WorldWideScience

Sample records for amorphous silica particles

  1. Effectiveness of amorphous silica encapsulation technology on welding fume particles and its impact on mechanical properties of welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel welding shielding gas containing a silica precursor. • Up to 76% of the welding fume particles encapsulated in an amorphous silica layer. • No statistical difference between different types of welds in mechanical tests. • Can potentially reduce the toxicity of welding fume particles. - Abstract: Stainless steel welding generates nano-sized fume particles containing toxic metals which may cause serious health effects upon inhalation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an amorphous silica encapsulation (ASE) technology by evaluating its silica coating efficiency (SCE), particle morphology, and its impact on the weld’s mechanical properties. Tetramethylsilane (TMS) added to the welding shielding gas decomposed at the high-temperature arc zone to enable the silica coating. Collected welding fume particles were digested by two acid mixtures with different degrees of silica solubility, and the measured mass differences in the digests were used to determine the SCE. The SCEs were around 48–64% at the low and medium primary shielding gas flow rates. The highest SCE of 76% occurred at the high shielding gas flow rate (30 Lpm) with a TMS carrier gas flow of 0.64 Lpm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the amorphous silica layer on the welding fume particles at most gas flow rates, as well as abundant stand-alone silica particles formed at the high gas flow rate. Metallography showed that welds from the baseline and from the ASE technology were similar except for a tiny crack found in one particular weld made with the ASE technology. Tensile tests showed no statistical difference between the baseline and the ASE welds. All the above test results confirm that welding equipment retrofitted with the ASE technology has the potential to effectively address the toxicity problem of welding fume particles without affecting the mechanical properties of the welds

  2. Mechanism of amorphous silica particles precipitation: simulation approach compared to experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Claudine; Fritz, Bertrand; Clement, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Despite its importance in numerous industrial and natural processes, many unsolved questions remain regarding the mechanism of silica precipitation in aqueous solutions: order of the reaction, role of silica oligomers, existence of an induction time and characteristics of the particle population. Beyond empirical approaches used in the past, we demonstrate that the classical nucleation theory associated to a size dependent growth law, as embedded in the NANOKIN code (1-3), allows a quantitative description of precipitation occurring under largely different experimental conditions : preexisting initial supersaturation in a large domain of temperature (5-150°C) and chemical composition (4), supersaturation reached by neutralization of a high pH silica solution (5) or by fast cooling (6). In that way, the mechanism of silica precipitation can be unraveled. We are able to discard the hypothesis of an induction time as an explanation for the plateaus observed in the saturation curves in these experiments. We challenge the role of oligomer incorporation at the growth stage to account for the observed rate laws and we stress the difference between the order of the growth law and the order of the total reaction rate. We also demonstrate that the characteristics of the particle population are strongly dependent on the way supersaturation is reached (7). Such a microscopic approach thus proves to be well suited to elucidate the mechanism of nanoparticle formation in natural and industrial contexts, involving silica, but also other mineral phases produced as nanoparticles (8). (1) Noguera C., Fritz B., Clément A. and Barronet A., J. Cryst. Growth, 2006, 297, 180. (2) Noguera C., Fritz B., Clément A. and Barronet A., J. Cryst. Growth, 2006, 297, 187. (3) Fritz B., Clément A., Amal Y. and Noguera C., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2009, 73, 1340. (4) Rothbaum, H.P. and Rohde A.G., J. Colloid Interf. Sci., 1979,71, 533. (5) Tobler D.J., Shaw S. and Benning L.G., Geochim

  3. The effects of size and surface modification of amorphous silica particles on biodistribution and liver metabolism in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Ji, Cai; Jin, Tingting; Fan, Xiaohui

    2015-05-01

    Engineered nanoparticles, with unconventional properties, are promising platforms for biomedical applications. Since they may interact with a wide variety of biomolecules, it is critical to understand the impact of the physicochemical properties of engineered nanoparticles on biological systems. In this study, the effects of particle size and surface modification alone or in combination of amorphous silica particles (SPs) on biological responses were determined using a suite of general toxicological assessments and metabonomics analysis in mice model. Our results suggested that amino or carboxyl surface modification mitigated the liver toxicity of plain-surface SPs. 30 nm SPs with amino surface modification were found to be the most toxic SPs among all the surface-modified SP treatments at the same dosage. When treatment dose was increased, submicro-sized SPs with amino or carboxyl surface modification also induced liver toxicity. Biodistribution studies suggested that 70 nm SPs were mainly accumulated in liver and spleen regardless of surface modifications. Interestingly, these two organs exhibited different uptake trends. Furthermore, metabonomics studies indicated that surface modification plays a more dominant role to affect the liver metabolism than particle size.

  4. Hydrophobic transition in porous amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realistic models of amorphous silica surfaces with different silanol densities are built using Monte Carlo annealing. Water-silica interfaces are characterized by their energy interaction maps, adsorption isotherms, self-diffusion coefficients, and Poiseuille flows. A hydrophilic to hydrophobic transition appears as the surface becomes purely siliceous. These results imply significant consequences for the description of surfaces. First, realistic models are required for amorphous silica interfaces. Second, experimental amorphous silica hydrophilicity is attributed to charged or uncharged defects, and not to amorphousness. In addition, auto irradiation in nuclear waste glass releases hydrogen atoms from silanol groups and can induce such a transition. (authors)

  5. Size and surface modification of amorphous silica particles determine their effects on the activity of human CYP3A4 in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Shunji; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Morishita, Yuki; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Uji, Miyuki; Nagano, Kazuya; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2014-12-01

    Because of their useful chemical and physical properties, nanomaterials are widely used around the world - for example, as additives in food and medicines - and such uses are expected to become more prevalent in the future. Therefore, collecting information about the effects of nanomaterials on metabolic enzymes is important. Here, we examined the effects of amorphous silica particles with various sizes and surface modifications on cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity by means of two different in vitro assays. Silica nanoparticles with diameters of 30 and 70 nm (nSP30 and nSP70, respectively) tended to inhibit CYP3A4 activity in human liver microsomes (HLMs), but the inhibitory activity of both types of nanoparticles was decreased by carboxyl modification. In contrast, amine-modified nSP70 activated CYP3A4 activity. In HepG2 cells, nSP30 inhibited CYP3A4 activity more strongly than the larger silica particles did. Taken together, these results suggest that the size and surface characteristics of the silica particles determined their effects on CYP3A4 activity and that it may be possible to develop silica particles that do not have undesirable effects on metabolic enzymes by altering their size and surface characteristics.

  6. In vitro toxicological assessment of amorphous silica particles in relation to their characteristics and mode of action in human skin cells

    OpenAIRE

    Moia, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Silica is the common name for silicon dioxide (SiO2) materials and exists in both crystalline and amorphous forms. While crystalline silica is known for its severe health effects, amorphous silica has been considered safe and applied in many areas. However, some recent studies have showed evidence of their toxicity, raising concerns about its use as nanomaterial for biomedical applications. When nanomaterials enter the body, they are enveloped in biological fluid...

  7. Cellular effects and gene expression after exposure to amorphous silica nanoparticles in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Beer, Christiane; Wang, Jing; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Autrup, Herman

    2012-01-01

    Much of the concerns regarding engineered NP toxicity are based on knowledge from previous studies on ambient and environmental particles. E.g., the effects of exposure to silica dust particles have been studied intensively due to the carcinogenicity of crystalline silica. However, the increasing usage of engineered amorphous silica NPs has emphasized the need for further mechanistic insight to predict the consequences of exposure to the amorphous type of silica NPs. Recently, the parallelogr...

  8. Physicochemical determinants in the cellular responses to nanostructured amorphous silicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzano, Elena; Ghiazza, Mara; Polimeni, Manuela; Bolis, Vera; Fenoglio, Ivana; Attanasio, Angelo; Mazzucco, Gianna; Fubini, Bice; Ghigo, Dario

    2012-07-01

    Amorphous silicas, opposite to crystalline polymorphs, have been regarded so far as nonpathogenic, but few studies have addressed the toxicity of the wide array of amorphous silica forms. With the advent of nanotoxicology, there has been a rising concern about the safety of silica nanoparticles to be used in nanomedicine. Here, we report a study on the toxicity of amorphous nanostructured silicas obtained with two different preparation procedures (pyrolysis vs. precipitation), the pyrogenic in two very different particle sizes, in order to assess the role of size and origin on surface properties and on the cell damage, oxidative stress, and inflammatory response elicited in murine alveolar macrophages. A quartz dust was employed as positive control and monodispersed silica spheres as negative control. Pyrogenic silicas were remarkably more active than the precipitated one as to cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide synthesis, and production of tumor necrosis factor-α, when compared both per mass and per unit surface. Between the two pyrogenic silicas, the larger one was the more active. Silanols density is the major difference in surface composition among the three silicas, being much larger than the precipitated one as indicated by joint calorimetric and infrared spectroscopy analysis. We assume here that full hydroxylation of a silica surface, with consequent stable coverage by water molecules, reduces/inhibits toxic behavior. The preparation route appears thus determinant in yielding potentially toxic materials, although the smallest size does not always correspond to an increased toxicity. PMID:22491428

  9. Toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles in mouse keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to examine the uptake, localization, and the cytotoxic effects of well-dispersed amorphous silica nanoparticles in mouse keratinocytes (HEL-30). Mouse keratinocytes were exposed for 24 h to various concentrations of amorphous silica nanoparticles in homogeneous suspensions of average size distribution (30, 48, 118, and 535 nm SiO2) and then assessed for uptake and biochemical changes. Results of transmission electron microscopy revealed all sizes of silica were taken up into the cells and localized into the cytoplasm. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay shows LDH leakage was dose- and size-dependent with exposure to 30 and 48 nm nanoparticles. However, no LDH leakage was observed for either 118 or 535 nm nanoparticles. The mitochondrial viability assay (MTT) showed significant toxicity for 30 and 48 nm at high concentrations (100 μg/mL) compared to the 118 and 535 nm particles. Further studies were carried out to investigate if cellular reduced GSH and mitochondria membrane potential are involved in the mechanism of SiO2 toxicity. The redox potential of cells (GSH) was reduced significantly at concentrations of 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL at 30 nm nanoparticle exposures. However, silica nanoparticles larger than 30 nm showed no changes in GSH levels. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation did not show any significant change between controls and the exposed cells. In summary, amorphous silica nanoparticles below 100 nm induced cytotoxicity suggest size of the particles is critical to produce biological effects.

  10. Amorphous silicon based particle detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N; Franco, A; Riesen, Y.; Despeisse, M; S. Dunand; Powolny, F; Jarron, P.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation hard monolithic particle sensors can be fabricated by a vertical integration of amorphous silicon particle sensors on top of CMOS readout chip. Two types of such particle sensors are presented here using either thick diodes or microchannel plates. The first type based on amorphous silicon diodes exhibits high spatial resolution due to the short lateral carrier collection. Combination of an amorphous silicon thick diode with microstrip detector geometries permits to achieve micromete...

  11. Amorphous silica from rice husk at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice husk is being used as a source of energy in many heat generating system because of its high calorific value and its availability in many rice producing areas. Rice husk contains approximately 20% silica which is presented in hydrated form. This hydrated silica can be retrieved as amorphous silica under controlled thermal conditions. Uncontrolled burning of rice husk produces crystalline silica which is not reactive silica but can be used as filler in many applications. Amorphous silica is reactive silica which has better market value due to its reactive nature in process industry. The present study deals with the production of amorphous silica at various temperatures from rice husk. Various ashes were prepared in tube furnace by changing the burning temperatures for fixed time intervals and analyzed by XRD. It has been observed that for two hours calculation's of rice husk renders mostly amorphous silica at 650 degree C where as at higher temperatures crystalline silica was obtained. (author)

  12. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  13. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic (''thermal'' or ''fumed'') silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physico-chemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no

  14. PROCESSING OF SERPENTINITE TAILINGS TO PURE AMORPHOUS SILICA

    OpenAIRE

    Alena Fedorockova; Pavel Raschman; Sucik Gabriel; Plesingerova Beatrice; Popovic Lubos; Briancin Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    While the published research papers describe preparation of amorphous silica from water glass or using special methods (e.g. hydrolysis of alkoxides), the present study demonstrates a feasible solution for the cheaper synthesis of highly reactive silica using two-stage (acid and alkaline) leaching of serpentinite (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4). The alkaline leaching, the purification of sodium metasilicate solution and the effect of impurities on the precipitation of amorphous silica under the conditions of...

  15. Amorphous silica in ultra-high performance concrete: First hour of hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous silica in the sub-micrometer size range is widely used to accelerate cement hydration. Investigations including properties of silica which differ from the specific surface area are rare. In this study, the reactivity of varying types of silica was evaluated based on their specific surface area, surface silanol group density, content of silanol groups and solubility in an alkaline suspension. Pyrogenic silica, silica fume and silica synthesized by hydrolysis and condensation of alkoxy silanes, so-called Stoeber particles, were employed. Influences of the silica within the first hour were further examined in pastes with water/cement ratios of 0.23 using in-situ X-ray diffraction, cryo scanning electron microscopy and pore solution analysis. It was shown that Stoeber particles change the composition of the pore solution. Na+, K+, Ca2+ and silicate ions seem to react to oligomers. The extent of this reaction might be highest for Stoeber particles due to their high reactivity

  16. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merget, R.; Bruening, T. [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Bauer, T. [Bergmannsheil, University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pneumonology, Allergology and Sleep Medicine, Bochum (Germany); Kuepper, H.U.; Breitstadt, R. [Degussa-Huels Corp., Wesseling (Germany); Philippou, S. [Department of Pathology, Augusta Krankenanstalten, Bochum (Germany); Bauer, H.D. [Research Institute for Hazardous Substances (IGF), Bochum (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic (''thermal'' or ''fumed'') silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physico-chemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or

  17. Development of empirical potentials for amorphous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carre, A.

    2007-09-15

    Amorphous silica (SiO{sub 2}) is of great importance in geoscience and mineralogy as well as a raw material in glass industry. Its structure is characterized as a disordered continuous network of SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Many efforts have been undertaken to understand the microscopic properties of silica by classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this method the interatomic interactions are modeled by an effective potential that does not take explicitely into account the electronic degrees of freedom. In this work, we propose a new methodology to parameterize such a potential for silica using ab initio simulations, namely Car-Parrinello (CP) method [Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2471 (1985)]. The new potential proposed is compared to the BKS potential [Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 1955 (1990)] that is considered as the benchmark potential for silica. First, CP simulations have been performed on a liquid silica sample at 3600 K. The structural features so obtained have been compared to the ones predicted by the classical BKS potential. Regarding the bond lengths the BKS tends to underestimate the Si-O bond whereas the Si-Si bond is overestimated. The inter-tetrahedral angular distribution functions are also not well described by the BKS potential. The corresponding mean value of the SiOSi angle is found to be {approx_equal} 147 , while the CP yields to a SiOSi angle centered around 135 . Our aim is to fit a classical Born-Mayer/Coulomb pair potential using ab initio calculations. To this end, we use the force-matching method proposed by Ercolessi and Adams [Europhys. Lett. 26, 583 (1994)]. The CP configurations and their corresponding interatomic forces have been considered for a least square fitting procedure. The classical MD simulations with the resulting potential have lead to a structure that is very different from the CP one. Therefore, a different fitting criterion based on the CP partial pair correlation functions was applied. Using this approach the resulting

  18. Sol-gel combustion synthesis, particle shape analysis and magnetic properties of hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles embedded in an amorphous silica matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopanja, Lazar; Milosevic, Irena; Panjan, Matjaz; Damnjanovic, Vesna; Tadic, Marin

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis and magnetic properties of hematite/amorphous silica nanostructures. Raman spectroscopy showed the formation of a hematite phase. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed spherically shaped hematite nanoparticles, well-dispersed in an amorphous silica matrix. In order to quantitatively describe morphological properties of nanoparticles, we use the circularity of shapes as a measure of how circular a shape is. Diameters of about 5 nm and a narrow size distribution of nanoparticles are observed. The obtained hematite nanoparticles exhibit superparamagnetic properties at room temperature (SPION). The sample does not display the Morin transition. The FC hysteresis loop at 5 K has shown an exchange bias effect. These results have been compared to those previously reported for α-Fe2O3/SiO2 nanosystems in the literature. These comparisons reveal that the sol-gel combustion method yields hematite nanoparticles with a higher magnetization and magnetic moment. These data indicate the existence of an additional factor that contributes to magnetization. We suggest that the increased magnetization is due to an increased number of the surface spins caused by the breaking of large numbers of exchange bonds between surface atoms (disordered structure). This leads to an increase in the magnetic moment per a hematite nanoparticle and an exchange bias effect. We have concluded that the combustion-related part of this synthesis method enhances surface effects, i.e. it promotes the breaking of bonds and surface disordered layers, which results in these magnetic properties. Such interesting structural and magnetic properties of hematite might be important in future practical applications and fundamental research.

  19. Cohesion of Amorphous Silica Spheres: Toward a Better Understanding of the Coagulation Growth of Silicate Dust Aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Senshu, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion forces between submicrometer-sized silicate grains play a crucial role in the formation of silicate dust agglomerates, rocky planetesimals, and terrestrial planets. The surface energy of silicate dust particles is the key to their adhesion and rolling forces in a theoretical model based on the contact mechanics. Here we revisit the cohesion of amorphous silica spheres by compiling available data on the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in various circumstances. It turned out that the surface energy for hydrophilic amorphous silica in a vacuum is a factor of 10 higher than previously assumed. Therefore, the previous theoretical models underestimated the critical velocity for the sticking of amorphous silica spheres, as well as the rolling friction forces between them. With the most plausible value of the surface energy for amorphous silica spheres, theoretical models based on the contact mechanics are in harmony with laboratory experiments. Consequently, we conclude that silicate grains ...

  20. Synthesis of Siloxanes Directly from Amorphous Silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A direct synthesis of oligomeric-siloxanes from amorphous silica has been achieved. The compound prepared was caedonal-siloxane. Cardonal is a mono hydroxyphenolic compound with a bulky group in the meta position. It was derived as a by-product from the renewable resources cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL). In the synthesis, one pot synthesis was carried out by using ethylene glycol (EG) as solvent. In the reaction ethylene glycol served as a primary precursor chelating ligand in the synthesised product. The one pot synthesis was enhanced by the strong base, triethylenetetramine (TETA) which served as the promoter catalyst. In the synthesis, optimal conditions were established on the basic of the yield percent of organo-siloxane compounds with respect to the variation of the weight fraction of TETA and to the variation of reaction time. Experimental runs were carried out at (ca 210 2c) which was nearly above the boiling point of the solvent. The substituted organo-silicon compounds obtained were characterized by FT- ir, Thermal analysis, XRD and SEM.

  1. Adsorption of mercury ions by mercapto-functionalized amorphous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Quintanilla, Damian; Hierro, Isabel del; Fajardo, Mariano; Sierra, Isabel [Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Departamento de Tecnologia Quimica y Ambiental, E.S.C.E.T, Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Carrillo-Hermosilla, Fernando [Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Organica y Bioquimica, Facultad de Quimicas, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2006-02-01

    Amorphous silicas have been functionalized by two different methods. In the heterogeneous route the silylating agent, 3-chloropropyltriethoxysilane, was initially immobilized onto the silica surface to give the chlorinated silica Cl-Sil. In a second reaction, multifunctionalized N,S donor compounds were incorporated to obtain the functionalized silicas, which are denoted as L-Sil-Het (where L=mercaptothiazoline, mercaptopyridine or mercaptobenzothiazole). In the homogeneous route, the functionalization was achieved through a one-step reaction between the silica and an organic ligand containing the chelating functions; this gave the modified silicas denoted as L-Sil-Hom. The functionalized silicas were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. These materials were employed as adsorbents for mercury cations from aqueous and acetone solutions at room temperature. The results indicate that, in all cases, mercury adsorption was higher in the modified silicas prepared by the homogeneous method. (orig.)

  2. Cellular effects and gene expression after exposure to amorphous silica nanoparticles in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Beer, Christiane; Wang, Jing;

    Much of the concerns regarding engineered NP toxicity are based on knowledge from previous studies on ambient and environmental particles. E.g., the effects of exposure to silica dust particles have been studied intensively due to the carcinogenicity of crystalline silica. However, the increasing...... usage of engineered amorphous silica NPs has emphasized the need for further mechanistic insight to predict the consequences of exposure to the amorphous type of silica NPs. Recently, the parallelogram approach was proposed as a scheme to assess biological effects of nanomaterials (Krug and Wick, 2011...... global gene expression. Instead, up-regulated genes primarily related to lipid metabolism and biosynthesis whereas down-regulated genes were enriched in several processes, including transcription, cell junction and extra cellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction. Accordingly, our data suggest that...

  3. Amorphous silica studied by high energy x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, H.F.; Neuefeind, J.; Neumann, H.B.; Schneider, J.R.; Zeidler, M.D.

    neutron data. A feasibility study of amorphous silica has been performed at 95 keV, using a wiggler synchrotron beam-line at HASYLAB and a cylindrical sample, 3 mm in diameter. The range of Q between 0.8 and 32 Angstrom(-1) was covered. A thorough discussion of the experimental challenges is given. The...

  4. Synthesis of amorphous silica and sulfonic acid functionalized silica used as reinforced phase for polymer electrolyte membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work silica (SiO2) and sulfonic acid-functionalized silica (sul-SiO2) were synthesized by sol–gel method from tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and 3-mercatopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) with various ratios between them. The synthesized materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) for crystalline structure, Brunauer–Emmet–Teller (BET) specific surface area analysis, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) for particle size analysis, and ion exchange capacity (IEC) for determining sulfur content in Sul-SiO2 materials. The initial results showed that the average particle size of amorphous SiO2 and Sul-SiO2 at different TEOS: MPTMS ratios are in narrow distribution with average diameter about 20–30 nm. The particle size of Sul-SiO2 is almost unaffected by the content of MPTMS while IEC depends strongly on it. Composite membranes of 60 μm thickness were successfully prepared from blending of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and synthesized amorphous SiO2. It was shown that the latter may be used as a reinforced phase for composite membrane electrolytes based on PVDF. (paper)

  5. Amorphous silica nanoparticles enhance cross-presentation in murine dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Silica nanoparticles enhanced cross-presentation. ► Silica nanoparticles induced endosomal release of exogenous antigens. ► Silica nanoparticle-induced cross-presentation was mediated by scavenger receptors. ► Surface-modification may enable the manufacture of safer silica nanoparticles. -- Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties and innovative functions, and they are increasingly being used in a wide variety of fields. Ensuring the safety of NMs is now an urgent task. Recently, we reported that amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSPs), one of the most widely used NMs, enhance antigen-specific cellular immune responses and may therefore aggravate immune diseases. Thus, to ensure the design of safer nSPs, investigations into the effect of nSPs on antigen presentation in dendritic cells, which are central orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, are now needed. Here, we show that nSPs with diameters of 70 and 100 nm enhanced exogenous antigen entry into the cytosol from endosomes and induced cross-presentation, whereas submicron-sized silica particles (>100 nm) did not. Furthermore, we show that surface modification of nSPs suppressed cross-presentation. Although further studies are required to investigate whether surface-modified nSPs suppress immune-modulating effects in vivo, the current results indicate that appropriate regulation of the characteristics of nSPs, such as size and surface properties, will be critical for the design of safer nSPs.

  6. Hydroxylated crystalline edingtonite silica faces as models for the amorphous silica surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully hydroxylated surfaces derived from crystalline edingtonite were adopted to model the variety of sites known to exist at the amorphous silica surface, namely isolated, geminal and interacting silanols. Structures, energetics and vibrational features of the surfaces either bare or in contact with water were modelled at DFT level using the B3LYP functional with a GTO basis set of double-zeta polarized quality using the periodic ab-initio CRYSTAL06 code. Simulated infrared spectra of both dry and water wet edingtonite surfaces were in excellent agreement with the experimental ones recorded on amorphous silica. Water interaction energies were compared with microcalorimetric differential heats of adsorption data showing good agreement, albeit computed ones being slightly underestimated due to the lack of dispersive forces in the B3LYP functional

  7. Hydroxylated crystalline edingtonite silica faces as models for the amorphous silica surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosoni, S; Civalleri, B; Ugliengo, P [Dipartimento di Chimica IFM and NIS (Centre of Excellence), Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 7, 10125 Torino - ITALY (Italy); Pascale, F [Laboratoire de Cristallographie ed Modelisation des Materiaux Mineraux et Biologiques, UMR-CNRS-7036. Universite Henri Poincare - Nancy I, B.P. 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy Cedex 05 - FRANCE (France)], E-mail: piero.ugliengo@unito.it

    2008-06-01

    Fully hydroxylated surfaces derived from crystalline edingtonite were adopted to model the variety of sites known to exist at the amorphous silica surface, namely isolated, geminal and interacting silanols. Structures, energetics and vibrational features of the surfaces either bare or in contact with water were modelled at DFT level using the B3LYP functional with a GTO basis set of double-zeta polarized quality using the periodic ab-initio CRYSTAL06 code. Simulated infrared spectra of both dry and water wet edingtonite surfaces were in excellent agreement with the experimental ones recorded on amorphous silica. Water interaction energies were compared with microcalorimetric differential heats of adsorption data showing good agreement, albeit computed ones being slightly underestimated due to the lack of dispersive forces in the B3LYP functional.

  8. In vitro comet and micronucleus assays do not predict morphological transforming effects of silica particles in Syrian Hamster Embryo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darne, Christian; Coulais, Catherine; Terzetti, Francine; Fontana, Caroline; Binet, Stéphane; Gaté, Laurent; Guichard, Yves

    2016-01-15

    Crystalline silica particles and asbestos have both been classified as carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, because of the limited data available, amorphous silica was not classifiable. In vitro, the carcinogenic potential of natural crystalline and amorphous silica particles has been revealed by the Syrian Hamster Embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay. On the other hand, the genotoxic potential of those substances has not been investigated in SHE cells. And yet, genotoxicity assays are commonly used for hazard evaluation and they are often used as in vitro assays of reference to predict a possible carcinogenic potential. The main objective of this study was to compare the genotoxic potential and the carcinogenic potential of different crystalline and amorphous silica particles in SHE cells. Three silica samples of different crystallinity were used: natural amorphous silica, partially crystallized silica and quartz silica particles. Their genotoxicity were tested through the in vitro micronucleus assay and the comet assay in SHE, and their carcinogenic potential through the SHE transformation assay. In addition, silica samples were also tested with the same genotoxicity assays in V79 hamster-lung cells, a common in vitro model for particle exposure. Results obtained in the micronucleus and the comet assays show that none of the silica was capable of inducing genotoxic effects in SHE cells and only the amorphous silica induced genotoxic effects in V79 cells. However in the SHE cell transformation assays, the partially crystallized and quartz silica were able to induce morphological cell transformation. Together, these data suggest that, in vitro, the short-term genotoxic assays alone are not sufficient to predict the hazard and the carcinogenic potential of this type of particles; SHE transformation assay appears a more reliable tool for this purpose and should be included in the "in vitro battery assays" for hazard

  9. Effect of amorphous silica nanoparticles on in vitro RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation in murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagano Kazuya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSP have been used as a polishing agent and/or as a remineralization promoter for teeth in the oral care field. The present study investigates the effects of nSP on osteoclast differentiation and the relationship between particle size and these effects. Our results revealed that nSP exerted higher cytotoxicity in macrophage cells compared with submicron-sized silica particles. However, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP activity and the number of osteoclast cells (TRAP-positive multinucleated cells were not changed by nSP treatment in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL at doses that did not induce cytotoxicity by silica particles. These results indicated that nSP did not cause differentiation of osteoclasts. Collectively, the results suggested that nanosilica exerts no effect on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of RAW264.7 cells, although a detailed mechanistic examination of the nSP70-mediated cytotoxic effect is needed.

  10. Differences in gene expression and cytokine production by crystalline vs. amorphous silica in human lung epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perkins Timothy N

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to respirable crystalline silica particles, as opposed to amorphous silica, is associated with lung inflammation, pulmonary fibrosis (silicosis, and potentially with lung cancer. We used Affymetrix/GeneSifter microarray analysis to determine whether gene expression profiles differed in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS 2B exposed to cristobalite vs. amorphous silica particles at non-toxic and equal surface areas (75 and 150 × 106μm2/cm2. Bio-Plex analysis was also used to determine profiles of secreted cytokines and chemokines in response to both particles. Finally, primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE were used to comparatively assess silica particle-induced alterations in gene expression. Results Microarray analysis at 24 hours in BEAS 2B revealed 333 and 631 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite at low (75 and high (150 × 106μm2/cm2 amounts, respectively (p 6μm2/cm2 induced 108 significant gene changes. Bio-Plex analysis of 27 human cytokines and chemokines revealed 9 secreted mediators (p FOS, ATF3, IL6 and IL8 early and over time (2, 4, 8, and 24 h. Patterns of gene expression in NHBE cells were similar overall to BEAS 2B cells. At 75 × 106μm2/cm2, there were 339 significant alterations in gene expression induced by cristobalite and 42 by amorphous silica. Comparison of genes in response to cristobalite (75 × 106μm2/cm2 revealed 60 common, significant gene alterations in NHBE and BEAS 2B cells. Conclusions Cristobalite silica, as compared to synthetic amorphous silica particles at equal surface area concentrations, had comparable effects on the viability of human bronchial epithelial cells. However, effects on gene expression, as well as secretion of cytokines and chemokines, drastically differed, as the crystalline silica induced more intense responses. Our studies indicate that toxicological testing of particulates by surveying viability and

  11. Amorphous silica nanoparticles enhance cross-presentation in murine dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, Toshiro [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Takahashi, Hideki; Ichihashi, Ko-ichi; Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Tochigi, Saeko [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagano, Kazuya [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhiro [Cancer Biology Research Center, Sanford Research/USD, 2301 E. 60th Street N, Sioux Falls, SD 57104 (United States); Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nabeshi, Hiromi [Division of Foods, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Tomoaki [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticles enhanced cross-presentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticles induced endosomal release of exogenous antigens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silica nanoparticle-induced cross-presentation was mediated by scavenger receptors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surface-modification may enable the manufacture of safer silica nanoparticles. -- Abstract: Nanomaterials (NMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties and innovative functions, and they are increasingly being used in a wide variety of fields. Ensuring the safety of NMs is now an urgent task. Recently, we reported that amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSPs), one of the most widely used NMs, enhance antigen-specific cellular immune responses and may therefore aggravate immune diseases. Thus, to ensure the design of safer nSPs, investigations into the effect of nSPs on antigen presentation in dendritic cells, which are central orchestrators of the adaptive immune response, are now needed. Here, we show that nSPs with diameters of 70 and 100 nm enhanced exogenous antigen entry into the cytosol from endosomes and induced cross-presentation, whereas submicron-sized silica particles (>100 nm) did not. Furthermore, we show that surface modification of nSPs suppressed cross-presentation. Although further studies are required to investigate whether surface-modified nSPs suppress immune-modulating effects in vivo, the current results indicate that appropriate regulation of the characteristics of nSPs, such as size and surface properties, will be critical for the design of safer nSPs.

  12. HEALTH EFFECTS OF INHALED CRYSTALLINE AND AMORPHOUS SILICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, public concern regarding nonoccupational or ambient silica exposure, mainly to crystalline silica, has emerged making it important to evaluate background and ambient concentrations. Ambient emissions of silica rarely are estimated or measured in air pollution studies of...

  13. Amorphous silica nanoparticles impair vascular homeostasis and induce systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemmar A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Abderrahim Nemmar,1 Sulayma Albarwani,2 Sumaya Beegam,1 Priya Yuvaraju,1 Javed Yasin,3 Samir Attoub,4 Badreldin H Ali5 1Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 2Department of Physiology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khod, Sultanate of Oman; 3Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 4Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates; 5Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khod, Sultanate of Oman Abstract: Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs are being used in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and many other industrial applications entailing human exposure. However, their potential vascular and systemic pathophysiologic effects are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the acute (24 hours systemic toxicity of intraperitoneally administered 50 nm and 500 nm SiNPs in mice (0.5 mg/kg. Both sizes of SiNPs induced a platelet proaggregatory effect in pial venules and increased plasma concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Elevated plasma levels of von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen and a decrease in the number of circulating platelets were only seen following the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. The direct addition of SiNPs to untreated mouse blood significantly induced in vitro platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent fashion, and these effects were more pronounced with 50 nm SiNPs. Both sizes of SiNPs increased lactate dehydrogenase activity and interleukin 1β concentration. However, tumor necrosis factor α concentration was only increased after the administration of 50 nm SiNPs. Nevertheless, plasma markers of oxidative stress, including 8-isoprostane

  14. Nanometer Sized Silver Particles Embedded Silica Particles—Spray Method

    OpenAIRE

    Karunagaran B; Nimma Elizabeth R.; Gnana kumar G; Nahm KeeSuk

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Spherical shaped, nanometer to micro meter sized silica particles were prepared in a homogeneous nature by spray technique. Silver nanoparticles were produced over the surface of the silica grains in a harmonized manner. The size of silver and silica particles was effectively controlled by the precursors and catalysts. The electrostatic repulsion among the silica spheres and the electro static attraction between silica spheres and silver particles make the synchronized structure of t...

