spectrum beam hardened with 4.5 cm Lucite is approximately 55% at close to zero spatial frequency at an exposure of 32.8 mR, and decreases to approximately 40% at a low exposure of 1.3 mR. Detector element nonuniformity and electronic gain variations were not significant after appropriate calibration and software corrections. The response of the imager was linear and did not exhibit signal saturation under tested exposure conditions.

  2. Core-shell amorphous silicon-carbon nanoparticles for high performance anodes in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourice, Julien; Bordes, Arnaud; Boulineau, Adrien; Alper, John P.; Franger, Sylvain; Quinsac, Axelle; Habert, Aurélie; Leconte, Yann; De Vito, Eric; Porcher, Willy; Reynaud, Cécile; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Haon, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    Core-shell silicon-carbon nanoparticles are attractive candidates as active material to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries while mitigating the detrimental effects of volume expansion upon lithiation. However crystalline silicon suffers from amorphization upon the first charge/discharge cycle and improved stability is expected in starting with amorphous silicon. Here we report the synthesis, in a single-step process, of amorphous silicon nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell (a-Si@C), via a two-stage laser pyrolysis where decomposition of silane and ethylene are conducted in two successive reaction zones. Control of experimental conditions mitigates silicon core crystallization as well as formation of silicon carbide. Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy show a carbon shell about 1 nm in thickness, which prevents detrimental oxidation of the a-Si cores. Cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that the core-shell composite reaches its maximal lithiation during the first sweep, thanks to its amorphous core. After 500 charge/discharge cycles, it retains a capacity of 1250 mAh.g-1 at a C/5 rate and 800 mAh.g-1 at 2C, with an outstanding coulombic efficiency of 99.95%. Moreover, post-mortem observations show an electrode volume expansion of less than 20% and preservation of the nanostructuration.

  3. Effect of light trapping in an amorphous silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iftiquar, S.M., E-mail: iftiquar@skku.edu [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Juyeon; Park, Hyeongsik [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaehyun; Shin, Chonghoon [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinjoo [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Junhee [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Bong, Sungjae [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunbo [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin, E-mail: yi@yurim.skku.ac.kr [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    Light trapping in amorphous silicon based solar cell has been investigated theoretically. The substrate for these cells can be textured, including pyramidally textured c-Si wafer, to improve capture of incident light. A thin silver layer, deposited on the substrate of an n–i–p cell, ultimately goes at the back of the cell structure and can act a back reflector to improve light trapping. The two physical solar cells we investigated had open circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) of 0.87, 0.90 V, short circuit current densities (J{sub sc}) of 14.2, 15.36 mA/cm{sup 2} respectively. The first cell was investigated for the effect on its performance while having and not having light trapping scheme (LT), when thickness of the active layer (d{sub i}) was changed in the range of 100 nm to 800 nm. In both the approaches, for having or not having LT, the short circuit current density increases with d{sub i} while the V{sub oc} and fill factor, decreases steadily. However, maximum cell efficiency can be obtained when d{sub i} = 400 nm, and hence it was considered optimized thickness of the active layer, that was used for further investigation. With the introduction of light trapping to the second cell, it shows a further enhancement in J{sub sc} and red response of the external quantum efficiency to 16.6 mA/cm{sup 2} and by 11.1% respectively. Considering multiple passages of light inside the cell, we obtained an improvement in cell efficiency from 9.7% to 10.6%. - Highlights: • A theoretical analysis of light trapping in p–i–n and n–i–p type solar cells • J{sub sc} increases and V{sub oc} decreases with the increase in i-layer thickness. • Observed optimized thickness of i-layer as 400 nm • J{sub sc} improved from 15.4 mA/cm{sup 2} to 16.6 mA/cm{sup 2} due to the light trapping. • Efficiency (η) improved from 9.7% to 10.6% due to better red response of the EQE.

  4. 3D silicon pixel detectors for the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, J.

    2016-01-01

    3D silicon pixel detectors have been investigated as radiation-hard candidates for the innermost layers of the HL-LHC upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector. 3D detectors are already in use today in the ATLAS IBL and AFP experiments. These are based on 50x250 um2 large pixels connected to the FE-I4 readout chip. Detectors of this generation were irradiated to HL-LHC fluences and demonstrated excellent radiation hardness with operational voltages as low as 180 V and power dissipation of 12--15 mW/cm2 at a fluence of about 1e16 neq/cm2, measured at -25 degree C. Moreover, to cope with the higher occupancies expected at the HL-LHC, a first run of a new generation of 3D detectors designed for the HL-LHC was produced at CNM with small pixel sizes of 50x50 and 25x100 um2, matched to the FE-I4 chip. They demonstrated a good performance in the laboratory and in beam tests with hit efficiencies of about 97% at already 1--2V before irradiation.

  5. Simulations of a silicon pixel based on MOS Deep Trapping Gate Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Fourches, Nicolas T

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the deep trapping gate device was introduced fairly recently on the basis of technological and transport simulations currently used in the field of classical electron devices. The concept of a buried gate containing localized deep level centers for holes (Deep Trapping Gate or DTG) renders possible the operation of this field effect pixel detector. One alternative to Deep Level introduction is the use of a quantum box, which is a hole quantum-well and an electron barrier. In all of these cases the buried gate modulates the drain-source current. This principle was formerly evaluated with realistic simulations parameters and this shows that a measurable signal is obtained for an energy deposition of a minimum-ionizing particle within a limited silicon thickness. In this work a quantitative study of the response of such a pixel to Minimum Ionizing Particles. The influence of some parameters such as the thickness of the pixel and its lateral dimensions, on the operation of the pixel is studied here...

  6. Thin pixel development for the SuperB silicon vertex tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, G., E-mail: giuliana.rizzo@pi.infn.it [INFN-Pisa and Universita di Pisa (Italy); Avanzini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Ceccanti, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Crescioli, F.; Dell' Orso, M.; Forti, F.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A. [INFN-Pisa and Universita di Pisa (Italy); Lusiani, A. [Scuola Normale Superiore and INFN-Pisa (Italy); Gregucci, S.; Mammini, P.; Marchiori, G.; Massa, M.; Morsani, F.; Neri, N. [INFN-Pisa and Universita di Pisa (Italy); and others

    2011-09-11

    The high luminosity SuperB asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, to be built near the INFN National Frascati Laboratory in Italy, has been designed to deliver a luminosity greater than 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with moderate beam currents and a reduced center of mass boost with respect to earlier B-Factories. An improved vertex resolution is required for precise time-dependent measurements and the SuperB Silicon Vertex Tracker will be equipped with an innermost layer of small radius (about 1.5 cm), resolution of 10-15{mu}m in both coordinates, low material budget (<1% X0), and able to withstand a background rate of several tens of MHz/cm{sup 2}. The ambitious goal of designing a thin pixel device with these stringent requirements is being pursued with specific R and D programs on different technologies: hybrid pixels, CMOS MAPS and pixel sensors developed with vertical integration technology. The latest results on the various pixel options for the SuperB SVT will be presented.

  7. 3D silicon pixel detectors for the High-Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J.; Carulla Areste, M.; Cavallaro, E.; Förster, F.; Grinstein, S.; López Paz, I.; Manna, M.; Pellegrini, G.; Quirion, D.; Terzo, S.; Vázquez Furelos, D.

    2016-11-01

    3D silicon pixel detectors have been investigated as radiation-hard candidates for the innermost layers of the HL-LHC upgrade of the ATLAS pixel detector. 3D detectors are already in use today in the ATLAS IBL and AFP experiments. These are based on 50 × 250 μm2 large pixels connected to the FE-I4 readout chip. Detectors of this generation were irradiated to HL-LHC fluences and demonstrated excellent radiation hardness with operational voltages as low as 180 V and power dissipation of 12-15 mW/cm2 at a fluence of about 1016 neq/cm2, measured at -25°C. Moreover, to cope with the higher occupancies expected at the HL-LHC, a first run of a new generation of 3D detectors designed for the HL-LHC was produced at CNM with small pixel sizes of 50 × 50 and 25 × 100 μm2, matched to the FE-I4 chip. They demonstrated a good performance in the laboratory and in beam tests with hit efficiencies of about 97% at already 1-2 V before irradiation.

  8. Study of the Tracking Method and Expected Performance of the Silicon Pixel Inner Tracker Applied in BESIII

    CERN Document Server

    Xiu, Qinglei; Li, Weidong; Liu, Huaimin; Ma, Qiumei; Ouyang, Qun; Qin, Zhonghua; Wang, Liangliang; Wu, Linghui; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yao

    2015-01-01

    The inner drift chamber of the BESIII is encountering serious aging problem after five year's running. For the first layer, the decrease in gas gain is about 26% from 2009 to 2013. The upgrade of the inner tracking detector has become an urgent problem for the BESIII experiment. An inner tracker using CMOS pixel sensors is an important candidate because of its great advantages on spatial resolution and radiation hardness. In order to carry out a Monte Carlo study on the expected performance, a Geant4-based full simulation for the silicon pixel detector has been implemented. The tracking method combining the silicon pixel inner tracker and outer drift chamber has been studied and a preliminary reconstruction software was developed. The Monte Carlo study shows that the performances including momentum resolution, vertex resolution and the tracking efficiency are significantly improved due to the good spatial resolution and moderate material budget of the silicon pixel detector.

  9. Stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells with low hydrogen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortmann, C.M.; Hegedus, S.S. (Institute of Energy Conversion, Newark, DE (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Results and conclusions obtained during a research program of the investigation of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon based alloy materials and solar cells fabricated by photo-chemical vapor and glow discharge depositions are reported. Investigation of the effects of the hydrogen content in a-si:H i-layers in amorphous silicon solar cells show that cells with lowered hydrogen content i-layers are more stable. A classical thermodynamic formulation of the Staebler-Wronski effect has been developed for standard solar cell operating temperatures and illuminations. Methods have been developed to extract a lumped equivalent circuit from the current voltage characteristic of a single junction solar cell in order to predict its behavior in a multijunction device.

  10. Infrared Insight into the Network of Hydrogenated Amorphous and Polycrystalline Silicon thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Mullerova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available IR measurements were carried out on both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon samples deposited by PECVDon glass substrate. The transition from amorphous to polycrystalline phase was achieved by increasing dilution of silaneplasma at the deposition process. The samples were found to be mixed phase materials. Commonly, infrared spectra ofhydrogenated silicon thin films yield information about microstructure, hydrogen content and hydrogen bonding to silicon. Inthis paper, additional understanding was retrieved from infrared response. Applying standard optical laws, effective mediatheory and Clausius-Mossoti approach concerning the Si-Si and Si-H bonds under IR irradiation as individual oscillators,refractive indices in the long wavelength limit, crystalline, amorphous and voids volume fractions and the mass density of thefilms were determined. The mass density was found to decrease with increasing crystalline volume fraction, which can beattributed to the void-dominated mechanism of network formation.

  11. Radial junction amorphous silicon solar cells on PECVD-grown silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linwei; O'Donnell, Benedict; Foldyna, Martin; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2012-05-17

    Constructing radial junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells on top of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) represents a promising approach towards high performance and cost-effective thin film photovoltaics. We here develop an all-in situ strategy to grow SiNWs, via a vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism on top of ZnO-coated glass substrate, in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactor. Controlling the distribution of indium catalyst drops allows us to tailor the as-grown SiNW arrays into suitable size and density, which in turn results in both a sufficient light trapping effect and a suitable arrangement allowing for conformal coverage of SiNWs by subsequent a-Si:H layers. We then demonstrate the fabrication of radial junction solar cells and carry on a parametric study designed to shed light on the absorption and quantum efficiency response, as functions of the intrinsic a-Si:H layer thickness and the density of SiNWs. These results lay a solid foundation for future structural optimization and performance ramp-up of the radial junction thin film a-Si:H photovoltaics.

  12. Development of the Pixelated Photon Detector Using Silicon on Insulator Technology for TOF-PET

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, Akihiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Orita, Tadashi; Arai, Yasuo; Kurachi, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nio, Daisuke; Hamasaki, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    To measure light emission pattern in scintillator, higher sensitivity and faster response are required to photo detector. Such as single photon avalanche diode (SPAD), conventional pixelated photo detector is operated at Geiger avalanche multiplication. However higher gain of SPAD seems very attractive, photon detection efficiency per unit area is low. This weak point is mainly caused by Geiger avalanche mechanism. To overcome these difficulties, we designed Pixelated Linear Avalanche Integration Detector using Silicon on Insulator technology (SOI-Plaid). To avoid dark count noise and dead time comes from quench circuit, we are planning to use APD in linear multiplication mode. SOI technology enables laminating readout circuit and APD layer, and high-speed and low-noise signal reading regardless smaller gain of linear APD. This study shows design of linear APD by using SOI fabrication process. We designed test element group (TEG) of linear APD and inspected optimal structure of linear APD.

  13. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  14. New concept of a submillimetric pixellated Silicon detector for intracerebral application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit, M. [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire (LAL, Universite Paris Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 8608), Orsay (France); Maerk, J.; Weiss, P. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille (CPPM, Universite Aix-Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 6550), Marseille (France); Benoit, D. [Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie (IMNC, Universite Paris Sud et Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, IMNC, Centre Universitaire, batiment 440, 91406 Orsay Cedex, UMR 8165), Orsay (France); Clemens, J.C.; Fougeron, D. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille (CPPM, Universite Aix-Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 6550), Marseille (France); Janvier, B. [Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie (IMNC, Universite Paris Sud et Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, IMNC, Centre Universitaire, batiment 440, 91406 Orsay Cedex, UMR 8165), Orsay (France); Jevaud, M.; Karkar, S.; Menouni, M. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille (CPPM, Universite Aix-Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 6550), Marseille (France); Pain, F.; Pinot, L. [Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie (IMNC, Universite Paris Sud et Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, IMNC, Centre Universitaire, batiment 440, 91406 Orsay Cedex, UMR 8165), Orsay (France); Morel, C. [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille (CPPM, Universite Aix-Marseille, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 6550), Marseille (France); and others

    2011-12-11

    A new beta{sup +} radiosensitive microprobe implantable in rodent brain dedicated to in vivo and autonomous measurements of local time activity curves of beta radiotracers in a volume of brain tissue of a few mm{sup 3} has been developed recently. This project expands the concept of the previously designed beta microprobe, which has been validated extensively in neurobiological experiments performed on anesthetized animals. Due to its limitations considering recordings on awake and freely moving animals, we have proposed to develop a wireless setup that can be worn by an animal without constraining its movements. To that aim, we have chosen a highly beta sensitive Silicon-based detector to devise a compact pixellated probe. Miniaturized wireless electronics is used to read-out and transfer the measurement data. Initial Monte-Carlo simulations showed that high resistive Silicon pixels are appropriate for this purpose, with their dimensions to be adapted to our specific signals. More precisely, we demonstrated that 200 {mu}m thick pixels with an area of 200 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 500 {mu}m are optimized in terms of beta{sup +}sensitivity versus relative transparency to the gamma background. Based on this theoretical study, we now present the development of the novel sensor, including the system simulations with technology computer-assisted design (TCAD) to investigate specific configurations of guard rings and their potential to increase the electrical isolation and stabilization of the pixel, as well as the corresponding physical tests to validate the particular geometries of this new sensor.

  15. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorini, M., E-mail: Massimiliano.Fiorini@cern.ch [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Aglieri Rinella, G. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carassiti, V. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); Ceccucci, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cortina Gil, E. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Cotta Ramusino, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara (Italy); Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P. [INFN Sezione di Torino (Italy); Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Martin, E. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Mazza, G. [INFN Sezione di Torino (Italy); Morel, M.; Noy, M. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nuessle, G. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Perktold, L.; Petagna, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); and others

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼1GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X{sub 0}. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2×10{sup 14} 1 MeV n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (<0.15%X{sub 0}) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200μm thick silicon sensors.

  16. N-type crystalline silicon films free of amorphous silicon deposited on glass by HCl addition using hot wire chemical vapour deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Jean-Ho; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-09-01

    Since n-type crystalline silicon films have the electric property much better than those of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films, they can enhance the performance of advanced electronic devices such as solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). Since the formation of amorphous silicon is unavoidable in the low temperature deposition of microcrystalline silicon on a glass substrate at temperatures less than 550 degrees C in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition and hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), crystalline silicon films have not been deposited directly on a glass substrate but fabricated by the post treatment of amorphous silicon films. In this work, by adding the HCl gas, amorphous silicon-free n-type crystalline silicon films could be deposited directly on a glass substrate by HWCVD. The resistivity of the n-type crystalline silicon film for the flow rate ratio of [HCl]/[SiH4] = 7.5 and [PH3]/[SiH4] = 0.042 was 5.31 x 10(-4) ohms cm, which is comparable to the resistivity 1.23 x 10(-3) ohms cm of films prepared by thermal annealing of amorphous silicon films. The absence of amorphous silicon in the film could be confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  17. In situ observation of shear-driven amorphization in silicon crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang; Zhong, Li; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Chongmin; Zhu, Ting; Mao, Scott X.

    2016-09-19

    Amorphous materials have attracted great interest in the scientific and technological fields. An amorphous solid usually forms under the externally driven conditions of melt-quenching, irradiation and severe mechanical deformation. However, its dynamic formation process remains elusive. Here we report the in situ atomic-scale observation of dynamic amorphization processes during mechanical straining of nanoscale silicon crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We observe the shear-driven amorphization (SDA) occurring in a dominant shear band. The SDA involves a sequence of processes starting with the shear-induced diamond-cubic to diamond-hexagonal phase transition that is followed by dislocation nucleation and accumulation in the newly formed phase, leading to the formation of amorphous silicon. The SDA formation through diamond-hexagonal phase is rationalized by its structural conformity with the order in the paracrystalline amorphous silicon, which maybe widely applied to diamond-cubic materials. Besides, the activation of SDA is orientation-dependent through the competition between full dislocation nucleation and partial gliding.

  18. Amorphization of silicon induced by nanodroplet impact: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Fernan; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The hypervelocity impact of electrosprayed nanodroplets on crystalline silicon produces an amorphous layer with a thickness comparable to the droplet diameters. The phase transition is puzzling considering that amorphization has not been observed in macroscopic shock compression of silicon, the only apparent difference being the several orders of magnitude disparity between the sizes of the macroscopic and nanodroplet projectiles. This article investigates the physics of the amorphization by modeling the impact of a nanodrop on single-crystal silicon via molecular dynamics. The simulation shows that the amorphization results from the heating and subsequent melting of a thin layer of silicon surrounding the impact area, followed by an ultrafast quenching with cooling rates surpassing 1013 K/s. These conditions impede crystalline growth in the supercooled liquid phase, which finally undergoes a glass transition to render a disordered solid phase. The high temperature field near the impact interface is a localized effect. The significantly different temperatures and cooling rates near the surface and in the bulk explain why amorphization occurs in nanodroplet impact, while it is absent in macroscopic shock compression. Since these high temperatures and ultrafast quenching rates are likely to occur in other materials, nanodroplet impact may become a general amorphatization technique for treating the surfaces of most crystalline substrates.

  19. A silicon pixel readout ASIC with 100 ps time resolution for the NA62 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellacasa, G; Garbolino, S; Marchetto, F; Martoiu, S; Mazza, G; Rivetti, A; Wheadon, R, E-mail: mazza@to.infn.it [INFN sez. di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    The silicon tracker of the NA62 experiment requires the measurement of the particles arrival time with a resolution better than 200 ps rms and a spatial resolution of 300 {mu}m. A time measurement technique based on a Time to Amplitude Converter has been implemented in an ASIC in order to prove the possibility to integrate a TDC with resolution better than 200 ps in a pixel cell. Time-walk problem has been addressed with the use of the Constant Fraction Discriminator technique. The ASIC has been designed in a CMOS 0.13 {mu}m technology with single event upset protection of the digital logic.

  20. Light Entrapping, Modeling & Effect of Passivation on Amorphous Silicon Based PV Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Md Mostafizur Rahman; Md. Moidul Islam; Mission Kumar Debnath; Saifullah, S.M.; Samera Hossein; Nusrat Jahan Bristy

    2016-01-01

    This research paper present efforts to enhance the performance of amorphous silicon p-i-n type solar cell using sidewall passivation. For sidewall passivation, MEMS insulation material Al2O3 was used. The main objective of this paper is to observe the effect of sidewall passivation in amorphous silicon solar cell and increase the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Passivation of Al2O3 is found effective to subdue reverse leakage. It increases the electric potential generated in the desi...

  1. Origin of the ESR signal with g=2.0055 in amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Defect-state wave functions for threefold- and fivefold-coordinated Si atoms in amorphous silicon clusters have been calculated with use of a first-principles linear combination of the atomic orbitals method in order to clarify the origin of the ESR signal with g=2.0055 in amorphous silicon. The wave function of the defect state originating from the threefold-coordinated Si atom is strongly localized on this atom. On the other hand, that for the fivefold-coordinated Si atom is extended on thi...

  2. Elastic behavior of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite: An atomistic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvankar; Dutta, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mechanical properties, nanocomposites with homogeneous chemical composition throughout the matrix and the dispersed phase are of particular interest. In this study, the elastic moduli of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite have been estimated using atomistic simulations. A comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the elastic behavior is significantly influenced by the crystal-amorphous interphase. On observing the effect of volume-fraction of the crystalline phase, an anomalous trend for the bulk modulus is obtained. This phenomenon is attributed to the relaxation displacements of the amorphous atoms.

  3. Anode properties of silicon-rich amorphous silicon suboxide films in all-solid-state lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Reona; Ohta, Narumi; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports the effects of introducing oxygen into amorphous silicon films on their anode properties in all-solid-state lithium batteries. Although poor cycling performance is a critical issue in silicon anodes, it has been effectively improved by introducing even a small amount of oxygen, that is, even in Si-rich amorphous silicon suboxide (a-SiOx) films. Because of the small amount of oxygen in the films, high cycling performance has been achieved without lowering the capacity and power density: an a-Si film delivers discharge capacity of 2500 mAh g-1 under high discharge current density of 10 mA cm-2 (35 C). These results demonstrate that a-SiOx is a promising candidate for high-capacity anode materials in solid-state batteries.

  4. Proton irradiation effects of amorphous silicon solar cell for solar power satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yousuke; Oshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sasaki, Susumu; Kuroda, Hideo; Ushirokawa, Akio

    1997-03-01

    Flexible amorphous silicon(fa-Si) solar cell module, a thin film type, is regarded as a realistic power generator for solar power satellite. The radiation resistance of fa-Si cells was investigated by the irradiations of 3,4 and 10 MeV protons. The hydrogen gas treatment of the irradiated fa-Si cells was also studied. The fa-Si cell shows high radiation resistance for proton irradiations, compared with a crystalline silicon solar cell. (author)

  5. Physics and technology of amorphous-crystalline heterostructure silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sark, Wilfried G.J.H.M. van [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Copernicus Institute, Science Technology and Society; Roca, Francesco [Unita Tecnologie Portici, Napoli (Italy). ENEA - Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l' Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile; Korte, Lars [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (Germany). Inst. Silizium-Photovoltaik

    2012-07-01

    The challenge of developing photovoltaic (PV) technology to a cost-competitive alternative for established energy sources can be achieved using simple, high-throughput mass-production compatible processes. Issues to be addressed for large scale PV deployment in large power plants or in building integrated applications are enhancing the performance of solar energy systems by increasing solar cell efficiency, using low amounts of materials which are durable, stable, and abundant on earth, and reducing manufacturing and installation cost. Today's solar cell multi-GW market is dominated by crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer technology, however new cell concepts are entering the market. One very promising solar cell design to answer these needs is the silicon hetero-junction solar cell, of which the emitter and back surface field are basically produced by a low temperature growth of ultra-thin layers of amorphous silicon. In this design, amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) constitutes both ''emitter'' and ''base-contact/back surface field'' on both sides of a thin crystalline silicon wafer-base (c-Si) where the photogenerated electrons and holes are generated; at the same time, a Si:H passivates the c-Si surface. Recently, cell efficiencies above 23% have been demonstrated for such solar cells. In this book, the editors present an overview of the state-of-the-art in physics and technology of amorphous-crystalline heterostructure silicon solar cells. (orig.)

  6. 3D silicon pixel detectors for the ATLAS Forward Physics experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00397348; Cavallaro, E.; Grinstein, S.; López Paz, I.

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) project plans to install 3D silicon pixel detectors about 210 m away from the interaction point and very close to the beamline (2-3 mm). This implies the need of slim edges of about 100-200 $\\mu$m width for the sensor side facing the beam to minimise the dead area. Another challenge is an expected non-uniform irradiation of the pixel sensors. It is studied if these requirements can be met using slightly-modified FE-I4 3D pixel sensors from the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer production. AFP-compatible slim edges are obtained with a simple diamond-saw cut. Electrical characterisations and beam tests are carried out and no detrimental impact on the leakage current and hit efficiency is observed. For devices without a 3D guard ring a remaining insensitive edge of less than 15 $\\mu$m width is found. Moreover, 3D detectors are non-uniformly irradiated up to fluences of several 10$^{15}$ n$_{eq}$/cm$^2$ with either a focussed 23 GeV proton beam or a 23 MeV proton beam through holes in Al ma...

  7. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  8. Amorphization of silicon by bombardment with oxygen ions of energy below 5 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukovskii, P.V.; Stel' makh, V.F.; Tkachev, V.D.

    1977-04-01

    Silicon was bombarded with /sup 16/O/sup +/ ions of 1.0 and 3.0 keV energies at room temperature. This bombardment created point defects which joined up to form amorphous layers about 100 A thick. (AIP)

  9. Thermal ideality factor of hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kind, R.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.; Rubinelli, F.A.; Solntsev, S.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n solar cells is limited, as they contain a relatively high concentration of defects. The dark current voltage (JV) characteristics at low forward voltages of these devices are dominated by recombination processes. The recombination rate

  10. Light Entrapping, Modeling & Effect of Passivation on Amorphous Silicon Based PV Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mostafizur Rahman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research paper present efforts to enhance the performance of amorphous silicon p-i-n type solar cell using sidewall passivation. For sidewall passivation, MEMS insulation material Al2O3 was used. The main objective of this paper is to observe the effect of sidewall passivation in amorphous silicon solar cell and increase the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Passivation of Al2O3 is found effective to subdue reverse leakage. It increases the electric potential generated in the designed solar cell. It also increases the current density generated in the solar cell by suppressing the leakage. Enhancement in J-V curve was observed after adding sidewall passivation. The short circuit current density (Jsc increased from 14.7 mA/cm2 to 18.5 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc improved from 0.87 V to 0.89 V, and the fill factor also slightly increased. Due to the sidewall of passivation of Al2O3, conversion efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cell increased by 29.07%. At the end, this research was a success to improve the efficiency of the amorphous silicon solar cell by adding sidewall passivation.

  11. Amorphous Silicon Position Detectors for the Link Alignment System of the CMS Detector: Users Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.

    2007-07-01

    We present the general characteristics, calibration procedures and measured performance of the Amorphous Silicon Position Detectors installed in the Link Alignment System of the CMS Detector for laser beam detection and reconstruction and give the Data Base to be used as a Handbook during CMS operation. (Author) 10 refs.

  12. Photoselective Metal Deposition on Amorphous Silicon p-i-n Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, E.S.; Hamoumi, M.; Kelly, J.J.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    1997-01-01

    A novel method is described for the patternwise metallization of amorphous silicon solar cells, based on photocathodic deposition. The electric field of the p-i-n structure is used for the separation of photogenerated charge carriers. The electrons are driven to the interface of the n+-layer with th

  13. Results from multipoint alignment monitoring using the new generation of amorphous silicon position detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-University of Cantabria Santander (Spain)] (and others)

    2008-08-11

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of large sensitive area (28x28 mm{sup 2}) semitransparent amorphous silicon position detector sensors. More than 100 units have been characterized. They show a very high performance. To illustrate a multipoint application, we present results from the monitoring of five sensors placed in a 5.5-m-long light path.

  14. Multipoint alignment monitoring with amorphous silicon position detectors in a complex light path

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A., E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2010-12-01

    This document presents an application of the new generation of amorphous silicon position detecting (ASPD) sensors to multipoint alignment. Twelve units are monitored along a 20 m long laser beam, where the light path is deflected by 90{sup o} using a pentaprism.

  15. Construction process and read-out electronics of amorphous silicon position detectors for multipoint alignment monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, C.; Schubert, M.B.; Lutz, B.; Werner, J.H. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M.G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria IFCA/CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)] (and others)

    2009-09-01

    We describe the construction process of large-area high-performance transparent amorphous silicon position detecting sensors. Details about the characteristics of the associated local electronic board (LEB), specially designed for these sensors, are given. In addition we report on the performance of a multipoint alignment monitoring application of 12 sensors in a 13 m long light path.

  16. Method of forming semiconducting amorphous silicon films from the thermal decomposition of fluorohydridodisilanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of forming amorphous, photoconductive, and semiconductive silicon films on a substrate by the vapor phase thermal decomposition of a fluorohydridodisilane or a mixture of fluorohydridodisilanes. The invention is useful for the protection of surfaces including electronic devices.

  17. A comparison of degradation in three amorphous silicon PV module technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radue, C.; van Dyk, E.E. [Physics Department, PO Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2010-03-15

    Three commercial amorphous silicon modules manufactured by monolithic integration and consisting of three technology types were analysed in this study. These modules were deployed outdoors for 14 months and underwent degradation. All three modules experienced the typical light-induced degradation (LID) described by the Staebler-Wronski effect, and this was followed by further degradation. A 14 W single junction amorphous silicon module degraded by about 45% of the initial measured maximum power output (P{sub MAX}) at the end of the study. A maximum of 30% of this has been attributed to LID and the further 15% to cell mismatch and cell degradation. The other two modules, a 64 W triple junction amorphous silicon module, and a 68 W flexible triple junction amorphous silicon module, exhibited LID followed by seasonal variation in the degraded P{sub MAX}. The 64 W module showed a maximum degradation in P{sub MAX} of about 22%. This is approximately 4% more than the manufacturer allowed for the initial LID. However, the seasonal variation in P{sub MAX} seems to be centred around the manufacturer's rating ({+-}4%). The 68 W flexible module has shown a maximum decrease in P{sub MAX} of about 27%. This decrease is about 17% greater than the manufacturer allowed for the initial LID. (author)

  18. Amorphous silicon solar cells on natively textured ZnO grown by PECVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.; Groenen, R.; Linden, J.L.; Sanden, M.C.M. van de; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Natively textured ZnO layers deposited by the expanding thermal plasma CVD technique between 150 and 350°C at a deposition rate between 0.65 and 0.75 nm/s have been investigated with respect to their suitability as front electrode material for amorphous silicon pin solar cells in comparison to refer

  19. Modelling the structure factors and pair distribution functions of amorphous germanium, silicon and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgic, Seyfettin; Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Baer, Shalom; Silbert, Moises

    2002-12-01

    We present the results of calculations of the static structure factor S(k) and the pair distribution function g(r) of the tetrahedral amorphous semiconductors germanium, silicon and carbon using the structural diffusion model (SDM). The results obtained with the SDM for S(k) and g(r) are of comparable quality with those obtained by the unconstrained Reverse Monte Carlo simulations and existing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for these systems. We have found that g(r) exhibits a small peak, or shoulder, a weak remnant of the prominent third neighbour peak present in the crystalline phase of these systems. This feature has been experimentally found to be present in recently reported high energy X-ray experiments of amorphous silicon (Phys. Rev. B 60 (1999) 13520), as well as in the previous X-ray diffraction of as-evaporated amorphous germanium (Phys. Rev. B 50 (1994) 539)

  20. Characterization of Ni/SnPb-TiW/Pt Flip Chip Interconnections in Silicon Pixel Detector Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Härkönen, Jaakko; Luukka, Panja-riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Tuominen, Eija; Haeggstrom, Edward; Kalliopuska, Juha; Vahanen, Sami; Kassamakov, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary high energy physics experiments, silicon detectors are essential for recording the trajectory of new particles generated by multiple simultaneous collisions. Modern particle tracking systems may feature 100 million channels, or pixels, which need to be individually connected to read-out chains. Silicon pixel detectors are typically connected to readout chips by flip-chip bonding using solder bumps. High-quality electro-mechanical flip-chip interconnects minimizes the number of dead read-out channels in the particle tracking system. Furthermore, the detector modules must endure handling during installation and withstand heat generation and cooling during operation. Silicon pixel detector modules were constructed by flip-chip bonding 16 readout chips to a single sensor. Eutectic SnPb solder bumps were deposited on the readout chips and the sensor chips were coated with TiW/Pt thin film UBM (under bump metallization). The modules were assembled at Advacam Ltd, Finland. We studied the uniformity o...

  1. CW laser induced crystallization of thin amorphous silicon films deposited by EBE and PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Said-Bacar, Z., E-mail: zabardjade@yahoo.fr [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Prathap, P. [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Cayron, C. [CEA, LITEN, DEHT, Minatec, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Cedex 9 (France); Mermet, F. [IREPA LASER, Pole API - Parc d' Innovation, 67400 Illkirch (France); Leroy, Y.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Fogarassy, E. [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of hydrogen in CW laser crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large hydrogen content results in decohesion of the films due to hydrogen effusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very low hydrogen content or hydrogen free amorphous silicon film are suitable for crystallization induced by CW laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grains of size between 20 and 100 {mu}m in width and about 200 {mu}m in long in scanning direction are obtained with these latter films. - Abstract: This work presents the Continuous Wave (CW) laser crystallization of thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and by Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE) on low cost glass substrate. The films are characterized by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate the hydrogen content. Analysis shows that the PECVD films contain a high hydrogen concentration ({approx}10 at.%) while the EBE films are almost hydrogen-free. It is found that the hydrogen is in a bonding configuration with the a-Si network and in a free form, requiring a long thermal annealing for exodiffusion before the laser treatment to avoid explosive effusion. The CW laser crystallization process of the amorphous silicon films was operated in liquid phase regime. We show by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) that polysilicon films with large grains can be obtained with EBE as well as for the PECVD amorphous silicon provided that for the latest the hydrogen content is lower than 2 at.%.

  2. Crystalline-Amorphous Core−Shell Silicon Nanowires for High Capacity and High Current Battery Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng

    2009-01-14

    Silicon is an attractive alloy-type anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its highest known capacity (4200 mAh/g). However silicon\\'s large volume change upon lithium insertion and extraction, which causes pulverization and capacity fading, has limited its applications. Designing nanoscale hierarchical structures is a novel approach to address the issues associated with the large volume changes. In this letter, we introduce a core-shell design of silicon nanowires for highpower and long-life lithium battery electrodes. Silicon crystalline- amorphous core-shell nanowires were grown directly on stainless steel current collectors by a simple one-step synthesis. Amorphous Si shells instead of crystalline Si cores can be selected to be electrochemically active due to the difference of their lithiation potentials. Therefore, crystalline Si cores function as a stable mechanical support and an efficient electrical conducting pathway while amorphous shells store Li ions. We demonstrate here that these core-shell nanowires have high charge storage capacity (̃1000 mAh/g, 3 times of carbon) with ̃90% capacity retention over 100 cycles. They also show excellent electrochemical performance at high rate charging and discharging (6.8 A/g, ̃20 times of carbon at 1 h rate). © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  3. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Mathieu [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Holman, Zachary [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  4. Characterisation of edgeless technologies for pixellated and strip silicon detectors with a micro-focused X-ray beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Christophersen, M.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Fadeyev, V.; Gimenez, E.; Kachkanov, V.; Kalliopuska, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Maneuski, D.; Phlips, B. F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Stewart, G.; Tartoni, N.; Zain, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    Reduced edge or ``edgeless'' detector design offers seamless tileability of sensors for a wide range of applications from particle physics to synchrotron and free election laser (FEL) facilities and medical imaging. Combined with through-silicon-via (TSV) technology, this would allow reduced material trackers for particle physics and an increase in the active area for synchrotron and FEL pixel detector systems. In order to quantify the performance of different edgeless fabrication methods, 2 edgeless detectors were characterized at the Diamond Light Source using an 11 μm FWHM 15 keV micro-focused X-ray beam. The devices under test were: a 150 μm thick silicon active edge pixel sensor fabricated at VTT and bump-bonded to a Medipix2 ROIC; and a 300 μm thick silicon strip sensor fabricated at CIS with edge reduction performed by SCIPP and the NRL and wire bonded to an ALiBaVa readout system. Sub-pixel resolution of the 55 μm active edge pixels was achieved. Further scans showed no drop in charge collection recorded between the centre and edge pixels, with a maximum deviation of 5% in charge collection between scanned edge pixels. Scans across the cleaved and standard guard ring edges of the strip detector also show no reduction in charge collection. These results indicate techniques such as the scribe, cleave and passivate (SCP) and active edge processes offer real potential for reduced edge, tiled sensors for imaging detection applications.

  5. AMORPHOUS SILICON ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE MODELING AND BASIC ELECTRO-PHYSICAL PARAMETERS CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Golodenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The amorphous semiconductor has any unique processing characteristics and it is perspective material for electronic engineering. However, we have not authentic information about they atomic structure and it is essential knot for execution calculation they electronic states and electro physical properties. The author's methods give to us decision such problem. This method allowed to calculation the amorphous silicon modeling cluster atomics Cartesian coordinates, determined spectrum and density its electronic states and calculation the basics electro physical properties of the modeling cluster. At that determined numerical means of the energy gap, energy Fermi, electron concentration inside valence and conduction band for modeling cluster. The find results provides real ability for purposeful control to type and amorphous semiconductor charge carriers concentration and else provides relation between atomic construction and other amorphous substance physical properties, for example, heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility and other thermodynamic sizes.

