WorldWideScience

Sample records for amorphous silicon flat-panel

  1. Image quality vs. radiation dose for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, H; Beckman, K W; Andersson, T; Persliden, J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector at various radiation dose settings and to compare the results with storage phosphor plates and a screen-film system. A CDRAD 2.0 contrast-detail phantom was imaged with a flat-panel detector (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) at three different dose levels with settings for intravenous urography. The same phantom was imaged with storage phosphor plates at a simulated system speed of 200 and a screen-film system with a system speed of 160. Entrance surface doses were recorded for all images. At each setting, three images were read by four independent observers. The flat-panel detector had equal image quality at less than half the radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates. The difference was even larger when compared with film with the flat-panel detector having equal image quality at approximately one-fifth the dose. The flat-panel detector has a very favourable combination of image quality vs radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates and screen film.

  2. Image quality vs radiation dose for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector: a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijer, H.; Andersson, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Oerebro Medical Centre Hospital (Sweden); Beckman, K.W.; Persliden, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Oerebro Medical Centre Hospital (Sweden)

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality for a flat-panel amorphous silicon detector at various radiation dose settings and to compare the results with storage phosphor plates and a screen-film system. A CDRAD 2.0 contrast-detail phantom was imaged with a flat-panel detector (Philips Medical Systems, Eindhoven, The Netherlands) at three different dose levels with settings for intravenous urography. The same phantom was imaged with storage phosphor plates at a simulated system speed of 200 and a screen-film system with a system speed of 160. Entrance surface doses were recorded for all images. At each setting, three images were read by four independent observers. The flat-panel detector had equal image quality at less than half the radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates. The difference was even larger when compared with film with the flat-panel detector having equal image quality at approximately one-fifth the dose. The flat-panel detector has a very favourable combination of image quality vs radiation dose compared with storage phosphor plates and screen film. (orig.)

  3. Full breast digital mammography with an amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector: Physical characteristics of a clinical prototype

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical prototype amorphous silicon-based flat panel imager for full-breast digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a thin thallium doped CsI scintillator on an amorphous silicon matrix of detector elements with a pixel pitch of 100 μm. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta were employed for this evaluation. The presampling MT...

  4. Multidetector-row CT with a 64-row amorphous silicon flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Edward G.; Colbeth, Richard E.; Daley, Earl T.; Job, Isaias D.; Mollov, Ivan P.; Mollov, Todor I.; Pavkovich, John M.; Roos, Pieter G.; Star-Lack, Josh M.; Tognina, Carlo A.

    2007-03-01

    A unique 64-row flat panel (FP) detector has been developed for sub-second multidetector-row CT (MDCT). The intent was to explore the image quality achievable with relatively inexpensive amorphous silicon (a-Si) compared to existing diagnostic scanners with discrete crystalline diode detectors. The FP MDCT system is a bench-top design that consists of three FP modules. Each module uses a 30 cm x 3.3 cm a-Si array with 576 x 64 photodiodes. The photodiodes are 0.52 mm x 0.52 mm, which allows for about twice the spatial resolution of most commercial MDCT scanners. The modules are arranged in an overlapping geometry, which is sufficient to provide a full-fan 48 cm diameter scan. Scans were obtained with various detachable scintillators, e.g. ceramic Gd IIO IIS, particle-in-binder Gd IIO IIS:Tb and columnar CsI:Tl. Scan quality was evaluated with a Catphan-500 performance phantom and anthropomorphic phantoms. The FP MDCT scans demonstrate nearly equivalent performance scans to a commercial 16-slice MDCT scanner at comparable 10 - 20 mGy/100mAs doses. Thus far, a high contrast resolution of 15 lp/cm and a low contrast resolution of 5 mm @ 0.3 % have been achieved on 1 second scans. Sub-second scans have been achieved with partial rotations. Since the future direction of MDCT appears to be in acquiring single organ coverage per scan, future efforts are planned for increasing the number of detector rows beyond the current 64- rows.

  5. Characterization and application of a GE amorphous silicon flat panel detector in a synchrotron light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.H. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States)], E-mail: jlee@aps.anl.gov; Almer, J. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Aydiner, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States); Bernier, J.; Chapman, K.; Chupas, P.; Haeffner, D. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Kump, K. [GE Healthcare (United States); Lee, P.L.; Lienert, U.; Miceli, A. [XSD Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (United States); Vera, G. [GE Healthcare (United States)

    2007-11-11

    Characterization, in the language of synchrotron radiation, was performed on a GE Revolution 41RT flat panel detector using the X-ray light source at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The detector has an active area of 41x41 cm{sup 2} with 200x200 {mu}m{sup 2} pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. Modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured in terms of line spread function (LSF) using a 25 {mu}mx1 cm tungsten slit. Memory effects of the detector elements, called lag, were also measured. The large area and fast data capturing rate -8 fps in unbinned mode, 30 fps in binned or region of interest (ROI) mode-make the GE flat panel detector a unique and very versatile detector for synchrotron experiments. In particular, we present data from pair distribution function (PDF) measurements to demonstrate the special features of this detector.

  6. Full breast digital mammography with an amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector: physical characteristics of a clinical prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantham, S; Karellas, A; Suryanarayanan, S; Albagli, D; Han, S; Tkaczyk, E J; Landberg, C E; Opsahl-Ong, B; Granfors, P R; Levis, I; D'Orsi, C J; Hendrick, R E

    2000-03-01

    The physical characteristics of a clinical prototype amorphous silicon-based flat panel imager for full-breast digital mammography have been investigated. The imager employs a thin thallium doped CsI scintillator on an amorphous silicon matrix of detector elements with a pixel pitch of 100 microm. Objective criteria such as modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), and noise equivalent quanta were employed for this evaluation. The presampling MTF was found to be 0.73, 0.42, and 0.28 at 2, 4, and 5 cycles/mm, respectively. The measured DQE of the current prototype utilizing a 28 kVp, Mo-Mo spectrum beam hardened with 4.5 cm Lucite is approximately 55% at close to zero spatial frequency at an exposure of 32.8 mR, and decreases to approximately 40% at a low exposure of 1.3 mR. Detector element nonuniformity and electronic gain variations were not significant after appropriate calibration and software corrections. The response of the imager was linear and did not exhibit signal saturation under tested exposure conditions.

  7. Performance of a 41X41-cm2 amorphous silicon flat panel x-ray detector for radiographic imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfors, P R; Aufrichtig, R

    2000-06-01

    We report the performance of a 41 X 41-cm2 amorphous silicon-based flat panel detector designed for radiographic imaging applications. The detector consists of an array of photodiodes and thin film transistor switches on a 0.2-mm pitch with an overlying thallium-doped cesium iodide scintillator. The performance of the detector was evaluated through measurement of the frequency-dependent detective quantum efficiency [DQE(f)]. Measurements of the characteristic curve and modulation transfer function (MTF) are also reported. All measurements were made in a radiographic imaging mode with a readout time of 125 ms. We evaluated a total of 15 detectors. One detector was characterized at a range of exposures and at three different electronic gain settings. Measurements of DQE(f) and MTF were also performed as a function of position on one detector. The measured DQE at an exposure of about 1 mR was 0.66 at zero spatial frequency and fell smoothly with frequency to a value of 0.24 at the Nyquist frequency, 2.5 cycles/mm. The DQE is independent of exposure for exposures in the upper 80% of each gain range, but is reduced somewhat at lower exposures because of the influence of additive system noise. The reduction can be controlled by adjusting the electronic gain. For a gain that allows a maximum exposure of 5 mR, the DQE at 0.056 mR was 0.64 at zero frequency and 0.19 at 2.5 cycles/mm. The standard deviation in DQE among measurements on different detectors was less than 0.02 at any frequency. The presampling MTF was 0.26 at 2.5 cycles/mm. The standard deviation in MTF among measurements on different detectors was less than 0.01 at any frequency. Both MTF and DQE were substantially independent of position on the detector.

  8. Solid-state flat panel imager with avalanche amorphous selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Howansky, Adrian; Goldan, Amir H.; Tousignant, Olivier; Levéille, Sébastien; Tanioka, K.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have become the dominant detector technology for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. For low dose imaging, electronic noise from the amorphous silicon thin film transistor (TFT) array degrades imaging performance. We have fabricated the first prototype solid-state AMFPI using a uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor to amplify the signal to eliminate the effect of electronic noise. We have previously developed a large area solid-state avalanche a-Se sensor structure referred to as High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) capable of achieving gains of 75. In this work we successfully deposited this HARP structure onto a 24 x 30 cm2 TFT array with a pixel pitch of 85 μm. An electric field (ESe) up to 105 Vμm-1 was applied across the a-Se layer without breakdown. Using the HARP layer as a direct detector, an X-ray avalanche gain of 15 +/- 3 was achieved at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. In indirect mode with a 150 μm thick structured CsI scintillator, an optical gain of 76 +/- 5 was measured at ESe = 105 Vμm-1. Image quality at low dose increases with the avalanche gain until the electronic noise is overcome at a constant exposure level of 0.76 mR. We demonstrate the success of a solid-state HARP X-ray imager as well as the largest active area HARP sensor to date.

  9. Amorphous selenium flat panel detectors for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Hunt, D. C.; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Rowlands, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    Different technologies for making X-ray sensitive active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPI) are reviewed for applications in digital radiography and fluoroscopy. Aspects of imaging performance requiring improvement are identified and potential new detector concepts addressing these issues are briefly described. The rationale is given for the investigation of a new detector concept—an indirect conversion FPI with avalanche gain—for low-dose X-ray imaging. This detector consists of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) photoconductor optically coupled to a structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillator. Under an electric field ESe, the a-Se is sensitive to light and converts the optical photons emitted from CsI into electronic signal that can be stored and read out in the same fashion as in existing AMFPI. When ESe is increased to >90 V/μm, avalanche multiplication occurs. The avalanche gain ranges between 1-800 depending on ESe and the thickness of the a-Se layer. The avalanche a-Se photoconductor is referred to as High-gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor. The feasibility of two detector configurations based on avalanche gain, each using a different image readout method, are under investigation. Their advantages are compared to other AMPFI technologies for digital radiography and fluoroscopy.

  10. Comparative Analysis between Two Amorphous Silicon Flat-panel Detector:Radiation Dose and Image Quality%碘化铯和硫氯化钆在DR系统中剂量与图像质量的分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志奎; 梁吉

    2014-01-01

    目的:比较碘化铯和硫氧化钆2种闪烁体材料平板探测器的DR系统在不同成像剂量条件下图像质量的差别。方法:以碘化铯为闪烁体材料的平板探测器系统和以硫氧化钆为闪烁体材料的平板探测器系统分别摄取对比度-细节体模(CDRAD 2.0)在相近成像剂量条件下的X射线图像,计算所对应的成像剂量下图像质量因子反数值(image quality figure inverse,IQFinv),应用ANOVA分析2平板探测器对比度及细节检测能力,应用Wilcoxon检验分析、比较2种平板探测器的图像信息检测能力的差别。结果:在一定剂量范围内,2种平板探测器的图像质量均随着成像剂量的增加而增加(P<0.001)。在管电流量不同mAs时,2种非晶硅DR平板探测器的IQFinv值差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论:成像剂量相同时,2种非晶硅平板探测器具有近似的图像质量,图像质量的提高与成像剂量的增加并不成线性关系。%Objective:To assess and compare the image quality at different exposures ettings using cesium iodide (CsI) flat-panel detector digital radiography system and GOS flat-panel detector digital radiography system. Methods: The images of contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD2.0) were taken at different exposure settings for two flat-panel detector systems. The image quality figure inverse (IQFinv) for different dose settings was calculated. The detectability of two system in contrast and detail was analysed using ANOVA. The statistical significance was evaluated using the Wilcoxon test between two system. Results: At certain dose range, the image quality improved with radiation dose increased for two amorphous silicon flat-panel detector system(P0.05). Conclusion:At the same radiation dose, two flat-panel detector systems have approximately image quality. There is not linear relevance between image quality improvement and radiation dose augment.

  11. Comparative Analysis between Two Amorphous Silicon Flat-panel Detector: Radiation Dose and Image Quality%2种非晶硅DR平板探测器成像剂量与图像质量的比较分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹国全; 许化致; 潘克华; 孙厚长

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess and compare the image quality at different exposure settings using cesium iodide (CsI) flat-panel detector digital radiography system and GOS flat-panel detector digital radiography system. Methods The images of contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD2. 0) were taken at different exposure settings for two flat-panel detector systems. The image quality figure inverse(IQFinv) for different dose settings was calculated. The detectability of two system in contrast and detail was analysed using ANOVA . The statistical significance was evaluated using the Wilcoxon test between two system. Results At certain dose range, the image quality improved with radiation dose increased for two amorphous silicon flat-panel detector system(P<O. 001). At different mAs value of tube current dosage,the IQFinv was no of statistical significance between two system(P>O. 05). Conclusion At the same radiation dose,two flat-panel detector systems have approximately image quality. There is not linear relevance between image quality improvement and radiation dose augment.%目的 比较碘化铯和硫氧化钆2种闪烁体材料平板探测器的DR系统在不同成像剂量条件下图像质量的差别.方法 以碘化铯为闪烁体材料的平板探测器系统和以硫氧化钆为闪烁体材料的平板探测器系统分别摄取对比度-细节体模(CDRAD 2.0)在相近成像剂量条件下的X射线图像,计算所对应的成像剂量下图像质量因子反数值(image quality figure inverse,IQFinv),应用ANOVA 分析2平板探测器对比度及细节检测能力,应用Wilcoxon检验分析、比较2种平板探测器的图像信息检测能力的差别.结果 在一定剂量范围内,2种平板探测器的图像质量均随着成像剂量的增加而增加(P<0.001).在管电流量不同mAs时,2种非晶硅DR平板探测器的IQFinv值差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 成像剂量相同时,2种非晶硅平板探测器具有近似的图像质量,图像质量的

  12. Digital flat-panel X-ray technology based on cesium iodide and amorphous silicon: experimental studies and preliminary clinical results; Digitale Flachbilddetektortechnik basierend auf Caesiumjodid und amorphem Silizium: Experimentelle Untersuchungen und erste klinische Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strotzer, M.; Gmeinwieser, J.; Voelk, M.; Fruend, R.; Feuerbach, S. [Regensburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Experimental and clinical evaluation of a digital flat-panel X-ray system based on cesium iodide (CsI) and amorphous silicon (a-Si). Methods: Performance of a prototype detector was compared with conventional screen-film radiography (SFR) using several phantom studies. Foreign bodies, fractures, osteolyses, and pulmonary lesions were analyzed. Additionally, 120 patients were studied prospectively, resulting in 400 comparative X-ray studies. The flat-panel detector was exposed with standard dose and with a dose reduction of up to 75%. Detector size was 15x15 cm, pixel matrix was 1x1 k with a pixel size of 143 {mu}m. Modulation-transfer function was determined to be 18% at the maximum spatial resolution of 3.5 Ip/mm. Results: The diagnostic results achieved with the digital detector were similar to those of conventional SFR, even at reduced radiation exposure. A potential for dose reduction was observed: 50% with respect to osteoarthrosis and fractures, and 75% for determining bony alignment. Discussion: This new technology can be used in thoracic and skeletal radiography. A significant dose reduction is possible, depending on the suspected disease. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Experimentelle und klinische Pruefung eines digitalen Flachbilddetektors aus Caesiumjodid (CsJ) und amorphem Silizium (a-Si). Methoden: Mit Hilfe verschiedener Phantommodelle wurde ein Detektor-Prototyp mit konventionellen Folien-Filmsystemen (FFS) verglichen. Untersucht wurden die Nachweisbarkeit von Fremdkoerpern, Frakturen, Osteolysen und artefiziellen pulmonalen Laesionen. Zusaetzlich erfolgten prospektiv an 120 Patienten insgesamt 400 vergleichende Skelettuntersuchungen. Der Flachbilddetektor wurde mit identischer Dosis bzw. mit um bis zu 75% reduzierter Dosis belichtet. Seine aktive Flaeche betrug ca. 15x15 cm bei einer Pixelmatrix von 1x1 k und eine Pixelgroesse von 143 {mu}m. Bei der Grenzaufloesung von 3,5 Lp/mm betrug der Wert der Modulationsuebertragungsfunktion 18%. Ergebnisse

  13. Characterization of an amorphous silicon flat panel for controlling the positioning accuracy of sheet; Caracterizacion de un panel plano de silicio amorfo para control de la exactitud en el posicionamiento de laminas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, J.; Gonzalez, V.; Gimeno, J.; Dolores, V. de los; Pastor, V.; Crispin, V.; Guardino, C.

    2011-07-01

    It has established a method for measuring the position of the blades in a multi leaf collimator (MLC) used to measure dose portal imaging device (EPID) of amorphous silicon, and verified its accuracy using radiochromic films and measures water with diode Cuba, techniques perfectly well validated in our institution. This dose profiles are studied for each sheet and determine their position at the point which has 50% of the dose in the open field.

  14. Amorphous and Polycrystalline Photoconductors for Direct Conversion Flat Panel X-Ray Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim S. Karim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs. We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE. Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI2 and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the

  15. Amorphous and polycrystalline photoconductors for direct conversion flat panel x-ray image sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Safa; Frey, Joel B; Belev, George; Tousignant, Olivier; Mani, Habib; Greenspan, Jonathan; Laperriere, Luc; Bubon, Oleksandr; Reznik, Alla; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Karim, Karim S; Rowlands, John A

    2011-01-01

    In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs). We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se) has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF) and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI(2) and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the HARP has been

  16. Image performance of a new amorphous selenium flat panel x-ray detector designed for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, L. K.; Jing, Z.; Bogdanovich, S.; Golden, K.; Robinson, S.; Beliaevskaia, E.; Parikh, S.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to report the performance of an amorphous selenium (a-Se) based flat-panel x-ray imager under development for application in digital breast tomosynthesis. This detector is designed to perform both in the conventional Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) mode and the tomosynthesis mode. The large area 24 x 29 cm detector achieves rapid image acquisition rates of up to 4 frames per second with minimal trapped charge induced effects such as ghost or lag images of previously acquired objects. In this work, a new a-Se/TFT detector layer structure is evaluated. The design uses a top conductive layer in direct contact with the a-Se x-ray detection layer. The simple structure has few layers and minimal hole and electron trapping effects. Prototype detectors were built to investigate the basic image performance of this new a-Se/TFT detector. Image signal generation, image ghosting, image lag, and detector DQE were studied. For digital mammography applications, the residual image ghosting was less than 1% at 30 seconds elapsed time. DQE, measured at a field of 5.15 V/um, showed significantly higher values over previously reported data, especially at low exposure levels. For digital breast tomosynthesis, the image lag at dynamic readout rate was < 0.6 % at 0.5-second elapsed time. A prototype tomosynthesis system is being developed utilizing this new a-Se/TFT detector.

  17. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  18. Quantitative comparison using generalized relative object detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution microangiographic fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M.; Shankar, A.; Jain, A.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Ionita, C. N.; Scott, C.; Karim, K. S.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2016-03-01

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25μm pixel pitch, and 1000μm thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/μm bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-pre-whitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal- spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide break- through abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  19. Comparison of low-contrast detail perception on storage phosphor radiographs and digital flat panel detector images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, S; Neitzel, U; Giacomuzzi, S M; Peer, R; Gassner, E; Steingruber, I; Jaschke, W

    2001-03-01

    A contrast detail analysis was performed to compare perception of low-contrast details on X-ray images derived from digital storage phosphor radiography and from a flat panel detector system based on a cesium iodide/amorphous silicon matrix. The CDRAD 2.0 phantom was used to perform a comparative contrast detail analysis of a clinical storage phosphor radiography system and an indirect type digital flat panel detector unit. Images were acquired at exposure levels comparable to film speeds of 50/100/200/400 and 800. Four observers evaluated a total of 50 films with respect to the threshold contrast for each detail size. The numbers of correctly identified objects were determined for all image subsets. The overall results show that low-contrast detail perception with digital flat panel detector images is better than with state of the art storage phosphor screens. This is especially true for the low-exposure setting, where a nearly 10% higher correct observation ratio is reached. Given its high detective quantum efficiency the digital flat panel technology based on the cesium iodide scintillator/amorphous silicon matrix is best suited for detection of low-contrast detail structures, which shows its high potential for clinical imaging.

  20. Flat panel display - Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu [Advanced Technology Planning, Sumitomo Eaton Nova Corporation, SBS Tower 9F, 10-1, Yoga 4-chome, Setagaya-ku, 158-0097 Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: suzuki_tsh@senova.co.jp

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  1. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs.

  2. Laser illuminated flat panel display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-12-31

    A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

  3. Plasma technology and its use in flat panel digital radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Plasma DR technology is used to produce a cost effective flat panel x-ray detector that acquires digital x-ray images with excellent diagnostic quality. The detector is radiation hard and permanently zero defect, with a full virtual pixel matrix that has no dead lines, pixels, or dead pixel clusters. The technology also allows the full potential of large area amorphous Selenium imaging to finally be realized (see Figure 4).

  4. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  5. Establishment of action levels for quality control of IMRT flat panel: experience with the algorithm iGRiMLO; Establecimiento de niveles de accion para el control de calidad de IMRT con panel plano: experiencia con el algoritmo iGRiMLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, V.; Dolores, VV. de los; Pastor, V.; Martinez, J.; Gimeno, J.; Guardino, C.; Crispin, V.

    2011-07-01

    Algorithm has been used at our institution iGRiMLO scheduled for individual verification of treatment plans for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) step and shoot through portal dosimetry pretreatment of non-transmission, triggering the plan directly to a portal imaging device (EPID) of an amorphous silicon flat panel.

  6. [Present state and future of flat panel detector in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Yoshiharu

    2002-01-01

    In our country, the introduction of flat panel detector is carried out in the diagnosis region since before several years. In flat panel detector with the high image characteristic, large expectation is being placed. In this paper, image characteristic of flat panel detector and effectiveness of clinical application were reviewed. It is anticipated that flat panel detector with the excellent image characteristic gives large effect in the radiological diagnosis.

  7. Phosphors for flat panel emissive displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.T.; Walko, R.J.; Phillips, M.L.F.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of emissive display technologies is presented. Display types briefly described include: cathode ray tubes (CRTs), field emission displays (FEDs), electroluminescent displays (ELDs), and plasma display panels (PDPs). The critical role of phosphors in further development of the latter three flat panel emissive display technologies is outlined. The need for stable, efficient red, green, and blue phosphors for RGB fall color displays is emphasized.

  8. Tritiated amorphous silicon for micropower applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kherani, N.P. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kosteski, T.; Zukotynski, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Shmayda, W.T. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-10-01

    The application of tritiated amorphous silicon as an intrinsic energy conversion semiconductor for radioluminescent structures and betavoltaic devices is presented. Theoretical analysis of the betavoltaic application shows an overall efficiency of 18% for tritiated amorphous silicon. This is equivalent to a 330 Ci intrinsic betavoltaic device producing 1 mW of power for 12 years. Photoluminescence studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a-Si:H, show emission in the infra-red with a maximum quantum efficiency of 7.2% at 50 K; this value drops by 3 orders of magnitude at a temperature of 300 K. Similar studies of hydrogenated amorphous carbon show emission in the visible with an estimated quantum efficiency of 1% at 300 K. These results suggest that tritiated amorphous carbon may be the more promising candidate for room temperature radioluminescence in the visible. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Raman Amplifier Based on Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ferrara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of stimulated Raman scattering in amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in Si-rich nitride/silicon superlattice structures (SRN/Si-SLs is reported. Using a 1427 nm continuous-wavelength pump laser, an amplification of Stokes signal up to 0.9 dB/cm at 1540.6 nm and a significant reduction in threshold power of about 40% with respect to silicon are experimentally demonstrated. Our results indicate that amorphous silicon nanoparticles are a great promise for Si-based Raman lasers.

  10. Data pre-processing for quantification in tomography and radiography with a digital flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinkel, Jean; Gerfault, Laurent; Estève, François; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2006-03-01

    In order to obtain accurate quantitative results, flat panel detectors require specific calibration and correction of acquisitions. Main artefacts are due to bad pixels, variations of photodiodes characteristics and inhomogeneity of X-rays sensitivity of the scintillator layer. Other limitations for quantification are the non-linearity of the detector due to charge trapping in the transistors and the scattering generated inside the detector, called detector scattering. Based on physical models of artefacts generation, this paper presents an unified framework for the calibration and correction of these artefacts. The following specific algorithms have been developed to correct them. A new method for correction of deviation to linearity is based on the comparison between experimental and simulated data. A method of detector scattering correction is performed in two steps: off-line characterization of detector scattering by considering its spatial distribution through a convolution model and on-line correction based on a deconvolution approach. Radiographic results on an anthropomorphic thorax phantom imaged with a flat panel detector, that convert X-rays into visible light using scintillator coupled to an amorphous silicon transistor frame for photons to electrons conversion, demonstrate that experimental X-rays attenuation images are significantly improved qualitatively and quantitatively by applying non-linearity correction and detector scattering correction. Results obtained on tomographic reconstructions from pre-processed acquisitions of the phantom are in very good agreement with expected attenuation coefficients values obtained with a multi-slice CT scanner. Thus, this paper demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed pre-processings to perform accurate quantification on radiographies and tomographies.

  11. Use and imaging performance of CMOS flat panel imager with LiF/ZnS(Ag) and Gadox scintillation screens for neutron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, B. K.; kim, J. Y.; Kim, T. J.; Sim, C.; Cho, G.; Lee, D. H.; Seo, C.-W.; Jeon, S.; Huh, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In digital neutron radiography system, a thermal neutron imaging detector based on neutron-sensitive scintillating screens with CMOS(complementary metal oxide semiconductor) flat panel imager is introduced for non-destructive testing (NDT) application. Recently, large area CMOS APS (active-pixel sensor) in conjunction with scintillation films has been widely used in many digital X-ray imaging applications. Instead of typical imaging detectors such as image plates, cooled-CCD cameras and amorphous silicon flat panel detectors in combination with scintillation screens, we tried to apply a scintillator-based CMOS APS to neutron imaging detection systems for high resolution neutron radiography. In this work, two major Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillation screens with various thickness were fabricated by a screen printing method. These neutron converter screens consist of a dispersion of Gd2O2S:Tb and 6LiF/ZnS:Ag scintillating particles in acrylic binder. These scintillating screens coupled-CMOS flat panel imager with 25x50mm2 active area and 48μm pixel pitch was used for neutron radiography. Thermal neutron flux with 6x106n/cm2/s was utilized at the NRF facility of HANARO in KAERI. The neutron imaging characterization of the used detector was investigated in terms of relative light output, linearity and spatial resolution in detail. The experimental results of scintillating screen-based CMOS flat panel detectors demonstrate possibility of high sensitive and high spatial resolution imaging in neutron radiography system.

  12. Towards upconversion for amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Wild, J.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijerink, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Condensed Matter and Interfaces, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Science, Technology and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    Upconversion of subbandgap light of thin film single junction amorphous silicon solar cells may enhance their performance in the near infrared (NIR). In this paper we report on the application of the NIR-vis upconverter {beta}-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}(18%) Er{sup 3+}(2%) at the back of an amorphous silicon solar cell in combination with a white back reflector and its response to infrared irradiation. Current-voltage measurements and spectral response measurements were done on experimental solar cells. An enhancement of 10 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} was measured under illumination with a 980 nm diode laser (10 mW). A part of this was due to defect absorption in localized states of the amorphous silicon. (author)

  13. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  14. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  15. High-performance low-noise 128-channel readout-integrated circuit for flat-panel x-ray detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuville, Eric J.; Belding, Mark; Costello, Adrienne N.; Hansen, Randy; Petronio, Susan M.

    2004-05-01

    A silicon mixed-signal integrated circuit is needed to extract and process x-ray induced signals from a coated flat panel thin film transistor array (TFT) in order to generate a digital x-ray image. Indigo Systems Corporation has designed, fabricated, and tested such a readout integrated circuit (ROIC), the ISC9717. This off-the-shelf, high performance, low-noise, 128-channel device is fully programmable with a multistage pipelined architecture and a 9 to 14-bit programmable A/D converter per channel, making it suitable for numerous X-ray medical imaging applications. These include high-resolution radiography in single frame mode and fluoroscopy where high frame rates are required. The ISC9717 can be used with various flat panel arrays and solid-state detectors materials: Selenium (Se), Cesium Iodide (CsI), Silicon (Si), Amorphous Silicon, Gallium Arsenide (GaAs), and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe). The 80-micron pitch ROIC is designed to interface (wire bonding or flip-chip) along one or two sides of the x-ray panel, where ROICs are abutted vertically, each reading out charge from pixels multiplexed onto 128 horizontal read lines. The paper will present the design and test results of the ROIC, including the mechanical and electrical interface to a TFT array, system performance requirements, output multiplexing of the digital signals to an off-board processor, and characterization test results from fabricated arrays.

  16. An asynchronous, pipelined, electronic acquisition system for Active Matrix Flat-Panel Imagers (AMFPIs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, W.; Antonuk, L.E. E-mail: antonuk@umich.edu; Berry, J.; Maolinbay, M.; Martelli, C.; Mody, P.; Nassif, S.; Yeakey, M

    1999-07-11

    The development of a full-custom electronic acquisition system designed for readout of large-area active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays is reported. The arrays, which comprise two-dimensional matrices of pixels utilizing amorphous silicon thin-film transistors, are themselves under development for a wide variety of X-ray imaging applications. The acquisition system was specifically designed to facilitate detailed, quantitative investigations of the properties of these novel imaging arrays and contains significant enhancements compared to a previously developed acquisition system. These enhancements include pipelined preamplifier circuits to allow faster readout speed, expanded addressing capabilities allowing a maximum of 4096 array data lines, and on-board summing of image frames. The values of many acquisition system parameters, including timings and voltages, may be specified and downloaded from a host computer. Once acquisition is enabled, the system operates asynchronously of its host computer. The system allows image capture in both radiographic mode (corresponding to the capture of individual X-ray images), and fluoroscopic mode (corresponding to the capture of a continual series of X-ray images). A detailed description of the system architecture and the underlying motivations for the design is reported in this paper. (author)

  17. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H.

  18. Resolution requirements for monitor viewing of digital flat-panel detector radiographs: a contrast detail analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Siegfried; Steingruber, Iris; Gassner, Eva; Peer, Regina; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.

    2002-05-01

    Since the introduction of digital flat panel detectors into clinical routine the discussion on monitor specifications for primary soft copy reading has gained new impetus. Major concerns exist for viewing of tiny opacities such as pulmonary nodules. In this study CDRAD phantom images were acquired on a caesium iodid/amorphous silicon detector at varying exposure levels. Images were read three times by three observers on a clinical 1K and 2K monitor workstation. All typical workstation functions such as magnification and window/level setting were applied during image reading. Correct detection ratios were calculated according to the CDRAD evaluation manual. Observer ratings were highest for high dose exposure and 2K monitor reading. No significant difference was detected in the correct detection ratio of observers. However, the difference between the two types of workstations (1K versus 2K monitors) despite less than 3% was significant at a 95% confidence level. This is in good accordance with recently published clinical studies. However, further clinical work will be needed to strengthen this laboratory based impression. Given these subtle differences in low contrast detail detection on 1K and 2K clinical PACS workstation we should probably rethink the recommendations of various national boards for the use of 2K monitors.

  19. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  20. Noise and degradation of amorphous silicon devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical noise measurements are reported on two devices of the disordered semiconductor hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The material is applied in sandwich structures and in thin-film transistors (TFTs). In a sandwich configuration of an intrinsic layer and two thin doped layers, the obse

  1. Amorphous silicon for thin-film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, Rudolf Emmanuel Isidore

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has considerable potential as a semiconducting material for large-area photoelectric and photovoltaic applications. Moreover, a-Si:H thin-film transistors (TFT’s) are very well suited as switching devices in addressable liquid crystal display panels and addres

  2. Nickel-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J A; Arce, R D; Buitrago, R H [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, S3000GLN Santa Fe (Argentina); Budini, N; Rinaldi, P, E-mail: jschmidt@intec.unl.edu.a [FIQ - UNL, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    The nickel-induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is used to obtain large grained polycrystalline silicon thin films on glass substrates. a-Si:H is deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at 200 deg. C, preparing intrinsic and slightly p-doped samples. Each sample was divided in several pieces, over which increasing Ni concentrations were sputtered. Two crystallization methods are compared, conventional furnace annealing (CFA) and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The crystallization was followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance measurements in the UV region. The large grain sizes obtained - larger than 100{mu}m for the samples crystallized by CFA - are very encouraging for the preparation of low-cost thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  3. Flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, technology, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajiv; Cheung, Arnold C; Bartling, Soenke H; Lisauskas, Jennifer; Grasruck, Michael; Leidecker, Christianne; Schmidt, Bernhard; Flohr, Thomas; Brady, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) systems have an innovative design that allows coverage of a large volume per rotation, fluoroscopic and dynamic imaging, and high spatial resolution that permits visualization of complex human anatomy such as fine temporal bone structures and trabecular bone architecture. In simple terms, flat-panel volume CT scanners can be thought of as conventional multidetector CT scanners in which the detector rows have been replaced by an area detector. The flat-panel detector has wide z-axis coverage that enables imaging of entire organs in one axial acquisition. Its fluoroscopic and angiographic capabilities are useful for intraoperative and vascular applications. Furthermore, the high-volume coverage and continuous rotation of the detector may enable depiction of dynamic processes such as coronary blood flow and whole-brain perfusion. Other applications in which flat-panel volume CT may play a role include small-animal imaging, nondestructive testing in animal survival surgeries, and tissue-engineering experiments. Such versatility has led some to predict that flat-panel volume CT will gain importance in interventional and intraoperative applications, especially in specialties such as cardiac imaging, interventional neuroradiology, orthopedics, and otolaryngology. However, the contrast resolution of flat-panel volume CT is slightly inferior to that of multidetector CT, a higher radiation dose is needed to achieve a comparable signal-to-noise ratio, and a slower scintillator results in a longer scanning time.

  4. [Flat-panel detectors in X-ray systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, M; Heer, V; Freytag, R

    2003-05-01

    For all application segments X-ray systems with flat-panel detectors increasingly enter the market. In digital radiography,mammography and cardiologic angiography flat-panel detectors are already well established while they are made ready for market introduction in general angiography and fluoroscopy. Two flat-panel detector technologies are available. One technology is based on an indirect conversion process of X-rays while the other one uses a direct conversion method. For radiography and dynamic applications the indirect method provides substantial advantages, while the direct method has some benefits for mammography. In radiography and mammography flat-panel detectors lead to clear improvements with respect to workflow, image quality and dose reduction potentials. These improvements are fostered by the immediate availability of the image, the large dynamic range and the high sensitivity to X-rays. New applications and the use of complex image processing algorithms have the potential to enlarge the present diagnostic range of applications. Up to now, image intensifiers are still the well-established technology for angiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless flat-panel detectors begin to enter this field, especially in cardiologic angiography. Characteristics of flat-panel detectors such as the availability of distortion-free images, the excellent contrast resolution, the large dynamic range, the high sensitivity to X-rays and the usability in magnetic fields provide the basis for improved and new diagnostic and interventional methods.

  5. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bosworth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using WxSi1−x, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (MoxSi1−x offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo83Si17. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz, there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  6. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Hung Tai; Chu-Hsuan Lin; Chih-Ming Wang; Chun-Chieh Lin

    2011-01-01

    Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si...

  7. Do LCDs have a chance to keep a leading position on flat panel display market?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Jerzy; Olifierczuk, Marek

    2004-09-01

    A lot of significant discoveries and inventions in the field of technology of displays were made in the latter part of the twentieth century. Apart from well-known CRT, the plasma-, luminescence- and liquid crystal-displays are commercially available. One can notice that a leading position on that flat panel displays market belong to LCD. But the progress in Organic LED materials and devices is impressive. Threshold voltage for light emission have fallen from several thousands V to just 2 - 3 V for today's OLEDs (polymer and small molecule). Luminous efficiency has increased from 0,01 to more than 10 lm/W. These improvements have brought PLED technology to the point where serious consideration is being given to OLED graphic and video display product. The question given some years ago by Dr. M. E. Becker, [Display Metrology and Systems]: "...is the current OLED enthusiasm justified because OLED displays feature significant improvements in visual and ergonomic performance, and because they are much cheaper to manufacture; Or it is just another hope for those who missed the LCD train?...," is trite. During SID Conference in Baltimore in 2003 two companies claiming to have built the largest organic LED. International Display Technology demonstrated a 20 inch display driven by "super amorphous silicon" technology; Sony showed off its 24 inch screen, which consists of a 2x2 tiled array of OLED displays. The presented work will be oriented towards specifying the characteristic features of liquid crystal and electro luminescence organic compounds which make these groups of displays so attractive and prospective among other imagery systems devices existing nowadays.

  8. Comparison measurements of DQE for two flat panel detectors: fluoroscopic detector vs. cone beam CT detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt Benítez, Ricardo; Ning, Ruola; Conover, David

    2006-03-01

    The physical performance of two flat panel detectors (FPD) has been evaluated using a standard x-ray beam quality set by IEC, namely RQA5. The FPDs evaluated in this study are based on an amorphous silicon photodiode array that is coupled to a thallium-doped Cesium Iodide scintillator and to a thin film transistor (TFT) array. One detector is the PaxScan 2520 that is designed for fluoro imaging, and has a small dynamic range and a large image lag. The other detector is the PaxScan 4030CB that is designed for cone beam CT, and has a large dynamic range (>16-bit), a reduced image lag and many imaging modes. Varian Medical Systems manufactured both detectors. The linearity of the FPDs was investigated by using an ionization chamber and aluminum filtration in order to obtain the beam quality. Since the FPDs are used in fluoroscopic mode, image lag of the FPD was measured in order to investigate its effect on this study, especially its effect on DQE. The spatial resolution of the FPDs was determined by obtaining the pre-sampling modulation transfer function for each detector. A sharp edge was used in accordance to IEC 62220-1. Next, the Normalized Noise Power Spectrum (NNPS) was calculated for various exposures levels at RQA5 radiation quality. Finally, the DQE of each FPD was obtained with a modified version of the international standard set by IEC 62220-1. The results show that the physical performance in DQE and MTF of the PaxScan 4030CB is superior to that of PaxScan2520.

  9. Electroluminescent Polymers and Carbon Nanotubes for Flat Panel Displays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Dai; Limin Dong; Mei Gao; Shaoming Huang; Oddvar Johansen; Albert W.H.Mau,Zoran Vasic; Berthold Winkler; Yongyuang Yang

    2000-01-01

    polymeric light-emitting diodes(LEDs) with sufficient brightness. efficiencies, low driving voltages, and various interesting features have been reported. The relatively short device lifetime, however, still remains as a major problem to be solved before any commercial applications will be realized. In this regard,carbon nanotubes have recently been proposed as more robust electron field emitters for flat panel displays. We have synthesised large arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, from which micropatterns of the aligned nanotubes suitable for flat panel displays were fabricated on various substrates. In this paper, we summarise our work on the synthesis and microfabrication of electroluminescent polymers and carbon nanotubes for flat panel displays with reference to other complementary work as appropriate.

  10. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  11. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C. [School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  12. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  13. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  14. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si solar cell achieved an efficiency of 11.4%, while the efficiency of a typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was 9.0%. Furthermore, an efficiency of 11.7% was achieved by thickness optimization of the three-terminal solar cell.

  15. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold.

  16. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin, Vibin

    2008-09-01

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  17. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  18. Silicon heterojunction solar cell and crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meijun

    The rapid growth of photovoltaics in the past decade brings on the soaring price and demand for crystalline silicon. Hence it becomes necessary and also profitable to develop solar cells with over 20% efficiency, using thin (˜100mum) silicon wafers. In this respect, diffused junction cells are not the best choice, since the inescapable heating in the diffusion process not only makes it hard to handle thin wafers, but also reduces carriers' bulk lifetime and impairs the crystal quality of the substrate, which could lower cell efficiency. An alternative is the heterojunction cells, such as amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell, where the emitter layer can be grown at low temperature (solar cell, including the importance of intrinsic buffer layer; the discussion on the often observed anomalous "S"-shaped J-V curve (low fill factor) by using band diagram analysis; the surface passivation quality of intrinsic buffer and its relationship to the performance of front-junction SHJ cells. Although the a-Si:H is found to help to achieve high efficiency in c-Si heterojuntion solar cells, it also absorbs short wavelength (cells. Considering this, heterojunction with both a-Si:H emitter and base contact on the back side in an interdigitated pattern, i.e. interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell, is developed. This dissertation will show our progress in developing IBC-SHJ solar cells, including the structure design; device fabrication and characterization; two dimensional simulation by using simulator Sentaurus Device; some special features of IBC-SHJ solar cells; and performance of IBC-SHJ cells without and with back surface buffer layers. Another trend for solar cell industry is thin film solar cells, since they use less materials resulting in lower cost. Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) is one promising thin-film material. It has the potential advantages to not only retain the performance and stability of c

  19. Stability of deuterated amorphous silicon solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Munyeme, G; Van der Meer, L F G; Dijkhuis, J I; Van der Weg, W F; Schropp, R

    2004-01-01

    In order to elucidate the microscopic mechanism for the earlier observed enhanced stability of deuterated amorphous silicon solar cells we conducted a side by-side study of fully deuterated intrinsic layers on crystalline silicon substrates using the free-electron laser facility at Nieuwegein (FELIX) to resonantly excite the Si-D stretching vibration and measure the various relaxation channels available to these modes, and of p-i-n solar cells with identical intrinsic absorber layers on glass/TCO substrates to record the degradation and stabilization of solar cell parameters under prolonged light soaking treatments. From our comparative study it is shown that a-Si:D has a superior resistance against light-induced defect creation as compared to a-Si:H and that this can now be explained in the light of the 'H collision model' since the initial step in the process, the release of H, is more likely than that of D. Thus, a natural explanation for the stability as observed in a-Si:D solar cells is provided.

  20. Nanocavity Shrinkage and Preferential Amorphization during Irradiation in Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xian-Fang; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2005-01-01

    @@ We model the recent experimental results and demonstrate that the internal shrinkage of nanocavities in silicon is intrinsically associated with preferential amorphization as induced by self-ion irradiation.

  1. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  2. Hydrogen effusion from tritiated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kherani, N. P.; Liu, B.; Virk, K.; Kosteski, T.; Gaspari, F.; Shmayda, W. T.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the effusion and outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) films are presented. The samples were grown by dc-saddle field glow discharge at various substrate temperatures between 150 and 300°C. The tracer property of radioactive tritium is used to detect tritium release. Tritium effusion measurements are performed in a nonvacuum ion chamber and are found to yield similar results as reported for standard high vacuum technique. The results suggest for decreasing substrate temperature the growth of material with an increasing concentration of voids. These data are corroborated by analysis of infrared absorption data in terms of microstructure parameters. For material of low substrate temperature (and high void concentration) tritium outgassing in air at room temperature was studied, and it was found that after 600h about 0.2% of the total hydrogen (hydrogen+tritium) content is released. Two rate limiting processes are identified. The first process, fast tritium outgassing with a time constant of 15h, seems to be related to surface desorption of tritiated water (HTO) with a free energy of desorption of 1.04eV. The second process, slow tritium outgassing with a time constant of 200-300h, appears to be limited by oxygen diffusivity in a growing oxide layer. This material of lowest H stability would lose half of the hydrogen after 60years.

  3. [Flat-panel detector technology -State-of-the-art and future prospects-].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya

    2002-01-01

    A flat-panel detector (FPD) is a long-awaited technology to implement the digital X-ray imaging technology into the radiological department. This paper describes the state-of-the-art technology and future prospects on the FPD technology. State-of-the-art technology was reviewed taking the CXDI series as an example. Several FPD-based systems have been introduced into the Japanese market since CXDI-11 opened it in November 1998. Accompanying CXDI-C2 for control, CXDI-22 for table position and CXDI-31 for portable, the CXDI series fulfills the requirement of the radiography room being a fully digitalized room. The FPD on the CXDI series is comprised of a scintillator (Gd(2)O(2)S:Tb(3+)) as a primary sensor in which the X-ray is captured and an amorphous silicon detector (LANMIT) as a secondary sensor in which the fluorescent light is detected. Since the scintillator is identical to that of the screen-film systems, it can be said as proven, durable and chemically stable and it is expected to produce the same image quality as the screen-film systems. CXDI-31, a portable FPD-based system, was developed targeting thinner dimensions, lightweight, durability and high spatial resolution. Thoroughly re-designing the mechanical structure and reducing the power consumption at the readout IC realized thinner dimensions. Introducing the portable note PC technologies successfully combined lightweight with durability. Improving the sensor process and re-designing the layout made the sensor high resolution without compromising the signal-to-noise ratio. Future prospects were overviewed in the aspect of technology and applications. Sensitivity, spatial resolution, frame rate and portability were described as the upcoming technology. Increasing gain and reducing noise will realize higher sensitivity, especially by adopting the PbI(2), HgI(2) or such photoconductor materials as the primary sensor. Pixelized amplifier will also achieve higher sensitivity. Layered sensor designed such

  4. Unfolding X-ray spectra using a flat panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Sergio; Juste, Belén; Pozuelo, Fausto; Ródenas, José; Querol, Andrea; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2013-01-01

    It is difficult to measure the energy spectrum of X-ray tubes due to the pile up effect produced by the high fluence of photons. Using attenuating materials, appropriate detector devices and the Monte Carlo method, primary X-ray spectrum of these devices can be estimated. In this work, a flat panel detector with a PMMA wedge has been used to obtain a dose curve corresponding to certain working conditions of a radiodiagnostic X-ray tube. The relation between the dose curve recorded by the flat panel and the primary X-ray spectrum is defined by a response function. Normally this function can be approximated by a matrix, which can be obtained by means of the Monte Carlo method. Knowing the measured dose curve and the response matrix, the primary X-ray spectrum can be unfolded. However, there are some problems that strongly affect the applicability of this method: i.e. technical features of the flat panel and inherent characteristics of the involved radiation physics (ill-posed problem). Both aspects are analyzed in this work, concluding that the proposed method can be applied with an acceptable accuracy for spectra without characteristic lines, for instance, tungsten anode in the 50-70 kVp range.

  5. Indirect flat-panel detector with avalanche gain: fundamental feasibility investigation for SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Dan; Reznik, Alla; Lui, B J M; Hunt, D C; Rowlands, J A; Ohkawa, Yuji; Tanioka, Kenkichi

    2005-09-01

    An indirect flat-panel imager (FPI) with avalanche gain is being investigated for low-dose x-ray imaging. It is made by optically coupling a structured x-ray scintillator CsI(Tl) to an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche photoconductor called HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing photoconductor). The final electronic image is read out using an active matrix array of thin film transistors (TFT). We call the proposed detector SHARP-AMFPI (scintillator HARP active matrix flat panel imager). The advantage of the SHARP-AMFPI is its programmable gain, which can be turned on during low dose fluoroscopy to overcome electronic noise, and turned off during high dose radiography to avoid pixel saturation. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the important design considerations for SHARP-AMFPI such as avalanche gain, which depends on both the thickness d(Se) and the applied electric field E(Se) of the HARP layer. To determine the optimal design parameter and operational conditions for HARP, we measured the E(Se) dependence of both avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency of an 8 microm HARP layer. The results were used in a physical model of HARP as well as a linear cascaded model of the FPI to determine the following x-ray imaging properties in both the avalanche and nonavalanche modes as a function of E(Se): (1) total gain (which is the product of avalanche gain and optical quantum efficiency); (2) linearity; (3) dynamic range; (4) gain nonuniformity resulting from thickness nonuniformity; and (5) effects of direct x-ray interaction in HARP. Our results showed that a HARP layer thickness of 8 microm can provide adequate avalanche gain and sufficient dynamic range for x-ray imaging applications to permit quantum limited operation over the range of exposures needed for radiography and fluoroscopy.

  6. ELA-beam shaping systems for flat panel display prepared by LTPS%用于平板显示 LTPS制备的 ELA光束整形系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹广玥; 游利兵; 方晓东

    2016-01-01

    介绍了多晶硅薄膜较非晶硅薄膜在平板显示领域的优势以及准分子激光晶化制备多晶硅膜的结晶过程。介绍了透镜阵列实现匀光的原理。阐述了典型的准分子激光退火线型光束整形系统的扩束、匀光、投影等结构。并介绍了连续横向固化技术在准分子激光制备低温多晶硅领域的应用。讨论了准分子激光退火光学系统的发展现状,指出了其在平板显示行业的重要意义。%The advantages to poly silicon film instead of amorphous silicon film in the field of flat panel display were introduced .Crystallization process of poly silicon film by using excimer laser crystallization system was studied .The principle of how lens array achieve the uniformity of output laser energy density was described .The structure of typical excimer laser annealing(ELA) line beam shaping system, which included beam expanding unit , beam energy homogenizing unit , projection unit and so on was focused on .Finally the application of sequential lateral solidification technology in the area of low temperature poly silicon ( LTPS ) using excimer laser nnealing was introduced .The status of ELA optical system was discussed and its significance in flat panel display industry was pointed out .

  7. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  8. Comprehensive modeling of ion-implant amorphization in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, K.R.C. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain) and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: g0202446@nus.edu.sg; Jaraiz, M. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Synopsys, Karl-Hammerschmidt Strasse 34, D-85609 Aschheim/Dornach (Germany); Rubio, J.E. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Castrillo, P. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pinacho, R. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Srinivasan, M.P. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Benistant, F. [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing. 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2005-12-05

    A physically based model has been developed to simulate the ion-implant induced damage accumulation up to amorphization in silicon. Based on damage structures known as amorphous pockets (AP), which are three-dimensional, irregularly shaped agglomerates of interstitials (I) and vacancies (V) surrounded by crystalline silicon, the model is able to reproduce a wide range of experimental observations of damage accumulation and amorphization with interdependent implantation parameters. Instead of recrystallizing the I's and V's instantaneously, the recrystallization rate of an AP containing nI and mV is a function of its effective size, defined as min(n, m), irrespective of its internal spatial configuration. The parameters used in the model were calibrated using the experimental silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature as a function of dose rate for C, Si, and Ge. The model is able to show the superlinear damage build-up with dose, the extent of amorphous layer and the superadditivity effect of polyatomic ions.

  9. Ab initio modelling of boron related defects in amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Tiago A.; Torres, Vitor J.B. [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-10-15

    We have modeled boron related point defects in amorphous silicon, using an ab initio method, the Density functional theory-pseudopotential code Aimpro. The boron atoms were embedded in 64 atom amorphous silicon cubic supercells. The calculations were performed using boron defects in 15 different supercells. These supercells were developed using a modified Wooten-Winer-Weaire bond switching mechanism. In average, the properties of the 15 supercells agree with the observed radial and bond angle distributions, as well the electronic and vibrational density of states and Raman spectra. In amorphous silicon it has been very hard to find real self-interstitials, since for almost all the tested configurations, the amorphous lattice relaxes overall. We found that substitutional boron prefers to be 4-fold coordinated. We find also an intrinsic hole-trap in the non-doped amorphous lattice, which may explain the low efficiency of boron doping. The local vibrational modes are, in average, higher than the correspondent crystalline values (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Supercontinuum generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safioui, Jassem; Leo, François; Kuyken, Bart; Gorza, Simon-Pierre; Selvaraja, Shankar Kumar; Baets, Roel; Emplit, Philippe; Roelkens, Gunther; Massar, Serge

    2014-02-10

    We report supercontinuum (SC) generation centered on the telecommunication C-band (1550 nm) in CMOS compatible hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides. A broadening of more than 550 nm is obtained in 1cm long waveguides of different widths using as pump picosecond pulses with on chip peak power as low as 4 W.

  11. Nanoscale Transformations in Metastable, Amorphous, Silicon-Rich Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehonic, Adnan; Buckwell, Mark; Montesi, Luca; Munde, Manveer Singh; Gao, David; Hudziak, Stephen; Chater, Richard J; Fearn, Sarah; McPhail, David; Bosman, Michel; Shluger, Alexander L; Kenyon, Anthony J

    2016-09-01

    Electrically biasing thin films of amorphous, substoichiometric silicon oxide drives surprisingly large structural changes, apparent as density variations, oxygen movement, and ultimately, emission of superoxide ions. Results from this fundamental study are directly relevant to materials that are increasingly used in a range of technologies, and demonstrate a surprising level of field-driven local reordering of a random oxide network.

  12. First-principles study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.; Groot, R.A. de; Wijs, G.A. de; Zeman, M.

    2009-01-01

    We use a molecular-dynamics simulation within density-functional theory to prepare realistic structures of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The procedure consists of heating a crystalline structure of Si64H8 to 2370 K, creating a liquid and subsequently cooling it down to room temperature. The effect

  13. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnham, N.A.; Fisher, R.F.; Asher, S.E.; Kazmerski, L.L.

    1987-07-01

    Electron energy-loss spectroscopy is used to study hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Core-level and plasma excitations were examined as a function of hydrogen content. This technique and its interpretation reveals a consistent picture of the electron excitations within this important material. The a-Si:H thin films were fabricated by rf sputtering. Their hydrogen concentrations ranged from 0% to 15%. Hydrogen content was determined by infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and inspection of the silicon Auger-KLL peak confirmed the silicon core levels.

  14. Silicon nanoparticle optimization and integration into amorphous silicon via PECVD for use in photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafehn, Grant W.

    An alternative approach to traditional growth methods of nanocrystalline material is co-deposition by injection of separately synthesized silicon nanoparticles into amorphous silicon. Current methods of co-deposition of silicon nanoparticles and amorphous silicon via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition allow the two reactors' pressures to affect each other, leading to either poor amorphous silicon quality or uncontrollable nanoparticle size and deposition rate. In this thesis, a technique for greater control of stand-alone silicon nanoparticle size and quality grown was achieved by using a slit nozzle. The nozzle was used to separate the nanoparticle and amorphous reactors, allowing for the ability to control nanoparticle size, crystallinity, and deposition rate during co-deposition, while still allowing for high quality amorphous silicon growth. Changing the width of the nozzle allowed for control of the size of the nanoparticles from 10 to 4.5 nm in diameter, and allowed for the precursor gas flow rate, and thus deposition rate, to be changed with only a 6 % change in size estimated from luminescence emission wavelength. Co-deposited samples were grown within a broad range of flow rates for the silicon nanoparticle precursor gas, resulting in each sample having a different crystal fraction. FTIR, PL, Raman, and XRD were used to analyze their composition. The silicon nanoparticle synthesis was separately optimized to control size and crystallinity, and the influence of the nanoparticle process gases on amorphous silicon growth was also explored. Finally, COMSOL simulations were performed to support and possibly predict Si-NP growth variables that pertain to Si-NP size.