  15. Anthropogenic impact on amorphous silica pools in temperate soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clymans, W.; Struyf, E.; Govers, G.; Vandevenne, F.; Conley, D. J.

    2011-08-01

    Human land use changes perturb biogeochemical silica (Si) cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. This directly affects Si mobilisation and Si storage and influences Si export from the continents, although the magnitude of the impact is unknown. A major reason for our lack of understanding is that very little information exists on how land use affects amorphous silica (ASi) storage in soils. We have quantified and compared total alkali-extracted (PSia) and easily soluble (PSie) Si pools at four sites along a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance in southern Sweden. Land use clearly affects ASi pools and their distribution. Total PSia and PSie for a continuous forested site at Siggaboda Nature Reserve (66 900 ± 22 800 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 952 ± 16 kg SiO2 ha-1) are significantly higher than disturbed land use types from the Råshult Culture Reserve including arable land (28 800 ± 7200 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 239 ± 91 kg SiO2 ha-1), pasture sites (27 300 ± 5980 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 370 ± 129 kg SiO2 ha-1) and grazed forest (23 600 ± 6370 kg SiO2 ha-1 and 346 ± 123 kg SiO2 ha-1). Vertical PSia and PSie profiles show significant (p export of 1.1 ± 0.8 Tmol Si yr-1 from the soil reservoir to aquatic ecosystems. This is ca. 20 % to the global land-ocean Si flux carried by rivers. It is necessary to update this estimate in future studies, incorporating differences in pedology, geology and climatology over temperate regions, but data are currently not sufficient. Yet, our results emphasize the importance of human activities for Si cycling in soils and for the land-ocean Si flux.

  16. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Jiang, Jianzhong

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials are...

  17. PROCESSING OF SERPENTINITE TAILINGS TO PURE AMORPHOUS SILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Fedorockova

    2015-12-01

    The prepared samples of silica were of high purity (99.4 % SiO2, did not contain residues of the original raw serpentinite, and the size and shape of the particles were given by the conditions of precipitation. The presence of impurities in the sodium silicate solution had a beneficial effect on the specific surface area - in all cases the values for SiO2 powders prepared from serpentine were higher than those of SiO2 prepared from a synthetic solution of Na2SiO3. The specific surface area of SiO2 samples synthesized under alkaline conditions has been much more affected by the presence of impurities if compared to that achieved by acidic precipitation.

  18. A novel composite material based on antimony(III) oxide and amorphous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zemnukhova, Ludmila A. [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, 690022 Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Panasenko, Alexander E., E-mail: panasenko@ich.dvo.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, 690022 Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-01

    The composite material nSb₂O₃·mSiO₂·xH₂O was prepared by hydrolysis of SbCl₃ and Na₂SiO₃ in an aqueous medium. It has been shown that the composition of the material is influenced by the ratio of the initial components and the acidity of the reaction medium. The morphology of the material particles and its specific surface area have been determined. The thermal and optic properties were also investigated. - Graphical abstract: Novel composite material containing amorphous silica and crystal antimony(III) oxide has been synthesized by hydrolysis of SbCl₃ and Na₂SiO₃ in an aqueous medium. Highlights: • The composite material nSb₂O₃·mSiO₂·xH₂O was prepared in an aqueous medium. • The composition of the material is controllable by a synthesis conditions. • The morphology of the material and its optic properties have been determined.

  19. Anthropogenic impact on amorphous silica pools in temperate soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Clymans

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human land use changes perturb biogeochemical silica (Si cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. This directly affects Si mobilisation and Si storage and influences Si export from the continents, although the magnitude of the impact is unknown. A major reason for our lack of understanding is that very little information exists on how land use affects amorphous silica (ASi storage in soils. We have quantified and compared total alkali-extracted (PSia and easily soluble (PSie Si pools at four sites along a gradient of anthropogenic disturbance in southern Sweden. Land use clearly affects ASi pools and their distribution. Total PSia and PSie for a continuous forested site at Siggaboda Nature Reserve (66 900 ± 22 800 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 952 ± 16 kg SiO2 ha−1 are significantly higher than disturbed land use types from the Råshult Culture Reserve including arable land (28 800 ± 7200 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 239 ± 91 kg SiO2 ha−1, pasture sites (27 300 ± 5980 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 370 ± 129 kg SiO2 ha−1 and grazed forest (23 600 ± 6370 kg SiO2 ha−1 and 346 ± 123 kg SiO2 ha−1. Vertical PSia and PSie profiles show significant (p < 0.05 variation among the sites. These differences in size and distribution are interpreted as the long-term effect of reduced ASi replenishment, as well as changes in ecosystem specific pedogenic processes and increased mobilisation of the PSia in disturbed soils. We have also made a first, though rough, estimate of the magnitude of change in temperate continental ASi pools due to human disturbance. Assuming that our data are representative, we estimate that total ASi storage in soils has declined by ca. 10 % since the onset of agricultural development (3000 BCE

  20. Cutting Silica Aerogel for Particle Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Glesias, R.; Grigoropoulos, C. P.; Weschler, M.

    2005-01-01

    The detailed laboratory analyses of extraterrestrial particles have revolutionized our knowledge of planetary bodies in the last three decades. This knowledge of chemical composition, morphology, mineralogy, and isotopics of particles cannot be provided by remote sensing. In order to acquire these detail information in the laboratories, the samples need be intact, unmelted. Such intact capture of hypervelocity particles has been developed in 1996. Subsequently silica aerogel was introduced as the preferred medium for intact capturing of hypervelocity particles and later showed it to be particularly suitable for the space environment. STARDUST, the 4th NASA Discovery mission to capture samples from 81P/Wild 2 and contemporary interstellar dust, is the culmination of these new technologies. In early laboratory experiments of launching hypervelocity projectiles into aerogel, there was the need to cut aerogel to isolate or extract captured particles/tracks. This is especially challenging for space captures, since there will be many particles/tracks of wide ranging scales closely located, even collocated. It is critical to isolate and extract one particle without compromising its neighbors since the full significance of a particle is not known until it is extracted and analyzed. To date, three basic techniques have been explored: mechanical cutting, lasers cutting and ion beam milling. We report the current findings.

  1. Characterization of amorphous silica obtained from KMnO/sub 4/ treated rice husk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice husk (RH) is available in large quantities in many rice producing areas of Pakistan. The use of rice husk as a fuel in heat generating systems adds to environmental pollution. Rice husk contains approximately 20 % silica which exists in hydrated form. This silica can be retrieved as amorphous silica under proper oxidizing conditions. In present study rice husk was treated with various dosages of potassium permanganate before subjecting to thermal treatment. Potassium permanganate acts as oxidizing agent during combustion process. Various ash samples were prepared by varying the potassium permanganate concentrations and the burning temperatures over long periods. Ash produced was characterized by XRD, FTIR and other analytical methods. It has been observed that low dosages of KMnO/sub 4/ favors the formation of amorphous silica along with low carbon contents. (author)

  2. Investigations on the homogeneity of silica glass and on the order of X-amorphous silica by luminescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica glasses melted from crystalline SiO2 were exposed to ionizing radiation. At room temperature the spatial intensity distribution of the emitted luminescent radiation has been recorded by means of photographic or autoradiographic materials. Thereby schlieren and inhomogeneities are made visible and information is obtained on the melting process of the crystalline SiO2. Synthetic fused silica made from SiCl4 shows no luminescent radiation. Depending on the penetration depth of the ionizing radiation the bulk or the surface of the sample can be studied. The decay curves of the integral luminescence intensity yield data on inhomogeneities in the silica glass leading to conclusions on order state and structure. The luminescence intensity and its half-life are a measure for the inhomogeneity of the silica glass and the existence of so-called 'preordered states'. This connection between luminescence intensity and the order state is found also with other X-amorphous SiO2 modifications: silica gel, precipitated silicic acids, porous SiO2 glasses, aerosil, thin SiO2 layers, mechanically activated quartz: whereas no luminescence phenomena occur in disordered nearly ideally amorphous SiO2 species, the luminescence increases with increasing order degree of the SiO2 network and attains a high intensity in the case of the crystalline SiO2 modifications quartz and cristobalite

  3. Contribution to the study of the mechanism of crack in amorphous silica: study by the molecular dynamics of crack in amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this thesis was to understand the mechanism which occurs during the crack at the atomic scale in amorphous silica. The difficulties of the experimental observations at this length scale lead us to use numerical studies by molecular dynamics to access to the dynamical and the thermodynamical informations. We have carried out large simulations with 500000 atoms and studied the structure of the amorphous silica before to studying their behaviours under an imposed strain. The structure of this simulated amorphous silica settled in three length scales. In small length scale between 0 and 5 angstrom glass is composed of tetrahedra, this is close to the crystalline structure. In intermediate length scale between 3 and 10 angstrom tetrahedra are connected together and build rings of different sizes composed in majority between 5 and 7 tetrahedra. In bigger length scale between 15 and 60 angstrom, areas with high density of rings are surrounded by areas with low density of rings. These structural considerations play an important role in initiation and propagation of a crack. Indeed. in this length scale. crack propagates by growth and coalescence of some small cavities which appear in area with low density of rings behind the crack tip. The cavities dissipate the stress with carries away a delay to propagation of the crack. This phenomenons seems ductile and leads to non linear elastic behaviour near the crack tip. We have also shown that the addition of alkali in the amorphous silica changes the structure by creation of nano-porosities and leads to enhance the ductility during the crack propagation. (author)

  4. Sonochemical synthesis of silica particles and their size control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwa-Min; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Bonghwan

    2016-09-01

    Using an ultrasound-assisted sol-gel method, we successfully synthesized very uniformly shaped, monodisperse, and size-controlled spherical silica particles from a mixture of ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of ammonia as catalyst, at room temperature. The diameters of the silica particles were distributed in the range from 40 to 400 nm; their morphology was well characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The silica particle size could be adjusted by choosing suitable concentrations of ammonium hydroxide and water, which in turn determined the nucleation and growth rates of the particles during the reaction. This sonochemical-based silica synthesis offers an alternative way to produce spherical silica particles in a relatively short reaction time. Thus, we suggest that this simple, low-cost, and efficient method of preparing uniform silica particles of various sizes will have practical and wide-ranging industrial applicability.

  5. Production and characterisation of amorphous silica from rice husk waste

    OpenAIRE

    Madrid, Rosario; Nogueira, C. A.; Margarido, F.

    2012-01-01

    Rice covers about 1% of the earth’s surface. Rice husk is the major by-product of the riceprocessing industries which must be appropriately managed. On average 20% of the rice paddy is husk. The major constituents of rice husk are cellulose, lignin and silica. During growth, rice plants absorb silica and other minerals from the soil and accumulate it into their structures. Its composition varies with the diversity, climate and geographic location of growth. The high grade of silica in the hus...

  6. Particle-induced amorphization complex ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, Lu-Min

    1996-02-16

    The presently funded three-year research program, supported by the Division of Materials Sciences of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, was initiated on August 1, 1993; during the period in which the grant will have been active, $249,561 of support have been provided to date with an additional $79,723 to be spent during the third, final year (ending July 30, 1996). The primary purpose of the program is to develop an understanding of heavy-particle radiation effects -- {alpha}-recoil nuclei, fission fragments, ion-irradiations -- on ceramic materials and the thermal annealing mechanisms by which crystallinity might be restored. During the past two years, we have completed major studies on zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), olivine (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and ten other compositions), spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and four other compositions), and silica polymorphs (quartz, coesite and stishovite), as well as berlinite (AlPO{sub 4}) which is isomorphous with quartz. In addition, based on the above research, we propose the use of zircon as a host phase for the immobilization of plutonium resulting from weapons dismantlement.

  7. Structural Characterization of Silica Particles Extracted from Grass Stenotaphrum secundatum: Biotransformation via Annelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Espíndola-Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study shows the structural characterization of silica particles extracted from Stenotaphrum secundatum (St. Augustine grass using an annelid-based biotransformation process. This bioprocess starts when St. Augustine grass is turned into humus by vermicompost, and then goes through calcination and acid treatment to obtain silica particles. To determine the effect of the bioprocess, silica particles without biotransformation were extracted directly from the sample of grass. The characterization of the silica particles was performed using Infrared (FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS, and Energy Dispersion Spectroscopy (EDS. Both types of particles showed differences in morphology and size. The particles without biotransformation were essentially amorphous while those obtained via annelids showed specific crystalline phases. The biological relationship between the metabolisms of worms and microorganisms and the organic-mineral matter causes changes to the particles' properties. The results of this study are important because they will allow synthesis of silica in cheaper and more ecofriendly ways.

  8. Novel nano-composite particles : titania-coated silica cores

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwood, Peter; Gevert, Börje S.; Otterstedt, Jan-Erik; Niklasson, Gunnar; Vargas, William

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to develop methods to produce white composite pigments consisting of a silica core with a titania shell. Design/methodology/approach - Silica cores were coated with titanium dioxide (TiO2) via forced hydrolysis of a solution prepared from titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4). The morphology, surface charge and particle size of obtained composite particles were studied. Findings - Dispersions of well-dispersed composite particles, having silica cores of uniform...

  9. Hierarchical silica particles by dynamic multicomponent assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Z. W.; Hu, Q. Y.; Pang, J. B.;

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: Aerosol-assisted assembly of mesoporous silica particles with hierarchically controllable pore structure has been prepared using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO, H[OCH(CH3)CH2],OH) as co-templates. Addition of the hydrophobic PPO significantly...... influences the delicate hydrophilic-hydrophobic balance in the well-studied CTAB-silicate co-assembling system, resulting in various mesostructures (such as hexagonal, lamellar, and hierarchical structure). The co-assembly of CTAB, silicate clusters, and a low-molecular-weight PPO (average M-n 425) results......-silicate assembling system was discussed. The mesostructure of these particles was characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and N-2 sorption. (c) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  10. Multimethod approach for the detection and characterisation of food-grade synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Francisco; Ojea-Jimenez, Isaac; Geiss, Otmar; Gilliland, Douglas; Barrero-Moreno, Josefa

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) has been used as food additive under the code E551 for decades and the agrifood sector is considered a main exposure vector for humans and environment. However, there is still a lack of detailed methodologies for the determination of SAS' particle size and concentration. This work presents the detection and characterization of NPs in eleven different food-grade SAS samples, following a reasoned and detailed sequential methodology. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Multiangle Light Scattering (MALS), Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation (AF4), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICPMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used. The suitability and limitations, information derived from each type of analytical technique and implications related to current EC Regulation 1169/2011 on the provision of food information to consumers are deeply discussed. In general the z-average, AF4 hydrodynamic diameters and root mean square (rms) radii measured were in good agreement. AF4-ICPMS coupling and pre channel calibration with silica NPs standards allowed the reliable detection of NPs below 100nm for ten of eleven samples (AF4 diameters between 20.6 and 39.8nm) and to quantify the mass concentration in seven different samples (at mgL(-1) concentration level). TEM characterisation included the determination of the minimum detectable size and subsequent measurement of the equivalent circle diameter (ECD) of primary particles and small aggregates, which were between 10.3 and 20.3nm. Because of the dynamic size application range is limited by the minimum detectable size, all the techniques in this work can be used only as positive tests. PMID:26787162

  11. Photo-induced changes in a hybrid amorphous chalcogenide/silica photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos

    2014-01-01

    Photostructural changes in a hybrid photonic crystal fiber with chalcogenide nanofilms inside the inner surface of the cladding holes are experimentally demonstrated. The deposition of the amorphous chalcogenide glass films inside the silica capillaries of the fiber was made by infiltrating the n...

  12. In situ catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulose using alkali-modified amorphous silica alumina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zabeti, M.; Nguyen, T. S.; Lefferts, L.; Heeres, H. J.; Seshan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Canadian pinewood was pyrolyzed at 450 degrees C in an Infrared oven and the pyrolysis vapors were converted by passing through a catalyst bed at 450 degrees C. The catalysts studied were amorphous silica alumina (ASA) containing alkali metal or alkaline earth metal species including Na, K, Cs, Mg a

  13. Does the crystal habit modulate the genotoxic potential of silica particles? A cytogenetic evaluation in human and murine cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, P; Nigro, M; Bernardeschi, M; Lucchesi, P; Scarcelli, V; Frenzilli, G

    2015-10-01

    Crystalline silica inhaled from occupational sources has been classified by IARC as carcinogenic to humans; in contrast, for amorphous silica, epidemiological and experimental evidence remains insufficient. The genotoxicity of crystalline silica is still debated because of the inconsistency of experimental results ("variability of silica hazard"), often related to the features of the particle surfaces. We have assessed the role of crystal habit in the genotoxicity of silica powders. Pure quartz (crystalline) and vitreous silica (amorphous), sharing the same surface features, were used in an in vitro study with human pulmonary epithelial (A549) and murine macrophage (RAW264.7) cell lines, representative of occupational and environmental exposures. Genotoxicity was evaluated by the comet and micronucleus assays, and cytotoxicity by the trypan blue method. Cells were treated with silica powders for 4 and 24h. Quartz but not vitreous silica caused cell death and DNA damage in RAW264.7 cells. A549 cells were relatively resistant to both powders. Our results support the view that crystal habit per se plays a pivotal role in modulating the biological responses to silica particles. PMID:26433261

  14. Molecular dynamics study of the mechanical loss in amorphous pure and doped silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational wave detectors and other precision measurement devices are limited by the thermal noise in the oxide coatings on the mirrors of such devices. We have investigated the mechanical loss in amorphous oxides by calculating the internal friction using classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We have implemented the trajectory bisection method and the non-local ridge method in the DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation software to carry out those calculations. These methods have been used to locate the local potential energy minima that a system visits during a molecular dynamics trajectory and the transition state between any two consecutive minima. Using the numerically calculated barrier height distributions, barrier asymmetry distributions, relaxation times, and deformation potentials, we have calculated the internal friction of pure amorphous silica and silica mixed with other oxides. The results for silica compare well with experiment. Finally, we use the numerical calculations to comment on the validity of previously used theoretical assumptions

  15. Molecular dynamics study of hydrogen isotopes migration in amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Fused silica is a material of interest due to its increasing number of applications in many different technology fields. In thermonuclear fusion it is a key component in a number of diagnostics of the Safety and Control Systems of the ITER machine as well as in the final focusing optics of lasers for NIF. Materials properties of interest (optical absorption, radioluminescence, mechanical properties, oe) are closely related to the presence of defects. These defects can be generated directly by irradiation or by the presence of impurities in the material. Hydrogen is an ubiquitous impurity in this material and, moreover in a fusion reactor environment this material will be exposed to energetic hydrogen isotopes. Hydrogen isotopes will be deposited also on the surface of the fused silica components coming from the reaction chamber. On the other hand, some experimental results show that radiation damage can be different depending on hydrogen content, indicating that a detailed knowledge of the hydrogen role in fused silica should be fully understood. In this work we present molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of different hydrogen isotopes in this material and their interaction with defects. The interatomic potential developed by Feuston and Garofallini has been used in these studies. The diffusion coefficients and mechanisms of H mobility in fused silica has been calculated and compared with those existing in the literature. (authors)

  16. Molecular dynamics study of hydrogen isotopes migration in amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fused silica is a material of interest due to its increasing number of applications in many different technology fields. In thermonuclear fusion it is a key component in a number of diagnostics of the Safety and Control Systems of the ITER machine as well as in the final focusing optics of lasers for NIF. Materials properties of interest (optical absorption, radioluminescence, mechanical properties, ...) are closely related to the presence of defects. These defects can be generated directly by irradiation or by the presence of impurities in the material. Hydrogen is an ubiquitous impurity in this material and, moreover in a fusion reactor environment this material will be exposed to energetic hydrogen isotopes. Hydrogen isotopes will be deposited also on the surface of the fused silica components coming from the reaction chamber. On the other hand, some experimental results show that radiation damage can be different depending on hydrogen content, indicating that a detailed knowledge of the hydrogen role in fused silica should be fully understood. In this work we present molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of different hydrogen isotopes in this material and their interaction with the defects. The interatomic potential developed by Feuston and Garofallini will be used in these studies. The diffusion coefficients and mechanisms of H mobility in fused silica will be calculated and compared with those existing in the literature. (author)

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Colloidal Silica Particles under Mild Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Frances; Zin, Azrinawati Mohd.; Jameson, Graeme J.; Wanless, Erica J.

    2012-01-01

    A microscale laboratory experiment for the preparation and characterization of silica particles at neutral pH and ambient temperature conditions is described. Students first employ experimental fabrication methods to make spherical submicrometer silica particles via the condensation of an alkoxysilane and polyethyleneimine, which act to catalyze…

  18. Molecular dynamics study of oil detachment from an amorphous silica surface in water medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaxuan; Si, Hao; Chen, Wenyang

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the mechanism of oil detachment from optical glass in water medium is studied by using molecular dynamics simulation. At the beginning, some undecane molecules are adsorbed on the amorphous silica surface to get contaminated glass. Upon addition of 6000 water molecules, most of the undecane molecules on the substrate surface can be detached from an amorphous silica surface through three stages. The formation of different directions of water channels is vital for oil detachment. The electrostatic interaction of water substrate contributes to disturbing the aggregates of undecane molecules and the H-bonding interaction between the water molecules is helpful for the oil puddle away from the substrate. However, there is still some oil molecules residue on the substrate surface after water cleaning. The simulation results showed that the specific ring potential well of amorphous silica surface will hinder the detachment of oil molecules. We also find that the formation of the specific ring potential well is related to the number of atoms and the average radius in silica atomic rings. Increasing the upward lift force, which acts on the hydrocarbon tail of oil molecules, will be benefit to clear the oil pollution residues from the glass surface.

  19. The protein corona protects against size- and dose-dependent toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Docter

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Besides the lung and skin, the gastrointestinal (GI tract is one of the main targets for accidental exposure or biomedical applications of nanoparticles (NP. Biological responses to NP, including nanotoxicology, are caused by the interaction of the NP with cellular membranes and/or cellular entry. Here, the physico-chemical characteristics of NP are widely discussed as critical determinants, albeit the exact mechanisms remain to be resolved. Moreover, proteins associate with NP in physiological fluids, forming the protein corona potentially transforming the biological identity of the particle and thus, adding an additional level of complexity for the bio–nano responses.Here, we employed amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASP and epithelial GI tract Caco-2 cells as a model to study the biological impact of particle size as well as of the protein corona. Caco-2 or mucus-producing HT-29 cells were exposed to thoroughly characterized, negatively charged ASP of different size in the absence or presence of proteins. Comprehensive experimental approaches, such as quantifying cellular metabolic activity, microscopic observation of cell morphology, and high-throughput cell analysis revealed a dose- and time-dependent toxicity primarily upon exposure with ASP30 (Ø = 30 nm. Albeit smaller (ASP20, Ø = 20 nm or larger particles (ASP100; Ø = 100 nm showed a similar zeta potential, they both displayed only low toxicity. Importantly, the adverse effects triggered by ASP30/ASP30L were significantly ameliorated upon formation of the protein corona, which we found was efficiently established on all ASP studied. As a potential explanation, corona formation reduced ASP30 cellular uptake, which was however not significantly affected by ASP surface charge in our model. Collectively, our study uncovers an impact of ASP size as well as of the protein corona on cellular toxicity, which might be relevant for processes at the nano–bio interface in general.

  20. Dielectric breakdown in silica-amorphous polymer nanocomposite films: the role of the polymer matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Christopher A; Fillery, Scott P; Westing, Nicholas M; Chi, Changzai; Meth, Jeffrey S; Durstock, Michael F; Vaia, Richard A

    2013-06-26

    The ultimate energy storage performance of an electrostatic capacitor is determined by the dielectric characteristics of the material separating its conductive electrodes. Polymers are commonly employed due to their processability and high breakdown strength; however, demands for higher energy storage have encouraged investigations of ceramic-polymer composites. Maintaining dielectric strength, and thus minimizing flaw size and heterogeneities, has focused development toward nanocomposite (NC) films; but results lack consistency, potentially due to variations in polymer purity, nanoparticle surface treatments, nanoparticle size, and film morphology. To experimentally establish the dominant factors in broad structure-performance relationships, we compare the dielectric properties for four high-purity amorphous polymer films (polymethyl methacrylate, polystyrene, polyimide, and poly-4-vinylpyridine) incorporating uniformly dispersed silica colloids (up to 45% v/v). Factors known to contribute to premature breakdown-field exclusion and agglomeration-have been mitigated in this experiment to focus on what impact the polymer and polymer-nanoparticle interactions have on breakdown. Our findings indicate that adding colloidal silica to higher breakdown strength amorphous polymers (polymethyl methacrylate and polyimide) causes a reduction in dielectric strength as compared to the neat polymer. Alternatively, low breakdown strength amorphous polymers (poly-4-vinylpyridine and especially polystyrene) with comparable silica dispersion show similar or even improved breakdown strength for 7.5-15% v/v silica. At ∼15% v/v or greater silica content, all the polymer NC films exhibit breakdown at similar electric fields, implying that at these loadings failure becomes independent of polymer matrix and is dominated by silica. PMID:23639183

  1. Transport of colloidal silica in unsaturated sand: Effect of charging properties of sand and silica particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Motoyoshi

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the transport of colloidal silica in various degrees of a water-saturated Toyoura sand column, because silica particles are widely used as catalyst carriers and abrasive agents, and their toxicity is reported recently. Since water-silica, water-sand, and air-water interfaces have pH-dependent negative charges, the magnitude of surface charge was controlled by changing the solution pH. The results show that, at high pH conditions (pH 7.4), the deposition of colloidal silica to the sand surface is interrupted and the silica concentration at the column outlet immediately reaches the input concentration in saturated conditions. In addition, the relative concentration of silica at the column outlet only slightly decreases to 0.9 with decreasing degrees of water saturation to 38%, because silica particles are trapped in straining regions in the soil pore and air-water interface. On the other hand, at pH 5 conditions (low pH), where sand and colloid have less charge, reduced repulsive forces result in colloidal silica attaching onto the sand in saturated conditions. The deposition amount of silica particles remarkably increases with decreasing degrees of water saturation to 37%, which is explained by more particles being retained in the sand column associated with the air-water interface. In conclusion, at higher pH, the mobility of silica particles is high, and the air-water interface is inactive for the deposition of silica. On the other hand, at low pH, the deposition amount increases with decreasing water saturation, and the particle transport is inhibited. PMID:27045635

  2. The behaviour of amorphous silica coatings at high temperatures in aggressive environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ayres, C. F.; Bennett, M. J.; Gohil, D.D.; Léon, B.; Pérez-Amor, M.; Pou, J.; Saunders, S

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous silica coatings produced by plasma assisted and laser chemical vapour deposition (PACVD and LCVD) on Incoloy 800H and 21/4 Cr 1 Mo ferritic steel were exposed in air and in simulated coal gasification atmospheres (CGA) for periods of up to two years at temperatures between 450°C and 900°C . In some cases interlayers of TiN were used to promote adhesion and to reduce interdiffusion between the coating and substrate. PACVD silica coatings deposited onto Incoloy 800H provided outstandi...

  3. The toxicological mode of action and the safety of synthetic amorphous silica-a nanostructured material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruijtier-Pölloth, Claudia

    2012-04-11

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS), in the form of pyrogenic (fumed), precipitated, gel or colloidal SAS, has been used in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications including food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products for many decades. Based on extensive physico-chemical, ecotoxicology, toxicology, safety and epidemiology data, no environmental or health risks have been associated with these materials if produced and used under current hygiene standards and use recommendations. With internal structures in the nanoscale size range, pyrogenic, precipitated and gel SAS are typical examples of nanostructured materials as recently defined by the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). The manufacturing process of these SAS materials leads to aggregates of strongly (covalently) bonded or fused primary particles. Weak interaction forces (van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding, physical adhesion) between aggregates lead to the formation of micrometre (μm)-sized agglomerates. Typically, isolated nanoparticles do not occur. In contrast, colloidal SAS dispersions may contain isolated primary particles in the nano-size range which can be considered nano-objects. The size of the primary particle resulted in the materials often being considered as "nanosilica" and in the inclusion of SAS in research programmes on nanomaterials. The biological activity of SAS can be related to the particle shape and surface characteristics interfacing with the biological milieu rather than to particle size. SAS adsorbs to cellular surfaces and can affect membrane structures and integrity. Toxicity is linked to mechanisms of interactions with outer and inner cell membranes, signalling responses, and vesicle trafficking pathways. Interaction with membranes may induce the release of endosomal substances, reactive oxygen species, cytokines and chemokines and thus induce inflammatory responses. None of the SAS forms, including colloidal nano-sized particles, were shown

  4. Mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic particles prepared by pseudomorphic transformation and their application in purification of plasmid DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic particles were prepared via pseudomorphic transformation of pre-made amorphous silica-coated Fe3O4–polymer composite particles using n-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and 1,3,5-trimethyl benzene (MES) as template. The mesoporous particles presented almost the same size, shape, and magnetic property as the original amorphous particles but an ordered mesoporous shell with wormhole-like pore structure. The pore size of the shells increased from 2.4 to 3.1 and 4.2 nm as the molar ratio of MES/CTAB increased from 0 to 1.0 and 1.5. DNA extraction experiments showed the mesoporous particles were qualified for purification of plasmid DNA from bacterial lysate.Graphical abstract

  5. Surface modification of zinc oxide nanoparticles with amorphous silica alters their fate in the circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konduru, Nagarjun V; Murdaugh, Kimberly M; Swami, Archana; Jimenez, Renato J; Donaghey, Thomas C; Demokritou, Philip; Brain, Joseph D; Molina, Ramon M

    2016-08-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) pharmacokinetics and biological effects are influenced by many factors, especially surface physicochemical properties. We assessed the effects of an amorphous silica coating on the fate of zinc after intravenous (IV) injection of neutron activated uncoated (65)ZnO or silica-coated (65)ZnO NPs in male Wistar Han rats. Groups of IV-injected rats were sequentially euthanized, and 18 tissues were collected and analyzed for (65)Zn radioactivity. The protein coronas on each ZnO NP after incubation in rat plasma were analyzed by SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry of selected gel bands. Plasma clearance for both NPs was biphasic with rapid initial and slower terminal clearance rates. Half-lives of plasma clearance of silica-coated (65)ZnO were shorter (initial - <1 min; terminal - 2.5 min) than uncoated (65)ZnO (initial - 1.9 min; terminal - 38 min). Interestingly, the silica-coated (65)ZnO group had higher (65)Zn associated with red blood cells and higher initial uptake in the liver. The (65)Zn concentrations in all the other tissues were significantly lower in the silica-coated than uncoated groups. We also found that the protein corona formed on silica-coated ZnO NPs had higher amounts of plasma proteins, particularly albumin, transferrin, A1 inhibitor 3, α-2-hs-glycoprotein, apoprotein E and α-1 antitrypsin. Surface modification with amorphous silica alters the protein corona, agglomerate size, and zeta potential of ZnO NPs, which in turn influences ZnO biokinetic behavior in the circulation. This emphasizes the critical role of the protein corona in the biokinetics, toxicology and nanomedical applications of NPs. PMID:26581431

  6. Formation of Micro and Mesoporous Amorphous Silica-Based Materials from Single Source Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazri Mohd Sokri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polysilazanes functionalized with alkoxy groups were designed and synthesized as single source precursors for fabrication of micro and mesoporous amorphous silica-based materials. The pyrolytic behaviors during the polymer to ceramic conversion were studied by the simultaneous thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry (TG-MS analysis. The porosity of the resulting ceramics was characterized by the N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm measurements. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic analyses as well as elemental composition analysis were performed on the polymer-derived amorphous silica-based materials, and the role of the alkoxy group as a sacrificial template for the micro and mesopore formations was discussed from a viewpoint to establish novel micro and mesoporous structure controlling technologies through the polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs route.

  7. Formation of Micro and Mesoporous Amorphous Silica-Based Materials from Single Source Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Nazri Mohd Sokri; Yusuke Daiko; Zineb Mouline; Sawao Honda; Yuji Iwamoto

    2016-01-01

    Polysilazanes functionalized with alkoxy groups were designed and synthesized as single source precursors for fabrication of micro and mesoporous amorphous silica-based materials. The pyrolytic behaviors during the polymer to ceramic conversion were studied by the simultaneous thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry (TG-MS) analysis. The porosity of the resulting ceramics was characterized by the N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm measurements. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) an...