  6. Design of a radiation hard silicon pixel sensor for X-ray science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwandt, Joern

    2014-06-15

    At DESY Hamburg the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (EuXFEL) is presently under construction. The EuXFEL has unique properties with respect to X-ray energy, instantaneous intensity, pulse length, coherence and number of pulses/sec. These properties of the EuXFEL pose very demanding requirements for imaging detectors. One of the detector systems which is currently under development to meet these challenges is the Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector, AGIPD. It is a hybrid pixel-detector system with 1024 x 1024 p{sup +} pixels of dimensions 200 μm x 200 μm, made of 16 p{sup +}nn{sup +}- silicon sensors, each with 10.52 cm x 2.56 cm sensitive area and 500 μm thickness. The particular requirements for the AGIPD are a separation between noise and single photons down to energies of 5 keV, more than 10{sup 4} photons per pixel for a pulse duration of less than 100 fs, negligible pile-up at the EuXFEL repetition rate of 4.5 MHz, operation for X-ray doses up to 1 GGy, good efficiency for X-rays with energies between 5 and 20 keV, and minimal inactive regions at the edges. The main challenge in the sensor design is the required radiation tolerance and high operational voltage, which is required to reduce the so-called plasma effect. This requires a specially optimized sensor. The X-ray radiation damage results in a build-up of oxide charges and interface traps which lead to a reduction of the breakdown voltage, increased leakage current, increased interpixel capacitances and charge losses. Extensive TCAD simulations have been performed to understand the impact of X-ray radiation damage on the detector performance and optimize the sensor design. To take radiation damage into account in the simulation, radiation damage parameters have been determined on MOS capacitors and gate-controlled diodes as function of dose. The optimized sensor design was fabricated by SINTEF. Irradiation tests on test structures and sensors show that the sensor design is radiation hard and

  7. Sub-amorphous thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline silicon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Matthew C; Kwon, Soonshin; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2015-04-08

    Thermal transport behavior in nanostructures has become increasingly important for understanding and designing next generation electronic and energy devices. This has fueled vibrant research targeting both the causes and ability to induce extraordinary reductions of thermal conductivity in crystalline materials, which has predominantly been achieved by understanding that the phonon mean free path (MFP) is limited by the characteristic size of crystalline nanostructures, known as the boundary scattering or Casimir limit. Herein, by using a highly sensitive measurement system, we show that crystalline Si (c-Si) nanotubes (NTs) with shell thickness as thin as ∼5 nm exhibit a low thermal conductivity of ∼1.1 W m(-1) K(-1). Importantly, this value is lower than the apparent boundary scattering limit and is even about 30% lower than the measured value for amorphous Si (a-Si) NTs with similar geometries. This finding diverges from the prevailing general notion that amorphous materials represent the lower limit of thermal transport but can be explained by the strong elastic softening effect observed in the c-Si NTs, measured as a 6-fold reduction in Young's modulus compared to bulk Si and nearly half that of the a-Si NTs. These results illustrate the potent prospect of employing the elastic softening effect to engineer lower than amorphous, or subamorphous, thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline nanostructures.

  8. A Comparison of Photo-Induced Hysteresis Between Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous IGZO Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Cho, Won-Ju; Chung, Hong-Bay; Koo, Sang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    We investigate photo-induced instability in thin-film transistors (TFTs) consisting of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) as active semiconducting layers by comparing with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). An a-IGZO TFT exhibits a large hysteresis window in the illuminated measuring condition but no hysteresis window in the dark condition. On the contrary, a large hysteresis window measured in the dark condition in a-Si:H was not observed in the illuminated condition. Even though such materials possess the structure of amorphous phase, optical responses or photo instability in TFTs looks different from each other. Photo-induced hysteresis results from initially trapped charges at the interface between semiconductor and dielectric films or in the gate dielectric which possess absorption energy to interact with deep trap-states and affect the movement of Fermi energy level. In order to support our claim, we also perform CV characteristics in photo-induced hysteresis and demonstrate thermal-activated hysteresis. We believe that this work can provide important information to understand different material systems for optical engineering which includes charge transport and band transition.

  9. Reactive Infiltration of Silicon Melt Through Microporous Amorphous Carbon Preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsuwan, P.; Tewari, S. N.; Gatica, J. E.; Singh, M.; Dickerson, R.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of unidirectional capillary infiltration of silicon melt into microporous carbon preforms have been investigated as a function of the pore morphology and melt temperature. The infiltrated specimens showed alternating bands of dark and bright regions, which corresponded to the unreacted free carbon and free silicon regions, respectively. The decrease in the infiltration front velocity for increasing infiltration distances, is in qualitative agreement with the closed-form solution of capillarity driven fluid flow through constant cross section cylindrical pores. However, drastic changes in the thermal response and infiltration front morphologies were observed for minute differences in the preforms microstructure. This suggests the need for a dynamic percolation model that would account for the exothermic nature of the silicon-carbon chemical reaction and the associated pore closing phenomenon.

  10. Study of Charge Diffusion in a Silicon Detector Using an Energy Sensitive Pixel Readout Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Schioppa, E. J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Visser, J.; Koffeman, E.; Heijne, E.; Engel, K. J.; Uher, J.

    2015-01-01

    A 300 μm thick thin p-on-n silicon sensor was connected to an energy sensitive pixel readout ASIC and exposed to a beam of highly energetic charged particles. By exploiting the spectral information and the fine segmentation of the detector, we were able to measure the evolution of the transverse profile of the charge carriers cloud in the sensor as a function of the drift distance from the point of generation. The result does not rely on model assumptions or electric field calculations. The data are also used to validate numerical simulations and to predict the detector spectral response to an X-ray fluorescence spectrum for applications in X-ray imaging.

  11. Silicon MOS Pixel Based on the Deep Trapping Gate Principle: Design and Material Science Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Fourches, Nicolas T

    2014-01-01

    The concept of the deep trapping gate device was introduced fairly recently on the basis of technological and transport simulations currently used in the field of classical electron devices. The concept of a buried gate containing localized deep level centers (Deep Trapping Gate or DTG) renders possible the operation of this field effect pixel detector. The deep centers can be deep defects or localized states in a quantum dot. This gate modulates the drain-source current. This principle was formerly evaluated with realistic simulations parameters and this shows that a measurable signal is obtained for an energy deposition of a minimum ionizing particle within a limited silicon thickness. We will study here the potential techniques usable for the fabrication of the device with their drawbacks, advantages and limits. The first technique introduced is impurity implantation, followed by annealing. The problems related to the control of the defects in the DTG will be examined in the light of recent work on ion imp...

  12. Characterisation of micro-strip and pixel silicon detectors before and after hadron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allport, P. P.; Ball, K.; Casse, G.; Chmill, V.; Forshaw, D.; Hadfield, K.; Pritchard, A.; Pool, P.; Tsurin, I.

    2012-01-01

    The use of segmented silicon detectors for tracking and vertexing in particle physics has grown substantially since their introduction in 1980. It is now anticipated that roughly 50,000 six inch wafers of high resistivity silicon will need to be processed into sensors to be deployed in the upgraded experiments in the future high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) at CERN. These detectors will also face an extremely severe radiation environment, varying with distance from the interaction point. The volume of required sensors is large and their delivery is required during a relatively short time, demanding a high throughput from the chosen suppliers. The current situation internationally, in this highly specialist market, means that security of supply for large orders can therefore be an issue and bringing additional potential vendors into the field can only be an advantage. Semiconductor companies that could include planar sensors suitable for particle physics in their product lines will, however, need to prove their products meet all the stringent technical requirements. A semiconductor company with very widespread experience of producing science grade CCDs (including deep depletion devices) has adapted their CCD process to fabricate for the first time several wafers of pixel and micro-strip radiation hard sensors, suitable for future high energy physics experiments. The results of the pre-irradiation characterization of devices fabricated with different processing parameters and the measurements of charge collection properties after different hadron irradiation doses up to those anticipated for the (larger area) outer pixel layers at the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) are presented and compared with results from more established particle physics suppliers.

  13. Unusually High and Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Silicon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soonshin; Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C; Cui, Shuang; Chen, Renkun

    2017-02-02

    Amorphous Si (a-Si) nanostructures are ubiquitous in numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices. Amorphous materials are considered to possess the lower limit to the thermal conductivity (κ), which is ∼1 W·m(-1) K(-1) for a-Si. However, recent work suggested that κ of micrometer-thick a-Si films can be greater than 3 W·m(-1) K(-1), which is contributed to by propagating vibrational modes, referred to as "propagons". However, precise determination of κ in a-Si has been elusive. Here, we used structures of a-Si nanotubes and suspended a-Si films that enabled precise in-plane thermal conductivity (κ∥) measurement within a wide thickness range of 5 nm to 1.7 μm. We showed unexpectedly high κ∥ in a-Si nanostructures, reaching ∼3.0 and 5.3 W·m(-1) K(-1) at ∼100 nm and 1.7 μm, respectively. Furthermore, the measured κ∥ is significantly higher than the cross-plane κ on the same films. This unusually high and anisotropic thermal conductivity in the amorphous Si nanostructure manifests the surprisingly broad propagon mean free path distribution, which is found to range from 10 nm to 10 μm, in the disordered and atomically isotropic structure. This result provides an unambiguous answer to the century-old problem regarding mean free path distribution of propagons and also sheds light on the design and performance of numerous a-Si based electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  14. Investigating the Inverse Square Law with the Timepix Hybrid Silicon Pixel Detector: A CERN [at] School Demonstration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyntie, T.; Parker, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detector has been used to investigate the inverse square law of radiation from a point source as a demonstration of the CERN [at] school detector kit capabilities. The experiment described uses a Timepix detector to detect the gamma rays emitted by an [superscript 241]Am radioactive source at a number of different…

  15. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Da; Kunz, Thomas [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wolf, Nadine [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Energy Efficiency, Am Galgenberg 87, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Liebig, Jan Philipp [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wittmann, Stephan; Ahmad, Taimoor; Hessmann, Maik T.; Auer, Richard [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Göken, Mathias [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-29

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm{sup 2} aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance.

  16. Classical two-dimensional numerical algorithm for ?-Induced charge carrier advection-diffusion in Medipix-3 silicon pixel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biamonte, Mason; Idarraga, John

    2013-04-01

    A classical hybrid alternating-direction implicit difference scheme is used to simulate two-dimensional charge carrier advection-diffusion induced by alpha particles incident upon silicon pixel detectors at room temperature in vacuum. A mapping between the results of the simulation and a projection of the cluster size for each incident alpha is constructed. The error between the simulation and the experimental data diminishes with the increase in the applied voltage for the pixels in the central region of the cluster. Simulated peripheral pixel TOT values do not match the data for any value of applied voltage, suggesting possible modifications to the current algorithm from first principles. Coulomb repulsion between charge carriers is built into the algorithm using the Barnes-Hut tree algorithm. The plasma effect arising from the initial presence of holes in the silicon is incorporated into the simulation. The error between the simulation and the data helps identify physics not accounted for in standard literature simulation techniques.

  17. Characterization of thin irradiated epitaxial silicon sensors for the CMS phase II pixel upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Centis Vignali, Matteo; Eichhorn, Thomas; Garutti, Erika; Junkes, Alexandra; Steinbrueck, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The high-luminosity upgrade fo the large hadron collider foreseen for 2023 resulted in the decision to replace the tracker system of the CMS experiment. The innermost layer of the new pixel detector will experience fluences in the order of $\\phi_{eq} \\approx 10^{16}$~cm$^{-2}$ and a dose of $\\approx 5$~MGy after an integrated luminosity of 3000~fb$^{-1}$. Several materials and designs are under investigation in order to build a detector that can withstand such high fluences. Thin planar silicon sensors are good canditates to achieve this goal since the degradation of the signal produced by traversing particles is less severe than for thicker devices. A study has been carried out in order to characterize highly irradiated planar epitaxial silicon sensors with an active thickness of 100~$\\mu$m. The investigation includes pad diodes and strip detectors irradiated up to a fluence of $\\phi_{eq} = 1.3 \\times 10^{16}$~cm$^{-2}$. The electrical properties of diodes have bee...

  18. In situ probing of surface hydrides on hydrogenated amorphous silicon using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kessels, W M M; Sanden, M C M; Aydil, E S

    2002-01-01

    An in situ method based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is presented for detecting surface silicon hydrides on plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and for determining their surface concentrations. Surface silicon hydrides are desorbed by exposing the a-Si:H films to low energy ions from a low density Ar plasma and by comparing the infrared spectrum before and after this low energy ion bombardment, the absorptions by surface hydrides can sensitively be separated from absorptions by bulk hydrides incorporated into the film. An experimental comparison with other methods that utilize isotope exchange of the surface hydrogen with deuterium showed good agreement and the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are discussed. Furthermore, the determination of the composition of the surface hydrogen bondings on the basis of the literature data on hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces is presented, and quantification of the h...

  19. Innovative Characterization of Amorphous and Thin-Film Silicon for Improved Module Performance: 1 February 2005 - 31 July 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P. C.; Williams, G. A.

    2009-09-01

    Electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance was done on amorphous silicon samples (modules with a-Si:H and a-SixGe1-x:H intrinsic layer) to study defects that contribute to Staebler-Wronski effect.

  20. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation of amorphous silicon to increase the temperature processing window of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianwei; Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2016-07-01

    The dehydrogenation of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) at temperatures above approximately 300 °C degrades its ability to passivate silicon wafer surfaces. This limits the temperature of post-passivation processing steps during the fabrication of advanced silicon heterojunction or silicon-based tandem solar cells. We demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma can rehydrogenate intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layers that have been dehydrogenated by annealing. The hydrogen plasma treatment fully restores the effective carrier lifetime to several milliseconds in textured crystalline silicon wafers coated with 8-nm-thick intrinsic a-Si:H layers after annealing at temperatures of up to 450 °C. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation also translates to complete solar cells: A silicon heterojunction solar cell subjected to annealing at 450 °C (following intrinsic a-Si:H deposition) had an open-circuit voltage of less than 600 mV, but an identical cell that received hydrogen plasma treatment reached a voltage of over 710 mV and an efficiency of over 19%.

  1. Picosecond all-optical switching in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microring resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Pelc, Jason S; Vo, Sonny; Santori, Charles; Fattal, David A; Beausoleil, Raymond G

    2014-01-01

    We utilize cross-phase modulation to observe all-optical switching in microring resonators fabricated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Using 2.7-ps pulses from a mode-locked fiber laser in the telecom C-band, we observe optical switching of a cw telecom-band probe with full-width at half-maximum switching times of 14.8 ps, using approximately 720 fJ of energy deposited in the microring. In comparison with telecom-band optical switching in crystalline silicon microrings, a-Si:H exhibits substantially higher switching speeds due to reduced impact of free-carrier processes.

  2. A fast method to diagnose phase transition from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU; GuoFu

    2007-01-01

    A series of hydrogenated silicon thin films were prepared by the radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method (RF-PECVD) with various silane concentrations. The influence of silane concentration on structural and electrical characteristics of these films was investigated to study the phase transition region from amorphous to microcrystalline phase. At the same time, optical emission spectra (OES) from the plasma during the deposition process were monitored to get information about the plasma properties, Raman spectra were measured to study the structural characteristics of the deposited films. The combinatorial analysis of OES and Raman spectra results demonstrated that the OES can be used as a fast method to diagnose phase transition from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon. At last the physical mechanism, why both OES and Raman can be used to diagnose the phase transition, was analyzed theoretically.……

  3. Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films with Embedded Nanocrystals for Thermal Detectors with Very High Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Calleja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have optimized the deposition conditions of amorphous silicon-germanium films with embedded nanocrystals in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD reactor, working at a standard frequency of 13.56 MHz. The objective was to produce films with very large Temperature Coefficient of Resistance (TCR, which is a signature of the sensitivity in thermal detectors (microbolometers. Morphological, electrical, and optical characterization were performed in the films, and we found optimal conditions for obtaining films with very high values of thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR = 7.9% K−1. Our results show that amorphous silicon-germanium films with embedded nanocrystals can be used as thermosensitive films in high performance infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs used in commercial thermal cameras.

  4. Modeling the Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Thin Films Using a High Repetition Rate Scanning Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Černý

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimum design of experimental setup for the preparation of polycrystalline silicon (pc-Si films from amorphous layers applicable in the solar cell production is analyzed in the paper. In the computational simulations, the influence of basic characteristic parameters of the experimental procedure on the mechanisms of pc-Si lateral growth is studied. Among these parameters, the energy density of the applied laser and the thickness of the amorphous silicon (a-Si layer are identified as the most significant. As an optimum solution, the mechanism of pc-Si growth consisting in repeated melting of a part of already crystallized pc-Si layer by the scanning laser is proposed.

  5. Highly efficient ultrathin-film amorphous silicon solar cells on top of imprinted periodic nanodot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wensheng, E-mail: yws118@gmail.com; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@swin.edu.au [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Tao, Zhikuo [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ong, Thiam Min Brian [Plasma Sources and Application Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    The addressing of the light absorption and conversion efficiency is critical to the ultrathin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. We systematically investigate ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with a 100 nm absorber on top of imprinted hexagonal nanodot arrays. Experimental evidences are demonstrated for not only notable silver nanodot arrays but also lower-cost ITO and Al:ZnO nanodot arrays. The measured external quantum efficiency is explained by the simulation results. The J{sub sc} values are 12.1, 13.0, and 14.3 mA/cm{sup 2} and efficiencies are 6.6%, 7.5%, and 8.3% for ITO, Al:ZnO, and silver nanodot arrays, respectively. Simulated optical absorption distribution shows high light trapping within amorphous silicon layer.

  6. An alternative system for mycotoxin detection based on amorphous silicon sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, D.; de Cesare, G.; De Rossi, P.; Fanelli, C.; Nascetti, A.; Ricelli, A.; Scipinotti, R.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we investigate, for the first time, the performances of a system based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon photosensors for the detection of Ochratoxin A. The sensor is a n-type/intrinsic/p-type amorphous silicon stacked structure deposited on a glass substrate. The mycotoxin is deposited on a thin layer chromatographic plate and aligned with the sensor. An ultraviolet radiation excites the ochratoxin A, whose fluorescence produces a photocurrent in the sensor. The photocurrent value is proportional to the deposited mycotoxin quantity. An excellent linearity of the detector response over more than two orders of magnitude of ochratoxin A amount is observed. The minimum detected mycotoxin quantity is equal to 0.1ng, suggesting that the presented detection system could be a good candidate to perform rapid and analytical ochratoxin A analysis in different kind of samples.

  7. Low Cost Amorphous Silicon Intrinsic Layer for Thin-Film Tandem Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-In Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors propose a methodology to improve both the deposition rate and SiH4 consumption during the deposition of the amorphous silicon intrinsic layer of the a-Si/μc-Si tandem solar cells prepared on Gen 5 glass substrate. It was found that the most important issue is to find out the saturation point of deposition rate which guarantees saturated utilization of the sourcing gas. It was also found that amorphous silicon intrinsic layers with the same k value will result in the same degradation of the fabricated modules. Furthermore, it was found that we could significantly reduce the production cost of the a-Si/μc-Si tandem solar cells prepared on Gen 5 glass substrate by fine-tuning the process parameters.

  8. Development of laser-fired contacts for amorphous silicon layers obtained by Hot-Wire CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D. [XaRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)], E-mail: delfina@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C.; Blanque, S. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Ibarz, D.; Bertomeu, J. [XaRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Alcubilla, R. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    In this work we study aluminium laser-fired contacts for intrinsic amorphous silicon layers deposited by Hot-Wire CVD. This structure could be used as an alternative low temperature back contact for rear passivated heterojunction solar cells. An infrared Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) has been used to locally fire the aluminium through the thin amorphous silicon layers. Under optimized laser firing parameters, very low specific contact resistances ({rho}{sub c} {approx} 10 m{omega} cm{sup 2}) have been obtained on 2.8 {omega} cm p-type c-Si wafers. This investigation focuses on maintaining the passivation quality of the interface without an excessive increase in the series resistance of the device.

  9. Spectral response of a silicon detector with 220 {mu}m pixel size bonded to MEDIPIX2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froejdh, Erik, E-mail: erik.frojdh@miun.se [Department of Information Technology and Media, Mid-Sweden University, SE-85170 Sundsvall (Sweden); Froejdh, Anna; Norlin, Boerje; Froejdh, Christer [Department of Information Technology and Media, Mid-Sweden University, SE-85170 Sundsvall (Sweden)

    2011-05-15

    Pixellated radiation detectors with single photon processing can be used for spectral X-ray imaging. A problem using such detectors with small pixels is that the spectral information is distorted by charge sharing. In order to get images with good spectral resolution a number of silicon sensors with a pixel size of 220 {mu}m were fabricated and bonded to a MEDIPIX2 readout chip using only a limited number of pixels on the readout chip. The device was then used in an X-ray microscopy setup to obtain good spatial resolution as well. It is shown that spectral imaging can provide good contrast images of embedded structures by selecting an appropriate energy window.

  10. The role of hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide buffer layer on improving the performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium single-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharathikhun, Jaran; Inthisang, Sorapong; Krajangsang, Taweewat; Krudtad, Patipan; Jaroensathainchok, Suttinan; Hongsingtong, Aswin; Limmanee, Amornrat; Sriprapha, Kobsak

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-Si1-xOx:H) film was used as a buffer layer at the p-layer (μc-Si1-xOx:H)/i-layer (a-Si1-xGex:H) interface for a narrow band gap hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium (a-Si1-xGex:H) single-junction solar cell. The a-Si1-xOx:H film was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 40 MHz in a same processing chamber as depositing the p-type layer. An optimization of the thickness of the a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layer and the CO2/SiH4 ratio was performed in the fabrication of the a-Si1-xGex:H single junction solar cells. By using the wide band gap a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layer with optimum thickness and CO2/SiH4 ratio, the solar cells showed an improvement in the open-circuit voltage (Voc), fill factor (FF), and short circuit current density (Jsc), compared with the solar cells fabricated using the conventional a-Si:H buffer layer. The experimental results indicated the excellent potential of the wide-gap a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layers for narrow band gap a-Si1-xGex:H single junction solar cells.

  11. Electronic transport in mixed-phase hydrogenated amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienkes, Lee Raymond

    Interest in mixed-phase silicon thin film materials, composed of an amorphous semiconductor matrix in which nanocrystalline inclusions are embedded, stems in part from potential technological applications, including photovoltaic and thin film transistor technologies. Conventional mixed-phase silicon films are produced in a single plasma reactor, where the conditions of the plasma must be precisely tuned, limiting the ability to adjust the film and nanoparticle parameters independently. The films presented in this thesis are deposited using a novel dual-plasma co-deposition approach in which the nanoparticles are produced separately in an upstream reactor and then injected into a secondary reactor where an amorphous silicon film is being grown. The degree of crystallinity and grain sizes of the films are evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction respectively. I describe detailed electronic measurements which reveal three distinct conduction mechanisms in n-type doped mixed-phase amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films over a range of nanocrystallite concentrations and temperatures, covering the transition from fully amorphous to ~30% nanocrystalline. As the temperature is varied from 470 to 10 K, we observe activated conduction, multiphonon hopping (MPH) and Mott variable range hopping (VRH) as the nanocrystal content is increased. The transition from MPH to Mott-VRH hopping around 100K is ascribed to the freeze out of the phonon modes. A conduction model involving the parallel contributions of these three distinct conduction mechanisms is shown to describe both the conductivity and the reduced activation energy data to a high accuracy. Additional support is provided by measurements of thermal equilibration effects and noise spectroscopy, both done above room temperature (>300 K). This thesis provides a clear link between measurement and theory in these complex materials.

  12. Results on photon and neutron irradiation of semitransparent amorphous-silicon sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Carabe, J; Ferrando, A; Fuentes, J; Gandia, J J; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Molinero, A; Oller, J C; Arce, P; Calvo, E; Figueroa, C F; García, N; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Vila, I; Virto, A L; Fenyvesi, A; Molnár, J; Sohler, D

    2000-01-01

    Semitransparent amorphous-silicon sensors are basic elements for laser 2D position reconstruction in the CMS multipoint alignment link system. Some of the sensors have to work in a very hard radiation environment. Two different sensor types have been irradiated with /sup 60/Co photons (up to 100 kGy) and fast neutrons (up to 10/sup 15 / cm/sup -2/), and the subsequent change in their performance has been measured. (13 refs).

  13. First Measurements of the Performance of New Semitransparent Amorphous Silicon Sensor Prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Calvo, E.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.

    2004-07-01

    We present first results on the performance of a new generation of semitransparent amorphous silicon position detectors having good properties such as an intrinsic position resolution better than 5{mu}m, an spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 {mu}m, deflection angles smaller than 10{mu}rad and transmission in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition the sensitive area is very large: 30x30 cm''3. (Author) 10 refs.

  14. Tandem solar cells made from amorphous silicon and polymer bulk heterojunction sub-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Heum; Shin, Insoo; Kim, Kwang Ho; Street, Robert; Roy, Anshuman; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-14

    A tandem solar cell based on a combination of an amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polymer solar cell (PSC) is demonstrated. As these tandem devices can be readily fabricated by low-cost methods, they require only a minor increase in the total manufacturing cost. Therefore, a combination of a-Si and PSC provides a compelling solution to reduce the cost of electricity produced by photovoltaics.

  15. Magneto-optical switch with amorphous silicon waveguides on magneto-optical garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Eiichi; Miura, Kengo; Shoji, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2016-08-01

    We fabricated a magneto-optical (MO) switch with a hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguide on an MO garnet. The switch is composed of a 2 × 2 Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). The switch state is controlled by an MO phase shift through a magnetic field generated by a current flowing in an electrode located on the MZI. The switching operation was successfully demonstrated with an extinction ratio of 11.7 dB at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  16. Improved stability of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon photosensitivity by ultraviolet illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branz, Howard M.; Xu, Yueqin; Heck, Stephan; Gao, Wei

    2002-10-01

    Postdeposition ultraviolet (UV) illumination, followed by etching, improves the stability of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon thin films against subsequent light-induced degradation of photosensitivity. The etch removes a heavily damaged layer extending about 100 nm below the surface, but beneath the damage, the UV has improved the stability of 200 to 300 nm of bulk film. The open-circuit voltage of Schottky solar cells is also stabilized by UV-etch treatment. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  17. 2H-SiC Dendritic Nanocrystals In Situ Formation from Amorphous Silicon Carbide under Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Under electron beam irradiation, the in-situ formation of 2H-SiC dentritic nanocrystals from amorphous silicon carbide at room temperature was observed. The homogenous transition mainly occurs at the thin edge and on the surface of specimen where the energy obtained from electron beam irradiation is high enough to cause the amorphous crystallizing into 2H-SiC.

  18. The structure and physical properties of paracrystalline atomistic models of amorphous silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, P. M.; Zotov, N.; Nakhmanson, S. M.; Drabold, D. A.; Gibson, J. M.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Keblinski, P.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. Bayreuth; Ohio Univ.; NEC Research Inst.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

    2001-11-01

    We have examined the structure and physical properties of paracrystalline molecular dynamics models of amorphous silicon. Simulations from these models show qualitative agreement with the results of recent mesoscale fluctuation electron microscopy experiments on amorphous silicon and germanium. Such agreement is not found in simulations from continuous random network models. The paracrystalline models consist of topologically crystalline grains which are strongly strained and a disordered matrix between them. We present extensive structural and topological characterization of the medium range order present in the paracrystalline models and examine their physical properties, such as the vibrational density of states, Raman spectra, and electron density of states. We show by direct simulation that the ratio of the transverse acoustic mode to transverse optical mode intensities I{sub TA}/I{sub TO} in the vibrational density of states and the Raman spectrum can provide a measure of medium range order. In general, we conclude that the current paracrystalline models are a good qualitative representation of the paracrystalline structures observed in the experiment and thus provide guidelines toward understanding structure and properties of medium-range-ordered structures of amorphous semiconductors as well as other amorphous materials.

  19. Deposition and characterization of amorphous silicon with embedded nanocrystals and microcrystalline silicon for thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, R., E-mail: rambrosi@uacj.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, UACJ, C.J., Chihuahua (Mexico); Moreno, M.; Torres, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Carrillo, A. [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, UACJ, C.J., Chihuahua (Mexico); Vivaldo, I.; Cosme, I. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Heredia, A. [Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nanostructured silicon thin films were deposited by PECVD. • Polymorphous and microcrystalline were obtained varying the pressure and power. • Structural and optoelectronics properties were studied. • The σ{sub dark} changed by 5 order of magnitude under illumination, V{sub d} was at 2.5 A/s. • The evidence of embedded nanocrystals into the amorphous matrix was investigated. - Abstract: Amorphous silicon thin films with embedded nanocrystals and microcrystalline silicon were deposited by the standard Radio Frequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) technique, from SiH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, Ar gas mixture at substrate temperature of 200 °C. Two series of films were produced varying deposition parameters as chamber pressure and RF power density. The chemical bonding in the films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, where it was observed a correlation between the hydrogen content and the morphological and electrical properties in the films. Electrical and optical parameters were extracted in both series of films, as room temperature conductivity (σ{sub RT}), activation energy (E{sub a}), and optical band gap (E{sub g}). As well, structural analysis in the films was performed by Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), which gives an indication of the films crystallinity. The photoconductivity changed in a range of 2 and 6 orders of magnitude from dark to AM 1.5 illumination conditions, which is of interest for thin film solar cells applications.

  20. Raman study of localized recrystallization of amorphous silicon induced by laser beam

    KAUST Repository

    Tabet, Nouar A.

    2012-06-01

    The adoption of amorphous silicon based solar cells has been drastically hindered by the low efficiency of these devices, which is mainly due to a low hole mobility. It has been shown that using both crystallized and amorphous silicon layers in solar cells leads to an enhancement of the device performance. In this study the crystallization of a-Si prepared by PECVD under various growth conditions has been investigated. The growth stresses in the films are determined by measuring the curvature change of the silicon substrate before and after film deposition. Localized crystallization is induced by exposing a-Si films to focused 532 nm laser beam of power ranging from 0.08 to 8 mW. The crystallization process is monitored by recording the Raman spectra after various exposures. The results suggest that growth stresses in the films affect the minimum laser power (threshold power). In addition, a detailed analysis of the width and position of the Raman signal indicates that the silicon grains in the crystallized regions are of few nm diameter. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. Bandgap and Carrier Transport Engineering of Quantum Confined Mixed Phase Nanocrystalline/Amorphous Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Tianyuan; Klafehn, Grant; Kendrick, Chito; Theingi, San; Airuoyo, Idemudia; Lusk, Mark T.; Stradins, Paul; Taylor, Craig; Collins, Reuben T.

    2016-11-21

    Mixed phase nanocrystalline/amorphous-silicon (nc/a-Si:H) thin films with band-gap higher than bulk silicon are prepared by depositing silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs), prepared in a separate deposition zone, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), simultaneously. Since the two deposition phases are well decoupled, optimized parameters for each component can apply to the growth process. Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) shows that the embedded SiNPs are small enough to exhibit quantum confinement effects. The low temperature PL measurements on the mixed phase reveal a dominant emission feature, which is associated with SiNPs surrounded by a-Si:H. In addition, we compare time dependent low temperature PL measurements for both a-Si:H and mixed phase material under intensive laser exposure for various times up to two hours. The PL intensity of a-Si:H with embedded SiNPs degrades much less than that of pure a-Si:H. We propose this improvement of photostability occurs because carriers generated in the a-Si:H matrix quickly transfer into SiNPs and recombine there instead of recombining in a-Si:H and creating defect states (Staebler-Wronski Effect).

  2. Effect of Ion Bombardment on the Growth and Properties of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Jérôme; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Naoto; Matsuura, Hideharu; Matsuda, Akihisa

    1989-01-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the effect of ion bombardment during the growth of amorphous silicon-germanium alloy films from silane and germane rf-glow discharge. Independent control of the plasma and the ion flux and energy is obtained by using a triode configuration. The ion contribution to the total deposition rate can reach 20% on negatively biased substrates. Although the Si and Ge composition of the film does not depend on the ion flux and energy, the optical, structural and electronic properties are drastically modified at low deposition temperatures when the maximum ion energy increases up to 50 eV, and remain constant above 50 eV. For a Ge atomic concentration of 37% and a temperature of 135°C, the optical gap decreases from 1.67 to 1.45 eV. This is correlated with a modification of hydrogen bonding configurations. Silicon dihydride sites disappear and preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon is reduced in favour of germanium. Moreover the photoconductivity increases which shows that ion bombardment is a key parameter to optimize the quality of low band gap amorphous silicon-germanium alloys.

  3. Accelerated growth from amorphous clusters to metallic nanoparticles observed in electrochemical deposition of platinum within nanopores of porous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Noval, Alvaro; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Akira; Gallach, Dario; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Portale, Giuseppe; Kitada, Atsushi; Murase, Kuniaki; Abe, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the formation of amorphous platinum (Pt) clusters in nanopores of porous silicon at an initial stage of pore filling. The time dependency of the chemical state and local structure of Pt in the nanoporous silicon were characterized by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (

  4. Characterization of silicon 3D pixel detectors for the ATLAS Forward Physics experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Paz, I.; Cavallaro, E.; Lange, J. [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies - IFAE, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Grinstein, S. [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies - IFAE, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies - ICREA, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    The ATLAS Forward Physics (AFP) project aims to measure protons scattered under a small angle from the pp collisions in ATLAS. In order to perform such measurements, a new silicon tracker, together with a time-of-flight detector for pile-up removal, are planned to be installed at ∼210 m from the interaction point and at 2-3 mm from the LHC proton beam. To cope with such configuration and maximize the physics outcome, the tracker has to fulfil three main requirements: endure highly non-uniform radiation doses, due to the very inhomogeneous beam profile, have slim and efficient edges to improve the acceptance of the tracker, and provide good position resolution. Recent laboratory and beam test characterization results of AFP prototypes will be presented. Slim-edged 3D pixel detectors down to 100-200 μm were studied and later non-uniformly irradiated (with a peak fluence of several 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}) to determine the fulfilment of the AFP requirements. (authors)

  5. A Measurement of Lorentz Angle and Spatial Resolution of Radiation Hard Silicon Pixel Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, I; Hoeferkamp, M; Seidel, S C; Ciocio, A; Einsweiler, Kevin F; Gilchriese, M G D; Joshi, A; Kleinfelder, S A; Marchesini, R; Milgrome, O; Palaio, N; Pengg, F X; Richardson, J; Zizka, G; Ackers, M; Fischer, P; Keil, M; Meuser, S; Stockmanns, T; Treis, J; Wermes, N; Gössling, C; Hügging, F G; Wüstenfeld, J; Wunstorf, R; Barberis, D; Beccherle, R; Cervetto, M; Darbo, G; Gagliardi, G; Gemme, C; Morettini, P; Netchaeva, P; Osculati, B; Parodi, F; Rossi, L; Dao, K; Fasching, D; Blanquart, L; Breugnon, P; Calvet, D; Clemens, J C; Delpierre, P A; Hallewell, G D; Laugier, D; Mouthuy, T; Rozanov, A N; Trouilleau, C; Valin, I; Aleppo, M; Andreazza, A; Caccia, M; Lari, T; Meroni, C; Ragusa, F; Troncon, C; Vegni, G; Rohe, T; Boyd, G; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Snow, J; Sícho, P; Tomasek, L; Vrba, V; Holder, M; Lipka, D; Ziolkowski, M; Cauz, D; D'Auria, S; del Papa, C; Grassman, H; Santi, L; Becks, K H; Gerlach, P; Grah, C; Gregor, I; Harenberg, T; Linder, C

    2002-01-01

    Silicon pixel sensors developed by the ATLAS collaboration to meet LHC requirements and to withstand hadronic irradiation to fluences of up to $10^{15} n_eq/cm^{2}$ have been evaluated using a test beam facility at CERN providing a magnetic field. The Lorentz angle was measured and found to alter from 9.0 deg. before irradiation, when the detectors operated at 150 V bias at B=1.48 T, to 3.1 deg after irradiation and operating at 600 V bias at 1.01 T. In addition to the effect due to magnetic field variation, this change is explained by the variation of the electric field inside the detectors arising from the different bias conditions. The depletion depths of irradiated sensors at various bias voltages were also measured. At 600 V bias 280 micron thick sensors depleted to ~200 micron after irradiation at the design fluence of 1 10^{15} 1 MeV n_eq/cm2 and were almost fully depleted at a fluence of 0.5 * 10^{15} 1 MeV n_eq/cm2. The spatial resolution was measured for angles of incidence between 0 deg and 30 deg....

  6. Laser Soldering and Thermal Cycling Tests of Monolithic Silicon Pixel Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Strand, Frode Sneve

    2015-01-01

    An ALPIDE-1 monolithic silicon pixel sensor prototype has been laser soldered to a flex printed circuit using a novel interconnection technique using lasers. This technique is to be optimised to ensure stable, good quality connections between the sensor chips and the FPCs. To test the long-term stability of the connections, as well as study the effects on hit thresholds and noise in the sensor, it was thermally cycled in a climate chamber 1200 times. The soldered connections showed good qualities like even melting and good adhesion on pad/flex surfaces, and the chip remained in working condition for 1080 cycles. After this, a few connections failed, having cracks in the soldering tin, rendering the chip unusable. Threshold and noise characteristics seemed stable, except for the noise levels of sector 2 in the chip, for 1000 cycles in a temperature interval of "10^{\\circ}" and "50^{\\circ}" C. Still, further testing with wider temperature ranges and more cycles is needed to test the limitations of the chi...