  15. Reconstruction of Spectra Using X-ray Flat Panel Detector; Reconstruccion de Espectros de Rayos X Utilizando un Detector Flat Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallardo, S.; Querol, A.; Pozuelo, F.; Juste, B.; Rodenas, J.; Verdu, G.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we used a flat panel detector with a wedge of PMMA for absorbed dose curve for given working conditions of X-ray tube The relationship between absorbed dose curve recorded by the flat panel and primary X-ray spectrum is defined by a response function that can be obtained using the Monte Carlo method, namely the MCNP5 code. However there are some problems that affect the applicability of this method such as: flat panel characteristics and the characteristics of the physical process (ill-conditioned problem). Both aspects are discussed in this paper.

  16. Novel Scheme of Amorphous/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Iuliis, S.; Geerligs, L.J. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands); Tucci, M.; Serenelli, L.; Salza, E. [ENEA Research Center Casaccia, Roma (Italy); De Cesare, G.; Caputo, D.; Ceccarelli, M. [University ' Sapienza' , Department of Electronic Engineering, Roma (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper we investigate in detail how the heterostructure concept can be implemented in an interdigitated back contact solar cell, in which both the emitters are formed on the back side of the c-Si wafer by amorphous/crystalline silicon heterostructure, and at the same time the grid-less front surface is passivated by a double layer of amorphous silicon and silicon nitride, which also provides an anti-reflection coating. The entire process, held at temperature below 300C, is photolithography-free, using a metallic self-aligned mask to create the interdigitated pattern, and we show that the alignment is feasible. An open-circuit voltage of 687 mV has been measured on a p-type monocrystalline silicon wafer. The mask-assisted deposition process does not influence the uniformity of the deposited amorphous silicon layers. Photocurrent limits factor has been investigated with the aid of one-dimensional modeling and quantum efficiency measurements. On the other hand several technological aspects that limit the fill factor and the short circuit current density still need improvements.

  17. Raman and ellipsometric characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced vapor deposition (PECVD) at different silane temperatures (Tg) before glow-discharge. The effect of Tg on the amorphous network and optoelectronic properties of the films has been investigated by Raman scattering spectra, ellipsometric transmittance spectra, and dark conductivity measurement, respectively. The results show that the increase in Tg leads to an improved ordering of amorphous network on the short and intermediate scales and an increase of both refractive index and absorption coefficient in a-Si:H thin films. It is indicated that the dark conductivity increases by two orders of magnitude when Tg is raised from room temperature (RT) to 433 K. The continuous ordering of amorphous network of a-Si:H thin films deposited at a higher Tg is the main cause for the increase of dark conductivity.

  18. High quality crystalline silicon surface passivation by combined intrinsic and n-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttauf, J.A.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Kielen, I.M.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Rath, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the influence of thermal annealing on the passivation quality of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces by intrinsic and n-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films. For temperatures up to 255 C, we find an increase in surface passivation quality, corresponding to a decreased da

  19. Amorphous silicon rich silicon nitride optical waveguides for high density integrated optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipp, Hugh T.; Andersen, Karin Nordström; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2004-01-01

    Amorphous silicon rich silicon nitride optical waveguides clad in silica are presented as a high-index contrast platform for high density integrated optics. Performance of different cross-sectional geometries have been measured and are presented with regards to bending loss and insertion loss...

  20. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistors for Flat Panel Display Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xuelei; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials for both high performance transistors for high speed computing and thin film transistors for macroelectronics, which can provide more functions at low cost. Among macroelectronics applications, carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFT) are expected to be used soon for backplanes in flat panel displays (FPDs) due to their superior performance. In this paper, we review the challenges of CNT-TFT technology for FPD applications. The device performance of state-of-the-art CNT-TFTs are compared with the requirements of TFTs for FPDs. Compatibility of the fabrication processes of CNT-TFTs and current TFT technologies are critically examined. Though CNT-TFT technology is not yet ready for backplane production line of FPDs, the challenges can be overcome by close collaboration between research institutes and FPD manufacturers in the short term.

  1. [Clinical study with angiography system using a flat panel detecter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichida, Takao; Okusako, Kenji; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shougaki, Masachika; Ogawa, Takayoshi; Kawahata, Hideki; Nasu, Takehisa; Hosogai, Minoru; Okuyama, Kazuo; Hatagawa, Masakatsu

    2004-08-01

    We have been using an X-ray angiography system that incorporates a flat panel detector (FPD) since December 2001. This system is equipped with the scintillator-type FPD PaxScan 4030A from Varian Medical Systems, and for objective comparison of the image intensifier (I.I.) and FPD, the system is constructed so that these detectors can be used alternatively. Using this system and other X-ray angiography systems, visual studies have been conducted on the digital subtraction angiography (DSA) images acquired by FPD and I.I. We have found from the clinical images that the FPD is superior to the I.I. in depiction of fine blood vessels as well as of physical characteristics. Fluoroscopy images acquired by the FPD were not entirely satisfactory, however the improvement made in its performance now permits equal use of the FPD and I.I. systems.

  2. Optimized anti-scatter grids for flat panel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendl, Markus

    2007-03-01

    Anti-scatter grids are well established in the field of X-ray projection imaging. In general these grids consist of a large number of parallel lead lamellae separated by X-ray-transparent material. This regular structure defines the characteristic grid frequency. Modern X-ray imaging systems apply digital receptors, i.e. image intensifiers coupled to a CCD camera or solid state flat-panel detector. Combining a digital detector and an anti-scatter grid may lead to Moire artifacts. This results from sampling an analog X-ray image with signal components higher than half the sampling frequency. Especially in high dose DSA images (Digital Subtraction Angiography) these irritating artifacts may be visible to the user. In this paper we present a concept for minimizing these grid artifacts: Signal propagation in the detector is modeled by three steps, scintillator MTF, aperture MTF, and sampling. Since the scintillator MTF is irrelevant for the grid optimization process, we focus on aperture MTF and sampling. From the given geometry of the detector elements the corresponding 2D Fourier transform is calculated. An evaluation for typical grid frequencies, i.e. arcs around the origin of the 2D Fourier transform, results in profiles exhibiting pronounced minima. From the respective angle values for these minima, grid orientation can be optimized for minimum Moire disturbances. Simulation results for typical detector pixel geometries and for grid frequencies used in practice are validated by measurement for two different anti-scatter grids on a Siemens angiographic system with a digital flat-panel detector.

  3. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells.

  4. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  5. Pyrolytic transformation from polydihydrosilane to hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Takashi, E-mail: mtakashi@jaist.ac.jp [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Matsuki, Yasuo [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Yokkaichi Research Center, JSR Corporation, 100 Kawajiri-cho, Yokkaichi, Mie, 510-8552 (Japan); Shimoda, Tatsuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, ERATO, Shimoda Nano-Liquid Process Project, 2-13 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 (Japan)

    2012-08-31

    The fabrication of thin film silicon devices based on solution processes rather than on conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest since cost reductions may result. Using a solution process, we coated substrates with polydihydrosilane solution and studied the pyrolytic transformation of the material into hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). From thermal gravimetry and differential thermal analysis data a significant reduction in weight of the material and a construction of Si-Si bonds are concluded for the pyrolysis temperature T{sub p} = 270 to 360 Degree-Sign C. The appearance of amorphous silicon phonon bands in Raman spectra for films prepared at T{sub p} {>=} 330 Degree-Sign C suggests the construction of a three-dimensional amorphous silicon network. Films prepared at T{sub p} {>=} 360 Degree-Sign C exhibit a hydrogen content near 10 at.% and an optical gap near 1.6 eV similar to device-grade vacuum processed a-Si:H. However, the infrared microstructure factor, the spin density, and the photosensitivity require significant improvements. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We fabricate hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films by a solution process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The a-Si:H films are prepared by pyrolytic transformation in polysilane solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate basic properties in relation to the pyrolysis temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Raman spectra, hydrogen content, and optical gap are similar to device-grade a-Si:H. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure factor, spin density, and photoconductivity show poor quality.

  6. Investigation of the crystallization process of amorphous silicon thin films%非晶硅薄膜晶化过程的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄木香; 杨琳; 刘玉琪; 王江涌

    2012-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon thin film is a high quality material for micro - electronic components, thin film transistors and large flat-panel LCD displays because of its high electrical mobility and stable photoelectric properties. Moreover, it has been regarded as a candidate material for making high efficiency, lower energy consumption and optimized thin film solar cells. Therefore, how to fabricate polycrystalline silicon thin film is a very meaningful research topic. Solid phase crystallization is a usual method to fabricate polycrystalline silicon thin film, by high temperature annealing to transfer amorphous film to polycrystalline phase, In this paper, the solid phase crystallization process of amorphous silicon thin films fabricated by different techniques are studied systematically by XRD and Raman spectroscopy.%多晶硅薄膜具有较高的电迁移率和稳定的光电性能,是制备微电子器件、薄膜晶体管、大面积平板液晶显示的优质材料.多晶硅薄膜被公认为是制备高效、低耗、最理想的薄膜太阳能电池的材料.因此,如何制备多晶硅薄膜是一个非常有意义的研究课题.固相法是制备多晶硅薄膜的一种常用方法,它是在高温退火的条件下,使非晶硅薄膜通过固相相变而成为多晶硅薄膜.本文采用固相法,利用X-ray衍射及拉曼光谱,对用不同方法制备的非晶硅薄膜的晶化过程进行了系统地研究.

  7. Excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on metallic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delachat, F.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Cayron, C.; Ducros, C.; Lerat, J.-F.; Emeraud, T.; Negru, R.; Huet, K.; Reydet, P.-L.

    2013-06-01

    An attempt has been made to achieve the crystallization of silicon thin film on metallic foils by long pulse duration excimer laser processing. Amorphous silicon thin films (100 nm) were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on a commercial metallic alloy (N42-FeNi made of 41 % of Ni) coated by a tantalum nitride (TaN) layer. The TaN coating acts as a barrier layer, preventing the diffusion of metallic impurities in the silicon thin film during the laser annealing. An energy density threshold of 0.3 J cm-2, necessary for surface melting and crystallization of the amorphous silicon, was predicted by a numerical simulation of laser-induced phase transitions and witnessed by Raman analysis. Beyond this fluence, the melt depth increases with the intensification of energy density. A complete crystallization of the layer is achieved for an energy density of 0.9 J cm-2. Scanning electron microscopy unveils the nanostructuring of the silicon after laser irradiation, while cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the crystallites' columnar growth.

  8. High thermal conductivity of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Feldman, J L; Cahill, D G; Crandall, R S; Bernstein, N; Photiadis, D M; Mehl, M J; Papaconstantopoulos, D A

    2009-01-23

    We measured the thermal conductivity kappa of an 80 microm thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon film prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition with the 3omega (80-300 K) and the time-domain thermo-reflectance (300 K) methods. The kappa is higher than any of the previous temperature dependent measurements and shows a strong phonon mean free path dependence. We also applied a Kubo based theory using a tight-binding method on three 1000 atom continuous random network models. The theory gives higher kappa for more ordered models, but not high enough to explain our results, even after extrapolating to lower frequencies with a Boltzmann approach. Our results show that this material is more ordered than any amorphous silicon previously studied.

  9. The reliability and stability of multijunction amorphous silicon PV modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D.E. [Solarex, Newtown, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Solarex is developing a manufacturing process for the commercial production of 8 ft{sup 2} multijunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV modules starting in 1996. The device structure used in these multijunction modules is: glass/textured tin oxide/p-i-n/p-i-n/ZnO/Al/EVA/Tedlar where the back junction of the tandem structure contains an amorphous silicon germanium alloy. As an interim step, 4 ft{sup 2} multijunction modules have been fabricated in a pilot production mode over the last several months. The distribution of initial conversion efficiencies for an engineering run of 67 modules (4 ft{sup 2}) is shown. Measurements recently performed at NREL indicate that the actual efficiencies are about 5% higher than those shown, and thus exhibit an average initial conversion efficiency of about 9.5%. The data indicates that the process is relatively robust since there were no modules with initial efficiencies less than 7.5%.

  10. Electrochemical degradation of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, G. R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    Techniques of module electrochemical corrosion research, developed during reliability studies of crystalline-silicon modules (C-Si), have been applied to this new investigation into amorphous-silicon (a-Si) module reliability. Amorphous-Si cells, encapsulated in the polymers polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), were exposed for more than 1200 hours in a controlled 85 C/85 percent RH environment, with a constant 500 volts applied between the cells and an aluminum frame. Plotting power output reduction versus charge transferred reveals that about 50 percent a-Si cell failures can be expected with the passage of 0.1 to 1.0 Coulomb/cm of cell-frame edge length; this threshold is somewhat less than that determined for C-Si modules.

  11. Infrared electroabsorption spectra in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyou, J.H.; Schiff, E.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    1999-07-01

    The authors report measurements of the infrared spectrum detected by modulating the reverse-bias voltage across amorphous silicon pin solar cells and Schottky barrier diodes. They find a band with a peak energy of 0.8 eV. The existence of this band has not, to their knowledge, been reported previously. The strength of the infrared band depends linearly upon applied bias, as opposed to the quadratic dependence for interband electroabsorption in amorphous silicon. The band's peak energy agrees fairly well with the known optical transition energies for dangling bond defects, but the linear dependence on bias and the magnitude of the signal are surprising if interpreted using an analogy to interband electroabsorption. A model based on absorption by defects near the n/i interface of the diodes accounts well for the infrared spectrum.

  12. Evolution of the potential-energy surface of amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Kallel, Houssem; Mousseau, Normand; Schiettekatte, François

    2010-01-01

    The link between the energy surface of bulk systems and their dynamical properties is generally difficult to establish. Using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau), we follow the change in the barrier distribution of a model of amorphous silicon as a function of the degree of relaxation. We find that while the barrier-height distribution, calculated from the initial minimum, is a unique function that depends only on the level of distribution, the reverse-barrier height distributio...

  13. Amorphous Silicon 16—bit Array Photodetector①

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGShaoqiang; XUZhongyang; 等

    1997-01-01

    An amorphous silicon 16-bit array photodetector with the a-SiC/a-Si heterojunction diode is presented.The fabrication processes of the device were studied systematically.By the optimum of the diode structure and the preparation procedures,the diode with Id<10-12A/mm2 and photocurrentIp≥0.35A/W has been obtained at the wavelength of 632nm.

  14. Optical characterization and density of states determination of silicon nanocrystals embedded in amorphous silicon based matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sebille, M.; Vasudevan, R. A.; Lancee, R. J.; van Swaaij, R. A. C. M. M.; Zeman, M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a non-destructive measurement and simple analysis method for obtaining the absorption coefficient of silicon nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in an amorphous matrix. This method enables us to pinpoint the contribution of silicon NCs to the absorption spectrum of NC containing films. The density of states (DOS) of the amorphous matrix is modelled using the standard model for amorphous silicon while the NCs are modelled using one Gaussian distribution for the occupied states and one for the unoccupied states. For laser annealed a-Si0.66O0.34:H films, our analysis shows a reduction of the NC band gap from approximately 2.34-2.08 eV indicating larger mean NC size for increasing annealing laser fluences, accompanied by a reduction in NC DOS distribution width from 0.28-0.26 eV, indicating a narrower size distribution.

  15. Two-phase electrochemical lithiation in amorphous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang Wei; He, Yu; Fan, Feifei; Liu, Xiao Hua; Xia, Shuman; Liu, Yang; Harris, C Thomas; Li, Hong; Huang, Jian Yu; Mao, Scott X; Zhu, Ting

    2013-02-13

    Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized portable electronics and will be a key to electrifying transport vehicles and delivering renewable electricity. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is being intensively studied as a high-capacity anode material for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. Its lithiation has been widely thought to occur through a single-phase mechanism with gentle Li profiles, thus offering a significant potential for mitigating pulverization and capacity fade. Here, we discover a surprising two-phase process of electrochemical lithiation in a-Si by using in situ transmission electron microscopy. The lithiation occurs by the movement of a sharp phase boundary between the a-Si reactant and an amorphous Li(x)Si (a-Li(x)Si, x ~ 2.5) product. Such a striking amorphous-amorphous interface exists until the remaining a-Si is consumed. Then a second step of lithiation sets in without a visible interface, resulting in the final product of a-Li(x)Si (x ~ 3.75). We show that the two-phase lithiation can be the fundamental mechanism underpinning the anomalous morphological change of microfabricated a-Si electrodes, i.e., from a disk shape to a dome shape. Our results represent a significant step toward the understanding of the electrochemically driven reaction and degradation in amorphous materials, which is critical to the development of microstructurally stable electrodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  16. Cryogenic flat-panel gas-gap heat switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanapalli, S.; Keijzer, R.; Buitelaar, P.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2016-09-01

    A compact additive manufactured flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at cryogenic temperature is reported in this paper. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus has been developed to measure the thermal conductance of the heat switch with the heat sink temperature in the range of 100-180 K. The apparatus is cooled by a two-stage GM cooler and the temperature is controlled with a heater and a braided copper wire connection. A thermal guard is mounted on the hot side of the device to confine the heat flow axially through the sample. A gas handling system allows testing the device with different gas pressures in the heat switch. Experiments are performed at various heat sink temperatures, by varying gas pressure in the gas-gap and with helium, hydrogen and nitrogen gas. The measured off-conductance with a heat sink temperature of 115 K and the hot plate at 120 K is 0.134 W/K, the on-conductance with helium and hydrogen gases at the same temperatures is 4.80 W/K and 4.71 W/K, respectively. This results in an on/off conductance ratio of 37 ± 7 and 35 ± 6 for helium and hydrogen respectively. The experimental results matches fairly well with the predicted heat conductance at cryogenic temperatures.

  17. Light sharing in multi-flat-panel-PMT PEM detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Raymond R; Majewski, Stan; Mayhugh, Michael R

    2006-01-01

    Large are a detectors, such as those used in positron emission mammography (PEM) and scintimammography, utilize arrays of discrete semtillator elements mounted on arrays of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMT). Scintillator elements can be packed very densely (minimizing area between elements), allowing good detection sensitivity and spatial resolution. And, while new flat panel PSPMTS have minimal inactive edges, when they are placed in arrays significant dead spaces where scintillation light is undetectable are created. To address this problem, a light guide is often placed between the detector and PSPMT array to spread scintillation light so that these gaps can be bridged. In this investigation we studied the effect of light guides of various thickness on system performance. A 10x10 element array of LYSO detector elements was coupled to the center of a 2x2 array of PSPMTs through varying thicknesses (1 to 4 mm) of UV glass. The spot size of the imaged elements and distortions in the regular square pattern of the imaged scintillator arrays were evaluated. Energy resolution was measured by placing single elements of LYSO at several locations of the PSPMT array. Spatial distortions in the images of the array were reduced by using thicker light guides (3-4 mm). Use of thicker light guides, however, resulted in reduced pixel resolution and slight degradation of energy resolution. Therefore, some loss of pixel and energy resolution will accompany the use of thick light guides (minimum of 3 mm) required for optimum identification of detector elements.

  18. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  19. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Zou, Xingquan; Chi, Lingfei; Li, Qiang; Xiao, Tan

    2007-03-01

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO2 and active carbon at 1000 °C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 µm. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiOx nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  20. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ping; Zou Xingquan; Chi Lingfei; Li Qiang; Xiao Tan [Department of Physics, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China)

    2007-03-28

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO{sub 2} and active carbon at 1000 deg. C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 {mu}m. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiO{sub x} nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  1. Silicon nanocrystals on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films: Control of film properties and nanocrystals growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbe, Jeremy, E-mail: jeremy.barbe@hotmail.com [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Xie, Ling; Leifer, Klaus [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Faucherand, Pascal; Morin, Christine; Rapisarda, Dario; De Vito, Eric [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Makasheva, Kremena; Despax, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Perraud, Simon [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-11-01

    The present study demonstrates the growth of silicon nanocrystals on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films. Amorphous silicon carbide films [a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H (with x < 0.3)] were obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from a mixture of silane and methane diluted in hydrogen. The effect of varying the precursor gas-flow ratio on the film properties was investigated. In particular, a wide optical band gap (2.3 eV) was reached by using a high methane-to-silane flow ratio during the deposition of the a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H layer. The effect of short-time annealing at 700 Degree-Sign C on the composition and properties of the layer was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was observed that the silicon-to-carbon ratio in the layer remains unchanged after short-time annealing, but the reorganization of the film due to a large dehydrogenation leads to a higher density of SiC bonds. Moreover, the film remains amorphous after the performed short-time annealing. In a second part, it was shown that a high density (1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}) of silicon nanocrystals can be grown by low pressure chemical vapor deposition on a-Si{sub 0.8}C{sub 0.2} surfaces at 700 Degree-Sign C, from silane diluted in hydrogen. The influence of growth time and silane partial pressure on nanocrystals size and density was studied. It was also found that amorphous silicon carbide surfaces enhance silicon nanocrystal nucleation with respect to SiO{sub 2}, due to the differences in surface chemical properties. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silicon nanocrystals (Si-NC) growth on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma deposited amorphous silicon carbide films with well-controlled properties Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study on the thermal effect of 700 Degree-Sign C short-time annealing on the layer properties Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low pressure

  2. Enhanced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films using embedded silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Curtis Michael

    This thesis is concerned with the production of silicon thin films for photovoltaic applications. Much research has been carried out to find a stable, more efficient alternative to amorphous silicon, resulting in a number of various amorphous/crystalline mixed-phase film structures with properties superior to amorphous silicon. This thesis work details a completely new approach to mixed-phase film deposition, focusing on the fast crystallization of these films. The deposition of amorphous silicon films with embedded nanocrystals was carried out via a dual-plasma system. It is known that plasma conditions to produce high quality films are much different from those to produce particles. Hence the experimental system used here involved two separate plasmas to allow the optimum production of the crystalline nanoparticles and the amorphous film. Both plasmas use 13.56 MHz excitation voltage with diluted silane as the silicon precursor. The nanoparticle production reactor is a flow-through device that can be altered to control the size of the particles from around 5--30 nm average diameter. The film production reactor is a parallel-plate capacitively-coupled plasma system, into which the aerosol-suspended nanoparticles were injected. The nanocrystals could either be "co-deposited" simultaneously with the amorphous film, or be deposited separately in a layer-by-layer technique; both approaches are discussed in detail. Measurements of the film conductivity provide for the first time unambiguous evidence that the presence of nanocrystallites above 5 nm in the amorphous film have a direct impact on the electronic properties of co-deposited films. Further measurements of the film structure by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy demonstrate clearly the effect of embedded nanocrystals on the annealed crystallization process; the immediate growth of the crystal seeds has been observed. Additionally, a newly discovered mechanism of film crystallization

  3. A ghost story: spatio-temporal response characteristics of an indirect-detection flat-panel imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J H; Jaffray, D A

    1999-08-01

    Spatial and temporal imaging characteristics of an amorphous silicon flat-panel imager (FPI) were investigated in terms relevant to the application of such devices in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and other x-ray imaging modalities, including general radiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, radiotherapy portal imaging, and nondestructive testing. Specifically, issues of image lag (including the magnitude, spatial uniformity, temporal-frequency characteristics, and dependence upon exposure and frame time) and long-term image persistence ("ghosts") were investigated. As part of the basic characterization of the FPI, pixel dark signal and noise (magnitude, temporal stability, and spatial uniformity) as well as radiation response (signal size, linearity, gain, and reciprocity) were also measured. Image lag was analyzed as a function of frame time and incident exposure. First-frame lag (i.e., the relative residual signal in the first frame following readout of an exposure) was approximately 2-10%, depending upon incident exposure and was spatially nonuniform to a slight degree across the FPI; second-, third-, and fourth-frame lag were approximately 0.7%, 0.4%, and 0.3%, respectively (at 25% sensor saturation). Image lag was also analyzed in terms of the temporal-frequency-dependent transfer function derived from the radiation response, allowing a quantitative description of system components contributing to lag. Finally, the contrast of objects as a function of time following an exposure was measured in order to examine long-term image persistence ("ghosts"). Ghosts were found to persist up to 30 min or longer, depending upon the exposure and frame time. Two means of reducing the apparent contrast of ghost images were tested: (i) rapid scanning of the FPI at maximum frame rate, and (ii) flood-field exposure of the FPI; neither was entirely satisfactory. These results pose important considerations for application of FPIs in CBCT as well as other x-ray imaging

  4. High-energy X-ray diffraction using the Pixium 4700 flat-panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, J E; Drakopoulos, M

    2009-07-01

    The Pixium 4700 detector represents a significant step forward in detector technology for high-energy X-ray diffraction. The detector design is based on digital flat-panel technology, combining an amorphous Si panel with a CsI scintillator. The detector has a useful pixel array of 1910 x 2480 pixels with a pixel size of 154 microm x 154 microm, and thus it covers an effective area of 294 mm x 379 mm. Designed for medical imaging, the detector has good efficiency at high X-ray energies. Furthermore, it is capable of acquiring sequences of images at 7.5 frames per second in full image mode, and up to 60 frames per second in binned region of interest modes. Here, the basic properties of this detector applied to high-energy X-ray diffraction are presented. Quantitative comparisons with a widespread high-energy detector, the MAR345 image plate scanner, are shown. Other properties of the Pixium 4700 detector, including a narrow point-spread function and distortion-free image, allows for the acquisition of high-quality diffraction data at high X-ray energies. In addition, high frame rates and shutterless operation open new experimental possibilities. Also provided are the necessary data for the correction of images collected using the Pixium 4700 for diffraction purposes.

  5. Interference filter with amorphous silicon layer and direct laser recording on it

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutanov, A.; Sydyk uluu, Nurbek; Snimshikov, I.; Kazakbaeva, Z.

    2016-08-01

    The interference spectral filters with amorphous silicon layer deposited by magnetron sputtering on the reflective metal layer on a glass substrate are developed. Interference filter select from white light source components corresponding to quasimonochromatic wavelength with a narrow bandwidth. The thickness of the amorphous silicon layer determines the center wavelength of the pass band of the filter. It proposed to use interference filter with amorphous silicon layer for direct laser recoding on it. Results on direct laser recording on amorphous silicon layer of the interference filter by single-mode Blu Ray laser (X = 405 nm) with high contrast reflected image are demonstrated.

  6. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized.

  7. Focal spot measurements using a digital flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Panse, A.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Focal spot size is one of the crucial factors that affect the image quality of any x-ray imaging system. It is, therefore, important to measure the focal spot size accurately. In the past, pinhole and slit measurements of x-ray focal spots were obtained using direct exposure film. At present, digital detectors are replacing film in medical imaging so that, although focal spot measurements can be made quickly with such detectors, one must be careful to account for the generally poorer spatial resolution of the detector and the limited usable magnification. For this study, the focal spots of a diagnostic x-ray tube were measured with a 10-μm pinhole using a 194-μm pixel flat panel detector (FPD). The twodimensional MTF, measured with the Noise Response (NR) Method was used for the correction for the detector blurring. The resulting focal spot sizes based on the FWTM (Full Width at Tenth Maxima) were compared with those obtained with a very high resolution detector with 8-μm pixels. This study demonstrates the possible effect of detector blurring on the focal spot size measurements with digital detectors with poor resolution and the improvement obtained by deconvolution. Additionally, using the NR method for measuring the two-dimensional MTF, any non-isotropies in detector resolution can be accurately corrected for, enabling routine measurement of non-isotropic x-ray focal spots. This work presents a simple, accurate and quick quality assurance procedure for measurements of both digital detector properties and x-ray focal spot size and distribution in modern x-ray imaging systems.

  8. Recent developments in amorphous silicon-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beneking, C.; Rech, B.; Foelsch, J.; Wagner, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Schicht- und Ionentechnik

    1996-03-01

    Two examples of recent advances in the field of thin-film, amorphous hydrogenated silicon (a-Si:H) pin solar cells are described: the improved understanding and control of the p/i interface, and the improvement of wide-bandgap a-Si:H material deposited at low substrate temperature as absorber layer for cells with high stabilized open-circuit voltage. Stacked a-Si:H/a-Si:H cells incorporating these concepts exhibit less than 10% (relative) efficiency degradation and show stabilized efficiencies as high as 9 to 10% (modules 8 to 9%). The use of low-gap a-Si:H and its alloys like a-SiGe:H as bottom cell absorber materials in multi-bandgap stacked cells offers additional possibilities. The combination of a-Si:H based top cells with thin-film crystalline silicon-based bottom cells appears as a promising new trend. It offers the perspective to pass significantly beyond the present landmark of 10% module efficiency reached by the technology utilizing exclusively amorphous silicon-based absorber layers, while keeping its advantages of potentially low-cost production. (orig.) 47 refs.

  9. FTIR study of silicon carbide amorphization by heavy ion irradiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Miro, Sandrine; Pluchery, Olivier

    2017-03-01

    We have measured at room temperature (RT) the Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) absorption spectra of ion-irradiated thin epitaxial films of cubic silicon carbide (3C–SiC) with 1.1 µm thickness on a 500 µm thick (1 0 0) silicon wafer substrate. Irradiations were carried out at RT with 2.3 MeV 28Si+ ions and 3.0 MeV 84Kr+ ions for various fluences in order to induce amorphization of the SiC film. Ion projected ranges were adjusted to be slightly larger than the film thickness so that the whole SiC layers were homogeneously damaged. FTIR spectra of virgin and irradiated samples were recorded for various incidence angles from normal incidence to Brewster’s angle. We show that the amorphization process in ion-irradiated 3C–SiC films can be monitored non-destructively by FTIR absorption spectroscopy without any major interference of the substrate. The compared evolutions of TO and LO peaks upon ion irradiation yield valuable information on the damage process. Complementary test experiments were also performed on virgin silicon nitride (Si3N4) self-standing films for similar conditions. Asymmetrical shapes were found for TO peaks of SiC, whereas Gaussian profiles are found for LO peaks. Skewed Gaussian profiles, with a standard deviation depending on wave number, were used to fit asymmetrical peaks for both materials. A new methodology for following the amorphization process is proposed on the basis of the evolution of fitted IR absorption peak parameters with ion fluence. Results are discussed with respect to Rutherford backscattering spectrometry channeling and Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  10. Comment on ``Electron drift mobility in doped amorphous silicon''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overhof, H.; Silver, M.

    1989-05-01

    Experimental drift-mobility data obtained by different methods in doped amorphous silicon are compared. It is shown that the presence of a long-range random potential will lead to a modification of the drift mobility in one experiment while the corresponding values in other experiments are virtually unaffected. It is shown that this effect accounts for the apparent discrepancy between the results of these experiments rather than the shift of the mobility edge upon doping which was recently proposed by Street, Kakalios, and Hack [Phys. Rev. B 38, 5603 (1988)] in order to understand their data.

  11. Eigenmode Splitting in all Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Nitride Coupled Microcavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-Gao; HUANG Xin-Fan; CHEN Kun-Ji; QIAN Bo; CHEN San; DING Hong-Lin; LIU Sui; WANG Xiang; XU Jun; LI Wei

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride based coupled optical microcavity is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical calculation of the transmittance spectra of optical microcavity with one cavity and coupled microcavity with two-cavity is performed.The optical eigenmode splitting for coupled microcavity is found due to the interaction between the neighbouring localized cavities.Experimentally,the coupled cavity samples are prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition and characterized by photoluminescence measurements.It is found that the photoluminescence peak wavelength agrees well with the cavity mode in the calculated transmittance spectra.This eigenmode splitting is analogous to the electron state energy splitting in diatom molecules.

  12. Atomic structure of the amorphous nonstoichiometric silicon oxides and nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, V A [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-31

    In addition to amorphous SiO{sub 2} and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, the two key dielectric film materials used in modern silicon devices, the fabrication technology of nonstoichiometric SiO{sub x}N{sub y}, SiN{sub x}, and SiO{sub x} compounds is currently under development. Varying the chemical composition of these compounds allows a wide range of control over their physical - specifically, optical and electrical - properties. The development of technology for synthesizing such films requires a detailed understanding of their atomic structure. Current views on the atomic structure of nonstoichiometric silicon nitrides and oxides are reviewed and summarized. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Multi-cusp ion source for doping process of flat panel display manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inouchi, Yutaka, E-mail: inouchi-yutaka@nissin.co.jp; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Dohi, Shojiro; Tanii, Masahiro; Takahashi, Genki; Nishimura, Ippei; Tatemichi, Junichi; Konishi, Masashi; Naito, Masao [FPD Machine Business Center, Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., Shiga 528-0068 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    We developed a multi-cusp ion source for Nissin ion doping system iG5 which is used in low temperature poly-crystalline silicon processes for flat panel display (FPD) manufacturing. In this ion source, BF{sub 3} or PH{sub 3} diluted H{sub 2} plasmas are produced and large area ribbon ion beams are extracted. In general, ion ratio of B{sup +} in BF{sub 3} plasma is much smaller than BF{sub 2}{sup +} in multi-cusp ion sources. We developed a new method to increase B{sup +} ratio and obtained mass analyzed B{sup +} target current of 130 mA. We employed newly improved multi-slot type electrodes for the beam extraction system and obtained stable beams with the uniformity of below 3%. In BF{sub 3} plasmas, several undesirable metal fluorides are produced in the plasma chamber and deposited on the electrode system, which cause glitches and poor beam uniformity. We introduce several cleaning methods.

  14. Determining the Onset of Amorphization of Crystalline Silicon due to Hypervelocity Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, C. Shane; Bachlechner, Martina E.

    2009-03-01

    Atomistic simulations were performed to study a hypervelocity impactor striking a silicon/silicon nitride interface with varying silicon substrate thicknesses. Visualization indicates that the crystalline silicon amorphizes upon impact. The objective of the present study is to determine where the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurrs. In the analysis, the silicon substrate is separated into sixty layers and for each layer the average z displacement is determined. Our results show that the boundary between amorphous and crystalline silicon occurs between layers 20 and 22 for an impactor traveling at 5 km/s. This corresponds to a depth of approximately 32 Angstroms into the silicon. More detailed analyses reveals that the z displacement is noticeably larger for the layers that do not have a silicon atom bonded beneath them compared to the ones that do.

  15. Experimental and Computer Modelling Studies of Metastability of Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munyeme, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    We present a combination of experimental and computer modelling studies of the light induced degradation in the performance of amorphous silicon based single junction solar cells. Of particular interest in this study is the degradation kinetics of different types of amorphous silicon single junction

  16. Performance analysis of a CsI-based flat panel detector in a cone beam variable resolution x-ray system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahi, Bahram; Keyes, Gary S.; Rendon, David A.; DiBianca, Frank A.

    2007-03-01

    A new Cone-Beam CT (CBCT) system is introduced that uses the concept of Variable Resolution X-ray (VRX) detection, which has previously been demonstrated to significantly increase spatial resolution for small objects. An amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector (FPD) with a CsI scintillator (PaxScan 2020, Varian, Salt Lake City, UT) is coupled with a micro-focus x-ray tube (35 - 80 kVp, 10 - 250 μA) to form a CBCT. The FPD is installed on a rotating arm that can be adjusted to any angle θ, called the VRX angle, between 90° and 0° with respect to the x-ray direction. A VRX angle of 90° for the detector corresponds to a conventional CBCT whereas a VRX angle of 30° means that the detector is tilted 90° - 30° = 60° from its perpendicular position. Tilting the FPD in this manner reduces both the line-spread function width and the sampling distance by a factor of sin(θ), thereby increasing detector spatial resolution proportionately. An in-house phantom is used to measure the MTF of the reconstructed CT images using different VRX angles. An increase by a factor of 1.67 +/- 0.007 is observed in the MTF cutoff frequency at 30° compared to 90° in images acquired at 75 kVp. Expected theoretical value for this case is 2.0. The new Cone-Beam Variable Resolution X-ray (CB-VRX) CT system is expected to significantly improve the images acquired from small objects - such as small animals - while exploiting the opportunities offered by a conventional CBCT.

  17. The design and imaging characteristics of dynamic, solid-state, flat-panel x-ray image detectors for digital fluoroscopy and fluorography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, A R; Davies, A G; Sivananthan, M U

    2008-10-01

    Dynamic, flat-panel, solid-state, x-ray image detectors for use in digital fluoroscopy and fluorography emerged at the turn of the millennium. This new generation of dynamic detectors utilize a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material superimposed upon an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Dynamic solid-state detectors come in two basic designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor based). This review explains the underlying principles and enabling technologies associated with these detector designs, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing their performance against the long established x-ray image intensifier television (TV) system. Solid-state detectors afford a number of physical imaging benefits compared with the latter. These include zero geometrical distortion and vignetting, immunity from blooming at exposure highlights and negligible contrast loss (due to internal scatter). They also exhibit a wider dynamic range and maintain higher spatial resolution when imaging over larger fields of view. The detective quantum efficiency of indirect-conversion, dynamic, solid-state detectors is superior to that of both x-ray image intensifier TV systems and direct-conversion detectors. Dynamic solid-state detectors are playing a burgeoning role in fluoroscopy-guided diagnosis and intervention, leading to the displacement of x-ray image intensifier TV-based systems. Future trends in dynamic, solid-state, digital fluoroscopy detectors are also briefly considered. These include the growth in associated three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques and potential improvements in dynamic detector design.

  18. Similarities in the electrical conduction processes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, H; Ohki, Y; Seol, K S; Noma, T

    2003-01-01

    Electrical conduction at high fields was examined in a series of hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxynitride and silicon nitride films with different nitrogen contents deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. It was shown that the conduction is attributable to the Poole-Frenkel (PF) emission in the two materials. The energy depths of the PF sites and the dependences on the sample's chemical composition are quite similar for the two samples. It is considered that the PF sites in the two materials are identical.

  19. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  20. Properties of interfaces in amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olibet, Sara; Vallat-Sauvain, Evelyne; Fesquet, Luc; Damon-Lacoste, Jerome; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), IMT, Photovoltaics and Thin Film Electronics Laboratory, Breguet 2, 2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Monachon, Christian; Hessler-Wyser, Aicha [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy (CIME), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2010-03-15

    To study recombination at the amorphous/crystalline Si (a-Si:H/c-Si) heterointerface, the amphoteric nature of silicon (Si) dangling bonds is taken into account. Modeling interface recombination measured on various test structures provides insight into the microscopic passivation mechanisms, yielding an excellent interface defect density reduction by intrinsic a-Si:H and tunable field-effect passivation by doped layers. The potential of this model's applicability to recombination at other Si heterointerfaces is demonstrated. Solar cell properties of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunctions are in good accordance with the microscopic interface properties revealed by modeling, that are, e.g., slight asymmetries in the neutral capture cross-sections and band offsets. The importance of atomically abrupt interfaces and the difficulties to obtain them on pyramidally textured c-Si is studied in combination with transmission electron microscopy. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. Si-H bond dynamics in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, R. Jason; McGrane, Shawn D.

    2007-08-01

    The ultrafast structural dynamics of the Si-H bond in the rigid solvent environment of an amorphous silicon thin film is investigated using two-dimensional infrared four-wave mixing techniques. The two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) vibrational correlation spectrum resolves the homogeneous line shapes ( 4ps waiting times. The Si-H stretching mode anharmonic shift is determined to be 84cm-1 and decreases slightly with vibrational frequency. The 1→2 linewidth increases with vibrational frequency. Frequency dependent vibrational population times measured by transient grating spectroscopy are also reported. The narrow homogeneous line shape, large inhomogeneous broadening, and lack of spectral diffusion reported here present the ideal backdrop for using a 2DIR probe following electronic pumping to measure the transient structural dynamics implicated in the Staebler-Wronski degradation [Appl. Phys. Lett. 31, 292 (1977)] in a-Si:H based solar cells.

  2. Infrared analysis of thin films amorphous, hydrogenated carbon on silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, W; Schwarz-Selinger, T

    2000-01-01

    The infrared analysis of thin films on a thick substrate is discussed using the example of plasma-deposited, amorphous, hydrogenated carbon layers (a-C:H) on silicon substrates. The framework for the optical analysis of thin films is presented. The main characteristic of thin film optics is the occurrence of interference effects due to the coherent superposition of light multiply reflected at the various internal and external interfaces of the optical system. These interference effects lead to a sinusoidal variation of the transmitted and reflected intensity. As a consequence, the Lambert-Beer law is not applicable for the determination of the absorption coefficient of thin films. Furthermore, observable changes of the transmission and reflection spectra occur in the vicinity of strong absorption bands due to the Kramers-Kronig relation. For a sound data evaluation these effects have to be included in the analysis. To be able to extract the full information contained in a measured optical thin film spectrum, ...

  3. Characteristics of Disorder and Defect in Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Nitride Thin Films Containing Silicon Nanograins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Wen-ge; YU Wei; ZHANG Jiang-yong; HAN Li; FU Guang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (SiNx) thin films embedded with nano-structural silicon were prepared and the microstructures at the interface of silicon nano-grains/SiNx were identified by the optical absorption and Raman scattering measurements. Characterized by the exponential tail of optical absorption and the band-width of the Raman scattering TO mode, the disorder in the interface region increases with the gas flow ratio increasing. Besides, as reflected by the sub-gap absorption coefficients, the density of interface defect states decreases, which can be attributed to the structural mismatch in the interface region and also the changes of hydrogen content in the deposited films. Additional annealing treatment results in a significant increase of defects and degree of disorder, for which the hydrogen out-diffusion in the annealing process would be responsible.

  4. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulraheem, Yaser, E-mail: yaser.abdulraheem@kuniv.edu.kw [Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University. P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat (Kuwait); Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  5. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Abdulraheem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause

  6. Electronic properties of intrinsic and doped amorphous silicon carbide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, M. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: mvetter@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ferre, R. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Martin, I. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Orpella, A. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Puigdollers, J. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Andreu, J. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Alcubilla, R. [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Gran Capita s/n, Modul C4, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-07-26

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC{sub x} : H) films have shown excellent surface passivation of crystalline silicon. With the aim of large area deposition of these films the influence of the rf plasma power was investigated. It is found that homogenous deposition with effective surface recombination velocity lower than 100 cms{sup -1} is possible up to 6'' diameter in a simple parallel plate reactor by optimizing deposition parameters. For application in solar cell processes the conductivity of these a-SiC{sub x} : H films might become of importance since good surface passivation results from field-effect passivation which needs an insulating dielectric layer. Therefore, the temperature dependence of the dark dc conductivity of these films was investigated in the temperature range from - 20 to 260 deg. C. Two transition temperatures, T {sub s}{approx}80 deg. C and T {sub s}{approx}170 deg. C, were found where conductivity increases, resp. decreases over-exponential. From Arrhenius plots activation energy (E {sub a}) and conductivity pre-factor ({sigma} {sub 0}) were calculated for a large number of samples with different composition. A correlation between E {sub a} and {sigma} {sub 0} was found giving a Meyer-Neldel relation with a slope of 59 mV, corresponding to a material characteristic temperature T {sub m} = 400 deg. C, and an intercept at {sigma} {sub 00} = 0.1 {omega}{sup -1}cm{sup -1}.

  7. The specific heat of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Daniel Robert

    At low temperature, amorphous materials have low energy excitations that result in a heat capacity that is in excess of the Debye heat capacity calculated from the sound velocity. These excitations are ubiquitous to the glassy state and occur with roughly the same density for all glasses. The specific heat has a linear temperature dependence below 1K that has been described by the phenomenological two-level systems (TLS) model in addition to a T 3 temperature dependence which is in excess of the T3 Debye specific heat. It is still unknown what exact mechanism gives rise to the TLS but it is assumed that groups of atoms have configurations that are close in energy and, at low temperature, these atoms can change configurations by tunneling through the energy barrier separating them. It has been an open question as to whether tetrahedrally bonded materials, like amorphous silicon, can support TLS due to the over-constrained nature of their bonding. It is shown in this work that amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have specific heat CP in excess of the Debye specific heat which depends on the details of the growth process. There is a linear term that is due to TLS in addition to an excess T3 contribution. We find that the TLS density depends on number density of atoms in the a-Si film and that the presence of hydrogen in a-Si:H increases CP further. We suggest that regions of low density are sufficiently under-constrained to support tunneling between structural configurations at low temperature as described by the TLS model. The presence of H further lowers the energy barriers for the tunneling process resulting in an increase in TLS density in a-Si:H. The presence of H in a-Si:H network is found to be metastable. Annealing causes H to diffuse away from clustered regions which reduces the density of TLS. A low temperature anomaly is found in the a-Si:H films in their as prepared state that is of unknown origin but appears to take the

  8. On the effect of the amorphous silicon microstructure on the grain size of solid phase crystallized polycrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Kashish; Branca, Annalisa; Illiberi, Andrea; Creatore, Mariadriana; Sanden, Mauritius C.M. van de [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Tichelaar, Frans D. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    In this paper the effect of the microstructure of remote plasma-deposited amorphous silicon films on the grain size development in polycrystalline silicon upon solid-phase crystallization is reported. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon films are deposited at different microstructure parameter values R* (which represents the distribution of SiH{sub x} bonds in amorphous silicon), at constant hydrogen content. Amorphous silicon films undergo a phase transformation during solid-phase crystallization and the process results in fully (poly-)crystallized films. An increase in amorphous film structural disorder (i.e., an increase in R*), leads to the development of larger grain sizes (in the range of 700-1100 nm). When the microstructure parameter is reduced, the grain size ranges between 100 and 450 nm. These results point to the microstructure parameter having a key role in controlling the grain size of the polycrystalline silicon films and thus the performance of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Femtosecond Laser Crystallization of Boron-doped Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Rybalko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization of amorphous hydrogenated silicon films with femtosecond laser pulses is one of the promising ways to produce nanocrystalline silicon for photovoltaics. The structure of laser treated films is the most important factor determining materials' electric and photoelectric properties. In this work we investigated the effect of femtosecond laser irradiation of boron doped amorphous hydrogenated silicon films with different fluences on crystalline volume fraction and electrical properties of this material. A sharp increase of conductivity and essential decrease of activation energy of conductivity temperature dependences accompany the crystallization process. The results obtained are explained by increase of boron doping efficiency in crystalline phase of modified silicon film.

  10. Environmental life cycle assessment of roof-integrated flexible amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon solar cell laminate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Mohr; A. Meijer; M.A.J. Huijbregts; L. Reijnders

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an environmental life cycle assessment of a roof-integrated flexible solar cell laminate with tandem solar cells composed of amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon (a-Si/nc-Si). The a-Si/nc-Si cells are considered to have 10% conversion efficiency. Their expected service life

  11. Solution growth of microcrystalline silicon on amorphous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimburger, Robert

    2010-07-05

    This work deals with low-temperature solution growth of micro-crystalline silicon on glass. The task is motivated by the application in low-cost solar cells. As glass is an amorphous material, conventional epitaxy is not applicable. Therefore, growth is conducted in a two-step process. The first step aims at the spatial arrangement of silicon seed crystals on conductive coated glass substrates, which is realized by means of vapor-liquid-solid processing using indium as the solvent. Seed crystals are afterwards enlarged by applying a specially developed steady-state solution growth apparatus. This laboratory prototype mainly consists of a vertical stack of a silicon feeding source and the solvent (indium). The growth substrate can be dipped into the solution from the top. The system can be heated to a temperature below the softening point of the utilized glass substrate. A temperature gradient between feeding source and growth substrate promotes both, supersaturation and material transport by solvent convection. This setup offers advantages over conventional liquid phase epitaxy at low temperatures in terms of achievable layer thickness and required growth times. The need for convective solute transport to gain the desired thickness of at least 50 {mu}m is emphasized by equilibrium calculations in the binary system indium-silicon. Material transport and supersaturation conditions inside the utilized solution growth crucible are analyzed. It results that the solute can be transported from the lower feeding source to the growth substrate by applying an appropriate heating regime. These findings are interpreted by means of a hydrodynamic analysis of fluid flow and supporting FEM simulation. To ensure thermodynamic stability of all materials involved during steady-state solution growth, the ternary phase equilibrium between molybdenum, indium and silicon at 600 C was considered. Based on the obtained results, the use of molybdenum disilicide as conductive coating

  12. Research on high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, H.; Dolan, J.; Fricano, G.; Danginis, V.

    1987-02-01

    A study was undertaken of the optoelectronic properties of amorphous silicon-hydrogen thin films deposited from disilane at high deposition rates. The information derived from this study was used to fabricate amorphous silicon solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 7%. The intrinsic layer of these solar cells was deposited at 15 angstroms/second. Material properties investigated included dark conductivity, photoconductivity, minority carrier diffusion length, and density of states. The solar cells properties characterized were absolute quantum yield and simulated global AM 1.5 efficiencies. Investigations were undertaken utilizing optical and infrared spectroscopy to optimize the microstructures of the intrinsic amorphous silicon. That work was sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The information was used to optimize the intrinsic layer of amorphous silicon solar cells, resulting in AM 1.5 efficiencies exceeding 7%.

  13. A fax-machine amorphous silicon sensor for X-ray detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Barcala, J.M. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Chvatchkine, V. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ioudine, I. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Molinero, A. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Navarrete, J.J. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Yuste, C. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    Amorphous silicon detectors have been used, basically, as solar cells for energetics applications. As light detectors, linear sensors are used in fax and photocopier machines because they can be built with a large size, low price and have a high radiation hardness. Due to these performances, amorphous silicon detectors have been used as radiation detectors, and, presently, some groups are developing matrix amorphous silicon detectors with built-in electronics for medical X-ray applications. Our group has been working on the design and development of an X-ray image system based on a commercial fax linear amorphous silicon detector. The sensor scans the selected area and detects light produced by the X-ray in a scintillator placed on the sensor. Image-processing software produces a final image with better resolution and definition. (orig.).

  14. Performance Study of an aSi Flat Panel Detector for Fast Neutron Imaging of Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, M.; Mauerhofer, E. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Engels, R.; Kemmerling, G. [Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics - Electronic Systems, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Frank, M. [MATHCCES - Department of Mathematics, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Havenith, A.; Kettler, J.; Klapdor-Kleingrothaus, T. [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Technology Transfer, RWTH Aachen University, 52062 Aachen (Germany); Schitthelm, O. [Corporate Technology, Siemens AG, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Radioactive waste must be characterized to check its conformance for intermediate storage and final disposal according to national regulations. For the determination of radio-toxic and chemo-toxic contents of radioactive waste packages non-destructive analytical techniques are preferentially used. Fast neutron imaging is a promising technique to assay large and dense items providing, in complementarity to photon imaging, additional information on the presence of structures in radioactive waste packages. Therefore the feasibility of a compact Neutron Imaging System for Radioactive waste Analysis (NISRA) using 14 MeV neutrons is studied in a cooperation framework of Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, RWTH Aachen University and Siemens AG. However due to the low neutron emission of neutron generators in comparison to research reactors the challenging task resides in the development of an imaging detector with a high efficiency, a low sensitivity to gamma radiation and a resolution sufficient for the purpose. The setup is composed of a commercial D-T neutron generator (Genie16GT, Sodern) with a surrounding shielding made of polyethylene, which acts as a collimator and an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (aSi, 40 x 40 cm{sup 2}, XRD-1642, Perkin Elmer). Neutron detection is achieved using a general propose plastic scintillator (EJ-260, Eljen Technology) linked to the detector. The thermal noise of the photodiodes is reduced by employing an entrance window made of aluminium. Optimal gain and integration time for data acquisition are set by measuring the response of the detector to the radiation of a 500 MBq {sup 241}Am-source. Detector performance was studied by recording neutron radiography images of materials with various, but well known, chemical compositions, densities and dimensions (Al, C, Fe, Pb, W, concrete, polyethylene, 5 x 8 x 10 cm{sup 3}). To simulate gamma-ray emitting waste radiographs in presence of a gamma-ray sources ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241

  15. Optimization of large amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations of energetic impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samela, Juha, E-mail: juha.samela@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Norris, Scott A. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205 (United States); Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Aziz, Michael J. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    A practical method to create optimized amorphous silicon and silica structures for molecular dynamics simulations is developed and tested. The method is based on the Wooten, Winer, and Weaire algorithm and combination of small optimized blocks to larger structures. The method makes possible to perform simulations of either very large cluster hypervelocity impacts on amorphous targets or small displacements induced by low energy ion impacts in silicon.

  16. Nickel-disilicide-assisted excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Yan-Ping; Shao Xi-Bin; Gao Feng-Li; Luo Wen-Sheng; Wu Yuan; Fu Guo-Zhu; Jing Hai; Ma Kai

    2006-01-01

    Polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin film has been prepared by means of nickel-disilicide (NiSi2) assisted excimer laser crystallization (ELC). The process to prepare a sample includes two steps. One step consists of the formation of NiSi2 precipitates by heat-treating the dehydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si) coated with a thin layer of Ni. And the other step consists of the formation of poly-Si grains by means of ELC. According to the test results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), another grain growth model named two-interface grain growth has been proposed to contrast with the conventional Ni-metal-induced lateral crystallization (Ni-MILC) model and the ELC model. That is, an additional grain growth interface other than that in conventional ELC is formed, which consists of NiSi2 precipitates and a-Si.The processes for grain growth according to various excimer laser energy densities delivered to the a-Si film have been discussed. It is discovered that grains with needle shape and most of a uniform orientation are formed which grow up with NiSi2 precipitates as seeds. The reason for the formation of such grains which are different from that of Ni-MILCwithout migration of Ni atoms is not clear. Our model and analysis point out a method to prepare grains with needle shape and mostly of a uniform orientation. If such grains are utilized to make thin-film transistor, its characteristics may be improved.

  17. Laser assisted patterning of hydrogenated amorphous silicon for interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchi, S.; Desrues, T.; Souche, F.; Muñoz, D.; Lemiti, M.

    2012-10-01

    This work reports on the elaboration of a new industrial process based on laser selective ablation of dielectric layers for Interdigitated Back Contact Silicon Heterojunction (IBC Si-HJ) solar cells fabrication. Choice of the process is discussed and cells are processed to validate its performance. A pulsed green laser (515nm) with 10-20ns pulse duration is used for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers patterning steps, whereas metallization is made by screen printed. High Open-Circuit Voltage (Voc=699mV) and Fill Factor (FF=78.5%) values are obtained simultaneously on IBC Si-HJ cells, indicating a high surface passivation level and reduced resistive losses. An efficiency of 19% on non textured 26 cm² solar cells has been reached with this new industrial process.

  18. Volumetry of human molars with flat panel-based volume CT in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hannig, C.; Krieger, E.; Dullin, C.; Merten, H.A.; Attin, T.; Grabbe, E.; Heidrich, G.

    2006-01-01

    The flat panel-based volume computed tomography (fpVCT) is a new CT device applicable for experimental, three-dimensional evaluation of teeth at a resolution of about 150 microm in the high contrast region. The aim of this study was to investigate whether fpVCT was suitable for quantification of the

  19. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgeway, R G; Hegedus, S S; Podraza, N J

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both CSi and Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  20. Carrier transport in amorphous silicon utilizing picosecond photoconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. M.

    1981-08-01

    The development of a high-speed electronic measurement capability permitted the direct observation of the transient photoresponse of amorphous silicon (a-Si) with a time resolution of approximately 10ps. This technique was used to measure the initial mobility of photogenerated (2.1eV) free carriers in three types of a-Si having widely different densities of structural defects (i.e., as prepared by: (1) RF glow discharge (a-Si:H); (2) chemical vapor deposition; and (3) evaporation in ultra-high vacuum). In all three types of a-Si, the same initial mobility of approximately 1 cu cm/Vs at room temperature was found. This result tends to confirm the often-made suggestion that the free carrier mobility is determined by the influence of shallow states associated with the disorder in the random atomic network, and is an intrinsic property of a-Si which is unaffected by the method of preparation. The rate of decay of the photocurrent correlates with the density of structural defects and varies from 4ps to 200ps for the three types of a-Si investigated. The initial mobility of a-Si:H was found to be thermally activated. The possible application of extended state transport controlled by multiple trapping and small polaron formation is discussed.