  8. The Role Seemingly of Amorphous Silica Gel Layers in Chiral Separations by Planar Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Kowalska

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In planar chromatography, silica gel appears as the most frequently used adsorbent. Its preference as planar chromatographic stationary phase is due to its high specific surface area (ca. 700 m2 g-1 and relatively simple active sites (silanol groups, Si-OH. The high specific surface area of silica gel and a high density of coverage of its surface with the silanol active sites contribute jointly to an excellent separation performance of this adsorbent. In our experiments on chiral separation of the enantiomer pairs by planar chromatography, contradictory behavior of the silica gel layers versus the chiral compounds was observed. The migration tracks of chiral compounds in the ascending planar chromatographic mode were not vertical but bent on either side being a function of analyte chirality. This deviation of the analyte’s migration track was noticed, when using the densitometric scanner to quantify the respective chromatograms. In order to confirm the hypothesis as to the microcrystalline nature of silica gel used in liquid chromatography, it was further investigated through circular dichroism (CD and the data thereof confirmed that the ‘chromatographic’ silica gels are not amorphous but microcrystalline, contributing to the (partial horizontal enantioseparation of the antimer pairs. This paper summarizes the results of our investigation on the microcrystalline nature of silica gels used in planar chromatography and their impact on enantioseparation of the selected pairs of antimers.

  9. Impact of surface impurity on phase transitions in amorphous micro silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Sonja; Yu, Donghong; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study three types of spherically shaped micron and submicron sized amorphous micro silica (MS) as common raw material for production of porous calcium silicate products used for insulation, which are selected on basis of chemical composition and production method. Two of them have...... silica content of 96% (from silicon production) and one has that of 92% (from ferro-silicon production). In order to achieve high quality calcium silicate products, which strongly depends on the characteristics of the raw MS, it is crucial to study the chemical and physical properties of the raw MS...... obtained from different sources. We find that the surface impurities of raw MS lower its crystallization temperature determined from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermodynamic origin of this correlation is discussed. From the surface crystallization behaviour of raw silica, it is inferred...

  10. Morphology controlling method for amorphous silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires and their luminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haitao; Huang, Zhaohui; Huang, Juntong; Xu, Song; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan-Gai; Wu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shaowei

    2016-03-01

    Uniform silica nanoparticles and jellyfish-like nanowires were synthesized by a chemical vapour deposition method on Si substrates treated without and with Ni(NO3)2, using silicon powder as the source material. Composition and structural characterization using field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the as-prepared products were silica nanoparticles and nanowires which have amorphous structures. The form of nanoparticles should be related to gas-phase nucleation procedure. The growth of the nanowires was in accordance with vapour-liquid-solid mechanism, followed by Ostwald ripening to form the jellyfish-like morphology. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements showed that the silica products excited by different light sources show different luminescence properties. The emission spectra of both silica nanoparticles and nanowires are due to the neutral oxygen vacancies (≡Si-Si≡). The as-synthesized silica with controlled morphology can find potential applications in future nanodevices with tailorable photoelectric properties.

  11. Consecutively Preparing D-Xylose, Organosolv Lignin, and Amorphous Ultrafine Silica from Rice Husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m2/g.

  12. Silica nanoparticles on front glass for efficiency enhancement in superstrate-type amorphous silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antireflective coating on front glass of superstrate-type single junction amorphous silicon solar cells (SCs) has been applied using highly monodispersed and stable silica nanoparticles (NPs). The silica NPs having 300 nm diameter were synthesized by Stober technique where the size of the NPs was controlled by varying the alcohol medium. The synthesized silica NPs were analysed by dynamic light scattering technique and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The NPs were spin coated on glass side of fluorinated tin oxide (SnO2: F) coated glass superstrate and optimization of the concentration of the colloidal solution, spin speed and number of coated layers was done to achieve minimum reflection characteristics. An estimation of the distribution of the NPs for different optimization parameters has been done using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. Subsequently, the transparent conducting oxide coated glass with the layer having the minimum reflectance is used for fabrication of amorphous silicon SC. Electrical analysis of the fabricated cell indicates an improvement of 6.5% in short-circuit current density from a reference of 12.40 mA cm−2 while the open circuit voltage and the fill factor remains unaltered. A realistic optical model has also been proposed to gain an insight into the system. (paper)

  13. Consecutively preparing d-xylose, organosolv lignin, and amorphous ultrafine silica from rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product reaching the output of 80 million tons annually in the world. The most common treatment method of rice husk is burning or burying, which caused serious air pollution and resource waste. In order to solve this problem, a new method is proposed to comprehensively utilize the rice husk in this paper. Firstly, the D-xylose was prepared from the semicellulose via dilute acid hydrolysis. Secondly, the lignin was separated via organic solvent pulping from the residue. Finally, the amorphous ultrafine silica was prepared via pyrolysis of the residue produced in the second process. In this way, the three main contents of rice husk (semicellulose, lignin, and silica) are consecutively converted to three fine chemicals, without solid waste produced. The yields of D-xylose and organosolv lignin reach 58.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The purity and specific surface of amorphous ultrafine silica reach 99.92% and 225.20 m(2)/g. PMID:25140120

  14. Macrophage Responses to Silica Nanoparticles are Highly Conserved Across Particle Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Masiello, Lisa M.; Zangar, Richard C.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Karin, Norman J.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2009-02-03

    Concerns about the potential adverse health effects of engineered nanoparticles stems in part from the possibility that some materials display unique chemical and physical properties at nanoscales which could exacerbate their biological activity. However, studies that have assessed the effect of particle size across a comprehensive set of biological responses have not been reported. Using a macrophage cell model, we demonstrate that the ability of unopsonized amorphous silica particles to stimulate inflammatory protein secretion and induce macrophage cytotoxicity scales closely with the total administered particle surface area across a wide range of particle diameters (7-500 nm). Whole genome microarray analysis of the early gene expression changes induced by 10 nm and 500 nm particles showed that the magnitude of change for the majority of genes affected correlated more tightly with particle surface area than either particle mass or number. Gene expression changes that were particle size-specific were also identified. However, the overall biological processes represented by all gene expression changes were nearly identical, irrespective of particle diameter. Direct comparison of the cell processes represented in the 10 nm and 500 nm particle gene sets using gene set enrichment analysis revealed that among 1009 total biological processes, none were statistically enriched in one particle size group over the other. The key mechanisms involved in silica nanoparticle-mediated gene regulation and cytotoxicity have yet to be established. However, our results suggest that on an equivalent nominal surface area basis, common biological modes of action are expected for nano- and supranano-sized silica particles.

  15. Amorphous nanosilica particles block induction of oral tolerance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Tsuguto; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-09-01

    The mucosal immune system is exposed to non-self antigens in food and the gut microbiota. Therefore, the recognition of orally ingested non-self antigens is suppressed in healthy individuals to avoid excessive immune responses in a process called "oral tolerance". The breakdown of oral tolerance has been cited as a possible cause of food allergy, and amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSP) have been implicated in this breakdown. As nSP are widely used in foodstuffs and other products, exposure to them is increasing; thus, investigations of any effects of nSP on oral tolerance are urgent. This study evaluated the effects of nSP30 (particle diameter = 39 nm) on immunological unresponsiveness induced in mice with oral ovalbumin (OVA). Specifically, production of OVA-specific antibodies, splenocyte proliferation in response to OVA, and effects on T-helper (TH)-1, TH2, and TH17 responses (in terms of cytokine and IgG/IgE subclass expression) were evaluated. nSP30 increased the levels of OVA-specific IgG in OVA-tolerized mice and induced the proliferation of OVA-immunized splenocytes in response to OVA in a dose-related manner. nSP30 also increased the expression of OVA-specific IgG1, IgE, and IgG2a, indicating stimulation of the TH1 and TH2 responses. The expression of interferon (IFN)-γ (TH1), interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 (TH2), and IL-17 (TH17) was also stimulated in a dose-related manner by nSP30 in splenocytes stimulated ex vivo with OVA. The induction of tolerance by OVA, the production of anti-OVA IgG antibodies, and proliferation of splenocytes in response to OVA was inhibited by nSP30 in conjunction with OVA and was dose-related. The nSP30 enhanced TH1 and TH2 responses that might prevent the induction of oral tolerance. Overall, this study showed that the abrogation of OVA-induced oral tolerance in mice by exposure to nSP30 was dose-related and that nSP30 stimulated TH1, TH2, and TH17 responses. PMID:27086695

  16. Properties of Amorphous Silica Entrapped Isoniazid Drug Delivery System (DDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the properties of drug delivery system (DDS) produced using micelles entrapment approach. Isoniazid, which is a water soluble drug for tuberculosis was used in the system. The effects of synthesis parameters were systematically studied such as synthesis temperature (38- 70 degree Celsius), amount of butanol co-solvent (6-18 ml), and amount of Si organic precursor (2-8 ml). From transmission electron microscope (TEM) images, the size of DDS could be tuned from 21-104 nm by changing the reaction temperature. While, the increase of butanol cosolvent enlarged the size of DDS in the range of 40-94 nm. A similar trend was observed for DDS with increasing organic Si precursor whereby the particle size could be tuned from 40-132 nm. However, at high amount of organic Si precursor of > 2 ml, a bimodal structure of DDS was observed. Stability study in biological media at 37 degree Celsius of selected samples showed that the produced DDS had acceptable degree of agglomeration (author)

  17. Pulmonary toxicity screening studies in male rats with TiO2 particulates substantially encapsulated with pyrogenically deposited, amorphous silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb TR

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute lung toxicity in rats of intratracheally instilled TiO2 particles that have been substantially encapsulated with pyrogenically deposited, amorphous silica. Groups of rats were intratracheally instilled either with doses of 1 or 5 mg/kg of hydrophilic Pigment A TiO2 particles or doses of 1 or 5 mg/kg of the following control or particle-types: 1 R-100 TiO2 particles (hydrophilic in nature; 2 quartz particles, 3 carbonyl iron particles. Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS instilled rats served as additional controls. Following exposures, the lungs of PBS and particle-exposed rats were evaluated for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid inflammatory markers, cell proliferation, and by histopathology at post-instillation time points of 24 hrs, 1 week, 1 month and 3 months. The bronchoalveolar lavage results demonstrated that lung exposures to quartz particles, at both concentrations but particularly at the higher dose, produced significant increases vs. controls in pulmonary inflammation and cytotoxicity indices. Exposures to Pigment A or R-100 TiO2 particles produced transient inflammatory and cell injury effects at 24 hours postexposure (pe, but these effects were not sustained when compared to quartz-related effects. Exposures to carbonyl iron particles or PBS resulted only in minor, short-term and reversible lung inflammation, likely related to the effects of the instillation procedure. Histopathological analyses of lung tissues revealed that pulmonary exposures to Pigment A TiO2 particles produced minor inflammation at 24 hours postexposure and these effects were not significantly different from exposures to R-100 or carbonyl iron particles. Pigment A-exposed lung tissue sections appeared normal at 1 and 3 months postexposure. In contrast, pulmonary exposures to quartz particles in rats produced a dose-dependent lung inflammatory response characterized by neutrophils and foamy (lipid

  18. Silica aerogel Cerenkov detectors for particle identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present light yield measurements of silica aerogel Cerenkov detectors with photomultiplier readout, showing the light yield dependence of pure and wavelength-shifter-doped silica aerogel on block size using both cosmic muons and electrons from a 106Ru source. We present studies of fluorescent fibers and single photon avalanche diodes, including measurements of attenuation lengths and emission spectra of fibers versus wavelength and tests with a single photon avalanche diode. We show results of the response of a single photon avalanche diode to different light sources. Finally, we discuss a new readout scheme using avalanche photodiodes

  19. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-02-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na+-K+ ATPase activity and Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro.

  20. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity and Ca(2+)-Mg(2+) ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro. PMID:26831695

  1. Water adsorption on amorphous silica surfaces: a Car-Parrinello simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of classical molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations is used to investigate the adsorption of water on a free amorphous silica surface. From the classical MD, SiO2 configurations with a free surface are generated which are then used as starting configurations for the CPMD. We study the reaction of a water molecule with a two-membered ring at the temperature T = 300 K. We show that the result of this reaction is the formation of two silanol groups on the surface. The activation energy of the reaction is estimated and it is shown that the reaction is exothermic

  2. Amorphous silica nanoparticles aggregate human platelets: potential implications for vascular homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbalan JJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available J Jose Corbalan1,2, Carlos Medina1, Adam Jacoby2, Tadeusz Malinski2, Marek W Radomski11School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Panoz Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USABackground: Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNP can be used in medical technologies and other industries leading to human exposure. However, an increased number of studies indicate that this exposure may result in cardiovascular inflammation and damage. A high ratio of nitric oxide to peroxynitrite concentrations ([NO]/[ONOO-] is crucial for cardiovascular homeostasis and platelet hemostasis. Therefore, we studied the influence of SiNP on the platelet [NO]/[ONOO-] balance and platelet aggregation.Methods: Nanoparticle–platelet interaction was examined using transmission electron microscopy. Electrochemical nanosensors were used to measure the levels of NO and ONOO- released by platelets upon nanoparticle stimulation. Platelet aggregation was studied using light aggregometry, flow cytometry, and phase contrast microscopy.Results: Amorphous SiNP induced NO release from platelets followed by a massive stimulation of ONOO- leading to an unfavorably low [NO]/[ONOO-] ratio. In addition, SiNP induced an upregulation of selectin P expression and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa activation on the platelet surface membrane, and led to platelet aggregation via adenosine diphosphate and matrix metalloproteinase 2-dependent mechanisms. Importantly, all the effects on platelet aggregation were inversely proportional to nanoparticle size.Conclusions: The exposure of platelets to amorphous SiNP induces a critically low [NO]/[ONOO-] ratio leading to platelet aggregation. These findings provide new insights into the pharmacological profile of SiNP in platelets.Keywords: amorphous silica nanoparticles, nanotoxicology, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, platelet aggregation

  3. Cellular Recognition and Trafficking of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles by Macrophage Scavenger Receptor A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Galya; Chrisler, William B.; Cassens, Kaylyn J.; Tan, Ruimin; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Zangar, Richard C.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2011-09-01

    The internalization of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) into cells is known to involve active transport mechanisms, yet the precise biological molecules involved are poorly understood. We demonstrate that the uptake of amorphous silica ENPs (92 nm) by macrophage cells is strongly inhibited by silencing expression of scavenger receptor A (SR-A). In addition, ENP uptake is augmented by introducing SR-A expression into human cells that are normally non-phagocytic. Confocal fluorescent microscopy analyses show that the majority of single or small clusters of silica ENPs co-localize intracellularly with SR-A and are internalized through a pathway characteristic of clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In contrast, larger silica NP agglomerates (>500 nm) are poorly co-localized with the receptor, suggesting independent trafficking or internalization pathways are involved. SR-A silencing also caused decreased cellular secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to silica ENPs. As SR-A is expressed in macrophages throughout the reticulo-endothelial system, this pathway is likely an important determinant of the biodistribution of, and cellular response to ENPs.

  4. Fluoroalkyl-functionalized silica particles: synthesis, characterization, and wetting characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Raymond; Guenthner, Andrew J; Haddad, Timothy S; Mabry, Joseph M

    2011-08-16

    Fluoroalkyl-functionalized silica particles for use in nonwetting surfaces were prepared by treatment of silica particles with fluoroalkyl-functional chlorosilanes. Both fumed and precipitated silica were studied, as well as the efficiency of surface coverage using mono-, di-, and trifunctional chlorosilanes. The most effective surface treatment was accomplished via the surface grafting of monofunctional chlorosilanes in the presence of preadsorbed dimethylamine under anhydrous conditions at room temperature. Confirmation of covalent attachment was accomplished via Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, while elemental analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to determine grafting densities and additional key geometric characteristics of the grafted layer. The effect of residual silanol content on the moisture uptake properties of the modified silica particles was determined by measuring the water uptake of unbound particles, while liquid wetting properties were determined by dynamic contact angle analysis of elastomeric composites. Although residual silanol content was shown to effect wetting properties, results suggest that surface geometry dominates the performance of liquid-repellent surfaces. The potential use of fluoroalkyl-functionalized silica particles for hydrophobic and oleophobic applications is discussed. PMID:21728328

  5. Charged particle detectors made from thin layers of amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of experiments was conducted to determine the feasibility of using hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) as solid state thin film charged particle detectors. 241Am alphas were successfully detected with α-Si:H devices. The measurements and results of these experiments are presented. The problems encountered and changes in the fabrication of the detectors that may improve the performance are discussed

  6. Micro-PIXE characterization of amorphous silica globules from a hydrothermal field on the sea floor of Okinawa, Southern Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the examination of the representative specimens, a barite ore and a polymetallic chimney, from the JADE hydrothermal field of Okinawa Trough, many amorphous silica globules of approximately 10 to 50 micrometers in diameter were found as isolated sphere or bunchy aggregation. We performed micro-PIXE analyses of the globules to check the effectiveness of the method to such soft and vulnerable material, and to understand the geochemical characteristics. The result shows that amorphous silica can include various kinds of elements in lithophile, chalcophile and siderophile categories. The trace element distribution of the globules indicates that amorphous silica could be a good monitor of geochemical environment; and implies that the chemical variation of ore often in a mineral field is mainly derived by change in local physicochemical conditions of single mineralizing fluid rather than multiple injection of the solution. (author)

  7. Production of amorphous silica by two-step ammoniation of by-product fluosilicic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hyo-Shin; Rhee, Kang-In; Lee, Churl-Kyoung; Yang, Dong-Hyo [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    Amorphous silica can be produced by the ammoniation of fluosilicic acid, leaving behind ammonium fluoride in the solution. In this work, a two-step ammoniation is applied to neutralize the fluosilicic acid generated in the production of a local superphosphate fertilizer. Based on a fixed total of 7.2 moles of ammonia per mole of H{sub 2}SiF{sub 6}(120% stoichiometry), four combination sets of ammonia addition are tested. Two to six molar ratios of ammonia to H{sub 2}SiF{sub 6} are applied in the first step and the balance of 5.2-1.2 in the second step. At a combination of 3 and 4.2 molar ratios of ammonia in the respective first and second steps, amorphous silica of 99.7% purity is readily produced in the second step while a majority of impurities is precipitated in the first step. The two-step ammoniation is near completion despite a non-equilibrium reaction. However, rapid ammoniation favors the crystallization of ammonium fluosilicate. A sharp pH change occurs between 1.5 and 2.5 NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SiF{sub 6} molar ratios, indicating the rapid disappearance of SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} ion from the solution. (author). 21 refs., 6 tabs., 5 figs.

  8. Properties of amorphous FeCoB alloy particles (abstract)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, S. W.; Wells, S.; Meagher, A.;

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous and crystalline alloy particles (0.05–0.5 nm) of FexCoyBz in which the ratio x:y ranges from 0 to 1 have been prepared by the borohydride reduction of iron and cobalt salts in aqueous solution. The structure of the particles has been studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy and x....... 1). It has been shown that the fraction of boron in the alloys (10–35 at. %) is dependent upon the rate of addition of salts to borohydride and the concentration of cobalt present; this in turn influences the crystallinity and magnetic properties . Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted...

  9. Amorphous Silica- and Carbon- rich nano-templated surfaces as model interstellar dust surfaces for laboratory astrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Natalia; Dawes, Anita; González-Posada, Fernando; Thompson, Neil; Chakarov, Dinko; Mason, Nigel J.; Fraser, Helen Jane

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies on surface astrochemistry are vital to our understanding of chemical evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). Laboratory surface-astrochemists have recently begun to study chemical reactions on interstellar dust-grain mimics, ranging from graphite, HOPG and graphene (representative of PAHs or large C-grains in the ISM) to amorphous olivine (representative of silicate dust) and ablated meteoritic samples (representative of interplanetary dust). These pioneering experiments show that the nature of the surface fundamentally affects processes at the substrate surface, substrate-ice interface, and ice over-layer. What these experiments are still lacking is the ability to account for effects arising from the discrete nano-scale of ISM grains, which might include changes to electronic structure, optical properties and surface-kinetics in comparison to bulk materials. The question arises: to what extent are the chemical and optical properties of interstellar ices affected by the size, morphology and material of the underlying ISM dust?We have designed, fabricated and characterised a set of nano-structured surfaces, where nanoparticles, representative of ISM grains, are adhered to an underlying support substrate. Here we will show the nanoparticles that have been manufactured from fused-silica (FS), glassy carbon (GC) and amorphous-C (aC). Our optical characterisation data shows that the nanostructured surfaces have different absorption cross-sections and significant scattering in comparison to the support substrates, which has implications for the energetic processing of icy ISM dust. We have been able to study how water-ice growth differs on the nanoparticles in comparison to the “flat” substrates, indicating increased ice amorphicity when nanoparticles are present, and on C-rich surfaces, compared to Si-rich particles. These data will be discussed in the context of interstellar water-ice features.

  10. In Situ Crystallization of Al-Containing Silicate Nanosheets on Monodisperse Amorphous Silica Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomohiko; Sueyoshi, Mai; Minamisawa, Hikari M

    2015-12-29

    The fine crystals of an Al-containing layered silicate, whose negative layer charge is generated by an isomorphous substitution in the tetrahedral SiO4 framework, successfully grew on monodisperse amorphous silica microspheres with diameters of 1.0 and 2.6 μm. The fine, plate-like crystals were observed to thoroughly cover the surface of the silica spheres, irrespective of their size, by the hydrothermal reactions of the silica powder in aqueous alkali solution containing Al and Mg ions in a rotating Teflon-lined autoclave. The crystal size increased when the concentration of the precursors was low. The presence of fluorine in the reaction media enlarged the crystalline phase in the direction of the layer stacking while reducing the plate size. The difference in the crystal size affected the kinetics on the hinokitiol desorption in n-hexane from the layered silicates modified with organoammonium ions. The organically modified layered silicate behaved as an exfoliated nanosheet in the nonpolar solvent. The less harmful elements in this hybrid suggest that it can be used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications as a drug support, without flaking off the fine layers on the microspherical substrates. PMID:26639090

  11. Molecular dynamics study of defect in amorphous silica; generation and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fused silica is a material of interest due to its increasing number of applications in many different technology fields. In thermonuclear fusion it is one of candidate materials for both final focusing optics of lasers for NIF and future inertial fusion reactors and diagnostics of the Safety and Control Systems of the ITER machine as well as DEMO magnetic fusion reactors. In operation, these materials will be exposed to high neutron irradiation fluxes and it can result in point defect. Materials properties of interest (optical absorption, radioluminescence, mechanical properties,...) are closely related to the presence of defects. These defects can be generated directly by irradiation or by the presence of impurities in the material. We present molecular dynamic simulation of displacement cascade due to energetic recoils in amorphous silica without hydrogen atoms and with 1% of hydrogen atoms trying to identify defects formation and we present molecular dynamics simulations to study the effects of hydrogen atoms in this material and their interaction with defects; The diffusion coefficients and mechanisms of H mobility in fused silica has been calculated and compared with those existing in the literature. The interatomic potential developed by Feuston and Garofallini has been used in both studies

  12. Proinflammatory Effects of Pyrogenic and Precipitated Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles in Innate Immunity Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cristo, Luisana; Movia, Dania; Bianchi, Massimiliano G; Allegri, Manfredi; Mohamed, Bashir M; Bell, Alan P; Moore, Caroline; Pinelli, Silvana; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Riego-Sintes, Juan; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Bussolati, Ovidio; Bergamaschi, Enrico

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASNP) can be synthetized via several processes, 2 of which are the thermal route (to yield pyrogenic silica) and the wet route from a solution containing silicate salts (to obtain precipitated, colloidal, mesoporous silica, or silica gel). Both methods of synthesis lead to ASNP that are applied as food additive (E551). Current food regulation does not require that production methods of additives are indicated on the product label, and, thus, the ASNP are listed without mentioning the production method. Recent results indicate, however, that pyrogenic ASNP are more cytotoxic than ASNP synthesized through the wet route. The present study was aimed at clarifying if 2 representative preparations of ASNP, NM-203 (pyrogenic) and NM-200 (precipitated), of comparable size, specific surface area, surface charge, and hydrodynamic radius in complete growth medium, had different effects on 2 murine macrophage cell lines (MH-S and RAW264.7 cells). Our results show that, when incubated in protein-rich fluids, NM-203 adsorbed on their surface more proteins than NM-200 and, once incubated with macrophages, elicited a greater oxidative stress, assessed from Hmox1 induction and ROS production. Flow cytometry and helium ion microscopy indicated that pyrogenic NM-203 interacted with macrophages more strongly than the precipitated NM-200 and triggered a more evident inflammatory response, evaluated with Nos2 induction, NO production and the secretion of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β. Moreover, both ASNP synergized macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), with a higher effect observed for NM-203. In conclusion, the results presented here demonstrate that, compared to precipitated, pyrogenic ASNP exhibit enhanced interaction with serum proteins and cell membrane, and cause a larger oxidative stress and stronger proinflammatory effects in macrophages. Therefore, these 2 nanomaterials should not be considered biologically equivalent. PMID

  13. Surface Complexation Model for Strontium Sorption to Amorphous Silica and Goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, S; Robers, S; Criscenti, L; O' Day, P

    2007-11-30

    Strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite was measured as a function of pH and dissolved strontium and carbonate concentrations at 25 C. Strontium sorption gradually increases from 0 to 100% from pH 6 to 10 for both phases and requires multiple outer-sphere surface complexes to fit the data. All data are modeled using the triple layer model and the site-occupancy standard state; unless stated otherwise all strontium complexes are mononuclear. Strontium sorption to amorphous silica in the presence and absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with tetradentate Sr{sup 2+} and SrOH{sup +} complexes on the {beta}-plane and a monodentate Sr{sup 2+} complex on the diffuse plane to account for strontium sorption at low ionic strength. Strontium sorption to goethite in the absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with monodentate and tetradentate SrOH{sup +} complexes and a tetradentate binuclear Sr{sup 2+} species on the {beta}-plane. The binuclear complex is needed to account for enhanced sorption at high strontium surface loadings. In the presence of dissolved carbonate additional monodentate Sr{sup 2+} and SrOH{sup +} carbonate surface complexes on the {beta}-plane are needed to fit strontium sorption to goethite. Modeling strontium sorption as outer-sphere complexes is consistent with quantitative analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) on selected sorption samples that show a single first shell of oxygen atoms around strontium indicating hydrated surface complexes at the amorphous silica and goethite surfaces. Strontium surface complexation equilibrium constants determined in this study combined with other alkaline earth surface complexation constants are used to recalibrate a predictive model based on Born solvation and crystal-chemistry theory. The model is accurate to about 0.7 log K units. More studies are needed to determine the dependence of alkaline earth sorption on ionic strength and dissolved carbonate and sulfate

  14. Quantitative characterization of agglomerates and aggregates of pyrogenic and precipitated amorphous silica nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Temmerman Pieter-Jan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interaction of a nanomaterial (NM with a biological system depends not only on the size of its primary particles but also on the size, shape and surface topology of its aggregates and agglomerates. A method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM, to visualize the NM and on image analysis, to measure detected features quantitatively, was assessed for its capacity to characterize the aggregates and agglomerates of precipitated and pyrogenic synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide (SAS, or silica, NM. Results Bright field (BF TEM combined with systematic random imaging and semi-automatic image analysis allows measuring the properties of SAS NM quantitatively. Automation allows measuring multiple and arithmetically complex parameters simultaneously on high numbers of detected particles. This reduces operator-induced bias and assures a statistically relevant number of measurements, avoiding the tedious repetitive task of manual measurements. Access to multiple parameters further allows selecting the optimal parameter in function of a specific purpose. Using principle component analysis (PCA, twenty-three measured parameters were classified into three classes containing measures for size, shape and surface topology of the NM. Conclusion The presented method allows a detailed quantitative characterization of NM, like dispersions of precipitated and pyrogenic SAS based on the number-based distributions of their mean diameter, sphericity and shape factor.

  15. Amorphous silica nanoparticles trigger nitric oxide/peroxynitrite imbalance in human endothelial cells: inflammatory and cytotoxic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corbalan JJ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available J Jose Corbalan1,2, Carlos Medina1, Adam Jacoby2, Tadeusz Malinski2, Marek W Radomski11School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Panoz Institute, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 2Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of noxious effects of amorphous silica nanoparticles on human endothelial cells.Methods: Nanoparticle uptake was examined by transmission electron microscopy. Electrochemical nanosensors were used to measure the nitric oxide (NO and peroxynitrite (ONOO- released by a single cell upon nanoparticle stimulation. The downstream inflammatory effects were measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, and cytotoxicity was measured by lactate dehydrogenase assay.Results: We found that the silica nanoparticles penetrated the plasma membrane and rapidly stimulated release of cytoprotective NO and, to a greater extent, production of cytotoxic ONOO-. The low [NO]/[ONOO-] ratio indicated increased nitroxidative/oxidative stress and correlated closely with endothelial inflammation and necrosis. This imbalance was associated with nuclear factor κB activation, upregulation of key inflammatory factors, and cell death. These effects were observed in a nanoparticle size-dependent and concentration-dependent manner.Conclusion: The [NO]/[ONOO-] imbalance induced by amorphous silica nanoparticles indicates a potentially deleterious effect of silica nanoparticles on vascular endothelium.Keywords: amorphous silica nanoparticles, nanotoxicology, nitric oxide, peroxynitrite, inflammation, risk factors

  16. Dispersion of "guava-like" silica/polyacrylate nanocomposite particles in polyacrylate matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A series of "guava-like" silica/polyacrylate nanocomposite particles with close silica content and different grafting degrees were prepared via mini-emulsion polymerization using 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TSPM) modified silica/acrylate dispersion.The silica/polyacrylate composite particles were melt-mixed with unfilled polyacrylate (PA) resin to prepare corresponding silica/polyacrylate molded composites and the dispersion mechanism of these silica particles from the "guava-like" composite particles into polyacrylate matrix was studied.It was calculated that about 110 silica particles were accumulated in the bulk of every silica/polyacrylate composite latex particle.Both the solubility tests of silica/polyacrylate composite latex particles in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and the section transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs of silica/polyacrylate molded composites indicated that the grafting degree of silica particles played a crucial role in the dispersion of silica/polyacrylate composite particles into the polyacrylate matrix.When the grafting degree of polyacrylate onto silica was in a moderate range (ca.20%-70%),almost all of silica particles in these "guava-like" composite particles were dispersed into the polyacrylate matrix in a primary-particle-level.However,at a lower grafting degree,massive silica aggregations were found in molded composites because of the lack of steric protection.At a greater grafting degree (i.e.,200%),a cross-linked network was formed in the silica/polyacrylate composite particles,which prevented the dispersion of composite particles in THF and polyacrylate matrix as primary particles.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of amorphous mesoporous silica using TEMPO-functionalized amphiphilic templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Wilke; Doerenkamp, Carsten; Zeng, Zhaoyang; de Oliveira, Marcos; Niehaus, Oliver; Pöttgen, Rainer; Studer, Armido; Eckert, Hellmut

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on amorphous mesoporous silica containing organized nitroxide radicals within its mesopores have been prepared using the micellar self-assembly of TEOS solutions containing the nitroxide functionalized amphiphile (4-(N,N-dimethyl-N-hexadecylammonium)-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-N-oxyl-iodide) (CAT-16). This template has been used both in its pure form and in various mixtures with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The samples have been characterized by chemical analysis, N2 sorption studies, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and various spectroscopic methods. While electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra indicate that the strength of the intermolecular spin-spin interactions can be controlled via the CAT-16/CTAB ratio, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data suggest that these interactions are too weak to facilitate cooperative magnetism.

  18. Application of Hectorite-Coated Silica Gel Particles as a Packing Material for Chromatographic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomohiko; Kumasaki, Aisaku; Shimizu, Kei; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Sato, Hisako

    2016-08-01

    A new type of clay column particles was prepared, in which a hectorite layer (∼0.1 µm thickness) covered uniformly the surface of amorphous silica particles with an average radius of 5 µm (ref. Okada et al., The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 116, 21864-21869 (2012)). The hectorite layer was fully ion-exchanged with Δ-[Ru(phen)3](2+) (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) ions by being immersed in a methanol solution of Δ-[Ru(phen)3](ClO4)2 (1 mM). The modified silica gel particles thus prepared were packed into a stainless steel tube (4 mm (i.d.) × 25 cm) as a high-performance liquid chromatography column. Optical resolution was achieved when the racemic mixtures of several metal complexes or organic molecules were eluted with methanol. In the case of tris(acetylacetonato)ruthenium(III) ([Ru(acac)3]), for example, the Λ- and Δ-enantiomers gave an elution volume of 2.6 and 3.0 mL, respectively, with the separation factor of 1.2. The total elution volume (5 mL) was nearly one-tenth for the previously reported column of the same size (RU-1 (Shiseido Co., Ltd.)) packed with the spray-dried particles of synthetic hectorite (average radius 5 µm) ion-exchanged by the same Ru(II) complexes. PMID:27130880

  19. MeV ion beam deformation of colloidal silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spherical sub-micrometer-sized silica particles were prepared by the Stoeber process, from a reaction mixture containing tetraethoxysilane, ammonia and ethanol, and deposited into silicon wafers. The samples were then irradiated at room temperature with 4 MeV Si, Ti, Pt or Au ions at a fluence of 4 x 1015 ions/cm2, under an angle of 49o with respect to the sample surface. The size, size distribution and shape of the silica particles were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After the irradiation the spherical silica particles can be turned into ellipsoidal particles, as a result of the increase of the particle dimension perpendicular to the ion beam and a decrease in the direction parallel to the ion beam. This effect increases with the ion fluence and depends on the electronic stopping power of the impinging ion. For the series of 4 MeV ions we used in this work a relative transverse diameter change of 17% per 1 keV/nm was obtained and it seems that no threshold for the electronic energy loss exists

  20. Size control of monodisperse nonporous silica particles by seed particle growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beibei Zhao; Caihua Tian; Yan Zhang; Tao Tang; Fengyun Wang

    2011-01-01

    Monodisperse nonporous silica particles were prepared by sol-precipitation via seed particle growth method, and the particle size, which varied from 1.0 to 4.7 μm, was strictly controlled in our experiment.The formation of secondary particles, which resulted in a multimodal distribution of particle size, was suppressed by changing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) concentration and reaction temperature. Furthermore,the effect of adding small amounts of electrolyte to the hydrolysis mixture was examined.