  7. Characterization and Performance of Silicon n-in-p Pixel Detectors for the ATLAS Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Weigell, Philipp; Gallrapp, Christian; La Rosa, Alessandro; Macchiolo, Anna; Nisius, Richard; Pernegger, Heinz; Richter, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    The existing ATLAS Tracker will be at its functional limit for particle fluences of 10^15 neq/cm^2 (LHC). Thus for the upgrades at smaller radii like in the case of the planned Insertable B-Layer (IBL) and for increased LHC luminosities (super LHC) the development of new structures and materials which can cope with the resulting particle fluences is needed. N-in-p silicon devices are a promising candidate for tracking detectors to achieve these goals, since they are radiation hard, cost efficient and are not type inverted after irradiation. A n-in-p pixel production based on a MPP/HLL design and performed by CiS (Erfurt, Germany) on 300 \\mu m thick Float-Zone material is characterised and the electrical properties of sensors and single chip modules (SCM) are presented, including noise, charge collection efficiencies, and measurements with MIPs as well as an 241Am source. The SCMs are built with sensors connected to the current the ATLAS read-out chip FE-I3. The characterisation has been performed with the ATL...

  8. Performance of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00052711; Boscardin, Maurizio; Bosisio, Luciano; Calderini, Giovanni; Chauveau, Jacques; Ducourthial, Audrey; Giacomini, Gabriele; Marchiori, Giovanni; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate to achieve a large area instrumented with pixel sensors, since it is radiation hard and cost effective. The paper reports on the performance of novel n-on-p edgeless planar pixel sensors produced by FBK-CMM, making use of the active trench for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. After discussing the sensor technology an overview of the first beam test results will be given.

  9. Development of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderini, G. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Paris (France); Dipartimento di Fisica E. Fermi, Universitá di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bagolini, A. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Povo di Trento (Italy); Beccherle, R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pisa (Italy); Bomben, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Paris (France); Boscardin, M. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Povo di Trento (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Università degli studi di Trieste (Italy); INFN-Trieste (Italy); Chauveau, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Paris (France); Giacomini, G. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Povo di Trento (Italy); La Rosa, A. [Section de Physique (DPNC), Universitè de Geneve, Geneve (Switzerland); Marchiori, G. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucléaire et des Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Paris (France); Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2016-09-21

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate to achieve a large area instrumented with pixel sensors, since it is radiation hard and cost effective. The presentation describes the performance of novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel sensors produced by FBK-CMM, making use of the active trench for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. After discussing the sensor technology, some feedback from preliminary results of the first beam test will be discussed.

  10. Development of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderini, G.; Bagolini, A.; Beccherle, R.; Bomben, M.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Chauveau, J.; Giacomini, G.; La Rosa, A.; Marchiori, G.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-09-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade phases towards the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment plans to upgrade the Inner Detector with an all-silicon system. The n-on-p silicon technology is a promising candidate to achieve a large area instrumented with pixel sensors, since it is radiation hard and cost effective. The presentation describes the performance of novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel sensors produced by FBK-CMM, making use of the active trench for the reduction of the dead area at the periphery of the device. After discussing the sensor technology, some feedback from preliminary results of the first beam test will be discussed.

  11. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  12. Low-mobility solar cells: a device physics primer with application to amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse University, New York (United States). Department of Physics

    2003-07-01

    The properties of pin solar cells based on photogeneration of charge carriers into low-mobility materials were calculated for two models. Ideal p- and n-type electrode layers were assumed in both cases. The first, elementary case involves only band mobilities and direct electron-hole recombination. An analytical approximation indicates that the power in thick cells rises as the 1/4 power of the lower band mobility, which reflects the buildup of space-charge under illumination. The approximation agrees well with computer simulation. The second model includes exponential bandtail trapping, which is commonly invoked to account for very low hole drift mobilities in amorphous silicon and other amorphous semiconductors. The two models have similar qualitative behavior. Predictions for the solar conversion efficiency of amorphous silicon-based cells that are limited by valence bandtail trapping are presented. The predictions account adequately for the efficiencies of present a-Si : H cells in their 'as-prepared' state (without light-soaking), and indicate the improvement that may be expected if hole drift mobilities (and valence bandtail widths) can be improved. (author)

  13. Silicon and aluminum doping effects on the microstructure and properties of polymeric amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: lxq_suse@sina.com [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Xie, Yuntao [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of nanostructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were firstly studied. • Si doping enhanced polymerization of the hydrocarbon chains and Al doping resulted in increase in the ordered carbon clusters of polymeric amorphous carbon films. • Soft polymeric amorphous carbon films exhibited an unconventional frictional behaviors with a superior wear resistance. • The mechanical and vacuum tribological properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were significantly improved by Si and Al co-doping. - Abstract: Polymeric amorphous carbon films were prepared by radio frequency (R.F. 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering deposition. The microstructure evolution of the deposited polymeric films induced by silicon (Si) and aluminum(Al) doping were scrutinized through infrared spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparative results show that Si doping can enhance polymerization and Al doping results in an increase in the ordered carbon clusters. Si and Al co-doping into polymeric films leads to the formation of an unusual dual nanostructure consisting of cross-linked polymer-like hydrocarbon chains and fullerene-like carbon clusters. The super-high elasticity and super-low friction coefficients (<0.002) under a high vacuum were obtained through Si and Al co-doping into the films. Unconventionally, the co-doped polymeric films exhibited a superior wear resistance even though they were very soft. The relationship between the microstructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films with different elements doping are also discussed in detail.

  14. Production and Characterisation of SLID Interconnected n-in-p Pixel Modules with 75 Micrometer Thin Silicon Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Andricek, L; Macchiolo, A.; Moser, H.-G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R.H.; Terzo, S.; Weigell, P.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of pixel modules built from 75 micrometer thin silicon sensors and ATLAS read-out chips employing the Solid Liquid InterDiffusion (SLID) interconnection technology is presented. This technology, developed by the Fraunhofer EMFT, is a possible alternative to the standard bump-bonding. It allows for stacking of different interconnected chip and sensor layers without destroying the already formed bonds. In combination with Inter-Chip-Vias (ICVs) this paves the way for vertical integration. Both technologies are combined in a pixel module concept which is the basis for the modules discussed in this paper. Mechanical and electrical parameters of pixel modules employing both SLID interconnections and sensors of 75 micrometer thickness are covered. The mechanical features discussed include the interconnection efficiency, alignment precision and mechanical strength. The electrical properties comprise the leakage currents, tunability, charge collection, cluster sizes and hit efficiencies. Targeting at ...

  15. Research and development of photovoltaic power system. Interface studies of amorphous silicon; Taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. Amorphous silicon kaimen no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagai, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the result obtained during fiscal 1994 on research on interface of amorphous silicon for solar cells. In research on amorphous solar cells using ZnO for transparent electrically conductive films, considerations were given on a growth mechanism of a ZnO film using the MOCVD process. It was made clear that the ZnO film grows with Zn(OH)2 working as a film forming species. It was also shown that the larger the ZnO particle size is, the more the solar cell efficiency is improved. Furthermore, theoretical elucidation was made on effects of rear face of an interface on cell characteristics, and experimental discussions were given subsequently. In research on solar cells using hydrogen diluted `i` layers, delta-doped solar cells were fabricated based on basic data obtained in the previous fiscal year, and the hydrogen dilution effect was evaluated from the cell characteristics. When the hydrogen dilution ratio is increased from zero to one, the conversion efficiency has improved from 12.2% to 12.6%. In addition, experiments and discussions were given on solar cells fabricated by using SiH2Cl2. 9 figs.

  16. Optimal scan strategy for mega-pixel and kilo-gray-level OLED-on-silicon microdisplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Ran, Feng; Ji, Weigui; Xu, Meihua; Chen, Zhangjing; Jiang, Yuxi; Shen, Weixin

    2012-06-10

    The digital pixel driving scheme makes the organic light-emitting diode (OLED) microdisplays more immune to the pixel luminance variations and simplifies the circuit architecture and design flow compared to the analog pixel driving scheme. Additionally, it is easily applied in full digital systems. However, the data bottleneck becomes a notable problem as the number of pixels and gray levels grow dramatically. This paper will discuss the digital driving ability to achieve kilogray-levels for megapixel displays. The optimal scan strategy is proposed for creating ultra high gray levels and increasing light efficiency and contrast ratio. Two correction schemes are discussed to improve the gray level linearity. A 1280×1024×3 OLED-on-silicon microdisplay, with 4096 gray levels, is designed based on the optimal scan strategy. The circuit driver is integrated in the silicon backplane chip in the 0.35 μm 3.3 V-6 V dual voltage one polysilicon layer, four metal layers (1P4M) complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process with custom top metal. The design aspects of the optimal scan controller are also discussed. The test results show the gray level linearity of the correction schemes for the optimal scan strategy is acceptable by the human eye.

  17. Absorption enhancement in amorphous silicon thin films via plasmonic resonances in nickel silicide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachtel, Jordan; Shen, Xiao; Pantelides, Sokrates; Sachan, Ritesh; Gonzalez, Carlos; Dyck, Ondrej; Fu, Shaofang; Kalnayaraman, Ramki; Rack, Phillip; Duscher, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Silicon is a near ideal material for photovoltaics due to its low cost, abundance, and well documented optical properties. The sole detriment of Si in photovoltaics is poor absorption in the infrared. Nanoparticle surface plasmon resonances are predicted to increase absorption by scattering to angles greater than the critical angle for total internal reflection (16° for a Si/air interface), trapping the light in the film. Experiments confirm that nickel silicide nanoparticles embedded in amorphous silicon increases absorption significantly in the infrared. However, it remains to be seen if electron-hole pair generation is increased in the solar cell, or whether the light is absorbed by the nanoparticles themselves. The nature of the absorption is explored by a study of the surface plasmon resonances through electron energy loss spectrometry and scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments, as well as first principles density functional theory calculations. Initial experimental results do not show strong plasmon resonances on the nanoparticle surfaces. Calculations of the optical properties of the nickel silicide particles in amorphous silicon are performed to understand why this resonance is suppressed. Work supported by NSF EPS 1004083 (TN-SCORE).

  18. Band offsets at the crystalline / hydrogenated amorphous silicon interface from first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrati, Ebrahim; Jarolimek, Karol; de Wijs, Gilles A.; InstituteMolecules; Materials Team

    2015-03-01

    The heterojunction formed between crystalline silicon (c-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key component of a new type of high-efficiency silicon solar cell. Since a-Si:H has a larger band gap than c-Si, band offsets are formed at the interface. A band offset at the minority carrier band will mitigate recombination and lead to an increased efficiency. Experimental values of band offsets scatter in a broad range. However, a recent meta-analysis of the results (W. van Sark et al.pp. 405, Springer 2012) gives a larger valence offset (0.40 eV) than the conduction offset (0.15 eV). In light of the conflicting reports our goal is to calculate the band offsets at the c-Si/a-Si:H interface from first-principles. We have prepared several atomistic models of the interface. The crystalline part is terminated with (111) surfaces on both sides. The amorphous structure is generated by simulating an annealing process at 1100 K, with DFT molecular dynamics. Once the atomistic is ready it can be used to calculate the electronic structure of the interface. Our preliminary results show that the valence offset is larger than the conduction band offset.

  19. Crystallization of amorphous silicon by self-propagation of nanoengineered thermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Maruf; Subramanian, Senthil; Bhattacharya, Shantanu; Gao, Yuanfang; Apperson, Steve; Shende, Rajesh; Guha, Suchi; Arif, Mohammad; Bai, Mengjun; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2007-03-01

    Crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film occurred by the self-propagation of copper oxide/aluminum thermite nanocomposites. Amorphous Si films were prepared on glass at a temperature of 250°C by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The platinum heater was patterned on the edge of the substrate and the CuO /Al nanoengineered thermite was spin coated on the substrate that connects the heater and the a-Si film. A voltage source was used to ignite the thermites followed by a piranha solution (4:1 of H2SO4:H2O2) etch for the removal of residual products of thermite reaction. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the crystallization of a-Si.

  20. Near-field optical study of 3rd order nonlinear properties of amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Jin; Park, J.H.; Kim, M.R.; Jhe, Won Ho [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, B.K. [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    The 3rd order nonlinear properties show optical bleaching (Saturation) and Reverse saturation in absorption aspect, whereas self-focusing and self-defocusing in refraction aspect. Optical bleaching and self-focusing phenomena of those properties in particular can be useful to make the optical beam spot size smaller for application on the higher optical storage density. In this experiment, amorphous silicon layer is used to investigate the effect of 3rd order nonlinear material(1) on the spot size. The amorphous silicon (A-Si) layer is deposited by the method of PECVD on the corning 1737 fusion glass and its thickness is 300 nm. Two experiments are carried out in this work. One is the far-field Z-Scan and the other is the near-field Z-scan where the laser beam spot is scanned by NSOM in the near field region of the material. The former is for investigating the general 3rd order nonlinear properties of amorphous silicon and the latter is for measuring the change of the beam spot size directly. The far-field Z-scan shows Reverse saturation (Im{chi}{sup (3)} {approx} 8 X 10{sup -3} esu) and self-focusing (Re{chi}{sup (3)} {approx} 2 X 10{sup -2} esu) properties for the A-Si layer. In the second experiment, we present the change the beam spot size as a function of the input beam intensity for the A-Si layer. As a result, we find that the stronger the input beam intensity is, the smaller a beam spot size is obtained for A-Si layer. (author)

  1. NOTE: First images of a digital autoradiography system based on a Medipix2 hybrid silicon pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettivier, Giovanni; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Russo, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    We present the first images of beta autoradiography obtained with the high-resolution hybrid pixel detector consisting of the Medipix2 single photon counting read-out chip bump-bonded to a 300 µm thick silicon pixel detector. This room temperature system has 256 × 256 square pixels of 55 µm pitch (total sensitive area of 14 × 14 mm2), with a double threshold discriminator and a 13-bit counter in each pixel. It is read out via a dedicated electronic interface and control software, also developed in the framework of the European Medipix2 Collaboration. Digital beta autoradiograms of 14C microscale standard strips (containing separate bands of increasing specific activity in the range 0.0038-32.9 kBq g-1) indicate system linearity down to a total background noise of 1.8 × 10-3 counts mm-2 s-1. The minimum detectable activity is estimated to be 0.012 Bq for 36 000 s exposure and 0.023 Bq for 10 800 s exposure. The measured minimum detection threshold is less than 1600 electrons (equivalent to about 6 keV Si). This real-time system for beta autoradiography offers lower pixel pitch and higher sensitive area than the previous Medipix1-based system. It has a 14C sensitivity better than that of micro channel plate based systems, which, however, shows higher spatial resolution and sensitive area.

  2. Integrated X-ray and charged particle active pixel CMOS sensor arrays using an epitaxial silicon sensitive region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bichsel, Hans; Bieser, Fred; Matis, Howard S.; Rai, Gulshan; Retiere, Fabrice; Weiman, Howard; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2002-07-01

    Integrated CMOS Active Pixel Sensor (APS) arrays have been fabricated and tested using X-ray and electron sources. The 128 by 128 pixel arrays, designed in a standard 0.25 micron process, use a {approx}10 micron epitaxial silicon layer as a deep detection region. The epitaxial layer has a much greater thickness than the surface features used by standard CMOS APS, leading to stronger signals and potentially better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). On the other hand, minority carriers confined within the epitaxial region may diffuse to neighboring pixels, blur images and reduce peak signal intensity. But for low-rate, sparse-event images, centroid analysis of this diffusion may be used to increase position resolution. Careful trade-offs involving pixel size and sense-node area verses capacitance must be made to optimize overall performance. The prototype sensor arrays, therefore, include a range of different pixel designs, including different APS circuits and a range of different epitaxial layer contact structures. The fabricated arrays were tested with 1.5 GeV electrons and Fe-55 X-ray sources, yielding a measured noise of 13 electrons RMS and an SNR for single Fe-55 X-rays of greater than 38.

  3. Fabrication and Modeling of Ambipolar Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    that over 150 die can be fabricated on a single 2in Si wafer. Individual die are 4 -- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - -- rM M- ri- PA NX RA "’K Kno ’--tx...Kusian, and B. Bullemer, "An Ambipolar Amorphous- Silicon Field-Effect Transistor," Siemens Forsch.-u. Entwickl.-Ber., vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 114-119...1985. 99. H. Pfleiderer, W. Kusian, and B. Bullemer, "An Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistor Model," Siemens Forsch.-u. Entwicki.-Ber., vol. 14, no. 2, pp

  4. Amorphous Silicon Solar cells with a Core-Shell Nanograting Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, L; Okuno, Y; He, S

    2011-01-01

    We systematically investigate the optical behaviors of an amorphous silicon solar cell based on a core-shell nanograting structure. The horizontally propagating Bloch waves and Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) waves lead to significant absorption enhancements and consequently short-circuit current enhancements of this structure, compared with the conventional planar one. The perpendicular carrier collection makes this structure optically thick and electronically thin. An optimal design is achieved through full-field numerical simulation, and physical explanation is given. Our numerical results show that this configuration has ultrabroadband, omnidirectional and polarization-insensitive responses, and has a great potential in photovoltaics.

  5. Thin metal layer as transparent electrode in n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theuring Martin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, transparent electrodes, based on a thin silver film and a capping layer, are investigated. Low deposition temperature, flexibility and low material costs are the advantages of this type of electrode. Their applicability in structured n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells is demonstrated in simulation and experiment. The influence of the individual layer thicknesses on the solar cell performance is discussed and approaches for further improvements are given. For the silver film/capping layer electrode, a higher solar cell efficiency could be achieved compared to a reference ZnO:Al front contact.

  6. Review of amorphous silicon based particle detectors: the quest for single particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrsch, N.; Ballif, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is attractive for radiation detectors because of its radiation resistance and processability over large areas with mature Si microfabrication techniques. While the use of a-Si:H for medical imaging has been very successful, the development of detectors for particle tracking and minimum-ionizing-particle detection has lagged, with almost no practical implementation. This paper reviews the development of various types of a-Si:H-based detectors and discusses their respective achievements and limitations. It also presents more recent developments of detectors that could potentially achieve single particle detection and be integrated in a monolithic fashion into a variety of applications.

  7. Stability of amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Aiga, M.; Otsubo, M.

    1987-06-25

    Results on reliability test for amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells and modules are described. It has been found that, for a-SiGe:H pin cells, reduction of the stress in the film is of first importance for stability. Application of low-temperature-deposited microcrystalline p-layer for each sub cell and of thinner i-layers for the middle and the bottom cells improves stability of triple-junction cells, by enhancing the electric field in the i-layers.

  8. Large-size high-performance transparent amorphous silicon sensors for laser beam position detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Martinez-Rivero, C. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Rodrigo, T. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Vila, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Alberdi, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Arce, P. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Barcala, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Luque, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Molinero, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Navarrete, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Oller, J.C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Koehler, C. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Lutz, B. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Schubert, M.B. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Werner, J.H. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparent amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30x30mm{sup 2}) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20mA/W), an intrinsic position resolution better than 3{mu}m, a spatial-point reconstruction precision better than 10{mu}m, deflection angles smaller than 10{mu}rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%.

  9. Large Size High Performance Transparent Amorphous Silicon Sensors for Laser Beam Position Detection and Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Kohler, C.; Lutz, B.; Schubert, M. B.

    2006-09-04

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparente amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30 x 30 mm2) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20 mA/W), an intinsic position resolution better than 3 m, a spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 m, deflection angles smaller than 10 rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition, multipoint alignment monitoring, using up to five sensors lined along a light path of about 5 meters, can be achieved with a resolution better than 20m. (Author)

  10. Defects left after regrowth of amorphous silicon on crystalline Si : C (V) and DLTS studies

    OpenAIRE

    Castaing, J.; Cass, T.

    1985-01-01

    n and p-type silicon have been self-ion implanted at 77 K with multi-energetic beams. This process was used to amorphize a 0.4 μm layer with a minimum amount of damage in the underlying crystal. After regrowth by a 550 °C anneal, the remaining defects were assessed by capacitance-voltage (C(V )) measurements and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). In n-type Si, a buried layer of deep donors in large concentration was found, whereas in p-type Si, their concentration was small. These trap...

  11. Novel photochemical vapor deposition reactor for amorphous silicon solar cell deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.; Hegedus, Steven S.; Buchanan, Wayne A.; Jackson, Scott C.

    1987-07-01

    A novel photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) reactor having a flexible ultraviolet-transparent Teflon curtain and a secondary gas flow to eliminate deposition on the window has been used to deposit amorphous silicon films and p-i-n solar cells. The background levels of atmospheric contaminants (H2O, CO2, N2) depend strongly on the vacuum procedures but not on the presence of a Teflon curtain in the reactor. Intrinsic films with a midgap density of states of 3×1015 eV-1 cm-3 and all-photo-CVD pin solar cells with efficiencies of 8.5% have been deposited.

  12. The model of solid phase crystallization of amorphous silicon under elastic stress

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Solid phase crystallization of an amorphous silicon (a-Si) film stressed by a Si3N4 cap was studied by laser Raman spectroscopy. The a-Si films were deposited on Si3N4 (50 nm)/Si(100) substrate by rf sputtering. The stress in an a-Si film was controlled by thickness of a Si3N4 cap layer. The Si3N4 films were also deposited by rf sputtering. It was observed that the crystallization was affected by the stress in a-Si films introduced by the Si3N4 cap layer. The study suggests that the elastic s...

  13. Dosimetric properties of an amorphous-silicon EPID used in continuous acquisition mode for application to dynamic and arc IMRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, B M C; Greer, P B

    2009-07-01

    Dosimetric properties of an amorphous-silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operated in a real-time acquisition mode were investigated. This mode will be essential for time-resolved dose verification of dynamic (sliding window) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and intensity modulated arc radiation therapy (arc-IMRT). The EPID was used in continuous acquisition mode (i.e., "cine" mode) where individual sequential image frames are acquired in real time. The properties studied include dose linearity, reproducibility of response, and image stability. Results of using the continuous acquisition mode with several example treatments including dynamic IMRT, arc treatment, and single-arc-IMRT are compared to results using the well-studied integrated acquisition mode (i.e., "frame averaging" or "IMRT" mode). Real-time EPID response was also compared to real-time ion-chamber data for selected points in the deliveries. The example treatment deliveries in both continuous and integrated acquisition modes were converted to arbitrary EPID dose units via a calibration field. The summation of all acquired continuous mode images was compared using percentage dose difference to the single image acquired in the integrated mode using in-field pixels only (defined as those pixels > 10% of maximum, in-field signal). Using the continuous acquisition mode, the EPID response was not linear with dose. It was found that the continuous mode dose response corresponded approximately to dropping one image per acquisition session. Reproducibility of EPID response to low monitor units (MUs) was found to be poor but greatly improved with increasing MU. Open field profiles were found to be stable in the cross-plane direction but required several frames to become stable in the in-plane direction. However, both of these issues are clinically insignificant due to arc-IMRT deliveries requiring relatively large monitor units (> 100 MU). Analysis of the five IMRT, arc, and arc

  14. High-stability transparent amorphous oxide TFT with a silicon-doped back-channel layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung-Rae; Park, Jea-Gun

    2014-10-01

    We significantly reduced various electrical instabilities of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) by using the co-deposition of silicon on an a-IGZO back channel. This process showed improved stability of the threshold voltage ( V th ) under high temperature and humidity and negative gate-bias illumination stress (NBIS) without any reduction of IDS. The enhanced stability was achieved with silicon, which has higher metal-oxide bonding strengths than gallium does. Additionally, SiO X distributed on the a-IGZO surface reduced the adsorption and the desorption of H2O and O2. This process is applicable to the TFT manufacturing process with a variable sputtering target.

  15. Study of the amorphization of surface silicon layers implanted by low-energy helium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomov, A. A.; Myakon'kikh, A. V.; Oreshko, A. P.; Shemukhin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural changes in surface layers of Si(001) substrates subjected to plasma-immersion implantation by (2-5)-keV helium ions to a dose of D = 6 × 1015-5 × 1017 cm-2 have been studied by highresolution X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering, and spectral ellipsometry. It is found that the joint application of these methods makes it possible to determine the density depth distribution ρ( z) in an implanted layer, its phase state, and elemental composition. Treatment of silicon substrates in helium plasma to doses of 6 × 1016 cm-2 leads to the formation of a 20- to 30-nm-thick amorphized surface layer with a density close to the silicon density. An increase in the helium dose causes the formation of an internal porous layer.

  16. Hydex Glass and Amorphous Silicon for Integrated Nonlinear Optical Signal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Photonic integrated circuits that exploit nonlinear optics in order to generate and process signals all-optically have achieved performance far superior to that possible electronically - particularly with respect to speed. Although silicon-on-insulator has been the leading platform for nonlinear optics for some time, its high two-photon absorption at telecommunications wavelengths poses a fundamental limitation. We review the recent achievements based in new CMOS-compatible platforms that are better suited than SOI for nonlinear optics, focusing on amorphous silicon and Hydex glass. We highlight their potential as well as the challenges to achieving practical solutions for many key applications. These material systems have opened up many new capabilities such as on-chip optical frequency comb generation and ultrafast optical pulse generation and measurement.

  17. Spin transport, magnetoresistance, and electrically detected magnetic resonance in amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Michael J.; Lenahan, Patrick M.; King, Sean W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a study of spin transport via electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and near-zero field magnetoresistance (MR) in silicon nitride films. Silicon nitrides have long been important materials in solid state electronics. Although electronic transport in these materials is not well understood, electron paramagnetic resonance studies have identified a single dominating paramagnetic defect and have also provided physical and chemical descriptions of the defects, called K centers. Our EDMR and MR measurements clearly link the near-zero field MR response to the K centers and also indicate that K center energy levels are approximately 3.1 eV above the a-SiN:H valence band edge. In addition, our results suggest an approach for the study of defect mediated spin-transport in inorganic amorphous insulators via variable electric field and variable frequency EDMR and MR which may be widely applicable.

  18. Two-dimensional modeling of the back amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction (BACH) photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Chutinan, Alongkarn; Gougam, Adel B.; Kherani, Nazir P.; Zukotynski, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Back Amorphous-Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction (BACH)1 solar cell can be fabricated using low temperature processes while integrating high efficiency features of heterojunction silicon solar cells and back-contact homojunction solar cells. This article presents a two-dimensional modeling study of the BACH cell concept. A parametric study of the BACH cell has been carried out using Sentaurus after benchmarking the software. A detailed model describing the optical generation is defined. Solar cell efficiency of 24.4% is obtained for AM 1.5 global spectrum with VOC of greater than 720 mV and JSC exceeding 40 mA/cm2, considering realistic surface passivation quality and other dominant recombination processes.

  19. Strong enhancement of spontaneous emission in amorphous-silicon-nitride photonic crystal based coupled-microcavity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayindir, M.; Tanriseven, S.; Aydinli, A.; Ozbay, E. [Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    We investigated photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band gap structures. The photonic crystals, a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator and a coupled-microcavity (CMC) structure, were fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-oxide layers. It was observed that these structures strongly modify the PL spectra from optically active amorphous-silicon-nitride thin films. Narrow-band and wide-band PL spectra were achieved in the FP microcavity and the CMC structure, respectively. The angle dependence of PL peak of the FP resonator was also investigated. We also observed that the spontaneous emission increased drastically at the coupled-cavity band edge of the CMC structure due to extremely low group velocity and long photon lifetime. The measurements agree well with the transfer-matrix method results and the prediction of the tight-binding approximation. (orig.)

  20. Strong enhancement of spontaneous emission in amorphous-silicon-nitride photonic crystal based coupled-microcavity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir, M.; Tanriseven, S.; Aydinli, A.; Ozbay, E.

    We investigated photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band gap structures. The photonic crystals, a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator and a coupled-microcavity (CMC) structure, were fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-oxide layers. It was observed that these structures strongly modify the PL spectra from optically active amorphous-silicon-nitride thin films. Narrow-band and wide-band PL spectra were achieved in the FP microcavity and the CMC structure, respectively. The angle dependence of PL peak of the FP resonator was also investigated. We also observed that the spontaneous emission increased drastically at the coupled-cavity band edge of the CMC structure due to extremely low group velocity and long photon lifetime. The measurements agree well with the transfer-matrix method results and the prediction of the tight-binding approximation.

  1. Fourier transform infrared analysis of ceramic powders: Quantitative determination of alpha, beta, and amorphous phases of silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trout, T.K.; Bellama, J.M.; Brinckman, F.E.; Faltynek, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) forms the basis for determining the morphological composition of mixtures containing alpha, beta, and amorphous phases of silicon nitride. The analytical technique, involving multiple linear regression treatment of Kubelka-Munk absorbance values from diffuse reflectance measurements, yields specific percent composition data for the amorphous phase as well as the crystalline phases in ternary mixtures of 0--1% by weight Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ in potassium bromide.

  2. Optimization of the Radiation Hardness of Silicon Pixel Sensors for High X-ray Doses using TCAD Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Schwandt, J; Klanner, R; Pintilie, I; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    The European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) will deliver 27000 fully coherent, high brilliance X-ray pulses per second each with a duration below 100 fs. This will allow the recording of diffraction patterns of single molecules and the study of ultra-fast processes. One of the detector systems under development for the XFEL is the Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD), which consists of a pixel array with readout ASICs bump-bonded to a silicon sensor with pixels of 200 {\\mu}m \\times 200 {\\mu}m. The particular requirements for the detector are a high dynamic range (0, 1 up to 10E5 12 keV photons/XFEL-pulse), a fast read-out and radiation tolerance up to doses of 1 GGy of 12 keV X-rays for 3 years of operation. At this X-ray energy no bulk damage in silicon is expected. However fixed oxide charges in the SiO2 layer and interface traps at the Si-SiO2 interface will build up. As function of the 12 keV X-ray dose the microscopic defects in test structures and the macro- scopic electrical properties of...

  3. Achieving thermography with a thermal security camera using uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tesdahl, Curtis; Owens, Jim; Dorn, David

    2012-06-01

    Advancements in uncooled microbolometer technology over the last several years have opened up many commercial applications which had been previously cost prohibitive. Thermal technology is no longer limited to the military and government market segments. One type of thermal sensor with low NETD which is available in the commercial market segment is the uncooled amorphous silicon (α-Si) microbolometer image sensor. Typical thermal security cameras focus on providing the best image quality by auto tonemaping (contrast enhancing) the image, which provides the best contrast depending on the temperature range of the scene. While this may provide enough information to detect objects and activities, there are further benefits of being able to estimate the actual object temperatures in a scene. This thermographic ability can provide functionality beyond typical security cameras by being able to monitor processes. Example applications of thermography[2] with thermal camera include: monitoring electrical circuits, industrial machinery, building thermal leaks, oil/gas pipelines, power substations, etc...[3][5] This paper discusses the methodology of estimating object temperatures by characterizing/calibrating different components inside a thermal camera utilizing an uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer image sensor. Plots of system performance across camera operating temperatures will be shown.

  4. Solid state photochemistry. Subpanel A-2(b): Metastability in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D. [Solarex Corporation, Newton, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    All device quality amorphous silicon based materials exhibit degradation in electronic properties when exposed to sunlight. The photo-induced defects are associated with Si dangling bonds that are created by the recombination and/or trapping of photogenerated carriers. The defects are metastable and can be annealed out at temperatures of about 150 to 200 degrees Centigrade. The density of metastable defects is larger in films that are contaminated with > 10{sup 19} per cubic cm of impurities such as oxygen, carbon and nitrogen. However, recent experimental results indicate that some metastable defects are still present in films with very low impurity concentrations. The photo-induced defects typically saturate after 100 to 1000 hours of exposure to one sun illumination depending on the deposition conditions. There is also experimental evidence that photo-induced structural changes are occurring in the amorphous silicon based materials and that hydrogen may be playing an important role in both the photo-induced structural changes and in the creation of metastable defects.

  5. Amorphous SiC layers for electrically conductive Rugate filters in silicon based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, S.; Peters, M.; Künle, M.; Gradmann, R.; Suwito, D.

    2010-05-01

    The subject of this work is the development of an electrically conductive Rugate filter for photovoltaic applications. We think that the optical as well as the electrical performance of the filter can be adapted especially to the requirements of crystalline Si thin-film and amorphous/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells. We have deposited amorphous hydrogenated Silicon Carbide layers (a-SixC1-x:H) with the precursor gases methane (CH4), silane (SiH4) and diborane (B2H6) applying Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). Through changing just the precursor flows a floating refractive index n from 1.9 to 3.5 (at 633 nm) could be achieved quite accurately. Different complex layer stacks (up to 200 layers) with a sinusoidal refractive index variation normal to the incident light were deposited in just 80 min on 100x100 mm2. Transmission measurements show good agreement between simulation and experiment which proofs our ability to control the deposition process, the good knowledge of the optical behaviour of the different SiC single layers and the advanced stage of our simulation model. The doped single layers show lateral conductivities which were extremely dependent on the Si/C ratio.

  6. Depth profile study on Raman spectra of high-energy-electron-irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    According to the different penetration depths for the incident lights of 472 nm and 532 nm in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, the depth profile study on Raman spectra of a-Si:H films was carried out. The network ordering evolution in the near surface and interior region of the unirradiated and irradiated a-Si:H films was investigated. The results show that there is a structural improvement in the shortand intermediate-range order towards the surface of the unirradiated a-Si:H films. The amorphous silicon network in the near and interior region becomes more disordered on the shortand intermediate-range scales after being irradiated with high energy electrons. However, the surface of the irradiated films becomes more disordered in comparison with their interior region, indicating that the created defects caused by electron irradiation are concentrated in the near surface of the irradiated films. Annealing eliminates the irradiation effects on a-Si:H thin films and the structural order of the irradiated films is similar to that of the unirradiated ones after being annealed. There exists a structural improvement in the shortand intermediate-range order towards the surface of the irradiated a-Si:H films after being annealed.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-04-04

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle--in particular, photon--detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80-120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200 °C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process.

  8. Silica nanoparticles on front glass for efficiency enhancement in superstrate-type amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sonali; Banerjee, Chandan; Kundu, Avra; Dey, Prasenjit; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan K.

    2013-10-01

    Antireflective coating on front glass of superstrate-type single junction amorphous silicon solar cells (SCs) has been applied using highly monodispersed and stable silica nanoparticles (NPs). The silica NPs having 300 nm diameter were synthesized by Stober technique where the size of the NPs was controlled by varying the alcohol medium. The synthesized silica NPs were analysed by dynamic light scattering technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were spin coated on glass side of fluorinated tin oxide (SnO2: F) coated glass superstrate and optimization of the concentration of the colloidal solution, spin speed and number of coated layers was done to achieve minimum reflection characteristics. An estimation of the distribution of the NPs for different optimization parameters has been done using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the transparent conducting oxide coated glass with the layer having the minimum reflectance is used for fabrication of amorphous silicon SC. Electrical analysis of the fabricated cell indicates an improvement of 6.5% in short-circuit current density from a reference of 12.40 mA cm-2 while the open circuit voltage and the fill factor remains unaltered. A realistic optical model has also been proposed to gain an insight into the system.

  9. Flexible amorphous silicon solar cells and their application to PV systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Y.; Fujikake, S.; Yoshida, T.; Sakai, H.; Natsume, F. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). New Energy Lab.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells are regarded as the next generation product following crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells. The performance of the large area cells has been improved to a practical application level and the durability has been confirmed by a number of outdoor tests at demonstration sites under various climatic conditions. The mass production technology for realizing low cost a-Si photovoltaic (PV) modules, however, has not been developed very well and is still in an elementary stage. A flexible a-Si:H PV module has been developed, which is rolled up around a cylindrical core, has a width of about 1 m, and is able to be cut to any length. The amorphous solar cell fabricated on a heat resistant plastic film with a thickness of 50 {mu}m has a new monolithic series connected structure named SCAF (Series-Connection through Apertures formed on Film) to obtain a high output voltage required for practical use. The details of the structure and the technology of the fabrication process are described as well as some of its applications. (author). 11 figs., 3 refs.