  1. Nanohole Structuring for Improved Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johlin, Eric; Al-Obeidi, Ahmed; Nogay, Gizem; Stuckelberger, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2016-06-22

    While low hole mobilities limit the current collection and efficiency of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic devices, attempts to improve mobility of the material directly have stagnated. Herein, we explore a method of utilizing nanostructuring of a-Si:H devices to allow for improved hole collection in thick absorber layers. This is achieved by etching an array of 150 nm diameter holes into intrinsic a-Si:H and then coating the structured material with p-type a-Si:H and a conformal zinc oxide transparent conducting layer. The inclusion of these nanoholes yields relative power conversion efficiency (PCE) increases of ∼45%, from 7.2 to 10.4% PCE for small area devices. Comparisons of optical properties, time-of-flight mobility measurements, and internal quantum efficiency spectra indicate this efficiency is indeed likely occurring from an improved collection pathway provided by the nanostructuring of the devices. Finally, we estimate that through modest optimizations of the design and fabrication, PCEs of beyond 13% should be obtainable for similar devices.

  2. Effects of relaxation on the energy landscape of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallel, Houssem; Mousseau, Normand; Schiettekatte, Francois

    2008-03-01

    Amorphous silicon is used in many devices around us, included as a thin-film transistor in most flat screens, it also serves as the reference for the study of disordered network systems. Recently, differential scanning calorimetry and nanocalorimetry measurements (DSC) ^1 have shown that the heat released as the temperature of the sample is raised following implantation, is temperature independent. To understand this behaviour, we characterize the energy landscape of model a-Si. Using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) with the modified Stillinger-Weber potential, we generate models at four levels of relaxation and identify the relaxation mechanisms by analysing 100 000 events for each model. We find that while the distribution of the activation barriers shifts to higher energy as the system is relaxed, the distribution of the relaxation energies is almost unchanged. The relation between these two phenomena is consistent with the DSC measurements. This work is supported, in part, by NSERC, FQRNT and the CRC Foundation. HK is grateful for a scholarship from the Tunisian Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Technology. ^1 R. Karmouch et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 075304 (2007)

  3. Experiment and Simulation Study on the Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaic Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on comparative study on two amorphous silicon photovoltaic walls (a-Si PV walls, the temperature distribution and the instant power were tested; and with EnergyPlus software, similar models of the walls were built to simulate annual power generation and air conditioning load. On typical sunshine day, the corresponding position temperature of nonventilated PV wall was generally 0.5~1.5°C higher than that of ventilated one, while the power generation was 0.2%~0.4% lower, which was consistent with the simulation results with a difference of 0.41% in annual energy output. As simulation results, in summer, comparing the PV walls with normal wall, the heat per unit area of these two photovoltaic walls was 5.25 kWh/m2 (nonventilated and 0.67 kWh/m2 (ventilated higher, respectively. But in winter the heat loss of nonventilated one was smaller, while ventilated PV wall was similar to normal wall. To annual energy consumption of heating and cooling, the building with ventilated PV wall and normal wall was also similar but slightly better than nonventilated one. Therefore, it is inferred that, at low latitudes, such as Zhuhai, China, air gap ventilation is suitable, while the length to thickness ratio of the air gap needs to be taken into account.

  4. Diffusion of Gold and Platinum in Amorphous Silicon

    CERN Multimedia

    Voss, T L

    2002-01-01

    By means of radiotracer experiments the diffusion of Au and Pt in radio-frequency-sputtered amorphous silicon (a-Si) was investigated. Specimens of a-Si with homogeneous doping concentrations of Au or Pt in the range 0$\\, - \\,$1,7~at.\\% were produced by co-sputtering of Si and Au or Pt, respectively. An additional tiny concentration of radioactive $^{195}$Au or $^{188}$Pt, about 10~at.ppm, was implanted at ISOLDE. The resulting Gaussian distribution of the implanted atoms served as a probe for measuring diffusion coefficients at various doping concentrations. It was found that for a given doping concentration the diffusion coefficients show Arrhenius-type temperature dependences, where the diffusion enthalpy and the pre-exponential factor depend on the doping concentration. From these results it was concluded that in a-Si Au and Pt undergo direct, interstitial-like diffusion that is retarded by temporary trapping of the radiotracer atoms at vacancy-type defects with different binding enthalpies. In the case o...

  5. Hot wire deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, A.H.; Iwaniczko, E.; Nelson, B.P.; Reedy, R.C. Jr.; Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    This paper details the results of a study in which low H content, high deposition rate hot wire (HW) deposited amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has been incorporated into a substrate solar cell. The authors find that the treatment of the top surface of the HW i layer while it is being cooled from its high deposition temperature is crucial to device performance. They present data concerning these surface treatments, and correlate these treatments with Schottky device performance. The authors also present first generation HW n-i-p solar cell efficiency data, where a glow discharge (GD) {mu}c-Si(p) layer was added to complete the partial devices. No light trapping layer was used to increase the device Jsc. Their preliminary investigations have yielded efficiencies of up to 6.8% for a cell with a 4000 {Angstrom} thick HW i-layer, which degrade less than 10% after a 900 hour light soak. The authors suggest avenues for further improvement of their devices.

  6. Raman spectroscopy of PIN hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keya, Kimitaka; Torigoe, Yoshihiro; Toko, Susumu; Yamashita, Daisuke; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced degradation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key issue for enhancing competitiveness in solar cell market. A-Si:H films with a lower density of Si-H2 bonds shows higher stability. Here we identified Si-H2 bonds in PIN a-Si:H solar cells fabricated by plasma CVD using Raman spectroscopy. A-Si:H solar cell has a structure of B-doped μc-SiC:H (12.5 nm)/ non-doped a-Si:H (250nm)/ P-doped μc-Si:H (40 nm) on glass substrates (Asahi-VU). By irradiating HeNe laser light from N-layer, peaks correspond to Si-H2 bonds (2100 cm-1) and Si-H bonds (2000 cm-1) have been identified in Raman scattering spectra. The intensity ratio of Si-H2 and Si-H ISiH2/ISiH is found to correlate well to light induced degradation of the cells Therefore, Raman spectroscopy is a promising method for studying origin of light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells.

  7. Progress in amorphous silicon solar cells produced by reactive sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, T. D.

    The photovoltaic properties of reactively sputtered amorphous silicon are reviewed and it is shown that efficient PIN solar cells can be fabricated by the method of sputtering. The photovoltaic properties of the intrinsic films correlate with their structural and compositional inhomogeneities. Hydrogen incorporation and small levels of phosphorus and boron impurities also affect the photovoltaic properties through reduction of residual dangling bond related defects and modification of their occupation. The optical and transport properties of the doped P and N-films were found to depend sensitively on the amount of hydrogen and boron or phosphorus incorporation into the films as well as on their degree of crystallinity. Combination of the best intrinsic and doped films leads to PIN solar cell structures generating J(sc) of 13 mA/sq cm and V(oc) of between 0.85 to 0.95 volts. The efficiency of these devices, 5 to 6 percent, is limited by the low FF, typically about 50 percent. As a further test to the potential of this technology efficient tandem solar cell structures were fabricated, and device design concepts, such as the incorporation of optically reflective back contacts were tested.

  8. Amorphization and reduction of thermal conductivity in porous silicon by irradiation with swift heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newby, Pascal J. [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Institut Interdisciplinaire d' Innovation Technologique (3IT), Universite de Sherbrooke, CNRS UMI-LN2, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1K0A5 (Canada); Canut, Bruno; Bluet, Jean-Marie; Lysenko, Vladimir [Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, INL-UMR5270, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Gomes, Severine [Centre de Thermique de Lyon, Universite de Lyon, CETHIL-UMR5008, CNRS, INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Isaiev, Mykola; Burbelo, Roman [Faculty of Physics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 64/13, Volodymyrs' ka St., Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Termentzidis, Konstantinos [Laboratoire LEMTA, Universite de Lorraine-CNRS UMR 7563, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy cedex (France); Chantrenne, Patrice [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, MATEIS-UMR CNRS 5510, Villeurbanne 69621 (France); Frechette, Luc G. [Institut Interdisciplinaire d' Innovation Technologique (3IT), Universite de Sherbrooke, CNRS UMI-LN2, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1K0A5 (Canada)

    2013-07-07

    In this article, we demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of nanostructured porous silicon is reduced by amorphization and also that this amorphous phase in porous silicon can be created by swift (high-energy) heavy ion irradiation. Porous silicon samples with 41%-75% porosity are irradiated with 110 MeV uranium ions at six different fluences. Structural characterisation by micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM imaging show that swift heavy ion irradiation causes the creation of an amorphous phase in porous Si but without suppressing its porous structure. We demonstrate that the amorphization of porous silicon is caused by electronic-regime interactions, which is the first time such an effect is obtained in crystalline silicon with single-ion species. Furthermore, the impact on the thermal conductivity of porous silicon is studied by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning thermal microscopy. The creation of an amorphous phase in porous silicon leads to a reduction of its thermal conductivity, up to a factor of 3 compared to the non-irradiated sample. Therefore, this technique could be used to enhance the thermal insulation properties of porous Si. Finally, we show that this treatment can be combined with pre-oxidation at 300 Degree-Sign C, which is known to lower the thermal conductivity of porous Si, in order to obtain an even greater reduction.

  9. Preparation of fine silicon particles from amorphous silicon monoxide by the disproportionation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiya, Mikito; Takei, Humihiko; Kikuchi, Masae; Uyeda, Chiaki

    2001-07-01

    Fine Si particles have been prepared by the disproportionation reaction of silicon monoxide (SiO), that is: 2SiO→Si+SiO 2. Amorphous powders of SiO are heated between 900°C and 1400°C in a flow of Ar and the obtained specimens are analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The treatments between 1000°C and 1300°C for more than 0.5 h result in origination of Si particles dispersed in amorphous oxide media. The particle size varies from 1-3 to 20-40 nm, depending on the heating temperature. Kinetic analyses of the reaction reveal that the activation energy is 1.1 eV (82.1 kJ mol -1). The specimens annealed above 1350°C changes into a mixture of Si and cristobalite, suggesting a solid state transformation in the surrounding oxides from the amorphous to crystalline states.

  10. Realistic inversion of diffraction data for an amorphous solid: The case of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anup; Biswas, Parthapratim; Bhattarai, Bishal; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    We apply a method called "force-enhanced atomic refinement" (FEAR) to create a computer model of amorphous silicon (a -Si) based upon the highly precise x-ray diffraction experiments of Laaziri et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 3460 (1999), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.82.3460]. The logic underlying our calculation is to estimate the structure of a real sample a -Si using experimental data and chemical information included in a nonbiased way, starting from random coordinates. The model is in close agreement with experiment and also sits at a suitable energy minimum according to density-functional calculations. In agreement with experiments, we find a small concentration of coordination defects that we discuss, including their electronic consequences. The gap states in the FEAR model are delocalized compared to a continuous random network model. The method is more efficient and accurate, in the sense of fitting the diffraction data, than conventional melt-quench methods. We compute the vibrational density of states and the specific heat, and we find that both compare favorably to experiments.

  11. Blurring artifacts in megavoltage radiography with a flat-panel imaging system: comparison of Monte Carlo simulations with measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach von Wittenau, A E; Logan, C M; Aufderheide, M B; Slone, D M

    2002-11-01

    Originally designed for use at medical-imaging x-ray energies, imaging systems comprising scintillating screens and amorphous Si detectors are also used at the megavoltage photon energies typical of portal imaging and industrial radiography. While image blur at medical-imaging x-ray energies is strongly influenced both by K-shell fluorescence and by the transport of optical photons within the scintillator layer, at higher photon energies the image blur is dominated by radiation scattered from the detector housing and internal support structures. We use Monte Carlo methods to study the blurring in a notional detector: a series of semi-infinite layers with material compositions, thicknesses, and densities similar to those of a commercially available flat-panel amorphous Si detector system comprising a protective housing, a gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen, and associated electronics. We find that the image blurring, as described by a point-spread function (PSF), has three length scales. The first component, with a submillimeter length scale, arises from electron scatter within the scintillator and detection electronics. The second component, with a millimeter-to-centimeter length scale, arises from electrons produced in the front cover of the detector. The third component, with a length scale of tens of centimeters, arises from photon scatter by the back cover of the detector. The relative contributions of each of these components to the overall PSF vary with incident photon energy. We present an algorithm that includes the energy-dependent sensitivity and energy-dependent PSF within a ray-tracing formalism. We find quantitative agreement (approximately 2%) between predicted radiographs with radiographs of copper step wedges, taken with a 9 MV bremsstrahlung source and a commercially available flat-panel system. The measured radiographs show the blurring artifacts expected from both the millimeter-scale electron transport and from the tens

  12. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Yimao, E-mail: yimao.wan@anu.edu.au; Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres [Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2015-12-07

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiN{sub x} stack, recombination current density J{sub 0} values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm{sup 2} are obtained on 10 Ω·cm n-type, 0.8 Ω·cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J{sub 0} on n-type 10 Ω·cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm{sup 2} when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  13. Full dynamic resolution low lower DA-Converters for flat panel displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Saas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stepwise charging can reduce the power dissipated in the source drivers of a flat panel display. However the solution presented only provided a dynamic resolution of 3 bits which is not sufficient for obtaining a full color resolution display. In this work a further development of the basic idea is presented. The stepwise charging is increased to 4 bits and supplemented by a current source to provide an output signal which represents an 8 bit value with sufficient accuracy. Within this work the application is an AM-OLED flat panel display, but the concept can easily be applied to other display technologies like TFT-LCD as well.

  14. A novel heuristic for optimization aggregate production problem: Evidence from flat panel display in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuhali, K.; Hussain M., I.; Zain Z., M.; Mullenix, P.

    2015-05-01

    Aim: This paper contribute to the flat panel display industry it terms of aggregate production planning. Methodology: For the minimization cost of total production of LCD manufacturing, a linear programming was applied. The decision variables are general production costs, additional cost incurred for overtime production, additional cost incurred for subcontracting, inventory carrying cost, backorder costs and adjustments for changes incurred within labour levels. Model has been developed considering a manufacturer having several product types, which the maximum types are N, along a total time period of T. Results: Industrial case study based on Malaysia is presented to test and to validate the developed linear programming model for aggregate production planning. Conclusion: The model development is fit under stable environment conditions. Overall it can be recommended to adapt the proven linear programming model to production planning of Malaysian flat panel display industry.

  15. Performance improvement in amorphous silicon based uncooled microbolometers through pixel design and materials development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmera, Sameer; Brady, John; Hanson, Charles; Schimert, Tom; Syllaios, A. J.; Taylor, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometers have been established as a field-worthy technology for a broad range of applications where performance and form factor are paramount, such as soldier-borne systems. Recent developments in both bolometer materials and pixel design at L-3 in the 17μm pixel node have further advanced the state-of-the-art. Increasing the a-Si material temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) has the impact of improving NETD sensitivity without increasing thermal time constant (TTC), leading to an improvement in the NETD×TTC product. By tuning the amorphous silicon thin-film microstructure using hydrogen dilution during deposition, films with high TCR have been developed. The electrical properties of these films have been shown to be stable even after thermal cycling to temperatures greater than 300oC enabling wafer-level vacuum packaging currently performed at L-3 to reduce the size and weight of the vacuum packaged unit. Through appropriate selection of conditions during deposition, amorphous silicon of ~3.4% TCR has been integrated into the L-3 microbolometer manufacturing flow. By combining pixel design enhancements with improvements to amorphous silicon thin-film technology, L-3's amorphous silicon microbolometer technology will continue to provide the performance required to meet the needs to tomorrow's war-fighter.

  16. Attenuated phase-shift mask (PSM) blanks for flat panel display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Kagehiro; Mochizuki, Satoru; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    The fine pattern exposure techniques are required for Flat Panel display applications as smart phone, tablet PC recently. The attenuated phase shift masks (PSM) are being used for ArF and KrF photomask lithography technique for high end pattern Semiconductor applications. We developed CrOx based large size PSM blanks that has good uniformity on optical characteristics for FPD applications. We report the basic optical characteristics and uniformity, stability data of large sized CrOx PSM blanks.

  17. Competing Technologies and Industry Evolution: The Benefits of Making Mistakes in the Flat Panel Display Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Eggers, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Managers at firms facing uncertain competing technologies evolving concurrently face a complex decision set, including options to invest in one technology or other, both technologies, or to wait to invest. This study investigates the role that experience, learning and timing play in affecting the firm-level pros and cons of each of these four strategies in a technological competition situation. Using a unique data set on the evolution of the global flat panel display industry, this study offe...

  18. Study of DQE dependence with beam quality on GE essential mammography flat panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mollá, Rafael; Linares, Rafael; Ayala, Rafael

    2010-11-25

    This paper deals with the analysis of the behavior of objective image quality parameters for the new GE Senographe Essential FFDM system, in particular its dependence with beam quality. The detector consists of an indirect conversion a-Si flat panel coupled to a CsI:Tl scintillator. The system under study has gone through a series of relevant modifications in flat panel with respect to the previous model (GE Senographe DS 2000). These changes in the detector modify its performance and are intended to favor advanced applications like tomosynthesis, which uses harder beam spectra and lower doses per exposure than conventional FFDM. Although our system does not have tomosynthesis implemented, we noticed that most clinical explorations were performed by automatically selecting a harder spectrum than that of typical use in FFDM (Rh/Rh 28-30 kV instead of Mo/Mo 28 kV). Since flat-panel optimization for tomosynthesis influences the usual FFDM clinical performance, the new detector behavior needed to be investigated. Therefore, the aim of our study is evaluating the dependence of the detector performance for different beam spectra and exposure levels. In this way, we covered the clinical beam quality range (Rh/Rh 28-30 kV) and we extended the study to even harder spectra (Rh/Rh 34 kV). Detector performance is quantified by means of modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). We found that flat-panel optimization results in slightly - but statistically significant - higher DQE values as beam quality increases, which is contrary to the expected behavior. This positive correlation between beam quality and DQE is also diametrically opposite to that of the previous model by the same manufacturer. As a direct consequence, usual FFDM takes advantage of the changes in the detector, as less exposure is needed to achieve the same DQE if harder beams are used.

  19. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approac...

  20. Qualification test results for DOE solar photovoltaic flat panel procurement - PRDA 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J. S.

    1980-01-01

    Twelve types of prototypes modules for the DOE Photovoltaic Flat Panel Procurement (PRDA 38) were subjected to qualification tests at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory according to a new specification. Environmental exposures were carried out separately and included temperature cycling, humidity, wind simulation, and hail. The most serious problems discovered were reduced insulation resistance to ground and ground continuity of the metal frames, electrical degradation, erratic power readings, and delamination. The electrical and physical characteristics of the newly received modules are also given.

  1. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80-120 kVp, and different current (10-50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  2. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyung Cha, Bo [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Keedong [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seongchae, E-mail: sarim@keri.re.kr [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Young [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80–120 kVp, and different current (10–50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  3. Evaluation of image quality and dose on a flat-panel CT-scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Suess, Ch.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Flohr, T.

    2005-04-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) scanner. We focused on improving the image quality using different detector settings and reducing x-ray scatter intensities. For the presented results we used a Varian 4030CB flat-panel detector mounted in a multislice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Systems). The scatter intensities may severely impair image quality in flat-panel detector CT systems. To reduce the impact of scatter we tested bowtie shaped filters, anti-scatter grids and post-processing correction algorithms. We evaluated the improvement of image quality by each method and also by a combination of the several methods. To achieve an extended dynamic range in the projection data, we implemented a novel dynamic gain-switching mode. The read out charge amplifier feedback capacitance is changing dynamically in this mode, depending on the signal level. For this scan mode dedicated corrections in the offset and gain calibration are required. We compared image quality in terms of low contrast for both, the dynamic mode and the standard fixed gain mode. VCT scanners require different types of dose parameters. We measured the dose in a 16 cm CTDI phantom and free air in the scanners iso-center and defined a new metric for a VCT dose index (VCTDI). The dose for a high quality VCT scan of this prototype scanner varied between 15 and 40 mGy.

  4. Photodiode forward bias to reduce temporal effects in a-Si based flat panel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollov, Ivan; Tognina, Carlo; Colbeth, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Lag and sensitivity modulation are well known temporal artifacts of a-Si photodiode based flat panel detectors. Both effects are caused by charge carriers being trapped in the semiconductor. Trapping and releasing of these carriers is a statistical process with time constants much longer than the frame time of flat panel detectors. One way to reduce these temporal artifacts is to keep the traps filled by applying a pulse of light over the entire detector area every frame before the x-ray exposure. This paper describes an alternative method, forward biasing the a-Si photodiodes and supplying free carriers to fill the traps. The array photodiodes are forward biased and then reversed biased again every frame between the panel readout and x-ray exposure. The method requires no change to the mechanical construction of the detector, only minor modifications of the detector electronics and no image post processing. An existing flat panel detector was modified and evaluated for lag and sensitivity modulation. The required changes of the panel configuration, readout scheme and readout timing are presented in this paper. The results of applying the new technique are presented and compared to the standard mode of operation. The improvements are better than an order of magnitude for both sensitivity modulation and lag; lowering their values to levels comparable to the scintillator afterglow. To differentiate the contribution of the a-Si array, from that of the scintillator, a large area light source was used. Possible implementations and applications of the method are discussed.

  5. Rotational flat-panel computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerfler, A.; Struffert, T.; Engelhorn, T.; Richter, C. [Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range than available with X-ray film or film-screen combinations, flat-panel detector technology has become widely accepted for neuroangiographic imaging. In particular flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) which uses rotational C-arm-mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with high spatial resolution. As ''Angiographic CT'' FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures, i.e. intracranial stenting for cerebrovascular stenoses, stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms and embolizations of arteriovenous malformations. By providing morphologic, CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize periprocedural hemorrhage and may thus improve rapid complication management without the need for patient transfer. In addition, myelography and postmyelographic FD-CT imaging can be carried out using a single machine. Spinal interventions, such as kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty might also benefit from FD-CT. This paper briefly reviews the technical principles of FD technology and then focuses on possible applications in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology. (orig.)

  6. High-performance flat-panel solar thermoelectric generators with high thermal concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Daniel; Poudel, Bed; Feng, Hsien-Ping; Caylor, J Christopher; Yu, Bo; Yan, Xiao; Ma, Yi; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Dezhi; Muto, Andrew; McEnaney, Kenneth; Chiesa, Matteo; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2011-05-01

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity has been dominated by photovoltaic and solar thermal power generation. Photovoltaic cells are deployed widely, mostly as flat panels, whereas solar thermal electricity generation relying on optical concentrators and mechanical heat engines is only seen in large-scale power plants. Here we demonstrate a promising flat-panel solar thermal to electric power conversion technology based on the Seebeck effect and high thermal concentration, thus enabling wider applications. The developed solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) achieved a peak efficiency of 4.6% under AM1.5G (1 kW m(-2)) conditions. The efficiency is 7-8 times higher than the previously reported best value for a flat-panel STEG, and is enabled by the use of high-performance nanostructured thermoelectric materials and spectrally-selective solar absorbers in an innovative design that exploits high thermal concentration in an evacuated environment. Our work opens up a promising new approach which has the potential to achieve cost-effective conversion of solar energy into electricity.

  7. Resolution requirements for monitor viewing of digital flat-panel detector radiographs: a contrast detail analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, Siegfried; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore M.; Peer, Regina; Gassner, Eva; Steingruber, Iris; Jaschke, Werner [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2003-02-01

    With the introduction of digital flat-panel detector systems into clinical practice, the still unresolved question of resolution requirements for picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation monitors has gained new momentum. This contrast detail analysis was thus performed to define the differences in observer performance in the detection of small low-contrast objects on clinical 1K and 2K monitor workstations. Images of the CDRAD 2.0 phantom were acquired at varying exposures on an indirect-type digital flat-panel detector. Three observers evaluated a total of 15 images each with respect to the threshold contrast for each detail size. The numbers of correctly identified objects were determined for all image subsets. No significant difference in the correct detection ratio was detected among the observers; however, the difference between the two types of workstations (1K vs 2K monitors) despite less than 3% was significant at a 95% confidence level. Slight but statistically significant differences exist in the detection of low-contrast nodular details visualized on 1K- and 2K-monitor workstations. Further work is needed to see if this result holds true also for comparison of clinical flat-panel detector images and may, for example, exert an influence on the diagnostic accuracy of chest X-ray readings. (orig.)

  8. Core-shell amorphous silicon-carbon nanoparticles for high performance anodes in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourice, Julien; Bordes, Arnaud; Boulineau, Adrien; Alper, John P.; Franger, Sylvain; Quinsac, Axelle; Habert, Aurélie; Leconte, Yann; De Vito, Eric; Porcher, Willy; Reynaud, Cécile; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Haon, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    Core-shell silicon-carbon nanoparticles are attractive candidates as active material to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries while mitigating the detrimental effects of volume expansion upon lithiation. However crystalline silicon suffers from amorphization upon the first charge/discharge cycle and improved stability is expected in starting with amorphous silicon. Here we report the synthesis, in a single-step process, of amorphous silicon nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell (a-Si@C), via a two-stage laser pyrolysis where decomposition of silane and ethylene are conducted in two successive reaction zones. Control of experimental conditions mitigates silicon core crystallization as well as formation of silicon carbide. Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy show a carbon shell about 1 nm in thickness, which prevents detrimental oxidation of the a-Si cores. Cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that the core-shell composite reaches its maximal lithiation during the first sweep, thanks to its amorphous core. After 500 charge/discharge cycles, it retains a capacity of 1250 mAh.g-1 at a C/5 rate and 800 mAh.g-1 at 2C, with an outstanding coulombic efficiency of 99.95%. Moreover, post-mortem observations show an electrode volume expansion of less than 20% and preservation of the nanostructuration.

  9. Effect of light trapping in an amorphous silicon solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iftiquar, S.M., E-mail: iftiquar@skku.edu [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Juyeon; Park, Hyeongsik [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jaehyun; Shin, Chonghoon [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinjoo [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Junhee [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Bong, Sungjae [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunbo [Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Junsin, E-mail: yi@yurim.skku.ac.kr [College of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    Light trapping in amorphous silicon based solar cell has been investigated theoretically. The substrate for these cells can be textured, including pyramidally textured c-Si wafer, to improve capture of incident light. A thin silver layer, deposited on the substrate of an n–i–p cell, ultimately goes at the back of the cell structure and can act a back reflector to improve light trapping. The two physical solar cells we investigated had open circuit voltages (V{sub oc}) of 0.87, 0.90 V, short circuit current densities (J{sub sc}) of 14.2, 15.36 mA/cm{sup 2} respectively. The first cell was investigated for the effect on its performance while having and not having light trapping scheme (LT), when thickness of the active layer (d{sub i}) was changed in the range of 100 nm to 800 nm. In both the approaches, for having or not having LT, the short circuit current density increases with d{sub i} while the V{sub oc} and fill factor, decreases steadily. However, maximum cell efficiency can be obtained when d{sub i} = 400 nm, and hence it was considered optimized thickness of the active layer, that was used for further investigation. With the introduction of light trapping to the second cell, it shows a further enhancement in J{sub sc} and red response of the external quantum efficiency to 16.6 mA/cm{sup 2} and by 11.1% respectively. Considering multiple passages of light inside the cell, we obtained an improvement in cell efficiency from 9.7% to 10.6%. - Highlights: • A theoretical analysis of light trapping in p–i–n and n–i–p type solar cells • J{sub sc} increases and V{sub oc} decreases with the increase in i-layer thickness. • Observed optimized thickness of i-layer as 400 nm • J{sub sc} improved from 15.4 mA/cm{sup 2} to 16.6 mA/cm{sup 2} due to the light trapping. • Efficiency (η) improved from 9.7% to 10.6% due to better red response of the EQE.

  10. Stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells with low hydrogen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortmann, C.M.; Hegedus, S.S. (Institute of Energy Conversion, Newark, DE (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Results and conclusions obtained during a research program of the investigation of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon based alloy materials and solar cells fabricated by photo-chemical vapor and glow discharge depositions are reported. Investigation of the effects of the hydrogen content in a-si:H i-layers in amorphous silicon solar cells show that cells with lowered hydrogen content i-layers are more stable. A classical thermodynamic formulation of the Staebler-Wronski effect has been developed for standard solar cell operating temperatures and illuminations. Methods have been developed to extract a lumped equivalent circuit from the current voltage characteristic of a single junction solar cell in order to predict its behavior in a multijunction device.

  11. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Michael A.; Raupp, Gregory B.

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  12. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Marrs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  13. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Michael A; Raupp, Gregory B

    2016-07-26

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm² and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  14. Infrared Insight into the Network of Hydrogenated Amorphous and Polycrystalline Silicon thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Mullerova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available IR measurements were carried out on both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon samples deposited by PECVDon glass substrate. The transition from amorphous to polycrystalline phase was achieved by increasing dilution of silaneplasma at the deposition process. The samples were found to be mixed phase materials. Commonly, infrared spectra ofhydrogenated silicon thin films yield information about microstructure, hydrogen content and hydrogen bonding to silicon. Inthis paper, additional understanding was retrieved from infrared response. Applying standard optical laws, effective mediatheory and Clausius-Mossoti approach concerning the Si-Si and Si-H bonds under IR irradiation as individual oscillators,refractive indices in the long wavelength limit, crystalline, amorphous and voids volume fractions and the mass density of thefilms were determined. The mass density was found to decrease with increasing crystalline volume fraction, which can beattributed to the void-dominated mechanism of network formation.

  15. Radial junction amorphous silicon solar cells on PECVD-grown silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linwei; O'Donnell, Benedict; Foldyna, Martin; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2012-05-17

    Constructing radial junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells on top of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) represents a promising approach towards high performance and cost-effective thin film photovoltaics. We here develop an all-in situ strategy to grow SiNWs, via a vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism on top of ZnO-coated glass substrate, in a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactor. Controlling the distribution of indium catalyst drops allows us to tailor the as-grown SiNW arrays into suitable size and density, which in turn results in both a sufficient light trapping effect and a suitable arrangement allowing for conformal coverage of SiNWs by subsequent a-Si:H layers. We then demonstrate the fabrication of radial junction solar cells and carry on a parametric study designed to shed light on the absorption and quantum efficiency response, as functions of the intrinsic a-Si:H layer thickness and the density of SiNWs. These results lay a solid foundation for future structural optimization and performance ramp-up of the radial junction thin film a-Si:H photovoltaics.

  16. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  17. N-type crystalline silicon films free of amorphous silicon deposited on glass by HCl addition using hot wire chemical vapour deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yung-Bin; Park, Hyung-Ki; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Song, Jean-Ho; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2011-09-01

    Since n-type crystalline silicon films have the electric property much better than those of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline silicon films, they can enhance the performance of advanced electronic devices such as solar cells and thin film transistors (TFTs). Since the formation of amorphous silicon is unavoidable in the low temperature deposition of microcrystalline silicon on a glass substrate at temperatures less than 550 degrees C in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition and hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD), crystalline silicon films have not been deposited directly on a glass substrate but fabricated by the post treatment of amorphous silicon films. In this work, by adding the HCl gas, amorphous silicon-free n-type crystalline silicon films could be deposited directly on a glass substrate by HWCVD. The resistivity of the n-type crystalline silicon film for the flow rate ratio of [HCl]/[SiH4] = 7.5 and [PH3]/[SiH4] = 0.042 was 5.31 x 10(-4) ohms cm, which is comparable to the resistivity 1.23 x 10(-3) ohms cm of films prepared by thermal annealing of amorphous silicon films. The absence of amorphous silicon in the film could be confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  18. In situ observation of shear-driven amorphization in silicon crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang; Zhong, Li; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Chongmin; Zhu, Ting; Mao, Scott X.

    2016-09-19

    Amorphous materials have attracted great interest in the scientific and technological fields. An amorphous solid usually forms under the externally driven conditions of melt-quenching, irradiation and severe mechanical deformation. However, its dynamic formation process remains elusive. Here we report the in situ atomic-scale observation of dynamic amorphization processes during mechanical straining of nanoscale silicon crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We observe the shear-driven amorphization (SDA) occurring in a dominant shear band. The SDA involves a sequence of processes starting with the shear-induced diamond-cubic to diamond-hexagonal phase transition that is followed by dislocation nucleation and accumulation in the newly formed phase, leading to the formation of amorphous silicon. The SDA formation through diamond-hexagonal phase is rationalized by its structural conformity with the order in the paracrystalline amorphous silicon, which maybe widely applied to diamond-cubic materials. Besides, the activation of SDA is orientation-dependent through the competition between full dislocation nucleation and partial gliding.

  19. Amorphization of silicon induced by nanodroplet impact: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Fernan; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The hypervelocity impact of electrosprayed nanodroplets on crystalline silicon produces an amorphous layer with a thickness comparable to the droplet diameters. The phase transition is puzzling considering that amorphization has not been observed in macroscopic shock compression of silicon, the only apparent difference being the several orders of magnitude disparity between the sizes of the macroscopic and nanodroplet projectiles. This article investigates the physics of the amorphization by modeling the impact of a nanodrop on single-crystal silicon via molecular dynamics. The simulation shows that the amorphization results from the heating and subsequent melting of a thin layer of silicon surrounding the impact area, followed by an ultrafast quenching with cooling rates surpassing 1013 K/s. These conditions impede crystalline growth in the supercooled liquid phase, which finally undergoes a glass transition to render a disordered solid phase. The high temperature field near the impact interface is a localized effect. The significantly different temperatures and cooling rates near the surface and in the bulk explain why amorphization occurs in nanodroplet impact, while it is absent in macroscopic shock compression. Since these high temperatures and ultrafast quenching rates are likely to occur in other materials, nanodroplet impact may become a general amorphatization technique for treating the surfaces of most crystalline substrates.

  20. Light Entrapping, Modeling & Effect of Passivation on Amorphous Silicon Based PV Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Md Mostafizur Rahman; Md. Moidul Islam; Mission Kumar Debnath; Saifullah, S.M.; Samera Hossein; Nusrat Jahan Bristy

    2016-01-01

    This research paper present efforts to enhance the performance of amorphous silicon p-i-n type solar cell using sidewall passivation. For sidewall passivation, MEMS insulation material Al2O3 was used. The main objective of this paper is to observe the effect of sidewall passivation in amorphous silicon solar cell and increase the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Passivation of Al2O3 is found effective to subdue reverse leakage. It increases the electric potential generated in the desi...

  1. Origin of the ESR signal with g=2.0055 in amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    Defect-state wave functions for threefold- and fivefold-coordinated Si atoms in amorphous silicon clusters have been calculated with use of a first-principles linear combination of the atomic orbitals method in order to clarify the origin of the ESR signal with g=2.0055 in amorphous silicon. The wave function of the defect state originating from the threefold-coordinated Si atom is strongly localized on this atom. On the other hand, that for the fivefold-coordinated Si atom is extended on thi...

  2. Elastic behavior of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite: An atomistic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Suvankar; Dutta, Amlan

    2017-01-01

    In the context of mechanical properties, nanocomposites with homogeneous chemical composition throughout the matrix and the dispersed phase are of particular interest. In this study, the elastic moduli of amorphous-crystalline silicon nanocomposite have been estimated using atomistic simulations. A comparison with the theoretical model reveals that the elastic behavior is significantly influenced by the crystal-amorphous interphase. On observing the effect of volume-fraction of the crystalline phase, an anomalous trend for the bulk modulus is obtained. This phenomenon is attributed to the relaxation displacements of the amorphous atoms.

  3. SAPHIRE: A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector With Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0554 TITLE: SAPHIRE : A New Flat-Panel Digital... SAPHIRE : A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector with Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout 5b. GRANT NUMBER w81xwh-04...CsI), and form a charge image that is read out by a high-resolution field emitter array (FEA). We call the proposed detector SAPHIRE (Scintillator

  4. Anode properties of silicon-rich amorphous silicon suboxide films in all-solid-state lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Reona; Ohta, Narumi; Ohnishi, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports the effects of introducing oxygen into amorphous silicon films on their anode properties in all-solid-state lithium batteries. Although poor cycling performance is a critical issue in silicon anodes, it has been effectively improved by introducing even a small amount of oxygen, that is, even in Si-rich amorphous silicon suboxide (a-SiOx) films. Because of the small amount of oxygen in the films, high cycling performance has been achieved without lowering the capacity and power density: an a-Si film delivers discharge capacity of 2500 mAh g-1 under high discharge current density of 10 mA cm-2 (35 C). These results demonstrate that a-SiOx is a promising candidate for high-capacity anode materials in solid-state batteries.

  5. Proton irradiation effects of amorphous silicon solar cell for solar power satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yousuke; Oshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sasaki, Susumu; Kuroda, Hideo; Ushirokawa, Akio

    1997-03-01

    Flexible amorphous silicon(fa-Si) solar cell module, a thin film type, is regarded as a realistic power generator for solar power satellite. The radiation resistance of fa-Si cells was investigated by the irradiations of 3,4 and 10 MeV protons. The hydrogen gas treatment of the irradiated fa-Si cells was also studied. The fa-Si cell shows high radiation resistance for proton irradiations, compared with a crystalline silicon solar cell. (author)

  6. Physics and technology of amorphous-crystalline heterostructure silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sark, Wilfried G.J.H.M. van [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Copernicus Institute, Science Technology and Society; Roca, Francesco [Unita Tecnologie Portici, Napoli (Italy). ENEA - Agenzia Nazionale per le Nuove Tecnologie, l' Energia e lo Sviluppo Economico Sostenibile; Korte, Lars [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (Germany). Inst. Silizium-Photovoltaik

    2012-07-01

    The challenge of developing photovoltaic (PV) technology to a cost-competitive alternative for established energy sources can be achieved using simple, high-throughput mass-production compatible processes. Issues to be addressed for large scale PV deployment in large power plants or in building integrated applications are enhancing the performance of solar energy systems by increasing solar cell efficiency, using low amounts of materials which are durable, stable, and abundant on earth, and reducing manufacturing and installation cost. Today's solar cell multi-GW market is dominated by crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer technology, however new cell concepts are entering the market. One very promising solar cell design to answer these needs is the silicon hetero-junction solar cell, of which the emitter and back surface field are basically produced by a low temperature growth of ultra-thin layers of amorphous silicon. In this design, amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) constitutes both ''emitter'' and ''base-contact/back surface field'' on both sides of a thin crystalline silicon wafer-base (c-Si) where the photogenerated electrons and holes are generated; at the same time, a Si:H passivates the c-Si surface. Recently, cell efficiencies above 23% have been demonstrated for such solar cells. In this book, the editors present an overview of the state-of-the-art in physics and technology of amorphous-crystalline heterostructure silicon solar cells. (orig.)

  7. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A; Abella, M; Desco, M; Vaquero, J J

    2014-01-20

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions.

  8. Designing, Modeling, Constructing, and Testing a Flat Panel Speaker and Sound Diffuser for a Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, model, build, and test a flat panel speaker and frame for a spherical dome structure being made into a simulator. The simulator will be a test bed for evaluating an immersive environment for human interfaces. This project focused on the loud speakers and a sound diffuser for the dome. The rest of the team worked on an Ambisonics 3D sound system, video projection system, and multi-direction treadmill to create the most realistic scene possible. The main programs utilized in this project, were Pro-E and COMSOL. Pro-E was used for creating detailed figures for the fabrication of a frame that held a flat panel loud speaker. The loud speaker was made from a thin sheet of Plexiglas and 4 acoustic exciters. COMSOL, a multiphysics finite analysis simulator, was used to model and evaluate all stages of the loud speaker, frame, and sound diffuser. Acoustical testing measurements were utilized to create polar plots from the working prototype which were then compared to the COMSOL simulations to select the optimal design for the dome. The final goal of the project was to install the flat panel loud speaker design in addition to a sound diffuser on to the wall of the dome. After running tests in COMSOL on various speaker configurations, including a warped Plexiglas version, the optimal speaker design included a flat piece of Plexiglas with a rounded frame to match the curvature of the dome. Eight of these loud speakers will be mounted into an inch and a half of high performance acoustic insulation, or Thinsulate, that will cover the inside of the dome. The following technical paper discusses these projects and explains the engineering processes used, knowledge gained, and the projected future goals of this project

  9. Integration of flat panel X-ray detector for high resolution diagnostic medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Woo; Yun, Min-Seok; Kim, Yoon-Suk; Oh, Kyung-Min; Shin, Jung-Wook; Nam, Kyung-Tae; Nam, Sang-Hee

    2011-05-01

    In these days, flat panel X-ray image detectors have shown their potential for replacing traditional screen-film systems. To detect the X-ray photon energy, there are two main methods known as a direct method and an indirect method. The X-rays are converted immediately into electrical signal with the direct method. The indirect method has two conversion steps: the scintillator absorbs the X-rays and converts them to visible light. And then the visible light is converted to electrical signal (e.g. by photodiodes). In this work, the flat panel digital X-ray image detector based on direct method with a high atomic number material was designed and evaluated. The high atomic number material for X-ray conversion is deposited by a rubbing method with about 300 μm. The rubbing method is similar to the screen printing method. It consists of two elements: the screen and the squeegee. The method uses a proper stiff bar stretched tightly over a frame made of wood or metal. Proper tension is essential for proper laminated structure. The detector prototype has 139 μm pixel pitch, total 1280×1536 pixels and 86% fill factor. Twelve readout ICs are installed on digital X-ray detector and simultaneously operated to reach short readout time. The electronics integrated: the preamplifier to amplify generated signal, the Analog to Digital converter and the source of bias voltage (1 V/μm). The system board and interface use an NI-camera program. Finally, we achieved images from this flat panel X-ray image detector.

  10. Amorphization of silicon by bombardment with oxygen ions of energy below 5 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukovskii, P.V.; Stel' makh, V.F.; Tkachev, V.D.

    1977-04-01

    Silicon was bombarded with /sup 16/O/sup +/ ions of 1.0 and 3.0 keV energies at room temperature. This bombardment created point defects which joined up to form amorphous layers about 100 A thick. (AIP)

  11. Thermal ideality factor of hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kind, R.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.; Rubinelli, F.A.; Solntsev, S.; Zeman, M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n solar cells is limited, as they contain a relatively high concentration of defects. The dark current voltage (JV) characteristics at low forward voltages of these devices are dominated by recombination processes. The recombination rate

  12. Light Entrapping, Modeling & Effect of Passivation on Amorphous Silicon Based PV Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mostafizur Rahman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This research paper present efforts to enhance the performance of amorphous silicon p-i-n type solar cell using sidewall passivation. For sidewall passivation, MEMS insulation material Al2O3 was used. The main objective of this paper is to observe the effect of sidewall passivation in amorphous silicon solar cell and increase the conversion efficiency of the solar cell. Passivation of Al2O3 is found effective to subdue reverse leakage. It increases the electric potential generated in the designed solar cell. It also increases the current density generated in the solar cell by suppressing the leakage. Enhancement in J-V curve was observed after adding sidewall passivation. The short circuit current density (Jsc increased from 14.7 mA/cm2 to 18.5 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc improved from 0.87 V to 0.89 V, and the fill factor also slightly increased. Due to the sidewall of passivation of Al2O3, conversion efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cell increased by 29.07%. At the end, this research was a success to improve the efficiency of the amorphous silicon solar cell by adding sidewall passivation.

  13. Amorphous Silicon Position Detectors for the Link Alignment System of the CMS Detector: Users Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.

    2007-07-01

    We present the general characteristics, calibration procedures and measured performance of the Amorphous Silicon Position Detectors installed in the Link Alignment System of the CMS Detector for laser beam detection and reconstruction and give the Data Base to be used as a Handbook during CMS operation. (Author) 10 refs.

  14. Photoselective Metal Deposition on Amorphous Silicon p-i-n Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, E.S.; Hamoumi, M.; Kelly, J.J.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    1997-01-01

    A novel method is described for the patternwise metallization of amorphous silicon solar cells, based on photocathodic deposition. The electric field of the p-i-n structure is used for the separation of photogenerated charge carriers. The electrons are driven to the interface of the n+-layer with th

  15. Results from multipoint alignment monitoring using the new generation of amorphous silicon position detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria (IFCA), CSIC-University of Cantabria Santander (Spain)] (and others)

    2008-08-11

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of large sensitive area (28x28 mm{sup 2}) semitransparent amorphous silicon position detector sensors. More than 100 units have been characterized. They show a very high performance. To illustrate a multipoint application, we present results from the monitoring of five sensors placed in a 5.5-m-long light path.

  16. Multipoint alignment monitoring with amorphous silicon position detectors in a complex light path

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A., E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2010-12-01

    This document presents an application of the new generation of amorphous silicon position detecting (ASPD) sensors to multipoint alignment. Twelve units are monitored along a 20 m long laser beam, where the light path is deflected by 90{sup o} using a pentaprism.

  17. Construction process and read-out electronics of amorphous silicon position detectors for multipoint alignment monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, C.; Schubert, M.B.; Lutz, B.; Werner, J.H. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M.G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria IFCA/CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)] (and others)

    2009-09-01

    We describe the construction process of large-area high-performance transparent amorphous silicon position detecting sensors. Details about the characteristics of the associated local electronic board (LEB), specially designed for these sensors, are given. In addition we report on the performance of a multipoint alignment monitoring application of 12 sensors in a 13 m long light path.

  18. Method of forming semiconducting amorphous silicon films from the thermal decomposition of fluorohydridodisilanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1988-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of forming amorphous, photoconductive, and semiconductive silicon films on a substrate by the vapor phase thermal decomposition of a fluorohydridodisilane or a mixture of fluorohydridodisilanes. The invention is useful for the protection of surfaces including electronic devices.

  19. A comparison of degradation in three amorphous silicon PV module technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radue, C.; van Dyk, E.E. [Physics Department, PO Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2010-03-15

    Three commercial amorphous silicon modules manufactured by monolithic integration and consisting of three technology types were analysed in this study. These modules were deployed outdoors for 14 months and underwent degradation. All three modules experienced the typical light-induced degradation (LID) described by the Staebler-Wronski effect, and this was followed by further degradation. A 14 W single junction amorphous silicon module degraded by about 45% of the initial measured maximum power output (P{sub MAX}) at the end of the study. A maximum of 30% of this has been attributed to LID and the further 15% to cell mismatch and cell degradation. The other two modules, a 64 W triple junction amorphous silicon module, and a 68 W flexible triple junction amorphous silicon module, exhibited LID followed by seasonal variation in the degraded P{sub MAX}. The 64 W module showed a maximum degradation in P{sub MAX} of about 22%. This is approximately 4% more than the manufacturer allowed for the initial LID. However, the seasonal variation in P{sub MAX} seems to be centred around the manufacturer's rating ({+-}4%). The 68 W flexible module has shown a maximum decrease in P{sub MAX} of about 27%. This decrease is about 17% greater than the manufacturer allowed for the initial LID. (author)

  20. Amorphous silicon solar cells on natively textured ZnO grown by PECVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.; Groenen, R.; Linden, J.L.; Sanden, M.C.M. van de; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2001-01-01

    Natively textured ZnO layers deposited by the expanding thermal plasma CVD technique between 150 and 350°C at a deposition rate between 0.65 and 0.75 nm/s have been investigated with respect to their suitability as front electrode material for amorphous silicon pin solar cells in comparison to refer

  1. Image blur in a flat-panel detector due to Compton scattering at its internal mountings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bub, A.; Gondrom, S.; Maisl, M.; Uhlmann, N.; Arnold, W.

    2007-05-01

    An image-blurring effect observable in digital x-ray flat-panel pixel detectors, used for x-ray computed tomography or radioscopy, has been studied. Our study indicates that the origin of this blurring effect is the Compton scattered radiation within the entrance window, the mounting of the detector scintillator and other parts of the detector. This effect becomes, in particular, noticeable in the presence of a sharp edge of a metallic component being tested, making the scattering in the detector asymmetric.

  2. Autostereoscopic 3D flat panel display using an LCD-pixel-associated parallax barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, En-guo; Guo, Tai-liang

    2014-05-01

    This letter reports an autostereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) flat panel display system employing a newly designed LCD-pixel-associated parallax barrier (LPB). The barrier's parameters can be conveniently determined by the LCD pixels and can help to greatly simplify the conventional design. The optical system of the proposed 3D display is built and simulated to verify the design. For further experimental demonstration, a 508-mm autostereoscopic 3D display prototype is developed and it presents good stereoscopic images. Experimental results agree well with the simulation, which reveals a strong potential for 3D display applications.

  3. Modelling the structure factors and pair distribution functions of amorphous germanium, silicon and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgic, Seyfettin; Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Baer, Shalom; Silbert, Moises

    2002-12-01

    We present the results of calculations of the static structure factor S(k) and the pair distribution function g(r) of the tetrahedral amorphous semiconductors germanium, silicon and carbon using the structural diffusion model (SDM). The results obtained with the SDM for S(k) and g(r) are of comparable quality with those obtained by the unconstrained Reverse Monte Carlo simulations and existing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for these systems. We have found that g(r) exhibits a small peak, or shoulder, a weak remnant of the prominent third neighbour peak present in the crystalline phase of these systems. This feature has been experimentally found to be present in recently reported high energy X-ray experiments of amorphous silicon (Phys. Rev. B 60 (1999) 13520), as well as in the previous X-ray diffraction of as-evaporated amorphous germanium (Phys. Rev. B 50 (1994) 539)

  4. CW laser induced crystallization of thin amorphous silicon films deposited by EBE and PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Said-Bacar, Z., E-mail: zabardjade@yahoo.fr [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Prathap, P. [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Cayron, C. [CEA, LITEN, DEHT, Minatec, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Cedex 9 (France); Mermet, F. [IREPA LASER, Pole API - Parc d' Innovation, 67400 Illkirch (France); Leroy, Y.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Fogarassy, E. [InESS (UMR 7163 CNRS-UDS), 23 rue de Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of hydrogen in CW laser crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Large hydrogen content results in decohesion of the films due to hydrogen effusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very low hydrogen content or hydrogen free amorphous silicon film are suitable for crystallization induced by CW laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grains of size between 20 and 100 {mu}m in width and about 200 {mu}m in long in scanning direction are obtained with these latter films. - Abstract: This work presents the Continuous Wave (CW) laser crystallization of thin amorphous silicon (a-Si) films deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) and by Electron Beam Evaporation (EBE) on low cost glass substrate. The films are characterized by Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis (ERDA) and by Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to evaluate the hydrogen content. Analysis shows that the PECVD films contain a high hydrogen concentration ({approx}10 at.%) while the EBE films are almost hydrogen-free. It is found that the hydrogen is in a bonding configuration with the a-Si network and in a free form, requiring a long thermal annealing for exodiffusion before the laser treatment to avoid explosive effusion. The CW laser crystallization process of the amorphous silicon films was operated in liquid phase regime. We show by Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) that polysilicon films with large grains can be obtained with EBE as well as for the PECVD amorphous silicon provided that for the latest the hydrogen content is lower than 2 at.%.

  5. Crystalline-Amorphous Core−Shell Silicon Nanowires for High Capacity and High Current Battery Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng

    2009-01-14

    Silicon is an attractive alloy-type anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its highest known capacity (4200 mAh/g). However silicon\\'s large volume change upon lithium insertion and extraction, which causes pulverization and capacity fading, has limited its applications. Designing nanoscale hierarchical structures is a novel approach to address the issues associated with the large volume changes. In this letter, we introduce a core-shell design of silicon nanowires for highpower and long-life lithium battery electrodes. Silicon crystalline- amorphous core-shell nanowires were grown directly on stainless steel current collectors by a simple one-step synthesis. Amorphous Si shells instead of crystalline Si cores can be selected to be electrochemically active due to the difference of their lithiation potentials. Therefore, crystalline Si cores function as a stable mechanical support and an efficient electrical conducting pathway while amorphous shells store Li ions. We demonstrate here that these core-shell nanowires have high charge storage capacity (̃1000 mAh/g, 3 times of carbon) with ̃90% capacity retention over 100 cycles. They also show excellent electrochemical performance at high rate charging and discharging (6.8 A/g, ̃20 times of carbon at 1 h rate). © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  6. Amorphous Silicon Carbide Passivating Layers to Enable Higher Processing Temperature in Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Mathieu [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Holman, Zachary [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-04-06

    "Very efficient crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells have been demonstrated when thin layers of intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) are used for passivation and carrier selectivity in a heterojunction device. One limitation of this device structure is the (parasitic) absorption in the front passivation/collection a-Si:H layers; another is the degradation of the a-Si:H-based passivation upon temperature, limiting the post-processes to approximately 200°C thus restricting the contacting possibilities and potential tandem device fabrication. To alleviate these two limitations, we explore the potential of amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), a widely studied material in use in standard a-Si:H thin-film solar cells, which is known for its wider bandgap, increased hydrogen content and stronger hydrogen bonding compared to a-Si:H. We study the surface passivation of solar-grade textured n-type c-Si wafers for symmetrical stacks of 10-nm-thick intrinsic a-SiC:H with various carbon content followed by either p-doped or n-doped a-Si:H (referred to as i/p or i/n stacks). For both doping types, passivation (assessed through carrier lifetime measurements) is degraded by increasing the carbon content in the intrinsic a-SiC:H layer. Yet, this hierarchy is reversed after annealing at 350°C or more due to drastic passivation improvements upon annealing when an a-SiC:H layer is used. After annealing at 350°C, lifetimes of 0.4 ms and 2.0 ms are reported for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, when using an intrinsic a-SiC:H layer with approximately 10% of carbon (initial lifetimes of 0.3 ms and 0.1 ms, respectively, corresponding to a 30% and 20-fold increase, respectively). For stacks of pure a-Si:H material the lifetimes degrade from 1.2 ms and 2.0 ms for i/p and i/n stacks, respectively, to less than 0.1 ms and 1.1 ms (12-fold and 2-fold decrease, respectively). For complete solar cells using pure a-Si:H i/p and i/n stacks, the open-circuit voltage (Voc

  7. AMORPHOUS SILICON ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE MODELING AND BASIC ELECTRO-PHYSICAL PARAMETERS CALCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Golodenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The amorphous semiconductor has any unique processing characteristics and it is perspective material for electronic engineering. However, we have not authentic information about they atomic structure and it is essential knot for execution calculation they electronic states and electro physical properties. The author's methods give to us decision such problem. This method allowed to calculation the amorphous silicon modeling cluster atomics Cartesian coordinates, determined spectrum and density its electronic states and calculation the basics electro physical properties of the modeling cluster. At that determined numerical means of the energy gap, energy Fermi, electron concentration inside valence and conduction band for modeling cluster. The find results provides real ability for purposeful control to type and amorphous semiconductor charge carriers concentration and else provides relation between atomic construction and other amorphous substance physical properties, for example, heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility and other thermodynamic sizes.