  1. Amorphization of complex ceramics by heavy-particle irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complex ceramics, for the purpose of this paper, include materials that are generally strongly bonded (mixed ionic and covalent), refractory and frequently good insulators. They are distinguished from simple, compact ceramics (e.g., MgO and UO2) by structural features which include: (1) open network structures, best characterized by a consideration of the shape, size and connectivity of coordination polyhedra; (2) complex compositions which characteristically lead to multiple cation sites and lower symmetry; (3) directional bonding; (4) bond-type variations within the structure. The heavy particle irradiations include ion-beam irradiations and recoil-nucleus damage resulting from a-decay events from constituent actinides. The latter effects are responsible for the radiation-induced transformation to the metamict state in minerals. The responses of these materials to irradiation are complex, as energy may be dissipated ballistically by transfer of kinetic energy from an incident projectile or radiolytically by conversion of radiation-induced electronic excitations into atomic motion. This results in isolated Frenkel defect pairs, defect aggregates, isolated collision cascades or bulk amorphization. Thus, the amorphization process is heterogeneous. Only recently have there been systematic studies of heavy particle irradiations of complex ceramics on a wide variety of structure-types and compositions as a function of dose and temperature. In this paper, we review the conditions for amorphization for the tetragonal orthosilicate, zircon [ZrSiO4]; the hexagonal orthosilicate/phosphate apatite structure-type [X10(ZO4)6(F,Cl,O)2]; the isometric pyrochlores [A1-2B2O6(O,OH,F)0-1pH2O] and its monoclinic derivative zirconotite [CaZrTi2O7]; the olivine (derivative - hcp) structure types, α-VIA2IVBO4, and spinel (ccp), γ-VIA2IVBO4

  2. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by α-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  3. Nucleation of polystyrene latex particles in the presence of gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane: functionalized silica particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie; Insulaire, Mickaelle; Reculusa, Stéphane; Perro, Adeline; Ravaine, Serge; Duguet, Etienne

    2006-02-01

    Silica/polystyrene nanocomposite particles with different morphologies were synthesized through emulsion polymerization of styrene in the presence of silica particles previously modified by gamma-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). Grafting of the silane molecule was performed by direct addition of MPS to the aqueous silica suspension in the presence of an anionic surfactant under basic conditions. The MPS grafting density on the silica surface was determined using the depletion method and plotted against the initial MPS concentration. The influence of the MPS grafting density, the silica particles size and concentration and the nature of the surfactant on the polymerization kinetics and the particles morphology was investigated. When the polymerization was performed in the presence of an anionic surfactant, transmission electron microscopy images showed the formation of polymer spheres around silica for MPS grafting densities lower than typically 1 micromole x m(-2) while the conversion versus time curves indicated a strong acceleration effect under such conditions. In contrast, polymerizations performed in the presence of a larger amount of MPS moieties or in the presence of a non ionic emulsifier resulted in the formation of "excentered" core-shell morphologies and lower polymerization rates. The paper identifies the parameters that allow to control particles morphology and polymerization kinetics and describes the mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite colloids. PMID:16573042

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of amorphous silica gel adsorbed on gold substrates for optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degioanni, S.; Jurdyc, A. M.; Cheap, A.; Champagnon, B.; Bessueille, F.; Coulm, J.; Bois, L.; Vouagner, D.

    2015-10-01

    Two kinds of gold substrates are used to produce surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of amorphous silica obtained via the sol-gel route using tetraethoxysilane Si(OC2H5)4 (TEOS) solution. The first substrate consists of a gold nanometric film elaborated on a glass slide by sputter deposition, controlling the desired gold thickness and sputtering current intensity. The second substrate consists of an array of micrometer-sized gold inverted pyramidal pits able to confine surface plasmon (SP) enhancing electric field, which results in a distribution of electromagnetic energy inside the cavities. These substrates are optically characterized to observe SPR with, respectively, extinction and reflectance spectrometries. Once coated with thin layers of amorphous silica (SiO2) gel, these samples show Raman amplification of amorphous SiO2 bands. This enhancement can occur in SERS sensors using amorphous SiO2 gel as shells, spacers, protective coatings, or waveguides, and represents particularly a potential interest in the field of Raman distributed sensors, which use the amorphous SiO2 core of optical fibers as a transducer to make temperature measurements.

  5. Timescales and mechanisms of formation of amorphous silica coatings on fresh basalts at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai’i

    OpenAIRE

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Rossman, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Young basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, frequently feature opaque surface coatings, 1–80 μm thick, composed of amorphous silica and Fe-Ti oxides. These coatings are the product of interaction of the basaltic surface with volcanically-derived acidic fluids. Previous workers have identified these coatings in a variety of contexts on Hawai'i, but the timescales of coating development, coating growth rates, and factors controlling lateral coating heterogeneity were largely unconstrained. We ...

  6. Electrodeposition of zinc–silica composite coatings: challenges in incorporating functionalized silica particles into a zinc matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabrisur Rahman Khan, Andreas Erbe, Michael Auinger, Frank Marlow and Michael Rohwerder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is a well-known sacrificial coating material for iron and co-deposition of suitable particles is of interest for further improving its corrosion protection performance. However, incorporation of particles that are well dispersible in aqueous electrolytes, such as silica particles, is extremely difficult. Here, we report a detailed study of Zn–SiO2 nanocomposite coatings deposited from a zinc sulfate solution at pH 3. The effect of functionalization of the silica particles on the electro-codeposition was investigated. The best incorporation was achieved for particles modified with SiO2–SH, dithiooxamide or cysteamine; these particles have functional groups that can strongly interact with zinc and therefore incorporate well into the metal matrix. Other modifications (SiO2–NH3+, SiO2–Cl and N,N-dimethyldodecylamine of the silica particles lead to adsorption and entrapment only.

  7. Tuning the properties of Ge-quantum dots superlattices in amorphous silica matrix through deposition conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, S. [University of Minho, Portugal; Roldan Gutierrez, Manuel A [ORNL; Ramos, M. M.D. [University of Minho, Portugal; Gomes, M.J.M. [University of Minho, Portugal; Molina, S. I. [Universidad de Cadiz, Spain; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Buljan, M. [R. Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia; Barradas, N. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), Lisbon, Portugal; Alves, E. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), Lisbon, Portugal; Chahboun, A. [FST Tanger, Morocco; Bernstorff, S. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza, Italy

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the structural properties of Ge quantum dot lattices in amorphous silica matrix, prepared by low-temperature magnetron sputtering deposition of (Ge+SiO{sub 2})/SiO{sub 2} multilayers. The dependence of quantum dot shape, size, separation, and arrangement type on the Ge-rich (Ge + SiO{sub 2}) layer thickness is studied. We show that the quantum dots are elongated along the growth direction, perpendicular to the multilayer surface. The size of the quantum dots and their separation along the growth direction can be tuned by changing the Ge-rich layer thickness. The average value of the quantum dots size along the lateral (in-plane) direction along with their lateral separation is not affected by the thickness of the Ge-rich layer. However, the thickness of the Ge-rich layer significantly affects the quantum dot ordering. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the multilayer average atomic composition and also the quantum dot crystalline quality on the deposition parameters.

  8. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals. PMID:25603034

  9. Discovery of homogeneously dispersed pentacoordinated Al(V) species on the surface of amorphous silica-alumina

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zichun; Yi, Xianfeng; Zhou, Cuifeng; Rawal, Aditya; Hook, James; Liu, Zongwen; Deng, Feng; Zheng, Anmin; Baiker, Alfons; Huang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion and coordination of aluminium species on the surface of silica-alumina based materials are essential for controlling their catalytic activity and selectivity. Al(IV) and Al(VI) are two common coordinations of Al species in the silica network and alumina phase, respectively. Al(V) is rare in nature and was found hitherto only in the alumina phase or interfaces containing alumina, a behavior which negatively affects the dispersion, population, and accessibility of Al(V) species on the silica-alumina surface. This constraint has limited the development of silica-alumina based catalysts, particularly because Al(V) had been confirmed to act as a highly active center for acid reactions and single-atom catalysts. Here, we report the direct observation of high population of homogenously dispersed Al(V) species in amorphous silica-alumina in the absence of any bulk alumina phase, by high resolution TEM/EDX and high magnetic-field MAS NMR. Solid-state 27Al multi-quantum MAS NMR experiments prove unambigu...

  10. Enhancement of ovalbumin-specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 immune responses by amorphous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Tsuguto; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-09-01

    Nanomaterials present in cosmetics and food additives are used for industrial applications. However, their safety profile is unclear. Amorphous silica nanoparticles (nSPs) are a widely used nanomaterial and have been shown to induce inflammatory cytokines following intratracheal administration in mice. The current study investigated the adjuvant effect of nSP30 (nSP with a diameter of 33 nm) on T helper (Th)1, Th2, and Th17 immune responses as well as immunoglobulin (Ig) levels in mice. BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally administered ovalbumin (OVA) with or without varying doses and varying sizes of nSPs. The adjuvant effect of nSPs was investigated by measuring OVA-specific IgG antibodies in sera, OVA-specific proliferative responses of splenocytes, and the production of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines. Aluminum hydroxide was used as a positive adjuvant control. Anti-OVA IgG production, splenocyte proliferative responses, and secretion of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17 were increased significantly in mice receiving a combined injection of nSP30 (30 or 300 µg) with OVA compared with OVA alone or a combined injection with nSP30 (3 µg). The responses were nSP30 dose-dependent. When different sized nSPs were used (with 30, 100, and 1000 nm diameters), the responses to OVA were enhanced and were size-dependent. The smaller sized nSP particles had a greater adjuvant effect. nSPs appear to exert a size-dependent adjuvant effect for Th1, Th2, and Th17 immune responses. Understanding the mechanisms of nSP adjuvanticity might lead to the development of novel vaccine adjuvants and therapies for allergic diseases caused by environmental factors. PMID:27343242

  11. Synthesis and characterization of aluminum particles coated with uniform silica shell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Zhi-peng; YANG Yi; LI Feng-sheng; PAN Zhen-hua

    2008-01-01

    The silica coated aluminum composite particles were prepared by hydrolysis-condensation polymerization of tetraethylorthosilicate(TEOS) on the surface of aluminum particle. The structure, morphology, and properties of the silica coated aluminum were studied. The peaks of Si-O-Si are presented in the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrum of the composite particles. The thickness of the silica shell is about 80 nm according to the results of transmission electron microscopy(TEM) and laser particle size analysis, while the mean diameter of the aluminum particle is 7.13 μm. The mass fraction of silica in the sample was determined by fluorescent X-ray spectrometry(XRF). Result of the thermogravimetric analysis(TGA) indicates that thermal stability of silica coated aluminum particles is better than that of pure aluminum particles at low temperature while more reactive at high temperature.

  12. Advanced treatment of swine wastewater using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Teruaki; Sugimoto, Kiyomi; Miura, Keiichi; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Minowa, Nobutaka; Toda, Masaya; Kinoshita, Katsumi; Yamashita, Takahiro; Ogino, Akifumi

    2014-01-01

    Advanced treatment using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime (M-CSH-lime) was developed and applied to swine wastewater treatment. Biologically treated wastewater and M-CSH-lime (approximately 6 w/v% slurry) were fed continuously into a column-shaped reactor from its bottom. Accumulated M-CSH-lime gradually formed a bed layer. The influent permeated this layer and contacted the M-CSH-lime, and the treatment reaction progressed. Treated liquid overflowing from the top of the reactor was neutralized with CO₂gas bubbling. The colour removal rate approximately exceeded 50% with M-CSH-lime addition rates of > 0.15 w/v%. The removal rate of PO(3⁻)(4) exceeded 80% with the addition of>0.03 w/v% of M-CSH-lime. The removal rates of coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli exceeded 99.9% with > 0.1 w/v%. Accumulated M-CSH-lime in the reactor was periodically withdrawn from the upper part of the bed layer. The content of citric-acid-soluble P₂O₅ in the recovered matter was>15% when the weight ratio of influent PO(3⁻)(4) -P to added M-CSH-lime was > 0.15. This content was comparable with commercial phosphorus fertilizer. The inhibitory effect of recovered M-CSH-lime on germination and growth of leafy vegetable komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. perviridis) was evaluated by an experiment using the Neubauer's pot. The recovered M-CSH-lime had no negative effect on germination and growth. These results suggest that advanced water treatment with M-CSH-lime was effective for simultaneous removal of colour, [Formula: see text] and coliform bacteria at an addition rate of 0.03-0.15 w/v%, and that the recovered M-CSH-lime would be suitable as phosphorus fertilizer. PMID:25189846

  13. Estimated storage of amorphous silica in soils of the circum-Arctic tundra region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, H.; Clymans, W.; Hugelius, G.; Kuhry, P.; Conley, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the vertical distribution, storage, landscape partitioning, and spatial variability of soil amorphous silica (ASi) at four different sites underlain by continuous permafrost and representative of mountainous and lowland tundra, in the circum-Arctic region. Based on a larger set of data, we present the first estimate of the ASi soil reservoir (0-1 m depth) in circum-Arctic tundra terrain. At all sites, the vertical distribution of ASi concentrations followed the pattern of either (1) declining concentrations with depth (most common) or (2) increasing/maximum concentrations with depth. Our results suggest that a set of processes, including biological control, solifluction and other slope processes, cryoturbation, and formation of inorganic precipitates influence vertical distributions of ASi in permafrost terrain, with the capacity to retain stored ASi on millennial timescales. At the four study sites, areal ASi storage (0-1 m) is generally higher in graminoid tundra compared to wetlands. Our circum-Arctic upscaling estimates, based on both vegetation and soil classification separately, suggest a storage amounting to 219 ± 28 and 274 ± 33 Tmol Si, respectively, of which at least 30% is stored in permafrost. This estimate would account for about 3% of the global soil ASi storage while occupying an equal portion of the global land area. This result does not support the hypothesis that the circum-Arctic tundra soil ASi reservoir contains relatively higher amounts of ASi than other biomes globally as demonstrated for carbon. Nevertheless, climate warming has the potential to significantly alter ASi storage and terrestrial Si cycling in the Arctic.

  14. Incorporation of Mesoporous Silica Particles in Gelatine Gels: Effect of Particle Type and Surface Modification on Physical Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Esteve, E.; Oliver, L.; Garcia, L.; Nieuwland, M.; Jongh, de H.H.J.; Martinez-Manez, R.; Barat, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the impact of mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) on the physicochemical properties of filled protein gels. We have studied the effect of the addition of different mesoporous silica particles, either bare or functionalized with amines or carboxylates, on the ph

  15. Oligo-lysine Induced Formation of Silica Particles in Neutral Silicate Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Oligo-(lysine)n (n = 1-4) containing different numbers of lysine residues was used to induce the condensation of silicic acid to form silica particles in neutral silicate solution. It was found that the condensation rate and the formation of silica particles are dependent on the number of lysine residues in an oligo-lysine. Oligo-lysine with more lysine residues can link more silicic acid together to form a matrix that promotes the effective aggregation of the condensed silica pieces to form large silica particles.

  16. Synthesis and new structure shaping mechanism of silica particles formed at high pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the sol–gel synthesis of silica particles under high pH catalytic conditions (pH>12) in water/ethanol solvent, we have deduced that the competing dynamics of chemical etching and sol–gel process can explain the types of silica particles formed and their morphologies. We have demonstrated that emulsion droplets that are generated by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a water–ethanol solution serve as soft templates for hollow spherical silica (1–2 μm). And if the emulsion is converted by the sol–gel process, one finds that suspended solid silica spheres of diameter of ∼900 nm are formed. Moreover, several other factors are found to play fundamental roles in determining the final morphologies of silica particles, such as by variation of the pH (in our case, using OH–) to a level where condensation dominates; by changing the volume ratios of water/ethanol; and using an emulsifier (specifically, CTAB) - Graphical abstract: “Local chemical etching” and sol–gel process have been proposed to interpret the control of morphologies of silica particles through varying initial pHs in syntheses. Highlights: ► Different initial pHs in our syntheses provides morphological control of silica particles. ► “Local chemical etching” and sol–gel process describes the formation of silica spheres. ► The formation of emulsions generates hollow silica particles.

  17. Loading amorphous Asarone in mesoporous silica SBA-15 through supercritical carbon dioxide technology to enhance dissolution and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzan; Quan, Guilan; Wu, Qiaoli; Zhou, Chan; Li, Feng; Bai, Xuequn; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to load amorphous hydrophobic drug into ordered mesoporous silica (SBA-15) by supercritical carbon dioxide technology in order to improve the dissolution and bioavailability of the drug. Asarone was selected as a model drug due to its lipophilic character and poor bioavailability. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of the obtained Asarone-SBA-15 were significantly improved as compared to the micronized crystalline drug. This study offers an effective, safe, and environmentally benign means of solving the problems relating to the solubility and bioavailability of hydrophobic molecules. PMID:25720818

  18. Genotoxicity of synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles in rats following short-term exposure. Part 1: Oral route

    OpenAIRE

    Tarantini, Adeline; Huet, Sylvie; Jarry, Gérard; Martine, Poul; Tavares, Ana; Vital, Nádia; Louro, Henriqueta; Silva, Maria João; Fessard, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) in its nanosized form is now used in food applications although the potential risks for human health have not been evaluated. In this study, genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage of two pyrogenic (NM-202 and 203) and two precipitated (NM-200 and -201) nanosized SAS were investigated in vivo in rats following oral exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg b.w./day for three days by gavage. DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damag...

  19. Forces between silica particles in the presence of multivalent cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmacco, Valentina; Elzbieciak-Wodka, Magdalena; Herman, David; Trefalt, Gregor; Maroni, Plinio; Borkovec, Michal

    2016-06-15

    Forces between negatively charged silica particles in aqueous electrolyte solutions were measured with the colloidal probe technique based on the atomic force microscope (AFM). The present study focuses on the comparison of monovalent and multivalent counterions, namely K(+), Mg(2+), and La(3+). The force profiles can be well described with the theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) down to distances of about 4nm. At smaller distances, the forces become strongly repulsive due to additional non-DLVO repulsion. In the presence of La(3+), one observes an additional attractive force with a range of about 1nm at intermediate salt concentrations. This force is probably related to ion-ion correlations, but could also be influenced by surface charge heterogeneities or charge fluctuation forces. PMID:27016916

  20. Study of Pickering emulsions stabilized by mixed particles of silica and calcite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sha Wang; Yongjun He; Yong Zou

    2010-01-01

    Picketing emulsions were prepared using mixed particles of silica and calcite as emulsifiers.The effects of the silica content in the mixed particles on the stability and the drop size of the Pickering emulsions were investigated.The results showed that the Pickering emulsions were of the oil-in-water type.With increasing silica content in the mixed particles,the stability and the drop size of the Pickering emulsions decreased.Larger silica particles had more influence on the stability of the emulsions,while smaller ones had more influence on the drop size of the emulsions.The effect of the silica particles on the emulsions was attributed to their adsorptive behavior at the oil-water interfaces of the Pickering emulsions.

  1. Solvent-mediated amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of nitrendipine in amorphous particle suspensions containing polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Dengning; Wu, Jian-Xiong; Cui, Fude;

    2012-01-01

    The amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of nitrendipine was investigated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The nucleation and growth rate of crystalline nitrendipine in a medium containing poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and polyethylene glycol (PEG 200) were quantitati...

  2. Laser Photochemical Etching of Silica: Nanodomains of Crystalline Chaoite and Silica in Amorphous C/Si/O/N Phase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Josef; Ouchi, A.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Maryško, Miroslav; Šubrt, Jan; Bastl, Zdeněk

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 34 (2008), s. 13281-13286. ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720619 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504; CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : laser deposition * silica etching * nanocomposite Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.396, year: 2008

  3. Nanoscale control of silica particle formation via silk-silica fusion proteins for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszawska, Aneta J; Nadkarni, Lauren D; Perry, Carole C; Kaplan, David L

    2010-10-26

    The biomimetic design of silk/silica fusion proteins was carried out, combining the self assembling domains of spider dragline silk (Nephila clavipes) and silaffin derived R5 peptide of Cylindrotheca fusiformis that is responsible for silica mineralization. Genetic engineering was used to generate the protein-based biomaterials incorporating the physical properties of both components. With genetic control over the nanodomain sizes and chemistry, as well as modification of synthetic conditions for silica formation, controlled mineralized silk films with different silica morphologies and distributions were successfully generated; generating 3D porous networks, clustered silica nanoparticles (SNPs), or single SNPs. Silk serves as the organic scaffolding to control the material stability and multiprocessing makes silk/silica biomaterials suitable for different tissue regenerative applications. The influence of these new silk-silica composite systems on osteogenesis was evaluated with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) subjected to osteogenic differentiation. hMSCs adhered, proliferated, and differentiated towards osteogenic lineages on the silk/silica films. The presence of the silica in the silk films influenced osteogenic gene expression, with the upregulation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and collagen type 1 (Col 1) markers. Evidence for early bone formation as calcium deposits was observed on silk films with silica. These results indicate the potential utility of these new silk/silica systems towards bone regeneration. PMID:20976116

  4. Chrysotile asbestos detoxification with a combined treatment of oxalic acid and silicates producing amorphous silica and biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valouma, Aikaterini; Verganelaki, Anastasia; Maravelaki-Kalaitzaki, Pagona; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2016-03-15

    This study was primarily imposed by the ever increasing need for detoxification of asbestos and asbestos containing materials (ACM), with potential application onsite. The present work investigates potential detoxification of pure chrysotile (Chr) asbestos via a combined treatment of oxalic acid dihydrate (Oxac) (Η2C2Ο4·2Η2Ο) with silicates, such as tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) (SiH20C8O4) and pure water glass (WG) (potassium silicate) (K2SiO3). These reagents used in the experimental procedure, do not cause adverse effects on the environment and are cost effective. The results of FTIR, XRD, optical and scanning microscopy coupled with EDS analyses indicated that all of the applied treatments destructed the Chr structure and yielded silica of amorphous phase and the biomaterial glushinskite from the Oxac reacted with brucite [Mg(OH)2] layer. Each of the proposed formulations can be applied for the detoxification of asbestos, according to priorities related to the specific products of the recovery treatment. Therefore, Oxac acid leaching followed by the TEOS addition is preferred in cases of glushinskite recovery; TEOS treatment of asbestos with subsequent Oxac addition produced amorphous silica production; finally Oxac acid leaching followed by WG encapsulated the asbestos fibers and can be used in cases of onsite asbestos and ACM detoxification. PMID:26685063

  5. Inhibition of surface crystallisation of amorphous indomethacin particles in physical drug-polymer mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priemel, Petra A; Laitinen, Riikka; Barthold, Sarah;

    2013-01-01

    Surface coverage may affect the crystallisation behaviour of amorphous materials. This study investigates crystallisation inhibition in powder mixtures of amorphous drug and pharmaceutical excipients. Pure amorphous indomethacin (IMC) powder and physical mixtures thereof with Eudragit(®) E or...... Soluplus(®) in 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 (w/w) ratios were stored at 30°C and 23 or 42% RH. Samples were analysed during storage by X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). IMC Eudragit(®) mixtures showed higher physical...... stability than pure IMC whereas IMC Soluplus(®) mixtures did not. Water uptake was higher for mixtures containing Soluplus(®) than for amorphous IMC or IMC Eudragit(®) mixtures. However, the Tg of amorphous IMC was unaffected by the presence (and nature) of polymer. SEM revealed that Eudragit(®) particles...

  6. Aluminium based composites strengthened with metallic amorphous phase or ceramic (Al2O3) particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Al-based composites with amorphous Al strengthening phase were obtained. • A better adhesion of metallic amorphous particles than of ceramic phase. • Avoiding crystallization of amorphous phase during a composite pressing process. • Properties similar for 10% metallic amorphous and ceramic strengthening phases. • Better amorphization in case of melt spinning than gas atomization of the Al alloy. - Abstract: Two methods were used to obtain amorphous aluminium alloy powder: gas atomization and melt spinning. The sprayed powder contained only a small amount of the amorphous phase and therefore bulk composites were prepared by hot pressing of aluminium powder with the 10% addition of ball milled melt spun ribbons of the Al84Ni6V5Zr5 alloy (numbers indicate at.%). The properties were compared with those of a composite containing a 10% addition of Al2O3 ceramic particles. Additionally, a composite based on 2618A Al alloy was prepared with the addition of the Al84Ni6V5Zr5 powder from the ribbons used as the strengthening phase. X-ray studies confirmed the presence of the amorphous phase with a small amount of aluminium solid solution in the melt spun ribbons. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) studies showed the start of the crystallization process of the amorphous ribbons at 437 °C. The composite samples were obtained in the process of uniaxial hot pressing in a vacuum at 380 °C, below the crystallization temperature of the amorphous phase. A uniform distribution of both metallic and ceramic strengthening phases was observed in the composites. The hardness of all the prepared composites was comparable and amounted to approximately 50 HV for those with the Al matrix and 120 HV for the ones with the 2618A alloy matrix. The composites showed a higher yield stress than the hot pressed aluminium or 2618A alloy. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) studies after compression tests revealed that the propagation of cracks in the composites

  7. Tailoring of thermomechanical properties of thermoplastic nanocomposites by surface modification of nanoscale silica particles

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Carsten; Krug, Herbert; Schmidt, Helmut K.

    1996-01-01

    Thermoplastic nanocomposites based on linear polymethacrylates as matrix materials and spherical silica particles as fillers have been synthesized using the in situ free radical polymerization technqiue of methacrylate monomers in presence of specially functionalized SiO2 nanoparticulate fillers. Uncoated monodisperse silica particles with particle sizes 100 nm and 10 nm were used as reference fillers. For surface modification, the alcoholic dispersions of the fillers were treated with approp...

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of Polyvinylpyrrolidone Silica Core-Shell Nanocomposite Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lian-Xi; Li, Jie; Li, Xi; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Jiao, Cai-Bin

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a novel and facile strategy for making a new type of polymer/silica nanocomposte particle was proposed. Colloidally stable polyvinypyrrolidone (PVP)/silica core-shell nanocomposite particles have been successfully synthesized using an azo initiator via seed polymerization of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and VFSs (VFSs) that were derived from vinyl triethoxysilane (VTES). It was suggested from the FTIR and TGA analysis that the copolymerization reaction of NVP with VFSs has been thoroughly carried out. In addition, SEM images showed that PVP/silica nanocomposite particles have relatively rough surface due to surface polymerization in comparison with VFSs. Furthermore, TEM results proved that the size of VFSs had considerable effects on the appearance of PVP/silica nanocomposite particles. Generally, it presented that several silica nanoparticle cores with an average size of 78 nm mainly pack together within each nanocomposite particle after seed polymerization. Interestingly, the average shell thickness was 59 nm for most PVP/silica nanocomposite particles with cores about 242 nm. However, when the core size was large enough to about 504 nm, a series of PVP/silica nanocomposite particles with a relative thin shell were observed. PMID:26413650

  9. Superparamagnetic amorphous Fe1-xCx alloy particles in a ferrofluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ferrofluid with ultrasmall magnetic particles (d=3.3 nm) of amorphous Fe1-xCx has been studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy and electron microscopy. The values of the particle size estimated by the two methods are in good agreement. The magnetic anisotropy energy constant, K=(1.0±0.3)x105 J m-3 has been estimated. (orig.)

  10. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M.; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15 mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1 day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5 mg/kg) treatment at 28 days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3 days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  11. Role of disorder in incorporation energies of oxygen atoms in amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the role of static disorder on defect energetics on examples of interstitial oxygen atoms in amorphous (a)-SiO2. We generate representative amorphous structures using molecular dynamics with empirical potentials and refine them using the periodic plane-wave density-functional method (DFT). We calculate the DFT distribution of incorporation energies for 96 peroxy-linkage (PL) configurations in a periodic model of a-SiO2. The calculations show a big site-to-site variation of incorporation energies. We partition the oxygen atom incorporation energy into contributions from a small local cluster around the defect and from the rest of the amorphous network. The striking result is that the incorporation of a defect can create as well as release the strain energy in the embedding network. The variation of the PL incorporation energy is dominated by the contribution from the surrounding amorphous network, with the distortion of the local geometry of the defect contributing only about one third of the total variation. The two contributions are statistically independent. Our results provide an analysis of the distribution of defect incorporation energies in a-SiO2 and emphasize the importance of disorder and statistical approaches, which cannot be achieved in crystalline and cluster models of amorphous structure. Additionally, since the defect energies can be so strongly dependent on the longer-range strain fields, amorphous samples prepared differently and hence having different distributions of strain may perform differently in applications

  12. Magnetic nanocomposites of periodic mesoporous silica: The influence of the silica substrate dimensionality on the inter-particle magnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Hematite particles inside porous silica with 2D hexagonal and 3D cubic symmetry. • Magnetic properties are strongly affected by the dimensionality of porous matrix. • Weak dipolar interactions observed in superparamagnetic hexagonal α-Fe2O3@SBA-15. • Strong interactions leading to superspin-glass observed in cubic α-Fe2O3@SBA-16. -- Abstract: Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (hematite, α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles loaded into the pores of the periodically ordered mesoporous silica with hexagonal (SBA-15) or cubic (SBA-16) symmetry were investigated. The characterization of the samples was carried out by N2 adsorption/desorption, Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), High-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) and HRTEM measurements. The magnetic properties of the prepared nanocomposites were investigated by the SQUID magnetometry. It was shown, that in spite of its non-magnetic nature the silica matrix significantly influences the magnetism of the samples. The magnetic properties are strongly affected by the strength of inter-particle interactions and dimensionality of the porous matrix. Weak dipolar interactions between superparamagnetic (SPM) hematite nanoparticles were observed in the nanocomposite with hexagonally ordered silica channels (α-Fe2O3@SBA-15), while the strong interactions between hematite nanoparticles, suggesting the superspin glass behavior (SSG), were observed in the nanocomposite with silica matrix of cubic symmetry (α-Fe2O3@SBA-16)

  13. Protective effect of mesoporous silica particles on encapsulated folates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rico, María; Daubenschüz, Hanna; Pérez-Esteve, Édgar; Marcos, María D; Amorós, Pedro; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón; Barat, José M

    2016-08-01

    Mesoporous silica particles (MSPs) are considered suitable supports to design gated materials for the encapsulation of bioactive molecules. Folates are essential micronutrients which are sensitive to external agents that provoke nutritional deficiencies. Folates encapsulation in MSPs to prevent degradation and to allow their controlled delivery is a promising strategy. Nevertheless, no information exists about the protective effect of MSPs encapsulation to prevent their degradation. In this work, 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (FO) and folic acid (FA) were entrapped in MSPs functionalized with polyamines, which acted as pH-dependent molecular gates. The stability of free and entrapped vitamins after acidic pH, high temperature and light exposure was studied. The results showed the degradation of FO after high temperature and acidic pH, whereas entrapped FO displayed enhanced stability. Free FA was degraded by light, but MSPs stabilized the vitamin. The obtained results point toward the potential use of MSPs as candidates to enhance stability and to improve the bioavailability of functional biomolecules. PMID:27235728

  14. Vegetation and proximity to the river control amorphous silica storage in a riparian wetland (Biebrza National Park, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Struyf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands can modify and control nutrient fluxes between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, yet little is known of their potential as biological buffers and sinks in the biogeochemical silica cycle. We investigated the storage of amorphous silica (ASi in a central-European riparian wetland. The variation in storage of ASi in the soil of an undisturbed wetland was significantly controlled by two factors: dominance of sedges and grasses and distance to the river (combined R2=78%. Highest ASi storage was found near the river and in sites with a dominance of grasses and sedges, plants which are well known to accumulate ASi. The management practice of mowing reduced the amount of variation attributed to both factors (R2=51%. Although ASi concentrations in soils were low (between 0.1 and 1% of soil dry weight, ASi controlled the availability of dissolved silica (DSi in the porewater, and thus potentially the exchange of DSi with the nearby river system through both diffusive and advective fluxes. A depth gradient in ASi concentrations, with lower ASi in the deeper layers, indicates dissolution. Our results show that storage and recycling of ASi in wetland ecosystems can differ significantly on small spatial scales. Human management interferes with the natural control mechanisms. Our study demonstrates that wetlands have the potential to modify the fluxes of both DSi and ASi along the land-ocean continuum and supports the hypothesis that wetlands are important ecosystems in the biogeochemical cycling of silica.