  10. Amorphous silicon based p-i-i-n photodetectors for point-of-care testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furin, Dominik; Proll, Guenther; Gauglitz, Guenther [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Thielmann, Johannes; Harendt, Christine [Institut fuer Mikroelektronik Stuttgart, Allmandring 30a, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Pfaefflin, Albrecht; Schleicher, Erwin [Universitaetsklinikum und Medizinische Fakultaet, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Geissweg 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Schubert, Markus B. [Institut fuer Physikalische Elektronik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Saemann, Marc

    2010-04-15

    Modern medical diagnostics demands point-of-care testing (POCT) systems for quick tests in clinical or out-patient environments. This investigation combines the Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS) with thin film technology for a highly sensitive, direct optical and label-free detection of proteins, e.g. inflammation or cardiovascular markers. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) based thin film photodetectors replace the so far needed spectrometer and permit downsizing of the POCT system. Photodetectors with p-i-i-n structure adjust their spectral sensitivity according to the applied read-out voltage. The use of amorphous silicon carbide in the p-type and the first intrinsic layer enhances the sensitivity through very low dark currents of the photodetectors and enables the adjustment of their absorption characteristics. Integrating the thin film photodetectors on the rear side of the RIfS substrate eliminates optical losses and distortions, as compared to the standard RIfS setup. An integrated Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) chip performs a current-frequency conversion to accurately detect the photocurrent of up to eight parallel photodetector channels. In addition to the optimization of the photo-detectors, this contribution presents first successful direct optical and label-free RIfS measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer in buffer solution in physiological relevant concentrations. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Aluminium-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kezzoula, F., E-mail: kezzoula@usa.com [UDTS 2Bd Frantz Fanon 7 merveilles Algiers (Algeria); Laboratory of Materials, Mineral and Composite (LMMC), Boumerdes University (Algeria); Hammouda, A. [UPR CNRS 3079 CEMHTI - 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Equipe Couches Minces, Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte de Physique, USTHB, Algiers (Algeria); Universite d' Orleans, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Kechouane, M. [Equipe Couches Minces, Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte de Physique, USTHB, Algiers (Algeria); Simon, P. [UPR CNRS 3079 CEMHTI - 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Abaidia, S.E.H. [Laboratory of Materials, Mineral and Composite (LMMC), Boumerdes University (Algeria); Keffous, A. [UDTS 2Bd Frantz Fanon 7 merveilles Algiers (Algeria); Cherfi, R. [Equipe Couches Minces, Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte de Physique, USTHB, Algiers (Algeria); Menari, H.; Manseri, A. [UDTS 2Bd Frantz Fanon 7 merveilles Algiers (Algeria)

    2011-09-15

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering technique with argon and hydrogen plasma mixture on Al deposited by thermal evaporation on glass substrates. The a-Si/Al and a-Si:H/Al thin films were annealed at different temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 deg. C during 4 h in vacuum-sealed bulb. The effects of annealing temperature on optical, structural and morphological properties of as-grown as well as the vacuum-annealed a-Si/Al and a-Si:H/Al thin films are presented in this contribution. The averaged transmittance of a-Si:H/Al film increases upon increasing the annealing temperature. XRD measurements clearly evidence that crystallization is initiated at 450 deg. C. The number and intensity of diffraction peaks appearing in the diffraction patterns are more important in a-Si:H/Al than that in a-Si/Al layers. Results show that a-Si:H films deposited on Al/glass crystallize above 450 deg. C and present better crystallization than the a-Si layers. The presence of hydrogen induces an improvement of structural properties of poly-Si prepared by aluminium-induced crystallization (AIC).

  12. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials.

  13. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-10-21

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials.

  14. Neural network based cluster creation in the ATLAS silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The read-out from individual pixels on planar semi-conductor sensors are grouped into clusters to reconstruct the location where a charged particle passed through the sensor. The resolution given by individual pixel sizes is significantly improved by using the information from the charge sharing between pixels. Such analog cluster creation techniques have been used by the ATLAS experiment for many years to obtain an excellent performance. However, in dense environments, such as those inside high-energy jets, clusters have an increased probability of merging the charge deposited by multiple particles. Recently, a neural network based algorithm which estimates both the cluster position and whether a cluster should be split has been developed for the ATLAS Pixel Detector. The algorithm significantly reduces ambiguities in the assignment of pixel detector measurement to tracks within jets and improves the position accuracy with respect to standard interpolation techniques by taking into account the 2-dimensional ...

  15. Neural network based cluster creation in the ATLAS silicon Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Perez Cavalcanti, T; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The hit signals read out from pixels on planar semi-conductor sensors are grouped into clusters, to reconstruct the location where a charged particle passed through. The resolution of the individual pixel sizes can be improved significantly using the information from the cluster of adjacent pixels. Such analog cluster creation techniques have been used by the ATLAS experiment for many years giving an excellent performance. However, in dense environments, such as those inside high-energy jets, is likely that the charge deposited by two or more close-by tracks merges into one single cluster. A new pattern recognition algorithm based on neural network methods has been developed for the ATLAS Pixel Detector. This can identify the shared clusters, split them if necessary, and estimate the positions of all particles traversing the cluster. The algorithm significantly reduces ambiguities in the assignment of pixel detector measurements to tracks within jets, and improves the positional accuracy with respect to stand...

  16. Direct measurement of free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Frank G.

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to measure the free-energy barrier W(sup *), the activation energy, and activation entropy to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous solids, independent of the energy barrier to growth. The method allows one to determine the temperature dependence of W(sup *), and the effect of the preparation conditions of the initial amorphous phase, the dopants, and the crystallization methds on W(sup *). The method is applied to determine the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. For thermally induced nucleation in a-Si thin films with annealing temperatures in the range of from 824 to 983 K, the free-energy barrier W(sup *) to nucleation of silicon crystals is about 2.0 - 2.1 eV regardless of the preparation conditions of the films. The observation supports the idea that a-Si transforms into an intermediate amorphous state through the structural relaxation prior to the onset of nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. The observation also indicates that the activation entropy may be an insignificant part of the free-energy barrier for the nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. Compared with the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in undoped a-Si films, a significant reduction is observed in the free-energy barrier to nucleation in Cu-doped a-Si films. For a-Si under irradiation of Xe(2+) at 10(exp 5) eV, the free-energy barrier to ion-induced nucleation of crystallites is shown to be about half of the value associated with thermal-induced nucleation of crystallites in a-Si under the otherwise same conditions, which is much more significant than previously expected. The present method has a general kinetic basis; it thus should be equally applicable to nucleation of crystallites in any amorphous elemental semiconductors and semiconductor alloys, metallic and polymeric glasses, and to nucleation of crystallites in melts and solutions.

  17. The Gigatracker: An ultra-fast and low-mass silicon pixel detector for the NA62 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, M.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Mapelli, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, E.; Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Petrucci, F.; Riedler, P.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Rivetti, A.; Tiuraniemi, S.

    2011-02-01

    The Gigatracker is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed to track the highly intense NA62 hadron beam with a time resolution of 150 ps (rms). The beam spectrometer of the experiment is composed of three Gigatracker stations installed in vacuum in order to precisely measure momentum, time and direction of every traversing particle. Precise tracking demands a very low mass of the detector assembly ( delay-locked loop based TDC placed at the end of each pixel column and a time-over-threshold discriminator with time-walk correction technique. The current status of the R&D program is overviewed and results from the prototype read-out chips test are presented.

  18. A New Low Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon Thin Film Transistor Pixel Circuit for Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ching-Lin; Lin, Yi-Yan; Chang, Jyu-Yu; Sun, Bo-Jhang; Liu, Yan-Wei

    2010-06-01

    This study presents one novel compensation pixel design and driving method for active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays that use low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs) with a voltage feed-back method and the simulation results are proposed and verified by SPICE simulator. The measurement and simulation of LTPS TFT characteristics demonstrate the good fitting result. The proposed circuit consists of four TFTs and two capacitors with an additional signal line. The error rates of OLED anode voltage variation are below 0.3% under the threshold voltage deviation of driving TFT (ΔVTH = ±0.33 V). The simulation results show that the pixel design can improve the display image non-uniformity by compensating the threshold voltage deviation of driving TFT and the degradation of OLED threshold voltage at the same time.

  19. Efficient visible luminescence of nanocrystalline silicon prepared from amorphous silicon films by thermal annealing and stain etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikulin Valery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Films of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si were prepared from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H by using rapid thermal annealing. The formed nc-Si films were subjected to stain etching in hydrofluoric acid solutions in order to passivate surfaces of nc-Si. The optical reflectance spectroscopy revealed the nc-Si formation as well as the high optical quality of the formed films. The Raman scattering spectroscopy was used to estimate the mean size and volume fraction of nc-Si in the annealed films, which were about 4 to 8 nm and 44 to 90%, respectively, depending on the annealing regime. In contrast to as-deposited a-Si:H films, the nc-Si films after stain etching exhibited efficient photoluminescence in the spectral range of 600 to 950 nm at room temperature. The photoluminescence intensity and lifetimes of the stain etched nc-Si films were similar to those for conventional porous Si formed by electrochemical etching. The obtained results indicate new possibilities to prepare luminescent thin films for Si-based optoelectronics.

  20. Improving the performance of amorphous and crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells by monitoring surface passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettauf, J.W.A.; Van der Werf, C.H.M.; Kielen, I.M.; Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics, Physics of Devices, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    The influence of thermal annealing on the crystalline silicon surface passivating properties of selected amorphous silicon containing layer stacks (including intrinsic and doped films), as well as the correlation with silicon heterojunction solar cell performance has been investigated. All samples have been isochronally annealed for 1 h in an N{sub 2} ambient at temperatures between 150C and 300C in incremental steps of 15C. For intrinsic films and intrinsic/n-type stacks, an improvement in passivation quality is observed up to 255C and 270C, respectively, and a deterioration at higher temperatures. For intrinsic/n-type a-Si:H layer stacks, a maximum minority carrier lifetime of 13.3 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} has been measured. In contrast, for intrinsic/p-type a-Si:H layer stacks, a deterioration in passivation is observed upon annealing over the whole temperature range. Comparing the lifetime values and trends for the different layer stacks to the performance of the corresponding cells, it is inferred that the intrinsic/p-layer stack is limiting device performance. Furthermore, thermal annealing of p-type layers should be avoided entirely. We therefore propose an adapted processing sequence, leading to a substantial improvement in efficiency to 16.7%, well above the efficiency of 15.8% obtained with the 'standard' processing sequence.

  1. Light prototype support using micro-channel technology as high efficiency system for silicon pixel detector cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosi, F., E-mail: filippo.bosi@pi.infn.it [INFN Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Balestri, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Mammini, P.; Massa, M.; Petragnani, G.; Ragonesi, A.; Soldani, A. [INFN Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2011-09-11

    The development of micro-scale mechanical systems has been moving rapidly, allowing an opportunity to the semiconductor detectors to have ever more power located on the active region. Miniaturization associated with micro-channel technologies allows the design of micro-system structures that are able to cool silicon pixel detectors with power of the order of some W/cm{sup 2} with thickness less than 0.3% of radiation length. We present the design and thermo-hydraulic test results for low material budget support and cooling obtained through forced liquid convection in micro-channels, developed for the innermost layer (Layer 0) of SuperB silicon vertex tracker.

  2. X-ray radiation damage studies and design of a silicon pixel sensor for science at the XFEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jiaguo

    2013-06-15

    Experiments at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) require silicon pixel sensors which can withstand X-ray doses up to 1 GGy. For the investigation of Xray radiation damage up to these high doses, MOS capacitors and gate-controlled diodes built on high resistivity n-doped silicon with crystal orientations left angle 100 right angle and left angle 111 right angle produced by four vendors, CiS, Hamamatsu, Canberra and Sintef have been irradiated with 12 keV X-rays at the DESY DORIS III synchrotron-light source. Using capacitance/ conductance-voltage, current-voltage and thermal dielectric relaxation current measurements, the densities of oxide charges and interface traps at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface, and the surface-current densities have been determined as function of dose. Results indicate that the dose dependence of the oxide-charge density, the interface-trap density and the surface-current density depend on the crystal orientation and producer. In addition, the influence of the voltage applied to the gates of the MOS capacitor and the gate-controlled diode during X-ray irradiation on the oxide-charge density, the interface-trap density and the surface-current density has been investigated at doses of 100 kGy and 100 MGy. It is found that both strongly depend on the gate voltage if the electric field in the oxide points from the surface of the SiO{sub 2} to the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface. To verify the long-term stability of irradiated silicon sensors, annealing studies have been performed at 60 C and 80 C on MOS capacitors and gate-controlled diodes irradiated to 5 MGy as well, and the annealing kinetics of oxide charges and surface current were determined. Moreover, the macroscopic electrical properties of segmented sensors have slao been investigated as function of dose. It is found that the defects introduced by X-rays increase the full depletion voltage, the surface leakage current and the inter-electrode capacitance of the segmented sensor. An

  3. Charge deep-level transient spectroscopy study of high-energy-electron-beam-irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, A.; Nádaždy, V.; Zeman, M.; Swaaiij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of changes in the defect density of states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) due to high-energy electron irradiation using charged deep-level transient spectroscopy. It was found that defect states near the conduction band were removed, while in other band gap regions the

  4. Infrared transient grating measurements of the dynamics of hydrogen local mode vibrations in amorphous silicon-germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobson, K.W.; Wells, J.P.R.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Vinh, N.Q.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2008-01-01

    We report on picosecond, time-resolved measurements of the vibrational relaxation and decay pathways of the Si–H and Ge–H stretching modes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium thin films (a-SiGe:H). It is demonstrated that the decay of both modes has a nonexponential shape, attributable to th

  5. Infrared transient grating measurements of the dynamics of hydrogen local mode vibrations in amorphous silicon-germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobson, K. W.; Wells, J. P. R.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Vinh, N. Q.; Dijkhuis, J. I.

    2008-01-01

    We report on picosecond, time-resolved measurements of the vibrational relaxation and decay pathways of the Si-H and Ge-H stretching modes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium thin films (a-SiGe: H). It is demonstrated that the decay of both modes has a nonexponential shape, attributable to t

  6. Natively textured ZnO grown by PECVD as front electrode material for amorphous silicon pin solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Groenen, Ft.; Van De Sanden, M.C.M.; Linden, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Natively textured ZnO layers for the application as front electrode material in amorphous silicon pin solar cells have been deposited by Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition. Films deposited in the temperature regime from 150 to 350°C at a rate between 0.65 and 0.75 nm/s have been char

  7. On the effect of the underlying ZnO:Al layer on the crystallization kinetics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, K.; Ponomarev, M. V.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we analyze the thickness effect of the underlying aluminum doped-zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers on the structural properties and crystallization kinetics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films. It is shown that the disorder in as-deposited a-Si:H films, as probed by

  8. Ultrafast all-optical arithmetic logic based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon microring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostimirovic, Dusan; Ye, Winnie N.

    2016-03-01

    For decades, the semiconductor industry has been steadily shrinking transistor sizes to fit more performance into a single silicon-based integrated chip. This technology has become the driving force for advances in education, transportation, and health, among others. However, transistor sizes are quickly approaching their physical limits (channel lengths are now only a few silicon atoms in length), and Moore's law will likely soon be brought to a stand-still despite many unique attempts to keep it going (FinFETs, high-k dielectrics, etc.). This technology must then be pushed further by exploring (almost) entirely new methodologies. Given the explosive growth of optical-based long-haul telecommunications, we look to apply the use of high-speed optics as a substitute to the digital model; where slow, lossy, and noisy metal interconnections act as a major bottleneck to performance. We combine the (nonlinear) optical Kerr effect with a single add-drop microring resonator to perform the fundamental AND-XOR logical operations of a half adder, by all-optical means. This process is also applied to subtraction, higher-order addition, and the realization of an all-optical arithmetic logic unit (ALU). The rings use hydrogenated amorphous silicon as a material with superior nonlinear properties to crystalline silicon, while still maintaining CMOS-compatibility and the many benefits that come with it (low cost, ease of fabrication, etc.). Our method allows for multi-gigabit-per-second data rates while maintaining simplicity and spatial minimalism in design for high-capacity manufacturing potential.

  9. Nanometric Cutting of Silicon with an Amorphous-Crystalline Layered Structure: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinshi; Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Materials with specific nanometric layers are of great value in both theoretical and applied research. The nanometric layer could have a significant influence on the response to the mechanical loading. In this paper, the nanometric cutting on the layered systems of silicon has been studied by molecular dynamics. This kind of composite structure with amorphous layer and crystalline substrate is important for nanomachining. Material deformation, stress status, and chip formation, which are the key issues in nano-cutting, are analyzed. A new chip formation mechanism, i.e., the mixture of extrusion and shear, has been observed. In addition, from the perspective of engineering, some specific composite models show the desired properties due to the low subsurface damage or large material removal rate. The results enrich the cutting theory and provide guidance on nanometric machining.

  10. Using amorphous silicon solar cells to boost the viability of luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, Daniel J. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, South Kensington campus, SW7 2AZ, London (United Kingdom); Sark, Wilfried G.J.H.M. van [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Science, Technology and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Velthuijsen, Steven T.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    We have, for the first time, designed and fabricated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells to be used in conjunction with Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs). LSCs are planar plastic sheets doped with organic dyes that absorb solar illumination and down shift the energy to narrowband luminescence which is collected by solar cells attached to the sheet edge. We fabricated an LSC module with two bonded solar cells and performed characterisation with the cells connected in series and parallel configurations. We find that the LSC module has an optical collection efficiency of 9.5% and an optimum power conversion efficiency of approaching 1% when the cells are in a parallel connection. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Serially Connected Micro Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells for Compact High-Voltage Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoon Nam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a compact amorphous silicon (a-Si solar module to be used as high-voltage power supply. In comparison with the organic solar module, the main advantages of the a-Si solar module are its compatibility with photolithography techniques and relatively high power conversion efficiency. The open circuit voltage of a-Si solar cells can be easily controlled by serially interconnecting a-Si solar cells. Moreover, the a-Si solar module can be easily patterned by photolithography in any desired shapes with high areal densities. Using the photolithographic technique, we fabricate a compact a-Si solar module with noticeable photovoltaic characteristics as compared with the reported values for high-voltage power supplies.

  12. 10.5% efficient polymer and amorphous silicon hybrid tandem photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehwan; Hong, Ziruo; Li, Gang; Song, Tze-Bin; Chey, Jay; Lee, Yun Seog; You, Jingbi; Chen, Chun-Chao; Sadana, Devendra K.; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Thin-film solar cells made with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) or organic semiconductors are considered as promising renewable energy sources due to their low manufacturing cost and light weight. However, the efficiency of single-junction a-Si:H or organic solar cells is typically photovoltaic cell by employing an a-Si:H film as a front sub-cell and a low band gap polymer:fullerene blend film as a back cell on planar glass substrates. Monolithic integration of 6.0% efficienct a-Si:H and 7.5% efficient polymer:fullerene blend solar cells results in a power conversion efficiency of 10.5%. Such high-efficiency thin-film tandem cells can be achieved by optical management and interface engineering of fully optimized high-performance front and back cells without sacrificing photovoltaic performance in both cells.

  13. Direct visualization of photoinduced glassy dynamics on the amorphous silicon carbide surface by STM movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Glassy dynamics can be controlled by light irradiation. Sub- and above-bandgap irradiation cause numerous phenomena in glasses including photorelaxation, photoexpansion, photodarkening and pohtoinduced fluidity. We used scanning tunneling microscopy to study surface glassy dynamics of amorphous silicon carbide irradiated with above- bandgap 532 nm light. Surface clusters of ~ 4-5 glass forming unit in diameter hop mostly in a two-state fashion, both without and with irradiation. Upon irradiation, the average surface hopping activity increases by a factor of 3. A very long (~1 day) movie of individual clusters with varying laser power density provides direct evidence for photoinduced enhanced hopping on the glass surfaces. We propose two mechanisms: heating and electronic for the photoenhanced surface dynamics.

  14. Picosecond and nanosecond laser annealing and simulation of amorphous silicon thin films for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakos, I.; Zergioti, I.; Vamvakas, V.; Tsoukalas, D.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a picosecond diode pumped solid state laser and a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser have been used for the annealing and the partial nano-crystallization of an amorphous silicon layer. These experiments were conducted as an alternative/complementary to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for fabrication of micromorph tandem solar cell. The laser experimental work was combined with simulations of the annealing process, in terms of temperature distribution evolution, in order to predetermine the optimum annealing conditions. The annealed material was studied, as a function of several annealing parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, fluence), as far as it concerns its structural properties, by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and micro-Raman techniques.

  15. 10.5% efficient polymer and amorphous silicon hybrid tandem photovoltaic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehwan; Hong, Ziruo; Li, Gang; Song, Tze-bin; Chey, Jay; Lee, Yun Seog; You, Jingbi; Chen, Chun-Chao; Sadana, Devendra K; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-04

    Thin-film solar cells made with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) or organic semiconductors are considered as promising renewable energy sources due to their low manufacturing cost and light weight. However, the efficiency of single-junction a-Si:H or organic solar cells is typically photovoltaic cell by employing an a-Si:H film as a front sub-cell and a low band gap polymer:fullerene blend film as a back cell on planar glass substrates. Monolithic integration of 6.0% efficienct a-Si:H and 7.5% efficient polymer:fullerene blend solar cells results in a power conversion efficiency of 10.5%. Such high-efficiency thin-film tandem cells can be achieved by optical management and interface engineering of fully optimized high-performance front and back cells without sacrificing photovoltaic performance in both cells.

  16. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaret, T.; Tanguy, A.; Boioli, F.; Rodney, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now.

  17. Investigation of the degradation of a thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dyk, E.E.; Audouard, A.; Meyer, E.L. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Woolard, C.D. [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2007-01-23

    The degradation of a thin-film hydrogenated single-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic (PV) module has been studied. We investigated the different modes of electrical and physical degradation of a-Si:H PV modules by employing a degradation and failure assessment procedure used in conjunction with analytical techniques, including, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry. This paper reveals that due to their thickness, thin films are very sensitive to the type of degradation observed. Moreover, this paper deals with the problems associated with the module encapsulant, poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate) (EVA). The main objective of this study was to establish the influence of outdoor environmental conditions on the performance of a thin-film PV module comprising a-Si:H single-junction cells. (author)

  18. Photoelectronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films deposited by R. F sputtering and glow discharge methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rahman, M.; Madkour, H. (Faculty of Science, Aswan (Egypt)); Hassan, H.H.; El-Desouki, S. (Cairo Univ., Giza (Egypt))

    1989-09-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films a-Si:H were deposited by both R.F. sputtering in a planar magnetron configuration and glow discharge methods on Corning glass substrates at different substrate temperatures. The dc and ac photoconductivities of the deposited films were extensively studied as a function of temperature, photon energy and photo-excitation intensity. The results showed that, the dark and photoconductivities have different dependency regions on temperature with different activation energies in the range of 0.08-0.20 eV. It has been also found that the photoconductivity is influenced by the method of deposition and the deposition parameters, indicating that the density of gap states is sensitive to the deposition conditions. The photoconductivity ({sigma}{sub ph}) has a power dependence on the illumination intensity (I) of the form {sigma}{sub ph} {alpha} I {sup {nu}}, where {nu} is a constant and was found also to be increase with temperature.

  19. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material\\'s luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon. This journal is

  20. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  1. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Studies of n-i-p Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Based Photovoltaic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Karki Gautam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of thin film photovoltaics (PV relies on characterizing the optoelectronic and structural properties of each layer and correlating these properties with device performance. Growth evolution diagrams have been used to guide production of materials with good optoelectronic properties in the full hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H PV device configuration. The nucleation and evolution of crystallites forming from the amorphous phase were studied using in situ near-infrared to ultraviolet spectroscopic ellipsometry during growth of films prepared as a function of hydrogen to reactive gas flow ratio R = [H2]/[SiH4]. In conjunction with higher photon energy measurements, the presence and relative absorption strength of silicon-hydrogen infrared modes were measured by infrared extended ellipsometry measurements to gain insight into chemical bonding. Structural and optical models have been developed for the back reflector (BR structure consisting of sputtered undoped zinc oxide (ZnO on top of silver (Ag coated glass substrates. Characterization of the free-carrier absorption properties in Ag and the ZnO + Ag interface as well as phonon modes in ZnO were also studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Measurements ranging from 0.04 to 5 eV were used to extract layer thicknesses, composition, and optical response in the form of complex dielectric function spectra (ε = ε1 + iε2 for Ag, ZnO, the ZnO + Ag interface, and undoped a-Si:H layer in a substrate n-i-p a-Si:H based PV device structure.

  2. Production and characterisation of SLID interconnected n-in-p pixel modules with 75 μm thin silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andricek, L. [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Otto Hahn Ring 6, D-81739 München (Germany); Beimforde, M.; Macchiolo, A.; Moser, H.-G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Nisius, R., E-mail: Richard.Nisius@mpp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Richter, R.H. [Halbleiterlabor der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Otto Hahn Ring 6, D-81739 München (Germany); Terzo, S.; Weigell, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany)

    2014-09-11

    The performance of pixel modules built from 75 μm thin silicon sensors and ATLAS read-out chips employing the Solid Liquid InterDiffusion (SLID) interconnection technology is presented. This technology, developed by the Fraunhofer EMFT, is a possible alternative to the standard bump-bonding. It allows for stacking of different interconnected chip and sensor layers without destroying the already formed bonds. In combination with Inter-Chip-Vias (ICVs) this paves the way for vertical integration. Both technologies are combined in a pixel module concept which is the basis for the modules discussed in this paper. Mechanical and electrical parameters of pixel modules employing both SLID interconnections and sensors of 75 μm thickness are covered. The mechanical features discussed include the interconnection efficiency, alignment precision and mechanical strength. The electrical properties comprise the leakage currents, tuning characteristics, charge collection, cluster sizes and hit efficiencies. Targeting at a usage at the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC accelerator called HL-LHC, the results were obtained before and after irradiation up to fluences of 10{sup 16}n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}.

  3. The Gigatracker: An ultra-fast and low-mass silicon pixel detector for the NA62 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorini, M., E-mail: Massimiliano.Fiorini@cern.c [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carassiti, V. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Ceccucci, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cortina, E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Cotta Ramusino, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mapelli, A. [EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marchetto, F. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Martin, E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Martoiu, S.; Mazza, G. [INFN Sezione di Torino, 10125 Torino (Italy); Morel, M.; Noy, M. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Nuessle, G. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Petrucci, F. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Riedler, P. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2011-02-01

    The Gigatracker is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed to track the highly intense NA62 hadron beam with a time resolution of 150 ps (rms). The beam spectrometer of the experiment is composed of three Gigatracker stations installed in vacuum in order to precisely measure momentum, time and direction of every traversing particle. Precise tracking demands a very low mass of the detector assembly (<0.5% X{sub 0} per station) in order to limit multiple scattering and beam hadronic interactions. The high rate and especially the high timing precision requirements are very demanding: two R and D options are ongoing and the corresponding prototype read-out chips have been recently designed and produced in 0.13{mu}m CMOS technology. One solution makes use of a constant fraction discriminator and on-pixel analogue-based time-to-digital-converter (TDC); the other comprises a delay-locked loop based TDC placed at the end of each pixel column and a time-over-threshold discriminator with time-walk correction technique. The current status of the R and D program is overviewed and results from the prototype read-out chips test are presented.

  4. The Gigatracker: An ultra-fast and low-mass silicon pixel detector for the NA62 experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fiorini, M; Morel, M; Petrucci, F; Marchetto, F; Garbolino, S; Cortina, E; Tiuraniemi, S; Ceccucci, A; Martin, E; Riedler, P; Martoiu, S; Ramusino, A C; Rinella, G A; Mapelli, A; Mazza, G; Noy, M; Jarron, P; Nuessle, G; Dellacasa, G; Kluge, A; Rivetti, A; Kaplon, J

    2011-01-01

    The Gigatracker is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed to track the highly intense NA62 hadron beam with a time resolution of 150 ps (rms). The beam spectrometer of the experiment is composed of three Gigatracker stations installed in vacuum in order to precisely measure momentum, time and direction of every traversing particle. Precise tracking demands a very low mass of the detector assembly (<0.5\\% X(O) per station) in order to limit multiple scattering and beam hadronic interactions. The high rate and especially the high timing precision requirements are very demanding: two R\\&D options are ongoing and the corresponding prototype read-out chips have been recently designed and produced in 0.13 mu m CMOS technology. One solution makes use of a constant fraction discriminator and on-pixel analogue-based time-to-digital-converter (TDC); the other comprises a delay-locked loop based TDC placed at the end of each pixel column and a time-over-threshold discriminator with time-walk correction techniq...

  5. Vectors and submicron precision: redundancy and 3D stacking in silicon pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, E H M; Wong, W; Idarraga, J; Visser, J; Jakubek, J; Leroy, C; Turecek, D; Visschers, J; Pospisil, S; Ballabriga, R; Vykydal, Z; Vermeulen, J; Plackett, R; Heijne, E H M; Llopart, X; Boltje, D; Campbell, M

    2010-01-01

    Measurements are shown of GeV pions and muons in two 300 mu m thick, Si Medipix pixel detector assemblies that are stacked on top of each other, with a 25 mu m thick brass foil in between. In such a radiation imaging semiconductor matrix with a large number of pixels along the particle trail, one can determine local space vectors for the particle trajectory instead of points. This improves pattern recognition and track reconstruction, especially in a crowded environment. Stacking of sensor planes is essential for resolving directional ambiguities. Signal charge sharing can be employed for measuring positions with submicron precision. In the measurements one notices accompanying `delta' electrons that emerge outside the particle trail, far beyond the boundaries of the 55 mu m pixel cells. The frequency of such corrupted position measurements is similar to one per 2.5mm of traversed Si.

  6. Highly ordered amorphous silicon-carbon alloys obtained by RF PECVD

    CERN Document Server

    Pereyra, I; Carreno, M N P; Prado, R J; Fantini, M C A

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that close to stoichiometry RF PECVD amorphous silicon carbon alloys deposited under silane starving plasma conditions exhibit a tendency towards c-Si C chemical order. Motivated by this trend, we further explore the effect of increasing RF power and H sub 2 dilution of the gaseous mixtures, aiming to obtain the amorphous counterpart of c-Si C by the RF-PECVD technique. Doping experiments were also performed on ordered material using phosphorus and nitrogen as donor impurities and boron and aluminum as acceptor ones. For nitrogen a doping efficiency close to device quality a-Si:H was obtained, the lower activation energy being 0,12 eV with room temperature dark conductivity of 2.10 sup - sup 3 (OMEGA.cm). Nitrogen doping efficiency was higher than phosphorous for all studied samples. For p-type doping, results indicate that, even though the attained conductivity values are not device levels, aluminum doping conducted to a promising shift in the Fermi level. Also, aluminum resulted a more efficie...

  7. Electronic properties of embedded graphene: doped amorphous silicon/CVD graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezki, Hakim; Boutchich, Mohamed; Alamarguy, David; Madouri, Ali; Alvarez, José; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Kleider, Jean-Paul; Yao, Fei; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-10-01

    Large-area graphene film is of great interest for a wide spectrum of electronic applications, such as field effect devices, displays, and solar cells, among many others. Here, we fabricated heterostructures composed of graphene (Gr) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper substrate and transferred to SiO2/Si substrates, capped by n- or p-type doped amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Using Raman scattering we show that despite the mechanical strain induced by the a-Si:H deposition, the structural integrity of the graphene is preserved. Moreover, Hall effect measurements directly on the embedded graphene show that the electronic properties of CVD graphene can be modulated according to the doping type of the a-Si:H as well as its phase i.e. amorphous or nanocrystalline. The sheet resistance varies from 360 Ω sq-1 to 1260 Ω sq-1 for the (p)-a-Si:H/Gr (n)-a-Si:H/Gr, respectively. We observed a temperature independent hole mobility of up to 1400 cm2 V-1 s-1 indicating that charge impurity is the principal mechanism limiting the transport in this heterostructure. We have demonstrated that embedding CVD graphene under a-Si:H is a viable route for large scale graphene based solar cells or display applications.

  8. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon applied in very thin tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicho, Sandra

    2011-07-28

    Thin-film solar cells are fabricated by low-cost production processes, and are therefore an alternative to conventionally used wafer solar cells based on crystalline silicon. Due to the different band gaps, tandem cells that consist of amorphous (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline ({mu}c-Si:H) single junction solar cells deposited on top of each other use the solar spectrum much more efficient than single junction solar cells. The silicon layers are usually deposited on TCO (Transparent Conductive Oxide)-coated glass and metal- or plastic foils. Compared to the CdTe and CIGS based thin-film technologies, silicon thin-film solar cells have the advantage that no limitation of raw material supply is expected and no toxic elements are used. Nevertheless, the production cost per Wattpeak is the decisive factor concerning competitiveness and can be reduced by, e.g., shorter deposition times or reduced material consumption. Both cost-reducing conceptions are simultaneously achieved by reducing the a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si:H absorber layer thicknesses in a tandem device. In the work on hand, the influence of an absorber layer thickness reduction up to 77% on the photovoltaic parameters of a-Si:H/{mu}c-Si:H tandem solar cells was investigated. An industry-oriented Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (RF-PECVD) system was used to deposit the solar cells on glass substrates coated with randomly structured TCO layers. The thicknesses of top and bottom cell absorber layers were varied by adjusting the deposition time. Reduced layer thicknesses lead to lower absorption and, hence, to reduced short-circuit current densities which, however, are partially balanced by higher open-circuit voltages and fill factors. Furthermore, by using very thin amorphous top cells, the light-induced degradation decreases tremendously. Accordingly, a thickness reduction of 75% led to an efficiency loss of only 21 %. By adjusting the parameters for the deposition of a-Si:H top cells, a

  9. The First JFET-Based Silicon Carbide Active Pixel Sensor UV Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) imaging is needed in the fields of astronomy, national defense, and bio-chemistry. United Silicon Carbide, Inc. proposes to develop a...

  10. The First JFET-based Silicon Carbide Active Pixel Sensor UV Imager Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solar-blind ultraviolet (UV) imaging is critically important in the fields of space astronomy, national defense, and bio-chemistry. United Silicon Carbide, Inc....

  11. The Effects of Hydrogen on the Potential-Energy Surface of Amorphous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Jean-Francois; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is an important semiconducting material used in many applications from solar cells to transistors. In 2010, Houssem et al. [1], using the open-ended saddle-point search method, ART nouveau, studied the characteristics of the potential energy landscape of a-Si as a function of relaxation. Here, we extend this study and follow the impact of hydrogen doping on the same a-Si models as a function of doping level. Hydrogen atoms are first attached to dangling bonds, then are positioned to relieve strained bonds of fivefold coordinated silicon atoms. Once these sites are saturated, further doping is achieved with a Monte-Carlo bond switching method that preserves coordination and reduces stress [2]. Bonded interactions are described with a modified Stillinger-Weber potential and non-bonded Si-H and H-H interactions with an adapted Slater-Buckingham potential. Large series of ART nouveau searches are initiated on each model, resulting in an extended catalogue of events that characterize the evolution of potential energy surface as a function of H-doping. [4pt] [1] Houssem et al., Phys Rev. Lett., 105, 045503 (2010)[0pt] [2] Mousseau et al., Phys Rev. B, 41, 3702 (1990)

  12. Numerical Analysis of Lamellar Gratings for Light-Trapping in Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Gablinger, David I

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the material specific absorption accurately using a modal method by determining the integral of the Poynting vector around the boundary of a specific material. Given that the accuracy of our method is only determined by the number of modes included, the material specific absorption can be used as a quality measure for the light-trapping performance. We use this method to investigate metallic gratings and find nearly degenerate plasmons at the interface between metal and amorphous silicon (a-Si). The plasmons cause large undesired absorption in the metal part of a grating as used in a-Si cells. We explore ways to alleviate the parasitic absorption in the metal by appropriate choice of the geometry. Separating the diffraction grating from the back reflector helps, lining silver or aluminum with a dielectric helps as well. Gratings with depth > 60nm are preferred, and periods > 600nm are not useful. Maximum absorption in silicon can occur for less thick a-Si than is standard. We also ...

  13. Band engineering of amorphous silicon ruthenium thin film and its near-infrared absorption enhancement combined with nano-holes pattern on back surface of silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Anran; Zhong, Hao; Li, Wei; Gu, Deen; Jiang, Xiangdong; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-10-01

    Silicon is widely used in semiconductor industry but has poor performance in near-infrared photoelectronic devices because of its bandgap limit. In this study, a narrow bandgap silicon rich semiconductor is achieved by introducing ruthenium (Ru) into amorphous silicon (a-Si) to form amorphous silicon ruthenium (a-Si1-xRux) thin films through co-sputtering. The increase of Ru concentration leads to an enhancement of light absorption and a narrower bandgap. Meanwhile, a specific light trapping technique is employed to realize high absorption of a-Si1-xRux thin film in a finite thickness to avoid unnecessary carrier recombination. A double-layer absorber comprising of a-Si1-xRux thin film and silicon random nano-holes layer is formed on the back surface of silicon substrates, and significantly improves near-infrared absorption while the leaky light intensity is less than 5%. This novel absorber, combining narrow bandgap thin film with light trapping structure, may have a potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic devices.

  14. Microcrystalline B-doped window layers prepared near amorphous to microcrystalline transition by HWCVD and its application in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany)]. E-mail: kumarp@rhrk.uni-kl.de; Kupich, M. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany); Grunsky, D. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany); Schroeder, B. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany)

    2006-04-20

    The electronic and structural properties of p-type microcrystalline silicon films prepared near the microcrystalline to amorphous ({mu}c-amorphous) transition by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition are studied. Silane is used as a source gas while H{sub 2} as diluent and trimethylboron (TMB) and boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}) as doping gases. Increasing TMB concentration from 0.01% to 5% favors the amorphous growth whereas for BF{sub 3} the crystalline fraction remains constant. The dark conductivity ({sigma} {sub d}) of {mu}c-Si:H p-layers remains approximately constant for TMB 1-5% at constant crystalline fraction X {sub c}. This dark conductivity behavior is attributed to the decrease in doping efficiency with increasing TMB concentration. The best initial efficiency obtained for a 400 nm amorphous pin solar cell with optimized {mu}c-Si:H p-layer is 7.7% (V {sub oc} = 874 mV, J {sub sc} = 12.91 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 68%)

  15. Preferred orientations of laterally grown silicon films over amorphous substrates using the vapor–liquid–solid technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBoeuf, J. L., E-mail: jerome.leboeuf@mail.mcgill.ca; Brodusch, N.; Gauvin, R.; Quitoriano, N. J. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2014-12-28

    A novel method has been optimized so that adhesion layers are no longer needed to reliably deposit patterned gold structures on amorphous substrates. Using this technique allows for the fabrication of amorphous oxide templates known as micro-crucibles, which confine a vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) catalyst of nominally pure gold to a specific geometry. Within these confined templates of amorphous materials, faceted silicon crystals have been grown laterally. The novel deposition technique, which enables the nominally pure gold catalyst, involves the undercutting of an initial chromium adhesion layer. Using electron backscatter diffraction it was found that silicon nucleated in these micro-crucibles were 30% single crystals, 45% potentially twinned crystals and 25% polycrystals for the experimental conditions used. Single, potentially twinned, and polycrystals all had an aversion to growth with the (1 0 0) surface parallel to the amorphous substrate. Closer analysis of grain boundaries of potentially twinned and polycrystalline samples revealed that the overwhelming majority of them were of the 60° Σ3 coherent twin boundary type. The large amount of coherent twin boundaries present in the grown, two-dimensional silicon crystals suggest that lateral VLS growth occurs very close to thermodynamic equilibrium. It is suggested that free energy fluctuations during growth or cooling, and impurities were the causes for this twinning.