  8. Sub-amorphous thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline silicon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Matthew C; Kwon, Soonshin; Hu, Ming; Poulikakos, Dimos; Xiang, Jie; Chen, Renkun

    2015-04-08

    Thermal transport behavior in nanostructures has become increasingly important for understanding and designing next generation electronic and energy devices. This has fueled vibrant research targeting both the causes and ability to induce extraordinary reductions of thermal conductivity in crystalline materials, which has predominantly been achieved by understanding that the phonon mean free path (MFP) is limited by the characteristic size of crystalline nanostructures, known as the boundary scattering or Casimir limit. Herein, by using a highly sensitive measurement system, we show that crystalline Si (c-Si) nanotubes (NTs) with shell thickness as thin as ∼5 nm exhibit a low thermal conductivity of ∼1.1 W m(-1) K(-1). Importantly, this value is lower than the apparent boundary scattering limit and is even about 30% lower than the measured value for amorphous Si (a-Si) NTs with similar geometries. This finding diverges from the prevailing general notion that amorphous materials represent the lower limit of thermal transport but can be explained by the strong elastic softening effect observed in the c-Si NTs, measured as a 6-fold reduction in Young's modulus compared to bulk Si and nearly half that of the a-Si NTs. These results illustrate the potent prospect of employing the elastic softening effect to engineer lower than amorphous, or subamorphous, thermal conductivity in ultrathin crystalline nanostructures.

  9. Perfusion analysis using a wide coverage flat-panel volume CT: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Klotz, E.; Schmidt, B.; Flohr, T.

    2007-03-01

    We developed a Flat-panel detector based Volume CT (VCT) prototype scanner with large z-coverage. In that prototype scanner a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector was mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions) which provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at isocenter. The large volume covered in one rotation can be used for visualization of complete organs of small animals, e.g. rabbits. By implementing a mode with continuous scanning, we are able to reconstruct the complete volume at any point in time during the propagation of a contrast bolus. Multiple volumetric reconstructions over time elucidate the first pass dynamics of a bolus of contrast resulting in 4-D angiography and potentially allowing whole organ perfusion analysis. We studied to which extent pixel based permeability and blood volume calculation with a modified Patlak approach was possible. Experimental validation was performed by imaging evolution of contrast bolus in New Zealand rabbits. Despite the short circulation time of a rabbit, the temporal resolution was sufficient to visually resolve various phases of the first pass of the contrast bolus. Perfusion imaging required substantial spatial smoothing but allowed a qualitative discrimination of different types of parenchyma in brain and liver. If a true quantitative analysis is possible, requires further studies.

  10. An iterative algorithm for soft tissue reconstruction from truncated flat panel projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, D.; Claus, B.; Edic, P.; Vaillant, R.; De Man, B.; Basu, S.; Iatrou, M.

    2006-03-01

    The capabilities of flat panel interventional x-ray systems continue to expand, enabling a broader array of medical applications to be performed in a minimally invasive manner. Although CT is providing pre-operative 3D information, there is a need for 3D imaging of low contrast soft tissue during interventions in a number of areas including neurology, cardiac electro-physiology, and oncology. Unlike CT systems, interventional angiographic x-ray systems provide real-time large field of view 2D imaging, patient access, and flexible gantry positioning enabling interventional procedures. However, relative to CT, these C-arm flat panel systems have additional technical challenges in 3D soft tissue imaging including slower rotation speed, gantry vibration, reduced lateral patient field of view (FOV), and increased scatter. The reduced patient FOV often results in significant data truncation. Reconstruction of truncated (incomplete) data is known an "interior problem", and it is mathematically impossible to obtain an exact reconstruction. Nevertheless, it is an important problem in 3D imaging on a C-arm to address the need to generate a 3D reconstruction representative of the object being imaged with minimal artifacts. In this work we investigate the application of an iterative Maximum Likelihood Transmission (MLTR) algorithm to truncated data. We also consider truncated data with limited views for cardiac imaging where the views are gated by the electrocardiogram(ECG) to combat motion artifacts.

  11. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun, E-mail: stscjun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Ziping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Microelectronics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  12. Evaluation of stent visibility by flat panel detector CT in patients treated for intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarencon, Frederic [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Piotin, Michel; Pistocchi, Silvia; Blanc, Raphael [Fondation A. de Rothschild, Paris (France); Babic, Drazenko [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the visibility of stents using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) acquisitions acquired with flat panel detector (XperCT, Allura series, Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands) for endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. On a 24-month period, 48 patients endovascularly treated by coiling and stenting (59 stents) for intracranial aneurysms were explored by flat panel detector CT technique. A sequence of 620 2D images was acquired over an angle of 240 using a 1,024 x 1,024 pixel matrix detector within a 48-cm field of view. The images were retrospectively analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists. Evaluation criteria were percentage of visualization of the stents and stent deployment (kinking or unsatisfactory deployment of the stent). Evaluation of the stent was feasible for all the patients. Stent visibility by XperCT was overall estimated at 76% of the stent length. Difficulties to analyze the stents were related to coil artifacts but not to packing density or aneurysm location. Stent length visualization was higher when the acquisition was performed before additional coiling (P < 0.0001). Mild kinking/misdeployment was noticed in 22% of the cases. XperCT technique provides multiplanar and 3D reconstructions that allows for a satisfying visualization of intracranial stents. This CT-like acquisition should be performed after the stent deployment and before coiling, in order to obtain better stent visualization. (orig.)

  13. View-dependent geometric calibration for offset flat-panel cone beam computed tomography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang

    2016-04-01

    Geometric parameters that define the geometry of imaging systems are crucial for image reconstruction and image quality in x-ray computed tomography (CT). The problem of determining geometric parameters for an offset flat-panel cone beam CT (CBCT) system, a recently introduced modality with a large field of view, with the assumption of an unstable mechanism and geometric parameters that vary in each view, is considered. To accurately and rapidly find the geometric parameters for each projection view, we use the projection matrix method and design a dedicated phantom that is partially visible in all projection views. The phantom consists of balls distributed symmetrically in a cylinder to ensure the inclusion of the phantom in all views, and a large portion of the phantom is covered in the projection image. To efficiently use calibrated geometric information in the reconstruction process and get rid of approximation errors, instead of decomposing the projection matrix into actual geometric parameters that are manually corrected before being used in reconstruction, as in conventional methods, we directly use the projection matrix and its pseudo-inverse in projection and backprojection operations of reconstruction algorithms. The experiments illustrate the efficacy of the proposed method with a real offset flat-panel CBCT system in dental imaging.

  14. A Comparison of Photo-Induced Hysteresis Between Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous IGZO Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Cho, Won-Ju; Chung, Hong-Bay; Koo, Sang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    We investigate photo-induced instability in thin-film transistors (TFTs) consisting of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) as active semiconducting layers by comparing with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). An a-IGZO TFT exhibits a large hysteresis window in the illuminated measuring condition but no hysteresis window in the dark condition. On the contrary, a large hysteresis window measured in the dark condition in a-Si:H was not observed in the illuminated condition. Even though such materials possess the structure of amorphous phase, optical responses or photo instability in TFTs looks different from each other. Photo-induced hysteresis results from initially trapped charges at the interface between semiconductor and dielectric films or in the gate dielectric which possess absorption energy to interact with deep trap-states and affect the movement of Fermi energy level. In order to support our claim, we also perform CV characteristics in photo-induced hysteresis and demonstrate thermal-activated hysteresis. We believe that this work can provide important information to understand different material systems for optical engineering which includes charge transport and band transition.

  15. AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents: physics of flat-panel fluoroscopy systems: Survey of modern fluoroscopy imaging: flat-panel detectors versus image intensifiers and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickoloff, Edward Lee

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the design and operation of both flat-panel detector (FPD) and image intensifier fluoroscopy systems. The different components of each imaging chain and their functions are explained and compared. FPD systems have multiple advantages such as a smaller size, extended dynamic range, no spatial distortion, and greater stability. However, FPD systems typically have the same spatial resolution for all fields of view (FOVs) and are prone to ghosting. Image intensifier systems have better spatial resolution with the use of smaller FOVs (magnification modes) and tend to be less expensive. However, the spatial resolution of image intensifier systems is limited by the television system to which they are coupled. Moreover, image intensifier systems are degraded by glare, vignetting, spatial distortions, and defocusing effects. FPD systems do not have these problems. Some recent innovations to fluoroscopy systems include automated filtration, pulsed fluoroscopy, automatic positioning, dose-area product meters, and improved automatic dose rate control programs. Operator-selectable features may affect both the patient radiation dose and image quality; these selectable features include dose level setting, the FOV employed, fluoroscopic pulse rates, geometric factors, display software settings, and methods to reduce the imaging time.

  16. Reactive Infiltration of Silicon Melt Through Microporous Amorphous Carbon Preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsuwan, P.; Tewari, S. N.; Gatica, J. E.; Singh, M.; Dickerson, R.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of unidirectional capillary infiltration of silicon melt into microporous carbon preforms have been investigated as a function of the pore morphology and melt temperature. The infiltrated specimens showed alternating bands of dark and bright regions, which corresponded to the unreacted free carbon and free silicon regions, respectively. The decrease in the infiltration front velocity for increasing infiltration distances, is in qualitative agreement with the closed-form solution of capillarity driven fluid flow through constant cross section cylindrical pores. However, drastic changes in the thermal response and infiltration front morphologies were observed for minute differences in the preforms microstructure. This suggests the need for a dynamic percolation model that would account for the exothermic nature of the silicon-carbon chemical reaction and the associated pore closing phenomenon.

  17. Unusually High and Anisotropic Thermal Conductivity in Amorphous Silicon Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soonshin; Zheng, Jianlin; Wingert, Matthew C; Cui, Shuang; Chen, Renkun

    2017-02-02

    Amorphous Si (a-Si) nanostructures are ubiquitous in numerous electronic and optoelectronic devices. Amorphous materials are considered to possess the lower limit to the thermal conductivity (κ), which is ∼1 W·m(-1) K(-1) for a-Si. However, recent work suggested that κ of micrometer-thick a-Si films can be greater than 3 W·m(-1) K(-1), which is contributed to by propagating vibrational modes, referred to as "propagons". However, precise determination of κ in a-Si has been elusive. Here, we used structures of a-Si nanotubes and suspended a-Si films that enabled precise in-plane thermal conductivity (κ∥) measurement within a wide thickness range of 5 nm to 1.7 μm. We showed unexpectedly high κ∥ in a-Si nanostructures, reaching ∼3.0 and 5.3 W·m(-1) K(-1) at ∼100 nm and 1.7 μm, respectively. Furthermore, the measured κ∥ is significantly higher than the cross-plane κ on the same films. This unusually high and anisotropic thermal conductivity in the amorphous Si nanostructure manifests the surprisingly broad propagon mean free path distribution, which is found to range from 10 nm to 10 μm, in the disordered and atomically isotropic structure. This result provides an unambiguous answer to the century-old problem regarding mean free path distribution of propagons and also sheds light on the design and performance of numerous a-Si based electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  18. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Da; Kunz, Thomas [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wolf, Nadine [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Energy Efficiency, Am Galgenberg 87, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Liebig, Jan Philipp [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wittmann, Stephan; Ahmad, Taimoor; Hessmann, Maik T.; Auer, Richard [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Göken, Mathias [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-29

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm{sup 2} aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance.

  19. In situ probing of surface hydrides on hydrogenated amorphous silicon using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Kessels, W M M; Sanden, M C M; Aydil, E S

    2002-01-01

    An in situ method based on attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) is presented for detecting surface silicon hydrides on plasma deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films and for determining their surface concentrations. Surface silicon hydrides are desorbed by exposing the a-Si:H films to low energy ions from a low density Ar plasma and by comparing the infrared spectrum before and after this low energy ion bombardment, the absorptions by surface hydrides can sensitively be separated from absorptions by bulk hydrides incorporated into the film. An experimental comparison with other methods that utilize isotope exchange of the surface hydrogen with deuterium showed good agreement and the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods are discussed. Furthermore, the determination of the composition of the surface hydrogen bondings on the basis of the literature data on hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces is presented, and quantification of the h...

  20. Innovative Characterization of Amorphous and Thin-Film Silicon for Improved Module Performance: 1 February 2005 - 31 July 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P. C.; Williams, G. A.

    2009-09-01

    Electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance was done on amorphous silicon samples (modules with a-Si:H and a-SixGe1-x:H intrinsic layer) to study defects that contribute to Staebler-Wronski effect.

  1. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation of amorphous silicon to increase the temperature processing window of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianwei; Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2016-07-01

    The dehydrogenation of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) at temperatures above approximately 300 °C degrades its ability to passivate silicon wafer surfaces. This limits the temperature of post-passivation processing steps during the fabrication of advanced silicon heterojunction or silicon-based tandem solar cells. We demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma can rehydrogenate intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layers that have been dehydrogenated by annealing. The hydrogen plasma treatment fully restores the effective carrier lifetime to several milliseconds in textured crystalline silicon wafers coated with 8-nm-thick intrinsic a-Si:H layers after annealing at temperatures of up to 450 °C. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation also translates to complete solar cells: A silicon heterojunction solar cell subjected to annealing at 450 °C (following intrinsic a-Si:H deposition) had an open-circuit voltage of less than 600 mV, but an identical cell that received hydrogen plasma treatment reached a voltage of over 710 mV and an efficiency of over 19%.

  2. Picosecond all-optical switching in hydrogenated amorphous silicon microring resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Pelc, Jason S; Vo, Sonny; Santori, Charles; Fattal, David A; Beausoleil, Raymond G

    2014-01-01

    We utilize cross-phase modulation to observe all-optical switching in microring resonators fabricated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Using 2.7-ps pulses from a mode-locked fiber laser in the telecom C-band, we observe optical switching of a cw telecom-band probe with full-width at half-maximum switching times of 14.8 ps, using approximately 720 fJ of energy deposited in the microring. In comparison with telecom-band optical switching in crystalline silicon microrings, a-Si:H exhibits substantially higher switching speeds due to reduced impact of free-carrier processes.

  3. A fast method to diagnose phase transition from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU; GuoFu

    2007-01-01

    A series of hydrogenated silicon thin films were prepared by the radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method (RF-PECVD) with various silane concentrations. The influence of silane concentration on structural and electrical characteristics of these films was investigated to study the phase transition region from amorphous to microcrystalline phase. At the same time, optical emission spectra (OES) from the plasma during the deposition process were monitored to get information about the plasma properties, Raman spectra were measured to study the structural characteristics of the deposited films. The combinatorial analysis of OES and Raman spectra results demonstrated that the OES can be used as a fast method to diagnose phase transition from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon. At last the physical mechanism, why both OES and Raman can be used to diagnose the phase transition, was analyzed theoretically.……

  4. Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Films with Embedded Nanocrystals for Thermal Detectors with Very High Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Calleja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have optimized the deposition conditions of amorphous silicon-germanium films with embedded nanocrystals in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD reactor, working at a standard frequency of 13.56 MHz. The objective was to produce films with very large Temperature Coefficient of Resistance (TCR, which is a signature of the sensitivity in thermal detectors (microbolometers. Morphological, electrical, and optical characterization were performed in the films, and we found optimal conditions for obtaining films with very high values of thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR = 7.9% K−1. Our results show that amorphous silicon-germanium films with embedded nanocrystals can be used as thermosensitive films in high performance infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs used in commercial thermal cameras.

  5. Modeling the Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Thin Films Using a High Repetition Rate Scanning Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Černý

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimum design of experimental setup for the preparation of polycrystalline silicon (pc-Si films from amorphous layers applicable in the solar cell production is analyzed in the paper. In the computational simulations, the influence of basic characteristic parameters of the experimental procedure on the mechanisms of pc-Si lateral growth is studied. Among these parameters, the energy density of the applied laser and the thickness of the amorphous silicon (a-Si layer are identified as the most significant. As an optimum solution, the mechanism of pc-Si growth consisting in repeated melting of a part of already crystallized pc-Si layer by the scanning laser is proposed.

  6. Highly efficient ultrathin-film amorphous silicon solar cells on top of imprinted periodic nanodot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Wensheng, E-mail: yws118@gmail.com; Gu, Min, E-mail: mgu@swin.edu.au [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Tao, Zhikuo [College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Ong, Thiam Min Brian [Plasma Sources and Application Center, NIE, Nanyang Technological University, 1 Nanyang Walk, Singapore 637616 (Singapore); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    The addressing of the light absorption and conversion efficiency is critical to the ultrathin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. We systematically investigate ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with a 100 nm absorber on top of imprinted hexagonal nanodot arrays. Experimental evidences are demonstrated for not only notable silver nanodot arrays but also lower-cost ITO and Al:ZnO nanodot arrays. The measured external quantum efficiency is explained by the simulation results. The J{sub sc} values are 12.1, 13.0, and 14.3 mA/cm{sup 2} and efficiencies are 6.6%, 7.5%, and 8.3% for ITO, Al:ZnO, and silver nanodot arrays, respectively. Simulated optical absorption distribution shows high light trapping within amorphous silicon layer.

  7. An alternative system for mycotoxin detection based on amorphous silicon sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, D.; de Cesare, G.; De Rossi, P.; Fanelli, C.; Nascetti, A.; Ricelli, A.; Scipinotti, R.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we investigate, for the first time, the performances of a system based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon photosensors for the detection of Ochratoxin A. The sensor is a n-type/intrinsic/p-type amorphous silicon stacked structure deposited on a glass substrate. The mycotoxin is deposited on a thin layer chromatographic plate and aligned with the sensor. An ultraviolet radiation excites the ochratoxin A, whose fluorescence produces a photocurrent in the sensor. The photocurrent value is proportional to the deposited mycotoxin quantity. An excellent linearity of the detector response over more than two orders of magnitude of ochratoxin A amount is observed. The minimum detected mycotoxin quantity is equal to 0.1ng, suggesting that the presented detection system could be a good candidate to perform rapid and analytical ochratoxin A analysis in different kind of samples.

  8. Low Cost Amorphous Silicon Intrinsic Layer for Thin-Film Tandem Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-In Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors propose a methodology to improve both the deposition rate and SiH4 consumption during the deposition of the amorphous silicon intrinsic layer of the a-Si/μc-Si tandem solar cells prepared on Gen 5 glass substrate. It was found that the most important issue is to find out the saturation point of deposition rate which guarantees saturated utilization of the sourcing gas. It was also found that amorphous silicon intrinsic layers with the same k value will result in the same degradation of the fabricated modules. Furthermore, it was found that we could significantly reduce the production cost of the a-Si/μc-Si tandem solar cells prepared on Gen 5 glass substrate by fine-tuning the process parameters.

  9. Development of laser-fired contacts for amorphous silicon layers obtained by Hot-Wire CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, D. [XaRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)], E-mail: delfina@eel.upc.edu; Voz, C.; Blanque, S. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Ibarz, D.; Bertomeu, J. [XaRMAE-Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain); Alcubilla, R. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Grup de Recerca en Micro i Nanotecnologies, Jordi Girona 1-3, Barcelona 08034 (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    In this work we study aluminium laser-fired contacts for intrinsic amorphous silicon layers deposited by Hot-Wire CVD. This structure could be used as an alternative low temperature back contact for rear passivated heterojunction solar cells. An infrared Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) has been used to locally fire the aluminium through the thin amorphous silicon layers. Under optimized laser firing parameters, very low specific contact resistances ({rho}{sub c} {approx} 10 m{omega} cm{sup 2}) have been obtained on 2.8 {omega} cm p-type c-Si wafers. This investigation focuses on maintaining the passivation quality of the interface without an excessive increase in the series resistance of the device.

  10. The role of hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide buffer layer on improving the performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium single-junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sritharathikhun, Jaran; Inthisang, Sorapong; Krajangsang, Taweewat; Krudtad, Patipan; Jaroensathainchok, Suttinan; Hongsingtong, Aswin; Limmanee, Amornrat; Sriprapha, Kobsak

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (a-Si1-xOx:H) film was used as a buffer layer at the p-layer (μc-Si1-xOx:H)/i-layer (a-Si1-xGex:H) interface for a narrow band gap hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium (a-Si1-xGex:H) single-junction solar cell. The a-Si1-xOx:H film was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) at 40 MHz in a same processing chamber as depositing the p-type layer. An optimization of the thickness of the a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layer and the CO2/SiH4 ratio was performed in the fabrication of the a-Si1-xGex:H single junction solar cells. By using the wide band gap a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layer with optimum thickness and CO2/SiH4 ratio, the solar cells showed an improvement in the open-circuit voltage (Voc), fill factor (FF), and short circuit current density (Jsc), compared with the solar cells fabricated using the conventional a-Si:H buffer layer. The experimental results indicated the excellent potential of the wide-gap a-Si1-xOx:H buffer layers for narrow band gap a-Si1-xGex:H single junction solar cells.

  11. A typical flat-panel membrane bioreactor with a composite membrane for sulfur removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Xiao, Yuan; Song, Jimin; Miao, Junhe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a concrete study to understand the effects of operation on biofilm morphology and microstructure and degradation efficiency for the disposal of sulfur dioxide produced by coal-fired power plants. For this purpose, a flat-panel reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a composite membrane consisting of a dense layer and a support layer was designed; the membrane bioreactors inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were further conducted for the removal of sulfur dioxide. Dry weight, active biomass, pressure drop, removal efficiency, morphology and structure of the formed biofilms were investigated and analyzed over period of biofilm formation. The results found that the dry weight, biomass, pressure drops and removal efficiency increased rapidly during biofilm formation, remained relatively stable in the stabilization period of biofilm growth, and finally reached 0.085 g, 7.00 μg, 180 Pa, and 78%, respectively. Our results suggested the MBR is available for flue-gas desulfurization.

  12. Comparison of flat-panel detector and image-intensifier detector for cone-beam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Rika; Konno, Yasutaka; Ueda, Ken; Ikeda, Shigeyuki

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated a flat-panel detector (FPD) (scintillator screen and a-Si photo-sensor array) for use in a cone-beam computed tomography (CT) detector and compared it with an image-intensifier detector (IID). The FPD cone-beam CT system has a higher spatial resolution than the IID system. At equal pixel sizes, the standard deviation of noise intensity of the FPD system is equal to that of the IID system. However, the circuit noise of the FPD must be reduced, especially at low doses. Our evaluations show that the FPD system has a strong potential for use as a cone-beam CT detector because of high-spatial resolution.

  13. Electronic transport in mixed-phase hydrogenated amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienkes, Lee Raymond

    Interest in mixed-phase silicon thin film materials, composed of an amorphous semiconductor matrix in which nanocrystalline inclusions are embedded, stems in part from potential technological applications, including photovoltaic and thin film transistor technologies. Conventional mixed-phase silicon films are produced in a single plasma reactor, where the conditions of the plasma must be precisely tuned, limiting the ability to adjust the film and nanoparticle parameters independently. The films presented in this thesis are deposited using a novel dual-plasma co-deposition approach in which the nanoparticles are produced separately in an upstream reactor and then injected into a secondary reactor where an amorphous silicon film is being grown. The degree of crystallinity and grain sizes of the films are evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction respectively. I describe detailed electronic measurements which reveal three distinct conduction mechanisms in n-type doped mixed-phase amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films over a range of nanocrystallite concentrations and temperatures, covering the transition from fully amorphous to ~30% nanocrystalline. As the temperature is varied from 470 to 10 K, we observe activated conduction, multiphonon hopping (MPH) and Mott variable range hopping (VRH) as the nanocrystal content is increased. The transition from MPH to Mott-VRH hopping around 100K is ascribed to the freeze out of the phonon modes. A conduction model involving the parallel contributions of these three distinct conduction mechanisms is shown to describe both the conductivity and the reduced activation energy data to a high accuracy. Additional support is provided by measurements of thermal equilibration effects and noise spectroscopy, both done above room temperature (>300 K). This thesis provides a clear link between measurement and theory in these complex materials.

  14. Results on photon and neutron irradiation of semitransparent amorphous-silicon sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Carabe, J; Ferrando, A; Fuentes, J; Gandia, J J; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Molinero, A; Oller, J C; Arce, P; Calvo, E; Figueroa, C F; García, N; Matorras, F; Rodrigo, T; Vila, I; Virto, A L; Fenyvesi, A; Molnár, J; Sohler, D

    2000-01-01

    Semitransparent amorphous-silicon sensors are basic elements for laser 2D position reconstruction in the CMS multipoint alignment link system. Some of the sensors have to work in a very hard radiation environment. Two different sensor types have been irradiated with /sup 60/Co photons (up to 100 kGy) and fast neutrons (up to 10/sup 15 / cm/sup -2/), and the subsequent change in their performance has been measured. (13 refs).

  15. First Measurements of the Performance of New Semitransparent Amorphous Silicon Sensor Prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Calvo, E.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.

    2004-07-01

    We present first results on the performance of a new generation of semitransparent amorphous silicon position detectors having good properties such as an intrinsic position resolution better than 5{mu}m, an spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 {mu}m, deflection angles smaller than 10{mu}rad and transmission in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition the sensitive area is very large: 30x30 cm''3. (Author) 10 refs.

  16. Tandem solar cells made from amorphous silicon and polymer bulk heterojunction sub-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Heum; Shin, Insoo; Kim, Kwang Ho; Street, Robert; Roy, Anshuman; Heeger, Alan J

    2015-01-14

    A tandem solar cell based on a combination of an amorphous silicon (a-Si) and polymer solar cell (PSC) is demonstrated. As these tandem devices can be readily fabricated by low-cost methods, they require only a minor increase in the total manufacturing cost. Therefore, a combination of a-Si and PSC provides a compelling solution to reduce the cost of electricity produced by photovoltaics.

  17. Magneto-optical switch with amorphous silicon waveguides on magneto-optical garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Eiichi; Miura, Kengo; Shoji, Yuya; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2016-08-01

    We fabricated a magneto-optical (MO) switch with a hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguide on an MO garnet. The switch is composed of a 2 × 2 Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). The switch state is controlled by an MO phase shift through a magnetic field generated by a current flowing in an electrode located on the MZI. The switching operation was successfully demonstrated with an extinction ratio of 11.7 dB at a wavelength of 1550 nm.

  18. Improved stability of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon photosensitivity by ultraviolet illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branz, Howard M.; Xu, Yueqin; Heck, Stephan; Gao, Wei

    2002-10-01

    Postdeposition ultraviolet (UV) illumination, followed by etching, improves the stability of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon thin films against subsequent light-induced degradation of photosensitivity. The etch removes a heavily damaged layer extending about 100 nm below the surface, but beneath the damage, the UV has improved the stability of 200 to 300 nm of bulk film. The open-circuit voltage of Schottky solar cells is also stabilized by UV-etch treatment. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  19. 2H-SiC Dendritic Nanocrystals In Situ Formation from Amorphous Silicon Carbide under Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Under electron beam irradiation, the in-situ formation of 2H-SiC dentritic nanocrystals from amorphous silicon carbide at room temperature was observed. The homogenous transition mainly occurs at the thin edge and on the surface of specimen where the energy obtained from electron beam irradiation is high enough to cause the amorphous crystallizing into 2H-SiC.

  20. Combination of CT scanning and fluoroscopy imaging on a flat-panel CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasruck, M.; Gupta, R.; Reichardt, B.; Suess, Ch.; Schmidt, B.; Stierstorfer, K.; Popescu, S.; Brady, T.; Flohr, T.

    2006-03-01

    We developed and evaluated a prototype flat-panel detector based Volume CT (fpVCT) scanner. The fpVCT scanner consists of a Varian 4030CB a-Si flat-panel detector mounted in a multi slice CT-gantry (Siemens Medical Solutions). It provides a 25 cm field of view with 18 cm z-coverage at the isocenter. In addition to the standard tomographic scanning, fpVCT allows two new scan modes: (1) fluoroscopic imaging from any arbitrary rotation angle, and (2) continuous, time-resolved tomographic scanning of a dynamically changing viewing volume. Fluoroscopic imaging is feasible by modifying the standard CT gantry so that the imaging chain can be oriented along any user-selected rotation angle. Scanning with a stationary gantry, after it has been oriented, is equivalent to a conventional fluoroscopic examination. This scan mode enables combined use of high-resolution tomography and real-time fluoroscopy with a clinically usable field of view in the z direction. The second scan mode allows continuous observation of a timeevolving process such as perfusion. The gantry can be continuously rotated for up to 80 sec, with the rotation time ranging from 3 to 20 sec, to gather projection images of a dynamic process. The projection data, that provides a temporal log of the viewing volume, is then converted into multiple image stacks that capture the temporal evolution of a dynamic process. Studies using phantoms, ex vivo specimens, and live animals have confirmed that these new scanning modes are clinically usable and offer a unique view of the anatomy and physiology that heretofore has not been feasible using static CT scanning. At the current level of image quality and temporal resolution, several clinical applications such a dynamic angiography, tumor enhancement pattern and vascularity studies, organ perfusion, and interventional applications are in reach.

  1. Modelling of scintillator based flat-panel detectors with Monte-Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reims, N.; Sukowski, F.; Uhlmann, N.

    2011-01-01

    Scintillator based flat panel detectors are state of the art in the field of industrial X-ray imaging applications. Choosing the proper system and setup parameters for the vast range of different applications can be a time consuming task, especially when developing new detector systems. Since the system behaviour cannot always be foreseen easily, Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are keys to gain further knowledge of system components and their behaviour for different imaging conditions. In this work we used two Monte-Carlo based models to examine an indirect converting flat panel detector, specifically the Hamamatsu C9312SK. We focused on the signal generation in the scintillation layer and its influence on the spatial resolution of the whole system. The models differ significantly in their level of complexity. The first model gives a global description of the detector based on different parameters characterizing the spatial resolution. With relatively small effort a simulation model can be developed which equates the real detector regarding signal transfer. The second model allows a more detailed insight of the system. It is based on the well established cascade theory, i.e. describing the detector as a cascade of elemental gain and scattering stages, which represent the built in components and their signal transfer behaviour. In comparison to the first model the influence of single components especially the important light spread behaviour in the scintillator can be analysed in a more differentiated way. Although the implementation of the second model is more time consuming both models have in common that a relatively small amount of system manufacturer parameters are needed. The results of both models were in good agreement with the measured parameters of the real system.

  2. The structure and physical properties of paracrystalline atomistic models of amorphous silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, P. M.; Zotov, N.; Nakhmanson, S. M.; Drabold, D. A.; Gibson, J. M.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Keblinski, P.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. Bayreuth; Ohio Univ.; NEC Research Inst.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst.

    2001-11-01

    We have examined the structure and physical properties of paracrystalline molecular dynamics models of amorphous silicon. Simulations from these models show qualitative agreement with the results of recent mesoscale fluctuation electron microscopy experiments on amorphous silicon and germanium. Such agreement is not found in simulations from continuous random network models. The paracrystalline models consist of topologically crystalline grains which are strongly strained and a disordered matrix between them. We present extensive structural and topological characterization of the medium range order present in the paracrystalline models and examine their physical properties, such as the vibrational density of states, Raman spectra, and electron density of states. We show by direct simulation that the ratio of the transverse acoustic mode to transverse optical mode intensities I{sub TA}/I{sub TO} in the vibrational density of states and the Raman spectrum can provide a measure of medium range order. In general, we conclude that the current paracrystalline models are a good qualitative representation of the paracrystalline structures observed in the experiment and thus provide guidelines toward understanding structure and properties of medium-range-ordered structures of amorphous semiconductors as well as other amorphous materials.

  3. The influence of liquid crystal display monitors on observer performance for the detection of interstitial lung markings on both storage phosphor and flat-panel-detector chest radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Yon Mi [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Hospital, 1198, Guwol-dong, Namdong-gu, Incheon 405-760 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myung Jin [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mj1.chung@samsung.com; Lee, Kyung Soo [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50, Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Bong-Keun [Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To compare observer performance with a flat-panel liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor and with a high-resolution gray-scale cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor in the detection of interstitial lung markings using a silicon flat-panel-detector direct radiography (DR) and storage phosphor computed radiography (CR) in a clinical setting. Materials and methods: We displayed 39 sets of posteroanterior chest radiographs from the patients who were suspected of interstitial lung disease. Each sets consisted of DR, CR and thin-section CT as the reference standard. Image identities were masked, randomly sorted, and displayed on both five mega pixel (2048 x 2560 x 8 bits) LCD and CRT monitors. Ten radiologists independently rated their confidence in detection for the presence of linear opacities in the four fields of the lungs; right upper, left upper, right lower, and left lower quadrant. Performance of a total 6240 (39 sets x 2 detector systems x 2 monitor system x 4 fields x 10 observers) observations was analyzed by multi-reader multi-case receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Differences between monitor systems in combinations of detector systems were compared using ANOVA and paired-samples t-test. Results: Area under curves (AUC) for the presence of linear opacities measured by ROC analysis was higher on the LCDs than CRTs without statistical significance (p = 0.082). AUC was significantly higher on the DR systems than CR systems (p = 0.006). AUC was significantly higher on the LCDs than CRTs for DR systems (p = 0.039) but not different for CR systems (p = 0.301). Conclusion: In clinical conditions, performance of the LCD monitor appears to be better for detecting interstitial lung markings when interfaced with DR systems.

  4. Deposition and characterization of amorphous silicon with embedded nanocrystals and microcrystalline silicon for thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, R., E-mail: rambrosi@uacj.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, UACJ, C.J., Chihuahua (Mexico); Moreno, M.; Torres, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Carrillo, A. [Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, UACJ, C.J., Chihuahua (Mexico); Vivaldo, I.; Cosme, I. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, INAOE, Puebla (Mexico); Heredia, A. [Universidad Popular Autónoma del Estado de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Nanostructured silicon thin films were deposited by PECVD. • Polymorphous and microcrystalline were obtained varying the pressure and power. • Structural and optoelectronics properties were studied. • The σ{sub dark} changed by 5 order of magnitude under illumination, V{sub d} was at 2.5 A/s. • The evidence of embedded nanocrystals into the amorphous matrix was investigated. - Abstract: Amorphous silicon thin films with embedded nanocrystals and microcrystalline silicon were deposited by the standard Radio Frequency (RF) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) technique, from SiH{sub 4}, H{sub 2}, Ar gas mixture at substrate temperature of 200 °C. Two series of films were produced varying deposition parameters as chamber pressure and RF power density. The chemical bonding in the films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, where it was observed a correlation between the hydrogen content and the morphological and electrical properties in the films. Electrical and optical parameters were extracted in both series of films, as room temperature conductivity (σ{sub RT}), activation energy (E{sub a}), and optical band gap (E{sub g}). As well, structural analysis in the films was performed by Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), which gives an indication of the films crystallinity. The photoconductivity changed in a range of 2 and 6 orders of magnitude from dark to AM 1.5 illumination conditions, which is of interest for thin film solar cells applications.

  5. Raman study of localized recrystallization of amorphous silicon induced by laser beam

    KAUST Repository

    Tabet, Nouar A.

    2012-06-01

    The adoption of amorphous silicon based solar cells has been drastically hindered by the low efficiency of these devices, which is mainly due to a low hole mobility. It has been shown that using both crystallized and amorphous silicon layers in solar cells leads to an enhancement of the device performance. In this study the crystallization of a-Si prepared by PECVD under various growth conditions has been investigated. The growth stresses in the films are determined by measuring the curvature change of the silicon substrate before and after film deposition. Localized crystallization is induced by exposing a-Si films to focused 532 nm laser beam of power ranging from 0.08 to 8 mW. The crystallization process is monitored by recording the Raman spectra after various exposures. The results suggest that growth stresses in the films affect the minimum laser power (threshold power). In addition, a detailed analysis of the width and position of the Raman signal indicates that the silicon grains in the crystallized regions are of few nm diameter. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. Bandgap and Carrier Transport Engineering of Quantum Confined Mixed Phase Nanocrystalline/Amorphous Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Tianyuan; Klafehn, Grant; Kendrick, Chito; Theingi, San; Airuoyo, Idemudia; Lusk, Mark T.; Stradins, Paul; Taylor, Craig; Collins, Reuben T.

    2016-11-21

    Mixed phase nanocrystalline/amorphous-silicon (nc/a-Si:H) thin films with band-gap higher than bulk silicon are prepared by depositing silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs), prepared in a separate deposition zone, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), simultaneously. Since the two deposition phases are well decoupled, optimized parameters for each component can apply to the growth process. Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) shows that the embedded SiNPs are small enough to exhibit quantum confinement effects. The low temperature PL measurements on the mixed phase reveal a dominant emission feature, which is associated with SiNPs surrounded by a-Si:H. In addition, we compare time dependent low temperature PL measurements for both a-Si:H and mixed phase material under intensive laser exposure for various times up to two hours. The PL intensity of a-Si:H with embedded SiNPs degrades much less than that of pure a-Si:H. We propose this improvement of photostability occurs because carriers generated in the a-Si:H matrix quickly transfer into SiNPs and recombine there instead of recombining in a-Si:H and creating defect states (Staebler-Wronski Effect).

  7. Effect of Ion Bombardment on the Growth and Properties of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon-Germanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Jérôme; Takeda, Yoshihiko; Hirano, Naoto; Matsuura, Hideharu; Matsuda, Akihisa

    1989-01-01

    We report a systematic investigation of the effect of ion bombardment during the growth of amorphous silicon-germanium alloy films from silane and germane rf-glow discharge. Independent control of the plasma and the ion flux and energy is obtained by using a triode configuration. The ion contribution to the total deposition rate can reach 20% on negatively biased substrates. Although the Si and Ge composition of the film does not depend on the ion flux and energy, the optical, structural and electronic properties are drastically modified at low deposition temperatures when the maximum ion energy increases up to 50 eV, and remain constant above 50 eV. For a Ge atomic concentration of 37% and a temperature of 135°C, the optical gap decreases from 1.67 to 1.45 eV. This is correlated with a modification of hydrogen bonding configurations. Silicon dihydride sites disappear and preferential attachment of hydrogen to silicon is reduced in favour of germanium. Moreover the photoconductivity increases which shows that ion bombardment is a key parameter to optimize the quality of low band gap amorphous silicon-germanium alloys.

  8. Application of the Monte Carlo method to analyze materials used in flat panel detectors to obtain X-ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Sergio; Pozuelo, Fausto; Querol, Andrea; Ródenas, José; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2014-06-01

    An accurate knowledge of the photon spectra emitted by X-ray tubes in radiodiagnostic is essential to better estimate the imparted dose to patients and to improve the quality image obtained with these devices. In this work, it is proposed the use of a flat panel detector together with a PMMA wedge to estimate the actual X-ray spectrum using the Monte Carlo method and unfolding techniques. The MCNP5 code has been used to model different flat panels (based on indirect and direct methods to produce charge carriers from absorbed X-rays) and to obtain the dose curves and system response functions. Most of the actual flat panel devices use scintillator materials that present K-edge discontinuities in the mass energy-absorption coefficient, which strongly affect the response matrix. In this paper, the applicability of different flat panels for reconstructing X-ray spectra is studied. The effect of the mass energy-absorption coefficient of the scintillator material has been studied on the response matrix and consequently, in the reconstructed spectra. Different unfolding methods are tested to reconstruct the actual X-ray spectrum knowing the dose curve and the response function. It has been concluded that the regularization method MTSVD is appropriate to unfold X-ray spectra in all the scintillators studied.

  9. Accelerated growth from amorphous clusters to metallic nanoparticles observed in electrochemical deposition of platinum within nanopores of porous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Noval, Alvaro; Fukami, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Akira; Gallach, Dario; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Portale, Giuseppe; Kitada, Atsushi; Murase, Kuniaki; Abe, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the formation of amorphous platinum (Pt) clusters in nanopores of porous silicon at an initial stage of pore filling. The time dependency of the chemical state and local structure of Pt in the nanoporous silicon were characterized by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (

  10. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soo Y

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approaches is based on the sinogram processing also known as the pre-processing techniques and the other category of techniques perform processing on the 2-D reconstructed images, recognized as the post-processing techniques in the literature. The strength and weakness of these categories of approaches are yet to be explored from a common platform. Method In this paper, a comparative study of the two categories of ring artifact reduction techniques basically designed for the multi-slice CT instruments is presented from a common platform. For comparison, two representative algorithms from each of the two categories are selected from the published literature. A very recently reported state-of-the-art sinogram domain ring artifact correction method that classifies the ring artifacts according to their strength and then corrects the artifacts using class adaptive correction schemes is also included in this comparative study. The first sinogram domain correction method uses a wavelet based technique to detect the corrupted pixels and then using a simple linear interpolation technique estimates the responses of the bad pixels. The second sinogram based correction method performs all the filtering operations in the transform domain, i.e., in the wavelet and Fourier domain. On the other hand, the two post-processing based correction techniques actually operate on the polar transform domain of the reconstructed CT images. The first method extracts the ring artifact template

  11. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  12. Low-mobility solar cells: a device physics primer with application to amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse University, New York (United States). Department of Physics

    2003-07-01

    The properties of pin solar cells based on photogeneration of charge carriers into low-mobility materials were calculated for two models. Ideal p- and n-type electrode layers were assumed in both cases. The first, elementary case involves only band mobilities and direct electron-hole recombination. An analytical approximation indicates that the power in thick cells rises as the 1/4 power of the lower band mobility, which reflects the buildup of space-charge under illumination. The approximation agrees well with computer simulation. The second model includes exponential bandtail trapping, which is commonly invoked to account for very low hole drift mobilities in amorphous silicon and other amorphous semiconductors. The two models have similar qualitative behavior. Predictions for the solar conversion efficiency of amorphous silicon-based cells that are limited by valence bandtail trapping are presented. The predictions account adequately for the efficiencies of present a-Si : H cells in their 'as-prepared' state (without light-soaking), and indicate the improvement that may be expected if hole drift mobilities (and valence bandtail widths) can be improved. (author)

  13. Silicon and aluminum doping effects on the microstructure and properties of polymeric amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: lxq_suse@sina.com [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Xie, Yuntao [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of nanostructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were firstly studied. • Si doping enhanced polymerization of the hydrocarbon chains and Al doping resulted in increase in the ordered carbon clusters of polymeric amorphous carbon films. • Soft polymeric amorphous carbon films exhibited an unconventional frictional behaviors with a superior wear resistance. • The mechanical and vacuum tribological properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were significantly improved by Si and Al co-doping. - Abstract: Polymeric amorphous carbon films were prepared by radio frequency (R.F. 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering deposition. The microstructure evolution of the deposited polymeric films induced by silicon (Si) and aluminum(Al) doping were scrutinized through infrared spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparative results show that Si doping can enhance polymerization and Al doping results in an increase in the ordered carbon clusters. Si and Al co-doping into polymeric films leads to the formation of an unusual dual nanostructure consisting of cross-linked polymer-like hydrocarbon chains and fullerene-like carbon clusters. The super-high elasticity and super-low friction coefficients (<0.002) under a high vacuum were obtained through Si and Al co-doping into the films. Unconventionally, the co-doped polymeric films exhibited a superior wear resistance even though they were very soft. The relationship between the microstructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films with different elements doping are also discussed in detail.

  14. Investigation of time-resolved proton radiography using x-ray flat-panel imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, K.-W.; Zhang, R.; Bentefour, E. H.; Doolan, P. J.; Cascio, E.; Sharp, G.; Flanz, J.; Lu, H.-M.

    2017-03-01

    Proton beam therapy benefits from the Bragg peak and delivers highly conformal dose distributions. However, the location of the end-of-range is subject to uncertainties related to the accuracy of the relative proton stopping power estimates and thereby the water-equivalent path length (WEPL) along the beam. To remedy the range uncertainty, an in vivo measurement of the WEPL through the patient, i.e. a proton-range radiograph, is highly desirable. Towards that goal, we have explored a novel method of proton radiography based on the time-resolved dose measured by a flat panel imager (FPI). A 226 MeV pencil beam and a custom-designed range modulator wheel (MW) were used to create a time-varying broad beam. The proton imaging technique used exploits this time dependency by looking at the dose rate at the imager as a function of time. This dose rate function (DRF) has a unique time-varying dose pattern at each depth of penetration. A relatively slow rotation of the MW (0.2 revolutions per second) and a fast image acquisition (30 frames per second, ~33 ms sampling) provided a sufficient temporal resolution for each DRF. Along with the high output of the CsI:Tl scintillator, imaging with pixel binning (2  ×  2) generated high signal-to-noise data at a very low radiation dose (~0.1 cGy). Proton radiographs of a head phantom and a Gammex CT calibration phantom were taken with various configurations. The results of the phantom measurements show that the FPI can generate low noise and high spatial resolution proton radiographs. The WEPL values of the CT tissue surrogate inserts show that the measured relative stopping powers are accurate to ~2%. The panel did not show any noticeable radiation damage after the accumulative dose of approximately 3831 cGy. In summary, we have successfully demonstrated a highly practical method of generating proton radiography using an x-ray flat panel imager.

  15. Research and development of photovoltaic power system. Interface studies of amorphous silicon; Taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. Amorphous silicon kaimen no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konagai, M. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the result obtained during fiscal 1994 on research on interface of amorphous silicon for solar cells. In research on amorphous solar cells using ZnO for transparent electrically conductive films, considerations were given on a growth mechanism of a ZnO film using the MOCVD process. It was made clear that the ZnO film grows with Zn(OH)2 working as a film forming species. It was also shown that the larger the ZnO particle size is, the more the solar cell efficiency is improved. Furthermore, theoretical elucidation was made on effects of rear face of an interface on cell characteristics, and experimental discussions were given subsequently. In research on solar cells using hydrogen diluted `i` layers, delta-doped solar cells were fabricated based on basic data obtained in the previous fiscal year, and the hydrogen dilution effect was evaluated from the cell characteristics. When the hydrogen dilution ratio is increased from zero to one, the conversion efficiency has improved from 12.2% to 12.6%. In addition, experiments and discussions were given on solar cells fabricated by using SiH2Cl2. 9 figs.

  16. Absorption enhancement in amorphous silicon thin films via plasmonic resonances in nickel silicide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachtel, Jordan; Shen, Xiao; Pantelides, Sokrates; Sachan, Ritesh; Gonzalez, Carlos; Dyck, Ondrej; Fu, Shaofang; Kalnayaraman, Ramki; Rack, Phillip; Duscher, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Silicon is a near ideal material for photovoltaics due to its low cost, abundance, and well documented optical properties. The sole detriment of Si in photovoltaics is poor absorption in the infrared. Nanoparticle surface plasmon resonances are predicted to increase absorption by scattering to angles greater than the critical angle for total internal reflection (16° for a Si/air interface), trapping the light in the film. Experiments confirm that nickel silicide nanoparticles embedded in amorphous silicon increases absorption significantly in the infrared. However, it remains to be seen if electron-hole pair generation is increased in the solar cell, or whether the light is absorbed by the nanoparticles themselves. The nature of the absorption is explored by a study of the surface plasmon resonances through electron energy loss spectrometry and scanning transmission electron microscopy experiments, as well as first principles density functional theory calculations. Initial experimental results do not show strong plasmon resonances on the nanoparticle surfaces. Calculations of the optical properties of the nickel silicide particles in amorphous silicon are performed to understand why this resonance is suppressed. Work supported by NSF EPS 1004083 (TN-SCORE).

  17. Band offsets at the crystalline / hydrogenated amorphous silicon interface from first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazrati, Ebrahim; Jarolimek, Karol; de Wijs, Gilles A.; InstituteMolecules; Materials Team

    2015-03-01

    The heterojunction formed between crystalline silicon (c-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a key component of a new type of high-efficiency silicon solar cell. Since a-Si:H has a larger band gap than c-Si, band offsets are formed at the interface. A band offset at the minority carrier band will mitigate recombination and lead to an increased efficiency. Experimental values of band offsets scatter in a broad range. However, a recent meta-analysis of the results (W. van Sark et al.pp. 405, Springer 2012) gives a larger valence offset (0.40 eV) than the conduction offset (0.15 eV). In light of the conflicting reports our goal is to calculate the band offsets at the c-Si/a-Si:H interface from first-principles. We have prepared several atomistic models of the interface. The crystalline part is terminated with (111) surfaces on both sides. The amorphous structure is generated by simulating an annealing process at 1100 K, with DFT molecular dynamics. Once the atomistic is ready it can be used to calculate the electronic structure of the interface. Our preliminary results show that the valence offset is larger than the conduction band offset.

  18. Crystallization of amorphous silicon by self-propagation of nanoengineered thermites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Maruf; Subramanian, Senthil; Bhattacharya, Shantanu; Gao, Yuanfang; Apperson, Steve; Shende, Rajesh; Guha, Suchi; Arif, Mohammad; Bai, Mengjun; Gangopadhyay, Keshab; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2007-03-01

    Crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin film occurred by the self-propagation of copper oxide/aluminum thermite nanocomposites. Amorphous Si films were prepared on glass at a temperature of 250°C by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The platinum heater was patterned on the edge of the substrate and the CuO /Al nanoengineered thermite was spin coated on the substrate that connects the heater and the a-Si film. A voltage source was used to ignite the thermites followed by a piranha solution (4:1 of H2SO4:H2O2) etch for the removal of residual products of thermite reaction. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm the crystallization of a-Si.

  19. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O' Sullivan, Andrew W. [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Catherall, David [Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63103 (United States); Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Tai, Yuan-Chuan, E-mail: taiy@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2015-09-11

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm{sup 3} with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm{sup 2}. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with {sup 68}Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  20. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O`Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  1. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O’Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC’s active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module’s mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/−0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules. PMID:26085702

  2. Potential Applications of Flat-Panel Volumetric CT in Morphologic, Functional Small Animal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Greschus

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic, preclinical research for monitoring disease progression, therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model, the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion, tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  3. Flat panel CT following stapes prosthesis insertion: an experimental and clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaoui, K. [University-Hospital Heidelberg, Ludwig-Karls-University Heidelberg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kromeier, J. [St.-Josefs-Hospital, RkK, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Neudert, M.; Zahnert, T. [University-Hospital Dresden, Technical-University Dresden, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Boedeker, C.C.; Laszig, R.; Offergeld, C. [University-Hospital Freiburg, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Anatomical information of the middle and inner ear is becoming increasingly important in post-operative evaluation especially after stapesplasty with unsuccessful improvement of the air-bone gap (ABG). So far computed tomography (CT) has been the first choice for detection of reasons for recurrent hearing loss. CT has the disadvantage of metal-induced artefacts after insertion of middle ear implants and of a relatively high irradiation dose. Flat panel CT (fpCT) was performed in three temporal bone specimen after experimental insertion of different stapes prostheses, aiming to validate the accuracy of fpCT of the middle and inner ear. Additionally, 28 consecutive patients, supplied with different stapes prostheses underwent post-operative fpCT to compare the pre- and post-operative hearing results with the determined prosthesis position in the middle and inner ear. In all cases, fpCT showed a statistically significant correlation between hearing improvement and prosthesis position. This technique provided detailed post-operative information of the implant position in patients and temporal bone specimen. The new imaging technique of fpCT allows the immediate and almost artefact-free evaluation of surgical results following stapesplasty. Further benefits are a lower irradiation dose and higher isovolumetric resolution compared with standard CT. (orig.)

  4. Clinical investigation of flat panel CT following middle ear reconstruction: a study of 107 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaoui, K. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Ruprecht Karls University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kromeier, J. [St. Josefs Hospital, RkK, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Neudert, M.; Beleites, T.; Zahnert, T. [University Hospital Dresden, Technical University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Laszig, R.; Offergeld, C. [University Hospital Freiburg, Albert Ludwigs University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    After middle ear reconstruction using partial or total ossicular replacement prostheses (PORP/TORP), an air-bone gap (ABG) may persist because of prosthesis displacement or malposition. So far, CT of the temporal bone has played the main role in the diagnosis of reasons for postoperative insufficient ABG improvement. Recent experimental and clinical studies have evaluated flat panel CT (fpCT) as an alternative imaging technique that provides images with high isovolumetric resolution, fewer metal-induced artefacts and lower irradiation doses. One hundred and seven consecutive patients with chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma underwent reconstruction by PORP (n = 52) or TORP (n = 55). All subjects underwent preoperative and postoperative audiometric testing and postoperative fpCT. Statistical evaluation of all 107 patients as well as the sole sub-assembly groups (PORP or TORP) showed a highly significant correlation between hearing improvement and fpCT-determined prosthesis position. FpCT enables detailed postoperative information on patients with middle ear reconstruction. FpCT is a new imaging technique that provides immediate feedback on surgical results after reconstructive middle ear surgery. Specific parameters evaluated by fpCT may serve as a predictive tool for estimated postoperative hearing improvement. Therefore this imaging technique is suitable for postoperative quality control in reconstructive middle ear surgery. (orig.)

  5. MTF compensation for digital radiography system with indirect conversion flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Souchay, Henri; Yang, Chao

    2009-02-01

    The MTF (modulation transfer function) of digital radiography systems can be enhanced in the spatial frequency domain due to their high signal to noise ratio. A Wiener filter, which requires prior estimation of the noise and signal power spectrum of the images, was used to compensate MTF of the detector and thereby optimally restore the images details. We studied the noise characteristics of two flat panel detectors with structured columnar scintillator (CsI) and granular scintillator (Gd2O2S). A noise model formulating noise transfer process was applied to estimate the noise components for the filter. Signal model was based on dose of the application. We revisited the noise and signal model that was used in previous work by Souchay et al. for mammography application [1], considering the difference in detector characteristics and the applications (extremity x-ray) that we are specifically investigating. Starting with real clinical images, we used an observer study method to measure the visually optimal parameter for the Wiener filter. A set of clinical images was used to evaluate the radiologists' preferences to compensated images against the reference images. Statistical results from three experienced radiologists ranking results show that the compensated images are preferred over the reference images.

  6. An Output Channel Nonuniformity Compensation Driving Method in Flat Panel Display Driving Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Ahn, Soon-Sung; Kwon, Christine H.; Kim, Seon-Yung; Lee, Jae-Sic; Choi, Byong-Deok

    2006-12-01

    Modern flat panel displays, including thin-film transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCDs) and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), pursue more and more natural color expression. This requires the data driving system should produce very fine and accurate signal voltages or currents. Especially, the uniformity among channels of a driving system is critically important because the color or luminance differences among columns are easily noticeable. We propose a simple and efficient driving method for solving the artifacts caused by the existing nonuniformity among channels of a driving system, and confirms its impact by simulations using C-programming. The nonuniformity among channels mostly stem from the random offset of the output circuits of a driving system, which in turn is caused by the process variations. The proposed driving method shares N-output circuits between N-output channels such that the existing offsets of the channels are averaged out. Thus, the output signal error due to the offsets spreads out among the channels, improving the uniformity between the channels.

  7. Practical expressions describing detective quantum efficiency in flat-panel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. K.