  15. Core-shell-structured silica/polyacrylate particles prepared by Pickering emulsion: influence of the nucleation model on particle interfacial organization and emulsion stability

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Jing; Shu, Shi; Wang, Feng; Li, Zhilin; Liu, Jingjun; Song, Ye; Jia, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a new evidence of the versatility of silica sol as a stabilizer for Pickering emulsions. The organization of silica particles at the oil-water interface is a function of the nucleation model. The present results show that nucleation model, together with monomer hydrophobicity, can be used as a trigger to modify the packing density of silica particles at the oil-water interface: Less hydrophobic methylmethacrylate, more wettable with silica particles, favors the formation of ...

  16. Synthesis and optical properties of amorphous C-Si-O particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous C-Si-O particles, prepared by pyrolyzing PDMS in a horizontal furnace using the carrier gas N2/H2 at 900 oC, were characterized by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. The particles possess four luminescence peaks at 440, 465, 533 and 620 nm, and produce stable red, green or blue light emissions at room temperature when irradiated with appropriate wavelengths, the four peaks attribute to different defect centers in the particles. And the particles exhibit the highest photoluminescence intensity when annealed at 600 oC. - graphical abstract: The figures are the fluorescence microscopy images of the amorphous C-Si-O particles, which show that the particles produce stable red, green or blue light emissions at room temperature when irradiated with appropriate wavelengths.

  17. Numerical Study of Silica Particle Formation in Turbulent H2/O2 Flame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaanen, A.; Oksanen, A. [Tampere University of Technology, Power Plant and Combustion Technology, Tampere (Finland); Maakelaa, J.M.; Nurminen, M.; Keskinen, J.; Keskinen, H.; Liimatainen, J.K.; Hellsten, S. [Tampere University of Technology, Aerosol Physics, Tampere (Finland); Janka, K.; Maaaattaa, T. [Liekki Oy, Lohja (Finland)

    2005-12-15

    In this paper, silica particle formation in a turbulent flame was studied. Micron sized spray droplets from liquid tetra-ethyl-ortho-silicate were introduced into a turbulent hydrogen-oxygen flame with a patented Liquid Flame Spraying technique. In this technique, the spraying gas is one of the reactant gases, and in this particular study hydrogen was used. In the flame, the liquid precursor evaporates and reacts in gas phase. The chemical product is finally nucleated generating nanosized silica powder. The purpose of the study was to estimate the spatial distribution of the particle formation for improving the in-flame collection of nanoparticles in commercial applications, where subsequent particle agglomeration needs to be avoided. To achieve that, a simple but effective method for approximating the nucleation of silica vapour was utilised. Results show, that within the turbulent diffusion flame, there is a spatial zone of high temperature with under-saturated silica vapour. This high temperature zone is first following by a region where liquid nanoparticles are generated, then a region where solid silica particles are formed. In conventional laminar diffusion flames with lower temperatures, solid silica particles are directly generated from the silica gas. In our case, the liquid nucleation stage may be described with the classical nucleation theory, but the overall model fails to convert all the silica vapour into particulate form. Therefore, in a large scale it is insufficient and needs compensating modelling of full aerosol dynamics, including barrierless nucleation kinetics, condensation, coagulation, coalescence and particle agglomeration. Another approach is to use a simple equilibrium model based on a constant value for critical saturation ratio for particle forming vapour. However, even with this simpler tool, the on-set of particle formation was probed. The model showed that the particle formation begins before the actual flame region, is interrupted

  18. Quantitative characterization of agglomerates and aggregates of pyrogenic and precipitated amorphous silica nanomaterials by transmission electron microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    De Temmerman Pieter-Jan; Van Doren Elke; Verleysen Eveline; Van der Stede Yves; Francisco Michel Abi; Mast Jan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The interaction of a nanomaterial (NM) with a biological system depends not only on the size of its primary particles but also on the size, shape and surface topology of its aggregates and agglomerates. A method based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to visualize the NM and on image analysis, to measure detected features quantitatively, was assessed for its capacity to characterize the aggregates and agglomerates of precipitated and pyrogenic synthetic amorphous ...

  19. Size-selective separation of DNA fragments by using lysine-functionalized silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Guo, Zilong; Huang, Zhenzhen; Zhuang, Jiaqi; Yang, Wensheng

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a facile and efficient approach has been demonstrated for size-selective separation of DNA fragments by using lysine-functionalized silica particles. At a given pH, the environmental ionic strength can be utilized to alter the electrostatic interactions of lysine-functionalized silica particles with DNA fragments and in turn the DNA fragments on the silica particle surfaces, which exhibits a clear dependence on the DNA fragment sizes. By carefully adjusting the environmental pH and salt concentration, therefore, the use of the lysine-functionalized silica particles allows effective separation of binary and ternary DNA mixtures, for example, two different DNA fragments with sizes of 101 and 1073 bp, 101 and 745 bp, 101 and 408 bp, respectively, and three different DNA fragments with sizes of 101, 408 and 1073 bp.

  20. Contribution to the study of the mechanism of crack in amorphous silica: study by the molecular dynamics of crack in amorphous silica; Contribution a l'etude des mecanismes de rupture dans les amorphes: etude par dynamique moleculaire de la rupture de verre de silice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Brutzel, L

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this thesis was to understand the mechanism which occurs during the crack at the atomic scale in amorphous silica. The difficulties of the experimental observations at this length scale lead us to use numerical studies by molecular dynamics to access to the dynamical and the thermodynamical informations. We have carried out large simulations with 500000 atoms and studied the structure of the amorphous silica before to studying their behaviours under an imposed strain. The structure of this simulated amorphous silica settled in three length scales. In small length scale between 0 and 5 angstrom glass is composed of tetrahedra, this is close to the crystalline structure. In intermediate length scale between 3 and 10 angstrom tetrahedra are connected together and build rings of different sizes composed in majority between 5 and 7 tetrahedra. In bigger length scale between 15 and 60 angstrom, areas with high density of rings are surrounded by areas with low density of rings. These structural considerations play an important role in initiation and propagation of a crack. Indeed. in this length scale. crack propagates by growth and coalescence of some small cavities which appear in area with low density of rings behind the crack tip. The cavities dissipate the stress with carries away a delay to propagation of the crack. This phenomenons seems ductile and leads to non linear elastic behaviour near the crack tip. We have also shown that the addition of alkali in the amorphous silica changes the structure by creation of nano-porosities and leads to enhance the ductility during the crack propagation. (author)

  1. Amorphous TM1−xBx alloy particles prepared by chemical reduction (invited)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Mørup, Steen

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous transition-metal boron (TM-B) alloy particles can be prepared by chemical reduction of TM ions by borohydride in aqueous solutions. ln the last few years systematic studies of the parameters which control the composition, and, in turn, many of the properties of the alloy particles, have...... been performed and are reviewed in the present paper. The most important preparation parameters which influence the composition are the concentration of the borohydride solution and the pH of the TM salt solution. By controlling these parameters it is possible to prepare amorphous alloy samples...

  2. Amorphous particle deposition and product quality under different conditions in a spray dryer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Wai Woo; Wan Ramli Wan Daud; Siti Masrinda Tasirin; Meor Zainal Meor Talib

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of amorphous particles, as a prevalent problem particularly in the spray drying of fruit and vegetable juices, is due to low-molecular weight sugars and is strongly dependent on the condition of the particles upon collision with the dryer wall. This paper investigates the condition of the amorphous particles impacting the wall at different drying conditions with the aim of elucidating the deposition mechanism and physical phenomena in the drying chamber. A model sucrose-maltodextrin solution was used to represent the low-molecular-weight sugar. Particle deposits were collected on sampling plates placed inside the dryer for analyses of moisture content, particle rigidity (using SEM) and size distribution. Moisture content was adopted as a general indicator of stickiness. Product particles collected at the bottom of the experimental dryer were found to have higher moisture than particle deposits on samplers inside the dryer. Moisture content profile in the dryer shows that apart from the atomizer region, where particles are relatively wet, particle deposits at other regions exhibit similar lower moisture content. At the highest temperature adopted in the experiments, particles became rubbery suggesting liquid-bridge formation as the dominant deposition mechanism. Further analysis on particles size distribution reveals a particle segregation mechanism whereby smaller particles follow preferentially to the central air stream while larger particles tend to re-circulate in the chamber, as predicted in past CFD simulation. The findings from this work will form the basis and provide validating data for further modeling of wall deposition of amorphous particles in spray drying using CFD.

  3. Fabrication and hyperthermia effect of magnetic functional fluids based on amorphous particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chuncheng; Bian, Xiufang; Qin, Jingyu; Guo, Tongxiao; Zhao, Shuchun

    2015-03-01

    An experimental study conducted on the preparation and hyperthermia effect of magnetic functional fluids based on Fe73.5Nb3Cu1Si13.5B9 amorphous particles, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4 nanoparticles dispersed in water is presented. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and vibrating sample magnetometer methods have been used to characterize the morphology, structure and magnetic property of the amorphous particles. It is disclosed that the Fe73.5Nb3Cu1Si13.5B9 particles are still amorphous after being milled for 48 h. Moreover, the saturation magnetization of metallic glass particles is approximately 75% and 50% larger than that of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, respectively. The hyperthermia experiment results show that when alternating electrical current is 150 A, the temperature of the functional fluids based on amorphous particles could rise to 33 °C in 1500 s. When the current is 300 A, the final stable temperature could reach to 60 °C. This study demonstrates that the Fe73.5Nb3Cu1Si13.5B9 magnetic functional fluids may have potential on biomedical applications.

  4. Multinucleation and cell dysfunction induced by amorphous silica nanoparticles in an L-02 human hepatic cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang W

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wen Wang,1–3,* Yang Li,1–3,* Xiaomei Liu,3 Minghua Jin,3 Haiying Du,3 Ying Liu,3 Peili Huang,1,2 Xianqing Zhou,1,2 Lan Yuan,4 Zhiwei Sun1–3 1School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 3School of Public Health, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin, 4Medical and Healthy Analysis Centre, Peking University, Beijing, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Silica nanoparticles (SNPs are one of the most important nanomaterials, and have been widely used in a variety of fields. Therefore, their effects on human health and the environment have been addressed in a number of studies. In this work, the effects of amorphous SNPs were investigated with regard to multinucleation in L-02 human hepatic cells. Our results show that L-02 cells had an abnormally high incidence of multinucleation upon exposure to silica, that increased in a dose-dependent manner. Propidium iodide staining showed that multinucleated cells were arrested in G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Increased multinucleation in L-02 cells was associated with increased generation of cellular reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial damage on flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, which might have led to failure of cytokinesis in these cells. Further, SNPs inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in exposed cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that multinucleation in L-02 human hepatic cells might be a failure to undergo cytokinesis or cell fusion in response to SNPs, and the increase in cellular reactive oxygen species could be responsible for the apoptosis seen in both mononuclear cells and multinucleated cells. Keywords: silica nanoparticles, human hepatic cell L-02, multinucleation, cell cycle, cell dysfunction, apoptosis

  5. Nanometer fluorescent hybrid silica particle as ultrasensitive and photostable biological labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huang-Hao; Qu, Hui-Ying; Lin, Peng; Li, Shun-Hua; Ding, Ma-Tai; Xu, Jin-Gou

    2003-05-01

    Nanometer-sized fluorescent hybrid silica (NFHS) particles were prepared for use as sensitive and photostable fluorescent probes in biological staining and diagnostics. The first step of the synthesis involves the covalent modification of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane with an organic fluorophore, such as fluorescein isothiocyanate, under N2 atmosphere for getting a fluorescent silica precursor. Then the NFHS particles, with a diameter of well below 40 nm, were prepared by controlled hydrolysis of the fluorescent silica precursor with tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) using the reverse micelle technique. The fluorophores are dispersed homogeneously in the silica network of the NFHS particles and well protected from the environmental oxygen. Furthermore, since the fluorophores are covalently bound to the silica network, there is no migration, aggregation and leakage of the fluorophores. In comparison with common single organic fluorophores, these particle probes are brighter, more stable against photobleaching and do not suffer from intermittent on/off light emission (blinking). We have used these newly developed NFHS particles as a fluorescent marker to label antibodies, using silica immobilization method, for the immunoassay of human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). The detection limit of this method was down to 0.05 ng mL(-1) under our current experimental conditions. We think this material would attract much attention and be applied widely in biotechnology. PMID:12790198

  6. Optical detection of antibody using silica-silver core-shell particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalele, S. A.; Ashtaputre, S. S.; Hebalkar, N. Y.; Gosavi, S. W.; Deobagkar, D. N.; Deobagkar, D. D.; Kulkarni, S. K.

    2005-03-01

    Nearly monodispersed spherical particles of silica were synthesized and coated with thin layer of silver nanoparticles. Silver coated silica particles, forming core-shell particles exhibited a strong surface plasmon resonance peak at 453 nm. A very small amount (20 μg) of rabbit immunoglobulin in core-shell particle solution results in to a marked shift in surface plasmon resonance. Addition of 20 μg quantity of goat anti rabbit antibodies results in to a red shift of surface plasmon resonance to 494 nm. This demonstrates that silver coated silica particles are sensitive probes for rapid antibody-anti antibody kind of interaction investigations. Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy have been used to interpret the optical extinction spectroscopy results.

  7. Magnetic nanocomposites of periodic mesoporous silica: The influence of the silica substrate dimensionality on the inter-particle magnetic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeleňáková, Adriana, E-mail: azelenak@upjs.sk [Department of Solid State Physics, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, Košice (Slovakia); Zeleňák, Vladimir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, Košice (Slovakia); Bednarčík, Jozef [DESY-Hasylab, Notkestrasse 85, Hamburg (Germany); Hrubovčák, Pavol [Department of Solid State Physics, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, Košice (Slovakia); Kováč, Jozef [Institute of Experimental Physics, SAS, Watsonova 41, Košice (Slovakia)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • Hematite particles inside porous silica with 2D hexagonal and 3D cubic symmetry. • Magnetic properties are strongly affected by the dimensionality of porous matrix. • Weak dipolar interactions observed in superparamagnetic hexagonal α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@SBA-15. • Strong interactions leading to superspin-glass observed in cubic α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@SBA-16. -- Abstract: Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of iron oxide (hematite, α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles loaded into the pores of the periodically ordered mesoporous silica with hexagonal (SBA-15) or cubic (SBA-16) symmetry were investigated. The characterization of the samples was carried out by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), High-energy X-ray diffraction (HE-XRD) and HRTEM measurements. The magnetic properties of the prepared nanocomposites were investigated by the SQUID magnetometry. It was shown, that in spite of its non-magnetic nature the silica matrix significantly influences the magnetism of the samples. The magnetic properties are strongly affected by the strength of inter-particle interactions and dimensionality of the porous matrix. Weak dipolar interactions between superparamagnetic (SPM) hematite nanoparticles were observed in the nanocomposite with hexagonally ordered silica channels (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@SBA-15), while the strong interactions between hematite nanoparticles, suggesting the superspin glass behavior (SSG), were observed in the nanocomposite with silica matrix of cubic symmetry (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}@SBA-16)

  8. Determining the Inter-Particle Force-Laws in Amorphous Solids from a Visual Image

    OpenAIRE

    Gendelman, Oleg; Pollack, Yoav G.; Procaccia, Itamar

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of how to determine the force laws in an amorphous system of interacting particles. Given the positions of the centers of mass of the constituent particles we propose a new algorithm to determine the inter-particle force-laws. Having $n$ different types of constituents we determine the coefficients in the Laurent polynomials for the $n(n+1)/2$ possibly different force-laws. A visual providing the particle positions in addition to a measurement of the pressure is all th...

  9. Time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering studies of polymer-silica nanocomposite particles: initial formation and subsequent silica redistribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Jennifer A; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Armes, Steven P; Fairclough, J Patrick A; Ryan, Anthony J; Gummel, Jeremie; Murray, Martin W; Murray, Kenneth A; Williams, Neal S J

    2011-02-01

    Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) is a powerful characterization technique for the analysis of polymer-silica nanocomposite particles due to their relatively narrow particle size distributions and high electron density contrast between the polymer core and the silica shell. Time-resolved SAXS is used to follow the kinetics of both nanocomposite particle formation (via silica nanoparticle adsorption onto sterically stabilized poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP) latex in dilute aqueous solution) and also the spontaneous redistribution of silica that occurs when such P2VP-silica nanocomposite particles are challenged by the addition of sterically stabilized P2VP latex. Silica adsorption is complete within a few seconds at 20 °C and the rate of adsorption strongly dependent on the extent of silica surface coverage. Similar very short time scales for silica redistribution are consistent with facile silica exchange occurring as a result of rapid interparticle collisions due to Brownian motion; this interpretation is consistent with a zeroth-order Smoluchowski-type calculation. PMID:21171624

  10. Amorphous Silica Based Nanomedicine with Safe Carrier Excretion and Enhanced Drug Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Silu

    With recent development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, a great amount of efforts have been devoted to nanomedicine development. Among various nanomaterials, silica nanoparticle (NP) is generally accepted as non-toxic, and can provide a versatile platform for drug loading. In addition, the surface of the silica NP is hydrophilic, being favorable for cellular uptake. Therefore, it is considered as one of the most promising candidates to serve as carriers for drugs. The present thesis mainly focuses on the design of silica based nanocarrier-drug systems, aiming at achieving safe nanocarrier excretion from the biological system and enhanced drug efficacy, which two are considered as most important issues in nanomedicine development. To address the safe carrier excretion issue, we have developed a special type of selfdecomposable SiO2-drug composite NPs. By creating a radial concentration gradient of drug in the NP, the drug release occurred simultaneously with the silica carrier decomposition. Such unique characteristic was different from the conventional dense SiO2-drug NP, in which drug was uniformly distributed and can hardly escape the carrier. We found that the controllable release of the drug was primarily determined by diffusion, which was caused by the radial drug concentration gradient in the NP. Escape of the drug molecules then triggered the silica carrier decomposition, which started from the center of the NP and eventually led to its complete fragmentation. The small size of the final carrier fragments enabled their easy excretion via renal systems. Apart from the feature of safe carrier excretion, we also found the controlled release of drugs contribute significantly to the drug efficacy enhancement. By loading an anticancer drug doxorubicin (Dox) to the decomposable SiO 2-methylene blue (MB) NPs, we achieved a self-decomposable SiO 2(MB)-Dox nanomedicine. The gradual escape of drug molecules from NPs and their enabled cytosolic release by optical

  11. Porous Silica-Supported Solid Lipid Particles for Enhanced Solubilization of Poorly Soluble Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Rokhsana; Rao, Shasha; Bremmell, Kristen E; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-07-01

    Low dissolution of drugs in the intestinal fluid can limit their effectiveness in oral therapies. Here, a novel porous silica-supported solid lipid system was developed to optimize the oral delivery of drugs with limited aqueous solubility. Using lovastatin (LOV) as the model poorly water-soluble drug, two porous silica-supported solid lipid systems (SSL-A and SSL-S) were fabricated from solid lipid (glyceryl monostearate, GMS) and nanoporous silica particles Aerosil 380 (silica-A) and Syloid 244FP (silica-S) via immersion/solvent evaporation. SSL particles demonstrated significantly higher rate and extent of lipolysis in comparison with the pure solid lipid, depending on the lipid loading levels and the morphology. The highest lipid digestion was observed when silica-S was loaded with 34% (w/w) solid lipid, and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis confirmed the encapsulation of up to 2% (w/w) non-crystalline LOV in this optimal SSL-S formulation. Drug dissolution under non-digesting intestinal conditions revealed a three- to sixfold increase in dissolution efficiencies when compared to the unformulated drug and a LOV-lipid suspension. Furthermore, the SSL-S provided superior drug solubilization under simulated intestinal digesting condition in comparison with the drug-lipid suspension and drug-loaded silica. Therefore, solid lipid and nanoporous silica provides a synergistic effect on optimizing the solubilization of poorly water-soluble compound and the solid lipid-based porous carrier system provides a promising delivery approach to overcome the oral delivery challenges of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:27048207

  12. Whole-body distribution of 14C-labeled silica nanoparticles and submicron particles after intravenous injection into Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the whole-body distribution of 14C–ADP-labeled silica nanoparticles (14C–ADP–SiO2 nanoparticles) and submicron particles (14C–ADP–SiO2 submicron particles) after intravenous injection into ICR mice. The 14C–ADP–SiO2 nanoparticles and submicron particles were synthesized before the injection and the particle size was 19.6 and 130 nm, respectively. Similarly, the shape was spherical and the crystallinity was amorphous. After the synthesis, we injected mice with the 14C–ADP–SiO2 nanoparticles or the 14C–ADP–SiO2 submicron particles and dissected tissues after 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h. The radioactivity in the tissues was measured with a liquid scintillation counter. As a result, the retention percentage in bone, skin, lymph nodes, and the digestive mixture was at least twofold higher in the 14C–ADP–SiO2 nanoparticles-exposed mice, whereas the retention percentage in the kidney was statistically higher in the 14C–ADP–SiO2 submicron particles-exposed mice. Both types of 14C–ADP–SiO2 particles mainly translocated to the muscle, bone, skin, and liver, but hardly translocated to the brain and olfactory bulb. Furthermore, the 14C–ADP–SiO2 nanoparticles had a higher retention percentage (62.4 %) in the entire body at 24-h post-injection than did the 14C–ADP–SiO2 submicron particles (50.7 %). Therefore, we suggested that the 14C–ADP–SiO2 nanoparticles might be more likely than the 14C–ADP–SiO2 submicron particles to be retained in the body, and consequently they might be gradually accumulated by chronic exposure.

  13. The Effect of Gelatin on the Preparation of Silica Coated Iron Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A method is described for coating fine iron particles(~1μm) with a uniform silica layer,produced by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate.The presence of a small amount of gelatin on the surface of the iron particles facilitates this process.The X-ray photoelectron measurements indicated that the gelatin interacted with the surface of the iron particles by means of both nitrogen(in -NH2 groups) and oxygen(in -COOH groups) and then bound to the silica.The silica coating increases the resistance of the iron particles to oxidation on heating in air,which makes the temperature at which an observable oxidization occurs from 330 ℃ to 400 ℃ raised.

  14. Effect of Variant Counterions on Stability and Particle Size of Silica Sol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN, Ming-Chu; YANG, Yu-Xiang; YING, Hai-Ping; JIA, Xiang-Chen; CHEN, Ya-Ru; TANG, Yue

    2007-01-01

    The effects of variant counterions with ionic strength of 0.05, 0.10, 0.20 and 0.25 mol·kg-1 on the stability and particle size of silica sols have been studied using the traditional methods of Ubbelohde viscosity measurement, TEM and titration respectively, finding that the stability and particle size of the silica sols are all concerned with the acidic, positively electric properties and the sizes of the counterions, as well as the attraction between the counteri ons and surface silicon hydroxyl groups of the silica sols. The small positively charged counterions lead to the de crease in particle sizes, making the silica sol the most stable. But the larger weakly acidic counterions can restrict the particle sizes of the silica sols and easily make the sols coagulate. It was also found that there existed a linear relationship between log r and log η, which has not ever been reported. The effect of temperature on the stability and particle sizes was also discussed.

  15. The effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary work has been completed to investigate the effect of particle-particle interaction forces on the flow properties of silica slurries. Classically hydro-transport studies have focused on the flow of coarse granular material in Newtonian fluids. However, with current economical and environmental pressures, the need to increase solid loadings in pipe flow has lead to studies that examine non-Newtonian fluid dynamics. The flow characteristics of non-Newtonian slurries can be greatly influenced through controlling the solution chemistry. Here we present data on an 'ideal' slurry where the particle size and shape is controlled together with the solution chemistry. We have investigated the effect of adsorbed cations on the stability of a suspension, the packing nature of a sediment and the frictional forces to be overcome during re-slurrying. A significant change in the criteria assessed was observed as the electrolyte concentration was increased from 0.1 mM to 1 M. In relation to industrial processes, such delicate control of the slurry chemistry can greatly influence the optimum operating conditions of non-Newtonian pipe flows. (authors)

  16. Effect of silica particle size in cellulose membrane for desalination process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurkhamidah, Siti; Rahmawati, Yeni; Taufany, Fadlilatul; Merta, I. Made Pendi Adi; Putra, Deffry Danius Dwi; Woo, Eamor M.

    2015-12-01

    Development of desalination technologies is very important for fulfilling future water demand. The objective of this research is to synthesis membrane for desalination process from cellulose acetate (CA) by blending with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and silica resulting CA/PEG/Silica composite membrane. In this study, the synthesis and characterization of composite membrane is attempt where membrane performance is investigated for reverse osmosis desalination of saline water. CA/PEG membrane with ratio 80/20 (wt%) was modified with three different particle sizes of silica: 0.007, 0.02, and 60 µm. Composite membranes were characterized for their hydrophilicity, functional groups and permeation properties. The experiment results show that hydrophilicity of CA/PEG membrane increases after the addition of silica as shown by the decreasing of contact angle and the increasing of silanol group. Hydrophilicity of composite membrane increases with the decreasing of particle size of silica. The best performance membrane is obtained by using silica with particle size of 0.02 µm.

  17. Effect of particle size on the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siti Shafiqah, A. S.; Amin, Y. M.; Nor, R. Md.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    By means of the sol-gel technique, silica nanoparticles have been synthesized at room temperature using tetraethyl orthosilicate, ethanol, deionized water, and ammonia solution. By increasing the amount of ethanol in the mixture, fine spherically shaped silica nanoparticles have been obtained. Using finite element scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, characterization was made of the morphology and elemental composition of the nanoparticles. The mean particle sizes of three of the samples were measured to be of the order of 80, 140, 550 nm, while the remaining sample contained particles of diameter silica particles, of around 80 nm, were observed to produce the largest thermoluminescence yield as a result of the surface to volume ratio increase, providing more accessible thermoluminescence carriers.

  18. One-step synthesis of dye-incorporated porous silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent nanoparticles have a variety of biomedical applications as diagnostics and traceable drug delivery agents. Highly fluorescent porous silica nanoparticles were synthesized in a water/oil phase by a microemulsion method. What is unique about the resulting porous silica nanoparticles is the combination of a single-step, efficient synthesis and the high stability of its fluorescence emission in the resulting materials. The key of the success of this approach is the choice of a lipid dye that functions as a surrogate surfactant in the preparation. The surfactant dye was incorporated at the interface of the inorganic silica matrix and organic environment (pore template), and thus insures the stability of the dye–silica hybrid structure. The resulting fluorescent silica materials have a number of properties that make them attractive for biomedical applications: the availability of various color of the resulting nanoparticle from among a broad spectrum of commercially dyes, the controllablity of pore size (diameters of ∼5 nm) and particle size (diameters of ∼40 nm) by adjusting template monomer concentration and the water/oil ratio, and the stability and durability of particle fluorescence because of the deep insertion of surfactant’s tail into the silica matrix.

  19. One-step synthesis of dye-incorporated porous silica particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Qing; DeShong, Philip; Zachariah, Michael R., E-mail: mrz@umd.edu [University of Maryland, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Fluorescent nanoparticles have a variety of biomedical applications as diagnostics and traceable drug delivery agents. Highly fluorescent porous silica nanoparticles were synthesized in a water/oil phase by a microemulsion method. What is unique about the resulting porous silica nanoparticles is the combination of a single-step, efficient synthesis and the high stability of its fluorescence emission in the resulting materials. The key of the success of this approach is the choice of a lipid dye that functions as a surrogate surfactant in the preparation. The surfactant dye was incorporated at the interface of the inorganic silica matrix and organic environment (pore template), and thus insures the stability of the dye-silica hybrid structure. The resulting fluorescent silica materials have a number of properties that make them attractive for biomedical applications: the availability of various color of the resulting nanoparticle from among a broad spectrum of commercially dyes, the controllablity of pore size (diameters of {approx}5 nm) and particle size (diameters of {approx}40 nm) by adjusting template monomer concentration and the water/oil ratio, and the stability and durability of particle fluorescence because of the deep insertion of surfactant's tail into the silica matrix.

  20. Simultaneous removal of colour, phosphorus and disinfection from treated wastewater using an agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Takahiro; Aketo, Tsuyoshi; Minowa, Nobutaka; Sugimoto, Kiyomi; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Ogino, Akifumi; Tanaka, Yasuo

    2013-01-01

    An agent synthesized from amorphous silica and hydrated lime (CSH-lime) was investigated for its ability to simultaneously remove the colour, phosphorus and disinfection from the effluents from wastewater treatment plants on swine farms. CSH-lime removed the colour and phosphate from the effluents, with the colour-removal effects especially high at pH 12, and phosphorous removal was more effective in strongly alkaline conditions (pH > 10). Colour decreased from 432 +/-111 (mean +/- SD) to 107 +/- 41 colour units and PO4(3-)P was reduced from 45 +/- 39 mg/L to undetectable levels at the CSH-lime dose of 2.0% w/v. Moreover, CSH-lime reduced the total organic carbon from 99.0 to 37.9 mg/L at the dose of 2.0% w/v and was effective at inactivating total heterotrophic and coliform bacteria. However, CSH-lime did not remove nitrogen compounds such as nitrite, nitrate and ammonium. Colour was also removed from dye solutions by CSH-lime, at the same dose. PMID:23837353

  1. Controlling Ethylene Hydrogenation Reactivity on Pt13 Clusters by Varying the Stoichiometry of the Amorphous Silica Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Andrew S; Rötzer, Marian D; Schweinberger, Florian F; Yoon, Bokwon; Landman, Uzi; Heiz, Ueli

    2016-07-25

    Ethylene hydrogenation was investigated on size-selected Pt13 clusters supported on three amorphous silica (a-SiO2 ) thin films with different stoichiometries. Activity measurements of the reaction at 300 K revealed that on a silicon-rich and a stoichiometric film, Pt13 exhibits a similar activity to that of Pt(111), in line with the known structure insensitivity of the reaction. On an oxygen-rich film, a threefold increased rate was measured. Pulsing ethylene at 400 K, then measuring the activity at 300 K, resulted in complete loss of activity on the silicon-rich surface compared to only marginal losses on the other surfaces. The measured reactivity trends correlate with charging characteristics of a Pt13 cluster on the SiO2 films, predicted through first-principle calculations. The results reveal that the stoichiometry-dependent charging by the support can be used to tune the selectivity of reaction pathways during a catalytic hydrogenation reaction. PMID:27356301

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Investigation of the Potential of Amorphous Microporous Silica as a Protein Delivery Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivering growth factors (GFs at bone/implant interface needs to be optimized to achieve faster osseointegration. Amorphous microporous silica (AMS has a potential to be used as a carrier and delivery platform for GFs. In this work, adsorption (loading and release (delivery mechanism of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA, from AMS was investigated in vitro as well as in vivo. In general, strong BSA adsorption to AMS was observed. The interaction was stronger at lower pH owing to favorable electrostatic interaction. In vitro evaluation of BSA release revealed a peculiar release profile, involving a burst release followed by a 6 h period without appreciable BSA release and a further slower release later. Experimental data supporting this observation are discussed. Apart from understanding protein/biomaterial (BSA/AMS interaction, determination of in vivo protein release is an essential aspect of the evaluation of a protein delivery system. In this regard micropositron emission tomography (μ-PET was used in an exploratory experiment to determine in vivo BSA release profile from AMS. Results suggest stronger in vivo retention of BSA when adsorbed on AMS. This study highlights the possible use of AMS as a controlled protein delivery platform which may facilitate osseointegration.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial activity of silver-doped silica nanocomposite particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-Shu; Chen, Chun-Nan; Tseng, Tzu-Tsung; Wei, Ming-Hsiung; Hsieh, J H; Tseng, Wenjea J

    2011-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles were adsorbed preferentially on silica surface to form composite particles using a reverse micelle process that stabilizes the silver particles by an anionic sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) surfactant in isooctane solvent together with the silica particles in which their surface being mediated by a cationic poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) polyelectrolyte. The heterogeneous adsorption was rendered by both electrostatic attraction and hydrophilic/hydrophobic interaction, and was carried out in multiple deposition cycles. The resulting nanocomposite particles were characterized by zeta-potential measurement, electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, field-emission electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), and inductively coupled plasma analysis, respectively. In addition, antibacterial activity of the composite particles was examined against Escherichia coli (E. coli) in aqueous environment. PMID:21446411

  4. Review: Bioanalytical applications of biomolecule-functionalized nanometer-sized doped silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research has looked to develop innovative and powerful novel biofunctionalized nanometer-sized silica particles, controlling and tailoring their properties in a very predictable manner to meet the needs of specific applications. The silica shells of these particles facilitate a wide variety of surface reactions and allow conjugation with biomolecules like proteins and DNA. There exist a multitude of possible applications of fabricated nanoparticles in biotechnology and medicine. In particular, they have proved to be highly useful for biosensing, assay labelling, bioimaging, and in research on a variety of molecular tags in cellular and molecular biology. Techniques commonly rely on the use of silica-coated semiconductor quantum dots, organic dyes, magnetic particles, and Raman active particles. Inorganic-biological hybrid particles combine the properties of both materials, i.e., the spectroscopic characteristics of the entrapped nanocrystal, and the biomolecular function of the conjugated entity. Rather than being exhaustive, this review focuses on selected examples to illustrate novel concepts and promising applications. Approaches described include the encoding of silica nanoparticles with different groups, and conjugation with various biological entities. Further, promising applications in bioanalysis are considered and discussed.