  16. Nanocrystalline silicon and silicon quantum dots formation within amorphous silicon carbide by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method controlling the Argon dilution of the process gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha, E-mail: erpc@iacs.res.in

    2012-11-01

    Structural and optical properties of the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method from a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) diluted in argon (Ar) have been studied with variation of Ar dilution from 94% to 98.4%. It is observed that nanocrystalline silicon starts to form within the a-SiC:H matrix by increasing the dilution to 96%. With further increase in Ar dilution to 98% formation of the silicon nanocrystals (nc-Si) with variable size is enhanced. The optical band gap (E{sub g}) of the a-SiC:H film decreases from 2.0 eV to 1.9 eV with increase in Ar dilution from 96% to 98% as the a-SiC:H films gradually become Si rich. On increasing the Ar dilution further to 98.4% leads to the appearance of crystalline silicon quantum dots (c-Si q-dots) of nearly uniform size of 3.5 nm. The quantum confinement effect is apparent from the sharp increase in the E{sub g} value to 2.6 eV. The phase transformation phenomenon from nc-Si within the a-SiC:H films to Si q-dot were further studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the grazing angle X-ray diffraction spectra. A relaxation in the lattice strain has been observed with the formation of Si q-dots.

  17. A critical appraisal of the factors affecting energy production from amorphous silicon photovoltaic arrays in a maritime climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalg, R.; Betts, T.R.; Williams, S.R.; Sauter, D.; Infield, D.G. [Loughborough University (United Kingdom). Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology; Kearney, M.J. [University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, Advanced Technology Institute

    2004-12-01

    Contradictory reports exist in the literature regarding the energy production from amorphous silicon photovoltaic arrays. The majority claims high-energy output compared to crystalline silicon arrays of the same power rating (i.e. high kW h/kW{sub p}), but some reports point to less favourable comparisons. The reasons for these conflicting reports are investigated using long-term measurements of the I-V characteristics of a number of amorphous silicon devices, in conjunction with in situ measurements of the solar spectrum and other relevant environmental parameters. It is shown that the variation in the performance of devices produced by different manufacturers is so significant that one cannot speak of the performance of amorphous silicon devices in general; one has to investigate each type of amorphous silicon panel separately. The causes of differences in energy production are investigated in detail. The major factor impacting on the seasonal performance in the UK is identified to be variations in the solar spectrum. Single junction devices exhibit some seasonal thermal annealing but multi-junctions do not show this effect at a significant level. Scope for further improvement is identified, largely in the photon absorption. The response to different spectra can be modified to some extent, which would bridge the gap between the best and the worst performers in the field. It is also shown that in the case of multi-junction devices an optimised current matching might bring a 5% increase in energy production for this location. Differences in the magnitude of the fill factor have been identified to be the second most significant cause for performance variation between the different samples in the test, suggesting additional scope for improvement. (author)

  18. DEPFET: A silicon pixel detector for future colliders. Fundamentals, characterization and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Marinas Pardo, Carlos Manuel; Vos, Marcel Andre

    2011-01-01

    The future electron-positron colliders, either breaking the energy frontier (like ILC or CLIC) or the luminosity frontier (SuperKEKB), impose unprecedented constraints over the new generation of detectors that will be operated in those facilities. In particular, the vertex detectors must be designed for an efficient flavour tagging and excellent vertex reconstruction. To cope with these requirements, highly pixelated sensors with a fast readout, very low material budget and low power consumption must be developed. Although the combination of these factors is a substantial challenge, the DEPFET Collaboration has developed a new generation of sensors that can be operated in such a harsh environment. The DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) is a pixel sensor that combines detection and internal amplification at the same time. With such configuration, thin detectors with good signal-to-noise ratio and low power consumption can be produced. In this thesis, the optimization and performance of two gen...

  19. Evaluation of the breakdown behaviour of ATLAS silicon pixel sensors after partial guard-ring removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goessling, C.; Klingenberg, R. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Muenstermann, D., E-mail: Daniel.Muenstermann@TU-Dortmund.d [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Wittig, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Physik IV, TU Dortmund, 44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-12-11

    To avoid geometrical inefficiencies in the ATLAS pixel detector, the concept of shingling is used up to now in the barrel section. For the upgrades of ATLAS, it is desired to avoid this as it increases the volume and material budget of the pixel layers and complicates the cooling. A direct planar edge-to-edge arrangement of pixel modules has not been possible in the past due to about 1100{mu}m of inactive edge composed of approximately 600{mu}m of guard rings and 500{mu}m of safety margin. In this work, the safety margin and guard rings of ATLAS SingleChip sensors were cut at different positions using a standard diamond dicing saw and irradiated afterwards to explore the breakdown behaviour and the leakage current development. It is found that the inactive edge can be reduced to about 400{mu}m of guard rings with almost no reduction in pre-irradiation testability and leakage current performance. This is in particular important for the insertable b-layer upgrade of ATLAS (IBL) where inactive edges of less than 450{mu}m width are required.

  20. Synthesis of Poly-Silicon Thin Films on Glass Substrate Using Laser Initiated Metal Induced Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon for Space Power Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Safe, Husam H.; Naseem, Hameed A.; Brown, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Poly-silicon thin films on glass substrates are synthesized using laser initiated metal induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. These films can be used to fabricate solar cells on low cost glass and flexible substrates. The process starts by depositing 200 nm amorphous silicon films on the glass substrates. Following this, 200 nm of sputtered aluminum films were deposited on top of the silicon layers. The samples are irradiated with an argon ion cw laser beam for annealing. Laser power densities ranging from 4 to 9 W/cm2 were used in the annealing process. Each area on the sample is irradiated for a different exposure time. Optical microscopy was used to examine any cracks in the films and loss of adhesion to the substrates. X-Ray diffraction patterns from the initial results indicated the crystallization in the films. Scanning electron microscopy shows dendritic growth. The composition analysis of the crystallized films was conducted using Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy. The results of poly-silicon films synthesis on space qualified flexible substrates such as Kapton are also presented.

  1. Development of Edgeless Silicon Pixel Sensors on p-type substrate for the ATLAS High-Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Calderini, G; Bomben, M; Boscardin, M; Bosisio, L; Chauveau, J; Giacomini, G; La Rosa, A; Marchiori, G; Zorzi, N

    2014-01-01

    In view of the LHC upgrade for the high luminosity phase (HL-LHC), the ATLAS experiment is planning to replace the inner detector with an all-silicon system. The n-in-p bulk technology represents a valid solution for the modules of most of the layers, given the significant radiation hardness of this option and the reduced cost. The large area necessary to instrument the outer layers will demand to tile the sensors, a solution for which the inefficient region at the border of each sensor needs to be reduced to the minimum size. This paper reports on a joint R&D project by the ATLAS LPNHE Paris group and FBK Trento on a novel n-in-p edgeless planar pixel design, based on the deep-trench process available at FBK.

  2. Observation by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy of strongly inverted surface layers at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, O. A.; Alvarez, J.; Gushina, E. V.; Favre, W.; Gueunier-Farret, M. E.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Terukov, E. I.; Kleider, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Heterojunctions made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) are examined by conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Conductive channels at both (n )a-Si:H/(p)c-Si and (p)a-Si:H/(n)c-Si interfaces are clearly revealed. These are attributed to two-dimension electron and hole gases due to strong inversion layers at the c-Si surface in agreement with previous planar conductance measurements. The presence of a hole gas in (p )a-Si:H/(n)c-Si structures implies a quite large valence band offset (EVc-Si-EVa-Si:H>0.25 eV).

  3. Femtosecond laser-controlled self-assembly of amorphous-crystalline nanogratings in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto, Daniel; Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembly (SA) of molecular units to form regular, periodic extended structures is a powerful bottom-up technique for nanopatterning, inspired by nature. SA can be triggered in all classes of solid materials, for instance, by femtosecond laser pulses leading to the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with a period slightly shorter than the laser wavelength. This approach, though, typically involves considerable material ablation, which leads to an unwanted increase of the surface roughness. We present a new strategy to fabricate high-precision nanograting structures in silicon, consisting of alternating amorphous and crystalline lines, with almost no material removal. The strategy can be applied to static irradiation experiments and can be extended into one and two dimensions by scanning the laser beam over the sample surface. We demonstrate that lines and areas with parallel nanofringe patterns can be written by an adequate choice of spot size, repetition rate and scan velocity, keeping a constant effective pulse number (N eff) per area for a given laser wavelength. A deviation from this pulse number leads either to inhomogeneous or ablative structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach can be used with different laser systems having widely different wavelengths (1030 nm, 800 nm, 400 nm), pulse durations (370 fs, 100 fs) and repetition rates (500 kHz, 100 Hz, single pulse) and that the grating period can also be tuned by changing the angle of laser beam incidence. The grating structures can be erased by irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse, triggering recrystallization of the amorphous stripes. Given the large differences in electrical conductivity between the two phases, our structures could find new applications in nanoelectronics.

  4. Investigation of properties of novel silicon pixel assemblies employing thin n-in-p sensors and 3D-integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigell, Philipp

    2013-01-15

    Until the end of the 2020 decade the LHC programme will be defining the high energy frontier of particle physics. During this time, three upgrade steps of the accelerator are currently planned to further increase the luminosity and energy reach. In the course of these upgrades the specifications of several parts of the current LHC detectors will be exceeded. Especially, the innermost tracking detectors are challenged by the increasing track densities and the radiation damage. This thesis focuses on the implications for the ATLAS experiment. Here, around 2021/2, after having collected an integrated luminosity of around 300 fb{sup -1}, the silicon and gas detector components of the inner tracker will reach the end of their lifetime and will need to be replaced to ensure sufficient performance for continued running - especially if the luminosity is raised to about 5 x 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} as currently planned. An all silicon inner detector is foreseen to be installed. This upgrade demands cost effective pixel assemblies with a minimal material budget, a larger active area fraction as compared to the current detectors, and a higher granularity. Furthermore, the assemblies must be able to withstand received fluences up to 2 . 10{sup 16} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. A new pixel assembly concept answering the challenges posed by the high instantaneous luminosities is investigated in this thesis. It employs five novel technologies, namely n-in-p pixel sensors, thin pixel sensors, slim edges with or without implanted sensor sides, and 3D-integration incorporating a new interconnection technology, named Solid Liquid InterDiffusion (SLID) as well as Inter-Chip-Vias (ICVs). n-in-p sensors are cost-effective, since they only need patterned processing on one side. Their performance before and after irradiation is investigated and compared to results obtained with currently used n-in-n sensors. Reducing the thickness of the sensors lowers the amount of multiple scattering

  5. 3D silicon sensors: Design, large area production and quality assurance for the ATLAS IBL pixel detector upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Via, Cinzia [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boscardin, Maurizio [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, FBK-CMM, Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco, E-mail: dallabe@disi.unitn.it [DISI, Universita degli Studi di Trento and INFN, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Darbo, Giovanni [INFN Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-14146 Genova (Italy); Fleta, Celeste [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona E-08193 (Spain); Gemme, Claudia [INFN Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, I-14146 Genova (Italy); Grenier, Philippe [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Grinstein, Sebastian [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE) and ICREA, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Hansen, Thor-Erik [SINTEF MiNaLab, Blindern, N-0314 Oslo (Norway); Hasi, Jasmine; Kenney, Chris [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Kok, Angela [SINTEF MiNaLab, Blindern, N-0314 Oslo (Norway); Parker, Sherwood [University of Hawaii, c/o Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pellegrini, Giulio [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, CNM-IMB (CSIC), Barcelona E-08193 (Spain); Vianello, Elisa; Zorzi, Nicola [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, FBK-CMM, Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    3D silicon sensors, where electrodes penetrate the silicon substrate fully or partially, have successfully been fabricated in different processing facilities in Europe and USA. The key to 3D fabrication is the use of plasma micro-machining to etch narrow deep vertical openings allowing dopants to be diffused in and form electrodes of pin junctions. Similar openings can be used at the sensor's edge to reduce the perimeter's dead volume to as low as {approx}4 {mu}m. Since 2009 four industrial partners of the 3D ATLAS R and D Collaboration started a joint effort aimed at one common design and compatible processing strategy for the production of 3D sensors for the LHC Upgrade and in particular for the ATLAS pixel Insertable B-Layer (IBL). In this project, aimed for installation in 2013, a new layer will be inserted as close as 3.4 cm from the proton beams inside the existing pixel layers of the ATLAS experiment. The detector proximity to the interaction point will therefore require new radiation hard technologies for both sensors and front end electronics. The latter, called FE-I4, is processed at IBM and is the biggest front end of this kind ever designed with a surface of {approx}4 cm{sup 2}. The performance of 3D devices from several wafers was evaluated before and after bump-bonding. Key design aspects, device fabrication plans and quality assurance tests during the 3D sensors prototyping phase are discussed in this paper.

  6. The upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System - Status of the R&D; on monolithic silicon pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem

    2014-01-01

    s a major part of its upgrade plans, the ALICE experiment schedules the installation of a novel Inner Tracking System (ITS) during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in 2018/19. It will replace the present silicon tracker with seven layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) and significantly improve the detector performance in terms of tracking and rate capabilities. The choice of technology has been guided by the tight requirements on the material budget of 0 : 3 % X = X 0 /layer for the three innermost layers and backed by the significant progress in the field of MAPS in recent years. The pixel chips are manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS imaging sensor process on wafers with a high resistivity epitaxial layer. Within the ongoing R&D; phase, several sensor chip prototypes have been developed and produced on different epitaxial layer thicknesses and resistivities. These chips are being characterized for their performance before and after irradiation using source tests, test beam and measu...

  7. The Temperature Dependence Coefficients of Amorphous Silicon and Crystalline Photovoltaic Modules Using Malaysian Field Test Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Shaari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence coefficients of amorphous silicon and crystalline photovoltaic (PV modules using Malaysian field data have been obtained using linear regression technique. This is achieved by studying three test stand-alone PV-battery systems using 62 Wp a-Si, 225 Wp multi-crystalline and 225 Wp mono-crystalline PV modules. These systems were designed to provide electricity for rural domestic loads at 200 W, 500 W and 530 W respectively. The systems were installed in the field with data monitored using data loggers. Upon analysis, the study found that the normalized power output per operating array temperature for the amorphous silicon modules, multi-crystalline modules and mono-crystalline modules were: +0.037 per°C, +0.0225 per °C and +0.0263 per °C respectively. In addition, at a solar irradiance value of 500 Wm-2, the current, voltage, power and efficiency dependence coefficients on operating array temperatures obtained from linear regression were: +37.0 mA per °C, -31.8 mV per °C, -0.1036 W per °C and -0.0214% per °C, for the a-Si modules, +22.5 mA per °C, -39.4 mV per °C, -0.2525 W per °C, -0.072 % per °C for the multi-crystalline modules and +26.3 mA per °C, -32.6 mV per °C, -0.1742 W per °C, -0.0523 % per °C for the mono-crystalline modules. These findings have a direct impact on all systems design and sizing in similar climate regions. It is thus recommended that the design and sizing of PV systems in the hot and humid climate regions of the globe give due address to these findings.

  8. Photostability Assessment in Amorphous-Silicon Solar Cells; Determinacion de la Fotoestabilidad en Celulas Solares de Silicio Amorfo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandia, J. J.; Carabe, J.; Fabero, F.; Jimenez, R.; Rivero, J. M. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The present status of amorphous-silicon-solar-cell research and development at CIEMAT requires the possibility to characterise the devices prepared from the point of view of their stability against sunlight exposure. Therefore a set of tools providing such a capacity has been developed. Together with an introduction to photovoltaic applications of amorphous silicon and to the photodegradation problem, the present work describes the process of setting up these tools. An indoor controlled-photodegradation facility has been designed and built, and a procedure has been developed for the measurement of J-V characteristics in well established conditions. This method is suitable for a kinds of solar cells, even for those for which no model is still available. The photodegradation and characterisation of some cells has allowed to validate both the new testing facility and method. (Author) 14 refs.

  9. Behavioral data of thin-film single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules under outdoor long term exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichou, Sofiane; Silvestre, Santiago; Nofuentes, Gustavo; Torres-Ramírez, Miguel; Chouder, Aissa; Guasch, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Four years׳ behavioral data of thin-film single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in a relatively dry and sunny inland site with a Continental-Mediterranean climate (in the city of Jaén, Spain) are presented in this article. The shared data contributes to clarify how the Light Induced Degradation (LID) impacts the output power generated by the PV array, especially in the first days of exposure under outdoor conditions. Furthermore, a valuable methodology is provided in this data article permitting the assessment of the degradation rate and the stabilization period of the PV modules. Further discussions and interpretations concerning the data shared in this article can be found in the research paper "Characterization of degradation and evaluation of model parameters of amorphous silicon photovoltaic modules under outdoor long term exposure" (Kichou et al., 2016) [1].

  10. Enhanced photocurrent in thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells via shape controlled three-dimensional nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilali, Mohamed M; Yang, Shuqiang; Miller, Mike; Xu, Frank; Banerjee, Sanjay; Sreenivasan, S V

    2012-10-12

    In this paper, we have explored manufacturable approaches to sub-wavelength controlled three-dimensional (3D) nano-patterns with the goal of significantly enhancing the photocurrent in amorphous silicon solar cells. Here we demonstrate efficiency enhancement of about 50% over typical flat a-Si thin-film solar cells, and report an enhancement of 20% in optical absorption over Asahi textured glass by fabricating sub-wavelength nano-patterned a-Si on glass substrates. External quantum efficiency showed superior results for the 3D nano-patterned thin-film solar cells due to enhancement of broadband optical absorption. The results further indicate that this enhanced light trapping is achieved with minimal parasitic absorption losses in the deposited transparent conductive oxide for the nano-patterned substrate thin-film amorphous silicon solar cell configuration. Optical simulations are in good agreement with experimental results, and also show a significant enhancement in optical absorption, quantum efficiency and photocurrent.

  11. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Caniello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coating became three time stronger than in the case of a bare silicon substrate. Physical structure and microstructural proprieties of the coatings were investigated by means of a scan electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the films was measured by a scratch tester.

  12. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells. Annual technical report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, R.G.; Sato, H.; Liang, H.; Liu, X.; Thornton, J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The general objective is to develop methods to deposit materials which can be used to make more efficient solar cells. The work is organized into three general tasks: Task 1. Develop improved methods for depositing and using transparent conductors of fluorine-doped zinc oxide in amorphous silicon solar cells Task 2. Deposit and evaluate titanium oxide as a reflection-enhancing diffusion barrier between amorphous silicon and an aluminum or silver back-reflector. Task 3. Deposit and evaluate electrically conductive titanium oxide as a transparent conducting layer on which more efficient and more stable superstrate cells can be deposited. About one-third of the current project resources are allocated to each of these three objectives.

  13. Thin-film amorphous silicon alloy research partnership, Phase I. Annual technical progress report, February 2, 1995--February 1, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guha, S. [United Solar Systems Corp., Troy, MI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The principal objective of this R&D program is to expand, enhance and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for the development of high-performance, two-terminal multifunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy modules. The near-term goal of the program is to achieve 12% stable module efficiency by 1998 using the multifunction approach. This report describes research on back reflectors of Ag/TiO{sub 2}/ZnO.

  14. Characterisation of micro-strip and pixel silicon detectors before and after hadron irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Allport, P.P

    2012-01-01

    The use of segmented silicon detectors for tracking and vertexing in particle physics has grown substantially since their introduction in 1980. It is now anticipated that roughly 50,000 six inch wafers of high resistivity silicon will need to be processed into sensors to be deployed in the upgraded experiments in the future high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) at CERN. These detectors will also face an extremely severe radiation environment, varying with distance from the interaction point. The volume of required sensors is large and their delivery is required during a relatively short time, demanding a high throughput from the chosen suppliers. The current situation internationally, in this highly specialist market, means that security of supply for large orders can therefore be an issue and bringing additional potential vendors into the field can only be an advantage. Semiconductor companies that could include planar sensors suitable for particle physics in their product lines will, however, need to prove their pro...

  15. Microchannel cooling in low material budget supports for silicon pixel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balestri, G. [INFN Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56010 Pisa (Italy); Bosi, F., E-mail: filippo.bosi@pi.infn.i [INFN Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56010 Pisa (Italy); Ceccanti, M.; Mammini, P.; Massa, M.; Petragnani, G.; Ragonesi, A.; Soldani, A. [INFN Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56010 Pisa (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    Pixel detectors at future colliders will need to match very stringent requirement on position resolution. To ensure the needed mechanical stability and the removal of the power dissipated by the read-out electronic, the support structure and cooling add an important contribution to the total material in the active area, in terms of radiation length. We present the development, the construction and the mechanical-thermal characterization of prototypes of light material support for pixel detectors with microchannel for heat evacuation through forced convection of liquid coolant. The solution we choose shows several advantages: heat exchange is taking place efficiently due to the high ratio surface/volume and so high thermal conductivities can be obtained, minimally affecting the stiffness of the structure; the thermal resistances are reduced because of the contiguity between the fluid and the circuit dissipating power; the uniformity of temperature on the surface covered by of the sensors is also kept under control. Several prototypes implementing different geometries of micro-machined channels have been realized in composites materials (CFRP). FEA studies have been performed to validated the experimental test conducted in the thermo-fluid dynamic test bench we recently assembled in the INFN Pisa laboratory.

  16. Preliminary test results of a new high-energy-resolution silicon and CdZnTe pixel detectors for application to x-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, V. V.; Hamilton, William J.; Hurley, Kevin; Maeding, Dale G.; Ogelman, Hakki; Paulos, Robert J.; Puetter, Richard C.; Tumer, Tumay O.; Zweerink, Jeffrey

    1999-10-01

    New, high spatial resolution CdZnTe (CZT) and silicon (Si) pixel detectors are highly suitable for x-ray astronomy. These detectors are planned for use in wide field of view, imaging x-ray, and low energy gamma-ray all-sky monitor (AXGAM) in a future space mission. The high stopping power of CZT detectors combined with low-noise front-end readout makes possible an order of magnitude improvement in spatial and energy resolution in x-ray detection. The AXGAM instrument will be built in the form of a fine coded aperture placed over two-dimensional, high spatial resolution and low energy threshold CZT pixel detector array. The preliminary result of CZT and silicon pixel detector test with low-noise readout electronics system are presented. These detectors may also be used with or without modification for medical and industrial imaging.

  17. Amorphous Silicon Single-Junction Thin-Film Solar Cell Exceeding 10% Efficiency by Design Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ikbal Kabir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion efficiency of a solar cell can substantially be increased by improved material properties and associated designs. At first, this study has adopted AMPS-1D (analysis of microelectronic and photonic structures simulation technique to design and optimize the cell parameters prior to fabrication, where the optimum design parameters can be validated. Solar cells of single junction based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H have been analyzed by using AMPS-1D simulator. The investigation has been made based on important model parameters such as thickness, doping concentrations, bandgap, and operating temperature and so forth. The efficiency of single junction a-Si:H can be achieved as high as over 19% after parametric optimization in the simulation, which might seem unrealistic with presently available technologies. Therefore, the numerically designed and optimized a-SiC:H/a-SiC:H-buffer/a-Si:H/a-Si:H solar cells have been fabricated by using PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, where the best initial conversion efficiency of 10.02% has been achieved ( V,  mA/cm2 and for a small area cell (0.086 cm2. The quantum efficiency (QE characteristic shows the cell’s better spectral response in the wavelength range of 400 nm–650 nm, which proves it to be a potential candidate as the middle cell in a-Si-based multijunction structures.

  18. 25th anniversary article: organic field-effect transistors: the path beyond amorphous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-03-05

    Over the past 25 years, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have witnessed impressive improvements in materials performance by 3-4 orders of magnitude, and many of the key materials discoveries have been published in Advanced Materials. This includes some of the most recent demonstrations of organic field-effect transistors with performance that clearly exceeds that of benchmark amorphous silicon-based devices. In this article, state-of-the-art in OFETs are reviewed in light of requirements for demanding future applications, in particular active-matrix addressing for flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. An overview is provided over both small molecule and conjugated polymer materials for which field-effect mobilities exceeding > 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) have been reported. Current understanding is also reviewed of their charge transport physics that allows reaching such unexpectedly high mobilities in these weakly van der Waals bonded and structurally comparatively disordered materials with a view towards understanding the potential for further improvement in performance in the future.

  19. Morphological and Chemical Analysis Of Degraded Single Junction Amorphous Silicon Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osayemwenre, Gilbert; Meyer, Edson; Mamphweli, Sampson

    2017-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar modules have different defects and degradation characteristic modes. These defects/degradation modes normally heats up some regions in the PV module, depending on the degree and size of the localised heat or hot spot, the localized heat can rise above the temperature limit of the module thereby cause damage to the structural orientation. The presence of severe defect and degradation correlates with high temperature gradients that usually results in morphological damage especially under outdoor conditions. The present study investigates the effect of defect/degradation on the surface morphology of the single junction amorphous silicon modules (a-Si:H) during outdoor deployment. The observed structural damage was analysed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersion X-ray (EDX) to ascertain the elemental composition. Results show huge discrepancies in the chemical composition constitute alone different regions. The presence of high concentration of carbon and oxygen was found in the affected region. The authors sincerely thank GMDRC University of Fort Hare for financial support. The authors also wish to thank Eskom for financing this project.

  20. Field collapse due to band-tail charge in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    1996-05-01

    It is common for the fill factor to decrease with increasing illumination intensity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells. This is especially critical for thicker solar cells, because the decrease is more severe than in thinner cells. Usually, the fill factor under uniformly absorbed red light changes much more than under strongly absorbed blue light. The cause of this is usually assumed to arise from space charge trapped in deep defect states. The authors model this behavior of solar cells using the Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS) simulation program. The simulation shows that the decrease in fill factor is caused by photogenerated space charge trapped in the band-tail states rather than in defects. This charge screens the applied field, reducing the internal field. Owing to its lower drift mobility, the space charge due to holes exceeds that due to electrons and is the main cause of the field screening. The space charge in midgap states is small compared with that in the tails and can be ignored under normal solar-cell operating conditions. Experimentally, the authors measured the photocapacitance as a means to probe the collapsed field. They also explored the light intensity dependence of photocapacitance and explain the decrease of FF with the increasing light intensity.

  1. Phosphorus- and boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared using vaporized liquid cyclopentasilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Takashi, E-mail: mtakashi@jaist.ac.jp [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 (Japan); Takagishi, Hideyuki; Shen, Zhongrong; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ALCA, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan)

    2015-08-31

    A simple, inexpensive method for fabricating a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film using thermal chemical vapor deposition from cyclopentasilane (CPS) at atmospheric pressure with a substrate temperature of 370 °C is described. The reactant gas was generated from liquid CPS by vaporization in the deposition chamber. The vaporized CPS gas was transformed immediately into a-Si:H film on a heated substrate. The a-Si:H films could be doped either n- or p-type by dissolving appropriate amounts of white phosphorus or decaborane, respectively, in the liquid CPS before vaporization. This process allows deposition of doped a-Si:H films of photovoltaic device-quality without the need for handling, storage, or transportation of large amounts of gaseous reactants. - Highlights: • B and P doped a-Si:H films made from liquid materials is presented. • Decaborane and white phosphorus is dissolved in the liquid materials. • A simple, inexpensive method for fabricating a-Si:H films using non-vacuum process. • The doped a-Si:H films with usable quality for photovoltaic devices are deposited.

  2. Room Temperature Growth of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Enhanced CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yu; ZHANG Xiwen; HAN Gaorong

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited on Si (100) and glass substrates by dielectric barrier discharge enhanced chemical vapour deposition (DBD-CVD)in (SiH4+H2) atmosphere at room temperature.Results of the thickness measurement,SEM (scanning electron microscope),Raman,and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) show that with the increase in the applied peak voltage,the deposition rate and network order of the films increase,and the hydrogen bonding configurations mainly in di-hydrogen (Si-H2) and poly hydrogen (SiH2)n are introduced into the films.The UV-visible transmission spectra show that with the decrease in Sill4/ (SiH4+H2) the thin films'band gap shifts from 1.92 eV to 2.17 eV.These experimental results are in agreement with the theoretic analysis of the DBD discharge.The deposition of a-Si:H films by the DBD-CVD method as reported here for the first time is attractive because it allows fast deposition of a-Si:H films on large-area low-melting-point substrates and requires only a low cost of production without additional heating or pumping equipment.

  3. Surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence in amorphous silicon carbide films by adjusting Ag island film sizes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wei; Wang Xin-Zhan; Dai Wan-Lei; Lu Wan-Bing; Liu Yu-Mei; Fu Guang-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Ag island films with different sizes are deposited on hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC∶H) films,and the influences of Ag island films on the optical properties of the α-SiC∶H films are investigated.Atomic force microscope images show that Ag nanoislands are formed after Ag coating,and the size of the Ag islands increases with increasing Ag deposition time.The extinction spectra indicate that two resonance absorption peaks which correspond to out-of-plane and in-plane surface plasmon modes of the Ag island films are obtained,and the resonance peak shifts toward longer wavelength with increasing Ag island size.The photoluminescence (PL) enhancement or quenching depends on the size of Ag islands,and PL enhancement by 1.6 times on the main PL band is obtained when the sputtering time is 10 min.Analyses show that the influence of surface plasmons on the PL of α-SiC:H is determined by the competition between the scattering and absorption of Ag islands,and PL enhancement is obtained when scattering is the main interaction between the Ag islands and incident light.

  4. Improvement of small-area, amorphous-silicon thin-film photovoltaics on polymer substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.F. (Minnesota Mining and Mfg. Co., St. Paul, MN (USA). Applied Technologies Lab.)

    1990-02-01

    This report describes a contract to produce, using roll-to-roll deposition on polyamide substrate, a small-area amorphous-silicon p-i-n photovoltaic (PV) cell with an energy conversion efficiency of 10% under air mass 1.5 insolation. Three improvements were attempted to achieve this goal: (1) zinc oxide, a transparent conducting oxide, was used as a top contact; the zinc oxide conductivity was improved to 8--9 ohms/square sheet resistance with less than 8% average optical absorption. (2) The red light response was improved with dielectric enhanced metal reflecting electrodes, which increased the short-circuit current density by more than 1 mA/Cm{sup 2}; a three-layer dielectric mirror coating was also designed that can increase the current density by another 1 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Improving the fill factor of the n-i-p (reverse structured) devices was also achieved in a multichamber deposition system. The overall energy conversion efficiency of the PV cell was 8.36%. Major obstacles to higher efficiencies are (1) controlling the thin-film defects that cause electrical shunts in devices fabricated on enhanced reflection electrodes, and (2) controlling impurities and introducing dopant profiles near the p/i interface in a continuous web deposition system.

  5. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, A. [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Mandelis, A. [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)

    2013-12-28

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10 nm at 355 nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  6. Light trapping in amorphous silicon solar cells with periodic grating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia, Haihua; Wang, Qingkang; Chen, Jian [National Key Laboratory of Micro /Nano Fabrication Technology, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication Technology of Ministry of Education, Research Institute of Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Krc, J. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Trzaska25, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Soppe, W.J. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands ECN, P. O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Pettern (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    We report on the design of amorphous silicon solar cells with the periodic grating structures. It is a combination of an anti-reflection structure and the metallic reflection grating. Optical coupling and light trapping in thin-film solar cells are studied numerically using the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis enhanced by the Modal Transmission Line theory. The impact of the structure parameters of the gratings is investigated. The results revealed that within the incident angles of - 40{sup 0} to + 40{sup 0} the reflectivity of the cell with a period of 0.5 {mu}m, a filling factor of 0.1 and a groove depth of 0.4 {mu}m is 4%-22.7% in the wavelength range of 0.3-0.6 {mu}m and 1%-20.8% in the wavelength range of 0.6-0.84 {mu}m, the absorption enhancement of the a-Si layer is 0.4%-10.8% and 20%-385%, respectively.

  7. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.; Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P.

    2013-12-01

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10 nm at 355 nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  8. Electric properties of undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon semiconductors irradiated with self-ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro, E-mail: sato.shinichiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sai, Hitoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Shimazaki, Kazunori [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Kondo, Michio [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    This paper reports dark conductivity (DC), photoconductivity (PC), and Seebeck coefficient variations of undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon semiconductors irradiated with protons and Si ions. Both the DC and PC values show nonmonotonic variations with increasing a fluence in the case of proton irradiation, whereas the monotonic decreases are observed in the case of Si ion irradiation. From results of the Seebeck coefficient variation due to proton irradiation, it is shown that the increase in DC and PC in the low fluence regime is caused by donor-center generation. Also, it is shown by analyzing the proton energy dependence and the energy deposition process that the donor-center generation is based on the electronic excitation effect. On the other hand, the decrease in DC and PC in the high fluence regime is attributed to the carrier removal effect and the carrier lifetime decrease due to the accumulation of dangling bonds, respectively. The dangling bond generation due to ion irradiation is mainly caused by the displacement damage effect and therefore it is different from the generation process in the Staebler-Wronski effect.

  9. Anomalous enhancement in radiation induced conductivity of hydrogenated amorphous silicon semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro, E-mail: sato.shinichiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sai, Hitoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Shimazaki, Kazunori [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Kondo, Michio [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Electric conductivity variations of undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) semiconductors induced by swift protons are investigated. The results show that the conductivity drastically increases at first and then decreases on further irradiation. The conductivity enhancement is observed only in the low fluence regime and lasts for a prolonged period of time when proton irradiation stops in this fluence regime. On the other hand, the photosensitivity has a minimum value around the conductivity peak. This fact indicates that non-equilibrium carriers do not play a dominant role in the electric conduction in this fluence regime. It is found that the anomalous conductivity enhancement in the low fluence regime is dominated by donor center generation. At higher fluences the conductivity during irradiation is dominated by non-equilibrium carriers as the generated donor centers disappear. It is also found that the RIC in the high fluence regime is proportional to the carrier generation rate. This indicates that the recombination process of non-equilibrium carriers is dominated by indirect recombination via defect levels.

  10. Image quality vs. radiation dose for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, H; Beckman, K W; Andersson, T; Persliden, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector at various radiation dose settings and to compare the results with storage phosphor plates and a screen-film system. A CDRAD 2.0 contrast-detail phantom was imaged with a flat-panel detector (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) at three different dose levels with settings for intravenous urography. The same phantom was imaged with storage phosphor plates at a simulated system speed of 200 and a screen-film system with a system speed of 160. Entrance surface doses were recorded for all images. At each setting, three images were read by four independent observers. The flat-panel detector had equal image quality at less than half the radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates. The difference was even larger when compared with film with the flat-panel detector having equal image quality at approximately one-fifth the dose. The flat-panel detector has a very favourable combination of image quality vs radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates and screen film.

  11. Image quality vs radiation dose for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijer, H.; Andersson, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Oerebro Medical Centre Hospital (Sweden); Beckman, K.W.; Persliden, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Oerebro Medical Centre Hospital (Sweden)

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector at various radiation dose settings and to compare the results with storage phosphor plates and a screen-film system. A CDRAD 2.0 contrast-detail phantom was imaged with a flat-panel detector (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) at three different dose levels with settings for intravenous urography. The same phantom was imaged with storage phosphor plates at a simulated system speed of 200 and a screen-film system with a system speed of 160. Entrance surface doses were recorded for all images. At each setting, three images were read by four independent observers. The flat-panel detector had equal image quality at less than half the radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates. The difference was even larger when compared with film with the flat-panel detector having equal image quality at approximately one-fifth the dose. The flat-panel detector has a very favourable combination of image quality vs radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates and screen film. (orig.)

  12. In vivo Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Carbide As a Biomaterial for Chronic Neural Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaack, Gretchen L; McHail, Daniel G; Borda, German; Koo, Beomseo; Peixoto, Nathalia; Cogan, Stuart F; Dumas, Theodore C; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Implantable microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer clinical promise for prosthetic devices by enabling restoration of communication and control of artificial limbs. While proof-of-concept recordings from MEAs have been promising, work in animal models demonstrates that the obtained signals degrade over time. Both material robustness and tissue response are acknowledged to have a role in device lifetime. Amorphous Silicon carbide (a-SiC), a robust material that is corrosion resistant, has emerged as an alternative encapsulation layer for implantable devices. We systematically examined the impact of a-SiC coating on Si probes by immunohistochemical characterization of key markers implicated in tissue-device response. After implantation, we performed device capture immunohistochemical labeling of neurons, astrocytes, and activated microglia/macrophages after 4 and 8 weeks of implantation. Neuron loss and microglia activation were similar between Si and a-SiC coated probes, while tissue implanted with a-SiC displayed a reduction in astrocytes adjacent to the probe. These results suggest that a-SiC has a similar biocompatibility profile as Si, and may be suitable for implantable MEA applications as a hermetic coating to prevent material degradation.