    2011-11-01

    In radiology, image quality excellence is a balance between system performance and patient dose, hence x-ray systems must be designed to ensure the maximum image quality is obtained for the lowest consistent dose. The concept of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used to quantify, understand, measure, and predict the performance of x-ray detectors and imaging systems. Cascaded linear-systems theory can be used to estimate DQE based on the system design parameters and this theoretical DQE can be utilized for determining the impact of various physical processes, such as secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, reabsorption noise, and others. However, the prediction of DQE usually requires tremendous efforts to determine each parameter consisting of the cascaded linear-systems model. In this paper, practical DQE formalisms assessing both the photoconductor- and scintillator-based flat-panel detectors under quantum-noise-limited operation are described. The developed formalisms are experimentally validated and discussed for their limits. The formalisms described in this paper would be helpful for the rapid prediction of the DQE performances of developing systems as well as the optimal design of systems.

  8. [C-MOS flat-panel sensor for real time X-ray imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, K; Aoki, Y; Sasaki, Y; Akanuma, A; Mizuno, S

    1998-02-01

    Flat-panel, self-scanning, solid state diagnostic x-ray imaging devices using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (C-MOS) arrays are under investigation. A unit device with a 5 cm by 5 cm sensor area was developed and tested. The device consists of a CsI scintillator and C-MOS detector arrays. The detector arrays are composed of a regular arrangement of pixels (256 x 256), each of which is made of a C-MOS photodiode sensor coupled to a C-MOS FET (field effect transistor). A common FET gate line is connected to all the FET gates along each column. A common date line is connected to all the FET drains of each row. The source contact of each FET is connected to that of its corresponding photodiode. A positive gate pulse applied to a gate turns on all FETs connected to the date lines. The readout continues column by column. Correlated double sampling circuits and an offset variance compensation circuit were installed to reduce noise. A sampling speed of 15 frames per second and spatial resolution of 2.5 line per mm were achieved. Noise level and maximum signal were 1.5 mV rms and 1.8 V, respectively. Image quality was considered acceptable for clinical use. It is also discussed how to fabricate a large area sensor with the unit device.

  9. Reliability of myocardial perfusion quantification in angiography using a digital flat panel cardiac system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Muriel; Vaillant, Regis; Gavit-Houdant, Laurence; Lienard, Jean; Benali, Karim

    2002-04-01

    Discordance between lesion severity from angiocardiography and physiological effects has been reported elsewhere. Quantification of myocardial perfusion during the angiography procedure may supply additional information about short- and long-term outcomes and may be helpful for clinical decision making. In previous works, myocardial perfusion has been assessed using time density curves (TDC), which represent the contrast medium dilution over time in the myocardium. The mean transit time (MTT), derived from the TDC, has been reported as a good indicator of the regional myocardial perfusion. Our objective is to estimate the accuracy and reproducibility of MTT estimation on digital flat panel (DFP) images. We have simulated typical myocardium TDC obtained with a DFP cardiac system (Innova 2000, GE), taking into account scatter and noise. Logarithmic or linear subtractions have been applied to derive a contrast medium concentration proportional quantity from image intensity. A non-linear minimisation realises the model curve fitting. MTT estimates are more stable with linear subtraction in presence of scatter. However logarithmic subtraction presents smaller bias when scatter level is small. Both approaches are equally sensible to image noise. Linear subtraction should be preferred. Image noise has a high influence on MTT accuracy and we may reduce.

  10. Continuous production of diatom Entomoneis sp. in mechanically stirred tank and flat-panel airlift photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viriyayingsiri, Thunyaporn; Sittplangkoon, Pantaporn; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Nootong, Kasidit

    2016-10-02

    Continuous production of diatom Entomonies sp. was performed in mechanically stirred tank and flat-panel airlift photobioreactors (FPAP). The maximum specific growth rate of diatom from the batch experiment was 0.98 d(-1). A series of dilution rate and macronutrient concentration adjustments were performed in a stirred tank photobioreactor and found that the dilution rate ranged from 0.7 to 0.8 d(-1) and modified F/2 growth media containing nitrate at 3.09 mg N/L, phosphate at 2.24 mg P/L, and silicate at 11.91 mg Si/L yielded the maximum cell number density. Finally, the continuous cultivation of Entomonies sp. was conducted in FPAP using the optimal conditions determined earlier, resulting in the maximum cell number density of 19.69 × 10(4) cells/mL, which was approximately 47 and 73% increase from the result using the stirred tank photobioreactor fed with modified and standard F/2 growth media, respectively.

  11. Astaxanthin induction in Microalga H. pluvialis with flat panel airlift photobioreactors under indoor and outdoor conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonkum, Woradej; Powtongsook, Sorawit; Pavasant, Prasert

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin was induced from Haematococcus pluvialis (NIES-144) under indoor and outdoor conditions using 17-, 50-, and 90-L flat-panel airlift photobioreactors (FP-APBRs). Preliminary experiments in 1.5-L bubble column photobioreactors (BC-PBRs) revealed that sterilized clean water with 3% CO2 aeration (1.47 cm(3) s(-1) CO2 loading) could best encourage astaxanthin accumulation at 18.21 g m(-3) (3.63% by weight). Operating 17-L FP-APBRs with these bubble column parameters under indoor conditions could further enhance astaxanthin to 26.63 g m(-3) (5.34% by weight). This was potentially due to the inherited up-lift force from the reactor that helped avoid cell precipitation by allowing the cells to be circulated within the reactor. In addition, the various sizes of FP-APBRs exhibited similar performance, implying a potential scale-up opportunity. However, similar operation under outdoor condition exhibited slightly poorer performance due to the light inhibition effect. The best outdoor performance was obtained with the FP-APBR covered with one layer of shading net, where 20.11 g m(-3) (4.47% by weight) of astaxanthin was resulted.

  12. Effect of oblique X-ray incidence in flat-panel computed tomography of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo; Kyprianou, Iacovos S; Freed, Melanie; Jennings, Robert J; Sempau, Josep

    2009-05-01

    We quantify the variation in resolution due to anisotropy caused by oblique X-ray incidence in indirect flat-panel detectors for computed tomography breast imaging systems. We consider a geometry and detector type utilized in breast computed tomography (CT) systems currently being developed. Our methods rely on mantis, a combined X-ray, electron, and optical Monte Carlo transport open source code. The physics models are the most accurate available in general-purpose Monte Carlo packages in the diagnostic energy range. We consider maximum-obliquity angles of 10 ( degrees ) and 13 ( degrees ) at the centers of the 30 and 40 cm detector edges, respectively, and 16 ( degrees ) at the corner of the detector. Our results indicate that blur is asymmetric and that the resolution properties vary significantly with the angle (or location) of incidence. Our results suggest that the asymmetry can be as high as a factor of 2.6 between orthogonal directions. Anisotropy maps predicted by mantis provide an understanding of the effect that such variations have on the imaging system and allow more accurate modeling and optimization of breast CT systems. These maps of anisotropy across the detector could lead to improved reconstruction and help motivate physics-based strategies for computer detection of breast lesions.

  13. Optimizing the tube potential for lumbar spine radiography with a flat-panel digital detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, H; Norrman, E; Persliden, J

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the optimal settings for lumbar spine radiography with a flat-panel detector. A CDRAD contrast-detail phantom was imaged at various tube potentials, system speeds and filtration settings. Factorial experiments yielded a range of optimized exposure settings, which were submitted to visual grading analysis with images of an Alderson phantom. The first optimized settings involved a system speed increase from 400 to 800. For anteroposterior projection, the optimal tube potential was reduced from the default of 77 kV to 60 kV to give the best image quality without increasing the effective dose, or to 66 kV to give the lowest dose without reducing image quality. For lateral projection, the tube potential was similarly reduced from the default of 90 kV to 70 kV or 77 kV. Visual grading analysis confirmed the results, with significantly better image quality when optimizing for image quality. The study thus shows that the tube potential can be reduced as long as the system speed is increased simultaneously. This leads to a lower effective dose and/or increased image quality depending on the settings chosen. The factorial experiments provided a powerful way to evaluate several parameters concomitantly.

  14. Dual-Energy Subtraction Imaging for Diagnosing Vocal Cord Paralysis with Flat Panel Detector Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machida, Haruhiko; Yoda, Keiko; Arai, Yasuko [Tokyo Women' s Medical University Medical Center East, Tokyo (Japan)] (and others)

    2010-06-15

    To investigate the clinical feasibility of dual energy subtraction (DES) imaging to improve the delineation of the vocal cord and diagnostic accuracy of vocal cord paralysis as compared with the anterior-posterior view of flat panel detector (FPD) neck radiography. For 122 consecutive patients who underwent both a flexible laryngoscopy and conventional/DES FPD radiography, three blinded readers retrospectively graded the radiographs during phonation and inspiration on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) for the delineation of the vocal cord, and in consensus, reviewed the diagnostic accuracy of vocal cord paralysis employing the laryngoscopy as the reference. We compared vocal cord delineation scores and accuracy of vocal cord paralysis diagnosis by both conventional and DES techniques using ({kappa}statistics and assessing the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Vocal cord delineation scores by DES (mean, 4.2 {+-} 0.4) were significantly higher than those by conventional imaging (mean, 3.3 {+-} 0.5) (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for diagnosing vocal cord paralysis by the conventional technique was 25%, whereas the specificity was 94%. Sensitivity by DES was 75%, whereas the specificity was 96%. The diagnostic accuracy by DES was significantly superior (({kappa}= 0.60, AUC = 0.909) to that by conventional technique ({kappa}= 0.18, AUC = 0.852) (p = 0.038). Dual energy subtraction is a superior method compared to the conventional FPD radiography for delineating the vocal cord and accurately diagnosing vocal cord paralysis.

  15. Near-field optical study of 3rd order nonlinear properties of amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Jin; Park, J.H.; Kim, M.R.; Jhe, Won Ho [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, B.K. [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    The 3rd order nonlinear properties show optical bleaching (Saturation) and Reverse saturation in absorption aspect, whereas self-focusing and self-defocusing in refraction aspect. Optical bleaching and self-focusing phenomena of those properties in particular can be useful to make the optical beam spot size smaller for application on the higher optical storage density. In this experiment, amorphous silicon layer is used to investigate the effect of 3rd order nonlinear material(1) on the spot size. The amorphous silicon (A-Si) layer is deposited by the method of PECVD on the corning 1737 fusion glass and its thickness is 300 nm. Two experiments are carried out in this work. One is the far-field Z-Scan and the other is the near-field Z-scan where the laser beam spot is scanned by NSOM in the near field region of the material. The former is for investigating the general 3rd order nonlinear properties of amorphous silicon and the latter is for measuring the change of the beam spot size directly. The far-field Z-scan shows Reverse saturation (Im{chi}{sup (3)} {approx} 8 X 10{sup -3} esu) and self-focusing (Re{chi}{sup (3)} {approx} 2 X 10{sup -2} esu) properties for the A-Si layer. In the second experiment, we present the change the beam spot size as a function of the input beam intensity for the A-Si layer. As a result, we find that the stronger the input beam intensity is, the smaller a beam spot size is obtained for A-Si layer. (author)

  16. Fabrication and Modeling of Ambipolar Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-08-01

    that over 150 die can be fabricated on a single 2in Si wafer. Individual die are 4 -- ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - -- rM M- ri- PA NX RA "’K Kno ’--tx...Kusian, and B. Bullemer, "An Ambipolar Amorphous- Silicon Field-Effect Transistor," Siemens Forsch.-u. Entwickl.-Ber., vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 114-119...1985. 99. H. Pfleiderer, W. Kusian, and B. Bullemer, "An Ambipolar Field-Effect Transistor Model," Siemens Forsch.-u. Entwicki.-Ber., vol. 14, no. 2, pp

  17. Amorphous Silicon Solar cells with a Core-Shell Nanograting Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, L; Okuno, Y; He, S

    2011-01-01

    We systematically investigate the optical behaviors of an amorphous silicon solar cell based on a core-shell nanograting structure. The horizontally propagating Bloch waves and Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) waves lead to significant absorption enhancements and consequently short-circuit current enhancements of this structure, compared with the conventional planar one. The perpendicular carrier collection makes this structure optically thick and electronically thin. An optimal design is achieved through full-field numerical simulation, and physical explanation is given. Our numerical results show that this configuration has ultrabroadband, omnidirectional and polarization-insensitive responses, and has a great potential in photovoltaics.

  18. Thin metal layer as transparent electrode in n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theuring Martin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, transparent electrodes, based on a thin silver film and a capping layer, are investigated. Low deposition temperature, flexibility and low material costs are the advantages of this type of electrode. Their applicability in structured n-i-p amorphous silicon solar cells is demonstrated in simulation and experiment. The influence of the individual layer thicknesses on the solar cell performance is discussed and approaches for further improvements are given. For the silver film/capping layer electrode, a higher solar cell efficiency could be achieved compared to a reference ZnO:Al front contact.

  19. Review of amorphous silicon based particle detectors: the quest for single particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrsch, N.; Ballif, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is attractive for radiation detectors because of its radiation resistance and processability over large areas with mature Si microfabrication techniques. While the use of a-Si:H for medical imaging has been very successful, the development of detectors for particle tracking and minimum-ionizing-particle detection has lagged, with almost no practical implementation. This paper reviews the development of various types of a-Si:H-based detectors and discusses their respective achievements and limitations. It also presents more recent developments of detectors that could potentially achieve single particle detection and be integrated in a monolithic fashion into a variety of applications.

  20. Stability of amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Aiga, M.; Otsubo, M.

    1987-06-25

    Results on reliability test for amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells and modules are described. It has been found that, for a-SiGe:H pin cells, reduction of the stress in the film is of first importance for stability. Application of low-temperature-deposited microcrystalline p-layer for each sub cell and of thinner i-layers for the middle and the bottom cells improves stability of triple-junction cells, by enhancing the electric field in the i-layers.

  1. Large-size high-performance transparent amorphous silicon sensors for laser beam position detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Martinez-Rivero, C. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Matorras, F. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Rodrigo, T. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Sobron, M. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Vila, I. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain); Alberdi, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Arce, P. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Barcala, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.es; Josa, M.I. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Luque, J.M. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Molinero, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Navarrete, J. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Oller, J.C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Koehler, C. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Lutz, B. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Schubert, M.B. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany); Werner, J.H. [Steinbeis-Transferzentrum fuer Angewandte Photovoltaik und Duennschichttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparent amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30x30mm{sup 2}) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20mA/W), an intrinsic position resolution better than 3{mu}m, a spatial-point reconstruction precision better than 10{mu}m, deflection angles smaller than 10{mu}rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%.

  2. Large Size High Performance Transparent Amorphous Silicon Sensors for Laser Beam Position Detection and Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon, A.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto; Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Luque, J. M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Kohler, C.; Lutz, B.; Schubert, M. B.

    2006-09-04

    We present the measured performance of a new generation of semitransparente amorphous silicon position detectors. They have a large sensitive area (30 x 30 mm2) and show good properties such as a high response (about 20 mA/W), an intinsic position resolution better than 3 m, a spatial point reconstruction precision better than 10 m, deflection angles smaller than 10 rad and a transmission power in the visible and NIR higher than 70%. In addition, multipoint alignment monitoring, using up to five sensors lined along a light path of about 5 meters, can be achieved with a resolution better than 20m. (Author)

  3. Defects left after regrowth of amorphous silicon on crystalline Si : C (V) and DLTS studies

    OpenAIRE

    Castaing, J.; Cass, T.

    1985-01-01

    n and p-type silicon have been self-ion implanted at 77 K with multi-energetic beams. This process was used to amorphize a 0.4 μm layer with a minimum amount of damage in the underlying crystal. After regrowth by a 550 °C anneal, the remaining defects were assessed by capacitance-voltage (C(V )) measurements and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). In n-type Si, a buried layer of deep donors in large concentration was found, whereas in p-type Si, their concentration was small. These trap...

  4. Novel photochemical vapor deposition reactor for amorphous silicon solar cell deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Richard E.; Hegedus, Steven S.; Buchanan, Wayne A.; Jackson, Scott C.

    1987-07-01

    A novel photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) reactor having a flexible ultraviolet-transparent Teflon curtain and a secondary gas flow to eliminate deposition on the window has been used to deposit amorphous silicon films and p-i-n solar cells. The background levels of atmospheric contaminants (H2O, CO2, N2) depend strongly on the vacuum procedures but not on the presence of a Teflon curtain in the reactor. Intrinsic films with a midgap density of states of 3×1015 eV-1 cm-3 and all-photo-CVD pin solar cells with efficiencies of 8.5% have been deposited.

  5. The model of solid phase crystallization of amorphous silicon under elastic stress

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Solid phase crystallization of an amorphous silicon (a-Si) film stressed by a Si3N4 cap was studied by laser Raman spectroscopy. The a-Si films were deposited on Si3N4 (50 nm)/Si(100) substrate by rf sputtering. The stress in an a-Si film was controlled by thickness of a Si3N4 cap layer. The Si3N4 films were also deposited by rf sputtering. It was observed that the crystallization was affected by the stress in a-Si films introduced by the Si3N4 cap layer. The study suggests that the elastic s...

  6. High-stability transparent amorphous oxide TFT with a silicon-doped back-channel layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung-Rae; Park, Jea-Gun

    2014-10-01

    We significantly reduced various electrical instabilities of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) by using the co-deposition of silicon on an a-IGZO back channel. This process showed improved stability of the threshold voltage ( V th ) under high temperature and humidity and negative gate-bias illumination stress (NBIS) without any reduction of IDS. The enhanced stability was achieved with silicon, which has higher metal-oxide bonding strengths than gallium does. Additionally, SiO X distributed on the a-IGZO surface reduced the adsorption and the desorption of H2O and O2. This process is applicable to the TFT manufacturing process with a variable sputtering target.

  7. Study of the amorphization of surface silicon layers implanted by low-energy helium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomov, A. A.; Myakon'kikh, A. V.; Oreshko, A. P.; Shemukhin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural changes in surface layers of Si(001) substrates subjected to plasma-immersion implantation by (2-5)-keV helium ions to a dose of D = 6 × 1015-5 × 1017 cm-2 have been studied by highresolution X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering, and spectral ellipsometry. It is found that the joint application of these methods makes it possible to determine the density depth distribution ρ( z) in an implanted layer, its phase state, and elemental composition. Treatment of silicon substrates in helium plasma to doses of 6 × 1016 cm-2 leads to the formation of a 20- to 30-nm-thick amorphized surface layer with a density close to the silicon density. An increase in the helium dose causes the formation of an internal porous layer.

  8. Hydex Glass and Amorphous Silicon for Integrated Nonlinear Optical Signal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Photonic integrated circuits that exploit nonlinear optics in order to generate and process signals all-optically have achieved performance far superior to that possible electronically - particularly with respect to speed. Although silicon-on-insulator has been the leading platform for nonlinear optics for some time, its high two-photon absorption at telecommunications wavelengths poses a fundamental limitation. We review the recent achievements based in new CMOS-compatible platforms that are better suited than SOI for nonlinear optics, focusing on amorphous silicon and Hydex glass. We highlight their potential as well as the challenges to achieving practical solutions for many key applications. These material systems have opened up many new capabilities such as on-chip optical frequency comb generation and ultrafast optical pulse generation and measurement.

  9. Spin transport, magnetoresistance, and electrically detected magnetic resonance in amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutch, Michael J.; Lenahan, Patrick M.; King, Sean W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on a study of spin transport via electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) and near-zero field magnetoresistance (MR) in silicon nitride films. Silicon nitrides have long been important materials in solid state electronics. Although electronic transport in these materials is not well understood, electron paramagnetic resonance studies have identified a single dominating paramagnetic defect and have also provided physical and chemical descriptions of the defects, called K centers. Our EDMR and MR measurements clearly link the near-zero field MR response to the K centers and also indicate that K center energy levels are approximately 3.1 eV above the a-SiN:H valence band edge. In addition, our results suggest an approach for the study of defect mediated spin-transport in inorganic amorphous insulators via variable electric field and variable frequency EDMR and MR which may be widely applicable.

  10. Two-dimensional modeling of the back amorphous-crystalline silicon heterojunction (BACH) photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Zahidur R.; Chutinan, Alongkarn; Gougam, Adel B.; Kherani, Nazir P.; Zukotynski, Stefan

    2010-06-01

    Back Amorphous-Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction (BACH)1 solar cell can be fabricated using low temperature processes while integrating high efficiency features of heterojunction silicon solar cells and back-contact homojunction solar cells. This article presents a two-dimensional modeling study of the BACH cell concept. A parametric study of the BACH cell has been carried out using Sentaurus after benchmarking the software. A detailed model describing the optical generation is defined. Solar cell efficiency of 24.4% is obtained for AM 1.5 global spectrum with VOC of greater than 720 mV and JSC exceeding 40 mA/cm2, considering realistic surface passivation quality and other dominant recombination processes.

  11. Strong enhancement of spontaneous emission in amorphous-silicon-nitride photonic crystal based coupled-microcavity structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayindir, M.; Tanriseven, S.; Aydinli, A.; Ozbay, E. [Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2001-07-01

    We investigated photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band gap structures. The photonic crystals, a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator and a coupled-microcavity (CMC) structure, were fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-oxide layers. It was observed that these structures strongly modify the PL spectra from optically active amorphous-silicon-nitride thin films. Narrow-band and wide-band PL spectra were achieved in the FP microcavity and the CMC structure, respectively. The angle dependence of PL peak of the FP resonator was also investigated. We also observed that the spontaneous emission increased drastically at the coupled-cavity band edge of the CMC structure due to extremely low group velocity and long photon lifetime. The measurements agree well with the transfer-matrix method results and the prediction of the tight-binding approximation. (orig.)

  12. Strong enhancement of spontaneous emission in amorphous-silicon-nitride photonic crystal based coupled-microcavity structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayindir, M.; Tanriseven, S.; Aydinli, A.; Ozbay, E.

    We investigated photoluminescence (PL) from one-dimensional photonic band gap structures. The photonic crystals, a Fabry-Perot (FP) resonator and a coupled-microcavity (CMC) structure, were fabricated by using alternating hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-nitride and hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-oxide layers. It was observed that these structures strongly modify the PL spectra from optically active amorphous-silicon-nitride thin films. Narrow-band and wide-band PL spectra were achieved in the FP microcavity and the CMC structure, respectively. The angle dependence of PL peak of the FP resonator was also investigated. We also observed that the spontaneous emission increased drastically at the coupled-cavity band edge of the CMC structure due to extremely low group velocity and long photon lifetime. The measurements agree well with the transfer-matrix method results and the prediction of the tight-binding approximation.

  13. Standard practice for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials used in aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice is intended to be used as a supplement to Practices E 1742, E 1255, and E 2033. 1.2 This practice describes procedures for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials made entirely or in part from fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites. Radiologic examination is: a) radiographic (RT) with film, b) Computed Radiography (CR) with Imaging Plate, c) Digital Radiology (DR) with Digital Detector Array’s (DDA), and d) Radioscopic (RTR) Real Time Radiology with a detection system such as an Image Intensifier. The composite materials under consideration typically contain continuous high modulus fibers (> 20 GPa), such as those listed in 1.4. 1.3 This practice describes established radiological examination methods that are currently used by industry that have demonstrated utility in quality assurance of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials during product process design and optimization, process control, after manufacture inspection, in service exami...

  14. Fourier transform infrared analysis of ceramic powders: Quantitative determination of alpha, beta, and amorphous phases of silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trout, T.K.; Bellama, J.M.; Brinckman, F.E.; Faltynek, R.A.

    1989-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) forms the basis for determining the morphological composition of mixtures containing alpha, beta, and amorphous phases of silicon nitride. The analytical technique, involving multiple linear regression treatment of Kubelka-Munk absorbance values from diffuse reflectance measurements, yields specific percent composition data for the amorphous phase as well as the crystalline phases in ternary mixtures of 0--1% by weight Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ in potassium bromide.

  15. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seochun, Kiheung, Yongin, Kyungki 449-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-21

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm{sup 2}, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:Tl (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 {mu}m{sup 3} and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 lp/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 lp/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented.

  16. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung

    2003-12-21

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:T1 (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 microm3 and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 1p/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 1p/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented.

  17. Assessment of the CO2 fixation capacity of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 outdoor cultures in vertical flat-panel reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clares, Marta E; Moreno, José; Guerrero, Miguel G; García-González, Mercedes

    2014-10-10

    The extent of biological CO2 fixation was evaluated for outdoor cultures of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047. Culture conditions were optimized indoors in bubble-column photochemostats operating in continuous mode, subjected to irradiance cycles mimicking the light regime outdoors. Highest values achieved for CO2 fixation rate and biomass productivity were 1 and 0.6 g L(-1) day(-1), respectively. The comparison among different reactors operating simultaneously - open pond, horizontal tubular reactor and vertical flat-panel - allowed to assess their relative efficiency for the outdoor development of Anabaena cultures. Despite the higher volumetric CO2 fixation capacity (and biomass productivity) exhibited by the tubular photobioreactor, yield of the flat-panel reactor was 50% higher than that of the tubular option on a per area basis, reaching values over 35 g CO2 fixed m(-2) d(-1). The flat-panel reactor actually represents a most suitable system for CO2 capture coupled to the generation of valuable biomass by Anabaena cultures.

  18. Reducing dose in urography while maintaining image quality - a comparison of storage phosphor plates and a flat-panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansson, Margareta; Geijer, Haakan; Andersson, Torbjoern [Oerebro University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Oerebro (Sweden); Persliden, Jan [Oerebro University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Oerebro (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of new flat-panel detector technology often forces us to accept too high dose levels as proposed by the manufacturers. We need a tool to compare the image quality of a new system with the accepted standard. The aim of this study was to obtain a comparable image quality for two systems - storage phosphor plates and a flat-panel system using intravenous urography (IVU) as a clinical model. The image quality figure was calculated using a contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD) for the two evaluated systems. This allowed us to set a dose for the flat-panel system that gave equivalent image quality to the storage phosphor plates. This reduced detector dose was used in an evaluation of clinical images to find out if the dose reduction from the phantom study indeed resulted in images of equal clinical image quality. The image quality was assessed using image criteria of the European guidelines for IVU with visual grading analysis. Equivalent image quality in image pairs was achieved at 30% of the dose. The CDRAD contrast-detail phantom makes it possible to find dose levels that give equal image quality using different imaging systems. (orig.)

  19. Achieving thermography with a thermal security camera using uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer image sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tesdahl, Curtis; Owens, Jim; Dorn, David

    2012-06-01

    Advancements in uncooled microbolometer technology over the last several years have opened up many commercial applications which had been previously cost prohibitive. Thermal technology is no longer limited to the military and government market segments. One type of thermal sensor with low NETD which is available in the commercial market segment is the uncooled amorphous silicon (α-Si) microbolometer image sensor. Typical thermal security cameras focus on providing the best image quality by auto tonemaping (contrast enhancing) the image, which provides the best contrast depending on the temperature range of the scene. While this may provide enough information to detect objects and activities, there are further benefits of being able to estimate the actual object temperatures in a scene. This thermographic ability can provide functionality beyond typical security cameras by being able to monitor processes. Example applications of thermography[2] with thermal camera include: monitoring electrical circuits, industrial machinery, building thermal leaks, oil/gas pipelines, power substations, etc...[3][5] This paper discusses the methodology of estimating object temperatures by characterizing/calibrating different components inside a thermal camera utilizing an uncooled amorphous silicon microbolometer image sensor. Plots of system performance across camera operating temperatures will be shown.

  20. Solid state photochemistry. Subpanel A-2(b): Metastability in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D. [Solarex Corporation, Newton, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    All device quality amorphous silicon based materials exhibit degradation in electronic properties when exposed to sunlight. The photo-induced defects are associated with Si dangling bonds that are created by the recombination and/or trapping of photogenerated carriers. The defects are metastable and can be annealed out at temperatures of about 150 to 200 degrees Centigrade. The density of metastable defects is larger in films that are contaminated with > 10{sup 19} per cubic cm of impurities such as oxygen, carbon and nitrogen. However, recent experimental results indicate that some metastable defects are still present in films with very low impurity concentrations. The photo-induced defects typically saturate after 100 to 1000 hours of exposure to one sun illumination depending on the deposition conditions. There is also experimental evidence that photo-induced structural changes are occurring in the amorphous silicon based materials and that hydrogen may be playing an important role in both the photo-induced structural changes and in the creation of metastable defects.

  1. Amorphous SiC layers for electrically conductive Rugate filters in silicon based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, S.; Peters, M.; Künle, M.; Gradmann, R.; Suwito, D.

    2010-05-01

    The subject of this work is the development of an electrically conductive Rugate filter for photovoltaic applications. We think that the optical as well as the electrical performance of the filter can be adapted especially to the requirements of crystalline Si thin-film and amorphous/crystalline silicon tandem solar cells. We have deposited amorphous hydrogenated Silicon Carbide layers (a-SixC1-x:H) with the precursor gases methane (CH4), silane (SiH4) and diborane (B2H6) applying Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD). Through changing just the precursor flows a floating refractive index n from 1.9 to 3.5 (at 633 nm) could be achieved quite accurately. Different complex layer stacks (up to 200 layers) with a sinusoidal refractive index variation normal to the incident light were deposited in just 80 min on 100x100 mm2. Transmission measurements show good agreement between simulation and experiment which proofs our ability to control the deposition process, the good knowledge of the optical behaviour of the different SiC single layers and the advanced stage of our simulation model. The doped single layers show lateral conductivities which were extremely dependent on the Si/C ratio.

  2. Depth profile study on Raman spectra of high-energy-electron-irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    According to the different penetration depths for the incident lights of 472 nm and 532 nm in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films, the depth profile study on Raman spectra of a-Si:H films was carried out. The network ordering evolution in the near surface and interior region of the unirradiated and irradiated a-Si:H films was investigated. The results show that there is a structural improvement in the shortand intermediate-range order towards the surface of the unirradiated a-Si:H films. The amorphous silicon network in the near and interior region becomes more disordered on the shortand intermediate-range scales after being irradiated with high energy electrons. However, the surface of the irradiated films becomes more disordered in comparison with their interior region, indicating that the created defects caused by electron irradiation are concentrated in the near surface of the irradiated films. Annealing eliminates the irradiation effects on a-Si:H thin films and the structural order of the irradiated films is similar to that of the unirradiated ones after being annealed. There exists a structural improvement in the shortand intermediate-range order towards the surface of the irradiated a-Si:H films after being annealed.

  3. Fabrication and characterization of monolithically integrated microchannel plates based on amorphous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Andrea; Geissbühler, Jonas; Wyrsch, Nicolas; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-04-04

    Microchannel plates are vacuum-based electron multipliers for particle--in particular, photon--detection, with applications ranging from image intensifiers to single-photon detectors. Their key strengths are large signal amplification, large active area, micrometric spatial resolution and picosecond temporal resolution. Here, we present the first microchannel plate made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) instead of lead glass. The breakthrough lies in the possibility of realizing amorphous silicon-based microchannel plates (AMCPs) on any kind of substrate. This achievement is based on mastering the deposition of an ultra-thick (80-120 μm) stress-controlled a-Si:H layer from the gas phase at temperatures of about 200 °C and micromachining the channels by dry etching. We fabricated AMCPs that are vertically integrated on metallic anodes of test structures, proving the feasibility of monolithic integration of, for instance, AMCPs on application-specific integrated circuits for signal processing. We show an electron multiplication factor exceeding 30 for an aspect ratio, namely channel length over aperture, of 12.5:1. This result was achieved for input photoelectron currents up to 100 pA, in the continuous illumination regime, which provides a first evidence of the a-Si:H effectiveness in replenishing the electrons dispensed in the multiplication process.

  4. Silica nanoparticles on front glass for efficiency enhancement in superstrate-type amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sonali; Banerjee, Chandan; Kundu, Avra; Dey, Prasenjit; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan K.

    2013-10-01

    Antireflective coating on front glass of superstrate-type single junction amorphous silicon solar cells (SCs) has been applied using highly monodispersed and stable silica nanoparticles (NPs). The silica NPs having 300 nm diameter were synthesized by Stober technique where the size of the NPs was controlled by varying the alcohol medium. The synthesized silica NPs were analysed by dynamic light scattering technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were spin coated on glass side of fluorinated tin oxide (SnO2: F) coated glass superstrate and optimization of the concentration of the colloidal solution, spin speed and number of coated layers was done to achieve minimum reflection characteristics. An estimation of the distribution of the NPs for different optimization parameters has been done using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the transparent conducting oxide coated glass with the layer having the minimum reflectance is used for fabrication of amorphous silicon SC. Electrical analysis of the fabricated cell indicates an improvement of 6.5% in short-circuit current density from a reference of 12.40 mA cm-2 while the open circuit voltage and the fill factor remains unaltered. A realistic optical model has also been proposed to gain an insight into the system.

  5. Amorphous silicon pixel layers with cesium iodide converters for medical radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, T.; Cho, G. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Goodman, C.A. [Air Techniques, Inc., Hicksville, NY (United States)] [and others

    1993-11-01

    We describe the properties of evaporated layers of Cesium Iodide (Thallium activated) deposited on substrates that enable easy coupling to amorphous silicon pixel arrays. The CsI(Tl) layers range in thickness from 65 to 220{mu}m. We used the two-boat evaporator system to deposit CsI(Tl) layers. This system ensures the formation of the scintillator film with homogenous thallium concentration which is essential for optimizing the scintillation light emission efficiency. The Tl concentration was kept to 0.1--0.2 mole percent for the highest light output. Temperature annealing can affect the microstructure as well as light output of the CsI(Tl) film. 200--300C temperature annealing can increase the light output by a factor of two. The amorphous silicon pixel arrays are p-i-n diodes approximately l{mu}m thick with transparent electrodes to enable them to detect the scintillation light produced by X-rays incident on the CsI(Tl). Digital radiography requires a good spatial resolution. This is accomplished by making the detector pixel size less then 50{mu}m. The light emission from the CsI(Tl) is collimated by techniques involving the deposition process on pattered substrates. We have measured MTF of greater than 12 line pairs per mm at the 10% level.

  6. Flexible amorphous silicon solar cells and their application to PV systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Y.; Fujikake, S.; Yoshida, T.; Sakai, H.; Natsume, F. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan). New Energy Lab.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells are regarded as the next generation product following crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells. The performance of the large area cells has been improved to a practical application level and the durability has been confirmed by a number of outdoor tests at demonstration sites under various climatic conditions. The mass production technology for realizing low cost a-Si photovoltaic (PV) modules, however, has not been developed very well and is still in an elementary stage. A flexible a-Si:H PV module has been developed, which is rolled up around a cylindrical core, has a width of about 1 m, and is able to be cut to any length. The amorphous solar cell fabricated on a heat resistant plastic film with a thickness of 50 {mu}m has a new monolithic series connected structure named SCAF (Series-Connection through Apertures formed on Film) to obtain a high output voltage required for practical use. The details of the structure and the technology of the fabrication process are described as well as some of its applications. (author). 11 figs., 3 refs.

  7. Three hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiodes stacked for an above integrated circuit colour sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gidon, Pierre; Giffard, Benoit; Moussy, Norbert; Parrein, Pascale; Poupinet, Ludovic [CEA-LETI, MINATEC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2010-03-15

    We present theoretical simulation and experimental results of a new colour pixel structure. This pixel catches the light in three stacked amorphous silicon photodiodes encompassed between transparent electrodes. The optical structure has been simulated for signal optimisation. The thickness of each stacked layer is chosen in order to absorb the maximum of light and the three signals allow to linearly calculate the CIE colour coordinates 1 with minimum error and noise. The whole process is compatible with an above integrated circuit (IC) approach. Each photodiode is an n-i-p structure. For optical reason, the upper diode must be controlled down to 25 nm thickness. The first test pixel structure allows a good recovering of colour coordinates. The measured absorption spectrum of each photodiode is in good agreement with our simulations. This specific stack with three photodiodes per pixel totalises two times more signal than an above IC pixel under a standard Bayer pattern 2,3. In each square of this GretagMacbeth chart is the reference colour on the right and the experimentally measured colour on the left with three amorphous silicon photodiodes per pixel. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Amorphous silicon based p-i-i-n photodetectors for point-of-care testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furin, Dominik; Proll, Guenther; Gauglitz, Guenther [Universitaet Tuebingen, Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Auf der Morgenstelle 8, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Thielmann, Johannes; Harendt, Christine [Institut fuer Mikroelektronik Stuttgart, Allmandring 30a, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Pfaefflin, Albrecht; Schleicher, Erwin [Universitaetsklinikum und Medizinische Fakultaet, Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Geissweg 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Schubert, Markus B. [Institut fuer Physikalische Elektronik, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Saemann, Marc

    2010-04-15

    Modern medical diagnostics demands point-of-care testing (POCT) systems for quick tests in clinical or out-patient environments. This investigation combines the Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS) with thin film technology for a highly sensitive, direct optical and label-free detection of proteins, e.g. inflammation or cardiovascular markers. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) based thin film photodetectors replace the so far needed spectrometer and permit downsizing of the POCT system. Photodetectors with p-i-i-n structure adjust their spectral sensitivity according to the applied read-out voltage. The use of amorphous silicon carbide in the p-type and the first intrinsic layer enhances the sensitivity through very low dark currents of the photodetectors and enables the adjustment of their absorption characteristics. Integrating the thin film photodetectors on the rear side of the RIfS substrate eliminates optical losses and distortions, as compared to the standard RIfS setup. An integrated Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) chip performs a current-frequency conversion to accurately detect the photocurrent of up to eight parallel photodetector channels. In addition to the optimization of the photo-detectors, this contribution presents first successful direct optical and label-free RIfS measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer in buffer solution in physiological relevant concentrations. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Aluminium-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kezzoula, F., E-mail: kezzoula@usa.com [UDTS 2Bd Frantz Fanon 7 merveilles Algiers (Algeria); Laboratory of Materials, Mineral and Composite (LMMC), Boumerdes University (Algeria); Hammouda, A. [UPR CNRS 3079 CEMHTI - 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Equipe Couches Minces, Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte de Physique, USTHB, Algiers (Algeria); Universite d' Orleans, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Kechouane, M. [Equipe Couches Minces, Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte de Physique, USTHB, Algiers (Algeria); Simon, P. [UPR CNRS 3079 CEMHTI - 1D Avenue de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Universite d' Orleans, 45067 Orleans Cedex 2 (France); Abaidia, S.E.H. [Laboratory of Materials, Mineral and Composite (LMMC), Boumerdes University (Algeria); Keffous, A. [UDTS 2Bd Frantz Fanon 7 merveilles Algiers (Algeria); Cherfi, R. [Equipe Couches Minces, Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, Faculte de Physique, USTHB, Algiers (Algeria); Menari, H.; Manseri, A. [UDTS 2Bd Frantz Fanon 7 merveilles Algiers (Algeria)

    2011-09-15

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering technique with argon and hydrogen plasma mixture on Al deposited by thermal evaporation on glass substrates. The a-Si/Al and a-Si:H/Al thin films were annealed at different temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 deg. C during 4 h in vacuum-sealed bulb. The effects of annealing temperature on optical, structural and morphological properties of as-grown as well as the vacuum-annealed a-Si/Al and a-Si:H/Al thin films are presented in this contribution. The averaged transmittance of a-Si:H/Al film increases upon increasing the annealing temperature. XRD measurements clearly evidence that crystallization is initiated at 450 deg. C. The number and intensity of diffraction peaks appearing in the diffraction patterns are more important in a-Si:H/Al than that in a-Si/Al layers. Results show that a-Si:H films deposited on Al/glass crystallize above 450 deg. C and present better crystallization than the a-Si layers. The presence of hydrogen induces an improvement of structural properties of poly-Si prepared by aluminium-induced crystallization (AIC).

  10. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials.

  11. Non-negligible Contributions to Thermal Conductivity From Localized Modes in Amorphous Silicon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-10-21

    Thermal conductivity is important for almost all applications involving heat transfer. The theory and modeling of crystalline materials is in some sense a solved problem, where one can now calculate their thermal conductivity from first principles using expressions based on the phonon gas model (PGM). However, modeling of amorphous materials still has many open questions, because the PGM itself becomes questionable when one cannot rigorously define the phonon velocities. In this report, we used our recently developed Green-Kubo modal analysis (GKMA) method to study amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO2). The predicted thermal conductivities exhibit excellent agreement with experiments and anharmonic effects are included in the thermal conductivity calculation for all the modes in a-SiO2 for the first time. Previously, localized modes (locons) have been thought to have a negligible contribution to thermal conductivity, due to their highly localized nature. However, in a-SiO2 our results indicate that locons contribute more than 10% to the total thermal conductivity from 400 K to 800 K and they are largely responsible for the increase in thermal conductivity of a-SiO2 above room temperature. This is an effect that cannot be explained by previous methods and therefore offers new insight into the nature of phonon transport in amorphous/glassy materials.

  12. Parameter investigation and first results from a digital flat panel detector with forward bias capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Virshup, Gary; Star-lack, Josh; Mollov, Ivan; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2008-03-01

    Digital flat panel a-Si x-ray detectors can exhibit image lag of several percent. The image lag can limit the temporal resolution of the detector, and introduce artifacts into CT reconstructions. It is believed that the majority of image lag is due to defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer. Software methods to characterize and correct for the image lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as the system behaves in a linear time-invariant manner. The proposed method of reducing lag is a hardware solution that makes few additional hardware changes. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new stage in between the readout of the detector and the data collection stages. During this stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. Parameters of importance are current per diode and current duration, which were investigated under light illumination by the following design parameters: 1.) forward bias voltage across the photodiode and TFT switch, 2.) number of rows simultaneously forward biased, and 3.) duration of the forward bias current. From measurements, it appears that good design criteria for the particular imager used are 8 or fewer active rows, 2.9V (or greater) forward bias voltage, and a row frequency of 100 kHz or less. Overall, the forward bias method has been found to reduce first frame lag by as much as 95%. The panel was also tested under x-ray irradiation. Image lag improved (94% reduction), but the temporal response of the scintillator became evident in the turn-on step response.

  13. The effect of discontinuous airlift mixing in outdoor flat panel photobioreactors on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leupold, Marco; Hindersin, Stefan; Kerner, Martin; Hanelt, Dieter

    2013-11-01

    Discontinuous airlift mixing was realized by injecting pressured air at time intervals with a frequency between 0.033 and 0.25 Hz (at 80 kPa; i.e., every 4-30 s; valve opening time 800 ms) into outdoor flat panel photobioreactors ([Formula: see text]). This caused a flow velocity between 2 and 20 cm s(-1) of the culture medium within the photobioreactor and the mixing time was between 38 and 103.5 s, requiring 0.175-1.340 L(gas volume) L(photobioreactor volume)(-1) min(-1) pressured air. In order to detect the effect on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus during outdoor experiments and to be able to compare obtained results, a batch run with an airlift frequency of 0.25 Hz was simultaneously used as control. Growth at different airlift frequencies was measured by the increase of cell dry weight (CDW) during 3-5 days and biomass yield on light energy was calculated. With increasing airlift frequencies, growth increased from 52 to 91 % compared to the control. When CDW was at around 1.0-1.5 g L(-1), airlift frequency had no effect on growth, indicating that mass transfer gradients of nutrients and gas were not the limiting factors of growth. Above 1.5 g CDW L(-1), growth increased with increasing airlift frequency and light limitation for a single cell occurred. This effect was observed during low and high irradiance and it is concluded that a higher mean flow causes a better light distribution, resulting in an enhanced growth. Biomass productivity and demand of pressured air are correlated logarithmically, which enables to save mixing energy during cultivation.

  14. Direct measurement of free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Frank G.

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to measure the free-energy barrier W(sup *), the activation energy, and activation entropy to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous solids, independent of the energy barrier to growth. The method allows one to determine the temperature dependence of W(sup *), and the effect of the preparation conditions of the initial amorphous phase, the dopants, and the crystallization methds on W(sup *). The method is applied to determine the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films. For thermally induced nucleation in a-Si thin films with annealing temperatures in the range of from 824 to 983 K, the free-energy barrier W(sup *) to nucleation of silicon crystals is about 2.0 - 2.1 eV regardless of the preparation conditions of the films. The observation supports the idea that a-Si transforms into an intermediate amorphous state through the structural relaxation prior to the onset of nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. The observation also indicates that the activation entropy may be an insignificant part of the free-energy barrier for the nucleation of crystallites in a-Si. Compared with the free-energy barrier to nucleation of crystallites in undoped a-Si films, a significant reduction is observed in the free-energy barrier to nucleation in Cu-doped a-Si films. For a-Si under irradiation of Xe(2+) at 10(exp 5) eV, the free-energy barrier to ion-induced nucleation of crystallites is shown to be about half of the value associated with thermal-induced nucleation of crystallites in a-Si under the otherwise same conditions, which is much more significant than previously expected. The present method has a general kinetic basis; it thus should be equally applicable to nucleation of crystallites in any amorphous elemental semiconductors and semiconductor alloys, metallic and polymeric glasses, and to nucleation of crystallites in melts and solutions.

  15. Efficient visible luminescence of nanocrystalline silicon prepared from amorphous silicon films by thermal annealing and stain etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikulin Valery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Films of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si were prepared from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H by using rapid thermal annealing. The formed nc-Si films were subjected to stain etching in hydrofluoric acid solutions in order to passivate surfaces of nc-Si. The optical reflectance spectroscopy revealed the nc-Si formation as well as the high optical quality of the formed films. The Raman scattering spectroscopy was used to estimate the mean size and volume fraction of nc-Si in the annealed films, which were about 4 to 8 nm and 44 to 90%, respectively, depending on the annealing regime. In contrast to as-deposited a-Si:H films, the nc-Si films after stain etching exhibited efficient photoluminescence in the spectral range of 600 to 950 nm at room temperature. The photoluminescence intensity and lifetimes of the stain etched nc-Si films were similar to those for conventional porous Si formed by electrochemical etching. The obtained results indicate new possibilities to prepare luminescent thin films for Si-based optoelectronics.

  16. Improving the performance of amorphous and crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells by monitoring surface passivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettauf, J.W.A.; Van der Werf, C.H.M.; Kielen, I.M.; Van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics, Physics of Devices, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    The influence of thermal annealing on the crystalline silicon surface passivating properties of selected amorphous silicon containing layer stacks (including intrinsic and doped films), as well as the correlation with silicon heterojunction solar cell performance has been investigated. All samples have been isochronally annealed for 1 h in an N{sub 2} ambient at temperatures between 150C and 300C in incremental steps of 15C. For intrinsic films and intrinsic/n-type stacks, an improvement in passivation quality is observed up to 255C and 270C, respectively, and a deterioration at higher temperatures. For intrinsic/n-type a-Si:H layer stacks, a maximum minority carrier lifetime of 13.3 ms at an injection level of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} has been measured. In contrast, for intrinsic/p-type a-Si:H layer stacks, a deterioration in passivation is observed upon annealing over the whole temperature range. Comparing the lifetime values and trends for the different layer stacks to the performance of the corresponding cells, it is inferred that the intrinsic/p-layer stack is limiting device performance. Furthermore, thermal annealing of p-type layers should be avoided entirely. We therefore propose an adapted processing sequence, leading to a substantial improvement in efficiency to 16.7%, well above the efficiency of 15.8% obtained with the 'standard' processing sequence.

  17. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elsayed Eldib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT. In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD. Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast.

  18. A Ring Artifact Correction Method: Validation by Micro-CT Imaging with Flat-Panel Detectors and a 2D Photon-Counting Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldib, Mohamed Elsayed; Hegazy, Mohamed; Mun, Yang Ji; Cho, Myung Hye; Cho, Min Hyoung; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an efficient ring artifact correction method for a cone-beam computed tomography (CT). In the first step, we correct the defective pixels whose values are close to zero or saturated in the projection domain. In the second step, we compute the mean value at each detector element along the view angle in the sinogram to obtain the one-dimensional (1D) mean vector, and we then compute the 1D correction vector by taking inverse of the mean vector. We multiply the correction vector with the sinogram row by row over all view angles. In the third step, we apply a Gaussian filter on the difference image between the original CT image and the corrected CT image obtained in the previous step. The filtered difference image is added to the corrected CT image to compensate the possible contrast anomaly that may appear due to the contrast change in the sinogram after removing stripe artifacts. We applied the proposed method to the projection data acquired by two flat-panel detectors (FPDs) and a silicon-based photon-counting X-ray detector (PCXD). Micro-CT imaging experiments of phantoms and a small animal have shown that the proposed method can greatly reduce ring artifacts regardless of detector types. Despite the great reduction of ring artifacts, the proposed method does not compromise the original spatial resolution and contrast. PMID:28146088

  19. Impact and Penetration of Thin Aluminum 2024 Flat Panels at Oblique Angles of Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Queitzsch, Gilbert K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    under more extreme conditions, using a projectile with a more complex shape and sharp contacts, impacting flat panels at oblique angles of incidence.

  20. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragusin, O.; Bosmans, H.; Pappas, C.; Desmet, W.

    2008-09-01

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 μGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK ~40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s-1, detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 μGy/im to 0.17 μGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters the quality of the

  1. Measurement of joint kinematics using a conventional clinical single-perspective flat-panel radiography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seslija, Petar; Teeter, Matthew G.; Yuan Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Bourne, Robert B.; MacDonald, Steven J.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W. [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) and Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Western Ontario and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Western Ontario and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The ability to accurately measure joint kinematics is an important tool in studying both normal joint function and pathologies associated with injury and disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, accuracy, precision, and clinical safety of measuring 3D joint motion using a conventional flat-panel radiography system prior to its application in an in vivo study. Methods: An automated, image-based tracking algorithm was implemented to measure the three-dimensional pose of a sparse object from a two-dimensional radiographic projection. The algorithm was tested to determine its efficiency and failure rate, defined as the number of image frames where automated tracking failed, or required user intervention. The accuracy and precision of measuring three-dimensional motion were assessed using a robotic controlled, tibiofemoral knee phantom programmed to mimic a subject with a total knee replacement performing a stair ascent activity. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the measurements of the single-plane radiographic tracking technique to those of an optical tracking system, and quantified by the measurement discrepancy between the two systems using the Bland-Altman technique. Precision was assessed through a series of repeated measurements of the tibiofemoral kinematics, and was quantified using the across-trial deviations of the repeated kinematic measurements. The safety of the imaging procedure was assessed by measuring the effective dose of ionizing radiation associated with the x-ray exposures, and analyzing its relative risk to a human subject. Results: The automated tracking algorithm displayed a failure rate of 2% and achieved an average computational throughput of 8 image frames/s. Mean differences between the radiographic and optical measurements for translations and rotations were less than 0.08 mm and 0.07 Degree-Sign in-plane, and 0.24 mm and 0.6 Degree-Sign out-of-plane. The repeatability of kinematics measurements performed

  2. Charge deep-level transient spectroscopy study of high-energy-electron-beam-irradiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, A.; Nádaždy, V.; Zeman, M.; Swaaiij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2006-01-01

    We present a study of changes in the defect density of states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) due to high-energy electron irradiation using charged deep-level transient spectroscopy. It was found that defect states near the conduction band were removed, while in other band gap regions the

  3. Infrared transient grating measurements of the dynamics of hydrogen local mode vibrations in amorphous silicon-germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobson, K.W.; Wells, J.P.R.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Vinh, N.Q.; Dijkhuis, J.I.

    2008-01-01

    We report on picosecond, time-resolved measurements of the vibrational relaxation and decay pathways of the Si–H and Ge–H stretching modes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium thin films (a-SiGe:H). It is demonstrated that the decay of both modes has a nonexponential shape, attributable to th

  4. Infrared transient grating measurements of the dynamics of hydrogen local mode vibrations in amorphous silicon-germanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobson, K. W.; Wells, J. P. R.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Vinh, N. Q.; Dijkhuis, J. I.

    2008-01-01

    We report on picosecond, time-resolved measurements of the vibrational relaxation and decay pathways of the Si-H and Ge-H stretching modes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-germanium thin films (a-SiGe: H). It is demonstrated that the decay of both modes has a nonexponential shape, attributable to t

  5. Natively textured ZnO grown by PECVD as front electrode material for amorphous silicon pin solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Löffler, J.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Groenen, Ft.; Van De Sanden, M.C.M.; Linden, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Natively textured ZnO layers for the application as front electrode material in amorphous silicon pin solar cells have been deposited by Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition. Films deposited in the temperature regime from 150 to 350°C at a rate between 0.65 and 0.75 nm/s have been char

  6. On the effect of the underlying ZnO:Al layer on the crystallization kinetics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, K.; Ponomarev, M. V.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, we analyze the thickness effect of the underlying aluminum doped-zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers on the structural properties and crystallization kinetics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films. It is shown that the disorder in as-deposited a-Si:H films, as probed by

  7. Response of a CsI/amorphous-Si flat panel detector as function of incident x-ray angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkaczyk, J. Eric; Claus, Bernhard; Trotter, Dinko Gonzalez; Eberhard, J. W.

    2006-03-01

    Two mechanisms for MTF dependence on incident x-ray angle are demonstrated by an experimental technique that separates the two phenomena. The dominant effect is that travel of x-ray photons through the scintillator at non-normal incidence involves an in-plane component. This mechanism leads to a significant but deterministic blurring of the incident image, but has no effect on the noise transfer characteristics of the detector. A secondary effect is that at large angles to the surface normal, x-ray-to-optical conversion occurs at positions in the scintillator further away from the photodiode surface. This leads to a small net decrease in MTF and NPS at angles above 60 degrees. The deterministic character of the angular dependence of gain, MTF and NPS leads to the conclusion that sufficient angular range can be supported by this detector construction. Excellent functionality in the context of tomography is expected.

  8. Ultrafast all-optical arithmetic logic based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon microring resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostimirovic, Dusan; Ye, Winnie N.

    2016-03-01

    For decades, the semiconductor industry has been steadily shrinking transistor sizes to fit more performance into a single silicon-based integrated chip. This technology has become the driving force for advances in education, transportation, and health, among others. However, transistor sizes are quickly approaching their physical limits (channel lengths are now only a few silicon atoms in length), and Moore's law will likely soon be brought to a stand-still despite many unique attempts to keep it going (FinFETs, high-k dielectrics, etc.). This technology must then be pushed further by exploring (almost) entirely new methodologies. Given the explosive growth of optical-based long-haul telecommunications, we look to apply the use of high-speed optics as a substitute to the digital model; where slow, lossy, and noisy metal interconnections act as a major bottleneck to performance. We combine the (nonlinear) optical Kerr effect with a single add-drop microring resonator to perform the fundamental AND-XOR logical operations of a half adder, by all-optical means. This process is also applied to subtraction, higher-order addition, and the realization of an all-optical arithmetic logic unit (ALU). The rings use hydrogenated amorphous silicon as a material with superior nonlinear properties to crystalline silicon, while still maintaining CMOS-compatibility and the many benefits that come with it (low cost, ease of fabrication, etc.). Our method allows for multi-gigabit-per-second data rates while maintaining simplicity and spatial minimalism in design for high-capacity manufacturing potential.