  5. Chitosan-coated Silica Nanoparticles - A Potential Support for Metal Particles used as Heterogeneous Catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a strategy to immobilize noble metal nanoparticles on silica microspheres is proposed. In order to achieve this, monodispersed silica nanoparticles of an average size of 63.5±6.7 nm were synthesized via sol-gel method. Then chitosan was coated onto the silica to create a core/ shell composite with the size range of 66.56±9.78 nm to 79.18±11.87 nm. The noble metal nanoparticles were then synthesized on the shell of the composite through coordination of the respective metal ions to the polymer followed by the subsequent reduction. In this way, the silver particles of average size 6.17±1.83 nm, 9.85±2.60 nm, and 11.80±4.26 nm have been synthesized on the shell successfully. The optimized supported metal particles can be used as a potential heterogeneous catalyst. (author)

  6. Surficial Siloxane-to-Silanol Interconversion during Room-Temperature Hydration/Dehydration of Amorphous Silica Films Observed by ATR-IR and TIR-Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warring, Suzanne L; Beattie, David A; McQuillan, A James

    2016-02-16

    Silica has been frequently studied using infrared and Raman spectroscopy due to its importance in many practical contexts where its surface chemistry plays a vital role. The majority of these studies have utilized chemical-vapor-deposited films in vacuo after high-temperature calcination. However, room-temperature hydration and dehydration of thin silica particle films has not been well characterized in spite of the importance of such films as substrates for polymer and surfactant adsorption. The present study has utilized ATR-IR spectroscopy and thin silica particle films exposed to varying humidity to clearly show reversible conversion between surface siloxanes and hydrogen-bonded silanols without the need for semiempirical peak deconvolution. The IR spectra from corresponding hydration experiments on deuterated silica films has confirmed the vibrational mode assignments. The variation of humidity over silica films formed from silica suspensions of differing pH gave IR spectra consistent with the change in the relative populations of siloxide to silanol surface groups. In addition, total internal reflection Raman spectroscopy has been used to provide further evidence of room-temperature dehydroxylation, with spectral evidence for the presence of three-membered siloxane rings when films are dehydrated under argon. The confirmation of room-temperature siloxane-to-silanol interconversion is expected to benefit understanding in many silica surface chemical contexts. PMID:26804934

  7. Effects of adding silica particles on certain properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of incorporation of silica particles with different concentrations on some properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC): Microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Materials and Methods: Silica particle was incorporated into RMGIC powder to study its effects, one type of RMGIC (Type II visible light-cured) and three concentrations of silica particles (0.06, 0.08, and 0.1% weight) were used. One hundred and twenty specimens were fabricated for measuring microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests were used for measuring significance between means where P ≤ 0.05. Results: RMGIC specimens without any additives showed significantly highest microleakage and lowest compressive and tensile strengths. Conclusion: Silica particles added to RMGIC have the potential as a reliable restorative material with increased compressive strength, tensile strength, and water sorption but decreased microleakage and water solubility. PMID:27095901

  8. Importance of particle formation to reconstructed water column biogenic silica fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moriceau, B.; Gallinari, M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Ragueneau, O.

    2007-01-01

    The particles sinking out of the ocean's surface layer are made up of a mixture of living and dead algal cells, fecal pellets, and aggregates, while the parameters used to describe the behavior of biogenic silica (bSiO2) in today's models are experimentally determined on freely suspended diatoms (FC

  9. Surface modification to produce hydrophobic nano-silica particles using sodium dodecyl sulfate as a modifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bing; Liang, Yong; Wang, Ting-Jie; Jiang, Yanping

    2016-02-01

    Hydrophobic silica particles were prepared using the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as a modifier by a new route comprising three processes, namely, aqueous mixing, spray drying and thermal treatment. Since SDS dissolves in water, this route is free of an organic solvent and gave a perfect dispersion of SDS, that is, there was excellent contact between SDS and silica particles in the modification reaction. The hydrophobicity of the modified surface was verified by the contact angle of the nano-sized silica particles, which was 107°. The SDS grafting density reached 1.82 nm-2, which is near the highest value in the literature. The optimal parameters of the SDS/SiO2 ratio in the aqueous phase, process temperature and time of thermal treatment were determined to be 20%, 200 °C and 30 min, respectively. The grafting mechanism was studied by comparing the modification with that on same sized TiO2 particles, which indicated that the protons of the Brønsted acid sites on the surface of SiO2 reacted with SDS to give a carbocation which then formed a Si-O-C structure. This work showed that the hydrophilic surface of silica can be modified to be a hydrophobic surface by using a water soluble modifier SDS in a new modification route.

  10. Stable Poly(methacrylic acid Brush Decorated Silica Nano-Particles by ARGET ATRP for Bioconjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Iacono

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of polymer brush decorated silica nano-particles is demonstrated by activator regeneration by electron transfer atom transfer radical polymerization (ARGET ATRP grafting of poly(tert-butyl methacrylate. ATRP initiator decorated silica nano-particles were obtained using a novel trimethylsiloxane derivatised ATRP initiator obtained by click chemistry. Comparison of de-grafted polymers with polymer obtained from a sacrificial initiator demonstrated good agreement up to 55% monomer conversion. Subsequent mild deprotection of the tert-butyl ester groups using phosphoric acid yielded highly colloidal and pH stable hydrophilic nano-particles comprising approximately 50% methacrylic acid groups. The successful bio-conjugation was achieved by immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase to the polymer brush decorated nano-particles and the enzyme activity demonstrated in a conversion of o-phenylene diamine dihydrochloride assay.

  11. All-acrylic film-forming colloidal polymer/silica nanocomposite particles prepared by aqueous emulsion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Lee A; Tonnar, Jeff; Armes, Steven P

    2011-09-01

    The efficient synthesis of all-acrylic, film-forming, core-shell colloidal nanocomposite particles via in situ aqueous emulsion copolymerization of methyl methacrylate with n-butyl acrylate in the presence of a glycerol-functionalized ultrafine silica sol using a cationic azo initiator at 60 °C is reported. It is shown that relatively monodisperse nanocomposite particles can be produced with typical mean weight-average diameters of 140-330 nm and silica contents of up to 39 wt %. The importance of surface functionalization of the silica sol is highlighted, and it is demonstrated that systematic variation of parameters such as the initial silica sol concentration and initiator concentration affect both the mean particle diameter and the silica aggregation efficiency. The nanocomposite morphology comprises a copolymer core and a particulate silica shell, as determined by aqueous electrophoresis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Moreover, it is shown that films cast from n-butyl acrylate-rich copolymer/silica nanocomposite dispersions are significantly more transparent than those prepared from the poly(styrene-co-n-butyl acrylate)/silica nanocomposite particles reported previously. In the case of the aqueous emulsion homopolymerization of methyl methacrylate in the presence of ultrafine silica, a particle formation mechanism is proposed to account for the various experimental observations made when periodically sampling such nanocomposite syntheses at intermediate comonomer conversions. PMID:21776995

  12. Preparation and Application of Hollow Silica/magnetic Nanocomposite Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Chien; Lin, Jing-Mo; Lin, Chun-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chang

    The hollow silica/cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic microsphere with amino-groups were successfully prepared via several steps, including preparing the chelating copolymer microparticles as template by soap-free emulsion polymerization, manufacturing the hollow cobalt ferrite magnetic microsphere by in-situ chemical co-precipitation following calcinations, and surface modifying of the hollow magnetic microsphere by 3-aminopropyltrime- thoxysilane via the sol-gel method. The average diameter of polymer microspheres was ca. 200 nm from transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurement. The structure of the hollow magnetic microsphere was characterized by using TEM and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The spinel-type lattice of CoFe2O4 shell layer was identified by using XRD measurement. The diameter of CoFe2O4 crystalline grains ranged from 54.1 nm to 8.5 nm which was estimated by Scherrer's equation. Additionally, the hollow silica/cobalt ferrite microsphere possesses superparamagnetic property after VSM measurement. The result of BET measurement reveals the hollow magnetic microsphere which has large surface areas (123.4m2/g). After glutaraldehyde modified, the maximum value of BSA immobilization capacity of the hollow magnetic microsphere was 33.8 mg/g at pH 5.0 buffer solution. For microwave absorption, when the hollow magnetic microsphere was compounded within epoxy resin, the maximum reflection loss of epoxy resins could reach -35dB at 5.4 GHz with 1.9 mm thickness.

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of phase transformations and amorphicity in nanotitania powder and silica-titania core-shell photocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, S.H.; Phonthammachai, N.; Liu, T.; White, T.J. [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). School of Mateials Science and Engineering

    2008-12-15

    The local environment of titanium in nanocrystalline sol-gel synthesized titania, cobaltiferous titania and silica-titania core-shell photocatalysts was investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Anatase reconstructively transforms to rutile via a persistent amorphous phase that is retained, in part, up to 1273 K. In nanotitania, temperature-dependent trends in Ti order correlation observed by XAS parallel the development of amorphous content extracted from powder X-ray diffraction patterns, such that amorphicity shows a transient maximum at {proportional_to}873 K with the onset of rutile crystallization. Cobaltiferous and core-shell materials behaved similarly, but with anatase retained to 973 and 1273 K, respectively. In the former, cobalt redox reactions may stabilize anatase to higher temperatures by ready charge-balancing during the loss of hydroxyl and the formation of oxygen vacancies. In the core-shell architecture, higher Ti coordination and interatomic distance variance in the first- and second-nearestneighbour shells are maintained to 1273 K by interaction of a substantially aperiodic TiO{sub 6} network with the glassy silica substrate, which inhibits crystallization of rutile from the amorphous intermediate. Comparisons are also drawn with the commercial P25 catalyst. The overall transformation mechanism can be summarized as gel {yields} non-stoichiometric anatase{yields}amorphous titania{yields}rutile. Smaller anatase crystals and a higher average Ti-Ti coordination environment in the core-shell structure may enhance photocatalytic activity directly, by creating larger specific surface areas and hosting reactive defects, or indirectly, by inhibiting exciton annihilation in aperiodic titania and delaying the crystallization of less photoactive rutile. (orig.)

  14. Trace the polymerization induced by gamma-ray irradiated silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoik; Ryu, Jungju; Kim, Myungwoong; Im, Seung Soon; Kim, Ick Soo; Sohn, Daewon

    2016-08-01

    A γ-ray irradiation to inorganic particles is a promising technique for preparation of organic/inorganic composites as it offers a number of advantages such as an additive-free polymerizations conducted under mild conditions, avoiding undesired damage to organic components in the composites. Herein, we demonstrated a step-wise formation mechanism of organic/inorganic nanocomposite hydrogel in detail. The γ-ray irradiation to silica particles dispersed in water generates peroxide groups on their surface, enabling surface-initiated polymerization of acrylic acid from the inorganic material. As a result, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) covers the silica particles in the form of a core-shell at the initial stage. Then, PAA-coated silica particles associate with each other by combination of radicals at the end of chains on different particles, leading to micro-gel domains. Finally, the micro-gels are further associated with each other to form a 3D network structure. We investigated this mechanism using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our result strongly suggests that controlling reaction time is critical to achieve specific and desirable organic/inorganic nanocomposite structure among core-shell particles, micro-gels and 3D network bulk hydrogel.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of hollow silica particles from tetraethyl orthosilicate and sodium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiwoong; Lee, Jinwoo; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Jang, Hee Dong

    2013-03-01

    We herein introduce an effective method to synthesize hollow silica particles (HSPs) from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) as silica sources using a sacrificial template method with a simple modification. The advantage of the method is that it can be applied to synthesize HSPs from not only TEOS but also Na2SiO3 silica sources without changing the method adopted to obtain the sacrificial polymeric templates. Polystyrene particles are adopted as sacrificial templates to synthesize the HSPs, and a conventional dispersion polymerization method is used to synthesis polystyrene particles in an oil medium. Size control of HSPs is enabled by modulation of the polymerization initiator content (2,2'-Azoisobutyronitrile). The particle size, shell thickness, and morphology are analyzed. Light reflection spectra are measured to obtain the light reflection properties of the HSPs. The results indicate that the hollow architecture is the most important factor in determining the light reflection properties of the particles. Such particles are potential candidates for use in light reflectors and heat insulators, as they may reduce energy consumption in heating and cooling applications. PMID:23755680

  16. New Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Polysilsesquioxane-Silica Particles as Sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, Stephanie H; McFadden, Peter D; Loy, Douglas A

    2016-02-10

    Effectiveness of organic sunscreens is limited by phototoxicity and degradation. Both of which can be significantly reduced by encapsulation in hollow particles or covalent incorporation into the solid structure of particles, but direct comparisons of the two methods have not been reported. In this study, physical encapsulation and covalent incorporation of sunscreens were compared with 1 mol % salicylate and curcumeroid sunscreens. 2-Ethylhexyl salicylate was physically encapsulated in hollow silica nanoparticles prepared by oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion polymerizations (E-Sal). Some of these particles were coated with an additional shell or cap of silica to reduce leaking of sunscreen (cap-E-Sal). Covalent incorporation involved co-polymerizing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) with 0.2 mol % of new salicylate and curcuminoid sunscreen monomers with triethoxsilyl groups. Particles were prepared with the salicylate attached to the silica matrix through single silsesquioxane groups (pendant; P-Sal) and two silsesquioxane groups (bridged; B-Sal). Particles based on a new curcuminoid-bridged monomer were also prepared (B-Curc). Sunscreen leaching, photodegradation, and sunscreen performance were determined for the E-Sal, cap-E-Sal, P-Sal, B-Sal, and B-Curc particles. Covalent attachment, particularly with bridged sunscreen monomers, reduced leaching and photodegradation over physical encapsulation, even with capping. PMID:26730573

  17. Genotoxicity of synthetic amorphous silica nanoparticles in rats following short-term exposure. Part 1: oral route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Adeline; Huet, Sylvie; Jarry, Gérard; Lanceleur, Rachelle; Poul, Martine; Tavares, Ana; Vital, Nádia; Louro, Henriqueta; João Silva, Maria; Fessard, Valérie

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) in its nanosized form is now used in food applications although the potential risks for human health have not been evaluated. In this study, genotoxicity and oxidative DNA damage of two pyrogenic (NM-202 and 203) and two precipitated (NM-200 and -201) nanosized SAS were investigated in vivo in rats following oral exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg b.w./day for three days by gavage. DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage were investigated in seven tissues (blood, bone marrow from femur, liver, spleen, kidney, duodenum, and colon) with the alkaline and the (Fpg)-modified comet assays, respectively. Concomitantly, chromosomal damage was investigated in bone marrow and in colon with the micronucleus assay. Additionally, malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation marker, was measured in plasma. When required, a histopathological examination was also conducted. The results showed neither obvious DNA strand breaks nor oxidative damage with the comet assay, irrespective of the dose and the organ investigated. Similarly, no increases in chromosome damage in bone marrow or lipid peroxidation in plasma were detected. However, although the response was not dose-dependent, a weak increase in the percentage of micronucleated cells was observed in the colon of rats treated with the two pyrogenic SAS at the lowest dose (5 mg/kg b.w./day). Additional data are required to confirm this result, considering in particular, the role of agglomeration/aggregation of SAS NMs in their uptake by intestinal cells. PMID:25504566

  18. Effect of crystalline metallic particles on the compressive behavior of a cellular amorphous metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Open-porosity foam with struts consisting of Zr-based BMG containing W particles. → Acoustic emissions used to evaluate damage evolution during compression. → Metallic-glass-matrix composite higher damage accumulation single-phase BMG foam. -- Molten Vit106 (Zr57Nb5Cu15.4Ni12.6Al10) was infiltrated into a BaF2 preform containing W particles, and quenched. Salt dissolution resulted in an open-porosity foam with struts consisting of amorphous Vit106 containing crystalline W particles. This composite foam exhibits high compressive strains (∼75%), a low plateau stress (∼30 MPa) and higher damage accumulation than prior single-phase Vit106 foams. Likely explanations are the lower porosity in the composite foam (43% vs. 76%), damage from galvanic corrosion during salt removal, and tungsten embrittlement during processing.

  19. SANS study of nanocrystalline Fe3Si particles in amorphous FeSiBCuNb matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The amorphous FeSiBCuNb alloy is the precursor material for the well-known nanocrystalline soft-magnetic finemets. In previous analyses the fully crystallised state with up to 70 vol% nanocrystals has been studied. There, the maximum appearing in the small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) curves was interpreted as a consequence of interparticle interferences. In the present study partially crystallised samples with 2 to 30 vol% of Fe3Si particles are analyzed. The results show that the maximum of the SANS curves must be considered as an intrinsic property of the isolated nanocrystalline precipitates. Our analysis of both the magnetic and the nuclear scattering contributions show that the Fe3Si particles are surrounded by a diffusion zone giving rise to interferences of this zone with the core of the particles. At high volume fractions of nanocrystals, additional interparticle interferences appear. (author)

  20. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Particle Dispersion Mechanism of Polyamide-imide/Silica Nano-composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Hideyuki; Iwasaki, Tomio; Hanawa, Hidehito; Honda, Yuki

    We studied the particle dispersion mechanism of polyamide-imide/silica nano-composite material by using molecular-dynamics simulation technique based on Newtonian dynamics and quantum mechanics. In simulations, adhesive fracture energies at the interfaces between silica and solvents were calculated, and Brownian motions of silica particles were simulated to clarify dispersion properties. The simulation results showed that the colloidal state of silica was maintained by covering the silica surface with a new low hygroscopicity solvent and that the chemical structure of polymer contributed to the dispersion of silica. It is found that the results obtained from molecular dynamics agree well with those obtained by experiments, and that molecular-dynamics simulation technique will become very useful for the development of nano-composite materials in the future.

  1. Effect of silica particles modified by in-situ and ex-situ methods on the reinforcement of silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In-situ and ex-situ methods were applied to modify silica particles. • In-situ method was more beneficial to preparing silica particles with high BET surface area. • Silicone rubber filled with in-situ modified silica exhibits excellent mechanical and thermal properties. - Abstract: In-situ and ex-situ methods were applied to modify silica particles in order to investigate their effects on the reinforcement of silicone rubber. Surface area and pore analyzer, laser particle size analyzer, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), contact-angle instrument, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate the structure and properties of the modified silica particles. Dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA) was employed to characterize the vulcanizing behavior and mechanical properties of the composites. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was performed to test the thermal stability of the composites. FTIR and contact angle analysis indicated that silica particles were successfully modified by these two methods. The BET surface area and TEM results reflected that in-situ modification was more beneficial to preparing silica particles with irregular shape and higher BET surface area in comparison with ex-situ modification. The DMTA and TGA data revealed that compared with ex-situ modification, the in-situ modification produced positive influence on the reinforcement of silicone rubber

  2. Size characterization by Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation of silica particles used as food additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Four types of SiO2 particles were characterized by SdFFF, PCS and EM techniques. •Clusters of 10 nm nanoparticles were found in some SiO2 samples. •A method was set up to extract SiO2 particles from food matrices. •The effects of the carrier solution composition on SdFFF separations were evaluated. •Particle size distributions were obtained from SiO2 particles extracted from foodstuffs. -- Abstract: Four types of SiO2, available on the market as additives in food and personal care products, were size characterized using Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF), SEM, TEM and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). The synergic use of the different analytical techniques made it possible, for some samples, to confirm the presence of primary nanoparticles (10 nm) organized in clusters or aggregates of different dimension and, for others, to discover that the available information is incomplete, particularly that regarding the presence of small particles. A protocol to extract the silica particles from a simple food matrix was set up, enriching (0.25%, w w−1) a nearly silica-free instant barley coffee powder with a known SiO2 sample. The SdFFF technique, in conjunction with SEM observations, made it possible to identify the added SiO2 particles and verify the new particle size distribution. The SiO2 content of different powdered foodstuffs was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS); the concentrations ranged between 0.006 and 0.35% (w w−1). The protocol to isolate the silica particles was so applied to the most SiO2-rich commercial products and the derived suspensions were separated by SdFFF; SEM and TEM observations supported the size analyses while GFAAS determinations on collected fractions permitted element identification

  3. The ir emission features: Emission from PAH [Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons] molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAHs can have several forms in the interstellar medium. To assess the importance of each requires the availability of a collection of high quality, complete mid-ir interstellar emission spectra, a collection of laboratory spectra of PAH samples prepared under realistic conditions and a firm understanding of the microscopic emission mechanism. Given what we currently know about PAHs, the spectroscopic data suggests that there are at least two components which contribute to the interstellar emission spectrum: free molecule sized PAHs producing the narrow features and amorphous carbon particles (which are primarily made up of an irregular ''lattice'' of PAHs) contributing to the broad underlying components. An exact treatment of the ir fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules shows that species containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra match more closely with the spectra of amorphous carbon particles. Since little is known about the spectroscopic properties of free PAHs and PAH clusters, much laboratory work is called for in conjunction with an observational program which focuses on the spatial characteristics of the spectra. In this way the distribution and evolution of carbon from molecule to particle can be traced. 38 refs., 9 figs

  4. Simulation of the tensile properties of silica aerogels: the effects of cluster structure and primary particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Lu, Zixing; Zhu, Man; Yuan, Zeshuai; Yang, Zhenyu; Hu, Zijun; Li, Junning

    2014-09-01

    A new two-level model is proposed to investigate the relationship between the mechanical properties and microstructure of silica aerogels. This two-level model consists of the particle-particle interaction model and the cluster structure model. The particle-particle interaction model is proposed to describe interactions between primary particles, in which the polymerization reaction between primary particles is considered. The cluster structure model represents the geometrical structure of silica aerogels, and it is established using a modified diffusion-limited colloid aggregation (DLCA) algorithm. This two-level model is used to investigate the tensile behavior of silica aerogels based on the discrete element method (DEM). The numerical results show that the primary particle size has significant effects on the elastic modulus and tensile strength of silica aerogels. Moreover, the power-law relationships between tensile properties and aerogel density are dependent on the variation of the primary particle radius with density. The present results can explain the difference among different experimental exponents to a certain extent. In comparison with experimental data within a wide density range, this two-level model provides good quantitative estimations of the elastic modulus and tensile strength of silica aerogels after the size effects of the primary particle are considered. This paper provides a fundamental understanding of the relationship between the mechanical properties and microstructure of silica aerogels. The two-level model can be extended to study the mechanical properties of other aerogels and aerogel composites. PMID:25022232

  5. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Jin, Tingting; Jin, Yachao; Wu, Leihong; Hu, Bin; Tian, Yu; Fan, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury.

  6. Toxicogenomic analysis of the particle dose- and size-response relationship of silica particles-induced toxicity in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the relationship between particle size and toxicity of silica particles (SP) with diameters of 30, 70, and 300 nm, which is essential to the safe design and application of SP. Data obtained from histopathological examinations suggested that SP of these sizes can all induce acute inflammation in the liver. In vivo imaging showed that intravenously administrated SP are mainly present in the liver, spleen and intestinal tract. Interestingly, in gene expression analysis, the cellular response pathways activated in the liver are predominantly conserved independently of particle dose when the same size SP are administered or are conserved independently of particle size, surface area and particle number when nano- or submicro-sized SP are administered at their toxic doses. Meanwhile, integrated analysis of transcriptomics, previous metabonomics and conventional toxicological results support the view that SP can result in inflammatory and oxidative stress, generate mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually cause hepatocyte necrosis by neutrophil-mediated liver injury. (paper)

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of strontium(II) coordination. II. Sorption and precipitation at kaolinite, amorphous silica, and goethite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of dissolved strontium on kaolinite, amorphous silica, and goethite was studied as a function of pH, aqueous strontium concentration, the presence or absence of atmospheric CO2 or dissolved phosphate, and aging over a 57-day period. Selected sorption samples ([Sr(a1)]i ∼ 0.5--1 x 10-3m) were examined with synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at low (13--23 K) and room temperatures to determine the local molecular coordination around strontium

  8. Particle size effect of redox reactions for Co species supported on silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotiwan, Siwaruk; Tomiga, Hiroki; Katagiri, Masaki; Yamamoto, Yusaku; Yamashita, Shohei; Katayama, Misaki; Inada, Yasuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Conversions of chemical states during redox reactions of two silica-supported Co catalysts, which were prepared by the impregnation method, were evaluated by using an in situ XAFS technique. The addition of citric acid into the precursor solution led to the formation on silica of more homogeneous and smaller Co particles, with an average diameter of 4 nm. The supported Co3O4 species were reduced to metallic Co via the divalent CoO species during a temperature-programmed reduction process. The reduced Co species were quantitatively oxidized with a temperature-programmed oxidation process. The higher observed reduction temperature of the smaller CoO particles and the lower observed oxidation temperature of the smaller metallic Co particles were induced by the higher dispersion of the Co oxide species, which apparently led to a stronger interaction with supporting silica. The redox temperature between CoO and Co3O4 was found to be independent of the particle size.

  9. Retrofit design of rice husk feeding system in the production of amorphous silica ash in a pilot scale fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Rice husk is among the most important recovery resources for silica that is produced annually in huge quantities in many countries such as Malaysia which produces 2.38 (MT) of rice paddy. Rice husks accounts for 14-35 % of the weight of the paddy harvested, depending on the paddy variety and because of its abundance it poses serious environmental problems in the rice producing countries. Therefore, the thermo-chemical conversion of rice husks to useful silica ash by fluidized bed combustion is the proven and cost-effective technology for converting the renewable waste husks by making commercial use of this rice husk ash because of its self sustaining ability. However, feeding of rice husk into the reactor bed has become a difficult problem hindering the production of amorphous silica. This is due to the poor penetration and low bulk density as well as the flaky, abrasive and joined nature of rice husk. Most of the researches into fluidized bed combustion are on laboratory or bench scale and none had discussed pilot scale combustion of rice husk into amorphous silica. A recent attempt to solve this feeding problem from an experimental investigation in a bench-scale culminates into a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor designed with a combined screw conveyor and an inclined pneumatic feeding by direct injection, yet the problem persists. This paper presents a retrofit design of the existing 0.5 m internal diameter pilot scale fluidized bed combustor by the use of combined screw feeding system. It is envisaged that at the end of the experimental investigation the retrofit design will address the problem associated with rice husk feeding in bubbling fluidized bed combustors. (author)

  10. Laser-induced damage initiated on the surface of particle contamination fused silica at 1064nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michlitsch, K.J.

    1998-06-01

    An experimental study was undertaken to quantify the effects of contamination particles on the damage threshold of laser-illuminated fused silica optics and set cleanliness requirements for optics on the beam line of the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Circular contamination particles were sputter-deposited onto fused silica windows which were then illuminated repetitively using a 1064nm laser. A variety of contaminants were tested including metals, oxides, and organics. Tests were conducted with particles on the input and output surfaces of the window, and the morphological features of the damage were very reproducible. A plasma often ignited at the contamination particle; its intensity was dependent upon the mass of the contaminant. Input surface damage was characteristically more severe than output surface damage. The size of the damaged area scaled with the size of the particle. On a few occasions, catastrophic damage (cracking or ablation of the substrate) initiated on the output surface due to contamination particles on either the input or output surface. From damage growth plots, predictions can be made about the severity of damage expected from contamination particles of known size and material.

  11. Boron carbide particles formed from an amorphous boron/graphite powder mixture using a shock-wave technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) particles with filamental, distorted ellipsoidal, platelike, and polyhedral shapes were formed from vapor generated from an amorphous boron/graphite powder mixture with 14% starting density using a cylindrical shock-wave technique. The crystal phases of shocked compact and microstructures of the B4C particles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy, respectively

  12. Effects of silica and calcium levels in nanobioglass ceramic particles on osteoblast proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At nanoscale, bioglass ceramic (nBGC) particles containing calcium oxide (lime), silica and phosphorus pentoxide promote osteoblast proliferation. However, the role of varied amounts of calcium and silica present in nBGC particles on osteoblast proliferation is not yet completely known. Hence, the current work was aimed at synthesizing two different nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium oxide and silica, nBGC-1: SiO2:CaO:P2O5; mol% ∼ 70:25:5 and nBGC-2: SiO2:CaO:P2O5; mol% ∼ 64:31:5, and investigating their role on osteoblast proliferation. The synthesized nBGC particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. They exhibited their size at nanoscale and were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells (MG-63). The nBGC-2 particles were found to have more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation and promoted entering of more cells into G2/M cell cycle phase compared to nBGC-1 particles. There was a differential expression of cyclin proteins in MG-63 cells by nBGC-1 and nBGC-2 treatments, and the expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment. Thus, these results provide us a new insight in understanding the design of various nBGC particles by altering their ionic constituents with desirable biological properties thereby supporting bone augmentation. - Highlights: • nBGC particles with varied amounts of calcium and silica were synthesized. • They were non-toxic to human osteoblastic cells. • nBGC-2 particles had more effect on stimulation of osteoblast proliferation. • nBGC-2 particles promoted entering of osteoblasts into G2/M cell cycle phase. • Expression of cyclin B1 and E proteins was found to be more by nBGC-2 treatment

  13. Effect of Recycled Rubber Particles and Silica on Tensile and Tear Properties of Natural Rubber Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Velu CHANDRAN; Thomas MANVEL RAJ; Thangavelu LAKSHMANAN

    2016-01-01

    Application of scrap rubber and worn out tires in natural rubber compounds has been studied. The scrap rubber can, however, be recycled and compounded with natural rubber and thus can be generated as a rubber composite. In this work, recycled rubber particles (RRP) were prepared using pulverization process. Then, RRP was blended with natural rubber and silica compounds, and it was synthesized by two- roll mill and hydraulic press at specified operating conditions. The samples ranging from 0 t...

  14. Toxicological and Immunomodulatory Properties of Mesoporous Silica Particles : Applications in Life Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Kupferschmidt, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Mesoporous silica particles offer great potential benefits as vehicles for drug delivery and in other biomedical applications. They present a high loading capacity due their ordered and size-tuneable pores that allow molecules to be loaded and released. In addition, they offer the possibility to enhance oral bioavailability of drugs with limited aqueous solubility and to protect pH sensitive drugs from the acidic conditions in the stomach on their way to the intestine. The aim of this thesis ...

  15. Aligned gold nanorods in silica made by ion irradiation of core-shell colloidal particles

    OpenAIRE

    Roorda, S.; Dillen, T. van; Polman, A.; Graf, C.; Blaaderen, A. van; Kooi, BJ

    2004-01-01

    Colloidal particles with a 14 nm diameter Au core surrounded by a 72 nm thick silica shell have been irradiated with 30 MeV heavy ions. The shell deforms into an oblate ellipsoid, while the core becomes rod-shaped (aspect ratio up to 9) with the major axis along the beam. Optical extinction measurements show evidence for split plasmon bands, characteristic for anisotropic metal nanoparticles.