  13. Memory effect in MOS structures containing amorphous or crystalline silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Sebastian; Brueggemann, Rudolf; Bauer, Gottfried Heinrich [Institute of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Nedev, Nicola [Istituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Benito Juarez Blvd., s/n, C.P. 21280, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Manolov, Emmo; Nesheva, Diana; Levi, Zelma [Insitute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Science, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-07-01

    Amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) embedded in a SiO{sub 2} matrix are fabricated by thermal annealing of Metal/SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub x}/c-Si structures (x=1.15) at 700 C or 1000 C in N{sub 2} atmosphere for 30 or 60 minutes. High frequency C-V measurements show that the samples can be charged negatively or positively by applying a positive or negative bias voltage to the gate. A memory effect, due to the Si-NPs in the SiO{sub 2} matrix, is observed. The method of measurement with open circuit between two measurements leads to the retention characteristic where the structures retain about 50% of negative charge trapped in Si-NPs for 24 hours. A second method, where the flat-band voltage is applied as bias voltage, shows shorter retention characteristics. There the Si-NPs retain 50% of their charge after 10 hours.

  14. Amorphous silicon under mechanical shear deformations: Shear velocity and temperature effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrache, Ali; Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical shear deformations lead, in some cases, to effects similar to those resulting from ion irradiation. Here we characterize the effects of shear velocity and temperature on amorphous silicon (a-Si) modeled using classical molecular-dynamics simulations based on the empirical environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP). With increasing shear velocity at low temperature, we find a systematic increase in the internal strain leading to the rapid appearance of structural defects (fivefold-coordinated atoms). The impacts of externally applied strain can be almost fully compensated by increasing the temperature, allowing the system to respond more rapidly to the deformation. In particular, we find opposite power-law relations between the temperature and the shear velocity and the deformation energy. The spatial distribution of defects is also found to depend strongly on temperature and strain velocity. For low temperature or high shear velocity, defects are concentrated in a few atomic layers near the center of the cell, while with increasing temperature or decreasing shear velocity, they spread slowly throughout the full simulation cell. This complex behavior can be related to the structure of the energy landscape and the existence of a continuous energy-barrier distribution.

  15. Low-level boron doping and light-induced effects in amorphous silicon pin solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, M.; Rauscher, B.; Kruehler, W.; Plaettner, R.; Pfleiderer, H.

    Amorphous silicon solar cells with the structure pin/ITO produced in the laboratory show an AM1 efficiency of up to 7.4 percent on 6 sq mm. The impact of doping the i-layer slightly with boron on the cell performance was studied together with its possible influence on the cell stability. Cells exposed to continuous AM1 illumination (up to 2000 hours) show a degradation of the efficiency. Differences in the bias-voltage during the deposition lead to significant differences in the stability whereas the influence of boron doping was not so prominent. The nu-tau-products for electrons and holes were shown to degrade differently through light-soaking for different doping-level. A further investigation was made by evaluating the frequency dependence of the capacitance via a new p i n junction model to obtain the density of states and the drift field in the i-layer for doping and light-soaking.

  16. A neural network clustering algorithm for the ATLAS silicon pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charfeddine, Driss; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Dwuznik, Michal; Dyndal, Mateusz; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Engelmann, Roderich; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmes, Tova Ray; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; König, Sebastian; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire, Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Narayan, Rohin; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Qureshi, Anum; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savard, Pierre; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chao; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wright, Michael; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    A novel technique to identify and split clusters created by multiple charged particles in the ATLAS pixel detector using a set of artificial neural networks is presented. Such merged clusters are a common feature of tracks originating from highly energetic objects, such as jets. Neural networks are trained using Monte Carlo samples produced with a detailed detector simulation. This technique replaces the former clustering approach based on a connected component analysis and charge interpolation. The performance of the neural network splitting technique is quantified using data from proton-proton collisions at the LHC collected by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and from Monte Carlo simulations. This technique reduces the number of clusters shared between tracks in highly energetic jets by up to a factor of three. It also provides more precise position and error estimates of the clusters in both the transverse and longitudinal impact parameter resolution.

  17. Novel Multi-pixel Silicon Photon Detectors and Applications in T2K

    CERN Document Server

    Beznosko, Dmitriy

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays, numerous fields such as High Energy Physics (HEP), medical imaging devices, portable radiation detectors etc., require a robust, miniature, reliable and readily available photon detector that is stable in a variety of environments, such as the presence of strong magnetic fields. The recently available $\\sim$1mm$^{\\textrm{2}}$ active area Multi-pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) sensors, produced by Hamamatsu Photonics, have been found to be reliable and an attractive choice for the HEP applications. The following sensor characteristics have been thoroughly tested by T2K collaboration: gain, dark noise, detection efficiency, reliability. These appear to be stable; in addition, the characteristic spread between numerous devices was assessed. Sensors with larger area are being developed for imaging and direct-to-scintillator coupling purposes.

  18. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon applied in very thin tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicho, Sandra

    2011-07-28

    Thin-film solar cells are fabricated by low-cost production processes, and are therefore an alternative to conventionally used wafer solar cells based on crystalline silicon. Due to the different band gaps, tandem cells that consist of amorphous (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline ({mu}c-Si:H) single junction solar cells deposited on top of each other use the solar spectrum much more efficient than single junction solar cells. The silicon layers are usually deposited on TCO (Transparent Conductive Oxide)-coated glass and metal- or plastic foils. Compared to the CdTe and CIGS based thin-film technologies, silicon thin-film solar cells have the advantage that no limitation of raw material supply is expected and no toxic elements are used. Nevertheless, the production cost per Wattpeak is the decisive factor concerning competitiveness and can be reduced by, e.g., shorter deposition times or reduced material consumption. Both cost-reducing conceptions are simultaneously achieved by reducing the a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si:H absorber layer thicknesses in a tandem device. In the work on hand, the influence of an absorber layer thickness reduction up to 77% on the photovoltaic parameters of a-Si:H/{mu}c-Si:H tandem solar cells was investigated. An industry-oriented Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (RF-PECVD) system was used to deposit the solar cells on glass substrates coated with randomly structured TCO layers. The thicknesses of top and bottom cell absorber layers were varied by adjusting the deposition time. Reduced layer thicknesses lead to lower absorption and, hence, to reduced short-circuit current densities which, however, are partially balanced by higher open-circuit voltages and fill factors. Furthermore, by using very thin amorphous top cells, the light-induced degradation decreases tremendously. Accordingly, a thickness reduction of 75% led to an efficiency loss of only 21 %. By adjusting the parameters for the deposition of a-Si:H top cells, a

  19. Low temperature plasma deposition of silicon thin films: From amorphous to crystalline

    OpenAIRE

    Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere; Cariou, Romain; Labrune, Martin

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We report on the epitaxial growth of crystalline silicon films on (100) oriented crystalline silicon substrates by standard plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 175 °C. Such unexpected epitaxial growth is discussed in the context of deposition processes of silicon thin films, based on silicon radicals and nanocrystals. Our results are supported by previous studies on plasma synthesis of silicon nanocrystals and point toward silicon nanocrystals being the most p...

  20. Band engineering of amorphous silicon ruthenium thin film and its near-infrared absorption enhancement combined with nano-holes pattern on back surface of silicon substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Anran; Zhong, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Li, Wei, E-mail: wli@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Gu, Deen; Jiang, Xiangdong [School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Jiang, Yadong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • The increase of Ru concentration leads to a narrower bandgap of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} thin film. • The absorption coefficient of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} is higher than that of SiGe. • A double-layer absorber comprising of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} film and Si nano-holes layer is achieved. - Abstract: Silicon is widely used in semiconductor industry but has poor performance in near-infrared photoelectronic devices because of its bandgap limit. In this study, a narrow bandgap silicon rich semiconductor is achieved by introducing ruthenium (Ru) into amorphous silicon (a-Si) to form amorphous silicon ruthenium (a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x}) thin films through co-sputtering. The increase of Ru concentration leads to an enhancement of light absorption and a narrower bandgap. Meanwhile, a specific light trapping technique is employed to realize high absorption of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} thin film in a finite thickness to avoid unnecessary carrier recombination. A double-layer absorber comprising of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} thin film and silicon random nano-holes layer is formed on the back surface of silicon substrates, and significantly improves near-infrared absorption while the leaky light intensity is less than 5%. This novel absorber, combining narrow bandgap thin film with light trapping structure, may have a potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic devices.

  1. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum abs-initio studies on lithium-intercalation in interconnected hollow spherical nano-spheres of amorphous Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmik, Arghya; Malik, R.; Prakash, S.;

    2016-01-01

    interconnected hollow nano-spheres of amorphous silicon have been found to exhibit high cyclability. The absence of fracture upon lithiation and the high cyclability has been attributed to reduction in intercalation stress due to hollow spherical geometry of the silicon nano-particles. The present work argues...

  2. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy study in micro-grain structured amorphous silicon anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloukis, Fotis; Elmasides, Costas; Farmakis, Filippos; Selinis, Petros; Neophytides, Stylianos G.; Georgoulas, Nikolaos

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a study of the lithiation mechanism of micro-grain structured silicon anode is presented. Micro-grain amorphous silicon was deposited on special copper foil and it is shown that after several decades of galvanostatic cycles, it preserves its granular nature with minor degradation. In order to shed light on the lithiation mechanisms of the micro-grain silicon, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was conducted on silicon half-cells at various State-of-Charge (SoC) and various discharging current values and the Solid-Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) RSEI and polarization resistance Rpol were determined. Results reveal that Rpol highly increases for cell voltages lower than 0.2 V and it strongly depends on the discharging C-rate. From X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements combined with surface sputtering, the existence of a LixSiyOz interlayer between SEI and silicon is confirmed, which is believed to play an important role to the lithium kinetics. Finally, combining our results, a lithiation mechanism of the micro-grain silicon anode is proposed.

  3. Scanning transmission electron microscope analysis of amorphous-Si insertion layers prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition, causing low surface recombination velocities on crystalline silicon wafers

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Microstructures of stacked silicon-nitride/amorphous-silicon/crystalline-silicon (SiN_x/a-Si/c-Si) layers prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition were investigated with scanning transmission electron microscopy to clarify the origin of the sensitive dependence of surface recombination velocities (SRVs) of the stacked structure on the thickness of the a-Si layer. Stacked structures with a-Si layers with thicknesses greater than 10 nm exhibit long effective carrier lifetimes, while thos...

  4. Accelerated kinetics of amorphous silicon using an on-the-fly off-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Jean-Francois; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Beland, Laurent Karim; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-03-01

    The time evolution of a series of well relaxed amorphous silicon models was simulated using the kinetic Activation-RelaxationTechnique (kART), an on-the-fly off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method. This novel algorithm uses the ART nouveau algorithm to generate activated events and links them with local topologies. It was shown to work well for crystals with few defects but this is the first time it is used to study an amorphous material. A parallel implementation allows us to increase the speed of the event generation phase. After each KMC step, new searches are initiated for each new topology encountered. Well relaxed amorphous silicon models of 1000 atoms described by a modified version of the empirical Stillinger-Weber potential were used as a starting point for the simulations. Initial results show that the method is faster by orders of magnitude compared to conventional MD simulations up to temperatures of 500 K. Vacancy-type defects were also introduced in this system and their stability and lifetimes are calculated.

  5. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Tao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Engineering-Nuclear Engineering

    1995-05-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (< 10ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N ~20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 {micro}s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  6. Plasmonic enhancement of amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells with hexagonal silver arrays made with nanosphere lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Guney, D. O.; Pearce, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Nanosphere lithography (NSL) provides an opportunity for a low-cost and scalable method to optically engineer solar photovoltaic (PV) cells. For PV applications, NSL is widely used in rear contact scenarios to excite surface plasmon polariton and/or high order diffractions, however, the top contact scenarios using NSL are rare. In this paper a systematic simulation study is conducted to determine the capability of achieving efficiency enhancement in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells using NSL as a top contact plasmonic optical enhancer. The study focuses on triangular prism and sphere arrays as they are the most commonly and easily acquired through direct deposition or low-temperature annealing, respectively. For optical enhancement, a characteristic absorption profile is generated and analyzed to determine the effects of size, shape and spacing of plasmonic structures compared to an un-enhanced reference cell. The factors affecting NSL-enhanced PV performance include absorption, shielding effects, diffraction, and scattering. In the triangular prism array, parasitic absorption of the silver particles proves to be problematic, and although it can be alleviated by increasing the particle spacing, no useful enhancement was observed in the triangular prism arrays that were simulated. Sphere arrays, on the other hand, have broad scattering cross-sections that create useful scattering fields at several sizes and spacing intervals. For the simulated sphere arrays the highest enhancement found was 7.4%, which was fabricated with a 250 nm radius nanosphere and a 50 nm silver thickness, followed by annealing in inert gas. These results are promising and provide a path towards the commercialization of plasmonic a-Si:H solar cells using NSL fabrication techniques.

  7. The status of lightweight photovoltaic space array technology based on amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Kaschmitter, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Ultralight, flexible photovoltaic (PV) array of amorphous silicon (a-Si) was identified as a potential low cost power source for small satellites. A survey was conducted of the status of the a-Si PV array technology with respect to present and future performance, availability, cost, and risks. For existing, experimental array blankets made of commercial cell material, utilizing metal foil substrates, the Beginning of Life (BOL) performance at Air Mass Zero (AM0) and 35 C includes total power up to 200 W, power per area of 64 W/sq m and power per weight of 258 W/kg. Doubling of power per weight occurs when polyimide substrates are used. Estimated End of Life (EOL) power output after 10 years in a nominal low earth orbit would be 80 pct. of BOL, the degradation being due to largely light induced effects (-10 to -15 pct.) and in part (-5 pct.) to space radiation. Predictions for the year 1995 for flexible PV arrays, made on the basis of published results for rigid a-Si modules, indicate EOL power output per area and per weight of 105 W/sq m and 400 W/kg, respectively, while predictions for the late 1990s based on existing U.S. national PV program goals indicate EOL values of 157 W/sq m and 600 W/kg. Cost estimates by vendors for 200 W ultralight arrays in volume of over 1000 units range from $100/watt to $125/watt. Identified risks include the lack of flexible, space compatible encapsulant, the lack of space qualification effort, recent partial or full acquisitions of US manufacturers of a-Si cells by foreign firms, and the absence of a national commitment for a long range development program toward developing of this important power source for space.

  8. Efficient nanorod-based amorphous silicon solar cells with advanced light trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Y. [Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, High Tech Campus, Building 21, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Plasma & Materials Processing, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE), P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lare, M. C. van; Polman, A. [Center for Nanophotonics, FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veldhuizen, L. W.; Schropp, R. E. I., E-mail: r.e.i.schropp@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Plasma & Materials Processing, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE), P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rath, J. K. [Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, High Tech Campus, Building 21, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-11-14

    We present a simple, low-cost, and scalable approach for the fabrication of efficient nanorod-based solar cells. Templates with arrays of self-assembled ZnO nanorods with tunable morphology are synthesized by chemical bath deposition using a low process temperature at 80 °C. The nanorod templates are conformally coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon light absorber layers of 100 nm and 200 nm thickness. An initial efficiency of up to 9.0% is achieved for the optimized design. External quantum efficiency measurements on the nanorod cells show a substantial photocurrent enhancement both in the red and the blue parts of the solar spectrum. Key insights in the light trapping mechanisms in these arrays are obtained via a combination of three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, optical absorption, and external quantum efficiency measurements. Front surface patterns enhance the light incoupling in the blue, while rear side patterns lead to enhanced light trapping in the red. The red response in the nanorod cells is limited by absorption in the patterned Ag back contact. With these findings, we develop and experimentally realize a further advanced design with patterned front and back sides while keeping the Ag reflector flat, showing significantly enhanced scattering from the back reflector with reduced parasitic absorption in the Ag and thus higher photocurrent generation. Many of the findings in this work can serve to provide insights for further optimization of nanostructures for thin-film solar cells in a broad range of materials.

  9. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  10. Photothermal performance of an amorphous silicon photovoltaic panel integrated in a membrane structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Hu, Jianhui; Chen, Wujun; Qiu, Zhenyu; Zhou, Jinyu; Qu, Yegao; Ge, Binbin

    2016-10-01

    The amorphous silicon photovoltaic (a-Si PV) cells are widely used for electricity generation from solar energy. When the a-Si PV cells are integrated into building roofs, such as ETFE (ethylene-tetrafouoroethylene) cushions, the temperature characteristics are indispensible for evaluating the thermal performances of a-Si PV and its constructions. This temperature value is directly dependent on the solar irradiance, wind velocity, ambient temperature and installation form. This paper concerns the field experiments and numerical modeling on the temperature characteristics and temperature value of the a-Si PV integrated in a double-layer ETFE cushion structure. To this end, an experimental model composed of two a-Si PV cells and a double-layer ETFE cushion was developed, and the corresponding experiments were carried out under two typical weather conditions (summer sunny and summer cloudy). The theoretical thermal model was developed based on an energy balance equation taking the short wave radiation, long wave radiation, convection and generated power into account. The measured solar irradiance and air temperature were used as real weather conditions for the thermal model. The corresponding differential equation of the a-Si PV temperature varying with the solar irradiance and air temperature was solved by a newly developed program based on the numerical method. The measured results show that the influence of solar irradiance on the temperature is much more significant than the other parameters, and the maximum temperature variation under sunny conditions is greater than that under cloudy conditions. The comparative study between the experimental and numerical results shows the correct predictions of the a-Si PV temperature under the sunny and cloudy conditions. The maximum difference is 3.9 °C with the acceptable reasons of the solar irradiance fluctuation and the PV thermal response time. These findings will provide useful observations and explanations for

  11. Intrinsic stress mitigation via elastic softening during two-step electrochemical lithiation of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zheng; Li, Teng

    2016-06-01

    Recent experiments and first-principles calculations show the two-step lithiation of amorphous silicon (a-Si). In the first step, the lithiation progresses by the movement of a sharp phase boundary between a pristine a-Si phase and an intermediate L iη Si phase until the a-Si phase is fully consumed. Then the second step sets in without a visible interface, with the L iη Si phase continuously lithiating to a L i3.75 Si phase. This unique feature of lithiation is believed to have important consequences for mechanical durability of a-Si anodes in lithium ion batteries, however the mechanistic understanding of such consequences is still elusive so far. Here, we reveal an intrinsic stress mitigation mechanism due to elastic softening during two-step lithiation of a-Si, via chemo-mechanical modeling. We find that lithiation-induced elastic softening of a-Si leads to effective stress mitigation in the second step of lithiation. These mechanistic findings allow for the first time to quantitatively predict the critical size of an a-Si anode below which the anode becomes immune to lithiation-induced fracture, which is in good agreement with experimental observations. Further studies on lithiation kinetics suggest that the two-step lithiation also results in a lower stress-induced energy barrier for lithiation. The present study reveals the physical underpinnings of previously unexplained favorable lithiation kinetics and fracture behavior of a-Si anodes, and thus sheds light on quantitative design guidelines toward high-performance anodes for lithium ion batteries.

  12. Performance of CMS 3D silicon pixel detectors before and after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obertino, M., E-mail: margherita.obertino@cern.ch [Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, and INFN, Torino (Italy); Solano, A. [Università di Torino and INFN, Torino (Italy); Alagoz, E. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Andresen, J. [University of Colorado, Boulder (United States); Arndt, K.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Boscardin, M. [Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Povo di Trento (Italy); Brosius, R. [SUNY, Buffalo (United States); Bubna, M. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [INFN Padova (Gruppo Collegato di Trento) and Università di Trento, Povo di Trento (Italy); Jensen, F. [University of Colorado, Boulder (United States); Krzywda, A. [Physics Department, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kumar, A. [SUNY, Buffalo (United States); Kwan, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Lei, C.M. [University of Colorado, Boulder (United States); Menasce, D.; Moroni, L. [INFN Milano Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Ngadiuba, J. [Università di Milano Bicocca and INFN, Milano (Italy); Osipenkov, I. [Texas A and M University, TX (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) silicon detectors are emerging as one of the most promising technologies for the innermost layers of tracking devices for the foreseen upgrades of the LHC. 3D sensors compatible with the CMS readout, fabricated at FBK (Trento, Italy), were tested in the laboratory and with a 120 GeV/c proton beam at the FNAL test beam facility, before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 3.5×10{sup 15}neq/cm{sup 2}. Preliminary results of the data analysis are presented. -- Highlights: •3D characterized in laboratory, tested with beam and irradiated with 800 MeV protons. •Leakage current: few hundred nA before irradiation, ∼10 μA after irradiation. •Depletion voltage: 20 V. Breakdown voltage: 25–35 V, not increasing after irradiation. •Efficiency: 97.5%, increasing when tilting sensors with respect to the beam. •Radiation effect: lower efficiency and lower collected charge.

  13. Amorphous silicon oxide layers for surface passivation and contacting of heterostructure solar cells of amorphous and crystalline silicon; Amorphe Siliziumoxidschichten zur Oberflaechenpassivierung und Kontaktierung von Heterostruktur-Solarzellen aus amorphen und kristallinem Silizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsele, Florian

    2010-02-05

    Atomic hydrogen plays a dominant role in the passivation of crystalline silicon surfaces by layers of amorphous silicon. In order to research into this role, this thesis presents the method of hydrogen effusion from thin amorphous films of silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}:H). The oxygen concentration of the sub-stoichiometric a-SiO{sub x}:H films ranges up to 10 at.-%. The effusion experiment yields information about the content and thermal stability of hydrogen and about the microstructure of the films. A mathematical description of the diffusion process of atomic hydrogen yields an analytical expression of the effusion rate R{sub E} depending on the linearly increasing temperature in the experiment. Fitting of the calculated effusion rates R{sub E} to measured effusion spectra yields the diffusion coefficient of atomic hydrogen in a-SiO{sub x}:H. With increasing oxygen concentration, the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the a-SiO{sub x}:H films decreases. This is attributed to an increasing Si-H bond energy due to back bonded oxygen, resulting in a higher stability of hydrogen in the films. This result is confirmed by an increasing thermal stability of the p-type c-Si passivation with a-SiO{sub x}:H of increasing oxygen concentrations up to 5 at.-%. The passivation reaches very low recombination velocities of S < 10 cm/s at the interface. However, for higher oxygen concentrations up to 10 at.-%, the passivation quality decreases significantly. Here, infrared spectroscopy of Si-H vibrational modes and hydrogen effusion show an increase of hydrogen-rich interconnected voids in the films. This microstructure results in a high amount of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the layers, which is not suitable for the saturation of c-Si interface defects. Annealing of the films at temperatures around 400 C leads to a release of H{sub 2} from the voids, as a result of which Si-Si bonds in the material reconstruct. Subsequently, hydrogen migration in the

  14. Amorphous silicon oxide layers for surface passivation and contacting of heterostructure solar cells of amorphous and crystalline silicon; Amorphe Siliziumoxidschichten zur Oberflaechenpassivierung und Kontaktierung von Heterostruktur-Solarzellen aus amorphen und kristallinem Silizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsele, Florian

    2010-02-05

    Atomic hydrogen plays a dominant role in the passivation of crystalline silicon surfaces by layers of amorphous silicon. In order to research into this role, this thesis presents the method of hydrogen effusion from thin amorphous films of silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}:H). The oxygen concentration of the sub-stoichiometric a-SiO{sub x}:H films ranges up to 10 at.-%. The effusion experiment yields information about the content and thermal stability of hydrogen and about the microstructure of the films. A mathematical description of the diffusion process of atomic hydrogen yields an analytical expression of the effusion rate R{sub E} depending on the linearly increasing temperature in the experiment. Fitting of the calculated effusion rates R{sub E} to measured effusion spectra yields the diffusion coefficient of atomic hydrogen in a-SiO{sub x}:H. With increasing oxygen concentration, the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the a-SiO{sub x}:H films decreases. This is attributed to an increasing Si-H bond energy due to back bonded oxygen, resulting in a higher stability of hydrogen in the films. This result is confirmed by an increasing thermal stability of the p-type c-Si passivation with a-SiO{sub x}:H of increasing oxygen concentrations up to 5 at.-%. The passivation reaches very low recombination velocities of S < 10 cm/s at the interface. However, for higher oxygen concentrations up to 10 at.-%, the passivation quality decreases significantly. Here, infrared spectroscopy of Si-H vibrational modes and hydrogen effusion show an increase of hydrogen-rich interconnected voids in the films. This microstructure results in a high amount of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the layers, which is not suitable for the saturation of c-Si interface defects. Annealing of the films at temperatures around 400 C leads to a release of H{sub 2} from the voids, as a result of which Si-Si bonds in the material reconstruct. Subsequently, hydrogen migration in the

  15. Optical and passivating properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for application on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, Daniel Nilsen

    2008-07-01

    Within this thesis, several important subjects related to the use of amorphous silicon nitride made by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition as an anti-reflective coating on silicon solar cells are presented. The first part of the thesis covers optical simulations to optimise single and double layer anti-reflective coatings with respect to optical performance when situated on a silicon solar cell. The second part investigates the relationship between important physical properties of silicon nitride films when deposited under different conditions. The optical simulations were either based on minimising the reflectance off a silicon nitride/silicon wafer stack or maximising the transmittance through the silicon nitride into the silicon wafer. The former method allowed consideration of the reflectance off the back surface of the wafer, which occurs typically at wavelengths above 1000 nm due to the transparency of silicon at these wavelengths. However, this method does not take into consideration the absorption occurring in the silicon nitride, which is negligible at low refractive indexes but quite significant when the refractive index increases above 2.1. For high-index silicon nitride films, the latter method is more accurate as it considers both reflectance and absorbance in the film to calculate the transmittance into the Si wafer. Both methods reach similar values for film thickness and refractive index for optimised single layer anti-reflective coatings, due to the negligible absorption occurring in these films. For double layer coatings, though, the reflectance based simulations overestimated the optimum refractive index for the bottom layer, which would have lead to excessive absorption if applied to real anti-reflective coatings. The experimental study on physical properties for silicon nitride films deposited under varying conditions concentrated on the estimation of properties important for its applications, such as optical properties, passivation

  16. Prototype of the front-end circuit for the GOSSIP (Gas On Slimmed Silicon Pixel) chip in the 0.13 μm CMOS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Gromov, V; van der Graaf, H

    2007-01-01

    The new GOSSIP detector, capable to detect single electrons in gas, has certain advantages with respect silicon (pixel) detectors. It does not require a Si sensor; it has a very low detector parasitic capacitance and a zero bias current at the pixel input. These are attractive features to design a compact, low-noise and low-power integrated input circuit. A prototype of the integrated circuit has been developed in 0.13 μm CMOS technology. It includes a few channels equipped with preamplifier, discriminator and the digital circuit to study the feasibility of the TDC-perpixel concept. The design demonstrates very low input referred noise (60e- RMS) in combination with a fast peaking time (40 ns) and an analog power dissipation as low as 2 μW per channel. Switching activity on the clock bus (up to 100 MHz) in the close vicinity of the pixel input pads does not cause noticeable extra noise.

  17. Amorphous Silicon Film Deposition from SiH4 by Chemical Vapor Deposition with Argon Excimer Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshikawa, Kiyohiko; Yokotani, Atsushi; Kurosawa, Kou

    2005-11-01

    We have deposited amorphous silicon thin films from monosilane (SiH4) gas by photochemical vapor deposition using a vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp (VUV-CVD). We used an argon excimer lamp (λ=126 nm, hν=9.8 eV) whose photons are strongly absorbed by SiH4 gas. The substrate temperatures were changed from 25 to 300°C. When the temperature was lower than 150°C, the films included H--Si--H units and H2 molecules in its structure. When it was higher than 150°C, the main structural unit was Si--H.

  18. Optical Properties of Amorphous AlN Thin Films on Glass and Silicon Substrates Grown by Single Ion Beam Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajakbari, Fatemeh; Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Majid; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Aslaninejad, Morteza; Hojabri, Alireza

    2010-09-01

    The structural and optical properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) films deposited on glass and silicon substrates by single ion beam sputtering technique have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study revealed the formation of the amorphous phase of AlN. The optical characteristics of films, such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, and average thickness, were calculated by Swanepoel's method using transmittance measurements. The refractive index and average roughness values of the films increased with film thickness. Moreover, it was found that thickness augmentation leads to a decrease in optical band gap energy calculated using Tauc's relation.

  19. Beam-test results of 4k pixel CMOS MAPS and high resistivity striplet detectors equipped with digital sparsified readout in the Slim5 low mass silicon demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, M., E-mail: villa@bo.infn.i [Universita degli Studi di Bologna and INFN-Bologna (Italy); Bruschi, M.; Di Sipio, R.; Fabbri, L.; Giacobbe, B.; Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F.; Pellegrini, G.; Sbarra, C.; Semprini, N.; Spighi, R.; Valentinetti, S.; Zoccoli, A. [Universita degli Studi di Bologna and INFN-Bologna (Italy); Avanzini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Calderini, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Cenci, R. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa and INFN-Pisa (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    The results obtained by the Slim5 collaboration on a low material budget tracking silicon demonstrator put on a 12 GeV/c proton test beam at CERN are reported. Inside a reference telescope, two different and innovative detectors were placed for careful tests. The first was a 4k-Pixel Matrix of Deep N Well MAPS, developed in a 130 nm CMOS Technology, square pixels 50{mu}m wide, thinned down to 100{mu}m and equipped with a digital sparsified readout running up to 50 MHz. The other was a high resistivity double sided silicon detector, 200{mu}m thick, with short strips with 50{mu}m pitch at 45{sup 0} angle to the detector's edge. The detectors were equipped with dedicated fast readout architectures performing on-chip data sparsification and providing the timing information for the hits. The criteria followed in the design of the pixel sensor and of the pixel readout architecture will be reviewed. Preliminary measurements of the pixel charge collection, track detection efficiencies and resolutions of pixel and strip sensors are discussed. The data driven architecture of the readout chips has been fully exploited in the test beam by a data acquisition system able to collect on electronic board up to 2.5 Million events per second before triggering. By using a dedicated Associative Memory board, we were able to perform a level 1 trigger system, with minimal latency, identifying cleanly tracks traversing the detectors. System architecture and main performances are shown.

  20. 非晶硅锗电池性能的调控研究%Modification to the performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium thin film solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伯飞; 白立沙; 魏长春; 孙建; 侯国付; 赵颖; 张晓丹

    2013-01-01

    采用射频等离子体增强化学气相沉积技术,研究了非晶硅锗薄膜太阳电池。针对非晶硅锗薄膜材料的本身特性,通过调控硅锗合金中硅锗的比例,实现了对硅锗薄膜太阳电池中开路电压和短路电流密度的分别控制。借助于本征层硅锗材料帯隙梯度的设计,获得了可有效用于多结叠层电池中的非晶硅锗电池。%In this paper, we study hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium thin film solar cells prepared by the radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. In the light of the inherent characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium mate-rial, the modulation of the germanium/silicon ratio in silicon germanium alloys can separately control open circuit voltage (Voc) and short circuit current density (Jsc) of a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. By the structural design of band gap profiling in the amorphous silicon germanium intrinsic layer, hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium thin film solar cells, which can be used efficiently as the component cell of multi-junction solar cells, are obtained.

  1. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, P A; Milichko, V A; Mukhin, I S; Gudovskikh, A S; Sitnikova, A A; Samusev, A K; Krasnok, A E; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonances, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanopart...

  2. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, P. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Milichko, V. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Samusev, A. K.; Krasnok, A. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonance, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanoparticles are studied using dark-field optical spectroscopy and full-wave electromagnetic simulations.

  3. Preparation of microcrystalline single junction and amorphous-microcrystalline tandem silicon solar cells entirely by hot-wire CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupich, M.; Grunsky, D.; Kumar, P.; Schroeder, B. [University of Kaiserslautern (Germany). Department of Physics

    2004-01-25

    The hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) has been used to prepare highly conducting p- and n-doped microcrystalline silicon thin layers as well as highly photoconducting, low defect density intrinsic microcrystalline silicon films. These films were incorporated in all-HWCVD, all-microcrystalline nip and pin solar cells, achieving conversion efficiencies of {eta}=5.4% and 4.5%, respectively. At present, only the nip-structures are found to be stable against light-induced degradation. Furthermore, microcrystalline nip and pin structures have been successfully incorporated as bottom cells in all-hot-wire amorphous-microcrystalline nipnip- and pinpin-tandem solar cells for the first time. So far, the highest conversion efficiencies of the 'micromorph' tandem structures are {eta}=5.7% for pinpin-solar cells and 7.0% for nipnip solar cells. (author)

  4. Stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells with low hydrogen content. Annual subcontract report, 1 March 1991--31 January 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortmann, C.M.; Hegedus, S.S. [Institute of Energy Conversion, Newark, DE (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Results and conclusions obtained during a research program of the investigation of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon based alloy materials and solar cells fabricated by photo-chemical vapor and glow discharge depositions are reported. Investigation of the effects of the hydrogen content in a-si:H i-layers in amorphous silicon solar cells show that cells with lowered hydrogen content i-layers are more stable. A classical thermodynamic formulation of the Staebler-Wronski effect has been developed for standard solar cell operating temperatures and illuminations. Methods have been developed to extract a lumped equivalent circuit from the current voltage characteristic of a single junction solar cell in order to predict its behavior in a multijunction device.

  5. Mr. Lorenzo Dellai, presidente della provincia Autonoma di Trento and Professor Andrea Zanotti, president dell'Instituto Trentino di Cultura, visit ALICE experiment underground area and Pixel Silicon Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2006-01-01

    Mr. Lorenzo Dellai, presidente della provincia Autonoma di Trento and Professor Andrea Zanotti, president dell'Instituto Trentino di Cultura, visit ALICE experiment underground area and Pixel Silicon Laboratory

  6. High hydrogen dilution and low substrate temperature cause columnar growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronsveld, Paula C.P.; Rath, Jatindra K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Mates, Tomas; Fejfar, Antonin; Kocka, Jan [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2010-03-15

    Columnar growth was observed in the amorphous part of mixed phase layers deposited at very low substrate temperatures. The width of the columns and the layer thickness at which they are first distinguishable in a cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (X-TEM) image, about 120 nm, is similar for the substrate temperature range of 40-100 C, but the columns are less well developed when either the substrate temperature is increased or the dilution ratio is lowered. This growth behaviour and the incubation layer are attributed to hydrogen-induced surface diffusion of growth precursors resulting in an amorphous-amorphous roughness transition. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Impact of contamination on hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerdenweber, Jan

    2011-09-26

    This thesis deals with atmospheric contamination and cross-contamination of boron (single-chamber process) of the intrinsic absorber layer (i-layer) of p-i-n thin film solar cells based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The atmospheric contaminations were introduced by means of intentional leaks. Hereby, the focus is on the influence of contamination species (oxygen and nitrogen), quantity of contamination (leak flow), source of contamination (leaks at chamber wall or in the process gas pipe), and plasma power on the properties of solar cells. Thereby, the minimum requirements for the purity of vacuum and process gas as well as leak conditions of the recipient and gas pipe system have been determined. Additionally, deposition regimes were developed, where the incorporation of impurities is significantly suppressed. For standard processes critical levels of nitrogen and oxygen contamination are determined to be {proportional_to} 4 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and {proportional_to} 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, respectively, for a leak situated at the chamber wall. Above these concentrations the solar cell efficiency deteriorates. In literature, incorporation of oxygen and nitrogen in doping configuration is assumed to be the reason for the cell deterioration. This assumption is supported by additional material studies of contaminated absorber layers done in this work. The difference in critical concentration is due to the higher doping efficiency of nitrogen compared to that for oxygen. Nevertheless, applying an air leak the critical concentrations of O and N are reached almost simultaneously since the incorporation probability of oxygen is about one order of magnitude higher compared to that for nitrogen. Applying a leak in the process gas pipe the critical oxygen contamination level increases to {proportional_to} 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} whereas the critical nitrogen level remains unchanged compared to a chamber wall leak. Applying a deposition regime with a very high

  8. The potential for the fabrication of wires embedded in the crystalline silicon substrate using the solid phase segregation of gold in crystallising amorphous volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.C.Y.; McCallum, J.C

    2004-05-15

    The refinement of gold in crystallising amorphous silicon volumes was tested as a means of creating a conducting element embedded in the crystalline matrix. Amorphous silicon volumes were created by self-ion-implantation through a mask. Five hundred kiloelectronvolt Au{sup +} was then implanted into the volumes. The amorphous volumes were crystallised on a hot stage in air, and the crystallisation was characterised using cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the amorphous silicon volumes crystallised via solid phase epitaxy at all the lateral and vertical interfaces. The interplay of the effects of the gold and also the hydrogen that infilitrated from the surface oxide resulted in a plug of amorphous material at the surface. Further annealing at this temperature demonstrated that the gold, once it had reached a certain critical concentration nucleated poly-crystalline growth instead of solid phase epitaxy. Time resolved reflectivity and Rutherford backscattering and channeling measurements were performed on large area samples that had been subject to the same implantation regime to investigate this system further. It was discovered that the crystallisation dynamics and zone refinement of the gold were complicated functions of both gold concentration and temperature. These findings do not encourage the use of this method to obtain conducting elements embedded in the crystalline silicon substrate.

  9. Development of an SU-8 MEMS process with two metal electrodes using amorphous silicon as a sacrificial material

    KAUST Repository

    Ramadan, Khaled S.