  9. An overview of uncooled infrared sensors technology based on amorphous silicon and silicon germanium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, Roberto; Mireles, Jose Jr. [Technology and Engineering Institute, Ciudad Juarez University UACJ, Av. Del Charro 450N, 32310 Chihuahua (Mexico); Moreno, Mario; Torres, Alfonso; Kosarev, Andrey [National Institute for Astrophysics Optics and Electronics INAOE, Luis E. Erro 1, PO Box 51 and 216, 7200 Puebla (Mexico); Heredia, Aurelio [Universidad Popular Autonoma del Estado de Puebla, 21 sur 1103 Col. Santiago, 72160 Puebla (Mexico)

    2010-04-15

    At the present time there are commercially available large un-cooled micro-bolometer arrays (as large as 1024 x 768 pixels) for a variety of thermal imaging applications. Different thermo-sensing materials have been employed as thermo sensing elements as Vanadium Oxide (VO{sub x}), metals, and amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors. Those materials present good characteristics but also have some disadvantages. As a consequence none of the commercially available arrays contain optimum pixels with an optimum thermo-sensing material. This paper reviews the development of the un-cooled bolometer technology and the research achievements on this area, with special attention on the key factors that would lead to improve the pixels performance characteristics. The work considers the R and D of microbolometer arrays and the integration with MEMS and IC technologies. A comparative study with the state of the art and data reported in literature is presented. Finally, further directions of uncooled bolometer based in thin films materials are also discussed in this paper. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Nanometric Cutting of Silicon with an Amorphous-Crystalline Layered Structure: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinshi; Fang, Fengzhou; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Materials with specific nanometric layers are of great value in both theoretical and applied research. The nanometric layer could have a significant influence on the response to the mechanical loading. In this paper, the nanometric cutting on the layered systems of silicon has been studied by molecular dynamics. This kind of composite structure with amorphous layer and crystalline substrate is important for nanomachining. Material deformation, stress status, and chip formation, which are the key issues in nano-cutting, are analyzed. A new chip formation mechanism, i.e., the mixture of extrusion and shear, has been observed. In addition, from the perspective of engineering, some specific composite models show the desired properties due to the low subsurface damage or large material removal rate. The results enrich the cutting theory and provide guidance on nanometric machining.

  11. Using amorphous silicon solar cells to boost the viability of luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, Daniel J. [Physics Department, Imperial College London, South Kensington campus, SW7 2AZ, London (United Kingdom); Sark, Wilfried G.J.H.M. van [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Science, Technology and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands); Velthuijsen, Steven T.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    We have, for the first time, designed and fabricated hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells to be used in conjunction with Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs). LSCs are planar plastic sheets doped with organic dyes that absorb solar illumination and down shift the energy to narrowband luminescence which is collected by solar cells attached to the sheet edge. We fabricated an LSC module with two bonded solar cells and performed characterisation with the cells connected in series and parallel configurations. We find that the LSC module has an optical collection efficiency of 9.5% and an optimum power conversion efficiency of approaching 1% when the cells are in a parallel connection. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Serially Connected Micro Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells for Compact High-Voltage Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoon Nam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a compact amorphous silicon (a-Si solar module to be used as high-voltage power supply. In comparison with the organic solar module, the main advantages of the a-Si solar module are its compatibility with photolithography techniques and relatively high power conversion efficiency. The open circuit voltage of a-Si solar cells can be easily controlled by serially interconnecting a-Si solar cells. Moreover, the a-Si solar module can be easily patterned by photolithography in any desired shapes with high areal densities. Using the photolithographic technique, we fabricate a compact a-Si solar module with noticeable photovoltaic characteristics as compared with the reported values for high-voltage power supplies.

  13. 10.5% efficient polymer and amorphous silicon hybrid tandem photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehwan; Hong, Ziruo; Li, Gang; Song, Tze-Bin; Chey, Jay; Lee, Yun Seog; You, Jingbi; Chen, Chun-Chao; Sadana, Devendra K.; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Thin-film solar cells made with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) or organic semiconductors are considered as promising renewable energy sources due to their low manufacturing cost and light weight. However, the efficiency of single-junction a-Si:H or organic solar cells is typically photovoltaic cell by employing an a-Si:H film as a front sub-cell and a low band gap polymer:fullerene blend film as a back cell on planar glass substrates. Monolithic integration of 6.0% efficienct a-Si:H and 7.5% efficient polymer:fullerene blend solar cells results in a power conversion efficiency of 10.5%. Such high-efficiency thin-film tandem cells can be achieved by optical management and interface engineering of fully optimized high-performance front and back cells without sacrificing photovoltaic performance in both cells.

  14. Direct visualization of photoinduced glassy dynamics on the amorphous silicon carbide surface by STM movies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Nienhaus, Lea; Haasch, Richard T.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Glassy dynamics can be controlled by light irradiation. Sub- and above-bandgap irradiation cause numerous phenomena in glasses including photorelaxation, photoexpansion, photodarkening and pohtoinduced fluidity. We used scanning tunneling microscopy to study surface glassy dynamics of amorphous silicon carbide irradiated with above- bandgap 532 nm light. Surface clusters of ~ 4-5 glass forming unit in diameter hop mostly in a two-state fashion, both without and with irradiation. Upon irradiation, the average surface hopping activity increases by a factor of 3. A very long (~1 day) movie of individual clusters with varying laser power density provides direct evidence for photoinduced enhanced hopping on the glass surfaces. We propose two mechanisms: heating and electronic for the photoenhanced surface dynamics.

  15. Amorphous silicon pixel radiation detectors and associated thin film transistor electronics readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Drewery, J.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.; Mireshghi, A.

    1994-10-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin (1 {mu}m) and thick (>30 {mu}m) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and {gamma} rays. For x-ray, {gamma} ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. Deposition techniques using helium dilution, which produce samples with low stress are described. Pixel arrays for flux exposures can be readout by transistor, single diode or two diode switches. Polysilicon charge sensitive pixel amplifiers for single event detection are described. Various applications in nuclear, particle physics, x-ray medical imaging, neutron crystallography, and radionuclide chromatography are discussed.

  16. Picosecond and nanosecond laser annealing and simulation of amorphous silicon thin films for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakos, I.; Zergioti, I.; Vamvakas, V.; Tsoukalas, D.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a picosecond diode pumped solid state laser and a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser have been used for the annealing and the partial nano-crystallization of an amorphous silicon layer. These experiments were conducted as an alternative/complementary to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for fabrication of micromorph tandem solar cell. The laser experimental work was combined with simulations of the annealing process, in terms of temperature distribution evolution, in order to predetermine the optimum annealing conditions. The annealed material was studied, as a function of several annealing parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, fluence), as far as it concerns its structural properties, by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and micro-Raman techniques.

  17. 10.5% efficient polymer and amorphous silicon hybrid tandem photovoltaic cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehwan; Hong, Ziruo; Li, Gang; Song, Tze-bin; Chey, Jay; Lee, Yun Seog; You, Jingbi; Chen, Chun-Chao; Sadana, Devendra K; Yang, Yang

    2015-03-04

    Thin-film solar cells made with amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) or organic semiconductors are considered as promising renewable energy sources due to their low manufacturing cost and light weight. However, the efficiency of single-junction a-Si:H or organic solar cells is typically photovoltaic cell by employing an a-Si:H film as a front sub-cell and a low band gap polymer:fullerene blend film as a back cell on planar glass substrates. Monolithic integration of 6.0% efficienct a-Si:H and 7.5% efficient polymer:fullerene blend solar cells results in a power conversion efficiency of 10.5%. Such high-efficiency thin-film tandem cells can be achieved by optical management and interface engineering of fully optimized high-performance front and back cells without sacrificing photovoltaic performance in both cells.

  18. Mapping between atomistic simulations and Eshelby inclusions in the shear deformation of an amorphous silicon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaret, T.; Tanguy, A.; Boioli, F.; Rodney, D.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we perform quasistatic shear simulations of model amorphous silicon bulk samples with Stillinger-Weber-type potentials. Local plastic rearrangements identified based on local energy variations are fitted through their displacement fields on collections of Eshelby spherical inclusions, allowing determination of their transformation strain tensors. The latter are then used to quantitatively reproduce atomistic stress-strain curves, in terms of both shear and pressure components. We demonstrate that our methodology is able to capture the plastic behavior predicted by different Stillinger-Weber potentials, in particular, their different shear tension coupling. These calculations justify the decomposition of plasticity into shear transformations used so far in mesoscale models and provide atomic-scale parameters that can be used to limit the empiricism needed in such models up to now.

  19. Investigation of the degradation of a thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dyk, E.E.; Audouard, A.; Meyer, E.L. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Woolard, C.D. [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

    2007-01-23

    The degradation of a thin-film hydrogenated single-junction amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) photovoltaic (PV) module has been studied. We investigated the different modes of electrical and physical degradation of a-Si:H PV modules by employing a degradation and failure assessment procedure used in conjunction with analytical techniques, including, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry. This paper reveals that due to their thickness, thin films are very sensitive to the type of degradation observed. Moreover, this paper deals with the problems associated with the module encapsulant, poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate) (EVA). The main objective of this study was to establish the influence of outdoor environmental conditions on the performance of a thin-film PV module comprising a-Si:H single-junction cells. (author)

  20. High-Sensitivity X-ray Polarimetry with Amorphous Silicon Active-Matrix Pixel Proportional Counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J. K.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jahoda, K.; Ready, S. E.; Street, R. A.

    2003-01-01

    Photoelectric X-ray polarimeters based on pixel micropattern gas detectors (MPGDs) offer order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity over more traditional techniques based on X-ray scattering. This new technique places some of the most interesting astronomical observations within reach of even a small, dedicated mission. The most sensitive instrument would be a photoelectric polarimeter at the focus of 2 a very large mirror, such as the planned XEUS. Our efforts are focused on a smaller pathfinder mission, which would achieve its greatest sensitivity with large-area, low-background, collimated polarimeters. We have recently demonstrated a MPGD polarimeter using amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) readout suitable for the focal plane of an X-ray telescope. All the technologies used in the demonstration polarimeter are scalable to the areas required for a high-sensitivity collimated polarimeter. Leywords: X-ray polarimetry, particle tracking, proportional counter, GEM, pixel readout

  1. Photoelectronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films deposited by R. F sputtering and glow discharge methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rahman, M.; Madkour, H. (Faculty of Science, Aswan (Egypt)); Hassan, H.H.; El-Desouki, S. (Cairo Univ., Giza (Egypt))

    1989-09-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films a-Si:H were deposited by both R.F. sputtering in a planar magnetron configuration and glow discharge methods on Corning glass substrates at different substrate temperatures. The dc and ac photoconductivities of the deposited films were extensively studied as a function of temperature, photon energy and photo-excitation intensity. The results showed that, the dark and photoconductivities have different dependency regions on temperature with different activation energies in the range of 0.08-0.20 eV. It has been also found that the photoconductivity is influenced by the method of deposition and the deposition parameters, indicating that the density of gap states is sensitive to the deposition conditions. The photoconductivity ({sigma}{sub ph}) has a power dependence on the illumination intensity (I) of the form {sigma}{sub ph} {alpha} I {sup {nu}}, where {nu} is a constant and was found also to be increase with temperature.

  2. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material\\'s luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon. This journal is

  3. Band-gap engineering by molecular mechanical strain-induced giant tuning of the luminescence in colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, A; El Demellawi, J K; Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2014-12-14

    Nano-silicon is a nanostructured material in which quantum or spatial confinement is the origin of the material's luminescence. When nano-silicon is broken into colloidal crystalline nanoparticles, its luminescence can be tuned across the visible spectrum only when the sizes of the nanoparticles, which are obtained via painstaking filtration methods that are difficult to scale up because of low yield, vary. Bright and tunable colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures have not yet been reported. In this letter, we report on a 100 nm modulation in the emission of freestanding colloidal amorphous porous silicon nanostructures via band-gap engineering. The mechanism responsible for this tunable modulation, which is independent of the size of the individual particles and their distribution, is the distortion of the molecular orbitals by a strained silicon-silicon bond angle. This mechanism is also responsible for the amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of silicon.

  4. Spectroscopic Ellipsometry Studies of n-i-p Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Based Photovoltaic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Karki Gautam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Optimization of thin film photovoltaics (PV relies on characterizing the optoelectronic and structural properties of each layer and correlating these properties with device performance. Growth evolution diagrams have been used to guide production of materials with good optoelectronic properties in the full hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H PV device configuration. The nucleation and evolution of crystallites forming from the amorphous phase were studied using in situ near-infrared to ultraviolet spectroscopic ellipsometry during growth of films prepared as a function of hydrogen to reactive gas flow ratio R = [H2]/[SiH4]. In conjunction with higher photon energy measurements, the presence and relative absorption strength of silicon-hydrogen infrared modes were measured by infrared extended ellipsometry measurements to gain insight into chemical bonding. Structural and optical models have been developed for the back reflector (BR structure consisting of sputtered undoped zinc oxide (ZnO on top of silver (Ag coated glass substrates. Characterization of the free-carrier absorption properties in Ag and the ZnO + Ag interface as well as phonon modes in ZnO were also studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Measurements ranging from 0.04 to 5 eV were used to extract layer thicknesses, composition, and optical response in the form of complex dielectric function spectra (ε = ε1 + iε2 for Ag, ZnO, the ZnO + Ag interface, and undoped a-Si:H layer in a substrate n-i-p a-Si:H based PV device structure.

  5. Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Sensor Deposited on Integrated Circuit for Radiation Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Despeisse, M; Jarron, P; Kaplon, J; Moraes, D; Nardulli, A; Powolny, F; Wyrsch, N

    2008-01-01

    Radiation detectors based on the deposition of a 10 to 30 mum thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) sensor directly on top of integrated circuits have been developed. The performance of this detector technology has been assessed for the first time in the context of particle detectors. Three different circuits were designed in a quarter micron CMOS technology for these studies. The so-called TFA (Thin-Film on ASIC) detectors obtained after deposition of a-Si:H sensors on the developed circuits are presented. High internal electric fields (104 to 105 V/cm) can be built in the a-Si:H sensor and overcome the low mobility of electrons and holes in this amorphous material. However, the deposited sensor's leakage current at such fields turns out to be an important parameter which limits the performance of a TFA detector. Its detailed study is presented as well as the detector's pixel segmentation. Signal induction by generated free carrier motion in the a-Si:H sensor has been characterized using a 660 nm pul...

  6. Highly ordered amorphous silicon-carbon alloys obtained by RF PECVD

    CERN Document Server

    Pereyra, I; Carreno, M N P; Prado, R J; Fantini, M C A

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that close to stoichiometry RF PECVD amorphous silicon carbon alloys deposited under silane starving plasma conditions exhibit a tendency towards c-Si C chemical order. Motivated by this trend, we further explore the effect of increasing RF power and H sub 2 dilution of the gaseous mixtures, aiming to obtain the amorphous counterpart of c-Si C by the RF-PECVD technique. Doping experiments were also performed on ordered material using phosphorus and nitrogen as donor impurities and boron and aluminum as acceptor ones. For nitrogen a doping efficiency close to device quality a-Si:H was obtained, the lower activation energy being 0,12 eV with room temperature dark conductivity of 2.10 sup - sup 3 (OMEGA.cm). Nitrogen doping efficiency was higher than phosphorous for all studied samples. For p-type doping, results indicate that, even though the attained conductivity values are not device levels, aluminum doping conducted to a promising shift in the Fermi level. Also, aluminum resulted a more efficie...

  7. Electronic properties of embedded graphene: doped amorphous silicon/CVD graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezki, Hakim; Boutchich, Mohamed; Alamarguy, David; Madouri, Ali; Alvarez, José; Cabarrocas, Pere Roca i.; Kleider, Jean-Paul; Yao, Fei; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-10-01

    Large-area graphene film is of great interest for a wide spectrum of electronic applications, such as field effect devices, displays, and solar cells, among many others. Here, we fabricated heterostructures composed of graphene (Gr) grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper substrate and transferred to SiO2/Si substrates, capped by n- or p-type doped amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Using Raman scattering we show that despite the mechanical strain induced by the a-Si:H deposition, the structural integrity of the graphene is preserved. Moreover, Hall effect measurements directly on the embedded graphene show that the electronic properties of CVD graphene can be modulated according to the doping type of the a-Si:H as well as its phase i.e. amorphous or nanocrystalline. The sheet resistance varies from 360 Ω sq-1 to 1260 Ω sq-1 for the (p)-a-Si:H/Gr (n)-a-Si:H/Gr, respectively. We observed a temperature independent hole mobility of up to 1400 cm2 V-1 s-1 indicating that charge impurity is the principal mechanism limiting the transport in this heterostructure. We have demonstrated that embedding CVD graphene under a-Si:H is a viable route for large scale graphene based solar cells or display applications.

  8. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidgunst, C; Ritter, D; Lang, E

    2007-09-01

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems, (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology.

  9. Monte Carlo calculation of the spatial response (Modulated Transfer Function) of a scintillation flat panel and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juste, Belén; Miró, Rafael; Monasor, Paula; Verdú, Gumersindo

    2015-11-01

    Phosphor screens are commonly used in many X-ray imaging applications. The design and optimization of these detectors can be achieved using Monte Carlo codes to simulate radiation transport in scintillation materials and to improve the spatial response. This work presents an exhaustive procedure to measure the spatial resolution of a scintillation flat panel image and to evaluate the agreement with data obtained by simulation. To evaluate the spatial response we have used the Modulated Transfer Function (MTF) parameter. According to this, we have obtained the Line Spread Function (LSF) of the system since the Fourier Transform (FT) of the LSF gives the MTF. The experimental images were carried out using a medical X-ray tube (Toshiba E7299X) and a flat panel (Hammamatsu C9312SK). Measurements were based on the slit methodology experimental implementation, which measures the response of the system to a line. LSF measurements have been performed using a 0.2 mm wide lead slit superimposed over the flat panel. The detector screen was modelled with MCNP (version 6) Monte Carlo simulation code in order to analyze the effect of the acquisition setup configuration and to compare the response of scintillator screens with the experimental results. MCNP6 offers the possibility of studying the optical physics parameters (optical scattering and absorption coefficients) that occur in the phosphor screen. The study has been tested for different X-ray tube voltages, from 100 to 140 kV. An acceptable convergence between the MTF results obtained with MCNP6 and the experimental measurements have been obtained.

  10. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon applied in very thin tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicho, Sandra

    2011-07-28

    Thin-film solar cells are fabricated by low-cost production processes, and are therefore an alternative to conventionally used wafer solar cells based on crystalline silicon. Due to the different band gaps, tandem cells that consist of amorphous (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline ({mu}c-Si:H) single junction solar cells deposited on top of each other use the solar spectrum much more efficient than single junction solar cells. The silicon layers are usually deposited on TCO (Transparent Conductive Oxide)-coated glass and metal- or plastic foils. Compared to the CdTe and CIGS based thin-film technologies, silicon thin-film solar cells have the advantage that no limitation of raw material supply is expected and no toxic elements are used. Nevertheless, the production cost per Wattpeak is the decisive factor concerning competitiveness and can be reduced by, e.g., shorter deposition times or reduced material consumption. Both cost-reducing conceptions are simultaneously achieved by reducing the a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si:H absorber layer thicknesses in a tandem device. In the work on hand, the influence of an absorber layer thickness reduction up to 77% on the photovoltaic parameters of a-Si:H/{mu}c-Si:H tandem solar cells was investigated. An industry-oriented Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (RF-PECVD) system was used to deposit the solar cells on glass substrates coated with randomly structured TCO layers. The thicknesses of top and bottom cell absorber layers were varied by adjusting the deposition time. Reduced layer thicknesses lead to lower absorption and, hence, to reduced short-circuit current densities which, however, are partially balanced by higher open-circuit voltages and fill factors. Furthermore, by using very thin amorphous top cells, the light-induced degradation decreases tremendously. Accordingly, a thickness reduction of 75% led to an efficiency loss of only 21 %. By adjusting the parameters for the deposition of a-Si:H top cells, a

  11. Volumetric soft tissue brain imaging on xCAT, a mobile flat-panel x-ray CT system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2009-02-01

    We discuss the ongoing development of soft-tissue imaging capabilities on xCAT, a highly portable, flat-panel based cone-beam X-ray CT platform. By providing the ability to rapidly detect intra-cranial bleeds and other symptoms of stroke directly at the patient's bedside, our new system can potentially significantly improve the management of neurological emergency and intensive care patients. The paper reports on the design of our system, as well as on the methods used to combat artifacts due to scatter, non-linear detector response and scintillator glare. Images of cadaveric head samples are also presented and compared with conventional CT scans.

  12. Radiation dose reduction using a CdZnTe-based computed tomography system: Comparison to flat-panel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Huy Q.; Ducote, Justin L.; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Although x-ray projection mammography has been very effective in early detection of breast cancer, its utility is reduced in the detection of small lesions that are occult or in dense breasts. One drawback is that the inherent superposition of parenchymal structures makes visualization of small lesions difficult. Breast computed tomography using flat-panel detectors has been developed to address this limitation by producing three-dimensional data while at the same time providing more comfort to the patients by eliminating breast compression. Flat panels are charge integrating detectors and therefore lack energy resolution capability. Recent advances in solid state semiconductor x-ray detector materials and associated electronics allow the investigation of x-ray imaging systems that use a photon counting and energy discriminating detector, which is the subject of this article. Methods: A small field-of-view computed tomography (CT) system that uses CdZnTe (CZT) photon counting detector was compared to one that uses a flat-panel detector for different imaging tasks in breast imaging. The benefits afforded by the CZT detector in the energy weighting modes were investigated. Two types of energy weighting methods were studied: Projection based and image based. Simulation and phantom studies were performed with a 2.5 cm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cylinder filled with iodine and calcium contrast objects. Simulation was also performed on a 10 cm breast specimen. Results: The contrast-to-noise ratio improvements as compared to flat-panel detectors were 1.30 and 1.28 (projection based) and 1.35 and 1.25 (image based) for iodine over PMMA and hydroxylapatite over PMMA, respectively. Corresponding simulation values were 1.81 and 1.48 (projection based) and 1.85 and 1.48 (image based). Dose reductions using the CZT detector were 52.05% and 49.45% for iodine and hydroxyapatite imaging, respectively. Image-based weighting was also found to have the least beam

  13. The Effects of Hydrogen on the Potential-Energy Surface of Amorphous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Jean-Francois; Mousseau, Normand

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is an important semiconducting material used in many applications from solar cells to transistors. In 2010, Houssem et al. [1], using the open-ended saddle-point search method, ART nouveau, studied the characteristics of the potential energy landscape of a-Si as a function of relaxation. Here, we extend this study and follow the impact of hydrogen doping on the same a-Si models as a function of doping level. Hydrogen atoms are first attached to dangling bonds, then are positioned to relieve strained bonds of fivefold coordinated silicon atoms. Once these sites are saturated, further doping is achieved with a Monte-Carlo bond switching method that preserves coordination and reduces stress [2]. Bonded interactions are described with a modified Stillinger-Weber potential and non-bonded Si-H and H-H interactions with an adapted Slater-Buckingham potential. Large series of ART nouveau searches are initiated on each model, resulting in an extended catalogue of events that characterize the evolution of potential energy surface as a function of H-doping. [4pt] [1] Houssem et al., Phys Rev. Lett., 105, 045503 (2010)[0pt] [2] Mousseau et al., Phys Rev. B, 41, 3702 (1990)

  14. Numerical Analysis of Lamellar Gratings for Light-Trapping in Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Gablinger, David I

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the material specific absorption accurately using a modal method by determining the integral of the Poynting vector around the boundary of a specific material. Given that the accuracy of our method is only determined by the number of modes included, the material specific absorption can be used as a quality measure for the light-trapping performance. We use this method to investigate metallic gratings and find nearly degenerate plasmons at the interface between metal and amorphous silicon (a-Si). The plasmons cause large undesired absorption in the metal part of a grating as used in a-Si cells. We explore ways to alleviate the parasitic absorption in the metal by appropriate choice of the geometry. Separating the diffraction grating from the back reflector helps, lining silver or aluminum with a dielectric helps as well. Gratings with depth > 60nm are preferred, and periods > 600nm are not useful. Maximum absorption in silicon can occur for less thick a-Si than is standard. We also ...

  15. Band engineering of amorphous silicon ruthenium thin film and its near-infrared absorption enhancement combined with nano-holes pattern on back surface of silicon substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Anran; Zhong, Hao; Li, Wei; Gu, Deen; Jiang, Xiangdong; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-10-01

    Silicon is widely used in semiconductor industry but has poor performance in near-infrared photoelectronic devices because of its bandgap limit. In this study, a narrow bandgap silicon rich semiconductor is achieved by introducing ruthenium (Ru) into amorphous silicon (a-Si) to form amorphous silicon ruthenium (a-Si1-xRux) thin films through co-sputtering. The increase of Ru concentration leads to an enhancement of light absorption and a narrower bandgap. Meanwhile, a specific light trapping technique is employed to realize high absorption of a-Si1-xRux thin film in a finite thickness to avoid unnecessary carrier recombination. A double-layer absorber comprising of a-Si1-xRux thin film and silicon random nano-holes layer is formed on the back surface of silicon substrates, and significantly improves near-infrared absorption while the leaky light intensity is less than 5%. This novel absorber, combining narrow bandgap thin film with light trapping structure, may have a potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic devices.

  16. Microcrystalline B-doped window layers prepared near amorphous to microcrystalline transition by HWCVD and its application in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany)]. E-mail: kumarp@rhrk.uni-kl.de; Kupich, M. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany); Grunsky, D. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany); Schroeder, B. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany)

    2006-04-20

    The electronic and structural properties of p-type microcrystalline silicon films prepared near the microcrystalline to amorphous ({mu}c-amorphous) transition by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition are studied. Silane is used as a source gas while H{sub 2} as diluent and trimethylboron (TMB) and boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}) as doping gases. Increasing TMB concentration from 0.01% to 5% favors the amorphous growth whereas for BF{sub 3} the crystalline fraction remains constant. The dark conductivity ({sigma} {sub d}) of {mu}c-Si:H p-layers remains approximately constant for TMB 1-5% at constant crystalline fraction X {sub c}. This dark conductivity behavior is attributed to the decrease in doping efficiency with increasing TMB concentration. The best initial efficiency obtained for a 400 nm amorphous pin solar cell with optimized {mu}c-Si:H p-layer is 7.7% (V {sub oc} = 874 mV, J {sub sc} = 12.91 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 68%)

  17. Preferred orientations of laterally grown silicon films over amorphous substrates using the vapor–liquid–solid technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBoeuf, J. L., E-mail: jerome.leboeuf@mail.mcgill.ca; Brodusch, N.; Gauvin, R.; Quitoriano, N. J. [Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2014-12-28

    A novel method has been optimized so that adhesion layers are no longer needed to reliably deposit patterned gold structures on amorphous substrates. Using this technique allows for the fabrication of amorphous oxide templates known as micro-crucibles, which confine a vapor–liquid–solid (VLS) catalyst of nominally pure gold to a specific geometry. Within these confined templates of amorphous materials, faceted silicon crystals have been grown laterally. The novel deposition technique, which enables the nominally pure gold catalyst, involves the undercutting of an initial chromium adhesion layer. Using electron backscatter diffraction it was found that silicon nucleated in these micro-crucibles were 30% single crystals, 45% potentially twinned crystals and 25% polycrystals for the experimental conditions used. Single, potentially twinned, and polycrystals all had an aversion to growth with the (1 0 0) surface parallel to the amorphous substrate. Closer analysis of grain boundaries of potentially twinned and polycrystalline samples revealed that the overwhelming majority of them were of the 60° Σ3 coherent twin boundary type. The large amount of coherent twin boundaries present in the grown, two-dimensional silicon crystals suggest that lateral VLS growth occurs very close to thermodynamic equilibrium. It is suggested that free energy fluctuations during growth or cooling, and impurities were the causes for this twinning.

  18. Nanocrystalline silicon and silicon quantum dots formation within amorphous silicon carbide by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method controlling the Argon dilution of the process gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha, E-mail: erpc@iacs.res.in

    2012-11-01

    Structural and optical properties of the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method from a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) diluted in argon (Ar) have been studied with variation of Ar dilution from 94% to 98.4%. It is observed that nanocrystalline silicon starts to form within the a-SiC:H matrix by increasing the dilution to 96%. With further increase in Ar dilution to 98% formation of the silicon nanocrystals (nc-Si) with variable size is enhanced. The optical band gap (E{sub g}) of the a-SiC:H film decreases from 2.0 eV to 1.9 eV with increase in Ar dilution from 96% to 98% as the a-SiC:H films gradually become Si rich. On increasing the Ar dilution further to 98.4% leads to the appearance of crystalline silicon quantum dots (c-Si q-dots) of nearly uniform size of 3.5 nm. The quantum confinement effect is apparent from the sharp increase in the E{sub g} value to 2.6 eV. The phase transformation phenomenon from nc-Si within the a-SiC:H films to Si q-dot were further studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the grazing angle X-ray diffraction spectra. A relaxation in the lattice strain has been observed with the formation of Si q-dots.

  19. A critical appraisal of the factors affecting energy production from amorphous silicon photovoltaic arrays in a maritime climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalg, R.; Betts, T.R.; Williams, S.R.; Sauter, D.; Infield, D.G. [Loughborough University (United Kingdom). Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology; Kearney, M.J. [University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom). School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, Advanced Technology Institute

    2004-12-01

    Contradictory reports exist in the literature regarding the energy production from amorphous silicon photovoltaic arrays. The majority claims high-energy output compared to crystalline silicon arrays of the same power rating (i.e. high kW h/kW{sub p}), but some reports point to less favourable comparisons. The reasons for these conflicting reports are investigated using long-term measurements of the I-V characteristics of a number of amorphous silicon devices, in conjunction with in situ measurements of the solar spectrum and other relevant environmental parameters. It is shown that the variation in the performance of devices produced by different manufacturers is so significant that one cannot speak of the performance of amorphous silicon devices in general; one has to investigate each type of amorphous silicon panel separately. The causes of differences in energy production are investigated in detail. The major factor impacting on the seasonal performance in the UK is identified to be variations in the solar spectrum. Single junction devices exhibit some seasonal thermal annealing but multi-junctions do not show this effect at a significant level. Scope for further improvement is identified, largely in the photon absorption. The response to different spectra can be modified to some extent, which would bridge the gap between the best and the worst performers in the field. It is also shown that in the case of multi-junction devices an optimised current matching might bring a 5% increase in energy production for this location. Differences in the magnitude of the fill factor have been identified to be the second most significant cause for performance variation between the different samples in the test, suggesting additional scope for improvement. (author)

  20. Dynamic modeling of the microalgae cultivation phase for energy production in open raceway ponds and flat panel photobioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eMarsullo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model of microalgae cultivation phase is presented in this work. Two cultivation technologies are taken into account: the open raceway pond and the flat panel photobioreactor. For each technology, the model is able to evaluate the microalgae areal and volumetric productivity and the energy production and consumption. Differently from the most common existing models in literature, which deal with a specific part of the overall cultivation process, the model presented here includes all physical and chemical quantities that mostly affect microalgae growth: the equation of the specific growth rate for the microalgae is influenced by CO2 and nutrients concentration in the water, light intensity, temperature of the water in the reactor and by the microalgae species being considered. All these input parameters can be tuned to obtain reliable predictions. A comparison with experimental data taken from the literature shows that the predictions are consistent, slightly overestimating the productivity in case of closed photobioreactor. The results obtained by the simulation runs are consistent with those found in literature, being the areal productivity for the open raceway pond between 50 and 70 t/(ha*year in Southern Spain (Sevilla and Brazil (Petrolina and between 250 and 350 t/(ha*year for the flat panel photobioreactor in the same locations.

  1. Use of personal digital assistants for retrieval of medical images and data on high-resolution flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; McCoy, J Michael; McGill, D Ric; Li, Minglin; Brown, Allen

    2003-01-01

    For its new acute care hospital, the University of California at Los Angeles is evaluating innovative technology involving high-resolution flat panel display devices configured as "network appliances" that can be wall mounted for use in the retrieval and display of medical images and data. Physicians and healthcare providers can log on with wireless handheld computers, which can serve as an identification device as well as a navigational tool for selecting patient records and data. These data are displayed and manipulated on the flat panel display without the need for a keyboard or mouse. A prototype was developed with commercially available image display software, which was modified to allow the remote control of software functions from a handheld device through an infrared communication port. The system also allows navigation through the patient data in a World Wide Web-based electronic patient record. This prototype illustrates the evolution of radiologic facilities toward "shareable" high-quality display devices that allow more convenient and cost-effective access to medical images and related data in complex clinical environments, resulting in a paradigm shift in data navigation and accessibility.

  2. Synthesis of Poly-Silicon Thin Films on Glass Substrate Using Laser Initiated Metal Induced Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon for Space Power Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Safe, Husam H.; Naseem, Hameed A.; Brown, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Poly-silicon thin films on glass substrates are synthesized using laser initiated metal induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. These films can be used to fabricate solar cells on low cost glass and flexible substrates. The process starts by depositing 200 nm amorphous silicon films on the glass substrates. Following this, 200 nm of sputtered aluminum films were deposited on top of the silicon layers. The samples are irradiated with an argon ion cw laser beam for annealing. Laser power densities ranging from 4 to 9 W/cm2 were used in the annealing process. Each area on the sample is irradiated for a different exposure time. Optical microscopy was used to examine any cracks in the films and loss of adhesion to the substrates. X-Ray diffraction patterns from the initial results indicated the crystallization in the films. Scanning electron microscopy shows dendritic growth. The composition analysis of the crystallized films was conducted using Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy. The results of poly-silicon films synthesis on space qualified flexible substrates such as Kapton are also presented.

  3. Observation by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy of strongly inverted surface layers at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, O. A.; Alvarez, J.; Gushina, E. V.; Favre, W.; Gueunier-Farret, M. E.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Terukov, E. I.; Kleider, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Heterojunctions made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) are examined by conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Conductive channels at both (n )a-Si:H/(p)c-Si and (p)a-Si:H/(n)c-Si interfaces are clearly revealed. These are attributed to two-dimension electron and hole gases due to strong inversion layers at the c-Si surface in agreement with previous planar conductance measurements. The presence of a hole gas in (p )a-Si:H/(n)c-Si structures implies a quite large valence band offset (EVc-Si-EVa-Si:H>0.25 eV).

  4. Femtosecond laser-controlled self-assembly of amorphous-crystalline nanogratings in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto, Daniel; Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Hernandez-Rueda, Javier; Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembly (SA) of molecular units to form regular, periodic extended structures is a powerful bottom-up technique for nanopatterning, inspired by nature. SA can be triggered in all classes of solid materials, for instance, by femtosecond laser pulses leading to the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with a period slightly shorter than the laser wavelength. This approach, though, typically involves considerable material ablation, which leads to an unwanted increase of the surface roughness. We present a new strategy to fabricate high-precision nanograting structures in silicon, consisting of alternating amorphous and crystalline lines, with almost no material removal. The strategy can be applied to static irradiation experiments and can be extended into one and two dimensions by scanning the laser beam over the sample surface. We demonstrate that lines and areas with parallel nanofringe patterns can be written by an adequate choice of spot size, repetition rate and scan velocity, keeping a constant effective pulse number (N eff) per area for a given laser wavelength. A deviation from this pulse number leads either to inhomogeneous or ablative structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this approach can be used with different laser systems having widely different wavelengths (1030 nm, 800 nm, 400 nm), pulse durations (370 fs, 100 fs) and repetition rates (500 kHz, 100 Hz, single pulse) and that the grating period can also be tuned by changing the angle of laser beam incidence. The grating structures can be erased by irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse, triggering recrystallization of the amorphous stripes. Given the large differences in electrical conductivity between the two phases, our structures could find new applications in nanoelectronics.

  5. The Temperature Dependence Coefficients of Amorphous Silicon and Crystalline Photovoltaic Modules Using Malaysian Field Test Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Shaari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependence coefficients of amorphous silicon and crystalline photovoltaic (PV modules using Malaysian field data have been obtained using linear regression technique. This is achieved by studying three test stand-alone PV-battery systems using 62 Wp a-Si, 225 Wp multi-crystalline and 225 Wp mono-crystalline PV modules. These systems were designed to provide electricity for rural domestic loads at 200 W, 500 W and 530 W respectively. The systems were installed in the field with data monitored using data loggers. Upon analysis, the study found that the normalized power output per operating array temperature for the amorphous silicon modules, multi-crystalline modules and mono-crystalline modules were: +0.037 per°C, +0.0225 per °C and +0.0263 per °C respectively. In addition, at a solar irradiance value of 500 Wm-2, the current, voltage, power and efficiency dependence coefficients on operating array temperatures obtained from linear regression were: +37.0 mA per °C, -31.8 mV per °C, -0.1036 W per °C and -0.0214% per °C, for the a-Si modules, +22.5 mA per °C, -39.4 mV per °C, -0.2525 W per °C, -0.072 % per °C for the multi-crystalline modules and +26.3 mA per °C, -32.6 mV per °C, -0.1742 W per °C, -0.0523 % per °C for the mono-crystalline modules. These findings have a direct impact on all systems design and sizing in similar climate regions. It is thus recommended that the design and sizing of PV systems in the hot and humid climate regions of the globe give due address to these findings.

  6. Photostability Assessment in Amorphous-Silicon Solar Cells; Determinacion de la Fotoestabilidad en Celulas Solares de Silicio Amorfo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandia, J. J.; Carabe, J.; Fabero, F.; Jimenez, R.; Rivero, J. M. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The present status of amorphous-silicon-solar-cell research and development at CIEMAT requires the possibility to characterise the devices prepared from the point of view of their stability against sunlight exposure. Therefore a set of tools providing such a capacity has been developed. Together with an introduction to photovoltaic applications of amorphous silicon and to the photodegradation problem, the present work describes the process of setting up these tools. An indoor controlled-photodegradation facility has been designed and built, and a procedure has been developed for the measurement of J-V characteristics in well established conditions. This method is suitable for a kinds of solar cells, even for those for which no model is still available. The photodegradation and characterisation of some cells has allowed to validate both the new testing facility and method. (Author) 14 refs.

  7. Behavioral data of thin-film single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic modules under outdoor long term exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kichou, Sofiane; Silvestre, Santiago; Nofuentes, Gustavo; Torres-Ramírez, Miguel; Chouder, Aissa; Guasch, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Four years׳ behavioral data of thin-film single junction amorphous silicon (a-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules installed in a relatively dry and sunny inland site with a Continental-Mediterranean climate (in the city of Jaén, Spain) are presented in this article. The shared data contributes to clarify how the Light Induced Degradation (LID) impacts the output power generated by the PV array, especially in the first days of exposure under outdoor conditions. Furthermore, a valuable methodology is provided in this data article permitting the assessment of the degradation rate and the stabilization period of the PV modules. Further discussions and interpretations concerning the data shared in this article can be found in the research paper "Characterization of degradation and evaluation of model parameters of amorphous silicon photovoltaic modules under outdoor long term exposure" (Kichou et al., 2016) [1].

  8. Enhanced photocurrent in thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells via shape controlled three-dimensional nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilali, Mohamed M; Yang, Shuqiang; Miller, Mike; Xu, Frank; Banerjee, Sanjay; Sreenivasan, S V

    2012-10-12

    In this paper, we have explored manufacturable approaches to sub-wavelength controlled three-dimensional (3D) nano-patterns with the goal of significantly enhancing the photocurrent in amorphous silicon solar cells. Here we demonstrate efficiency enhancement of about 50% over typical flat a-Si thin-film solar cells, and report an enhancement of 20% in optical absorption over Asahi textured glass by fabricating sub-wavelength nano-patterned a-Si on glass substrates. External quantum efficiency showed superior results for the 3D nano-patterned thin-film solar cells due to enhancement of broadband optical absorption. The results further indicate that this enhanced light trapping is achieved with minimal parasitic absorption losses in the deposited transparent conductive oxide for the nano-patterned substrate thin-film amorphous silicon solar cell configuration. Optical simulations are in good agreement with experimental results, and also show a significant enhancement in optical absorption, quantum efficiency and photocurrent.

  9. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Caniello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coating became three time stronger than in the case of a bare silicon substrate. Physical structure and microstructural proprieties of the coatings were investigated by means of a scan electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the films was measured by a scratch tester.

  10. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells. Annual technical report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, R.G.; Sato, H.; Liang, H.; Liu, X.; Thornton, J. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The general objective is to develop methods to deposit materials which can be used to make more efficient solar cells. The work is organized into three general tasks: Task 1. Develop improved methods for depositing and using transparent conductors of fluorine-doped zinc oxide in amorphous silicon solar cells Task 2. Deposit and evaluate titanium oxide as a reflection-enhancing diffusion barrier between amorphous silicon and an aluminum or silver back-reflector. Task 3. Deposit and evaluate electrically conductive titanium oxide as a transparent conducting layer on which more efficient and more stable superstrate cells can be deposited. About one-third of the current project resources are allocated to each of these three objectives.

  11. Thin-film amorphous silicon alloy research partnership, Phase I. Annual technical progress report, February 2, 1995--February 1, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guha, S. [United Solar Systems Corp., Troy, MI (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The principal objective of this R&D program is to expand, enhance and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for the development of high-performance, two-terminal multifunction amorphous silicon (a-Si) alloy modules. The near-term goal of the program is to achieve 12% stable module efficiency by 1998 using the multifunction approach. This report describes research on back reflectors of Ag/TiO{sub 2}/ZnO.

  12. Amorphous Silicon Single-Junction Thin-Film Solar Cell Exceeding 10% Efficiency by Design Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ikbal Kabir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion efficiency of a solar cell can substantially be increased by improved material properties and associated designs. At first, this study has adopted AMPS-1D (analysis of microelectronic and photonic structures simulation technique to design and optimize the cell parameters prior to fabrication, where the optimum design parameters can be validated. Solar cells of single junction based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H have been analyzed by using AMPS-1D simulator. The investigation has been made based on important model parameters such as thickness, doping concentrations, bandgap, and operating temperature and so forth. The efficiency of single junction a-Si:H can be achieved as high as over 19% after parametric optimization in the simulation, which might seem unrealistic with presently available technologies. Therefore, the numerically designed and optimized a-SiC:H/a-SiC:H-buffer/a-Si:H/a-Si:H solar cells have been fabricated by using PECVD (plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, where the best initial conversion efficiency of 10.02% has been achieved ( V,  mA/cm2 and for a small area cell (0.086 cm2. The quantum efficiency (QE characteristic shows the cell’s better spectral response in the wavelength range of 400 nm–650 nm, which proves it to be a potential candidate as the middle cell in a-Si-based multijunction structures.

  13. 25th anniversary article: organic field-effect transistors: the path beyond amorphous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-03-05

    Over the past 25 years, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have witnessed impressive improvements in materials performance by 3-4 orders of magnitude, and many of the key materials discoveries have been published in Advanced Materials. This includes some of the most recent demonstrations of organic field-effect transistors with performance that clearly exceeds that of benchmark amorphous silicon-based devices. In this article, state-of-the-art in OFETs are reviewed in light of requirements for demanding future applications, in particular active-matrix addressing for flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. An overview is provided over both small molecule and conjugated polymer materials for which field-effect mobilities exceeding > 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) have been reported. Current understanding is also reviewed of their charge transport physics that allows reaching such unexpectedly high mobilities in these weakly van der Waals bonded and structurally comparatively disordered materials with a view towards understanding the potential for further improvement in performance in the future.

  14. Morphological and Chemical Analysis Of Degraded Single Junction Amorphous Silicon Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osayemwenre, Gilbert; Meyer, Edson; Mamphweli, Sampson

    2017-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar modules have different defects and degradation characteristic modes. These defects/degradation modes normally heats up some regions in the PV module, depending on the degree and size of the localised heat or hot spot, the localized heat can rise above the temperature limit of the module thereby cause damage to the structural orientation. The presence of severe defect and degradation correlates with high temperature gradients that usually results in morphological damage especially under outdoor conditions. The present study investigates the effect of defect/degradation on the surface morphology of the single junction amorphous silicon modules (a-Si:H) during outdoor deployment. The observed structural damage was analysed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersion X-ray (EDX) to ascertain the elemental composition. Results show huge discrepancies in the chemical composition constitute alone different regions. The presence of high concentration of carbon and oxygen was found in the affected region. The authors sincerely thank GMDRC University of Fort Hare for financial support. The authors also wish to thank Eskom for financing this project.

  15. Field collapse due to band-tail charge in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi; Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    1996-05-01

    It is common for the fill factor to decrease with increasing illumination intensity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells. This is especially critical for thicker solar cells, because the decrease is more severe than in thinner cells. Usually, the fill factor under uniformly absorbed red light changes much more than under strongly absorbed blue light. The cause of this is usually assumed to arise from space charge trapped in deep defect states. The authors model this behavior of solar cells using the Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS) simulation program. The simulation shows that the decrease in fill factor is caused by photogenerated space charge trapped in the band-tail states rather than in defects. This charge screens the applied field, reducing the internal field. Owing to its lower drift mobility, the space charge due to holes exceeds that due to electrons and is the main cause of the field screening. The space charge in midgap states is small compared with that in the tails and can be ignored under normal solar-cell operating conditions. Experimentally, the authors measured the photocapacitance as a means to probe the collapsed field. They also explored the light intensity dependence of photocapacitance and explain the decrease of FF with the increasing light intensity.

  16. Phosphorus- and boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared using vaporized liquid cyclopentasilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Takashi, E-mail: mtakashi@jaist.ac.jp [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 (Japan); Takagishi, Hideyuki; Shen, Zhongrong; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya [Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1292 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ALCA, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan)

    2015-08-31

    A simple, inexpensive method for fabricating a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film using thermal chemical vapor deposition from cyclopentasilane (CPS) at atmospheric pressure with a substrate temperature of 370 °C is described. The reactant gas was generated from liquid CPS by vaporization in the deposition chamber. The vaporized CPS gas was transformed immediately into a-Si:H film on a heated substrate. The a-Si:H films could be doped either n- or p-type by dissolving appropriate amounts of white phosphorus or decaborane, respectively, in the liquid CPS before vaporization. This process allows deposition of doped a-Si:H films of photovoltaic device-quality without the need for handling, storage, or transportation of large amounts of gaseous reactants. - Highlights: • B and P doped a-Si:H films made from liquid materials is presented. • Decaborane and white phosphorus is dissolved in the liquid materials. • A simple, inexpensive method for fabricating a-Si:H films using non-vacuum process. • The doped a-Si:H films with usable quality for photovoltaic devices are deposited.

  17. Room Temperature Growth of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon Films by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Enhanced CVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yu; ZHANG Xiwen; HAN Gaorong

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films were deposited on Si (100) and glass substrates by dielectric barrier discharge enhanced chemical vapour deposition (DBD-CVD)in (SiH4+H2) atmosphere at room temperature.Results of the thickness measurement,SEM (scanning electron microscope),Raman,and FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) show that with the increase in the applied peak voltage,the deposition rate and network order of the films increase,and the hydrogen bonding configurations mainly in di-hydrogen (Si-H2) and poly hydrogen (SiH2)n are introduced into the films.The UV-visible transmission spectra show that with the decrease in Sill4/ (SiH4+H2) the thin films'band gap shifts from 1.92 eV to 2.17 eV.These experimental results are in agreement with the theoretic analysis of the DBD discharge.The deposition of a-Si:H films by the DBD-CVD method as reported here for the first time is attractive because it allows fast deposition of a-Si:H films on large-area low-melting-point substrates and requires only a low cost of production without additional heating or pumping equipment.

  18. Surface plasmon enhanced photoluminescence in amorphous silicon carbide films by adjusting Ag island film sizes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wei; Wang Xin-Zhan; Dai Wan-Lei; Lu Wan-Bing; Liu Yu-Mei; Fu Guang-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Ag island films with different sizes are deposited on hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (α-SiC∶H) films,and the influences of Ag island films on the optical properties of the α-SiC∶H films are investigated.Atomic force microscope images show that Ag nanoislands are formed after Ag coating,and the size of the Ag islands increases with increasing Ag deposition time.The extinction spectra indicate that two resonance absorption peaks which correspond to out-of-plane and in-plane surface plasmon modes of the Ag island films are obtained,and the resonance peak shifts toward longer wavelength with increasing Ag island size.The photoluminescence (PL) enhancement or quenching depends on the size of Ag islands,and PL enhancement by 1.6 times on the main PL band is obtained when the sputtering time is 10 min.Analyses show that the influence of surface plasmons on the PL of α-SiC:H is determined by the competition between the scattering and absorption of Ag islands,and PL enhancement is obtained when scattering is the main interaction between the Ag islands and incident light.

  19. Improvement of small-area, amorphous-silicon thin-film photovoltaics on polymer substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, M.F. (Minnesota Mining and Mfg. Co., St. Paul, MN (USA). Applied Technologies Lab.)

    1990-02-01

    This report describes a contract to produce, using roll-to-roll deposition on polyamide substrate, a small-area amorphous-silicon p-i-n photovoltaic (PV) cell with an energy conversion efficiency of 10% under air mass 1.5 insolation. Three improvements were attempted to achieve this goal: (1) zinc oxide, a transparent conducting oxide, was used as a top contact; the zinc oxide conductivity was improved to 8--9 ohms/square sheet resistance with less than 8% average optical absorption. (2) The red light response was improved with dielectric enhanced metal reflecting electrodes, which increased the short-circuit current density by more than 1 mA/Cm{sup 2}; a three-layer dielectric mirror coating was also designed that can increase the current density by another 1 mA/cm{sup 2}. (3) Improving the fill factor of the n-i-p (reverse structured) devices was also achieved in a multichamber deposition system. The overall energy conversion efficiency of the PV cell was 8.36%. Major obstacles to higher efficiencies are (1) controlling the thin-film defects that cause electrical shunts in devices fabricated on enhanced reflection electrodes, and (2) controlling impurities and introducing dopant profiles near the p/i interface in a continuous web deposition system.

  20. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, A. [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Mandelis, A. [Center for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies (CADIFT), Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada); Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)

    2013-12-28

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10 nm at 355 nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  1. Light trapping in amorphous silicon solar cells with periodic grating structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lia, Haihua; Wang, Qingkang; Chen, Jian [National Key Laboratory of Micro /Nano Fabrication Technology, Key Laboratory for Thin Film and Microfabrication Technology of Ministry of Education, Research Institute of Micro/Nano Science and Technology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Krc, J. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Trzaska25, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Soppe, W.J. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands ECN, P. O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Pettern (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    We report on the design of amorphous silicon solar cells with the periodic grating structures. It is a combination of an anti-reflection structure and the metallic reflection grating. Optical coupling and light trapping in thin-film solar cells are studied numerically using the Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis enhanced by the Modal Transmission Line theory. The impact of the structure parameters of the gratings is investigated. The results revealed that within the incident angles of - 40{sup 0} to + 40{sup 0} the reflectivity of the cell with a period of 0.5 {mu}m, a filling factor of 0.1 and a groove depth of 0.4 {mu}m is 4%-22.7% in the wavelength range of 0.3-0.6 {mu}m and 1%-20.8% in the wavelength range of 0.6-0.84 {mu}m, the absorption enhancement of the a-Si layer is 0.4%-10.8% and 20%-385%, respectively.

  2. Effective interface state effects in hydrogenated amorphous-crystalline silicon heterostructures using ultraviolet laser photocarrier radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A.; Mandelis, A.; Halliop, B.; Kherani, N. P.

    2013-12-01

    Ultraviolet photocarrier radiometry (UV-PCR) was used for the characterization of thin-film (nanolayer) intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (i-a-Si:H) on c-Si. The small absorption depth (approximately 10 nm at 355 nm laser excitation) leads to strong influence of the nanolayer parameters on the propagation and recombination of the photocarrier density wave (CDW) within the layer and the substrate. A theoretical PCR model including the presence of effective interface carrier traps was developed and used to evaluate the transport parameters of the substrate c-Si as well as those of the i-a-Si:H nanolayer. Unlike conventional optoelectronic characterization methods such as photoconductance, photovoltage, and photoluminescence, UV-PCR can be applied to more complete quantitative characterization of a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunction solar cells, including transport properties and defect structures. The quantitative results elucidate the strong effect of a front-surface passivating nanolayer on the transport properties of the entire structure as the result of effective a-Si:H/c-Si interface trap neutralization through occupation. A further dramatic improvement of those properties with the addition of a back-surface passivating nanolayer is observed and interpreted as the result of the interaction of the increased excess bulk CDW with, and more complete occupation and neutralization of, effective front interface traps.

  3. Electric properties of undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon semiconductors irradiated with self-ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro, E-mail: sato.shinichiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sai, Hitoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Shimazaki, Kazunori [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Kondo, Michio [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    This paper reports dark conductivity (DC), photoconductivity (PC), and Seebeck coefficient variations of undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon semiconductors irradiated with protons and Si ions. Both the DC and PC values show nonmonotonic variations with increasing a fluence in the case of proton irradiation, whereas the monotonic decreases are observed in the case of Si ion irradiation. From results of the Seebeck coefficient variation due to proton irradiation, it is shown that the increase in DC and PC in the low fluence regime is caused by donor-center generation. Also, it is shown by analyzing the proton energy dependence and the energy deposition process that the donor-center generation is based on the electronic excitation effect. On the other hand, the decrease in DC and PC in the high fluence regime is attributed to the carrier removal effect and the carrier lifetime decrease due to the accumulation of dangling bonds, respectively. The dangling bond generation due to ion irradiation is mainly caused by the displacement damage effect and therefore it is different from the generation process in the Staebler-Wronski effect.

  4. Anomalous enhancement in radiation induced conductivity of hydrogenated amorphous silicon semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro, E-mail: sato.shinichiro@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sai, Hitoshi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Shimazaki, Kazunori [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Kondo, Michio [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Electric conductivity variations of undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) semiconductors induced by swift protons are investigated. The results show that the conductivity drastically increases at first and then decreases on further irradiation. The conductivity enhancement is observed only in the low fluence regime and lasts for a prolonged period of time when proton irradiation stops in this fluence regime. On the other hand, the photosensitivity has a minimum value around the conductivity peak. This fact indicates that non-equilibrium carriers do not play a dominant role in the electric conduction in this fluence regime. It is found that the anomalous conductivity enhancement in the low fluence regime is dominated by donor center generation. At higher fluences the conductivity during irradiation is dominated by non-equilibrium carriers as the generated donor centers disappear. It is also found that the RIC in the high fluence regime is proportional to the carrier generation rate. This indicates that the recombination process of non-equilibrium carriers is dominated by indirect recombination via defect levels.

  5. In vivo Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Carbide As a Biomaterial for Chronic Neural Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaack, Gretchen L; McHail, Daniel G; Borda, German; Koo, Beomseo; Peixoto, Nathalia; Cogan, Stuart F; Dumas, Theodore C; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Implantable microelectrode arrays (MEAs) offer clinical promise for prosthetic devices by enabling restoration of communication and control of artificial limbs. While proof-of-concept recordings from MEAs have been promising, work in animal models demonstrates that the obtained signals degrade over time. Both material robustness and tissue response are acknowledged to have a role in device lifetime. Amorphous Silicon carbide (a-SiC), a robust material that is corrosion resistant, has emerged as an alternative encapsulation layer for implantable devices. We systematically examined the impact of a-SiC coating on Si probes by immunohistochemical characterization of key markers implicated in tissue-device response. After implantation, we performed device capture immunohistochemical labeling of neurons, astrocytes, and activated microglia/macrophages after 4 and 8 weeks of implantation. Neuron loss and microglia activation were similar between Si and a-SiC coated probes, while tissue implanted with a-SiC displayed a reduction in astrocytes adjacent to the probe. These results suggest that a-SiC has a similar biocompatibility profile as Si, and may be suitable for implantable MEA applications as a hermetic coating to prevent material degradation.