  16. Influence of the ammonium hydroxide concentration in morphological control of meso porous silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of new M41S meso porous silica families in 1992 extended the applications into much wider pore ranges, bringing in a new prosperous era in porous material research. The synthesis of these meso porous silicas has been mainly accomplished through a self-assembly between surfactant molecules and inorganic species under various pH conditions. Meanwhile, many studies have been conducted on the application as catalysts, adsorbents, and packing materials for separation columns due to their unique properties such as high specific surface area, large pore volume, tuneable pore size, and narrow pore size distribution. The pore sizes of these materials can be easily controlled by changing the alkyl-chain length of the surfactant used. However, the control of the morphology and the pore structure is not so common. The morphological control of these materials in particular is one of the major challenges for their industrial application. Recently, the meso porous silica materials with various shapes such as fibers, films, polyhedral particles, and spheres have been reported. In our previous study, the core-shell nanoparticles with a silica core and a meso porous shell under basic conditions were synthesized using the silica nanoparticles as a core and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS)-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr)-NH4OH-H2O-C2H5OH system. In this work, we report the synthesis of the most well known hexagonal MCM-41 among three main mesophases in the M41S families using TEOS-CTABr-NH4OH-H2O system. Also, in the control of the morphology and pore structure of the meso porous silica materials, the influence of the NH4OH concentration was investigated

  17. Influence of the ammonium hydroxide concentration in morphological control of meso porous silica particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sukbon; Jung, Chonghun; Yoon, Inho; Kim, Changki; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon [Division of Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Development, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The discovery of new M41S meso porous silica families in 1992 extended the applications into much wider pore ranges, bringing in a new prosperous era in porous material research. The synthesis of these meso porous silicas has been mainly accomplished through a self-assembly between surfactant molecules and inorganic species under various pH conditions. Meanwhile, many studies have been conducted on the application as catalysts, adsorbents, and packing materials for separation columns due to their unique properties such as high specific surface area, large pore volume, tuneable pore size, and narrow pore size distribution. The pore sizes of these materials can be easily controlled by changing the alkyl-chain length of the surfactant used. However, the control of the morphology and the pore structure is not so common. The morphological control of these materials in particular is one of the major challenges for their industrial application. Recently, the meso porous silica materials with various shapes such as fibers, films, polyhedral particles, and spheres have been reported. In our previous study, the core-shell nanoparticles with a silica core and a meso porous shell under basic conditions were synthesized using the silica nanoparticles as a core and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS)-cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTABr)-NH{sub 4}OH-H{sub 2}O-C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH system. In this work, we report the synthesis of the most well known hexagonal MCM-41 among three main mesophases in the M41S families using TEOS-CTABr-NH{sub 4}OH-H{sub 2}O system. Also, in the control of the morphology and pore structure of the meso porous silica materials, the influence of the NH{sub 4}OH concentration was investigated.

  18. Optical encoding of microbeads based on silica particle encapsulated quantum dots and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel method concerning the coding technology of polystyrene beads with Si encapsulated quantum dot (QD) particles (Si - QDs particles) is studied in this paper. In the reverse microemulsion system containing tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), water-soluble QDs (emission peak at 600 nm) were enveloped within the silica shell, forming Si - QDs particles. The Si - QDs particles were characterized by TEM, showing good uniform size, with an average diameter of about 167.0 nm. In comparison with the pure water-soluble QDs, the encapsulation of water-soluble QDs in the silica shell led to an enhancement in anti-photobleaching by providing inert barriers for the QDs. Images presented by SEM and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the Si - QDs particles were equably coated on the surface of carboxyl functionalized polystyrene (PS) beads. Then, with the assistance of ethyl-3-(dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS), human IgG could be successfully crosslinked to Si - QDs particle coated PS-COOH beads. Furthermore, the Si - QDs coated PS-COOH beads with human IgG were examined in immunoassay experiments, and the results indicated that these beads could be applied in the specific recognition of goat-anti-human IgG in solution. This investigation is expected to provide a new route to bead coding in the field of suspension microarrays, based on the use of QDs

  19. Size control of rhodium particles of silica-supported catalysts using water-in-oil microemulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Masahiro; Hanaoka, Toshiaki; Kim, Won Young; Nagata, Hideo; Wakabayashi, Katsuhiko

    1997-11-01

    Effects of components of water-in-oil microemulsions on rhodium particle sizes of silica-supported rhodium catalysts were investigated in the catalyst preparation method using microemulsion. In the case of the microemulsion of polyoxyethylene(23)dodecyl ether/ n-alcohols/RhCl 3 aq., the rhodium particle size increased from 3.4 to 5.0 nm as the specific permittivity of the organic solvent increased. The chain length of hydrophilic group of polyoxyethylene- p-nonylphenyl ether ( n = 5 to 15) employed as surfactants had an effect on the rhodium particle size where the rhodium size ranged between 2.0 and 3.6 nm. The rhodium particle size was 1.5 nm in the case of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfocuccinate and this value was found to be the smallest. These results could be interpreted in terms of the adsorption of the surfactant on rhodium-hydrazine particle surface.

  20. Assessment of the rice husk lean-combustion in a bubbling fluidized bed for the production of amorphous silica-rich ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice husk lean-combustion in a bubbling and atmospheric fluidized bed reactor (FBR) of 0.3 m diameter with expansion to 0.4 m in the freeboard zone and 3 m height was investigated. Experiment design - response surface methodology (RSM) - is used to evaluate both excess air and normal fluidizing velocity influence (independent and controllable variables), in the combustion efficiency (carbon transformation), bed and freeboard temperature and silica content in the ashes. Hot gases emissions (CO2, CO and NOx), crystallographic structure and morphology of the ash are also shown. A cold fluidization study is also presented. The values implemented in the equipment operation, excess air in the range of 40-125% and normal fluidization velocities (0.13-0.15 Nm/s) show that the values near the lower limit, encourage bed temperatures around 750 oC with higher carbon transformation efficiencies around 98%. However, this condition deteriorated the amorphous potential of silica present in the ash. An opposite behavior was evidenced at the upper limit of the excess air. This thermochemical process in this type of reactor shows the technical feasibility to valorize RH producing hot gases and an amorphous siliceous raw material.

  1. Silica Nanoparticles as the Adjuvant for the Immunisation of Mice Using Hepatitis B Core Virus-Like Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Dace Skrastina; Ivars Petrovskis; Ilva Lieknina; Janis Bogans; Regina Renhofa; Velta Ose; Andris Dishlers; Yuri Dekhtyar; Paul Pumpens

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology and nanomaterials have facilitated the development of silicon dioxide, or Silica, particles as a promising immunological adjuvant for the generation of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In the present study, we have compared the adjuvanting potential of commercially available Silica nanoparticles (initial particles size of 10-20 nm) with that of aluminium hydroxide, or Alum, as well as that of complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants for the immunisatio...

  2. Effect of Recycled Rubber Particles and Silica on Tensile and Tear Properties of Natural Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velu CHANDRAN

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Application of scrap rubber and worn out tires in natural rubber compounds has been studied. The scrap rubber can, however, be recycled and compounded with natural rubber and thus can be generated as a rubber composite. In this work, recycled rubber particles (RRP were prepared using pulverization process. Then, RRP was blended with natural rubber and silica compounds, and it was synthesized by two- roll mill and hydraulic press at specified operating conditions. The samples ranging from 0 to 40 phr of RRP loaded with silica were used as constant filler. The mechanical properties and morphological analysis were carried out. The results showed that tensile strength and elongation at break gradually decreased with increasing RRP loading in natural rubber and silica compounds. Tensile modulus went down at 10 phr of RRP and then showed an increasing trend. Hardness increased up to 30 phr of RRP and tear strength increased up to 20 phr of RRP. A comparative study was also carried out with virgin natural rubber vulcanizates. The incorporation of RRP and silica up to 20 phr in natural rubber did not lower the performance of rubber articles. Morphological studies revealed that better filler dispersion, interfacial adhesion, and cross link density could increase the tensile and tear strengths.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.7330

  3. INFLUENCE OF RESIN TO BIND SILICA PARTICLES ON THE COTTON FABRIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOU-BEDA Eva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fictionalization of textiles has been the aim of many studies in the field of intelligent materials. The application of nanoparticles on the fabric is one of approaches used for get textile fictionalization. Normally, there is no attraction between inorganic particles and polymeric materials such as textiles. The difference between surface energy of two aforementioned organic and inorganic materials causes a kind of repellency in their interfaces. This problem is intensified by using nanoparticles because of their high specific surfaces In this research, treated samples with silica particles are compared to evaluate the effectiveness of the binder used. Cotton fabrics´ surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive using X-Ray (EDX. EDX technique showed that it was a suitable method to detect Si particles presence on fabric surface, this technique offers quantitative results which help to compare different formulations. We confirm that the treated fabric with resin contained higher quantity of Ti particles than the one treated without resin. We analyzed %weight (Si/O for unwashed and washed treated samples with and without binder. We concluded that whased samples which had been treated using acrylic resin contain higher quantity of the silica particles onto fabric than those whased samples which had been treated without resin

  4. Effects of trace water on charging of silica particles dispersed in a nonpolar medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacek, Matthew; Bergsman, David; Michor, Edward; Berg, John C

    2012-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the effects of trace water on the charging of silica (SiO(2)) particles dispersed in a nonpolar medium. There are a growing number of applications that seek to use electrostatic effects in apolar media to control particle movement and aggregation stability in such systems. One factor that is often overlooked in the preparation of nonpolar colloidal dispersions is the amount of water that is introduced to the system by hygroscopic particles and surfactants. The amount and location of this water can have significant effects on the electrical properties of these systems. For nonpolar surfactant solutions it has been shown that water can affect the conductivity, and it has been speculated that this is due to swelling of the polar cores of inverse micelles, increasing the fraction of them that are charged. Some studies have suggested that particle surface charging may also be sensitive to water content, but a clear mechanism for the process has not been fully developed. The situation with particles is further complicated by the fact that it is often unclear whether the water resides on the particle surfaces or in the polar cores of inverse micelles. The current work explores not only the effect of water content on reverse micelle and particle charging but seeks to differentiate between water bound to the particles and water located in the micelles. This is accomplished by measuring the solution conductivity and the electrophoretic mobility of silicon dioxide particles dispersed in solutions of Isopar-L and OLOA 11000. The water content is determined for both the dispersion and the supernatant after centrifuging the particles out. It is found that at equilibrium the majority of the water in the system adsorbs to the surface of the hygroscopic silica particles. In addition, the effect of water on particle electrophoretic mobility is found to be dependent on surfactant concentration. At small OLOA concentrations, additional water

  5. Silica nanoparticles as the adjuvant for the immunisation of mice using hepatitis B core virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Lieknina, Ilva; Bogans, Janis; Renhofa, Regina; Ose, Velta; Dishlers, Andris; Dekhtyar, Yuri; Pumpens, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology and nanomaterials have facilitated the development of silicon dioxide, or Silica, particles as a promising immunological adjuvant for the generation of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In the present study, we have compared the adjuvanting potential of commercially available Silica nanoparticles (initial particles size of 10-20 nm) with that of aluminium hydroxide, or Alum, as well as that of complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants for the immunisation of BALB/c mice with virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by recombinant full-length Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The induction of B-cell and T-cell responses was studied after immunisation. Silica nanoparticles were able to adsorb maximally 40% of the added HBc, whereas the adsorption capacity of Alum exceeded 90% at the same VLPs/adjuvant ratio. Both Silica and Alum formed large complexes with HBc VLPs that sedimented rapidly after formulation, as detected by dynamic light scattering, spectrophotometry, and electron microscopy. Both Silica and Alum augmented the humoral response against HBc VLPs to the high anti-HBc level in the case of intraperitoneal immunisation, whereas in subcutaneous immunisation, the Silica-adjuvanted anti-HBc level even exceeded the level adjuvanted by Alum. The adjuvanting of HBc VLPs by Silica resulted in the same typical IgG2a/IgG1 ratios as in the case of the adjuvanting by Alum. The combination of Silica with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) led to the same enhancement of the HBc-specific T-cell induction as in the case of the Alum and MPL combination. These findings demonstrate that Silica is not a weaker putative adjuvant than Alum for induction of B-cell and T-cell responses against recombinant HBc VLPs. This finding may have an essential impact on the development of the set of Silica-adjuvanted vaccines based on a long list of HBc-derived virus-like particles as the biological component. PMID:25436773

  6. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmao Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium (Ce corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0×10−14 m2s for Ce3+ compared to 2.5×10−13 m2s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.

  7. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nano porous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerium (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0x10-14 m2s for Ce3+ compared to 2.5x10-13 m2s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.

  8. Electrorheological Fluids Based on Titania Particles Coated with Silica and Their Application in Smart Windows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The electrorheological (ER) fluids are colloidal suspension of highly polarizable particles in a non-conducting solvent. Chains ofsubmicron-sized particles formed along an applied DC electric field by the so-called electrorheological effect. According to theobvious change of transmittance of the ER fluids in a DC electric field when the polarized particles arranged along the field,the model of smart window was proposed by sandwiching the ER fluids based on titania particles coated with silica between apair of In-Sn oxide (ITO) coated glasses. The solar transmittance change as much as 48.0% was obtained with the wavelengthof 500 nm at the maximum on applying and removing the electric field of 500 V/mm.

  9. Modeling the mean interaction forces between powder particles. Application to silica gel-magnesium stearate mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G., E-mail: gthomas@emse.fr [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint Etienne, Centre SPIN-LPMG, UMR CNRS 5148, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 02 (France); Ouabbas, Y. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint Etienne, Centre SPIN-LPMG, UMR CNRS 5148, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 02 (France); Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Industrielles et des Mines d' Albi-Carmaux, Centre RAPSODEE, UMR CNRS 2392, Campus Jarlard-81013 Albi (France); Grosseau, P. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint Etienne, Centre SPIN-LPMG, UMR CNRS 5148, 158 Cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne Cedex 02 (France); Baron, M.; Chamayou, A.; Galet, L. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Industrielles et des Mines d' Albi-Carmaux, Centre RAPSODEE, UMR CNRS 2392, Campus Jarlard-81013 Albi (France)

    2009-06-15

    Dry coating experiments were performed by using the Hybridizer (Nara). Large host silica gel (SG) particles (d{sub 50} = 55 {mu}m) were coated with fine invited particles of magnesium stearate (MS, d{sub 50} = 4.6 {mu}m) for different contents of MS in the mixture. The real MS mass fraction w{sub I} obtained after mechanical treatment has been determined thanks to calibration from TGA measurements. The surface structure and morphology of MS coatings were observed using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) [Y. Ouabbas, A. Chamayou, L. Galet, M. Baron, J. Dodds, A.M. Danna, G. Thomas, B. Guilhot, P. Grosseau, Modification of powders properties by dry coating: some examples of process and products characteristics, Proceedings of CHISA2008, Prague, August 2008, submitted for publication; L. Galet, Y. Ouabbas, A.M. Danna, G. Thomas, P. Grosseau, M. Baron, A. Chamayou, Surface morphology analysis and AFM study of silica gel particles after mechanical dry coating with magnesium stearate, Proceedings of PSA2008, UK, September 2008, submitted for publication]. AFM has been also used to measure the adhesion forces between particles. Interaction forces between the material attached to the cantilever (magnesium stearate MS) and the surface of the composite material (silica gel SG or magnesium stearate MS) have been determined at different surface locations. For different compositions w{sub I} of the mixture MS-SG, the numeric distribution and the mean value f of the forces f{sub H} obtained for MS-SG interactions or f{sub I} for MS-MS interactions have been established and the experimental curve showing the evolution of f versus w{sub I} has been derived. Models of ordered structures have been developed, implying morphological hypotheses concerning large spherical or cylindrical host particles H and small invited spherical I. Different types of distribution of I materials onto the surface of H have been considered: for examples a

  10. Modeling the mean interaction forces between powder particles. Application to silica gel-magnesium stearate mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry coating experiments were performed by using the Hybridizer (Nara). Large host silica gel (SG) particles (d50 = 55 μm) were coated with fine invited particles of magnesium stearate (MS, d50 = 4.6 μm) for different contents of MS in the mixture. The real MS mass fraction wI obtained after mechanical treatment has been determined thanks to calibration from TGA measurements. The surface structure and morphology of MS coatings were observed using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) [Y. Ouabbas, A. Chamayou, L. Galet, M. Baron, J. Dodds, A.M. Danna, G. Thomas, B. Guilhot, P. Grosseau, Modification of powders properties by dry coating: some examples of process and products characteristics, Proceedings of CHISA2008, Prague, August 2008, submitted for publication; L. Galet, Y. Ouabbas, A.M. Danna, G. Thomas, P. Grosseau, M. Baron, A. Chamayou, Surface morphology analysis and AFM study of silica gel particles after mechanical dry coating with magnesium stearate, Proceedings of PSA2008, UK, September 2008, submitted for publication]. AFM has been also used to measure the adhesion forces between particles. Interaction forces between the material attached to the cantilever (magnesium stearate MS) and the surface of the composite material (silica gel SG or magnesium stearate MS) have been determined at different surface locations. For different compositions wI of the mixture MS-SG, the numeric distribution and the mean value f of the forces fH obtained for MS-SG interactions or fI for MS-MS interactions have been established and the experimental curve showing the evolution of f versus wI has been derived. Models of ordered structures have been developed, implying morphological hypotheses concerning large spherical or cylindrical host particles H and small invited spherical I. Different types of distribution of I materials onto the surface of H have been considered: for examples a discrete monolayer - or multilayers - of

  11. Dynamic High-Pressure Behavior of Quartz Silica Sand of Two Different Particle Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gregory; Thadhani, Naresh

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic high-pressure behavior of customized high purity quartz silica sand is presented. The silica was chosen to have rounded grains and controlled size, size distribution, and water content. The customized sand was selected with two narrow size ranges, approximately 100 μm and 500 μm, to provide a range of responses to compare with meso-scale simulations. The materials were pressed into a copper capsule ring connected to a copper driver plate and backed by a PMMA window. Experiments were performed in plate impact light gas gun and powder gun, using VISAR and PDV velocity measurement techniques, and PVDF piezoelectric pressure gauges. The compaction wave velocity was calculated from transit times measured by PVDF gauges placed on either side of the silica samples. Interface particle velocity profiles were recorded by VISAR and PDV at the rear surface of the sample in contact with a PMMA window. Analysis of the details of the shapes of the rise and plateaus in the VISAR and PDV measured velocities reveal a dependence on the size of the particles.

  12. Design and characterization of Nafion/ex-situ silica nanocomposite membranes: Effects of particle size and surface modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriithi, Beatrice Wanjku

    This dissertation focuses on the preparation of new Nafion RTM/ex-situ silica nanocomposite membranes and the impact of particle size of spherical silica particles on the nanocomposites' properties. To achieve acceptable power production, fuel cell polymer membranes are required with good proton conductivity, water retention, thermal and mechanical stability. However, to avoid poisoning of fuel cell electrocatalysts with CO or other fuel contaminants, they must be operated at temperatures (>100°C). At these temperatures, fuel cell membranes dehydrate resulting in dramatic decreases in proton conductivity or complete failure as membranes crack due to volumetric stress from water loss. Even if fuel cell is kept in a humidified chamber, increasing temperature will eventually shut the cell down as Nafion RTM's bicontinuous structure "dissolves" into a single poorly conducting phase at temperatures above the polymer's Tg. This research provides systematic studies of effects of silica particle size on properties of silica-NafionRTM nanocomposites. Results of this study include new insights into requirements for reproducible particle syntheses, practical methods for avoiding silica particle floatation during NafionRTM nanocomposite membranes preparation, and a summary of the influence of particle size and functionalization on NafionRTM membrane properties. Stober particle syntheses showed high sensitive to ammonia concentration and we discovered that literature procedures' variability is likely due to researchers' failure to accurately measure ammonia concentration in their aqueous base (which can be 50% or more off). Homogeneous nanocomposite membranes, as determined by AFM and SEM, were successfully prepared using more viscous dispersions. It was observed that nanocomposite membranes with small particles (80°C. Small, unmodified particles led to enhanced thermal stability of the NafionRTM ionic domain, however, surface modification did not result in any thermal

  13. Growth and Dispersion the Silica Particle on the Glass via Modified Stöber Method and Spray Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Thi Thanh Ho*

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We presented the fabrication of a novel geometric light trapping structure based on silica particle. This light trapping structure with good morphology was fabricated through modified Stöber method and spray technique. More importantly, the silica particles were dispersed onto glass by using bottom-up or chemical approach involves a common route used to synthesis silica particles from atomic or molecular scale. An optimized synthesis condition is a combination of optimal values of each reaction parameter of Stöber method that could produce homogenous and mono-dispersed silica nanoparticles with uniform size. The diameter of silica particles can be varied from 200, 430, 560, 460 nm by increasing concentrations of ammonia from 2.33 mM to 4.65 mM, 9.31 mM and 13.96 mM, respectively. We found that the silica particle size was well controlled and uniform from ~200 nm to 560 nm by controlling the ammonia concentration. These results open up the possibility to further fabricate geometric light trapping structure with high scattering level (haze and subsequently to increase the short circuit current density (Jsc in the solar cells

  14. Influence of particle surface properties on the dielectric behavior of silica/epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica/epoxy composites have been widely used in functional electric device applications. Silica nanoparticles, both unmodified and modified with the coupling agent KH-550, were used to prepare epoxy composites. Dielectric measurements showed that nanocomposites exhibit a higher dielectric constant than the control sample, and had more obvious dielectric relaxation characteristics. Results showed that particle surface properties have a profound effect on the dielectric behavior of the nanocomposites. These characteristics are attributed to the local ununiformity of the microstructure caused by the large interface area and the interaction between the filler and the matrix. This phenomenon is explained in terms of prolonging chemical chains created during the curing process. The mechanism is discussed with measurements of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR)

  15. Mesoporous Silica Coated CeF3:Tb3+ Particles for Drug Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyan Kong

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available CeF3:Tb3+ nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a polyol process using diethylene glycol (DEG as solvent. After being coated with dense silica, these CeF3:Tb3+ nanoparticles can be coated with mesoporous silica using nonionic triblock copolymer EO20PO70EO20 (P 123 as structure-directing agent. The composite can load ibuprofen and release the drug in the PBS. The composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, nitrogen absorption/desorption isotherms, fluorescence spectra, and UV/Vis absorption spectra, respectively. The composite particles have considerable large pore volume and large surface area. In addition, the composite still emits strong green fluorescence (Tb3+ and can be used as fluorescent probes in drug delivery system.

  16. Study on the thermal resistance in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the heat transport in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel. The two adjacent particles as the basic heat transport unit were modelled to characterize the heat transfer through the calculation of thermal resistance and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The total thermal resistance of two contact particles was predicted by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD). The defects were formed by deleting atoms in the system randomly first and performing heating and quenching process afterwards to achieve the DLCA (diffusive limited cluster-cluster aggregation) process. This kind of treatment showed a very reasonable prediction of thermal conductivity for the silica aerogels compared with the experimental values. The heat transport was great suppressed as the contact length increased or defect concentration increased. The constrain effect of heat transport was much significant when contact length fraction was in the small range (0.5). Also, as the contact length increased, the role of joint thermal resistance played in the constraint of heat transport was increasing. However, the defect concentration did not affect the share of joint thermal resistance as the contact length did. VDOS of the system was calculated by numerical method to characterize the heat transport from atomic vibration view. The smaller contact length and greater defect concentration primarily affected the longitudinal acoustic modes, which ultimately influenced the heat transport between the adjacent particles

  17. Study on the thermal resistance in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel by molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M. [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190 (China); Department of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qiu, L., E-mail: qiulin111@sina.com, E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zheng, X. H., E-mail: qiulin111@sina.com, E-mail: jzzhengxinghua@163.com; Zhu, J.; Tang, D. W. [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing100190 (China)

    2014-09-07

    In this article, molecular dynamics simulation was performed to study the heat transport in secondary particles chain of silica aerogel. The two adjacent particles as the basic heat transport unit were modelled to characterize the heat transfer through the calculation of thermal resistance and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The total thermal resistance of two contact particles was predicted by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD). The defects were formed by deleting atoms in the system randomly first and performing heating and quenching process afterwards to achieve the DLCA (diffusive limited cluster-cluster aggregation) process. This kind of treatment showed a very reasonable prediction of thermal conductivity for the silica aerogels compared with the experimental values. The heat transport was great suppressed as the contact length increased or defect concentration increased. The constrain effect of heat transport was much significant when contact length fraction was in the small range (<0.5) or the defect concentration is in the high range (>0.5). Also, as the contact length increased, the role of joint thermal resistance played in the constraint of heat transport was increasing. However, the defect concentration did not affect the share of joint thermal resistance as the contact length did. VDOS of the system was calculated by numerical method to characterize the heat transport from atomic vibration view. The smaller contact length and greater defect concentration primarily affected the longitudinal acoustic modes, which ultimately influenced the heat transport between the adjacent particles.

  18. Mechanical properties of dental resin composites by co-filling diatomite and nanosized silica particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical property effects of co-filling dental resin composites with porous diatomite and nanosized silica particles (OX-50). The purification of raw diatomite by acid-leaching was conducted in a hot 5 M HCl solution at 80 deg. C for 12 h. Both diatomite and nanosized SiO2 were silanized with 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane. The silanized inorganic particles were mixed into a dimethacrylate resin. Purified diatomite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm. Silanized inorganic particles were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a thermogravimetric analysis. The mechanical properties of the composites were tested by three-point bending, compression and Vicker's microhardness. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show the cross-section morphologies of the composites. Silanization of diatomite and nanosized silica positively reinforced interactions between the resin matrix and the inorganic particles. The mechanical properties of the resin composites gradually increased with the addition of modified diatomite (m-diatomite). The fracture surfaces of the composites exhibited large fracture steps with the addition of m-diatomite. However, when the mass fraction of m-diatomite was greater than 21 wt.% with respect to modified nanosized silica (mOX-50) and constituted 70% of the resin composite by weight, the mechanical properties of the resin composites started to decline. Thus, the porous structure of diatomite appears to be a crucial factor to improve mechanical properties of resin composites.

  19. Thermal pretreatments of superficially porous silica particles for high-performance liquid chromatography: Surface control, structural characterization and chromatographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Mélanie; Sebban, Muriel; Tchapla, Alain; Mercier, Olivier; Cardinael, Pascal; Peulon-Agasse, Valérie

    2015-11-01

    This study reports the impact of thermal pretreatment between 400 and 1100°C on superficially porous silica particles (e.g. core-shell, fused-core; here abbreviated as SPP silica). The different thermally pretreated SPP silica (400°C, 900°C and 1100°C) were chemically bonded with an octadecyl chain under microwave irradiation. The bare SPP silica, thermally untreated and pretreated, as well as the chemically bonded phases (CBPs) were fully characterized by elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), and solid state cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) (29)Si NMR. The chromatographic properties of the overall set of C18-thermally pretreated SPP silica stationary phases were determined using the Tanaka test. Complementary, the simplified Veuthey test was used to deeply study the silanol activity, considering a set of 7 basic solutes with various physicochemical properties. Both tests were also performed on different commercial SPP silica columns and different types of bonding chemistry (C18, Phenyl-hexyl, RP-amide, C30, aQ). Multivariate data analyses (hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis) were carried out to define groups of stationary phases with similar chromatographic properties and situate them in relation to those commercially available. These different C18-thermally pretreated SPP silicas represented a wide range of stationary phases as they were spread out along the score plot. Moreover, this study highlighted that the thermal pretreatment improved the chemical stability of the SPP silica compare to untreated SPP silica and untreated porous silica. Consequently, higher thermal pretreatment can be applied (up to 900°C) before functionalization without destruction of the silica matrix. Indeed, a significantly lower dissolution of the thermally pretreated SPP silica under aggressive conditions could allow the use of the corresponding functionalized stationary phases at high

  20. Measurements of Silica Aggregate Particle Growth Using Light Scattering and Thermophoretic Sampling in a Coflow Diffusion Flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of silica aggregate particles in a coflow diffusion flame has been studied experimentally using light scattering and thermophoretic sampling techniques. An attempt has been made to calculate the aggregate number density and volume fraction using the measurements of scattering cross section from 90o light scattering with combination of measuring the particle size and morphology from the localized sampling and a TEM image analysis. Aggregate or particle number densities and volume fractions were calculated using Rayleigh-Debye-Gans and Mie theory for fractal aggregates and spherical particles, respectively. Using this technique, the effects of H2 flow rates on the evolution of silica aggregate particles have been studied in a coflow diffusion flame burner. As the flow rate of H2 increases, the primary particle diameters of silica aggregates have been first decreased, but, further increase of H2 flow rate causes the diameter of primary particles to increase and for sufficiently larger flow rates, the fractal aggregates finally become spherical particles. For the cases of high flame temperatures, the particle sizes become larger and the number densities decrease by coagulation as the particles move up within the flame. For cases of low flame temperatures, the primary particle diameters of aggregates vary a little following the centerline of burner and for the case of the lowest flame temperature in the present experiments, the sizes of primary particles even decrease as particles move upward

  1. Infrared study of the interaction of charged silica particles with TiO2 particles containing adsorbed cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Tripp, Carl P

    2005-03-15

    Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the adsorption of charged silica particles onto TiO(2) particles coated with anionic sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) or cationic poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDADMAC). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that IR spectroscopy has been used to study the interaction of a polymer layer on one particle with a second different particle. The results show that, once adsorbed on the TiO(2) particle, the PDADMAC or the NaPA does not transfer to the silica particles. In the case of NaPA coated TiO(2), positively charged silica particles deposit on the TiO(2) and this is accompanied by a change in the relative intensities of the bands due to COOH and COO(-) groups. From this change in band intensity, it is calculated that only approximately 6% of the COO(-) groups located in the loops and tails bind to the silica particle. This shows that the polymer bridges the two particles through an electrostatic interaction with the outer COO(-) groups. Similarly, in the case of the TiO(2) particles coated with PDADMAC, negatively charged silica deposits on the TiO(2) and this is accompanied by an increase in intensity of the symmetric bending mode of the (+)N(CH(3))(3) group. This change in band intensity arises from the binding of these cationic sites of the polymer to the negative surface sites on the silica. PMID:15752056

  2. Intermolecular Interaction and Vibrational Spectra at Fumed Silica Particles/Silicone Polymer Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic view on the interface formed by fumed silica particle and silicone polymers is suggested basing on a combined study that involves quantum-chemical (QCh) calculations and vibrational spectroscopic experiment. The former were performed for model clusters simulating a real 'area of contact' on the interface. Vibrational spectra were obtained for commercial products. Calculated vibrational spectra, obtained for model clusters by using force constants determined in due course of the QCh study, provided a quite perfect linkage between the QCh results and experimental spectra. This makes the suggested QCh microscopic description highly reliable

  3. An infrared spectroscopic study of the adsorption of carbon monoxide on silica-supported copper particles

    OpenAIRE

    De Jong, K P; Geus, John W.; Joziasse, J.

    2006-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is used to study the adsorption of carbon monoxide (20°C; 0.1– 100 Torr) on copper-on-silica catalysts differently prepared and pretreated. As determined by electron microscopy and X-ray line broadening, the catalysts contain copper particles having sizes of 60 to 5000 Å depending on the preparation procedure and the thermal treatment. Adsorbed carbon monoxide displays broad infrared absorption bands exhibiting a maximum at 2099 to 2146 cm-1. The position of the maximum ...

  4. Upgrading the rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis for the production of amorphous silica and high quality activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jon; Lopez, Gartzen; Amutio, Maider; Bilbao, Javier; Olazar, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The overall valorization of rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR) has been studied in a two-step process. Thus, silica has been recovered in a first step and the remaining carbon material has been subjected to steam activation. The char samples used in this study have been obtained by continuous flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor at 500°C. Extraction with Na2CO3 allows recovering 88% of the silica contained in the rice husk char. Activation of the silica-free rice husk char has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor at 800°C using steam as activating agent. The porous structure of the activated carbons produced includes a combination of micropores and mesopores, with a BET surface area of up to 1365m(2)g(-1) at the end of 15min. PMID:25127010

  5. Characterisation of amorphous silica in air-oxidised Ti3SiC2 at 500-1000 deg. C using secondary-ion mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we have described the use of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), solid state 29Si magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to detect the existence of amorphous silica in Ti3SiC2 oxidised at 500-1000 deg. C. The formation of amorphous SiO2 and growth of crystalline TiO2 with temperature was monitored using dynamic SIMS and synchrotron radiation diffraction. A duplex structure with an outer TiO2-rich layer and an inner mixed layer of SiO2 and TiO2 was observed. Results of NMR and TEM verified for the first time the direct evidence of amorphous silica formation during the oxidation of Ti3SiC2 at the temperature range 500-1000 deg. C.