    2013-02-08

    This work presents an SU-8 surface micromachining process using amorphous silicon as a sacrificial material, which also incorporates two metal layers for electrical excitation. SU-8 is a photo-patternable polymer that is used as a structural layer for MEMS and microfluidic applications due to its mechanical properties, biocompatibility and low cost. Amorphous silicon is used as a sacrificial layer in MEMS applications because it can be deposited in large thicknesses, and can be released in a dry method using XeF2, which alleviates release-based stiction problems related to MEMS applications. In this work, an SU-8 MEMS process was developed using ;-Si as a sacrificial layer. Two conductive metal electrodes were integrated in this process to allow out-of-plane electrostatic actuation for applications like MEMS switches and variable capacitors. In order to facilitate more flexibility for MEMS designers, the process can fabricate dimples that can be conductive or nonconductive. Additionally, this SU-8 process can fabricate SU-8 MEMS structures of a single layer of two different thicknesses. Process parameters were optimized for two sets of thicknesses: thin (5-10 m) and thick (130 m). The process was tested fabricating MEMS switches, capacitors and thermal actuators. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  10. Optimization of Recombination Layer in the Tunnel Junction of Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Tandem Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Shin Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon (a-Si/a-Si tandem solar cells have attracted much attention in recent years, due to the high efficiency and low manufacturing cost compared to the single-junction a-Si solar cells. In this paper, the tandem cells are fabricated by high-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD at 27.1 MHz. The effects of the recombination layer and the i-layer thickness matching on the cell performance have been investigated. The results show that the tandem cell with a p+ recombination layer and i2/i1 thickness ratio of 6 exhibits a maximum efficiency of 9.0% with the open-circuit voltage (Voc of 1.59 V, short-circuit current density (Jsc of 7.96 mA/cm2, and a fill factor (FF of 0.70. After light-soaking test, our a-Si/a-Si tandem cell with p+ recombination layer shows the excellent stability and the stabilized efficiency of 8.7%.

  11. X-ray Polarimetry with an Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report the first results from an X-ray polarimeter with a micropattern gas proportional counter using an amorphous silicon active matrix readout. With 100% polarized X-rays at 4.5 keV, we obtain a modulation factor of 0.33+/- 0.03, confirming previous reports of the high polarization sensitivity of a finely segmented pixel proportional counter. The detector described here has a geometry suitable for the focal plane of an astronomical X-ray telescope. Amorphous silicon readout technology will enable additional extensions and improvements.

  12. Energy-recycling pixel for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Che-Yu; Cho, Ting-Yi; Chen, Yen-Yu; Yang, Chih-Jen; Meng, Chao-Yu; Yang, Chieh-Hung; Yang, Po-Chuan; Chang, Hsu-Yu; Hsueh, Chun-Yuan; Wu, Chung-Chih; Lee, Si-Chen

    2007-06-01

    The authors report a pixel structure for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays that has a hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cell inserted between the driving polycrystalline Si thin-film transistor and the pixel OLED. Such an active-matrix OLED pixel structure not only exhibits a reduced reflection (and thus improved contrast) compared to conventional OLEDs but also is capable of recycling both incident photon energies and internally generated OLED radiation. Such a feature of energy recycling may be of use for portable/mobile electronics, which are particularly power aware.

  13. Silicon-based thin-film transistors with a high stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stannowski, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Thin-Film Transistors (TFTs) are widely applied as pixel-addressing devices in large-area electronics, such as active-matrix liquid-crystal displays (AMLCDs) or sensor arrays. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) are generally used as the semiconductor and the insul

  14. The role of oxide interlayers in back reflector configurations for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demontis, V.; Sanna, C.; Melskens, J.; Santbergen, R.; Smets, A.H.M.; Damiano, A.; Zeman, M.

    2013-01-01

    Thin oxide interlayers are commonly added to the back reflector of thin-film silicon solar cells to increase their current. To gain more insight in the enhancement mechanism, we tested different back reflector designs consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) and/or hydrogenated silicon oxid

  15. Approaching Defect-free Amorphous Silicon Nitride by Plasma-assisted Atomic Beam Deposition for High Performance Gate Dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shu-Ju; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Lee, Hung-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yeh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Shiu, Hong-Wei; Chang, Lo-Yueh; Hsueh, Han-Ting; Chen, Hung-Ying; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Li-Wei; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wu, Chung-Lin

    2016-06-01

    In the past few decades, gate insulators with a high dielectric constant (high-k dielectric) enabling a physically thick but dielectrically thin insulating layer, have been used to replace traditional SiOx insulator and to ensure continuous downscaling of Si-based transistor technology. However, due to the non-silicon derivative natures of the high-k metal oxides, transport properties in these dielectrics are still limited by various structural defects on the hetero-interfaces and inside the dielectrics. Here, we show that another insulating silicon compound, amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4), is a promising candidate of effective electrical insulator for use as a high-k dielectric. We have examined a-Si3N4 deposited using the plasma-assisted atomic beam deposition (PA-ABD) technique in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment and demonstrated the absence of defect-related luminescence; it was also found that the electronic structure across the a-Si3N4/Si heterojunction approaches the intrinsic limit, which exhibits large band gap energy and valence band offset. We demonstrate that charge transport properties in the metal/a-Si3N4/Si (MNS) structures approach defect-free limits with a large breakdown field and a low leakage current. Using PA-ABD, our results suggest a general strategy to markedly improve the performance of gate dielectric using a nearly defect-free insulator.

  16. Performance of a hybrid photon detector prototype with electrostatic cross-focussing and integrated silicon Pixel readout for Cherenkov ring detection

    CERN Document Server

    Alemi, M; Bibby, J H; Campbell, M; Duane, A; Easo, S; Gys, Thierry; Halley, A W; Piedigrossi, D; Puertolas, D; Rosso, E; Simmons, B; Snoeys, W; Websdale, David M; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, Ken H

    1999-01-01

    We report on the first test beam performance of a hybrid photon detector prototype, using binary readout electronics, intended for use in the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The detector has been installed in a quarter-scale prototype vessel of the LHCb ring imaging Cherenkov system. Focussed ring images produced by 120 GeV/c negative pions traversing an air radiator have been recorded. The observed light yield and Cherenkov angle resolution are discussed.

  17. Performance of a hybrid photon detector prototype with electrostatic cross-focussing and integrated silicon pixel readout for Cherenkov ring detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alemi, M.; Barber, G.; Bibby, J.; Campbell, M.; Duane, A.; Easo, S.; Gys, T.; Halley, A.; Piedigrossi, D.; Puertolas, D.; Rosso, E.; Simmons, B.; Snoeys, W.; Websdale, D.; Wotton, S.; Wyllie, K

    1999-08-01

    We report on the first test beam performance of a hybrid photon detector prototype, using binary readout electronics, intended for use in the ring imaging Cherenkov detectors of the LHCb experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The photon detector is based on a cross-focussed image intensifier tube geometry. The anode consists of a silicon pixel array bump-bonded to a binary readout chip with matching pixel electronics. The detector has been installed in a quarter-scale prototype vessel of the LHCb ring imaging Cherenkov system. Focussed ring images produced by 120 GeV/c negative pions traversing an air radiator have been recorded. The observed light yield and Cherenkov angle resolution are discussed.

  18. Improved conductivity of aluminum-doped ZnO: The effect of hydrogen diffusion from a hydrogenated amorphous silicon capping layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Sharma, K.; Verheijen, M. A.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma-deposited aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) demonstrated a resistivity gradient as function of the film thickness, extending up to about 600 nm. This gradient decreased sharply when the ZnO:Al was capped by a hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer (a-Si:H) and subsequently treated according to the so

  19. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Amorphous Tandem Thin-Film Silicon Modules Produced by A Roll-to-Roll Process on Plastic Foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couty, P.; Duchamp, Martial; Söderström, K.;

    2011-01-01

    An improvement of the photo-current is expected when amorphous silicon solar cells are grown on a ZnO texture. A full understanding of the relationship between cell structure and electrical performance is essential for the rapid development of high efficiency VHF-tandem cells on textured substrates...

  20. Preparation and Characterisation of Amorphous-silicon Photovoltaic Devices Having Microcrystalline Emitters; Preparacion y Caracterizacion de Dispositivos Fotovoltaicos de Silicio Amorfo con Emisiones Microcristalinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, M. T.; Gandia, J. J.; Carabe, J. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain)

    1999-11-01

    The present work summarises the essential aspects of the research carried out so far at CIEMAT on amorphous-silicon solar cells. The experience accumulated on the preparation and characterisation of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon has allowed to start from intrinsic (absorbent) and p-and n-type (emitters) materials not only having excellent optoelectronic properties, but enjoying certain technological advantages with respect to those developed by other groups. Among these are absorbent-layer growth rates between 5 and 10 times as fast as conventional ones and microcrystalline emitters prepared without using hydrogen. The preparation of amorphous-silicon cells has required the solution of a number of problems, such as those related to pinholes, edge leak currents and diffusion of metals into the semiconductor. Once such constraints have been overcome, it has been demonstrated not only that the amorphous-silicon technology developed at CIEMAT is valid for making solar cells, but also that the quality of the semiconductor material is good for the application according to the partial results obtained. The development of thin-film laser-scribing technology is considered essential. Additionally it has been concluded that cross contamination, originated by the fact of using a single-chamber reactor, is the basic factor limiting the quality of the cells developed at CIEMAT. The present research activity is highly focused on the solution of this problem. (Author)

  1. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells deposited under well controlled ion bombardment using pulse-shaped substrate biasing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wank, M. A.; van Swaaij, R.; R. van de Sanden,; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    We applied pulse-shaped biasing (PSB) to the expanding thermal plasma deposition of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers at substrate temperatures of 200 degrees C and growth rates of about 1?nm/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of intrinsic films showed a densification with incr

  2. Amorphous silicon carbon films prepared by hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor/sputtering deposition system: Effects of r.f. power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Maisarah Abdul, E-mail: nurmaisarahrashid@gmail.com [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Gani, Siti Meriam Ab. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat [Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul, E-mail: saadah@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-02-01

    Silicon carbon films were deposited using a hybrid radio frequency (r.f.) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)/sputtering deposition system at different r.f. powers. This deposition system combines the advantages of r.f. PECVD and sputtering techniques for the deposition of silicon carbon films with the added advantage of eliminating the use of highly toxic silane gas in the deposition process. Silicon (Si) atoms were sputtered from a pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) target by argon (Ar) ions and carbon (C) atoms were incorporated into the film from C based growth radicals generated through the discharge of methane (CH{sub 4}) gas. The effects of r.f. powers of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 150 W applied during the deposition process on the structural and optical properties of the films were investigated. Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the silicon carbon films contain amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) and amorphous carbon (a-C) phases. The r.f. power showed significant influence on the C incorporation in the film structure. The a-C phases became more ordered in films with high C incorporation in the film structure. These films also produced high photoluminescence emission intensity at around 600 nm wavelength as a result of quantum confinement effects from the presence of sp{sup 2} C clusters embedded in the a-SiC and a-C phases in the films. - Highlights: ► Effects of radio frequency (r.f.) power on silicon carbon (SiC) films were studied. ► Hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition/sputtering technique was used. ► r.f. power influences C incorporation in the film structure. ► High C incorporation results in higher ordering of the amorphous C phase. ► These films produced high photoluminescence emission intensity.

  3. A Study of The Evolution of The Silicon Nanocrystallites in The Amorphous Silicon Carbide Under Argon Dilution of the Source Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural evolution of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H films deposited by rf-PECVD from a mixture of SiH4 and CH4 diluted in Ar shows that a smooth transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline phase occurs in the material by increasing the Ar dilution. The optical band gap (Eg decreases from 1.99 eV to 1.91 eV and the H-content (CH decreases from 14.32 at% to 5.29 at% by increasing the dilution from 94 % to 98 %. at 98 % Ar dilution, the material contains irregular shape Si nanocrystallites with sizes over 10 nm. Increasing the Ar dilution further to 98.4 % leads to a reduction of the size of the Si nanocrystals to regular shape Si quantum dots of size about 5 nm. The quantum confinement effect is apparent from the increase in the Eg value to 2.6 eV at 98.4 % Ar dilution. Formation of Si quantum dots may be explained by the etching of the nanocrystallites of Si by the energetic ion bombardment from the plasma.

  4. Annealing Kinetic Model Using Fast and Slow Metastable Defects for Hydrogenated-Amorphous-Silicon-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yeop Myong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-component kinetic model employing “fast” and “slow” metastable defects for the annealing behaviors in pin-type hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon- (a-Si:H- based solar cells is simulated using a normalized fill factor. Reported annealing data on pin-type a-Si:H-based solar cells are revisited and fitted using the model to confirm its validity. It is verified that the two-component model is suitable for fitting the various experimental phenomena. In addition, the activation energy for annealing of the solar cells depends on the definition of the recovery time. From the thermally activated and high electric field annealing behaviors, the plausible microscopic mechanism on the defect removal process is discussed.

  5. Fabrication of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films by decomposition of hexamethyldisilane with microwave discharge flow of Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Haruhiko; Kumakura, Motoki; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Niibe, Masahito; Kanda, Kazuhiro; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films have been fabricated by the decomposition of hexamethyldisilane with a microwave discharge flow of Ar. Mechanically hard films were obtained by applying radio-frequency (RF) bias voltages to the substrate. The atomic compositions of the films were analyzed by a combination of Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical structure was analyzed by carbon-K near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, high-resolution XPS, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. The structural changes upon the application of RF bias were investigated, and the concentration of O atoms near the film surface was found to play a key role in the mechanical hardness of the present films.

  6. Solar Hydrogen Production by Amorphous Silicon Photocathodes Coated with a Magnetron Sputter Deposited Mo2C Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Thorwarth, Kerstin; Niesen, Bjoern; Liardet, Laurent; Patscheider, Jörg; Ballif, Christophe; Hu, Xile

    2015-06-10

    Coupling of Earth-abundant hydrogen evolution catalysts to photoabsorbers is crucial for the production of hydrogen fuel using sunlight. In this work, we demonstrate the use of magnetron sputtering to deposit Mo2C as an efficient hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst onto surface-protected amorphous silicon (a-Si) photoabsorbers. The a-Si/Mo2C photocathode evolves hydrogen under simulated solar illumination in strongly acidic and alkaline electrolytes. Onsets of photocurrents are observed at potentials as positive as 0.85 V vs RHE. Under AM 1.5G (1 sun) illumination, the photocathodes reach current densities of -11.2 mA cm(-2) at the reversible hydrogen potential in 0.1 M H2SO4 and 1.0 M KOH. The high photovoltage and low-cost of the Mo2C/a-Si assembly make it a promising photocathode for solar hydrogen production.

  7. PHOTO- AND ELECTRO-LUMINESCENCE FROM HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS SILICON CARBIDE FILMS PREPARED BY USING ORGANIC CARBON SOURCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jun; Ma Tian-fu; Li Wei; Chen Kun-ji; Li Zhi-feng; Lu Wei

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films were grown byusing an organic source, xylene (C8H{10), instead of methane(CH4) in a conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapor depositionsystem. The optical band gap of these samples was increased gradually bychanging the gas ratio of C8H10 to SiH4. The film with highoptical band gap was soft and polymer-like and intense photoluminescencewere obtained. Room temperature electro-luminescence was also achievedwith peak energy at 2.05 eV (600 nm) for the a-SiC:H film withoptical band gap of 3.2 eV.1.8mm

  8. Kinetics of the laser-induced solid phase crystallization of amorphous silicon-Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy and computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Očenášek, J.; Novák, P.; Prušáková, L.

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates that a laser-induced crystallization instrumented with Raman spectroscopy is, in general, an effective tool to study the thermally activated crystallization kinetics. It is shown, for the solid phase crystallization of an amorphous silicon thin film, that the integral intensity of Raman spectra corresponding to the crystalline phase grows linearly in the time-logarithmic scale. A mathematical model, which assumes random nucleation and crystal growth, was designed to simulate the crystallization process in the non-uniform temperature field induced by laser. The model is based on solving the Eikonal equation and the Arhenius temperature dependence of the crystal nucleation and the growth rate. These computer simulations successfully approximate the crystallization process kinetics and suggest that laser-induced crystallization is primarily thermally activated.

  9. Study on the effect of process conditions on the thermo-optic coefficient of amorphous silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Shuang; Tang, Haihua; Zhong, Zhiyong; Liu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    A thermo-optical coefficient (TOC) test platform based on FILMeasure-20 was designed and the thermal coefficient of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films material at 1330 nm was tested. a-Si:H were deposited on the quartz glass using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) was used to characterize the infrared spectral feature of films. The hydrogen content of films was influenced by different radio frequency (RF) power and deposition pressure conditions according to the FTIR spectra and theoretical analysis, and the thermo-optic effect of a-Si:H varied with temperature characteristics. Experimental results indicated that selecting the appropriate process conditions to prepare a-Si:H films can effectively increase or avoid the impact of thermo-optical effect on the optical devices.

  10. Vibrational mean free paths and thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sääskilahti, K.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J.; McGaughey, A. J. H.; Volz, S.

    2016-12-01

    The frequency-dependent mean free paths (MFPs) of vibrational heat carriers in amorphous silicon are predicted from the length dependence of the spectrally decomposed heat current (SDHC) obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest a (frequency)- 2 scaling of the room-temperature MFPs below 5 THz. The MFPs exhibit a local maximum at a frequency of 8 THz and fall below 1 nm at frequencies greater than 10 THz, indicating localized vibrations. The MFPs extracted from sub-10 nm system-size simulations are used to predict the length-dependence of thermal conductivity up to system sizes of 100 nm and good agreement is found with independent molecular dynamics simulations. Weighting the SDHC by the frequency-dependent quantum occupation function provides a simple and convenient method to account for quantum statistics and provides reasonable agreement with the experimentally-measured trend and magnitude.

  11. Vibrational mean free paths and thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sääskilahti, K; Tulkki, J; McGaughey, A J H; Volz, S

    2016-01-01

    The frequency-dependent mean free paths (MFPs) of vibrational heat carriers in amorphous silicon are predicted from the length dependence of the spectrally decomposed heat current (SDHC) obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest a (frequency)$^{-2}$ scaling of the room-temperature MFPs below 5 THz. The MFPs exhibit a local maximum at a frequency of 8 THz and fall below 1 nm at frequencies greater than 10 THz, indicating localized vibrations. The MFPs extracted from sub-10 nm system-size simulations are used to predict the length-dependence of thermal conductivity up to system sizes of 100 nm and good agreement is found with separate molecular dynamics simulations. Weighting the SDHC by the frequency-dependent quantum occupation function provides a simple and convenient method to account for quantum statistics and provides reasonable agreement with the experimentally-measured trend and magnitude.

  12. Amorphous silicon films with high deposition rate prepared using argon and hydrogen diluted silane for stable solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, Purabi; Agarwal, Pratima [Department of Physics, IIT Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Dixit, P.N. [Plasma Processed Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2007-08-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films with high deposition rate (4-5 Aa/s) and reduced Staebler-Wronski effect are prepared using a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}), hydrogen and argon. The films show an improvement in short and medium range order. The structural, transport and stability studies on the films are done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman scattering studies, electrical conductivity and diffusion length measurement. Presence of both atomic hydrogen and Ar{sup *} in the plasma causes breaking of weak Si-Si bonds and subsequent reconstruction of strong bonds resulting in improvement of short and medium range order. The improved structural order enhances the stability of these films against light soaking. High deposition rate is due to the lesser etching of growing surface compared to the case of only hydrogen diluted silane. (author)

  13. Spatially-Resolved Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Films on the Glass Substrate by Multi-beam Laser Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Laser interference induced crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) on the glass substrate was performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser. White light interferometer (WLI) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were used to characterize the morphology of the structured films, while X-ray diffraction (XRD), combined with the AFM, was used to analyse the crystalline structure of the film. The experimental results show that the laser energy density above a certain threshold, in the range of 400-500 mJ/cm2,triggers the patterned crystallizations which take the form similar to the laser intensity distribution. For the patterned crystallization under multipulse exposure, a definite polycrystalline structure with individual phases was observed by XRD. The difference in feature form, e.g., deepened craters or heightened lines, is related to the laser energy density relative to the threshold of evaporation of the material.

  14. The correlation of open-circuit voltage with bandgap in amorphous silicon-based pin solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, R. S.; Schiff, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    We briefly review the correlation of open-circuit voltages VOC with the bandgap of the intrinsic layer in amorphous silicon based pin solar cells. We discuss two mechanisms which limit VOC: intrinsic layer recombination, and the built-in potential VBI. In particular we discuss Li's proposal that the open-circuit voltages in higher bandgap cells (EG>1.9 eV) are VBI-limited. Based on computer simulations of pin solar cells we propose that VBI limitation occurs when the recombination limit to VOC exceeds the cell's field-reversal voltage VR. For a-Si:H based cells this field-reversal voltage occurs at about VBI-0.3 V. This proposal would account for the observation that VBI limitation occurs for VOC significantly smaller than VBI.

  15. Structural and optical properties of thin films porous amorphous silicon carbide formed by Ag-assisted photochemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukezzata, A., E-mail: assiab2006@yahoo.fr [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd. Frantz FANON, B.P. 140 Algiers (Algeria); Keffous, A., E-mail: keffousa@yahoo.fr [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd. Frantz FANON, B.P. 140 Algiers (Algeria); Cheriet, A.; Belkacem, Y.; Gabouze, N.; Manseri, A. [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd. Frantz FANON, B.P. 140 Algiers (Algeria); Nezzal, G. [Houari Boumediene University (USTHB), Chemical Faculty, Algiers (Algeria); Kechouane, M.; Bright, A. [Houari Boumediene University, Physical Faculty, Algiers (Algeria); Guerbous, L. [Algerian Nuclear Research Center (CRNA), Algiers (Algeria); Menari, H. [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd. Frantz FANON, B.P. 140 Algiers (Algeria)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, we present the formation of porous layers on hydrogenated amorphous SiC (a-SiC: H) by Ag-assisted photochemical etching using HF/K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} solution under UV illumination at 254 nm wavelength. The amorphous films a-SiC: H were elaborated by d.c. magnetron sputtering using a hot pressed polycrystalline 6H-SiC target. Because of the high resistivity of the SiC layer, around 1.6 M{Omega} cm and in order to facilitate the chemical etching, a thin metallic film of high purity silver (Ag) has been deposited under vacuum onto the thin a-SiC: H layer. The etched surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence. The results show that the morphology of etched a-SiC: H surface evolves with etching time. For an etching time of 20 min the surface presents a hemispherical crater, indicating that the porous SiC layer is perforated. Photoluminescence characterization of etched a-SiC: H samples for 20 min shows a high and an intense blue PL, whereas it has been shown that the PL decreases for higher etching time. Finally, a dissolution mechanism of the silicon carbide in 1HF/1K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} solution has been proposed.

  16. Amorphization and recrystallization processes in monocrystalline beta silicon carbide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmond, J.A.; Withrow, S.P.; Kong, H.S.; Davis, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Individual, as well as multiple doses of /sup 27/Al/sup +/, /sup 31/P/sup +/, /sup 28/Si/sup +/, and /sup 28/Si/sup +/ and /sup 12/C/sup +/, were implanted into (100) oriented monocrystalline ..beta..-SiC films. The critical energy of approx. =16 eV/atom required for the amorphization of ..beta..-SiC via implantation of /sup 27/Al/sup +/ and /sup 31/P/sup +/ was determined using the TRIM84 computer program for calculation of the damage-energy profiles coupled with the results of RBS/ion channeling analyses. In order to recrystallize amorphized layers created by the individual implantation of all four ion species, thermal annealing at 1600, 1700, or 1800/sup 0/C was employed. Characterization of the recrystallized layers was performed using XTEM. Examples of SPE regrown layers containing precipitates and dislocation loops, highly faulted-microtwinned regions, and random crystallites were observed.

  17. Spectroscopy and structural properties of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halindintwali, Sylvain; Knoesen, D.; Julies, B.A.; Arendse, C.J.; Muller, T.; Gengler, Régis Y.N.; Rudolf, P.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous SiC:H thin films were grown by hot wire chemical vapour deposition from a SiH4/CH4/H2 mixture at a substrate temperature below 400 °C. Thermal annealing in an argon environment up to 900 °C shows that the films crystallize as μc-Si:H and SiC with a porous microstructure that favours an oxi

  18. Silicon Monoxide at 1 atm and Elevated Pressures: Crystalline or Amorphous?

    KAUST Repository

    AlKaabi, Khalid

    2014-03-05

    The absence of a crystalline SiO phase under ordinary conditions is an anomaly in the sequence of group 14 monoxides. We explore theoretically ordered ground-state and amorphous structures for SiO at P = 1 atm, and crystalline phases also at pressures up to 200 GPa. Several competitive ground-state P = 1 atm structures are found, perforce with Si-Si bonds, and possessing Si-O-Si bridges similar to those in silica (SiO2) polymorphs. The most stable of these static structures is enthalpically just a little more stable than a calculated random bond model of amorphous SiO. In that model we find no segregation into regions of amorphous Si and amorphous SiO2. The P = 1 atm structures are all semiconducting. As the pressure is increased, intriguing new crystalline structures evolve, incorporating Si triangular nets or strips and stishovite-like regions. A heat of formation of crystalline SiO is computed; it is found to be the most negative of all the group 14 monoxides. Yet, given the stability of SiO2, the disproportionation 2SiO (s) → Si(s)+SiO2(s) is exothermic, falling right into the series of group 14 monoxides, and ranging from a highly negative ΔH of disproportionation for CO to highly positive for PbO. There is no major change in the heat of disproportionation with pressure, i.e., no range of stability of SiO with respect to SiO2. The high-pressure SiO phases are metallic. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Large Polycrystalline Silicon Grains Prepared by Excimer Laser Crystallization of Sputtered Amorphous Silicon Film with Process Temperature at 100 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Neihof, Ellen J. J.; van Andel, Yvonne; Schellevis, Hugo; Metselaar, Wim; Beenakker, Kees

    2007-03-01

    Large polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) grains with a diameter of 1.8 μm are successfully prepared by excimer laser crystallization (ELC) of a sputtered amorphous silicon (α-Si) film at a maximum process temperature of 100 °C. By pulsed DC magnetron sputtering, α-Si is deposited on a non-structured oxidized wafer. It is found that the α-Si film deposited with a bias is easily ablated during ELC, even at an energy density below the super lateral growth (SLG) region. However, the α-Si film deposited without a bias can endure an energy density well beyond the SLG region without ablation. This zero-bias sputtered α-Si film with a high compressive stress has a low Ar content and a high density, which is beneficial for the suppression of ablation. Large grains with a petal-like shape can be obtained in a wide energy density window, which can be a result from some fine crystallites in the α-Si matrix. These large grains with a low process temperature are promising for the direct formation of system circuits as well as a high-quality display on a plastic foil.

  20. Development of Thin Film Amorphous Silicon Tandem Junction Based Photocathodes Providing High Open-Circuit Voltages for Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Urbain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film tandem solar cells (a-Si:H/a-Si:H have been developed with focus on high open-circuit voltages for the direct application as photocathodes in photoelectrochemical water splitting devices. By temperature variation during deposition of the intrinsic a-Si:H absorber layers the band gap energy of a-Si:H absorber layers, correlating with the hydrogen content of the material, can be adjusted and combined in a way that a-Si:H/a-Si:H tandem solar cells provide open-circuit voltages up to 1.87 V. The applicability of the tandem solar cells as photocathodes was investigated in a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC measurement set-up. With platinum as a catalyst, the a-Si:H/a-Si:H based photocathodes exhibit a high photocurrent onset potential of 1.76 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE and a photocurrent of 5.3 mA/cm2 at 0 V versus RHE (under halogen lamp illumination. Our results provide evidence that a direct application of thin film silicon based photocathodes fulfills the main thermodynamic requirements to generate hydrogen. Furthermore, the presented approach may provide an efficient and low-cost route to solar hydrogen production.

  1. Arrays of ZnO nanocolumns for 3-dimensional very thin amorphous and microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neykova, Neda, E-mail: neykova@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering Trojanova 13, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Hruska, Karel; Holovsky, Jakub; Remes, Zdenek; Vanecek, Milan [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-30

    We report on the hydrothermal growth of high quality arrays of single crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocolumns, oriented perpendicularly to the transparent conductive oxide substrate. In order to obtain precisely defined spacing and arrangement of ZnO nanocolumns over an area up to 0.5 cm{sup 2}, we used electron beam lithography. Vertically aligned ZnO (multicrystalline or single crystals) nanocolumns were grown in an aqueous solution of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetetramine at 95 °C, with a growth rate 0.5 ÷ 1 μm/h. The morphology of the nanostructures was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Such nanostructured ZnO films were used as a substrate for the recently developed 3-dimensional thin film silicon (amorphous, microcrystalline) solar cell, with a high efficiency potential. The photoelectrical and optical properties of the ZnO nanocolumns and the silicon absorber layers of these type nanostructured solar cells were investigated in details. - Highlights: • Vertically-oriented ZnO nanocolumns were grown by hydrothermal method. • The ZnO nanocolumns were grown over an area of 0.5 cm{sup 2}. • For precise arrangement of the ZnO nanocolumns electron beam lithography was used. • We report on 3-D design of nanostructured solar cell. • Optical thickness of nanostructured cell was three times higher compared to flat cell.

  2. Silanization effect on the photoluminescence characteristics of crystalline and amorphous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caregnato, Paula; Dell'Arciprete, Maria Laura; Gonzalez, Mónica Cristina

    2013-09-01

    Silicon nanoparticles synthesized by two different methods were surface modified with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane. The particles of ~2 nm size exhibit photoluminescence (PL) in the UV-Vis range of the spectrum. The most intense PL band at 430 nm with an emission lifetime of 1-2 ns is attributed to the presence of the surface defects Si-O-Si, generated after anchoring the organic molecule onto the interface. The excitation-emission matrix of this band is essentially independent of the technique of synthesis, crystalline structure, and size of the silicon nanoparticles.

  3. Simulation studies on the effect of a buffer layer on the external parameters of hydrogenated amorphous silicon –– solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Rajeev Kumar; M Zeman

    2008-10-01

    Device modeling of –– junction amorphous silicon solar cells has been carried out using the amorphous semiconductor analysis (ASA) simulation programme. The aim of the study was to explain the role of a buffer layer in between the - and -layers of the –– solar cell on the external parameters such as dark current density and open circuit voltage. Investigations based on the simulation of dark – characteristics revealed that as the buffer layer thickness increases the dark current for a given voltage decreases.

  4. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgeway, R G; Hegedus, S S; Podraza, N J

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both CSi and Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  5. Nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon-silicon core-shell structures for high-power supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, S. A. Safiabadi; Soleimani-Amiri, S.; Sanaee, Z.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2017-02-01

    We report successful deposition of nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon films to realize high-power core-shell supercapacitor electrodes. A catalyst-free method is proposed to deposit large-area stable, highly conformal and highly conductive nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon (a-C:N) films by means of a direct-current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (DC-PECVD). This approach exploits C2H2 and N2 gases as the sources of carbon and nitrogen constituents and can be applied to various micro and nanostructures. Although as-deposited a-C:N films have a porous surface, their porosity can be significantly improved through a modification process consisting of Ni-assisted annealing and etching steps. The electrochemical analyses demonstrated the superior performance of the modified a-C:N as a supercapacitor active material, where specific capacitance densities as high as 42 F/g and 8.5 mF/cm2 (45 F/cm3) on silicon microrod arrays were achieved. Furthermore, this supercapacitor electrode showed less than 6% degradation of capacitance over 5000 cycles of a galvanostatic charge-discharge test. It also exhibited a relatively high energy density of 2.3 × 103 Wh/m3 (8.3 × 106 J/m3) and ultra-high power density of 2.6 × 108 W/m3 which is among the highest reported values.

  6. Uniform dehydrogenation of amorphous silicon thin films using a wide thermal annealing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chan; Seong, Sejong; Lee, Taehoon; Ahn, Jinho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yeo, Won-Jae; Park, In-Sung

    2017-02-01

    To prevent ablation caused by sudden hydrogen eruption during crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin films, a wide dehydrogenation thermal annealing (wDTA) system was developed to reduce hydrogen content in a-Si:H film prior to its crystallization process. The annealed a-Si:H films were fully dehydrogenated and nanocrystallized by the wDTA system. Raman scattering measurement revealed that the dehydrogenation process lowers the hydrogen content through disappearance of the peak intensity at 2000 cm-1. The a-Si:H film was transformed into nanocrystallized Si with lower residual stress. The major advantage of this wDTA was the large area uniformity of the thermal and the resulting material properties for 8 generation display. The uniform material characteristics of the hydrogen content, thickness, energy bandgap, and transmittance of the annealed Si films in the overall area was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and UV-vis spectrometer measurement.

  7. Mobility-lifetime product and interface property in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, H.; Kida, H.; Nonomura, S.; Fukumoto, K.; Hamakawa, Y.

    1983-06-01

    A technique for evaluating the mobility-lifetime product of electrons and holes for amorphous Si solar cells is reported and used to assay the variation of the products with impurity doping, temperature, and prolonged light exposure. The product was examined as a significant indicator of solar cell performance and durability. The a-Si:H cells examined were prepared by an rf technique, and the spectral response of the photocurrent was examined in monochromatic light. The maximum products were observed when small amounts of boron atoms were used as the dopant. The hole lifetime dominated the photoconductivity in undoped and phosphorus doped cells, while the electron lifetime was dominant in boron doped cells. The mobility-lifetime product controlled the effective surface recombination factor. The method was concluded useful for optimizing the material, structure, and manufacturing processes for producing higher performance, reproducible, and stable a-Si:H pin solar cells.

  8. Characterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: jlee@aps.anl.gov; Almer, J. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Aydiner, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Bernier, J.; Chapman, K.; Chupas, P.; Haeffner, D. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Kump, K. [GE Healthcare (United States); Lee, P.L.; Lienert, U.; Miceli, A. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Vera, G. [GE Healthcare (United States)

    2007-11-11

    Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41x41 cm{sup 2} with 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {mu}mx1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate -8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode-make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.

  9. Pixel structures to compensate nonuniform threshold voltage and mobility of polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors using subthreshold current for large-size active matrix organic light-emitting diode displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jun-Seok; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2014-01-01

    We propose pixel structures for large-size and high-resolution active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) displays using a polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane. The proposed pixel structures compensate the variations of the threshold voltage and mobility of the driving TFT using the subthreshold current. The simulated results show that the emission current error of the proposed pixel structure B ranges from -2.25 to 2.02 least significant bit (LSB) when the variations of the threshold voltage and mobility of the driving TFT are ±0.5 V and ±10%, respectively.

  10. Methane Flow Rate Effects On The Optical Properties of Amorphous Silicon Carbon (a-SiC:H Films Deposited By DC Sputtering Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosari Saleh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the refractive index (n and the optical absorption coeffi cient (α from refl ection and transmission measurements on hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon (a-SiC:H fi lms. The a-SiC:H fi lms were prepared by dc sputtering method using silicon target in argon and methane gas mixtures. The refractive index (n decreases as the methane fl ow rate increase. The optical absorption coeffi cient (α shifts to higher energy with increasing methane fl ow rate. At higher methane fl ow rate, the fi lms tend to be more disorder and have wider optical gap. The relation of the optical properties and the disorder amorphous network with the compositional properties will be discussed.

  11. Research and development of photovoltaic power system. Study on structural defects in silicon-based amorphous materials; Taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. Amorphous silicon kei zairyo no kozo kekkan ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, T. [Kanazawa University, Ishikawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-01

    Described herein are the results of the FY1994 research program for structural defects of silicon-based amorphous materials for solar cells. The study on light generation defects of the a-Si:H system and rejuvenation process by annealing establishes the effects of light irradiation time on changed neutral dangling bond density as a result of light irradiation at varying temperature of 77K, room temperature and 393K. The study on annealing to rejuvenate light generation defects of various types of a-Si-H systems establishes the activation energy distribution with respect to annealing to remove light-induced defects, showing that hydrogen affects the distribution of light-induced defects. The study on decaying process of light-induced ESR for undoped and N-doped a-Si:H systems observes the decaying process of light-induced ESR, after light is cut off, extending for a period of several seconds to several hours at 77K for the a-Si-H systems containing N in a range from 0 to 12at%. The other results presented are space distribution of neutral defects of light-irradiated a-Si-H systems, and rejuvenation process of light-induced spin for the a-Si(1-x)N(x):H composition. 6 figs.