  6. Memory effect in MOS structures containing amorphous or crystalline silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, Sebastian; Brueggemann, Rudolf; Bauer, Gottfried Heinrich [Institute of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Nedev, Nicola [Istituto de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California, Benito Juarez Blvd., s/n, C.P. 21280, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico); Manolov, Emmo; Nesheva, Diana; Levi, Zelma [Insitute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Science, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2008-07-01

    Amorphous and crystalline silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) embedded in a SiO{sub 2} matrix are fabricated by thermal annealing of Metal/SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub x}/c-Si structures (x=1.15) at 700 C or 1000 C in N{sub 2} atmosphere for 30 or 60 minutes. High frequency C-V measurements show that the samples can be charged negatively or positively by applying a positive or negative bias voltage to the gate. A memory effect, due to the Si-NPs in the SiO{sub 2} matrix, is observed. The method of measurement with open circuit between two measurements leads to the retention characteristic where the structures retain about 50% of negative charge trapped in Si-NPs for 24 hours. A second method, where the flat-band voltage is applied as bias voltage, shows shorter retention characteristics. There the Si-NPs retain 50% of their charge after 10 hours.

  7. Amorphous silicon under mechanical shear deformations: Shear velocity and temperature effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerrache, Ali; Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical shear deformations lead, in some cases, to effects similar to those resulting from ion irradiation. Here we characterize the effects of shear velocity and temperature on amorphous silicon (a-Si) modeled using classical molecular-dynamics simulations based on the empirical environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP). With increasing shear velocity at low temperature, we find a systematic increase in the internal strain leading to the rapid appearance of structural defects (fivefold-coordinated atoms). The impacts of externally applied strain can be almost fully compensated by increasing the temperature, allowing the system to respond more rapidly to the deformation. In particular, we find opposite power-law relations between the temperature and the shear velocity and the deformation energy. The spatial distribution of defects is also found to depend strongly on temperature and strain velocity. For low temperature or high shear velocity, defects are concentrated in a few atomic layers near the center of the cell, while with increasing temperature or decreasing shear velocity, they spread slowly throughout the full simulation cell. This complex behavior can be related to the structure of the energy landscape and the existence of a continuous energy-barrier distribution.

  8. Low-level boron doping and light-induced effects in amorphous silicon pin solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, M.; Rauscher, B.; Kruehler, W.; Plaettner, R.; Pfleiderer, H.

    Amorphous silicon solar cells with the structure pin/ITO produced in the laboratory show an AM1 efficiency of up to 7.4 percent on 6 sq mm. The impact of doping the i-layer slightly with boron on the cell performance was studied together with its possible influence on the cell stability. Cells exposed to continuous AM1 illumination (up to 2000 hours) show a degradation of the efficiency. Differences in the bias-voltage during the deposition lead to significant differences in the stability whereas the influence of boron doping was not so prominent. The nu-tau-products for electrons and holes were shown to degrade differently through light-soaking for different doping-level. A further investigation was made by evaluating the frequency dependence of the capacitance via a new p i n junction model to obtain the density of states and the drift field in the i-layer for doping and light-soaking.

  9. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon applied in very thin tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicho, Sandra

    2011-07-28

    Thin-film solar cells are fabricated by low-cost production processes, and are therefore an alternative to conventionally used wafer solar cells based on crystalline silicon. Due to the different band gaps, tandem cells that consist of amorphous (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline ({mu}c-Si:H) single junction solar cells deposited on top of each other use the solar spectrum much more efficient than single junction solar cells. The silicon layers are usually deposited on TCO (Transparent Conductive Oxide)-coated glass and metal- or plastic foils. Compared to the CdTe and CIGS based thin-film technologies, silicon thin-film solar cells have the advantage that no limitation of raw material supply is expected and no toxic elements are used. Nevertheless, the production cost per Wattpeak is the decisive factor concerning competitiveness and can be reduced by, e.g., shorter deposition times or reduced material consumption. Both cost-reducing conceptions are simultaneously achieved by reducing the a-Si:H and {mu}c-Si:H absorber layer thicknesses in a tandem device. In the work on hand, the influence of an absorber layer thickness reduction up to 77% on the photovoltaic parameters of a-Si:H/{mu}c-Si:H tandem solar cells was investigated. An industry-oriented Radio Frequency Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (RF-PECVD) system was used to deposit the solar cells on glass substrates coated with randomly structured TCO layers. The thicknesses of top and bottom cell absorber layers were varied by adjusting the deposition time. Reduced layer thicknesses lead to lower absorption and, hence, to reduced short-circuit current densities which, however, are partially balanced by higher open-circuit voltages and fill factors. Furthermore, by using very thin amorphous top cells, the light-induced degradation decreases tremendously. Accordingly, a thickness reduction of 75% led to an efficiency loss of only 21 %. By adjusting the parameters for the deposition of a-Si:H top cells, a

  10. Robot arm based flat panel CT-guided electromagnetic tracked spine interventions: phantom and animal model experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, Aachen (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Wiemann, Christian; Guenther, Rolf W. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A. [Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate accuracy and procedure times of electromagnetic tracking (EMT) in a robotic arm mounted flat panel setting using phantom and animal cadaveric models. A robotic arm mounted flat panel (RMFP) was used in combination with EMT to perform anthropomorphic phantom (n = 90) and ex vivo pig based punctures (n = 120) of lumbar facet joints (FJ, n = 120) and intervertebral discs (IVD, n = 90). Procedure accuracies and times were assessed and evaluated. FJ punctures were carried out with a spatial accuracy of 0.8 {+-} 0.9 mm (phantom) and 0.6 {+-} 0.8 mm (ex vivo) respectively. While IVD punctures showed puncture deviations of 0.6 {+-} 1.2 mm (phantom) and 0.5 {+-} 0.6 mm (ex vivo), direct and angulated phantom based punctures had accuracies of 0.8 {+-} 0.9 mm and 1.0 {+-} 1.3 mm. Planning took longer for ex vivo IVD punctures compared to phantom model interventions (39.3 {+-} 17.3 s vs. 20.8 {+-} 5.0 s, p = 0.001) and for angulated vs. direct phantom FJ punctures (19.7 {+-} 5.1 s vs. 28.6 {+-} 7.8 s, p < 0.001). Puncture times were longer for ex vivo procedures when compared to phantom model procedures in both FJ (37.9 {+-} 9.0 s vs. 23.6 {+-} 7.2 s, p = 0.001) and IVD punctures (43.9 {+-} 16.1 s vs. 31.1 {+-} 6.4 s, p = 0.026). The combination of RMFP with EMT provides an accurate method of navigation for spinal interventions such as facet joint punctures and intervertebral disc punctures. (orig.)

  11. Performance quantification of a flat-panel imager in industrial mega-voltage X-ray imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritt, Carina; Plamondon, Mathieu; Hofmann, Jürgen; Flisch, Alexander; Sennhauser, Urs

    2017-03-01

    Active matrix flat-panel detectors have gained popularity amongst X-ray imaging systems due to their speed, resolution and high dynamic range. With appropriate shielding modern flat-panel imagers can even be used in high energy Computed Tomography (CT) systems of energies up to several mega-electronvolt (MeV). However, the performance of a digital detector is not independent of the rest of the radiographic system but depends on all other components of the system. Signal and noise transfer properties highly depend on all parameters of an imaging chain. This work focuses on quantifying the resolution capabilities and the noise in the signals of a MeV X-ray imaging system. The performance quantification is done by computing the modulation transfer function (MTF) using the standard edge method as well as the noise power spectrum (NPS) of the imaging system. We performed Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in order to understand the influence of scattered radiation on the measurements. A comparison of the horizontal and vertical MTF showed that the imaging behaviour of the detector is isotropic. Moreover, an additional investigation of the noise performance of the system showed that there is no measurable noise correlation present in the system. It was shown that the thickness of the edge device does not have a significant influence on the resulting system MTF. A rapid drop in the visibility could be observed resulting in a value of 1.2 line pairs per mm at 50% MTF. The visibility limit of line pair patterns was found to be at 2.3 line pairs per mm given by the 10% MTF value.

  12. Evaluation of imaging quality for flat-panel detector based low dose C-arm CT system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Chang-Woo; Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Sungchae; Huh, Young [Converged Medical Device Research Center, Advanced Medical Device Research Division, KERI, Gyeonggido 426-910 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-01

    The image quality associated with the extent of the angle of gantry rotation, the number of projection views, and the dose of X-ray radiation was investigated in flat-panel detector (FPD) based C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system for medical applications. A prototype CBCT system for the projection acquisition used the X-ray tube (A-132, Varian inc.) having rhenium-tungsten molybdenum target and flat panel a-Si X-ray detector (PaxScan 4030CB, Varian inc.) having a 397 x 298 mm active area with 388 μm pixel pitch and 1024 x 768 pixels in 2 by 2 binning mode. The performance comparison of X-ray imaging quality was carried out using the Feldkamp, Davis, and Kress (FDK) reconstruction algorithm between different conditions of projection acquisition. In this work, head-and-dental (75 kVp/20 mA) and chest (90 kVp/25 mA) phantoms were used to evaluate the image quality. The 361 (30 fps x 12 s) projection data during 360 deg. gantry rotation with 1 deg. interval for the 3D reconstruction were acquired. Parke weighting function were applied to handle redundant data and improve the reconstructed image quality in a mobile C-arm system with limited rotation angles. The reconstructed 3D images were investigated for comparison of qualitative image quality in terms of scan protocols (projection views, rotation angles and exposure dose). Furthermore, the performance evaluation in image quality will be investigated regarding X-ray dose and limited projection data for a FPD based mobile C-arm CBCT system. (authors)

  13. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seong-Rin [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, 2017 Kemper Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Schoenung, Julie M., E-mail: jmschoenung@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, 2017 Kemper Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  14. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Schoenung, Julie M

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  15. Low temperature plasma deposition of silicon thin films: From amorphous to crystalline

    OpenAIRE

    Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere; Cariou, Romain; Labrune, Martin

    2012-01-01

    International audience; We report on the epitaxial growth of crystalline silicon films on (100) oriented crystalline silicon substrates by standard plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition at 175 °C. Such unexpected epitaxial growth is discussed in the context of deposition processes of silicon thin films, based on silicon radicals and nanocrystals. Our results are supported by previous studies on plasma synthesis of silicon nanocrystals and point toward silicon nanocrystals being the most p...

  16. Band engineering of amorphous silicon ruthenium thin film and its near-infrared absorption enhancement combined with nano-holes pattern on back surface of silicon substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Anran; Zhong, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Li, Wei, E-mail: wli@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Gu, Deen; Jiang, Xiangdong [School of Optoelectronic Information, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Jiang, Yadong [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Highlights: • The increase of Ru concentration leads to a narrower bandgap of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} thin film. • The absorption coefficient of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} is higher than that of SiGe. • A double-layer absorber comprising of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} film and Si nano-holes layer is achieved. - Abstract: Silicon is widely used in semiconductor industry but has poor performance in near-infrared photoelectronic devices because of its bandgap limit. In this study, a narrow bandgap silicon rich semiconductor is achieved by introducing ruthenium (Ru) into amorphous silicon (a-Si) to form amorphous silicon ruthenium (a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x}) thin films through co-sputtering. The increase of Ru concentration leads to an enhancement of light absorption and a narrower bandgap. Meanwhile, a specific light trapping technique is employed to realize high absorption of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} thin film in a finite thickness to avoid unnecessary carrier recombination. A double-layer absorber comprising of a-Si{sub 1-x}Ru{sub x} thin film and silicon random nano-holes layer is formed on the back surface of silicon substrates, and significantly improves near-infrared absorption while the leaky light intensity is less than 5%. This novel absorber, combining narrow bandgap thin film with light trapping structure, may have a potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic devices.

  17. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum abs-initio studies on lithium-intercalation in interconnected hollow spherical nano-spheres of amorphous Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmik, Arghya; Malik, R.; Prakash, S.;

    2016-01-01

    interconnected hollow nano-spheres of amorphous silicon have been found to exhibit high cyclability. The absence of fracture upon lithiation and the high cyclability has been attributed to reduction in intercalation stress due to hollow spherical geometry of the silicon nano-particles. The present work argues...

  18. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy study in micro-grain structured amorphous silicon anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloukis, Fotis; Elmasides, Costas; Farmakis, Filippos; Selinis, Petros; Neophytides, Stylianos G.; Georgoulas, Nikolaos

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a study of the lithiation mechanism of micro-grain structured silicon anode is presented. Micro-grain amorphous silicon was deposited on special copper foil and it is shown that after several decades of galvanostatic cycles, it preserves its granular nature with minor degradation. In order to shed light on the lithiation mechanisms of the micro-grain silicon, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was conducted on silicon half-cells at various State-of-Charge (SoC) and various discharging current values and the Solid-Electrolyte Interphase (SEI) RSEI and polarization resistance Rpol were determined. Results reveal that Rpol highly increases for cell voltages lower than 0.2 V and it strongly depends on the discharging C-rate. From X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements combined with surface sputtering, the existence of a LixSiyOz interlayer between SEI and silicon is confirmed, which is believed to play an important role to the lithium kinetics. Finally, combining our results, a lithiation mechanism of the micro-grain silicon anode is proposed.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscope analysis of amorphous-Si insertion layers prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition, causing low surface recombination velocities on crystalline silicon wafers

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Microstructures of stacked silicon-nitride/amorphous-silicon/crystalline-silicon (SiN_x/a-Si/c-Si) layers prepared by catalytic chemical vapor deposition were investigated with scanning transmission electron microscopy to clarify the origin of the sensitive dependence of surface recombination velocities (SRVs) of the stacked structure on the thickness of the a-Si layer. Stacked structures with a-Si layers with thicknesses greater than 10 nm exhibit long effective carrier lifetimes, while thos...

  20. Accelerated kinetics of amorphous silicon using an on-the-fly off-lattice kinetic Monte-Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Jean-Francois; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Beland, Laurent Karim; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-03-01

    The time evolution of a series of well relaxed amorphous silicon models was simulated using the kinetic Activation-RelaxationTechnique (kART), an on-the-fly off-lattice kinetic Monte Carlo method. This novel algorithm uses the ART nouveau algorithm to generate activated events and links them with local topologies. It was shown to work well for crystals with few defects but this is the first time it is used to study an amorphous material. A parallel implementation allows us to increase the speed of the event generation phase. After each KMC step, new searches are initiated for each new topology encountered. Well relaxed amorphous silicon models of 1000 atoms described by a modified version of the empirical Stillinger-Weber potential were used as a starting point for the simulations. Initial results show that the method is faster by orders of magnitude compared to conventional MD simulations up to temperatures of 500 K. Vacancy-type defects were also introduced in this system and their stability and lifetimes are calculated.

  1. Cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS flat panel detector: Visibility of simulated microcalcifications

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To measure and investigate the improvement of microcalcification (MC) visibility in cone beam breast CT with a high pitch (75 μm), thick (500 μm) scintillator CMOS/CsI flat panel detector (Dexela 2923, Perkin Elmer).

  2. High spatial resolution radiation detectors based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Tao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Engineering-Nuclear Engineering

    1995-05-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) as a large-area thin film semiconductor with ease of doping and low-cost fabrication capability has given a new impetus to the field of imaging sensors; its high radiation resistance also makes it a good material for radiation detectors. In addition, large-area microelectronics based on a-Si:H or polysilicon can be made with full integration of peripheral circuits, including readout switches and shift registers on the same substrate. Thin a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes coupled to suitable scintillators are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. The response speed of CsI/a-Si:H diode combinations to individual particulate radiation is limited by the scintillation light decay since the charge collection time of the diode is very short (< 10ns). The reverse current of the detector is analyzed in term of contact injection, thermal generation, field enhanced emission (Poole-Frenkel effect), and edge leakage. A good collection efficiency for a diode is obtained by optimizing the p layer of the diode thickness and composition. The CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to an a-Si:H photodiode detector shows a capability for detecting minimum ionizing particles with S/N ~20. In such an arrangement a p-i-n diode is operated in a photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). In addition, a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3--8 for shaping times of 1 {micro}s. The mechanism of the formation of structured CsI scintillator layers is analyzed. Initial nucleation in the deposited layer is sensitive to the type of substrate medium, with imperfections generally catalyzing nucleation. Therefore, the microgeometry of a patterned substrate has a significant effect on the structure of the CsI growth.

  3. Plasmonic enhancement of amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells with hexagonal silver arrays made with nanosphere lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Guney, D. O.; Pearce, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Nanosphere lithography (NSL) provides an opportunity for a low-cost and scalable method to optically engineer solar photovoltaic (PV) cells. For PV applications, NSL is widely used in rear contact scenarios to excite surface plasmon polariton and/or high order diffractions, however, the top contact scenarios using NSL are rare. In this paper a systematic simulation study is conducted to determine the capability of achieving efficiency enhancement in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells using NSL as a top contact plasmonic optical enhancer. The study focuses on triangular prism and sphere arrays as they are the most commonly and easily acquired through direct deposition or low-temperature annealing, respectively. For optical enhancement, a characteristic absorption profile is generated and analyzed to determine the effects of size, shape and spacing of plasmonic structures compared to an un-enhanced reference cell. The factors affecting NSL-enhanced PV performance include absorption, shielding effects, diffraction, and scattering. In the triangular prism array, parasitic absorption of the silver particles proves to be problematic, and although it can be alleviated by increasing the particle spacing, no useful enhancement was observed in the triangular prism arrays that were simulated. Sphere arrays, on the other hand, have broad scattering cross-sections that create useful scattering fields at several sizes and spacing intervals. For the simulated sphere arrays the highest enhancement found was 7.4%, which was fabricated with a 250 nm radius nanosphere and a 50 nm silver thickness, followed by annealing in inert gas. These results are promising and provide a path towards the commercialization of plasmonic a-Si:H solar cells using NSL fabrication techniques.

  4. The status of lightweight photovoltaic space array technology based on amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Joseph J.; Kaschmitter, Jim

    1991-01-01

    Ultralight, flexible photovoltaic (PV) array of amorphous silicon (a-Si) was identified as a potential low cost power source for small satellites. A survey was conducted of the status of the a-Si PV array technology with respect to present and future performance, availability, cost, and risks. For existing, experimental array blankets made of commercial cell material, utilizing metal foil substrates, the Beginning of Life (BOL) performance at Air Mass Zero (AM0) and 35 C includes total power up to 200 W, power per area of 64 W/sq m and power per weight of 258 W/kg. Doubling of power per weight occurs when polyimide substrates are used. Estimated End of Life (EOL) power output after 10 years in a nominal low earth orbit would be 80 pct. of BOL, the degradation being due to largely light induced effects (-10 to -15 pct.) and in part (-5 pct.) to space radiation. Predictions for the year 1995 for flexible PV arrays, made on the basis of published results for rigid a-Si modules, indicate EOL power output per area and per weight of 105 W/sq m and 400 W/kg, respectively, while predictions for the late 1990s based on existing U.S. national PV program goals indicate EOL values of 157 W/sq m and 600 W/kg. Cost estimates by vendors for 200 W ultralight arrays in volume of over 1000 units range from $100/watt to $125/watt. Identified risks include the lack of flexible, space compatible encapsulant, the lack of space qualification effort, recent partial or full acquisitions of US manufacturers of a-Si cells by foreign firms, and the absence of a national commitment for a long range development program toward developing of this important power source for space.

  5. Efficient nanorod-based amorphous silicon solar cells with advanced light trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, Y. [Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, High Tech Campus, Building 21, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Plasma & Materials Processing, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE), P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Lare, M. C. van; Polman, A. [Center for Nanophotonics, FOM Institute AMOLF, Science Park 104, 1098 XG Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veldhuizen, L. W.; Schropp, R. E. I., E-mail: r.e.i.schropp@tue.nl [Department of Applied Physics, Plasma & Materials Processing, Eindhoven University of Technology (TUE), P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Rath, J. K. [Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, High Tech Campus, Building 21, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2015-11-14

    We present a simple, low-cost, and scalable approach for the fabrication of efficient nanorod-based solar cells. Templates with arrays of self-assembled ZnO nanorods with tunable morphology are synthesized by chemical bath deposition using a low process temperature at 80 °C. The nanorod templates are conformally coated with hydrogenated amorphous silicon light absorber layers of 100 nm and 200 nm thickness. An initial efficiency of up to 9.0% is achieved for the optimized design. External quantum efficiency measurements on the nanorod cells show a substantial photocurrent enhancement both in the red and the blue parts of the solar spectrum. Key insights in the light trapping mechanisms in these arrays are obtained via a combination of three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulations, optical absorption, and external quantum efficiency measurements. Front surface patterns enhance the light incoupling in the blue, while rear side patterns lead to enhanced light trapping in the red. The red response in the nanorod cells is limited by absorption in the patterned Ag back contact. With these findings, we develop and experimentally realize a further advanced design with patterned front and back sides while keeping the Ag reflector flat, showing significantly enhanced scattering from the back reflector with reduced parasitic absorption in the Ag and thus higher photocurrent generation. Many of the findings in this work can serve to provide insights for further optimization of nanostructures for thin-film solar cells in a broad range of materials.

  6. Photothermal performance of an amorphous silicon photovoltaic panel integrated in a membrane structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Hu, Jianhui; Chen, Wujun; Qiu, Zhenyu; Zhou, Jinyu; Qu, Yegao; Ge, Binbin

    2016-10-01

    The amorphous silicon photovoltaic (a-Si PV) cells are widely used for electricity generation from solar energy. When the a-Si PV cells are integrated into building roofs, such as ETFE (ethylene-tetrafouoroethylene) cushions, the temperature characteristics are indispensible for evaluating the thermal performances of a-Si PV and its constructions. This temperature value is directly dependent on the solar irradiance, wind velocity, ambient temperature and installation form. This paper concerns the field experiments and numerical modeling on the temperature characteristics and temperature value of the a-Si PV integrated in a double-layer ETFE cushion structure. To this end, an experimental model composed of two a-Si PV cells and a double-layer ETFE cushion was developed, and the corresponding experiments were carried out under two typical weather conditions (summer sunny and summer cloudy). The theoretical thermal model was developed based on an energy balance equation taking the short wave radiation, long wave radiation, convection and generated power into account. The measured solar irradiance and air temperature were used as real weather conditions for the thermal model. The corresponding differential equation of the a-Si PV temperature varying with the solar irradiance and air temperature was solved by a newly developed program based on the numerical method. The measured results show that the influence of solar irradiance on the temperature is much more significant than the other parameters, and the maximum temperature variation under sunny conditions is greater than that under cloudy conditions. The comparative study between the experimental and numerical results shows the correct predictions of the a-Si PV temperature under the sunny and cloudy conditions. The maximum difference is 3.9 °C with the acceptable reasons of the solar irradiance fluctuation and the PV thermal response time. These findings will provide useful observations and explanations for

  7. Intrinsic stress mitigation via elastic softening during two-step electrochemical lithiation of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zheng; Li, Teng

    2016-06-01

    Recent experiments and first-principles calculations show the two-step lithiation of amorphous silicon (a-Si). In the first step, the lithiation progresses by the movement of a sharp phase boundary between a pristine a-Si phase and an intermediate L iη Si phase until the a-Si phase is fully consumed. Then the second step sets in without a visible interface, with the L iη Si phase continuously lithiating to a L i3.75 Si phase. This unique feature of lithiation is believed to have important consequences for mechanical durability of a-Si anodes in lithium ion batteries, however the mechanistic understanding of such consequences is still elusive so far. Here, we reveal an intrinsic stress mitigation mechanism due to elastic softening during two-step lithiation of a-Si, via chemo-mechanical modeling. We find that lithiation-induced elastic softening of a-Si leads to effective stress mitigation in the second step of lithiation. These mechanistic findings allow for the first time to quantitatively predict the critical size of an a-Si anode below which the anode becomes immune to lithiation-induced fracture, which is in good agreement with experimental observations. Further studies on lithiation kinetics suggest that the two-step lithiation also results in a lower stress-induced energy barrier for lithiation. The present study reveals the physical underpinnings of previously unexplained favorable lithiation kinetics and fracture behavior of a-Si anodes, and thus sheds light on quantitative design guidelines toward high-performance anodes for lithium ion batteries.

  8. Implementation of a program of quality assurance of image in an imaging system of flat panel portal; Puesta en marcha de un programa de garantia de calidad de imagen en un sistema de imagen portal de panel plano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Benitez, J. A.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    (IGRT) image-guided radiation therapy is the one in which images are used to locate the area of treatment. Modern irradiation systems are equipped with different modalities for obtaining images, such as flat panel systems, systems conebeam, tomoimagen, etc. This paper describes the start-up and the experience of a quality assurance program based on a flat panel portal Imaging System. (Author)

  9. Edge-Spread Functions Expected for Several Changes in a Commercial Flat-Panel System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schach von Wittenau, A E

    2002-02-25

    The Bldg. 239 radiography facility uses a 9 MeV bremsstrahlung linac and a commercially available fiat-panel detector system. Ref. [1] discusses the facility in detail. Ref. [1] furthermore discusses the imaging quality of the fiat-panel system, and identifies several sources of image blur for the system in question. The maim'' contributors to the imaging blur are radiation scattered from the front cover of the detector housing, radiation scattered from the back cover of the detector housing, and radiation scattered from the aluminum plate that supports the amorphous-Si detector within the detector housing. The manufacturer of one such fiat-panel system seems willing to modify one of their products as requested, if such modifications may be made easily. Easy modifications would include making the detector housing thinner, decreasing the sizes of air gaps inside tile detector system, etc. Removing the aluminum support plate is considered to be a difficult modification. This memo reports the results of a set of Monte Carlo simulations that were performed to predict the changes in imaging quality, compared to that of the current system, if the detector is modified as suggested above. In particular, the edge-spread function (ESF) was calculated for each modification. ESFs were calculated for three photon energies: 100 keV, 450 keV, and 3 MeV. The results suggest that thinning and moving tile front and back covers of the detector housing should result in improved image quality for all of the photon energies considered. Interestingly, the results also suggest that removing the aluminum support plate would improve tim imaging performance at 100 keV and 450 keV, but that removing the plate has no additional benefit for imaging with 3 MeV photons.

  10. Amorphous silicon oxide layers for surface passivation and contacting of heterostructure solar cells of amorphous and crystalline silicon; Amorphe Siliziumoxidschichten zur Oberflaechenpassivierung und Kontaktierung von Heterostruktur-Solarzellen aus amorphen und kristallinem Silizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsele, Florian

    2010-02-05

    Atomic hydrogen plays a dominant role in the passivation of crystalline silicon surfaces by layers of amorphous silicon. In order to research into this role, this thesis presents the method of hydrogen effusion from thin amorphous films of silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}:H). The oxygen concentration of the sub-stoichiometric a-SiO{sub x}:H films ranges up to 10 at.-%. The effusion experiment yields information about the content and thermal stability of hydrogen and about the microstructure of the films. A mathematical description of the diffusion process of atomic hydrogen yields an analytical expression of the effusion rate R{sub E} depending on the linearly increasing temperature in the experiment. Fitting of the calculated effusion rates R{sub E} to measured effusion spectra yields the diffusion coefficient of atomic hydrogen in a-SiO{sub x}:H. With increasing oxygen concentration, the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the a-SiO{sub x}:H films decreases. This is attributed to an increasing Si-H bond energy due to back bonded oxygen, resulting in a higher stability of hydrogen in the films. This result is confirmed by an increasing thermal stability of the p-type c-Si passivation with a-SiO{sub x}:H of increasing oxygen concentrations up to 5 at.-%. The passivation reaches very low recombination velocities of S < 10 cm/s at the interface. However, for higher oxygen concentrations up to 10 at.-%, the passivation quality decreases significantly. Here, infrared spectroscopy of Si-H vibrational modes and hydrogen effusion show an increase of hydrogen-rich interconnected voids in the films. This microstructure results in a high amount of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the layers, which is not suitable for the saturation of c-Si interface defects. Annealing of the films at temperatures around 400 C leads to a release of H{sub 2} from the voids, as a result of which Si-Si bonds in the material reconstruct. Subsequently, hydrogen migration in the

  11. Amorphous silicon oxide layers for surface passivation and contacting of heterostructure solar cells of amorphous and crystalline silicon; Amorphe Siliziumoxidschichten zur Oberflaechenpassivierung und Kontaktierung von Heterostruktur-Solarzellen aus amorphen und kristallinem Silizium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einsele, Florian

    2010-02-05

    Atomic hydrogen plays a dominant role in the passivation of crystalline silicon surfaces by layers of amorphous silicon. In order to research into this role, this thesis presents the method of hydrogen effusion from thin amorphous films of silicon (a-Si:H) and silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}:H). The oxygen concentration of the sub-stoichiometric a-SiO{sub x}:H films ranges up to 10 at.-%. The effusion experiment yields information about the content and thermal stability of hydrogen and about the microstructure of the films. A mathematical description of the diffusion process of atomic hydrogen yields an analytical expression of the effusion rate R{sub E} depending on the linearly increasing temperature in the experiment. Fitting of the calculated effusion rates R{sub E} to measured effusion spectra yields the diffusion coefficient of atomic hydrogen in a-SiO{sub x}:H. With increasing oxygen concentration, the diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in the a-SiO{sub x}:H films decreases. This is attributed to an increasing Si-H bond energy due to back bonded oxygen, resulting in a higher stability of hydrogen in the films. This result is confirmed by an increasing thermal stability of the p-type c-Si passivation with a-SiO{sub x}:H of increasing oxygen concentrations up to 5 at.-%. The passivation reaches very low recombination velocities of S < 10 cm/s at the interface. However, for higher oxygen concentrations up to 10 at.-%, the passivation quality decreases significantly. Here, infrared spectroscopy of Si-H vibrational modes and hydrogen effusion show an increase of hydrogen-rich interconnected voids in the films. This microstructure results in a high amount of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in the layers, which is not suitable for the saturation of c-Si interface defects. Annealing of the films at temperatures around 400 C leads to a release of H{sub 2} from the voids, as a result of which Si-Si bonds in the material reconstruct. Subsequently, hydrogen migration in the

  12. Optical and passivating properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition for application on silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wight, Daniel Nilsen

    2008-07-01

    Within this thesis, several important subjects related to the use of amorphous silicon nitride made by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition as an anti-reflective coating on silicon solar cells are presented. The first part of the thesis covers optical simulations to optimise single and double layer anti-reflective coatings with respect to optical performance when situated on a silicon solar cell. The second part investigates the relationship between important physical properties of silicon nitride films when deposited under different conditions. The optical simulations were either based on minimising the reflectance off a silicon nitride/silicon wafer stack or maximising the transmittance through the silicon nitride into the silicon wafer. The former method allowed consideration of the reflectance off the back surface of the wafer, which occurs typically at wavelengths above 1000 nm due to the transparency of silicon at these wavelengths. However, this method does not take into consideration the absorption occurring in the silicon nitride, which is negligible at low refractive indexes but quite significant when the refractive index increases above 2.1. For high-index silicon nitride films, the latter method is more accurate as it considers both reflectance and absorbance in the film to calculate the transmittance into the Si wafer. Both methods reach similar values for film thickness and refractive index for optimised single layer anti-reflective coatings, due to the negligible absorption occurring in these films. For double layer coatings, though, the reflectance based simulations overestimated the optimum refractive index for the bottom layer, which would have lead to excessive absorption if applied to real anti-reflective coatings. The experimental study on physical properties for silicon nitride films deposited under varying conditions concentrated on the estimation of properties important for its applications, such as optical properties, passivation

  13. Amorphous Silicon Film Deposition from SiH4 by Chemical Vapor Deposition with Argon Excimer Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshikawa, Kiyohiko; Yokotani, Atsushi; Kurosawa, Kou

    2005-11-01

    We have deposited amorphous silicon thin films from monosilane (SiH4) gas by photochemical vapor deposition using a vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp (VUV-CVD). We used an argon excimer lamp (λ=126 nm, hν=9.8 eV) whose photons are strongly absorbed by SiH4 gas. The substrate temperatures were changed from 25 to 300°C. When the temperature was lower than 150°C, the films included H--Si--H units and H2 molecules in its structure. When it was higher than 150°C, the main structural unit was Si--H.

  14. Optical Properties of Amorphous AlN Thin Films on Glass and Silicon Substrates Grown by Single Ion Beam Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajakbari, Fatemeh; Mojtahedzadeh Larijani, Majid; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Aslaninejad, Morteza; Hojabri, Alireza

    2010-09-01

    The structural and optical properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) films deposited on glass and silicon substrates by single ion beam sputtering technique have been investigated. The X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study revealed the formation of the amorphous phase of AlN. The optical characteristics of films, such as refractive index, extinction coefficient, and average thickness, were calculated by Swanepoel's method using transmittance measurements. The refractive index and average roughness values of the films increased with film thickness. Moreover, it was found that thickness augmentation leads to a decrease in optical band gap energy calculated using Tauc's relation.

  15. 非晶硅锗电池性能的调控研究%Modification to the performance of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium thin film solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伯飞; 白立沙; 魏长春; 孙建; 侯国付; 赵颖; 张晓丹

    2013-01-01

    采用射频等离子体增强化学气相沉积技术,研究了非晶硅锗薄膜太阳电池。针对非晶硅锗薄膜材料的本身特性,通过调控硅锗合金中硅锗的比例,实现了对硅锗薄膜太阳电池中开路电压和短路电流密度的分别控制。借助于本征层硅锗材料帯隙梯度的设计,获得了可有效用于多结叠层电池中的非晶硅锗电池。%In this paper, we study hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium thin film solar cells prepared by the radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. In the light of the inherent characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium mate-rial, the modulation of the germanium/silicon ratio in silicon germanium alloys can separately control open circuit voltage (Voc) and short circuit current density (Jsc) of a-SiGe:H thin film solar cells. By the structural design of band gap profiling in the amorphous silicon germanium intrinsic layer, hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium thin film solar cells, which can be used efficiently as the component cell of multi-junction solar cells, are obtained.

  16. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitriev, P A; Milichko, V A; Mukhin, I S; Gudovskikh, A S; Sitnikova, A A; Samusev, A K; Krasnok, A E; Belov, P A

    2015-01-01

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonances, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanopart...

  17. Laser fabrication of crystalline silicon nanoresonators from an amorphous film for low-loss all-dielectric nanophotonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, P. A.; Makarov, S. V.; Milichko, V. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Samusev, A. K.; Krasnok, A. E.; Belov, P. A.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of high refractive index subwavelength dielectric nanoresonators, supporting electric and magnetic optical resonance, is a promising platform for waveguiding, sensing, and nonlinear nanophotonic devices. However, high concentration of defects in the nanoresonators diminishes their resonant properties, which are crucially dependent on their internal losses. Therefore, it seems to be inevitable to use initially crystalline materials for fabrication of the nanoresonators. Here, we show that the fabrication of crystalline (low-loss) resonant silicon nanoparticles by femtosecond laser ablation of amorphous (high-loss) silicon thin films is possible. We apply two conceptually different approaches: recently proposed laser-induced transfer and a novel laser writing technique for large-scale fabrication of the crystalline nanoparticles. The crystallinity of the fabricated nanoparticles is proven by Raman spectroscopy and electron transmission microscopy, whereas optical resonant properties of the nanoparticles are studied using dark-field optical spectroscopy and full-wave electromagnetic simulations.

  18. Preparation of microcrystalline single junction and amorphous-microcrystalline tandem silicon solar cells entirely by hot-wire CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupich, M.; Grunsky, D.; Kumar, P.; Schroeder, B. [University of Kaiserslautern (Germany). Department of Physics

    2004-01-25

    The hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) has been used to prepare highly conducting p- and n-doped microcrystalline silicon thin layers as well as highly photoconducting, low defect density intrinsic microcrystalline silicon films. These films were incorporated in all-HWCVD, all-microcrystalline nip and pin solar cells, achieving conversion efficiencies of {eta}=5.4% and 4.5%, respectively. At present, only the nip-structures are found to be stable against light-induced degradation. Furthermore, microcrystalline nip and pin structures have been successfully incorporated as bottom cells in all-hot-wire amorphous-microcrystalline nipnip- and pinpin-tandem solar cells for the first time. So far, the highest conversion efficiencies of the 'micromorph' tandem structures are {eta}=5.7% for pinpin-solar cells and 7.0% for nipnip solar cells. (author)

  19. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kawajiri, Satoshi; Arai, Hiroshi; Higashino, Yoshifumi; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-05-15

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel's cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel's cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments.

  20. Evaluation of bone substitute materials: comparison of flat-panel based volume CT to conventional multidetector CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbier, Sebastian; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Sachlos, Elefterios; Haberstroh, Jörg; Scheifele, Christian; Wrbas, Karl-Thomas; Voss, Pit Jacob; Veigel, Egle; Smedek, Jörg; Ganter, Philip; Tuna, Taskin; Gutwald, Ralf; Palmowski, Moritz

    2013-10-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a key factor in bone regeneration within the field of cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Despite this in vivo analysis of tissue-engineered-constructs to monitor bone rehabilitation are difficult to conduct. Novel high-resolving flat-panel based volume CTs (fp-VCT) are increasingly used for imaging bone structures. This study compares the potential value of novel fp-VCT with conventional multidetector CT (MDCT) based on a sheep sinus floor elevation model. Calcium-hydroxyapatite reinforced collagen scaffolds were populated with autologous osteoblasts and implanted into sheep maxillary sinus. After 8, 16 and 24 weeks MDCT and fp-VCT scans were performed to investigate the volume of the augmented area; densities of cancellous and compact bone were assessed as comparative values. fp-VCT imaging resulted in higher spatial resolution, which was advantageous when separating closely related anatomical structures (i.e. trabecular and compact bone, biomaterials). Fp-VCT facilitated imaging of alterations occurring in test specimens over time. fp-VCTs therefore displayed high volume coverage, dynamic imaging potential and superior performance when investigating superfine bone structures and bone remodelling of biomaterials. Thus, fp-VCTs may be a suitable instrument for intraoperative imaging and future in vivo tissue-engineering studies.

  1. Morphologic Changes of Mammary Carcinomas in Mice over Time as Monitored by Flat-Panel Detector Volume Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive methods are strongly needed to detect and quantify not only tumor growth in murine tumor models but also the development of vascularization and necrosis within tumors. This study investigates the use of a new imaging technique, flat-panel detector volume computed tomography (fpVCT, to monitor in vivo tumor progression and structural changes within tumors of two murine carcinoma models. After tumor cell inoculation, single fpVCT scans of the entire mice were performed at different time points. The acquired isotropic, high-resolution volume data sets enable an accurate real-time assessment and precise measurements of tumor volumes. Spreading of contrast agent-containing blood vessels around and within the tumors was clearly visible over time. Furthermore, fpVCT permits the identification of differences in the uptake of contrast media within tumors, thus delineating necrosis, tumor tissues, and blood vessels. Classification of tumor tissues based on the decomposition of the underlying mixture distribution of tissue-related Hounsfield units allowed the quantitative acquisition of necrotic tissues at each time point. Morphologic alterations of the tumor depicted by fpVCT were confirmed by histopathologic examination. Concluding, our data show that fpVCT may be highly suitable for the noninvasive evaluation of tumor responses to anticancer therapies during the course of the disease.

  2. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARISHIMA, Hidetaka; KAWAJIRI, Satoshi; ARAI, Hiroshi; HIGASHINO, Yoshifumi; KODERA, Toshiaki; KIKUTA, Ken-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments. PMID:27041633

  3. High-resolution dynamic angiography using flat-panel volume CT: feasibility demonstration for neuro and lower limb vascular applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehndiratta, Amit [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); University of Oxford, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Keble College, Oxford (United Kingdom); Indian Institute of Technology Delhi and All India Institute of Medical Science, Centre for Biomedical Engineering, New Delhi (India); Rabinov, James D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Grasruck, Michael [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany); Liao, Eric C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Center for Regenerative Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Crandell, David [Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States); Gupta, Rajiv [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    This paper evaluates a prototype flat-panel volume CT (fpVCT) for dynamic in vivo imaging in a variety of neurovascular and lower limb applications. Dynamic CTA was performed on 12 patients (neuro = 8, lower limb = 4) using an fpVCT with 120 kVp, 50 mA, rotation time varying from 8 to 19 s, and field of view of 25 x 25 x 18 cm{sup 3}. Four-dimensional data sets (i.e. 3D images over time) were reconstructed and reviewed. Dynamic CTA demonstrated sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to elucidate first-pass and recirculation dynamics of contrast bolus through neurovasclar pathologies and phasic blood flow though lower-limb vasculature and grafts. The high spatial resolution of fpVCT resulted in reduced partial volume and metal beam-hardening artefacts. This facilitated assessment of vascular lumen in the presence of calcified plaque and evaluation of fractures, especially in the presence of fixation hardware. Evaluation of arteriovenous malformation using dynamic fpVCT angiography was of limited utility. Dynamic CTA using fpVCT can visualize time-varying phenomena in neuro and lower limb vascular applications and has sufficient diagnostic imaging quality to evaluate a number of pathologies affecting these regions. (orig.)

  4. Visualization of novel microstents in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms with contrast-enhanced flat panel detector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech, E-mail: wponcyl@poczta.onet.pl [Departament of Interventional Radiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Neurointerventional Cath Lab MSW Hospital, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland); Zwarzany, Łukasz, E-mail: zwarzany@gmail.com [Departament of Interventional Radiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Neurointerventional Cath Lab MSW Hospital, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland); Safranow, Krzysztof, E-mail: chrissaf@mp.pl [Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We examine the feasibility of FPDCT for visualizing intracranial microstents. • Stent deployment and its apposition to the vessel wall are easily assessable. • Coil streaking artifacts hamper the assessment of stent visibility. - Abstract: Objectives: The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of contrast-enhanced flat panel detector CT (FPDCT) for visualizing the novel microstents implanted in patients with unruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Forty-four cases of patients who underwent stent assisted coiling at our department were retrospectively analyzed. In each case, FPDCT images were performed after stent and coils deployment and then assessed in the terms of stent struts and all radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility separately using a 3-grade scale (1 – inadequate, 2 – good, 3 – excellent). Results: Stent struts visibility was assessed to be inadequate for evaluation in all cases. All radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility was excellent in 61.4% and good in 38.6% of cases. We observed 4 (9.09%) cases of incomplete stent opening. Treated aneurysm size <10 mm was an independent predictor of excellent stent all radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility (ρ = 0.014). Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced FPDCT is feasible for visualizing stents implanted in patients with intracranial aneurysms as it gives precise visualization of the relationships between the stent tantalum strands and the vessel wall. Stents used in the treatment of aneurysms ≥10 mm in size are worse visualized because of the coil streaking artifacts.

  5. Development and evaluation of a digital radiography system using a large-area flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Ken; Iinuma, Gen; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Konno, Yasutaka

    2002-05-01

    A new DR system using a large-area flat panel detector (FPD) with a 40 by 30 cm active area and a 194 micrometers pixel pitch, has been developed to compare with a conventional image intensifier and charge-coupled device camera type DR system. After measuring basic characteristics of the new DR system such as signal-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function, and detective quantum efficiency, we applied the FPD to a Gastro-Intestinal study with contrast media, and discussed its potential for clinical use with a medical doctor. In radiography mode, the new DR system with a large-are FPD has superior image quality compared with the conventional I.I.- CCD camera type DR system because of high SNR and DQE. In fluoroscopy mode, the SNR of the new DR system at the exposure range of over 2(mu) R/frame is similar with the conventional I.I.-CCD camera type DR system. As a result, we considered that new DR system with a large-area FPD could be applied to a clinical study replacing an I.I.-CCD camera type. In the evaluation using various clinical images taken with the new DR system by a medical doctor, the new DR system with a large-are FPD performed sufficiently for a GI study.

  6. Aging of imaging properties of a CMOS flat-panel detector for dental cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; Han, J. C.; Yun, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the long-term stability of imaging properties of a flat-panel detector in conditions used for dental x-ray imaging. The detector consists of a CsI:Tl layer and CMOS photodiode pixel arrays. Aging simulations were carried out using an 80-kVp x-ray beam at an air-kerma rate of approximately 5 mGy s-1 at the entrance surface of the detector with a total air kerma of up to 0.6 kGy. Dark and flood-field images were periodically obtained during irradiation, and the mean signal and noise levels were evaluated for each image. We also evaluated the modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The aging simulation showed a decrease in both the signal and noise of the gain-offset-corrected images, but there was negligible change in the signal-to-noise performance as a function of the accumulated dose. The gain-offset correction for analyzing images resulted in negligible changes in MTF, NPS, and DQE results over the total dose. Continuous x-ray exposure to a detector can cause degradation in the physical performance factors such the detector sensitivity, but linear analysis of the gain-offset-corrected images can assure integrity of the imaging properties of a detector during its lifetime.

  7. Varied tube potential with constant effective dose at lumbar spine radiography using a flat-panel digital detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, Håkan; Persliden, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the image quality at different tube potential (kV) settings using anteroposterior lumbar spine radiography as a model. An Alderson phantom was used with a flat-panel detector. The tube potential varied between 48 and 125 kV while the tube charge (mAs) was adjusted to keep an effective dose of 0.11 mSv. Image quality was assessed with a visual grading analysis and with a CDRAD contrast-detail phantom together with a computer program. The VGA showed inferior image quality for the higher kV settings, > or =96 kVwith similar results for the contrast-detail phantom. When keeping the effective dose fixed, it seems beneficial to reduce kV to get the best image quality despite the fact that the mAs is not as high as with automatic exposure. However, this cannot be done with automatic exposure, which is set for a constant detector dose.

  8. Cross Talk Study to the Single Photon Response of a Flat Panel PMT for the RICH Upgrade at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnaboldi, C; Calvi, M; Fanchini, E; Gotti, C; Maino, M; Matteuzzi, C; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Wang, J C

    2009-01-01

    The Ring Imaging CHerenkov, RICH, detector at LHCb is now readout by Hybrid Photon Detectors. In view of its upgrade a possible option is the adoption of the flat panel Photon Multipliers Tubes, PMT. An important issue for the good determination of the rings produced in the sensitive media is a negligible level of cross talk. We have experimentally studied the cross talk from the 64x64 pixels of the H9500 PMT from Hamamatsu. Results have shown that at the single photon signal level, as expected at LHCb, the statistics applied to the small number of electrons generated at the first dynode of the PMT chain leads to a cross talk mechanism that must be interpreted in term of the percentage of the number of induced signals rather than on the amplitude of the induced signals. The threshold to suppress cross talk must be increased to a significant fraction of the single photon signal for the worst case. The number of electrons generated at the first dynode is proportional to the biasing voltage. Measurements have sh...

  9. Stable, high-efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells with low hydrogen content. Annual subcontract report, 1 March 1991--31 January 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortmann, C.M.; Hegedus, S.S. [Institute of Energy Conversion, Newark, DE (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Results and conclusions obtained during a research program of the investigation of amorphous silicon and amorphous silicon based alloy materials and solar cells fabricated by photo-chemical vapor and glow discharge depositions are reported. Investigation of the effects of the hydrogen content in a-si:H i-layers in amorphous silicon solar cells show that cells with lowered hydrogen content i-layers are more stable. A classical thermodynamic formulation of the Staebler-Wronski effect has been developed for standard solar cell operating temperatures and illuminations. Methods have been developed to extract a lumped equivalent circuit from the current voltage characteristic of a single junction solar cell in order to predict its behavior in a multijunction device.

  10. High hydrogen dilution and low substrate temperature cause columnar growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronsveld, Paula C.P.; Rath, Jatindra K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Mates, Tomas; Fejfar, Antonin; Kocka, Jan [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2010-03-15

    Columnar growth was observed in the amorphous part of mixed phase layers deposited at very low substrate temperatures. The width of the columns and the layer thickness at which they are first distinguishable in a cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (X-TEM) image, about 120 nm, is similar for the substrate temperature range of 40-100 C, but the columns are less well developed when either the substrate temperature is increased or the dilution ratio is lowered. This growth behaviour and the incubation layer are attributed to hydrogen-induced surface diffusion of growth precursors resulting in an amorphous-amorphous roughness transition. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. Impact of contamination on hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woerdenweber, Jan

    2011-09-26

    This thesis deals with atmospheric contamination and cross-contamination of boron (single-chamber process) of the intrinsic absorber layer (i-layer) of p-i-n thin film solar cells based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The atmospheric contaminations were introduced by means of intentional leaks. Hereby, the focus is on the influence of contamination species (oxygen and nitrogen), quantity of contamination (leak flow), source of contamination (leaks at chamber wall or in the process gas pipe), and plasma power on the properties of solar cells. Thereby, the minimum requirements for the purity of vacuum and process gas as well as leak conditions of the recipient and gas pipe system have been determined. Additionally, deposition regimes were developed, where the incorporation of impurities is significantly suppressed. For standard processes critical levels of nitrogen and oxygen contamination are determined to be {proportional_to} 4 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and {proportional_to} 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}, respectively, for a leak situated at the chamber wall. Above these concentrations the solar cell efficiency deteriorates. In literature, incorporation of oxygen and nitrogen in doping configuration is assumed to be the reason for the cell deterioration. This assumption is supported by additional material studies of contaminated absorber layers done in this work. The difference in critical concentration is due to the higher doping efficiency of nitrogen compared to that for oxygen. Nevertheless, applying an air leak the critical concentrations of O and N are reached almost simultaneously since the incorporation probability of oxygen is about one order of magnitude higher compared to that for nitrogen. Applying a leak in the process gas pipe the critical oxygen contamination level increases to {proportional_to} 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} whereas the critical nitrogen level remains unchanged compared to a chamber wall leak. Applying a deposition regime with a very high

  12. The potential for the fabrication of wires embedded in the crystalline silicon substrate using the solid phase segregation of gold in crystallising amorphous volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.C.Y.; McCallum, J.C

    2004-05-15

    The refinement of gold in crystallising amorphous silicon volumes was tested as a means of creating a conducting element embedded in the crystalline matrix. Amorphous silicon volumes were created by self-ion-implantation through a mask. Five hundred kiloelectronvolt Au{sup +} was then implanted into the volumes. The amorphous volumes were crystallised on a hot stage in air, and the crystallisation was characterised using cross sectional transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the amorphous silicon volumes crystallised via solid phase epitaxy at all the lateral and vertical interfaces. The interplay of the effects of the gold and also the hydrogen that infilitrated from the surface oxide resulted in a plug of amorphous material at the surface. Further annealing at this temperature demonstrated that the gold, once it had reached a certain critical concentration nucleated poly-crystalline growth instead of solid phase epitaxy. Time resolved reflectivity and Rutherford backscattering and channeling measurements were performed on large area samples that had been subject to the same implantation regime to investigate this system further. It was discovered that the crystallisation dynamics and zone refinement of the gold were complicated functions of both gold concentration and temperature. These findings do not encourage the use of this method to obtain conducting elements embedded in the crystalline silicon substrate.

  13. Development of an SU-8 MEMS process with two metal electrodes using amorphous silicon as a sacrificial material

    KAUST Repository

    Ramadan, Khaled S.

    2013-02-08

    This work presents an SU-8 surface micromachining process using amorphous silicon as a sacrificial material, which also incorporates two metal layers for electrical excitation. SU-8 is a photo-patternable polymer that is used as a structural layer for MEMS and microfluidic applications due to its mechanical properties, biocompatibility and low cost. Amorphous silicon is used as a sacrificial layer in MEMS applications because it can be deposited in large thicknesses, and can be released in a dry method using XeF2, which alleviates release-based stiction problems related to MEMS applications. In this work, an SU-8 MEMS process was developed using ;-Si as a sacrificial layer. Two conductive metal electrodes were integrated in this process to allow out-of-plane electrostatic actuation for applications like MEMS switches and variable capacitors. In order to facilitate more flexibility for MEMS designers, the process can fabricate dimples that can be conductive or nonconductive. Additionally, this SU-8 process can fabricate SU-8 MEMS structures of a single layer of two different thicknesses. Process parameters were optimized for two sets of thicknesses: thin (5-10 m) and thick (130 m). The process was tested fabricating MEMS switches, capacitors and thermal actuators. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Optimization of Recombination Layer in the Tunnel Junction of Amorphous Silicon Thin-Film Tandem Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Shin Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The amorphous silicon/amorphous silicon (a-Si/a-Si tandem solar cells have attracted much attention in recent years, due to the high efficiency and low manufacturing cost compared to the single-junction a-Si solar cells. In this paper, the tandem cells are fabricated by high-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD at 27.1 MHz. The effects of the recombination layer and the i-layer thickness matching on the cell performance have been investigated. The results show that the tandem cell with a p+ recombination layer and i2/i1 thickness ratio of 6 exhibits a maximum efficiency of 9.0% with the open-circuit voltage (Voc of 1.59 V, short-circuit current density (Jsc of 7.96 mA/cm2, and a fill factor (FF of 0.70. After light-soaking test, our a-Si/a-Si tandem cell with p+ recombination layer shows the excellent stability and the stabilized efficiency of 8.7%.

  15. Clinical evaluation of digital angiographic system equipped with the Safire' flat-panel detector of a direct conversion type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Yoshiaki; Miura, Yusuke; Goto, Keiichi [Shimadzu Corporation, Medical Systems Division, Research and Development, Kyoto (JP)] [and others

    2003-06-01

    This report presents a report on clinical evaluation of our newly developed flat-panel X-ray detector of a direct conversion type, designed to provide images of a resolution higher than, or at least equal to, that ensured by X-ray photographic films, in clinical digital X-ray cinematography. This new detector was named 'Safire' the acronym of 'Shimadzu advanced flat imaging receptor', emphasizing its high technological level, such as the capability to ensure high quality of images. The clinical evaluation of Shimadzu DIGITEX Premier digital angiography system, equipped with this new flat-panel X-ray detector of a direct conversion type, has been started in March, 2003, at the Kokura Memorial Hospital in Kyushu, Japan. (author)

  16. DR静态平板去除错层伪影的研究%Research on Elimination of Truncation Artifacts with Digital Radiography Static Flat Panel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王克枢

    2016-01-01

    This paper researched the occasional truncation artifacts during the application of Shimadzu D-vision digital radiography (DR) photographic system. Through analysis of features of abnormal image and design features of the DR equipment, the research found out that truncation artifacts were directly caused by premature movement of the flat panel detector. Based on the finding, the research proposed a resolution plan in which a flat panel detector delay return control circuit was added. Clinical results showed that the flat panel detector delay return control circuit integrated with D-vision DR photographic system could eliminate truncation artifacts caused by flat panel detector motion and improve DR image quality without decreasing examination efficiency, which allowed the design to be used in the improvement of related equipments.%本文对岛津D-vision平板摄影透视系统偶发的图像错层伪影现象进行了研究,通过对异常图像和设备自身设计特点进行分析,发现曝光后平板的过早运动是导致图像伪影的直接原因,基于此提出了加配平板延时返回控制电路的解决方案。改进后结果表明,在平板摄影透视系统加装平板延时返回功能后,图像错层现象消失,DR摄影图像质量得到提升,且改进不会影响检查效率,可应用推广至相关设备的改进。

  17. Comparative study of two flat-panel x-ray detectors applied to small-animal imaging cone-beam micro-CT

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Proceeding of: 2008 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium Conference Record (NSS '08), Dresden, Germany, 19-25 Oct. 2008 This work compares two different X-ray flat-panel detectors for its use in high-speed, cone-beam CT applied to small-animal imaging. The main differences between these two devices are the scintillators and the achievable frame rate. Both devices have been tested in terms of system linearity, sensitivity, resolution, stability and noise properties, taking into account the dif...