  12. Very high frequency plasma deposited amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon tandem solar cells on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The work in this thesis is to develop high quality intrinsic layers (especially nc-Si:H) for micromorph silicon tandem solar cells/modules on plastic substrates following the substrate transfer method or knows as the Helianthos procedure. Two objectives are covered in this thesis: (1) preliminary work on trial and optimization of single junction and tandem cells on glass substrate, (2) silicon film depositions on Al foil, and afterwards the characterization and development of these cells/modules on a plastic substrate. The first objective includes the development of suitable ZnO:Al TCO for nc Si:H single junction solar cells, fabrication of the aimed micromorph tandem solar cells on glass, and finally the optimization of the nc-Si:H i-layer for the depositions afterwards on Al foil. Chapter 3 addresses the improvement of texture etching of ZnO:Al by studying the HCl etching effect on ZnO:Al films sputter-deposited in a set substrate heater temperature series. With the texture-etched ZnO:Al front TCO, a single junction nc-Si:H solar cell was deposited with an initial efficiency of 8.33%. Chapter 4 starts with studying the light soaking and annealing effects on micromorph tandem solar cell. In the end, a highly stabilized bottom cell current limited tandem cell was made. The tandem shows an initial efficiency of 10.2%, and degraded only 6.9% after 1600 h of light soaking. In Chapter 5, the nc-Si:H i-layers were studied in 3 pressure and inter-electrode distance series. The correlations between plasma physics and the consequent i-layers’ properties are investigated. We show that the Raman crystalline ratio and porosity of the nc-Si:H layer have an interesting relation with the p•d product. By varying p and d, device quality nc-Si:H layer can be deposited at a high rate of 0.6 nm/s. These results in fact are a very important step for the second objective. The second objective is covered by the entire Chapter 6. All silicon layers are deposited on special aluminum

  13. RF power control for fabricating amorphous silicon nitride without Si-nanocrystals and its effect on defects and luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seunghun [Department of Physics, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moonsup, E-mail: mhan@uos.ac.kr [Department of Physics, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-25

    Highlights: • We fabricated a-SiN{sub x} without Si-nanocrystals by using PECVD. • We investigated comprehensively the defects in a-SiN{sub x} and the relation between their defects and PL by providing energy-level diagram. • We succeeded to tune efficiently the whole range of visible luminescence with one system based material. • We conclude that RF power-control provides an efficient way to tune the color. - Abstract: We studied defect and luminescence properties of amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}) without silicon nanocrystals (Si-NC) fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition under a controlled radio-frequency (RF) power with subsequent post-annealing. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity became stronger and the central PL peak position shifted from 2.85 eV to 1.35 eV as the applied RF power decreased from 100 W to 60 W. Through the analyses of the PL and the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra we classified different kinds of defect states that each sample contains. On the basis of a further analysis of the chemical states of the Si 2p and the N 1s core-levels by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we discuss the reason that the 60 W sample contains more defect states than other samples and clarify the origin of the strong luminescence observed in the 60 W sample without Si-NC fabricated at relatively low RF power. In addition, this work shows also that the RF power control could provide an efficient way to select a color or all colors for the display devices by tuning the various kinds of defects in a-SiN{sub x} thin films.

  14. Study and Development of a novel Silicon Pixel Detector for the Upgrade of the ALICE Inner Tracking System

    CERN Document Server

    van Hoorn, Jacobus Willem; Riedler, Petra

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As an important part of its upgrade plans, the ALICE experiment schedules the installation of a new Inner Tracking System (ITS) during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in 2019/20. The new ITS will consist of seven concentric layers, covering about 10m2 with Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS). This choice of technology has been guided by the tight requirements on the material budget of 0.3 % x/X0 per layer for the three innermost layers and backed by the significant progress in the field of MAPS in recent years. The pixel chips are manufactured in the TowerJazz 180 nm CMOS process on wafers with a high-resistivity epitaxial layer on top of the substrate. During the R&D phase several chip architectures have been investigated, which take full advantage of a particular process feature, the deep p-well, that allows for full CMOS circuitry within the pixel matrix while retaining full charge colle...

  15. Improving the organic/Si heterojunction hybrid solar cell property by optimizing PEDOT:PSS film and with amorphous silicon as back surface field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hongbin; Cai, Hongkun; Du, Yangyang; Dai, Xiaowan; Sun, Yun; Ni, Jian; Li, Juan; Zhang, Dexian; Zhang, Jianjun

    2017-01-01

    Organic/Si hybrid heterojunction hybrid solar cells have got a great progress. The hybrid device may be promising in terms of reducing cost due to its simple technological process. It is crucial for high efficiency solar cells to form better coating films on the Si substrate. Here, the performance of organic/Si heterojunction hybrid solar cells is obviously enhanced by adding surfactant (FS300) into poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) film and the device with amorphous silicon as back surface field is successfully fabricated. The proper amount of surfactant addition improves the uniformity and homogeneous of the polymer film that can be reflected by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope, which allows good contact on the texture-Si substrate resulting in excellent device property. Also, the power conversion efficiency of cells is boosted to 9.37 from 7.31% displayed a 28% enhancement by embedding amorphous silicon thin film layer at rear interface as holes blocking layer. The insertion layer of amorphous silicon enhances the extraction of photon-generated carrier and suppresses the recombination of hole-electron at the rear cathode. Which results all improvement in the short-circuit current density, the open-circuit voltage and the fill factor. By optimizing the polymer film property and inserting the hole blocking layer, the performance of hybrid Si/organic hybrid solar cells is greatly improved.

  16. Structural Variations in Amorphous Silicon and Germanium: a Vibrational Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Nagendranath

    Variations in short range structural order in the tetrahedral amorphous semiconductors Si and Ge have been studied by means of vibrational spectroscopy. Short range order (SRO) in in a-Si and a-Ge can be described by bond length, bond angle and dihedral angle distributions. While the existence of SRO in amorphous (a-) Si and Ge has been known for a long time, it was believed until recently that it was not variable. This notion was, in part, based on the results of conventional diffraction studies which showed negligible changes in the radial distribution function for different samples. Thus the observed variations in physical properties as a function of sample preparation conditions were attributed to extrinsic effects such as voids. However, recent studies in this laboratory showed that SRO is variable, primarily through modifications of P((THETA)), the bond angle distribution, and that Raman scattering can be used to measure small variations in (DELTA)(THETA), the width of P((THETA)). Subsequent studies here and elsewhere have shown strong correlations between Raman and various physical properties suggesting that variations in SRO have important consequences on electronic as well as vibrational properties of both a-Si and a-Ge. A detailed study has been carried out to investigate the extent of variation in SRO and the effect of preparation conditions. The results show the bond angle distribution width to be very sensitive to preparation conditions, particularly, temperature, bombardment and hydrogen incorporation. Phonon spectra of highly ordered and highly disordered samples of a-Ge have been obtained by means of inelastic neutron scattering. Detailed comparisons between theory and experiment for phonon as well as Raman spectra show qualitative agreement. The discrepancies provide suggestions for further improvements in theory. Estimates from a combination of optical, Raman and RDF data and comparisons between theory and experiment suggest that (DELTA

  17. STEM-EELS analysis reveals stable high-density He in nanopores of amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierholz, Roland; Lacroix, Bertrand; Godinho, Vanda; Caballero-Hernández, Jaime; Duchamp, Martial; Fernández, Asunción

    2015-02-20

    A broad interest has been showed recently on the study of nanostructuring of thin films and surfaces obtained by low-energy He plasma treatments and He incorporation via magnetron sputtering. In this paper spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope is used to locate and characterize the He state in nanoporous amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering. A dedicated MATLAB program was developed to quantify the helium density inside individual pores based on the energy position shift or peak intensity of the He K-edge. A good agreement was observed between the high density (∼35-60 at nm(-3)) and pressure (0.3-1.0 GPa) values obtained in nanoscale analysis and the values derived from macroscopic measurements (the composition obtained by proton backscattering spectroscopy coupled to the macroscopic porosity estimated from ellipsometry). This work provides new insights into these novel porous coatings, providing evidence of high-density He located inside the pores and validating the methodology applied here to characterize the formation of pores filled with the helium process gas during deposition. A similar stabilization of condensed He bubbles has been previously demonstrated by high-energy He ion implantation in metals and is newly demonstrated here using a widely employed methodology, magnetron sputtering, for achieving coatings with a high density of homogeneously distributed pores and He storage capacities as high as 21 at%.

  18. Dual-Layer Nanostructured Flexible Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells with Enhanced Light Harvesting and Photoelectric Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yinyue; Xu, Zhen; Yu, Dongliang; Lu, Linfeng; Yin, Min; Tavakoli, Mohammad Mahdi; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Hao, Yuying; Fan, Zhiyong; Cui, Yanxia; Li, Dongdong

    2016-05-04

    Three-dimensional (3-D) structures have triggered tremendous interest for thin-film solar cells since they can dramatically reduce the material usage and incident light reflection. However, the high aspect ratio feature of some 3-D structures leads to deterioration of internal electric field and carrier collection capability, which reduces device power conversion efficiency (PCE). Here, we report high performance flexible thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells with a unique and effective light trapping scheme. In this device structure, a polymer nanopillar membrane is attached on top of a device, which benefits broadband and omnidirectional performances, and a 3-D nanostructure with shallow dent arrays underneath serves as a back reflector on flexible titanium (Ti) foil resulting in an increased optical path length by exciting hybrid optical modes. The efficient light management results in 42.7% and 41.7% remarkable improvements of short-circuit current density and overall efficiency, respectively. Meanwhile, an excellent flexibility has been achieved as PCE remains 97.6% of the initial efficiency even after 10 000 bending cycles. This unique device structure can also be duplicated for other flexible photovoltaic devices based on different active materials such as CdTe, Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), organohalide lead perovskites, and so forth.

  19. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filali, Larbi; Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine; Bouhekka, Ahmed; Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi

    2016-10-01

    We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1-3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) on the hydrogen-rich surfaces. The most important result is that the surface hydrogen content was the dominant factor, compared to wettability and morphology, for protein adsorption.

  20. Detection of charged particles and X-rays by scintillator layers coupled to amorphous silicon photodiode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, T.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Lee, H.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Goodman, C.A.; Wildermuth, D. [Air Techniques, Inc. Hicksville, NY (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n diodes with transparent metallic contacts are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. When coupled to a suitable scintillator using CsI(Tl) as the scintillator we show a capability to detect minimum ionizing particles with S/N {approximately}20. We demonstrate such an arrangement by operating a p-i-n diode in photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). Moreover, we show that a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3-8 higher light sensitivity for shaping times of 1 {mu}s. n-i-n devices have similar optical gain as the p-i-n photoconductor for short integrating times ( < 10{mu}s). However, n-i-n devices exhibit much higher gain for a long term integration (10ms) than the p-i-n ones. High sensitivity photosensors are very desirable for X-ray medical imaging because radiation exposure dose can be reduced significantly. The scintillator CsI layers we made have higher spatial resolution than the Kodak commercial scintillator screens due to their internal columnar structure which can collimate the scintillation light. Evaporated CsI layers are shown to be more resistant to radiation damage than the crystalline bulk CsI(Tl).

  1. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, R [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru SN, Lima (Peru); Cremona, M [Departamento de Fisica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica de Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, Cx. Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Achete, C A, E-mail: rreyes@uni.edu.pe [Departamento de Engenheria Metalurgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq{sub 3}/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  2. Scattering effect of the high-index dielectric nanospheres for high performance hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhai; Gao, Pingqi; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Xiaofeng; Ye, Jichun

    2016-07-01

    Dielectric nanosphere arrays are considered as promising light-trapping designs with the capability of transforming the freely propagated sunlight into guided modes. This kinds of designs are especially beneficial to the ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells due to the advantages of using lossless material and easily scalable assembly. In this paper, we demonstrate numerically that the front-sided integration of high-index subwavelength titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanosphere arrays can significantly enhance the light absorption in 100 nm-thick a-Si:H thin films and thus the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of related solar cells. The main reason behind is firmly attributed to the strong scattering effect excited by TiO2 nanospheres in the whole waveband, which contributes to coupling the light into a-Si:H layer via two typical ways: 1) in the short-waveband, the forward scattering of TiO2 nanospheres excite the Mie resonance, which focuses the light into the surface of the a-Si:H layer and thus provides a leaky channel; 2) in the long-waveband, the transverse waveguided modes caused by powerful scattering effectively couple the light into almost the whole active layer. Moreover, the finite-element simulations demonstrate that photocurrent density (Jph) can be up to 15.01 mA/cm2, which is 48.76% higher than that of flat system.

  3. Microspot-based ELISA in microfluidics: chemiluminescence and colorimetry detection using integrated thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Pedro; Prazeres, Duarte Miguel França; Chu, Virginia; Conde, João Pedro

    2011-12-07

    Microfluidic technology has the potential to decrease the time of analysis and the quantity of sample and reactants required in immunoassays, together with the potential of achieving high sensitivity, multiplexing, and portability. A lab-on-a-chip system was developed and optimized using optical and fluorescence microscopy. Primary antibodies are adsorbed onto the walls of a PDMS-based microchannel via microspotting. This probe antibody is then recognised using secondary FITC or HRP labelled antibodies responsible for providing fluorescence or chemiluminescent and colorimetric signals, respectively. The system incorporated a micron-sized thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiode microfabricated on a glass substrate. The primary antibody spots in the PDMS-based microfluidic were precisely aligned with the photodiodes for the direct detection of the antibody-antigen molecular recognition reactions using chemiluminescence and colorimetry. The immunoassay takes ~30 min from assay to the integrated detection. The conditions for probe antibody microspotting and for the flow-through ELISA analysis in the microfluidic format with integrated detection were defined using antibody solutions with concentrations in the nM-μM range. Sequential colorimetric or chemiluminescence detection of specific antibody-antigen molecular recognition was quantitatively detected using the photodiode. Primary antibody surface densities down to 0.182 pmol cm(-2) were detected. Multiplex detection using different microspotted primary antibodies was demonstrated.

  4. Formation of ion tracks in amorphous silicon nitride films with MeV C{sub 60} ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitayama, T.; Morita, Y.; Nakajima, K. [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Narumi, K.; Saitoh, Y. [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Matsuda, M.; Sataka, M. [Nuclear Science Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tsujimoto, M.; Isoda, S. [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Toulemonde, M. [CIMAP-GANIL (CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-Université de Caen Basse Normandie), Bd. H. Becquerel, 14070 Caen (France); Kimura, K., E-mail: kimura@kues.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Micro Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-08-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN) films (thickness 5–100 nm) were irradiated with 0.12–5 MeV C{sub 60}, 100 MeV Xe, 200 MeV Kr, and 200 and 420 MeV Au ions. Ion tracks were clearly observed using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) except for 100 MeV Xe and 200 MeV Kr. The observed HAADF-STEM images showed that the ion tracks consist of a low density core (0.5–2 nm in radius) and a high density shell (several nm in radius). The observed core and shell radii are not simply correlated with the electronic energy loss indicating that the nuclear energy loss plays an important role in the both core and shell formations. The observed track radii were well reproduced by the unified thermal spike model with two thresholds for shell and core formations.

  5. Low contrast detectability and dose savings with an amorphous silicon detector designed for x-ray radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ping; Schubert, Scott F.; Aufrichtig, Richard

    2000-04-01

    In an observer study we compare low contrast detectability and dose efficiency of an amorphous silicon x-ray detector versus a standard thoracic screen-film (Kodak InSight HC/InSight IT). Twelve images of a CDRAD contrast-detail phantom were acquired with the screen-film system using an entrance exposure corresponding to a conventional chest x-ray. Using the same x- ray system with an interchanged digital detector, we acquired four digital image sets (12 images each) at dose levels corresponding to 27%, 41%, 63% and 100% of the film dose. Prior to laser printing, the digital images were processed to match the film contrast and optical density level. A 4- alternative forced choice (4-AFC) paradigm with seven observers was used to measure the threshold contrasts of disk sizes from 0.5 to 4.0 mm. Further, we estimated the equivalent perceptual dose (EPD), which is the dose level of digital for which the same contrast detectability as film is obtained. Contrast detectability is significantly improved with the digital detector. On average, all disk shaped objects detected from the digital detector have lower threshold contrasts than those from film at the same dose level. The EPD value averaged over disk size is 44%, which corresponds to a 56% dose savings for the digital detector.

  6. The correlation of open-circuit voltage with bandgap in amorphous silicon-based {ital pin} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Schiff, E.A. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244-1130 (United States)

    1996-01-01

    We briefly review the correlation of open-circuit voltages {ital V}{sub OC} with the bandgap of the intrinsic layer in amorphous silicon based {ital pin} solar cells. We discuss two mechanisms which limit {ital V}{sub OC}: intrinsic layer recombination, and the built-in potential {ital V}{sub BI}. In particular we discuss Li{close_quote}s proposal that the open-circuit voltages in higher bandgap cells ({ital E}{sub G}{gt}1.9 eV) are {ital V}{sub BI}-limited. Based on computer simulations of {ital pin} solar cells we propose that {ital V}{sub BI} limitation occurs when the recombination limit to {ital V}{sub OC} exceeds the cell{close_quote}s field-reversal voltage {ital V}{sub R}. For {ital a}-Si:H based cells this field-reversal voltage occurs at about {ital V}{sub BI}-0.3 V. This proposal would account for the observation that {ital V}{sub BI} limitation occurs for {ital V}{sub OC} significantly smaller than {ital V}{sub BI}. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Conduction Mechanism of Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Nitride Films%a-SiNx∶H薄膜的导电机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王燕; 岳瑞峰

    2001-01-01

    研究了a-SiNx∶H薄膜的电导激活能与氮含量的关系。结果表明,随氮含量增加,样品表现出两种并行的电导机制:欧姆机制与Poole-Frenkel机制。采用两种电导机制拟合电流随温度变化曲线后得到了不同氮含量样品的电导激活能。由于氮在非晶硅中为施主类杂质,且具有特殊的结构组态,因而提出了一种调制掺杂模型解释了实验现象。%Dependence of conductivity activated energy on nitrogen contents in amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride (a-SiNx∶H)films was studied.The results show that both Ohmic mechanism and Poole-Frenkel mechanism are responsible for the variations in the conductivity activated energies.Temperature dependence of the current can be analytically evaluated by means of the two mechanisms and the conductivity activated energies can be calculated for samples with different nitrogen contents.Since nitrogen is a donor-type impurity with special stoichiometry in a-SiNx∶H,we propose a modulated doping model to understand the dependence of the conductivity activated energy on N contents.

  8. Application of metal nanowire networks on hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shouyi; Hou, Guofu; Chen, Peizhuan; Jia, Baohua; Gu, Min

    2017-02-24

    We demonstrate the application of metal nanowire (NW) networks as a transparent electrode on hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cells. We first systematically investigate the optical performances of the metal NW networks on a-Si:H solar cells in different electrode configurations through numerical simulations to fully understand the mechanisms to guide the experiments. The theoretically optimized configuration is discovered to be metal NWs sandwiched between a 40 nm indium tin oxide (ITO) layer and a 20 nm ITO layer. The overall performances of the solar cells integrated with the metal NW networks are experimentally studied. It has been found the experimentally best performing NW integrated solar cell deviates from the theoretically predicated design due to the performance degradation induced by the fabrication complicity. A 6.7% efficiency enhancement was achieved for the solar cell with metal NW network integrated on top of a 60 nm thick ITO layer compared to the cell with only the ITO layer due to enhanced electrical conductivity by the metal NW network.

  9. Amorphous carbon-silicon heterojunctions by pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan; Yow, Ho-Kwang [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Selangor 63100 (Malaysia); Tou, Teck-Yong, E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.m [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Selangor 63100 (Malaysia)

    2009-07-31

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited at 10{sup -4} Pa on n-Si (Si-111) and p-Si (Si-100) substrates using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fundamental, second- and third-harmonic outputs. These unhydrogenated and undoped a-C films were characterized by visible and UV Raman spectroscopy which indicated the presence of substantial amount of sp{sup 3} hybridized carbon network depending on the laser wavelength. The bulk resistivity in the Au/a-C/indium tin oxide structure varied between (10{sup 9}-10{sup 13}) {Omega} cm - the lowest resistivity was obtained for films deposited by the fundamental laser output at 1064 nm while the highest value was by the third-harmonic laser output at 355 nm. All the a-C/Si heterostructures exhibited a nonlinear current density-voltage characteristic. Under light illumination, by taking into consideration the fill factor of {approx} 0.2 for a-C/n-Si, the conversion efficiency at the highest photovoltage and photocurrent, at an illumination density of 0.175 mW/cm{sup 2} was estimated to be {approx} 0.28%.

  10. Application of metal nanowire networks on hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shouyi; Hou, Guofu; Chen, Peizhuan; Jia, Baohua; Gu, Min

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the application of metal nanowire (NW) networks as a transparent electrode on hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) solar cells. We first systematically investigate the optical performances of the metal NW networks on a-Si:H solar cells in different electrode configurations through numerical simulations to fully understand the mechanisms to guide the experiments. The theoretically optimized configuration is discovered to be metal NWs sandwiched between a 40 nm indium tin oxide (ITO) layer and a 20 nm ITO layer. The overall performances of the solar cells integrated with the metal NW networks are experimentally studied. It has been found the experimentally best performing NW integrated solar cell deviates from the theoretically predicated design due to the performance degradation induced by the fabrication complicity. A 6.7% efficiency enhancement was achieved for the solar cell with metal NW network integrated on top of a 60 nm thick ITO layer compared to the cell with only the ITO layer due to enhanced electrical conductivity by the metal NW network.

  11. Study of the effect of boron doping on the solid phase crystallisation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westra, J.M.; Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M. van [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices, Department of Sustainable Electrical Energy, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Šutta, P. [New Technologies-Research Centre, University of West Bohemia, Plzen (Czech Republic); Sharma, K.; Creatore, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Zeman, M. [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices, Department of Sustainable Electrical Energy, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-10-01

    Thin-film polycrystalline silicon on glass obtained by crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films is an interesting alternative for thin-film silicon solar cells. Although the solar-cell efficiencies are still limited, this technique offers excellent opportunity to study the influence of B-doping on the crystallisation process of a-Si:H. Our approach is to slowly crystallize B-doped a-Si:H films by solid phase crystallization in the temperature range 580–600°C. We use plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETPCVD) for the B-doped a-Si:H deposition. In this work we show the first in-situ study of the crystallization process of B-doped a-Si:H films produced by ETPCVD and make a comparison to the crystallization of intrinsic ETPCVD deposited a-Si:H as well as intrinsic and B-doped a-Si:H films deposited by PECVD. The crystallization process is investigated by in-situ x-ray diffraction, using a high temperature chamber for the annealing procedure. The study shows a strong decrease in the time required for full crystallisation for B-doped a-Si:H films compared to the intrinsic films. The time before the onset of crystallisation is reduced by the incorporation of B as is the grain growth velocity. The time to full crystallisation can be manipulated by the B{sub 2}H{sub 6}-to-SiH{sub 4} ratio used during the deposition and by the microstructure of the as-deposited a-Si:H films. - Highlights: • Solid-phase crystallization of B-doped a-Si:H films is presented. • Crystallization study of B-doped and intrinsic a-Si:H by in-situ x-ray diffraction • The microstructure and B-doping of a-Si:H influences the crystallisation process. • B enhances the grain growth rate, but the effect on the nucleation rate is limited.

  12. Pixel detector readout chip

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    Close-up of a pixel detector readout chip. The photograph shows an aera of 1 mm x 2 mm containing 12 separate readout channels. The entire chip contains 1000 readout channels (around 80 000 transistors) covering a sensitive area of 8 mm x 5 mm. The chip has been mounted on a silicon detector to detect high energy particles.

  13. Electronic structure of the amorphous-crystalline Silicon heterostructure contact; Die elektronische Struktur des amorph-kristallinen Silizium-Heterostruktur-Kontakts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, L.

    2006-07-01

    In the present work, the electronic density of states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers in the thickness range from 300 down to {proportional_to}2 nm was examined by Near-UV-photoelectron spectroscopy (NUV-PES). The measurements yield a mean density (averaged over all directions in k space) of the extended states in the valence band close to the band edge E{sub v}, down to approximately E{sub v}-1 eV, as well as the density of states in the band-gap between E{sub v} and the Fermi level E{sub f}. An analytic model for the density of states was fitted to the measured yield data. The model describes the extended states close to the band edge as well as the localized states in the band gap. The defect parameters obtained from the fits to the 300 nm sample are elevated with respect to literature data. In contrast to PES the photocurrent measurement yield the defect parameters averaged over the entire layer thickness. Finally, the photocurrent measurements can be evaluated in the Tauc plot to yield the optical band-gap, E{sub g}{sup opt}=1.76(5) eV. The methodology developed in the first part of the thesis (PES measurement and fit of the model density of states) was then applied to various series of approximately 10 nm thin a-Si:H layers on c-Si substrates, where the deposition temperature of the layers and the concentration of their doping both by phosphorus and boron were varied. The experimental results can be summarized as follows: Ultrathin a-Si:H layers show an optimum of the deposition-temperature around 230 C. The optimum is characterized by an Urbach energy of 66(1) meV and a defect-density of 2,9(3).10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. For undoped layers, the Fermi level lies E{sub F}-E{sub V}{sup {mu}}=1.04(6) eV, the films are therefore slightly n-type. Conductivity measurements at identically prepared thick layers on glass allow to determine the distance of the Fermi level to the conduction band mobility edge, E{sub C}{sup {mu}}-E{sub F}. Both for the

  14. Carrier collection losses in interface passivated amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumüller, A.; Bereznev, S.; Ewert, M.; Volobujeva, O.; Sergeev, O.; Falta, J.; Vehse, M.; Agert, C.

    2016-07-01

    In silicon thin-film solar cells the interface between the i- and p-layer is the most critical. In the case of back diffusion of photogenerated minority carriers to the i/p-interface, recombination occurs mainly on the defect states at the interface. To suppress this effect and to reduce recombination losses, hydrogen plasma treatment (HPT) is usually applied. As an alternative to using state of the art HPT we apply an argon plasma treatment (APT) before the p-layer deposition in n-i-p solar cells. To study the effect of APT, several investigations were applied to compare the results with HPT and no plasma treatment at the interface. Carrier collection losses in resulting solar cells were examined with spectral response measurements with and without bias voltage. To investigate single layers, surface photovoltage and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements were conducted. The results with APT at the i/p-interface show a beneficial contribution to the carrier collection compared with HPT and no plasma treatment. Therefore, it can be concluded that APT reduces the recombination centers at the interface. Further, we demonstrate that carrier collection losses of thin-film solar cells are significantly lower with APT.

  15. Energy loss process analysis for radiation degradation and immediate recovery of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro; Beernink, Kevin; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    Performance degradation of a-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe triple-junction solar cells due to irradiation of silicon ions, electrons, and protons are investigated using an in-situ current-voltage measurement system. The performance recovery immediately after irradiation is also investigated. Significant recovery is always observed independent of radiation species and temperature. It is shown that the characteristic time, which is obtained by analyzing the short-circuit current annealing behavior, is an important parameter for practical applications in space. In addition, the radiation degradation mechanism is discussed by analyzing the energy loss process of incident particles (ionizing energy loss: IEL, and non-ionizing energy loss: NIEL) and their relative damage factors. It is determined that ionizing dose is the primarily parameter for electron degradation whereas displacement damage dose is the primarily parameter for proton degradation. This is because the ratio of NIEL to IEL in the case of electrons is small enough to be ignored the damage due to NIEL although the defect creation ratio of NIEL is much larger than that of IEL in the cases of both protons and electrons. The impact of “radiation quality effect” has to be considered to understand the degradation due to Si ion irradiation.

  16. High Growth Rate Deposition of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films and Devices Using ECR-PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium films (a-SiGe:H) and devices have been extensively studied because of the tunable band gap for matching the solar spectrum and mature the fabrication techniques. a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells have great potential for commercial manufacture because of very low cost and adaptability to large-scale manufacturing. Although it has been demonstrated that a-SiGe:H thin films and devices with good quality can be produced successfully, some issues regarding growth chemistry have remained yet unexplored, such as the hydrogen and inert-gas dilution, bombardment effect, and chemical annealing, to name a few. The alloying of the SiGe introduces above an order-of-magnitude higher defect density, which degrades the performance of the a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. This degradation becomes worse when high growth-rate deposition is required. Preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon, clustering of Ge and Si, and columnar structure and buried dihydride radicals make the film intolerably bad. The work presented here uses the Electron-Cyclotron-Resonance Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (ECR-PECVD) technique to fabricate a-SiGe:H films and devices with high growth rates. Helium gas, together with a small amount of H2, was used as the plasma species. Thickness, optical band gap, conductivity, Urbach energy, mobility-lifetime product, I-V curve, and quantum efficiency were characterized during the process of pursuing good materials. The microstructure of the a-(Si,Ge):H material was probed by Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. They found that the advantages of using helium as the main plasma species are: (1) high growth rate--the energetic helium ions break the reactive gas more efficiently than hydrogen ions; (2) homogeneous growth--heavy helium ions impinging on the surface promote the surface mobility of the reactive radicals, so that heteroepitaxy growth as clustering of Ge and Si, columnar structure are

  17. Photovoltaic manufacturing technology monolithic amorphous silicon modules on continuous polymer substrates: Final technical report, July 5, 1995--December 31, 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, F.

    2000-03-28

    Iowa Thin Film Technologies is completing a three-phase program that has increased throughput and decreased costs in nearly all aspects of its thin-film photovoltaic manufacturing process. The overall manufacturing costs have been reduced by 61 percent through implementation of the improvements developed under this program. Development of the ability to use a 1-mil substrate, rather than the standard 2-mil substrate, results in a 50 percent cost-saving for this material. Process development on a single-pass amorphous silicon deposition system has resulted in a 37 percent throughput improvement. A wide range of process and machine improvements have been implemented on the transparent conducting oxide deposition system. These include detailed parameter optimization of deposition temperatures, process gas flows, carrier gas flows, and web speeds. An overall process throughput improvement of 275 percent was achieved based on this work. The new alignment technique was developed for the laser scriber and printer systems, which improved registration accuracy from 100 microns to 10 microns. The new technique also reduced alignment time for these registration systems significantly. This resulted in a throughput increase of 75 percent on the scriber and 600 percent on the printer. Automated techniques were designed and implemented for the module assembly processes. These include automated busbar attachment, roll-based lamination, and automated die cutting of finished modules. These processes were previously done by hand labor. Throughput improvements ranged from 200 percent to 1200 percent, relative to hand labor rates. A wide range of potential encapsulation materials were evaluated for suitability in a roll lamination process and for cost-effectiveness. A combination material was found that has a cost that is only 10 percent of the standard EVA/Tefzel cost and is suitable for medium-lifetime applications. The 20-year lifetime applications still require the more expensive

  18. Surface morphology and grain analysis of successively industrially grown amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catena, Alberto [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); McJunkin, Thomas [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 43210 Columbus, Ohio (United States); Agnello, Simonpietro; Gelardi, Franco M. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Palermo, 90100 Palermo (Italy); Wehner, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); Fischer, Christian B., E-mail: chrbfischer@uni-koblenz.de [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two different a-C:H coatings in various thicknesses on Si (1 0 0) have been studied. • For both types no significant difference in surface morphology is detectable. • The grain number with respect to their height appears randomly distributed. • In average no grain higher than 14 nm and larger than 0.05 μm{sup 2} was observed. • A height to area correlation confines all detected grains to a limited region. - Abstract: Silicon (1 0 0) has been gradually covered by amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films via an industrial process. Two types of these diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, one more flexible (f-DLC) and one more robust (r-DLC), have been investigated. Both types have been grown by a radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique with acetylene plasma. Surface morphologies have been studied in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the DLC structure. Both types appeared to have very similar morphology and sp{sup 2} carbon arrangement. The average height and area for single grains have been analyzed for all depositions. A random distribution of grain heights was found for both types. The individual grain structures between the f- and r-type revealed differences: the shape for the f-DLC grains is steeper than for the r-DLC grains. By correlating the average grain heights to the average grain areas for all depositions a limited region is identified, suggesting a certain regularity during the DLC deposition mechanisms that confines both values. A growth of the sp{sup 2} carbon entities for high r-DLC depositions is revealed and connected to a structural rearrangement of carbon atom hybridizations and hydrogen content in the DLC structure.

  19. Performance of a 41X41-cm2 amorphous silicon flat panel x-ray detector for radiographic imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfors, P R; Aufrichtig, R

    2000-06-01

    We report the performance of a 41 X 41-cm2 amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector designed for radiographic imaging applications. The detector consists of an array of photodiodes and thin film transistor switches on a 0.2-mm pitch with an overlying thallium-doped cesium iodide scintillator. The performance of the detector was evaluated through measurement of the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency [DQE(f)]. Measurements of the characteristic curve and modulation transfer function (MTF) are also reported. All measurements were made in a radiographic imaging mode with a readout time of 125 ms. We evaluated a total of 15 detectors. One detector was characterized at a range of exposures and at three different electronic gain settings. Measurements of DQE(f) and MTF were also performed as a function of position on one detector. The measured DQE at an exposure of about 1 mR was 0.66 at zero spatial frequency and fell smoothly with frequency to a value of 0.24 at the Nyquist frequency, 2.5 cycles/mm. The DQE is independent of exposure for exposures in the upper 80% of each gain range, but is reduced somewhat at lower exposures because of the influence of additive system noise. The reduction can be controlled by adjusting the electronic gain. For a gain that allows a maximum exposure of 5 mR, the DQE at 0.056 mR was 0.64 at zero frequency and 0.19 at 2.5 cycles/mm. The standard deviation in DQE among measurements on different detectors was less than 0.02 at any frequency. The presampling MTF was 0.26 at 2.5 cycles/mm. The standard deviation in MTF among measurements on different detectors was less than 0.01 at any frequency. Both MTF and DQE were substantially independent of position on the detector.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma CVD of Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) Films Using Triethylsilane and Nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan Guruvenket; Steven Andrie; Mark Simon; Kyle W. Johnson; Robert A. Sailer

    2011-10-04

    Amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbonitride (a-SiCN:H) thin films are synthesized by atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor (AP-PECVD) deposition using the Surfx Atomflow{trademark} 250D APPJ source with triethylsilane (HSiEt{sub 3}, TES) and nitrogen as the precursor and the reactive gases, respectively. The effect of the substrate temperature (T{sub s}) on the growth characteristics and the properties of a-SiCN:H films was evaluated. The properties of the films were investigated via scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) for surface morphological analyses, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chemical and compositional analyses; spectroscopic ellipsometry for optical properties and thickness determination and nanoindentation to determine the mechanical properties of the a-SiCN:H films. Films deposited at low T{sub s} depict organic like features, while the films deposited at high T{sub s} depict ceramic like features. FTIR and XPS studies reveal that an increases in T{sub s} helps in the elimination of organic moieties and incorporation of nitrogen in the film. Films deposited at T{sub s} of 425 C have an index of refraction (n) of 1.84 and hardness (H) of 14.8 GPa. A decrease in the deposition rate between T{sub s} of 25 and 250 C and increase in deposition rate between T{sub s} of 250 and 425 C indicate that the growth of a-SiCN:H films at lower T{sub s} are surface reaction controlled, while at high temperatures film growth is mass-transport controlled. Based on the experimental results, a potential route for film growth is proposed.

  1. Development of a very fast spectral response measurement system for analysis of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.A., E-mail: jose.rodriguez@tsolar.eu [Dept. Technology, Development and Innovation, T-Solar Global S.A., Parque Tecnologico de Galicia, Avda. de Vigo 5, E-32900 San Cibrao das Vinas (Ourense) (Spain); Fortes, M. [Departamento de Electronica e Computacion, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alberte, C.; Vetter, M.; Andreu, J. [Dept. Technology, Development and Innovation, T-Solar Global S.A., Parque Tecnologico de Galicia, Avda. de Vigo 5, E-32900 San Cibrao das Vinas (Ourense) (Spain)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spectral response equipment for measuring a-Si:H solar cells in a few seconds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Equipment based on 16 LEDs with simultaneous illumination of the solar cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The current generated by each LED is analyzed by a Fast Fourier Transform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cheap equipment without lock-in technology for the current measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement error vs. conventional measurement less than 1% in J{sub sc}. - Abstract: An important requirement for a very fast spectral response measurement system is the simultaneous illumination of the solar cell at multiple well defined wavelengths. Nowadays this can be done by means of light emitting diodes (LEDs) available for a multitude of wavelengths. For the purpose to measure the spectral response (SR) of amorphous silicon solar cells a detailed characterization of LEDs emitting in the wavelength range from 300 nm to 800 nm was performed. In the here developed equipment the LED illumination is modulated in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 200 Hz and the current generated by each LED is analyzed by a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to determine the current component corresponding to each wavelength. The equipment provides a signal to noise ratio of 2-4 orders of magnitude for individual wavelengths resulting in a precise measurement of the SR over the whole wavelength range. The difference of the short circuit current determined from the SR is less than 1% in comparison to a conventional system with monochromator.

  2. The effect of amorphous silicon surface hydrogenation on morphology, wettability and its implication on the adsorption of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filali, Larbi, E-mail: larbifilali5@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Brahmi, Yamina; Sib, Jamal Dine [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Bouhekka, Ahmed [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria); Département de Physique, Université Hassiba Ben Bouali, 02000 Chlef (Algeria); Benlakehal, Djamel; Bouizem, Yahya; Kebab, Aissa; Chahed, Larbi [Laboratoire de Physique des Couches Minces et Matériaux pour l' Electronique, Université d' Oran 1, Ahmed Ben Bella, BP 1524, El M' naouar 31100 Oran (Algeria)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of the surfaces had the effect of reducing the roughness by way of shadow etching. • Roughness was the driving factor affecting the wettability of the hydrogenated surfaces. • Bovine Serum Albumin proteins favored the surfaces with highest hydrogen content. • Surface modification induced secondary structure change of adsorbed proteins. - Abstract: We study the effect of amorphous silicon (a-Si) surface hydrogenation on Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) adsorption. A set of (a-Si) films was prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) and after deposition; they were treated in molecular hydrogen ambient at different pressures (1–3 Pa). Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) were used to study the hydrogenation effect and BSA adsorption. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to evaluate morphological changes caused by hydrogenation. The wettability of the films was measured using contact angle measurement, and in the case of the hydrogenated surfaces, it was found to be driven by surface roughness. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy and SE measurements show that proteins had the strongest affinity toward the surfaces with the highest hydrogen content and their secondary structure was affected by a significant decrease of the α-helix component (-27%) compared with the proteins adsorbed on the un-treated surface, which had a predominantly α-helix (45%) structure. The adsorbed protein layer was found to be densely packed with a large thickness (30.9 nm) o