  18. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Bo Kyung; Jeon, Seongchae; Seo, Chang-Woo

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 μm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 μm×100 μm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  19. X-ray performance of a wafer-scale CMOS flat panel imager for applications in medical imaging and nondestructive testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Bo Kyung, E-mail: goldrain99@kaist.ac.kr [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seongchae [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Gangwon-do 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-21

    This paper presents a wafer-scale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-based X-ray flat panel detector for medical imaging and nondestructive testing applications. In this study, our proposed X-ray CMOS flat panel imager has been fabricated by using a 0.35 µm 1-poly/4-metal CMOS process. The pixel size is 100 µm×100 µm and the pixel array format is 1200×1200 pixels, which provide a field-of-view (FOV) of 120mm×120 mm. The 14.3-bit extended counting analog-to digital converter (ADC) with built-in binning mode was used to reduce the area and simultaneously improve the image resolution. The different screens such as thallium-doped CsI (CsI:Tl) and terbium gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb) scintillators were used as conversion materials for X-rays to visible light photons. The X-ray imaging performance such as X-ray sensitivity as a function of X-ray exposure dose, spatial resolution, image lag and X-ray images of various objects were measured under practical medical and industrial application conditions. This paper results demonstrate that our prototype CMOS-based X-ray flat panel imager has the significant potential for medical imaging and non-destructive testing (NDT) applications with high-resolution and high speed rate.

  20. Reducing dose in urography while maintaining image quality-a comparison of storage phosphor plates and a flat-panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Margareta; Geijer, Håkan; Persliden, Jan; Andersson, Torbjörn

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of new flat-panel detector technology often forces us to accept too high dose levels as proposed by the manufacturers. We need a tool to compare the image quality of a new system with the accepted standard. The aim of this study was to obtain a comparable image quality for two systems-storage phosphor plates and a flat-panel system using intravenous urography (IVU) as a clinical model. The image quality figure was calculated using a contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD) for the two evaluated systems. This allowed us to set a dose for the flat-panel system that gave equivalent image quality to the storage phosphor plates. This reduced detector dose was used in an evaluation of clinical images to find out if the dose reduction from the phantom study indeed resulted in images of equal clinical image quality. The image quality was assessed using image criteria of the European guidelines for IVU with visual grading analysis. Equivalent image quality in image pairs was achieved at 30% of the dose. The CDRAD contrast-detail phantom makes it possible to find dose levels that give equal image quality using different imaging systems.

  1. The role of oxide interlayers in back reflector configurations for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demontis, V.; Sanna, C.; Melskens, J.; Santbergen, R.; Smets, A.H.M.; Damiano, A.; Zeman, M.

    2013-01-01

    Thin oxide interlayers are commonly added to the back reflector of thin-film silicon solar cells to increase their current. To gain more insight in the enhancement mechanism, we tested different back reflector designs consisting of aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) and/or hydrogenated silicon oxid

  2. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Traylor Building, Room 718, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  3. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-08-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions—for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in

  4. Design and performance of the prototype full field breast tomosynthesis system with selenium based flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Baorui; Ruth, Chris; Stein, Jay; Smith, Andrew; Shaw, Ian; Jing, Zhenxue

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a breast tomosynthesis system utilizing a selenium-based direct conversion flat panel detector. This prototype system is a modification of Selenia, Hologic"s full field digital mammography system, using an add-on breast holding device to allow 3D tomosynthetic imaging. During a tomosynthesis scan, the breast is held stationary while the x-ray source and detector mounted on a c-arm rotate continuously around the breast over an angular range up to 30 degrees. The x-ray tube is pulsed to acquire 11 projections at desired c-arm angles. Images are reconstructed in planes parallel to the breastplate using a filtered backprojection algorithm. Processing time is typically 1 minute for a 50 mm thick breast at 0.1 mm in-plane pixel size, 1 mm slice-to-slice separation. Clinical studies are in progress. Performance evaluations were carried out at the system and the subsystem levels including spatial resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, spectra optimization, imaging technique, and phantom and patient studies. Experimental results show that we have successfully built a tomosynthesis system with images showing less structure noise and revealing 3D information compared with the conventional mammogram. We introduce, for the first time, the definition of "Depth of Field" for tomosynthesis based on a spatial resolution study. This parameter is used together with Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) to evaluate 3D resolution of a tomosynthesis system as a function of system design, imaging technique, and reconstruction algorithm. Findings from the on-going clinical studies will help the design of the next generation tomosynthesis system offering improved performance.

  5. SU-E-J-45: The Correlation Between CBCT Flat Panel Misalignment and 3D Image Guidance Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenton, O; Valdes, G; Yin, L; Teo, B [The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brousmiche, S; Wikler, D [Ion Beam Application, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To simulate the impact of CBCT flat panel misalignment on the image quality, the calculated correction vectors in 3D image guided proton therapy and to determine if these calibration errors can be caught in our QA process. Methods The X-ray source and detector geometrical calibration (flexmap) file of the CBCT system in the AdaPTinsight software (IBA proton therapy) was edited to induce known changes in the rotational and translational calibrations of the imaging panel. Translations of up to ±10 mm in the x, y and z directions (see supplemental) and rotational errors of up to ±3° were induced. The calibration files were then used to reconstruct the CBCT image of a pancreatic patient and CatPhan phantom. Correction vectors were calculated for the patient using the software’s auto match system and compared to baseline values. The CatPhan CBCT images were used for quantitative evaluation of image quality for each type of induced error. Results Translations of 1 to 3 mm in the x and y calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector errors of equal magnitude. Similar 10mm shifts were seen in the y-direction; however, in the x-direction, the image quality was too degraded for a match. These translational errors can be identified through differences in isocenter from orthogonal kV images taken during routine QA. Errors in the z-direction had no effect on the correction vector and image quality.Rotations of the imaging panel calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector rotations of the patient images. These rotations also resulted in degraded image quality which can be identified through quantitative image quality metrics. Conclusion Misalignment of CBCT geometry can lead to incorrect translational and rotational patient correction vectors. These errors can be identified through QA of the imaging isocenter as compared to orthogonal images combined with monitoring of CBCT image quality.

  6. The line-noise-reduction for low dose x-ray fluoroscopy with the flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Katsumi; Takenouchi, Shinobu

    2006-03-01

    A scintillator type Flat Panel Detector (FPD)1 has a good noise performance especially in Fluoroscopic images because of high DQE. Almost same dose as I.I. and CCD system is accepted in clinical use. According to the clinical study, the dose in fluoroscopy will be decreased if we can reduce the line noise coming from gate line of the Thin Film Transistor (TFT). The purpose of this study is to detect and reduce this line noise from the fluoroscopic images making it possible to perform a lower dose of fluoroscopy imaging. We detected the line noise by acquiring a dark image (without exposure) and then comparing the average of the line data along to the gate line to the neighborhood lines. We have applied this method to the dark area taken by the collimator of the Lucite phantom image and detected it. The detected line will be compensated by interpolation with neighborhood lines. The FPD of our system2 has a big detecting area (40cm x 30cm) and a zoom mode is selected in fluoroscopy because the doctor is watching an edge of the guide-wire and a contrast medium. The collimated area of the detector is displayed in a monitor after the zooming process and we can take a collimated dark area for detecting the line noise. As we applied this method to the dark image (1024pixels x 1024lines) including 54 lines with noise, we can improve 10% of SD. Visible line noise of chest phantom image was reduced with this method. It will help to lower the fluoroscopy dose.

  7. Novel Na(+) doped Alq3 hybrid materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices and flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, S A; Borghate, S V; Kalyani, N Thejo; Dhoble, S J

    2015-05-01

    Pure and Na(+) -doped Alq3 complexes were synthesized by a simple precipitation method at room temperature, maintaining a stoichiometric ratio. These complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The X-ray diffractogram exhibits well-resolved peaks, revealing the crystalline nature of the synthesized complexes, FTIR confirms the molecular structure and the completion of quinoline ring formation in the metal complex. UV/Vis absorption and PL spectra of sodium-doped Alq3 complexes exhibit high emission intensity in comparison with Alq3 phosphor, proving that when doped in Alq3 , Na(+) enhances PL emission intensity. The excitation spectra of the synthesized complexes lie in the range 242-457 nm when weak shoulders are also considered. Because the sharp excitation peak falls in the blue region of visible radiation, the complexes can be employed for blue chip excitation. The emission wavelength of all the synthesized complexes lies in the bluish green/green region ranging between 485 and 531 nm. The intensity of the emission wavelength was found to be elevated when Na(+) is doped into Alq3 . Because both the excitation and emission wavelengths fall in the visible region of electromagnetic radiation, these phosphors can also be employed to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells by using the solar spectral conversion principle. Thus, the synthesized phosphors can be used as bluish green/green light-emitting phosphors for organic light-emitting diodes, flat panel displays, solid-state lighting technology - a step towards the desire to reduce energy consumption and generate pollution free light.

  8. Nonlinear statistical reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with blur and correlated noise models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-03-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications.

  9. Semi-automatic classification of skeletal morphology in genetically altered mice using flat-panel volume computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dullin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid progress in exploring the human and mouse genome has resulted in the generation of a multitude of mouse models to study gene functions in their biological context. However, effective screening methods that allow rapid noninvasive phenotyping of transgenic and knockout mice are still lacking. To identify murine models with bone alterations in vivo, we used flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT for high-resolution 3-D imaging and developed an algorithm with a computational intelligence system. First, we tested the accuracy and reliability of this approach by imaging discoidin domain receptor 2- (DDR2- deficient mice, which display distinct skull abnormalities as shown by comparative landmark-based analysis. High-contrast fpVCT data of the skull with 200 microm isotropic resolution and 8-s scan time allowed segmentation and computation of significant shape features as well as visualization of morphological differences. The application of a trained artificial neuronal network to these datasets permitted a semi-automatic and highly accurate phenotype classification of DDR2-deficient compared to C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Even heterozygous DDR2 mice with only subtle phenotypic alterations were correctly determined by fpVCT imaging and identified as a new class. In addition, we successfully applied the algorithm to classify knockout mice lacking the DDR1 gene with no apparent skull deformities. Thus, this new method seems to be a potential tool to identify novel mouse phenotypes with skull changes from transgenic and knockout mice on the basis of random mutagenesis as well as from genetic models. However for this purpose, new neuronal networks have to be created and trained. In summary, the combination of fpVCT images with artificial neuronal networks provides a reliable, novel method for rapid, cost-effective, and noninvasive primary screening tool to detect skeletal phenotypes in mice.

  10. Approaching Defect-free Amorphous Silicon Nitride by Plasma-assisted Atomic Beam Deposition for High Performance Gate Dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Shu-Ju; Wang, Chiang-Lun; Lee, Hung-Chun; Lin, Chun-Yeh; Chen, Jhih-Wei; Shiu, Hong-Wei; Chang, Lo-Yueh; Hsueh, Han-Ting; Chen, Hung-Ying; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tu, Li-Wei; Teng, Hsisheng; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Chia-Hao; Wu, Chung-Lin

    2016-06-01

    In the past few decades, gate insulators with a high dielectric constant (high-k dielectric) enabling a physically thick but dielectrically thin insulating layer, have been used to replace traditional SiOx insulator and to ensure continuous downscaling of Si-based transistor technology. However, due to the non-silicon derivative natures of the high-k metal oxides, transport properties in these dielectrics are still limited by various structural defects on the hetero-interfaces and inside the dielectrics. Here, we show that another insulating silicon compound, amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si3N4), is a promising candidate of effective electrical insulator for use as a high-k dielectric. We have examined a-Si3N4 deposited using the plasma-assisted atomic beam deposition (PA-ABD) technique in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment and demonstrated the absence of defect-related luminescence; it was also found that the electronic structure across the a-Si3N4/Si heterojunction approaches the intrinsic limit, which exhibits large band gap energy and valence band offset. We demonstrate that charge transport properties in the metal/a-Si3N4/Si (MNS) structures approach defect-free limits with a large breakdown field and a low leakage current. Using PA-ABD, our results suggest a general strategy to markedly improve the performance of gate dielectric using a nearly defect-free insulator.

  11. Improved conductivity of aluminum-doped ZnO: The effect of hydrogen diffusion from a hydrogenated amorphous silicon capping layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarev, M. V.; Sharma, K.; Verheijen, M. A.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Creatore, M.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma-deposited aluminum-doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) demonstrated a resistivity gradient as function of the film thickness, extending up to about 600 nm. This gradient decreased sharply when the ZnO:Al was capped by a hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer (a-Si:H) and subsequently treated according to the so

  12. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Amorphous Tandem Thin-Film Silicon Modules Produced by A Roll-to-Roll Process on Plastic Foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couty, P.; Duchamp, Martial; Söderström, K.;

    2011-01-01

    An improvement of the photo-current is expected when amorphous silicon solar cells are grown on a ZnO texture. A full understanding of the relationship between cell structure and electrical performance is essential for the rapid development of high efficiency VHF-tandem cells on textured substrates...

  13. Preparation and Characterisation of Amorphous-silicon Photovoltaic Devices Having Microcrystalline Emitters; Preparacion y Caracterizacion de Dispositivos Fotovoltaicos de Silicio Amorfo con Emisiones Microcristalinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, M. T.; Gandia, J. J.; Carabe, J. [CIEMAT. Madrid (Spain)

    1999-11-01

    The present work summarises the essential aspects of the research carried out so far at CIEMAT on amorphous-silicon solar cells. The experience accumulated on the preparation and characterisation of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon has allowed to start from intrinsic (absorbent) and p-and n-type (emitters) materials not only having excellent optoelectronic properties, but enjoying certain technological advantages with respect to those developed by other groups. Among these are absorbent-layer growth rates between 5 and 10 times as fast as conventional ones and microcrystalline emitters prepared without using hydrogen. The preparation of amorphous-silicon cells has required the solution of a number of problems, such as those related to pinholes, edge leak currents and diffusion of metals into the semiconductor. Once such constraints have been overcome, it has been demonstrated not only that the amorphous-silicon technology developed at CIEMAT is valid for making solar cells, but also that the quality of the semiconductor material is good for the application according to the partial results obtained. The development of thin-film laser-scribing technology is considered essential. Additionally it has been concluded that cross contamination, originated by the fact of using a single-chamber reactor, is the basic factor limiting the quality of the cells developed at CIEMAT. The present research activity is highly focused on the solution of this problem. (Author)

  14. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells deposited under well controlled ion bombardment using pulse-shaped substrate biasing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wank, M. A.; van Swaaij, R.; R. van de Sanden,; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    We applied pulse-shaped biasing (PSB) to the expanding thermal plasma deposition of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers at substrate temperatures of 200 degrees C and growth rates of about 1?nm/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of intrinsic films showed a densification with incr

  15. Amorphous silicon carbon films prepared by hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor/sputtering deposition system: Effects of r.f. power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Maisarah Abdul, E-mail: nurmaisarahrashid@gmail.com [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Gani, Siti Meriam Ab. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat [Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul, E-mail: saadah@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-02-01

    Silicon carbon films were deposited using a hybrid radio frequency (r.f.) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)/sputtering deposition system at different r.f. powers. This deposition system combines the advantages of r.f. PECVD and sputtering techniques for the deposition of silicon carbon films with the added advantage of eliminating the use of highly toxic silane gas in the deposition process. Silicon (Si) atoms were sputtered from a pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) target by argon (Ar) ions and carbon (C) atoms were incorporated into the film from C based growth radicals generated through the discharge of methane (CH{sub 4}) gas. The effects of r.f. powers of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 150 W applied during the deposition process on the structural and optical properties of the films were investigated. Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the silicon carbon films contain amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) and amorphous carbon (a-C) phases. The r.f. power showed significant influence on the C incorporation in the film structure. The a-C phases became more ordered in films with high C incorporation in the film structure. These films also produced high photoluminescence emission intensity at around 600 nm wavelength as a result of quantum confinement effects from the presence of sp{sup 2} C clusters embedded in the a-SiC and a-C phases in the films. - Highlights: ► Effects of radio frequency (r.f.) power on silicon carbon (SiC) films were studied. ► Hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition/sputtering technique was used. ► r.f. power influences C incorporation in the film structure. ► High C incorporation results in higher ordering of the amorphous C phase. ► These films produced high photoluminescence emission intensity.

  16. A Study of The Evolution of The Silicon Nanocrystallites in The Amorphous Silicon Carbide Under Argon Dilution of the Source Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kole

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural evolution of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H films deposited by rf-PECVD from a mixture of SiH4 and CH4 diluted in Ar shows that a smooth transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline phase occurs in the material by increasing the Ar dilution. The optical band gap (Eg decreases from 1.99 eV to 1.91 eV and the H-content (CH decreases from 14.32 at% to 5.29 at% by increasing the dilution from 94 % to 98 %. at 98 % Ar dilution, the material contains irregular shape Si nanocrystallites with sizes over 10 nm. Increasing the Ar dilution further to 98.4 % leads to a reduction of the size of the Si nanocrystals to regular shape Si quantum dots of size about 5 nm. The quantum confinement effect is apparent from the increase in the Eg value to 2.6 eV at 98.4 % Ar dilution. Formation of Si quantum dots may be explained by the etching of the nanocrystallites of Si by the energetic ion bombardment from the plasma.

  17. Annealing Kinetic Model Using Fast and Slow Metastable Defects for Hydrogenated-Amorphous-Silicon-Based Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Yeop Myong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The two-component kinetic model employing “fast” and “slow” metastable defects for the annealing behaviors in pin-type hydrogenated-amorphous-silicon- (a-Si:H- based solar cells is simulated using a normalized fill factor. Reported annealing data on pin-type a-Si:H-based solar cells are revisited and fitted using the model to confirm its validity. It is verified that the two-component model is suitable for fitting the various experimental phenomena. In addition, the activation energy for annealing of the solar cells depends on the definition of the recovery time. From the thermally activated and high electric field annealing behaviors, the plausible microscopic mechanism on the defect removal process is discussed.

  18. Fabrication of hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films by decomposition of hexamethyldisilane with microwave discharge flow of Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Haruhiko; Kumakura, Motoki; Suzuki, Tsuneo; Niibe, Masahito; Kanda, Kazuhiro; Saitoh, Hidetoshi

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films have been fabricated by the decomposition of hexamethyldisilane with a microwave discharge flow of Ar. Mechanically hard films were obtained by applying radio-frequency (RF) bias voltages to the substrate. The atomic compositions of the films were analyzed by a combination of Rutherford backscattering and elastic recoil detection, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The chemical structure was analyzed by carbon-K near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, high-resolution XPS, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. The structural changes upon the application of RF bias were investigated, and the concentration of O atoms near the film surface was found to play a key role in the mechanical hardness of the present films.

  19. Solar Hydrogen Production by Amorphous Silicon Photocathodes Coated with a Magnetron Sputter Deposited Mo2C Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Thorwarth, Kerstin; Niesen, Bjoern; Liardet, Laurent; Patscheider, Jörg; Ballif, Christophe; Hu, Xile

    2015-06-10

    Coupling of Earth-abundant hydrogen evolution catalysts to photoabsorbers is crucial for the production of hydrogen fuel using sunlight. In this work, we demonstrate the use of magnetron sputtering to deposit Mo2C as an efficient hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst onto surface-protected amorphous silicon (a-Si) photoabsorbers. The a-Si/Mo2C photocathode evolves hydrogen under simulated solar illumination in strongly acidic and alkaline electrolytes. Onsets of photocurrents are observed at potentials as positive as 0.85 V vs RHE. Under AM 1.5G (1 sun) illumination, the photocathodes reach current densities of -11.2 mA cm(-2) at the reversible hydrogen potential in 0.1 M H2SO4 and 1.0 M KOH. The high photovoltage and low-cost of the Mo2C/a-Si assembly make it a promising photocathode for solar hydrogen production.

  20. PHOTO- AND ELECTRO-LUMINESCENCE FROM HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS SILICON CARBIDE FILMS PREPARED BY USING ORGANIC CARBON SOURCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jun; Ma Tian-fu; Li Wei; Chen Kun-ji; Li Zhi-feng; Lu Wei

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films were grown byusing an organic source, xylene (C8H{10), instead of methane(CH4) in a conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapor depositionsystem. The optical band gap of these samples was increased gradually bychanging the gas ratio of C8H10 to SiH4. The film with highoptical band gap was soft and polymer-like and intense photoluminescencewere obtained. Room temperature electro-luminescence was also achievedwith peak energy at 2.05 eV (600 nm) for the a-SiC:H film withoptical band gap of 3.2 eV.1.8mm

  1. Kinetics of the laser-induced solid phase crystallization of amorphous silicon-Time-resolved Raman spectroscopy and computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Očenášek, J.; Novák, P.; Prušáková, L.

    2017-01-01

    This study demonstrates that a laser-induced crystallization instrumented with Raman spectroscopy is, in general, an effective tool to study the thermally activated crystallization kinetics. It is shown, for the solid phase crystallization of an amorphous silicon thin film, that the integral intensity of Raman spectra corresponding to the crystalline phase grows linearly in the time-logarithmic scale. A mathematical model, which assumes random nucleation and crystal growth, was designed to simulate the crystallization process in the non-uniform temperature field induced by laser. The model is based on solving the Eikonal equation and the Arhenius temperature dependence of the crystal nucleation and the growth rate. These computer simulations successfully approximate the crystallization process kinetics and suggest that laser-induced crystallization is primarily thermally activated.

  2. Study on the effect of process conditions on the thermo-optic coefficient of amorphous silicon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Shuang; Tang, Haihua; Zhong, Zhiyong; Liu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    A thermo-optical coefficient (TOC) test platform based on FILMeasure-20 was designed and the thermal coefficient of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films material at 1330 nm was tested. a-Si:H were deposited on the quartz glass using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) was used to characterize the infrared spectral feature of films. The hydrogen content of films was influenced by different radio frequency (RF) power and deposition pressure conditions according to the FTIR spectra and theoretical analysis, and the thermo-optic effect of a-Si:H varied with temperature characteristics. Experimental results indicated that selecting the appropriate process conditions to prepare a-Si:H films can effectively increase or avoid the impact of thermo-optical effect on the optical devices.

  3. Vibrational mean free paths and thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sääskilahti, K.; Oksanen, J.; Tulkki, J.; McGaughey, A. J. H.; Volz, S.

    2016-12-01

    The frequency-dependent mean free paths (MFPs) of vibrational heat carriers in amorphous silicon are predicted from the length dependence of the spectrally decomposed heat current (SDHC) obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest a (frequency)- 2 scaling of the room-temperature MFPs below 5 THz. The MFPs exhibit a local maximum at a frequency of 8 THz and fall below 1 nm at frequencies greater than 10 THz, indicating localized vibrations. The MFPs extracted from sub-10 nm system-size simulations are used to predict the length-dependence of thermal conductivity up to system sizes of 100 nm and good agreement is found with independent molecular dynamics simulations. Weighting the SDHC by the frequency-dependent quantum occupation function provides a simple and convenient method to account for quantum statistics and provides reasonable agreement with the experimentally-measured trend and magnitude.

  4. Vibrational mean free paths and thermal conductivity of amorphous silicon from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Sääskilahti, K; Tulkki, J; McGaughey, A J H; Volz, S

    2016-01-01

    The frequency-dependent mean free paths (MFPs) of vibrational heat carriers in amorphous silicon are predicted from the length dependence of the spectrally decomposed heat current (SDHC) obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest a (frequency)$^{-2}$ scaling of the room-temperature MFPs below 5 THz. The MFPs exhibit a local maximum at a frequency of 8 THz and fall below 1 nm at frequencies greater than 10 THz, indicating localized vibrations. The MFPs extracted from sub-10 nm system-size simulations are used to predict the length-dependence of thermal conductivity up to system sizes of 100 nm and good agreement is found with separate molecular dynamics simulations. Weighting the SDHC by the frequency-dependent quantum occupation function provides a simple and convenient method to account for quantum statistics and provides reasonable agreement with the experimentally-measured trend and magnitude.

  5. Amorphous silicon films with high deposition rate prepared using argon and hydrogen diluted silane for stable solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, Purabi; Agarwal, Pratima [Department of Physics, IIT Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Dixit, P.N. [Plasma Processed Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2007-08-15

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films with high deposition rate (4-5 Aa/s) and reduced Staebler-Wronski effect are prepared using a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}), hydrogen and argon. The films show an improvement in short and medium range order. The structural, transport and stability studies on the films are done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman scattering studies, electrical conductivity and diffusion length measurement. Presence of both atomic hydrogen and Ar{sup *} in the plasma causes breaking of weak Si-Si bonds and subsequent reconstruction of strong bonds resulting in improvement of short and medium range order. The improved structural order enhances the stability of these films against light soaking. High deposition rate is due to the lesser etching of growing surface compared to the case of only hydrogen diluted silane. (author)

  6. Spatially-Resolved Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Films on the Glass Substrate by Multi-beam Laser Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Laser interference induced crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) on the glass substrate was performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser. White light interferometer (WLI) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were used to characterize the morphology of the structured films, while X-ray diffraction (XRD), combined with the AFM, was used to analyse the crystalline structure of the film. The experimental results show that the laser energy density above a certain threshold, in the range of 400-500 mJ/cm2,triggers the patterned crystallizations which take the form similar to the laser intensity distribution. For the patterned crystallization under multipulse exposure, a definite polycrystalline structure with individual phases was observed by XRD. The difference in feature form, e.g., deepened craters or heightened lines, is related to the laser energy density relative to the threshold of evaporation of the material.

  7. The correlation of open-circuit voltage with bandgap in amorphous silicon-based pin solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, R. S.; Schiff, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    We briefly review the correlation of open-circuit voltages VOC with the bandgap of the intrinsic layer in amorphous silicon based pin solar cells. We discuss two mechanisms which limit VOC: intrinsic layer recombination, and the built-in potential VBI. In particular we discuss Li's proposal that the open-circuit voltages in higher bandgap cells (EG>1.9 eV) are VBI-limited. Based on computer simulations of pin solar cells we propose that VBI limitation occurs when the recombination limit to VOC exceeds the cell's field-reversal voltage VR. For a-Si:H based cells this field-reversal voltage occurs at about VBI-0.3 V. This proposal would account for the observation that VBI limitation occurs for VOC significantly smaller than VBI.

  8. Structural and optical properties of thin films porous amorphous silicon carbide formed by Ag-assisted photochemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukezzata, A., E-mail: assiab2006@yahoo.fr [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd. Frantz FANON, B.P. 140 Algiers (Algeria); Keffous, A., E-mail: keffousa@yahoo.fr [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd. Frantz FANON, B.P. 140 Algiers (Algeria); Cheriet, A.; Belkacem, Y.; Gabouze, N.; Manseri, A. [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd. Frantz FANON, B.P. 140 Algiers (Algeria); Nezzal, G. [Houari Boumediene University (USTHB), Chemical Faculty, Algiers (Algeria); Kechouane, M.; Bright, A. [Houari Boumediene University, Physical Faculty, Algiers (Algeria); Guerbous, L. [Algerian Nuclear Research Center (CRNA), Algiers (Algeria); Menari, H. [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd. Frantz FANON, B.P. 140 Algiers (Algeria)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, we present the formation of porous layers on hydrogenated amorphous SiC (a-SiC: H) by Ag-assisted photochemical etching using HF/K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} solution under UV illumination at 254 nm wavelength. The amorphous films a-SiC: H were elaborated by d.c. magnetron sputtering using a hot pressed polycrystalline 6H-SiC target. Because of the high resistivity of the SiC layer, around 1.6 M{Omega} cm and in order to facilitate the chemical etching, a thin metallic film of high purity silver (Ag) has been deposited under vacuum onto the thin a-SiC: H layer. The etched surface was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence. The results show that the morphology of etched a-SiC: H surface evolves with etching time. For an etching time of 20 min the surface presents a hemispherical crater, indicating that the porous SiC layer is perforated. Photoluminescence characterization of etched a-SiC: H samples for 20 min shows a high and an intense blue PL, whereas it has been shown that the PL decreases for higher etching time. Finally, a dissolution mechanism of the silicon carbide in 1HF/1K{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} solution has been proposed.

  9. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between an image-intensifier system and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system - technical phantom measurements and evaluation of clinical imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Meike; Hagelstein, Claudia; Diehm, Theo; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Neff, K.W. [University Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Many image-intensifier fluoroscopy systems have been replaced by flat-panel detectors in recent years. To compare the level of contrast, image resolution and radiation dose between an image-intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system in a pediatric radiology unit. We compared two systems - a conventional image intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel system. We measured image quality and radiation dose using a technical phantom. Additionally, we retrospectively compared age-matched fluoroscopic pediatric voiding cystourethrography (n = 15) and upper gastrointestinal investigations (n = 25). In phantom studies image contrast was equal while image resolution was higher and mean radiation dose lower using the flat-panel system (P < 0.0001). In pediatric investigations, mean dose area product was significantly reduced on the flat-panel system for upper gastrointestinal investigation (45 ± 38 μGy*m{sup 2} vs. 11 ± 9 μGy*m{sup 2}; P < 0.0001) and for voiding cystourethrography (18 ± 20 μGy*m{sup 2} vs. 10 ± 12 μGy*m{sup 2}; P = 0.04). The newer flat-panel system performs at lower dose levels with equal to better image quality and therefore seems to be the more suitable technique for pediatric fluoroscopy in comparison to image-intensifier systems. (orig.)

  10. Amorphization and recrystallization processes in monocrystalline beta silicon carbide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmond, J.A.; Withrow, S.P.; Kong, H.S.; Davis, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Individual, as well as multiple doses of /sup 27/Al/sup +/, /sup 31/P/sup +/, /sup 28/Si/sup +/, and /sup 28/Si/sup +/ and /sup 12/C/sup +/, were implanted into (100) oriented monocrystalline ..beta..-SiC films. The critical energy of approx. =16 eV/atom required for the amorphization of ..beta..-SiC via implantation of /sup 27/Al/sup +/ and /sup 31/P/sup +/ was determined using the TRIM84 computer program for calculation of the damage-energy profiles coupled with the results of RBS/ion channeling analyses. In order to recrystallize amorphized layers created by the individual implantation of all four ion species, thermal annealing at 1600, 1700, or 1800/sup 0/C was employed. Characterization of the recrystallized layers was performed using XTEM. Examples of SPE regrown layers containing precipitates and dislocation loops, highly faulted-microtwinned regions, and random crystallites were observed.

  11. Spectroscopy and structural properties of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halindintwali, Sylvain; Knoesen, D.; Julies, B.A.; Arendse, C.J.; Muller, T.; Gengler, Régis Y.N.; Rudolf, P.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous SiC:H thin films were grown by hot wire chemical vapour deposition from a SiH4/CH4/H2 mixture at a substrate temperature below 400 °C. Thermal annealing in an argon environment up to 900 °C shows that the films crystallize as μc-Si:H and SiC with a porous microstructure that favours an oxi

  12. Silicon Monoxide at 1 atm and Elevated Pressures: Crystalline or Amorphous?

    KAUST Repository

    AlKaabi, Khalid

    2014-03-05

    The absence of a crystalline SiO phase under ordinary conditions is an anomaly in the sequence of group 14 monoxides. We explore theoretically ordered ground-state and amorphous structures for SiO at P = 1 atm, and crystalline phases also at pressures up to 200 GPa. Several competitive ground-state P = 1 atm structures are found, perforce with Si-Si bonds, and possessing Si-O-Si bridges similar to those in silica (SiO2) polymorphs. The most stable of these static structures is enthalpically just a little more stable than a calculated random bond model of amorphous SiO. In that model we find no segregation into regions of amorphous Si and amorphous SiO2. The P = 1 atm structures are all semiconducting. As the pressure is increased, intriguing new crystalline structures evolve, incorporating Si triangular nets or strips and stishovite-like regions. A heat of formation of crystalline SiO is computed; it is found to be the most negative of all the group 14 monoxides. Yet, given the stability of SiO2, the disproportionation 2SiO (s) → Si(s)+SiO2(s) is exothermic, falling right into the series of group 14 monoxides, and ranging from a highly negative ΔH of disproportionation for CO to highly positive for PbO. There is no major change in the heat of disproportionation with pressure, i.e., no range of stability of SiO with respect to SiO2. The high-pressure SiO phases are metallic. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  13. Large Polycrystalline Silicon Grains Prepared by Excimer Laser Crystallization of Sputtered Amorphous Silicon Film with Process Temperature at 100 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Ishihara, Ryoichi; Neihof, Ellen J. J.; van Andel, Yvonne; Schellevis, Hugo; Metselaar, Wim; Beenakker, Kees

    2007-03-01

    Large polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) grains with a diameter of 1.8 μm are successfully prepared by excimer laser crystallization (ELC) of a sputtered amorphous silicon (α-Si) film at a maximum process temperature of 100 °C. By pulsed DC magnetron sputtering, α-Si is deposited on a non-structured oxidized wafer. It is found that the α-Si film deposited with a bias is easily ablated during ELC, even at an energy density below the super lateral growth (SLG) region. However, the α-Si film deposited without a bias can endure an energy density well beyond the SLG region without ablation. This zero-bias sputtered α-Si film with a high compressive stress has a low Ar content and a high density, which is beneficial for the suppression of ablation. Large grains with a petal-like shape can be obtained in a wide energy density window, which can be a result from some fine crystallites in the α-Si matrix. These large grains with a low process temperature are promising for the direct formation of system circuits as well as a high-quality display on a plastic foil.

  14. Development of Thin Film Amorphous Silicon Tandem Junction Based Photocathodes Providing High Open-Circuit Voltages for Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Urbain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film tandem solar cells (a-Si:H/a-Si:H have been developed with focus on high open-circuit voltages for the direct application as photocathodes in photoelectrochemical water splitting devices. By temperature variation during deposition of the intrinsic a-Si:H absorber layers the band gap energy of a-Si:H absorber layers, correlating with the hydrogen content of the material, can be adjusted and combined in a way that a-Si:H/a-Si:H tandem solar cells provide open-circuit voltages up to 1.87 V. The applicability of the tandem solar cells as photocathodes was investigated in a photoelectrochemical cell (PEC measurement set-up. With platinum as a catalyst, the a-Si:H/a-Si:H based photocathodes exhibit a high photocurrent onset potential of 1.76 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE and a photocurrent of 5.3 mA/cm2 at 0 V versus RHE (under halogen lamp illumination. Our results provide evidence that a direct application of thin film silicon based photocathodes fulfills the main thermodynamic requirements to generate hydrogen. Furthermore, the presented approach may provide an efficient and low-cost route to solar hydrogen production.

  15. Arrays of ZnO nanocolumns for 3-dimensional very thin amorphous and microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neykova, Neda, E-mail: neykova@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering Trojanova 13, 120 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Hruska, Karel; Holovsky, Jakub; Remes, Zdenek; Vanecek, Milan [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 16253 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-30

    We report on the hydrothermal growth of high quality arrays of single crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocolumns, oriented perpendicularly to the transparent conductive oxide substrate. In order to obtain precisely defined spacing and arrangement of ZnO nanocolumns over an area up to 0.5 cm{sup 2}, we used electron beam lithography. Vertically aligned ZnO (multicrystalline or single crystals) nanocolumns were grown in an aqueous solution of zinc nitrate hexahydrate and hexamethylenetetramine at 95 °C, with a growth rate 0.5 ÷ 1 μm/h. The morphology of the nanostructures was visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Such nanostructured ZnO films were used as a substrate for the recently developed 3-dimensional thin film silicon (amorphous, microcrystalline) solar cell, with a high efficiency potential. The photoelectrical and optical properties of the ZnO nanocolumns and the silicon absorber layers of these type nanostructured solar cells were investigated in details. - Highlights: • Vertically-oriented ZnO nanocolumns were grown by hydrothermal method. • The ZnO nanocolumns were grown over an area of 0.5 cm{sup 2}. • For precise arrangement of the ZnO nanocolumns electron beam lithography was used. • We report on 3-D design of nanostructured solar cell. • Optical thickness of nanostructured cell was three times higher compared to flat cell.

  16. Silanization effect on the photoluminescence characteristics of crystalline and amorphous silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caregnato, Paula; Dell'Arciprete, Maria Laura; Gonzalez, Mónica Cristina

    2013-09-01

    Silicon nanoparticles synthesized by two different methods were surface modified with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane. The particles of ~2 nm size exhibit photoluminescence (PL) in the UV-Vis range of the spectrum. The most intense PL band at 430 nm with an emission lifetime of 1-2 ns is attributed to the presence of the surface defects Si-O-Si, generated after anchoring the organic molecule onto the interface. The excitation-emission matrix of this band is essentially independent of the technique of synthesis, crystalline structure, and size of the silicon nanoparticles.

  17. Simulation studies on the effect of a buffer layer on the external parameters of hydrogenated amorphous silicon –– solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Rajeev Kumar; M Zeman

    2008-10-01

    Device modeling of –– junction amorphous silicon solar cells has been carried out using the amorphous semiconductor analysis (ASA) simulation programme. The aim of the study was to explain the role of a buffer layer in between the - and -layers of the –– solar cell on the external parameters such as dark current density and open circuit voltage. Investigations based on the simulation of dark – characteristics revealed that as the buffer layer thickness increases the dark current for a given voltage decreases.

  18. 激光切割平板夹具的改进%The improvement of laser cutting flat-panel clamp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌修; 贺敬地

    2011-01-01

    The paper designs a new type of cutting workmanship facility through analyzing domestic laser cutting flat -panel workmanship facility, and points out the shortcomings.The new workmanship facility can be disassembled so that it increases using efficiency greatly.%通过对国内激光平面切割工装的分析对比,指出了现有工装的缺点,设计了一套新型的切割工装.该工装可拆卸,极大地提高了使用效率.

  19. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbijewski, W., E-mail: wzbijewski@jhu.edu; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  20. Nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon-silicon core-shell structures for high-power supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, S. A. Safiabadi; Soleimani-Amiri, S.; Sanaee, Z.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2017-02-01

    We report successful deposition of nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon films to realize high-power core-shell supercapacitor electrodes. A catalyst-free method is proposed to deposit large-area stable, highly conformal and highly conductive nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon (a-C:N) films by means of a direct-current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (DC-PECVD). This approach exploits C2H2 and N2 gases as the sources of carbon and nitrogen constituents and can be applied to various micro and nanostructures. Although as-deposited a-C:N films have a porous surface, their porosity can be significantly improved through a modification process consisting of Ni-assisted annealing and etching steps. The electrochemical analyses demonstrated the superior performance of the modified a-C:N as a supercapacitor active material, where specific capacitance densities as high as 42 F/g and 8.5 mF/cm2 (45 F/cm3) on silicon microrod arrays were achieved. Furthermore, this supercapacitor electrode showed less than 6% degradation of capacitance over 5000 cycles of a galvanostatic charge-discharge test. It also exhibited a relatively high energy density of 2.3 × 103 Wh/m3 (8.3 × 106 J/m3) and ultra-high power density of 2.6 × 108 W/m3 which is among the highest reported values.

  1. Uniform dehydrogenation of amorphous silicon thin films using a wide thermal annealing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chan; Seong, Sejong; Lee, Taehoon; Ahn, Jinho; Kim, Tae Hyun; Yeo, Won-Jae; Park, In-Sung

    2017-02-01

    To prevent ablation caused by sudden hydrogen eruption during crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si:H) thin films, a wide dehydrogenation thermal annealing (wDTA) system was developed to reduce hydrogen content in a-Si:H film prior to its crystallization process. The annealed a-Si:H films were fully dehydrogenated and nanocrystallized by the wDTA system. Raman scattering measurement revealed that the dehydrogenation process lowers the hydrogen content through disappearance of the peak intensity at 2000 cm-1. The a-Si:H film was transformed into nanocrystallized Si with lower residual stress. The major advantage of this wDTA was the large area uniformity of the thermal and the resulting material properties for 8 generation display. The uniform material characteristics of the hydrogen content, thickness, energy bandgap, and transmittance of the annealed Si films in the overall area was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and UV-vis spectrometer measurement.

  2. Mobility-lifetime product and interface property in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, H.; Kida, H.; Nonomura, S.; Fukumoto, K.; Hamakawa, Y.

    1983-06-01

    A technique for evaluating the mobility-lifetime product of electrons and holes for amorphous Si solar cells is reported and used to assay the variation of the products with impurity doping, temperature, and prolonged light exposure. The product was examined as a significant indicator of solar cell performance and durability. The a-Si:H cells examined were prepared by an rf technique, and the spectral response of the photocurrent was examined in monochromatic light. The maximum products were observed when small amounts of boron atoms were used as the dopant. The hole lifetime dominated the photoconductivity in undoped and phosphorus doped cells, while the electron lifetime was dominant in boron doped cells. The mobility-lifetime product controlled the effective surface recombination factor. The method was concluded useful for optimizing the material, structure, and manufacturing processes for producing higher performance, reproducible, and stable a-Si:H pin solar cells.

  3. Methane Flow Rate Effects On The Optical Properties of Amorphous Silicon Carbon (a-SiC:H Films Deposited By DC Sputtering Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosari Saleh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the refractive index (n and the optical absorption coeffi cient (α from refl ection and transmission measurements on hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon (a-SiC:H fi lms. The a-SiC:H fi lms were prepared by dc sputtering method using silicon target in argon and methane gas mixtures. The refractive index (n decreases as the methane fl ow rate increase. The optical absorption coeffi cient (α shifts to higher energy with increasing methane fl ow rate. At higher methane fl ow rate, the fi lms tend to be more disorder and have wider optical gap. The relation of the optical properties and the disorder amorphous network with the compositional properties will be discussed.

  4. Research and development of photovoltaic power system. Study on structural defects in silicon-based amorphous materials; Taiyoko hatsuden system no kenkyu kaihatsu. Amorphous silicon kei zairyo no kozo kekkan ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, T. [Kanazawa University, Ishikawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1994-12-01

    Described herein are the results of the FY1994 research program for structural defects of silicon-based amorphous materials for solar cells. The study on light generation defects of the a-Si:H system and rejuvenation process by annealing establishes the effects of light irradiation time on changed neutral dangling bond density as a result of light irradiation at varying temperature of 77K, room temperature and 393K. The study on annealing to rejuvenate light generation defects of various types of a-Si-H systems establishes the activation energy distribution with respect to annealing to remove light-induced defects, showing that hydrogen affects the distribution of light-induced defects. The study on decaying process of light-induced ESR for undoped and N-doped a-Si:H systems observes the decaying process of light-induced ESR, after light is cut off, extending for a period of several seconds to several hours at 77K for the a-Si-H systems containing N in a range from 0 to 12at%. The other results presented are space distribution of neutral defects of light-irradiated a-Si-H systems, and rejuvenation process of light-induced spin for the a-Si(1-x)N(x):H composition. 6 figs.

  5. Thermo-enhanced field emission from ZnO nanowires: Role of defects and application in a diode flat panel X-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Daokun; Chen, Wenqing; Chen, Yicong; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhan, Runze; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2017-03-01

    A thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon was observed from ZnO nanowires. The field emission current increased by almost two orders of magnitude under a constant applied electric field, and the turn-on field decreased from 6.04 MV/m to 5.0 MV/m when the temperature increased from 323 to 723 K. The Poole-Frenkel electron excitation from the defect-induced trapping centers to the conduction band under high electric fields is believed to be the primary cause of the observed phenomenon. The experimental results fit well with the proposed physical model. The field emission from ZnO nanowires with different defect concentrations further confirmed the role of defects. Using the thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon, a diode flat panel X-ray source was demonstrated, for which the energy and dose can be separately tuned. The thermo-enhanced field emission phenomenon observed from ZnO nanowires could be an effective way to realize a large area flat panel multi-energy X-ray source.

  6. [Correlation between basic imaging properties and subjective evaluations of two digital radiographic X-ray systems based on direct-conversion flat panel detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Taro; Katayama, Reiji; Morishita, Junji; Sakai, Shinji; Kuroki, Hidefumi; Ohkubo, Seiji; Maeda, Takashi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2010-11-20

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the basic imaging properties of two digital radiographic X-ray systems with a direct conversion flat-panel detector and their image qualities, which were evaluated by the observer in hard copy and soft copy studies. The subjective image quality was evaluated and compared in terms of the low-contrast detectability and image sharpness in the two digital radiographic X-ray systems. We applied the radiographs of a contrast detail phantom to the evaluation of low-contrast detectability and analyzed the contrast detail diagrams. Finally, low-contrast detectability was evaluated by the image quality figure (IQF) calculated from the contrast detail diagrams. Also, the subjective image sharpness of human dry bones of two systems was examined and evaluated by the normalized-rank method. The results indicated that System A tended to provide superior subjective image quality compared to System B in both observer studies. We also found high correlations between IQFs and basic imaging properties, such as the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the noise equivalent quantum (NEQ). In conclusion, the low-contrast detectability of the two digital radiographic X-ray systems with a direct conversion flat-panel detector corresponded to the NPS and the NEQ in both outputs (soft copy and hard copy). On the other hand, the subjective image sharpness of human dry bones was affected by their noise properties.

  7. Clinical application of flat-panel CT in the angio suite; Klinische Anwendung der Flachdetektor-CT im Angio-OP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.A.; Fuerstner, M.; Hauser, M.; Smetana, F.; Kau, T. [Landeskrankenhaus Klagenfurt (Austria). Roentgendiagnostisches Zentralinstitut; Klinikum Klagenfurt (Austria). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-12-15

    The introduction of flat-panel detectors in modern angiographic C-arm systems makes it possible to acquire CT-like images in the angiographic suite (flat-panel CT; FD-CT). In this review, after a short technical introduction of FD-CT including the discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of this new imaging modality, the most commonly and best evaluated indications for FD-CT will be described. FD-CT has become an important adjunctive imaging modality in neurointerventional procedures and embolizations, especially during liver embolization. Another attractive indication for FD-CT is musculoskeletal interventions. FD-CT may provide important additional information in complicated peripheral vascular interventions and stent-graft procedures. FD-CT has a broad spectrum of possible applications, which finally depends on the experience and innovative thinking of the operator. However, it has to be kept in mind that FD-CT causes additional radiation exposure. Roughly, it can be assumed that currently one FD-CT sequence causes at least the same radiation exposure as one spiral CT sequence of the corresponding body region. (orig.)

  8. 数字平板探测器的原理及应用%Principle and Application of Flat Panel Detectors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建华

    2011-01-01

    Digital radiographic testing is a hot research direction at present, in which the development process of the digital detector will determine the development direction of digital radiographic testing. The developing history, structure, imaging process, image quality and application advantages of digital flat panel detector were described. By the practical measurement, it was confirmed that flat-panel detector test was expected to replace traditional film imaging and image intensifier mode, and it showed a very broad application prospects.%数字射线检测是当前射线检测的热点研究方向,其中探测器的发展进程直接决定了数字射线检测的发展方向。介绍了目前应用较广的平板探测器的发展历史、平板结构、成像过程、成像质量以及应用优势等。通过实测试验,证实了平板探测器有望取代传统的胶片成像以及图像增强器方式成像,应用前景非常广阔。

  9. Theoretical and Monte Carlo optimization of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray imager for applications in multi-spectral diagnostic medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Maurino, Sebastian; Badano, Aldo; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new design of a stacked three-layer flat-panel x-ray detector for dual-energy (DE) imaging. Each layer consists of its own scintillator of individual thickness and an underlying thin-film-transistor-based flat-panel. Three images are obtained simultaneously in the detector during the same x-ray exposure, thereby eliminating any motion artifacts. The detector operation is two-fold: a conventional radiography image can be obtained by combining all three layers' images, while a DE subtraction image can be obtained from the front and back layers' images, where the middle layer acts as a mid-filter that helps achieve spectral separation. We proceed to optimize the detector parameters for two sample imaging tasks that could particularly benefit from this new detector by obtaining the best possible signal to noise ratio per root entrance exposure using well-established theoretical models adapted to fit our new design. These results are compared to a conventional DE temporal subtraction detector and a single-shot DE subtraction detector with a copper mid-filter, both of which underwent the same theoretical optimization. The findings are then validated using advanced Monte Carlo simulations for all optimized detector setups. Given the performance expected from initial results and the recent decrease in price for digital x-ray detectors, the simplicity of the three-layer stacked imager approach appears promising to usher in a new generation of multi-spectral digital x-ray diagnostics.

  10. Signal and noise analysis of flat-panel sandwich detectors for single-shot dual-energy x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Ho Kyung; Youn, Hanbean; Yun, Seungman; Han, Jong Chul; Kim, Junwoo; Kam, Soohwa; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a novel sandwich-style single-shot (single-kV) detector by stacking two indirect-conversion flat-panel detectors for preclinical mouse imaging. In the sandwich detector structure, extra noise due to the direct x-ray absorption in photodiode arrays is inevitable. We develop a simple cascaded linear-systems model to describe signal and noise propagation in the flat-panel sandwich detector considering direct x-ray interactions. The noise-power spectrum (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) obtained from the front and rear detectors are analyzed by using the cascaded-systems model. The NPS induced by the absorption of direct x-ray photons that are unattenuated within the photodiode layers is white in the spatial-frequency domain like the additive readout noise characteristic; hence that is harmful to the DQE at higher spatial frequencies at which the number of secondary quanta lessens. The model developed in this study will be useful for determining the optimal imaging techniques with sandwich detectors and their optimal design.

  11. A novel potential source of β-carotene: Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and pilot β-carotene production in bubble column and flat panel photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Ma, Xiaoqin; Li, Aifen; Zhang, Chengwu

    2012-08-01

    Carotenoids profile of the unicellular Eustigmatos cf. polyphem (Eustigmatophyceae) and β-carotene production of the microalga in bubble column and large flat panel bioreactors were studied. The microalga which contained β-carotene, violaxanthin and vaucheriaxanthin as the major carotenoids accumulated large amount of β-carotene. The β-carotene production of this microalga in the bubble column bioreactor was considerable, with the maximum intracellular β-carotene content reaching 60.76 mg g(-1), biomass reaching 9.2 g L(-1), and β-carotene yield up to 470.2 mg L(-1). The β-carotene productions in two large flat panel bioreactors were relatively lower, whereas over 100 mg β-carotene L(-1) was achieved. Besides, high light intensity helped to accumulate intracellular β-carotene and biomass. Deficient nitrate supply inhibited biomass growth, though it helped to accumulate β-carotene. Our results first proved that E. cf. polyphem was a potential source and producer of β-carotene, making it an interesting subject for further β-carotene study or commercial exploration.

  12. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Hasan, Md Kamrul

    2011-10-07

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  13. Very high frequency plasma deposited amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon tandem solar cells on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The work in this thesis is to develop high quality intrinsic layers (especially nc-Si:H) for micromorph silicon tandem solar cells/modules on plastic substrates following the substrate transfer method or knows as the Helianthos procedure. Two objectives are covered in this thesis: (1) preliminary work on trial and optimization of single junction and tandem cells on glass substrate, (2) silicon film depositions on Al foil, and afterwards the characterization and development of these cells/modules on a plastic substrate. The first objective includes the development of suitable ZnO:Al TCO for nc Si:H single junction solar cells, fabrication of the aimed micromorph tandem solar cells on glass, and finally the optimization of the nc-Si:H i-layer for the depositions afterwards on Al foil. Chapter 3 addresses the improvement of texture etching of ZnO:Al by studying the HCl etching effect on ZnO:Al films sputter-deposited in a set substrate heater temperature series. With the texture-etched ZnO:Al front TCO, a single junction nc-Si:H solar cell was deposited with an initial efficiency of 8.33%. Chapter 4 starts with studying the light soaking and annealing effects on micromorph tandem solar cell. In the end, a highly stabilized bottom cell current limited tandem cell was made. The tandem shows an initial efficiency of 10.2%, and degraded only 6.9% after 1600 h of light soaking. In Chapter 5, the nc-Si:H i-layers were studied in 3 pressure and inter-electrode distance series. The correlations between plasma physics and the consequent i-layers’ properties are investigated. We show that the Raman crystalline ratio and porosity of the nc-Si:H layer have an interesting relation with the p•d product. By varying p and d, device quality nc-Si:H layer can be deposited at a high rate of 0.6 nm/s. These results in fact are a very important step for the second objective. The second objective is covered by the entire Chapter 6. All silicon layers are deposited on special aluminum

  14. RF power control for fabricating amorphous silicon nitride without Si-nanocrystals and its effect on defects and luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seunghun [Department of Physics, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moonsup, E-mail: mhan@uos.ac.kr [Department of Physics, University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-25

    Highlights: • We fabricated a-SiN{sub x} without Si-nanocrystals by using PECVD. • We investigated comprehensively the defects in a-SiN{sub x} and the relation between their defects and PL by providing energy-level diagram. • We succeeded to tune efficiently the whole range of visible luminescence with one system based material. • We conclude that RF power-control provides an efficient way to tune the color. - Abstract: We studied defect and luminescence properties of amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiN{sub x}) without silicon nanocrystals (Si-NC) fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition under a controlled radio-frequency (RF) power with subsequent post-annealing. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity became stronger and the central PL peak position shifted from 2.85 eV to 1.35 eV as the applied RF power decreased from 100 W to 60 W. Through the analyses of the PL and the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra we classified different kinds of defect states that each sample contains. On the basis of a further analysis of the chemical states of the Si 2p and the N 1s core-levels by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we discuss the reason that the 60 W sample contains more defect states than other samples and clarify the origin of the strong luminescence observed in the 60 W sample without Si-NC fabricated at relatively low RF power. In addition, this work shows also that the RF power control could provide an efficient way to select a color or all colors for the display devices by tuning the various kinds of defects in a-SiN{sub x} thin films.

  15. Single-grain Silicon Technology for Large Area X-ray Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslan, A.

    2015-01-01

    Digital flat panel X-ray imagers are currently using a-Si and poly-Si thin-film-transistors (TFTs). a-Si TFT permits the use of large area substrates, however, due to the amorphous nature, the carrier mobility is very low (<1 cm2/Vs). Poly-Si TFT improves the mobility (~150 cm2/Vs) but due to random