  6. The role of porous nanostructure in controlling lipase-mediated digestion of lipid loaded into silica particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Paul; Tan, Angel; Whitby, Catherine P; Prestidge, Clive A

    2014-03-18

    The rate and extent of lipolysis, the breakdown of fat into molecules that can be absorbed into the bloodstream, depend on the interfacial composition and structure of lipid (fat) particles. A novel method for controlling the interfacial properties is to load the lipid into porous colloidal particles. We report on the role of pore nanostructure and surface coverage in controlling the digestion kinetics of medium-chain and long-chain triglycerides loaded into porous silica powders of different particle size, porosity, and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity. An in vitro lipolysis model was used to measure digestion kinetics of lipid by pancreatic lipase, a digestive enzyme. The rate and extent of lipid digestion were significantly enhanced when a partial monolayer of lipid was loaded in porous hydrophilic silica particles compared to a submicrometer lipid-in-water emulsion or a coarse emulsion. The inhibitory effect of digestion products was clearly evident for digestion from a submicrometer emulsion and coarse emulsion. This effect was minimal, however, in the two silica-lipid systems. Lipase action was inhibited for lipid loaded in the hydrophobic silica and considered due to the orientation of lipase adsorption on the methylated silica surface. Thus, hydrophilic silica promotes enhanced digestion kinetics, whereas hydrophobic silica exerts an inhibitory effect on hydrolysis. Evaluation of digestion kinetics enabled the mechanism for enhanced rate of lipolysis in silica-lipid systems to be derived and detailed. These investigations provide valuable insights for the optimization of smart food microparticles and lipid-based drug delivery systems based on lipid excipients and porous nanoparticles. PMID:24552363

  7. Importance of the Direct Contact of Amorphous Solid Particles with the Surface of Monolayers for the Transepithelial Permeation of Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Shunsuke; Kasatani, Sachiha; Tanaka, Megumi; Araki, Kaeko; Enomura, Masakazu; Moriyama, Kei; Inoue, Daisuke; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Kusamori, Kosuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-02-01

    The amorphization has been generally known to improve the absorption and permeation of poorly water-soluble drugs through the enhancement of the solubility. The present study focused on the direct contact of amorphous solid particles with the surface of the membrane using curcumin as a model for water-insoluble drugs. Amorphous nanoparticles of curcumin (ANC) were prepared with antisolvent crystallization method using a microreactor. The solubility of curcumin from ANC was two orders of magnitude higher than that of crystalline curcumin (CC). However, the permeation of curcumin from the saturated solution of ANC was negligible. The transepithelial permeation of curcumin from ANC suspension was significantly increased as compared to CC suspension, while the permeation was unlikely correlated with the solubility, and the increase in the permeation was dependent on the total concentration of curcumin in ANC suspension. The absorptive transport of curcumin (from apical to basal, A to B) from ANC suspension was much higher than the secretory transport (from basal to apical, B to A). In vitro transport of curcumin through air-interface monolayers is large from ANC but negligible from CC particles. These findings suggest that the direct contact of ANC with the absorptive membrane can play an important role in the transport of curcumin from ANC suspension. The results of the study suggest that amorphous particles may be directly involved in the transepithlial permeation of curcumin. PMID:26656401

  8. Distribution and histologic effects of intravenously administered amorphous nanosilica particles in the testes of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► There is rising concern regarding the potential health risks of nanomaterials. ► Few studies have investigated the effect of nanomaterials on the reproductive system. ► Here, we evaluated the intra-testicular distribution of nanosilica particles. ► We showed that nanosilica particles can penetrate the blood-testis barrier. ► These data provide basic information on ways to create safer nanomaterials. -- Abstract: Amorphous nanosilica particles (nSP) are being utilized in an increasing number of applications such as medicine, cosmetics, and foods. The reduction of the particle size to the nanoscale not only provides benefits to diverse scientific fields but also poses potential risks. Several reports have described the in vivo and in vitro toxicity of nSP, but few studies have examined their effects on the male reproductive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the testicular distribution and histologic effects of systemically administered nSP. Mice were injected intravenously with nSP with diameters of 70 nm (nSP70) or conventional microsilica particles with diameters of 300 nm (nSP300) on two consecutive days. The intratesticular distribution of these particles 24 h after the second injection was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. nSP70 were detected within sertoli cells and spermatocytes, including in the nuclei of spermatocytes. No nSP300 were observed in the testis. Next, mice were injected intravenously with 0.4 or 0.8 mg nSP70 every other day for a total of four administrations. Testes were harvested 48 h and 1 week after the last injection and stained with hematoxylin–eosin for histologic analysis. Histologic findings in the testes of nSP70-treated mice did not differ from those of control mice. Taken together, our results suggest that nSP70 can penetrate the blood-testis barrier and the nuclear membranes of spermatocytes without producing apparent testicular injury.

  9. Distribution and histologic effects of intravenously administered amorphous nanosilica particles in the testes of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishita, Yuki [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Satoh, Hiroyoshi; Nojiri, Nao [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagano, Kazuya [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhiro [Cancer Biology Research Center, Sanford Research/USD, 2301 E. 60th Street N, Sioux Falls, SD 57104 (United States); Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nabeshi, Hiromi [Division of Foods, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1, Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Tomoaki [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is rising concern regarding the potential health risks of nanomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies have investigated the effect of nanomaterials on the reproductive system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Here, we evaluated the intra-testicular distribution of nanosilica particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that nanosilica particles can penetrate the blood-testis barrier. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These data provide basic information on ways to create safer nanomaterials. -- Abstract: Amorphous nanosilica particles (nSP) are being utilized in an increasing number of applications such as medicine, cosmetics, and foods. The reduction of the particle size to the nanoscale not only provides benefits to diverse scientific fields but also poses potential risks. Several reports have described the in vivo and in vitro toxicity of nSP, but few studies have examined their effects on the male reproductive system. The aim of this study was to evaluate the testicular distribution and histologic effects of systemically administered nSP. Mice were injected intravenously with nSP with diameters of 70 nm (nSP70) or conventional microsilica particles with diameters of 300 nm (nSP300) on two consecutive days. The intratesticular distribution of these particles 24 h after the second injection was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. nSP70 were detected within sertoli cells and spermatocytes, including in the nuclei of spermatocytes. No nSP300 were observed in the testis. Next, mice were injected intravenously with 0.4 or 0.8 mg nSP70 every other day for a total of four administrations. Testes were harvested 48 h and 1 week after the last injection and stained with hematoxylin-eosin for histologic analysis. Histologic findings in the testes of nSP70-treated mice did not differ from those of control mice. Taken together, our results suggest that nSP70 can penetrate the blood-testis barrier and the

  10. Earthquake lubrication and healing explained by amorphous nanosilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, C. D.; Lamothe, K. G.; Rempe, M.; Andrews, M.; Mitchell, T. M.; Di Toro, G.; White, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake slip and rupture propagation require fault strength to decrease during slip. Extreme shear weakening observed in laboratory friction experiments on silica-rich rocks has been explained by the formation of a hydrated amorphous 'silica gel' on the slip surface, but the mode of formation and deformation behavior of this material are not known. In addition, the wear material displays time-dependent strengthening on timescales of hours to days. We performed shearing experiments on chert rocks and analyzed the wear material formed at a range of slip rates from 10-4 - 10-1 m/s. We show by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction that silica lubrication is the result of the formation of amorphous nanopowder rather than a gel. The nanopowder has distinct structure and properties when compared to commercially available amorphous silica nanoparticles, which result from the degree and distribution of hydration and the style of bond strain within particles (observed by Raman spectroscopy and FTIR). The lubrication effect is due to intra-particle plasticity, even at low temperature and interparticle lubrication caused by trapping of water layers between hydrated surfaces. The hours to days timescale of healing may be explained by the natural time-dependent sintering between the hydrated surfaces of the nanopowder. Formation of amorphous silica nanopowders during slip can explain the general characteristics of earthquake ruptures, including the timescales of coseismic weakening and post-seismic healing.

  11. Amorphous Fe²⁺-rich FeOx loaded in mesoporous silica as a highly efficient heterogeneous Fenton catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Shu, Zhu; Zhang, Lingxia; Fan, Xiangqian; Tao, Guiju; Wang, Yongxia; Chen, Lisong; Wu, Meiying; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-06-28

    A simple physical-vapor-infiltration (PVI) method using ferrocene as the iron source, has been developed to load FeOx into the pore channels of mesoporous silica SBA-15. The obtained FeOx/SBA-15 composite has a high loading amount of FeOx (e.g. 26.64 wt% Fe content obtained at PVI duration 17 h and calcination temperature 450 °C) but unblocked pore channels thanks to the unique preparation strategy. The FeOx species are amorphous, rich of Fe(2+) and have been highly dispersed as a nanocoating onto the pore channel surface. The FeOx/SBA-15 composite was used as a heterogeneous Fenton catalyst to degrade Acid orange 7 (AO7). It showed a high catalytic activity and degradation efficiency, which was attributed to the high proportion of Fe(2+) in the amorphous FeOx and their favorable adsorption capability for the dye. The influences of the PVI duration, the calcination temperature and the Fenton reaction conditions (FeOx/SBA-15 dosages, H2O2 dosages and initial pH value) on the catalytic activity were investigated in detail. PMID:24816279

  12. Use of polypropylene fibers coated with nano-silica particles into a cementitious mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) materials have been widely used during last decades in order to overcome some of traditional cementitious materials issues: brittle behaviour, fire resistance, cover spalling, impact strength. For composite materials, fiber/matrix bond plays an important role because by increasing fiber/matrix interactions is possible to increase the behaviour of the entire material. In this study, in order to improve fiber to matrix adhesion, two chemical treatments of polypropylene fibers were investigated: alkaline hydrolysis and nano-silica sol-gel particles deposition. Treatmtents effect on fibers morphology and mechanical properties was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile tests. SEM investigations report the presence of spherical nano-silica particles on fiber surface, in the case of sol-gel process, while alkaline hydrolysis leads to an increase of fibers roughness. Both treatments have negligible influence on fibers mechanical properties confirming the possibility of their use in a cementitious mortar. Pullout tests were carried out considering three embedded length of fibers in mortar samples (10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively) showing an increase of pullout energy for treated fibers. The influence on fiber reinforced mortar mechanical properties was investigated by three-point flexural tests on prismatic specimens considering two fibers length (15 and 30 mm) and two fibers volume fractions (0.50 and 1.00 %). A general increase of flexural strength over the reference mix was achieved and an overall better behaviour is recognizable for mortars containing treated fibers

  13. Use of polypropylene fibers coated with nano-silica particles into a cementitious mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, B.; Di Maio, L.; Scarfato, P.; Incarnato, L.

    2015-12-01

    Fiber reinforced cementitious composite (FRCC) materials have been widely used during last decades in order to overcome some of traditional cementitious materials issues: brittle behaviour, fire resistance, cover spalling, impact strength. For composite materials, fiber/matrix bond plays an important role because by increasing fiber/matrix interactions is possible to increase the behaviour of the entire material. In this study, in order to improve fiber to matrix adhesion, two chemical treatments of polypropylene fibers were investigated: alkaline hydrolysis and nano-silica sol-gel particles deposition. Treatmtents effect on fibers morphology and mechanical properties was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile tests. SEM investigations report the presence of spherical nano-silica particles on fiber surface, in the case of sol-gel process, while alkaline hydrolysis leads to an increase of fibers roughness. Both treatments have negligible influence on fibers mechanical properties confirming the possibility of their use in a cementitious mortar. Pullout tests were carried out considering three embedded length of fibers in mortar samples (10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively) showing an increase of pullout energy for treated fibers. The influence on fiber reinforced mortar mechanical properties was investigated by three-point flexural tests on prismatic specimens considering two fibers length (15 and 30 mm) and two fibers volume fractions (0.50 and 1.00 %). A general increase of flexural strength over the reference mix was achieved and an overall better behaviour is recognizable for mortars containing treated fibers.

  14. Magnetorheological fluid based on submicrometric silica-coated magnetite particles under an oscillatory magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Serrano, R.; Donado, F.; Rubio-Rosas, E.

    2013-06-01

    An experimental study conducted on the rheological properties of a magnetorheological fluid based on submicrometric silica-coated magnetite particles dispersed in silicone oil is presented. We investigated the rheological behaviour when the system is simultaneously exposed to a static field and a sinusoidal field used as a perturbation. The results show that the perturbation modifies the rheological behaviour of the system and can be used to control its physical properties; however, the changes that are induced are smaller than expected from previous results for the aggregation of particles under magnetic perturbations. We discussed this difference in terms of the ratio between the magnetic energy and the thermal energy. We observed that a threshold magnetic field exists; below it, the yield stress is practically zero, whereas above it, the yield stress grows quickly. We discuss this result in terms of a model based on chain length distribution.

  15. X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy of Silica Particles Grafted with Polymer Brush in Polystyrene Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, Taiki; Kikuchi, Moriya; Murakami, Daiki; Mitamura, Koji; Harada, Yoshiko; Takahara, Atsushi [JST, ERATO, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Sasaki, Sono; Takata, Masaki, E-mail: t-hoshino@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute (Japan)

    2011-01-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy system was setup at SPring-8, BL19LXU, and the partial coherence scattering data from the silica particles grafted with polymer brush in polystyrene matrix were measured. Firstly, the static speckle patterns were checked. Below the glass transition temperature of polystyrene (T{sub g}), speckles were clearly observed, on the other hand, above T{sub g}, the scattering patterns became smooth and speckles were hardly observed. These variances of the speckle patterns result from the particle motion. Secondly, from the time variance of the speckle data, time autocorrelation functions g{sub 2}(q,t) are calculated. While the flat behaviour of g{sub 2}(q,t) without relaxation were observed below T{sub g}, the relaxation behavior with relaxation time{approx}10{sup 0}-10{sup 1} were observed above T{sub g}

  16. Synthesis of copper nanostructures on silica-based particles for antimicrobial organic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palza, Humberto; Delgado, Katherine; Curotto, Nicolás

    2015-12-01

    Sol-gel based silica nanoparticles of 100 nm were used to interact with copper ions from the dissolution of CuCl2 allowing the synthesis of paratacamite (Cu2(OH)3Cl) nanocrystals of around 20 nm. The method produced well dispersed copper nanostructures directly supported on the surface of the SiO2 particles and was generalized by using a natural zeolite microparticle as support with similar results. These hybrid Cu based nanoparticles released copper ions when immersed in water explaining their antimicrobial behavior against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as measured by the minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MIC and MBC). Noteworthy, when these nanostructured particles were mixed with an organic coating the resulting film eliminated until a 99% of both bacteria at concentrations as low as 0.01 wt%.

  17. Photoresponsive Release from Azobenzene-Modified Single Cubic Crystal NaCl/Silica Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmao Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Azobenzene ligands were uniformly anchored to the pore surfaces of nanoporous silica particles with single crystal NaCl using 4-(3-triethoxysilylpropylureidoazobenzene (TSUA. The functionalization delayed the release of NaCl significantly. The modified particles demonstrated a photocontrolled release by trans/cis isomerization of azobenzene moieties. The addition of amphiphilic solvents, propylene glycol (PG, propylene glycol propyl ether (PGPE, and dipropylene glycol propyl ether (DPGPE delayed the release in water, although the wetting behavior was improved and the delay is the most for the block molecules with the longest carbon chain. The speedup by UV irradiation suggests a strong dependence of diffusion on the switchable pore size. TGA, XRD, FTIR, and NMR techniques were used to characterize the structures.

  18. Temperature control of light transmission using mixed system of silica hollow particles with nanoparticle shell and organic components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masahiro; Shiokawa, Kumi; Monobe, Hirosato; Shimizu, Yo

    2015-01-21

    We reported before that a silica hollow particle whose shell consists of silica nanoparticle (SHP-NP) has a high light reflection ability to prevent light transmission through the particle, which is caused from the intensive light diffusion by the hollow structure and the nanoparticle of the shell. Since the difference in the refractive indices between silica and air is responsible for the strong light reflection, the mixing of the particle with organic components having refractive indices close to that of silica such as tetradecane produced transparent mixtures by suppression of the light reflection. The transparency of the mixtures thus prepared could be controlled by temperature variation. For example, the mixture of the particle SHP-NP with tetradecane was transparent at 20 °C and opaque at 70 °C, while the mixture with n-hexyl cyclohexane was opaque at 20 °C and transparent at 70 °C. As the refractive indices of organic components changed with temperature more than 10 times wider than that of silica, the temperature alternation produced a significant change in the difference of the refractive indices between them to achieve complete control of the transparency of the mixtures. This simple control of the light transmission that can automatically regulate sunlight into the room with temperature alteration is expected to be suitable for smart glass technology for energy conservation. PMID:25536370

  19. Synthesis and Characteristic of Precipitated Nano-Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi, Mohammad; Dorodian, M.; Rezaei, M

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of precipitation of amorphous silicon dioxide from aqueous solution of sodium silicate and sulfuric acid has been studied. The factors affecting the precipitation process of the sodium silicate solution such as sodium silicate concentration and addition of anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) on particle size, size distribution and degree of agglomeration of the precipitated silica were examined. The precipitation of silica from the produced sodium silicate solution w...

  20. Investigation of selective etching mechanism and its dependency on the particle size in preparation of hollow silica spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the core–shell SiO2@mSiO2/CTAB spheres were fabricated by choosing the solid silica spheres of different sizes as the internal cores, then a series of etching experiments were conducted. For different etching time and particle size, different rattle-type or hollow silica spheres were obtained. Investigation showed that CTAB in the mesoporous shell played a very important role to the selectivity of the etching. Both the rattle-type and hollow structures were successfully fabricated by adjusting the etching time in the presence of CTAB but without obvious etching of mesoporous silica shell. More importantly, the morphology transformation depended on the particle size of the solid silica cores. Generally, when the particle size of the internal cores was very small (d < 170 nm), the hollow structure was first obtained even after being etched for a short time. When the particle size of the internal cores was slightly larger (200 nm < d < 500 nm), the rattle-type microspheres with double-shell structure were first obtained after being etched for a short time, then the hollow structure was obtained with prolonging etching time. But when the particle size of the internal cores was far larger (d > 1 μm), the rattle-type microspheres with at least double-shell structure were first obtained after a certain period of etching time, then the hollow spheres with multi-shell structure were obtained with prolonging etching time. It is further revealed that both the rattle-type and hollow silica spheres with multi-shell structure could be prepared successfully if the particle size of the solid silica core was large enough.Graphical Abstract

  1. Investigation of selective etching mechanism and its dependency on the particle size in preparation of hollow silica spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wei; Tian, Yi; Zhao, Chenhui; Zhang, Baoliang; Zhang, Hepeng; Zhang, Qiuyu, E-mail: qyzhang@nwpu.edu.cn; Geng, Wangchang, E-mail: w.geng@nwpu.edu.cn [Northwestern Polytechnical University, Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Science (China)

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, the core–shell SiO{sub 2}@mSiO{sub 2}/CTAB spheres were fabricated by choosing the solid silica spheres of different sizes as the internal cores, then a series of etching experiments were conducted. For different etching time and particle size, different rattle-type or hollow silica spheres were obtained. Investigation showed that CTAB in the mesoporous shell played a very important role to the selectivity of the etching. Both the rattle-type and hollow structures were successfully fabricated by adjusting the etching time in the presence of CTAB but without obvious etching of mesoporous silica shell. More importantly, the morphology transformation depended on the particle size of the solid silica cores. Generally, when the particle size of the internal cores was very small (d < 170 nm), the hollow structure was first obtained even after being etched for a short time. When the particle size of the internal cores was slightly larger (200 nm < d < 500 nm), the rattle-type microspheres with double-shell structure were first obtained after being etched for a short time, then the hollow structure was obtained with prolonging etching time. But when the particle size of the internal cores was far larger (d > 1 μm), the rattle-type microspheres with at least double-shell structure were first obtained after a certain period of etching time, then the hollow spheres with multi-shell structure were obtained with prolonging etching time. It is further revealed that both the rattle-type and hollow silica spheres with multi-shell structure could be prepared successfully if the particle size of the solid silica core was large enough.Graphical Abstract.

  2. Silica-Polystyrene Nanocomposite Particles Synthesized by Nitroxide-Mediated Polymerization and Their Encapsulation through Miniemulsion Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Bourgeat-Lami

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene (PS chains with molecular weights comprised between 8000 and 64000 g⋅mol-1 and narrow polydispersities were grown from the surface of silica nanoparticles (Aerosil A200 fumed silica and Stöber silica, resp. through nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP. Alkoxyamine initiators based on N-tert-butyl-1-diethylphosphono-2,2-dimethylpropyl nitroxide (DEPN and carrying a terminal functional group have been synthesized in situ and grafted to the silica surface. The resulting grafted alkoxyamines have been employed to initiate the growth of polystyrene chains from the inorganic surface. The maximum grafting density of the surface-tethered PS chains was estimated and seemed to be limited by initiator confinement at the interface. Then, the PS-grafted Stöber silica nanoparticles were entrapped inside latex particles via miniemulsion polymerization. Transmission electron microscopy indicated the successful formation of silica-polystyrene core-shell particles.

  3. Strain-induced transformation of amorphous spherical precipitates into platelets: Application to oxide particles in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spherical shape of an amorphous precipitate becomes unstable if the combination P2R of precipitate radius R and pressure P exceeds some critical value. This critical value was found to be about 4.44 Gσ, where G is the matrix shear modulus and σ is the specific energy of the precipitate/matrix interface. Once this instability criterion is fulfilled, the initially spherical particle will reduce the total free energy (the sum of strain energy and the surface energy) by becoming a thin oblate spheroid (effectively, a platelet). The actual pressure P in the course of oxygen precipitation in silicon is controlled by a high self-interstitial supersaturation caused by emission of self-interstitials by growing precipitates. The duration of annealing necessary to reach the stage of collapse of spheres into platelets is calculated as a function of temperature and the precipitate density. Calculated results are compatible with the experimentally observed annealing conditions for platelet formation. Another important example of sphere to platelet transformation is microdefect formation in vacancy-type silicon. In this case a large negative value of P is sufficient to induce collapse. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  4. Surface modification of silica particles and upconverting particles using click chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mader, Heike Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs) of the NaYF4 type with narrow size distribution from 60 to 90 nm, were prepared using the established co-precipitation method. The particles were codoped using Yb3+ as the sensitizer ion, Er3+, Tm3+ or Ho3+, respectively as the emitting activator ions. Erbium doped particles displayed the brightest luminescence (green and red). A dopant ratio of 25% Yb3+ and 2% Er3+ proved to be the best composition to enable a partial phase transfer from the cubic alpha-NaY...

  5. Fabrication of Controllable Pore and Particle Size of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles via a Liquid-phase Synthesis Method and Its Absorption Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandiyanto, Asep Bayu Dani; Iskandar, Ferry; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2011-12-01

    Monodisperse spherical mesoporous silica nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using a liquid-phase synthesis method. The result showed particles with controllable pore size from several to tens nanometers with outer diameter of several tens nanometers. The ability in the control of pore size and outer diameter was altered by adjusting the precursor solution ratios. In addition, we have conducted the adsorption ability of the prepared particles. The result showed that large organic molecules were well-absorbed to the prepared silica porous particles, in which this result was not obtained when using commercial dense silica particle and/or hollow silica particle. With this result, the prepared mesoporous silica particles may be used efficiently in various applications, such as sensors, pharmaceuticals, environmentally sensitive pursuits, etc.

  6. Amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles interacting with water vapor – Part 1: Microstructure, phase transitions, hygroscopic growth and kinetic limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Koop

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions with water are crucial for the properties, transformation and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. Here we outline characteristic features and differences in the interaction of amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles with water vapor. Using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA, we performed hydration, dehydration and cyclic hydration&dehydration experiments with aerosol particles composed of levoglucosan, oxalic acid and ammonium sulfate (diameters ~100–200 nm, relative uncertainties <0.4%, relative humidities <5% to 95% at 298 K. The measurements and accompanying Köhler model calculations provide new insights into particle microstructure, surface adsorption, bulk absorption, phase transitions and hygroscopic growth. The results of these and related investigations lead to the following main conclusions: 1. Many organic substances (including carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and proteins tend to form amorphous rather than crystalline phases upon drying of aqueous solution droplets. Depending on viscosity and microstructure, the amorphous phases can be classified as glasses, rubbers, gels or viscous liquids. 2. Amorphous organic substances tend to absorb water vapor and undergo gradual deliquescence and hygroscopic growth at much lower relative humidity than their crystalline counterparts. 3. In the course of hydration and dehydration, certain organic substances can form rubber- or gel-like structures (supra-molecular networks and undergo stepwise transitions between swollen and collapsed network structures. 4. Organic gels or (semi-solid amorphous shells (glassy, rubbery, ultra-viscous with low molecular diffusivity can kinetically limit the uptake and release of water by submicron aerosol particles on (multi-second time scales, which may influence the hygroscopic growth and activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and ice nuclei (IN. 5. The shape and porosity of amorphous

  7. Silica nanoparticles as the adjuvant for the immunisation of mice using hepatitis B core virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dace Skrastina

    Full Text Available Advances in nanotechnology and nanomaterials have facilitated the development of silicon dioxide, or Silica, particles as a promising immunological adjuvant for the generation of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In the present study, we have compared the adjuvanting potential of commercially available Silica nanoparticles (initial particles size of 10-20 nm with that of aluminium hydroxide, or Alum, as well as that of complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants for the immunisation of BALB/c mice with virus-like particles (VLPs formed by recombinant full-length Hepatitis B virus core (HBc protein. The induction of B-cell and T-cell responses was studied after immunisation. Silica nanoparticles were able to adsorb maximally 40% of the added HBc, whereas the adsorption capacity of Alum exceeded 90% at the same VLPs/adjuvant ratio. Both Silica and Alum formed large complexes with HBc VLPs that sedimented rapidly after formulation, as detected by dynamic light scattering, spectrophotometry, and electron microscopy. Both Silica and Alum augmented the humoral response against HBc VLPs to the high anti-HBc level in the case of intraperitoneal immunisation, whereas in subcutaneous immunisation, the Silica-adjuvanted anti-HBc level even exceeded the level adjuvanted by Alum. The adjuvanting of HBc VLPs by Silica resulted in the same typical IgG2a/IgG1 ratios as in the case of the adjuvanting by Alum. The combination of Silica with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL led to the same enhancement of the HBc-specific T-cell induction as in the case of the Alum and MPL combination. These findings demonstrate that Silica is not a weaker putative adjuvant than Alum for induction of B-cell and T-cell responses against recombinant HBc VLPs. This finding may have an essential impact on the development of the set of Silica-adjuvanted vaccines based on a long list of HBc-derived virus-like particles as the biological component.

  8. Preparation and Characterization of Titania-silica Composite Particles by Pechini Sol-gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Yuanting

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two Pechini sol-gel processes were used to prepare titania-silica composite particles. The dynamic oxidation behavior of the TiO2-SiO2 powders has been characterized by thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DTG-DSC. The crystal phase and microstructure of the composite particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM. The effects of Si:Ti molar ratio and sol-gel process on the TiO2-SiO2 powders were studied. The preparation of the polymeric precursors can influence the morphology of obtained TiO2-SiO2 composite particles. The spherical TiO2-SiO2 composite particles which are 20 nm~400 nm in diameter appear in gel-1 system. However, the TiO2-SiO2 powders obtained by gel-2 system are irregular in shape and 2~15 μm in diameter which show a loose porous structure consisted of very fine granules.

  9. Proton Conductivity of Nafion/Ex-Situ Sulfonic Acid-Modified Stöber Silica Nanocomposite Membranes As a Function of Temperature, Silica Particles Size and Surface Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Muriithi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of sulfonic acid modified silica in Nafion nanocomposite membranes is a good method of improving the Nafion performance at high temperature and low relative humidity. Sulfonic acid-modified silica is bifunctional, with silica phase expected to offer an improvement in membranes hydration while sulfonic groups enhance proton conductivity. However, as discussed in this paper, this may not always be the case. Proton conductivity enhancement of Nafion nanocomposite membranes is very dependent on silica particle size, sometimes depending on experimental conditions, and by surface modification. In this study, Sulfonated Preconcentrated Nafion Stober Silica composites (SPNSS were prepared by modification of Stober silica particles with mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane, dispersing the particles into a preconcentrated solution of Nafion, then casting the membranes. The mercapto groups were oxidized to sulfonic acids by heating the membranes in 10 wt % hydrogen peroxide for 1 h. At 80 °C and 100% relative humidity, a 20%–30% enhancement of proton conductivity was only observed when sulfonic acid modified particle less than 50 nm in diameter were used. At 120 °C, and 100% humidity, proton conductivity increased by 22%–42% with sulfonated particles with small particles showing the greatest enhancement. At 120 °C and 50% humidity, the sulfonated particles are less efficient at keeping the membranes hydrated, and the composites underperform Nafion and silica-Nafion nanocomposite membranes.

  10. Proton Conductivity of Nafion/Ex-Situ Sulfonic Acid-Modified Stöber Silica Nanocomposite Membranes As a Function of Temperature, Silica Particles Size and Surface Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of sulfonic acid modified silica in Nafion nanocomposite membranes is a good method of improving the Nafion performance at high temperature and low relative humidity. Sulfonic acid-modified silica is bifunctional, with silica phase expected to offer an improvement in membranes hydration while sulfonic groups enhance proton conductivity. However, as discussed in this paper, this may not always be the case. Proton conductivity enhancement of Nafion nanocomposite membranes is very dependent on silica particle size, sometimes depending on experimental conditions, and by surface modification. In this study, Sulfonated Preconcentrated Nafion Stober Silica composites (SPNSS) were prepared by modification of Stober silica particles with mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane, dispersing the particles into a preconcentrated solution of Nafion, then casting the membranes. The mercapto groups were oxidized to sulfonic acids by heating the membranes in 10 wt % hydrogen peroxide for 1 h. At 80 °C and 100% relative humidity, a 20%-30% enhancement of proton conductivity was only observed when sulfonic acid modified particle less than 50 nm in diameter were used. At 120 °C, and 100% humidity, proton conductivity increased by 22%-42% with sulfonated particles with small particles showing the greatest enhancement. At 120 °C and 50% humidity, the sulfonated particles are less efficient at keeping the membranes hydrated, and the composites underperform Nafion and silica-Nafion nanocomposite membranes. PMID:26828525

  11. In vitro effects on macrophages induced by noncytotoxic doses of silica particles possibly relevant to ambient exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RAW 246.7 macrophage cell line was exposed in vitro to aged crystalline silica particles of respirable size for 24 h at a range of doses starting from 15 μg/2x106 cells, which is a realistic exposure level of macrophages in the airways of ambiently exposed individuals. The particle sample used for the experiments was prepared to mimic some aspects of ambient crystalline silica particles: size distribution, morphology, and surface reactivity. Our purpose was to determine whether a nontoxic quartz load comparable to that of ambient exposure would be able to induce macrophage activation and impairment of the phagocytic ability, factors altering the lung's capacity to deal with increased particle loads (as occurs during high-pollution episodes) or infections and affecting the local and systemic responses through the release of biologically active compounds (cytokines, reactive oxygen species, NO, isoprostanes). Exposure of RAW 264.7 cells to aged silica particles induced macrophage activation (evidenced by the morphological features observed with scanning electron microscopy and by the release of TNF-α and IL-6) and impairment of phagocytosis of test particles, even at noncytotoxic doses. The reduction of the phagocytic function of the cells after silica treatment was dose-dependent, as evidenced by an increase of the population of unphagocytic cells, paralleled by a decrease of the actively phagocytizing cell population. We evaluated the oxidative stress induced by aged silica particles, quantifying the peroxidation products (8-isoprostanes) in the culture media of treated cells, and found a strong release at low doses. Isoprostanes are a complex family of compounds which have been used as in vivo markers of lipid peroxidation in human disorders, but that, as far as we know, have never been evaluated in relation to airborne particulate matter exposure. Lipid peroxides are involved in various cellular events in the inflammatory response, and isoprostanes are also

  12. Facile preparation and characterization of modified magnetic silica nanocomposite particles for oil absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liuhua; Hao, Gazi; Liang, Qianqian; Zhou, Shuai; Zhang, Ning; Jiang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a novel environmental-friendly and superhydrophobic oil absorbent was fabricated by modifying magnetic silica nanocomposites. It was demonstrated that the modified rough magnetic silica nanocomposite particles possessed a number of superior features such as superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity, and high oil-water separation efficiency etc. Moreover, the as-obtained material could be used as excellent absorbents for high density oils such as toluene and many organic liquids including viscous oils e.g. lubricating oil. The lubricating oil intake capacity for the nanocomposites was 7.15 times of its own weight. Importantly, the oil-absorption process of the nanocomposites was selective, fast and efficient when they were used in the purification of oil-contaminated water. Notably, the oil-absorbed nanocomposites could be renewed after suitable absolute ethanol washing and natural drying. In addition, the renewed nanocomposites still remained high oil-absorption capacity after the 20th cycle. These inspiring results show that the oil-absorbent material has good prospects for selection removal of oils and organic solvents on water surface. It is believed that the present work may have provided a novel and facile way for preparing environmental-friendly materials with ideal properties.

  13. Study and characterization of an integrated circuit-deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensor for the detection of particles and radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Next generation experiments at the European laboratory of particle physics (CERN) require particle detector alternatives to actual silicon detectors. This thesis presents a novel detector technology, which is based on the deposition of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon sensor on top of an integrated circuit. Performance and limitations of this technology have been assessed for the first time in this thesis in the context of particle detectors. Specific integrated circuits have been designed and the detector segmentation, the interface sensor-chip and the sensor leakage current have been studied in details. The signal induced by the track of an ionizing particle in the sensor has been characterized and results on the signal speed, amplitude and on the sensor resistance to radiation are presented. The results are promising regarding the use of this novel technology for radiation detection, though limitations have been shown for particle physics application. (author)

  14. A new method of utilizing rice husk: consecutively preparing D-xylose, organosolv lignin, ethanol and amorphous superfine silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxi; Ding, Xuefeng; Chen, Xue; Ma, Yuejia; Wang, Zichen; Zhao, Xu

    2015-06-30

    Rice husk is an abundant agricultural by-product with the annual output of 120 and 40 million tons in the world and China, respectively. The common disposal method of rice husk in China has caused the pollution. This manuscript deals with a new method of comprehensively utilizing rice husk, by which hazardous materials are avoided to release. 100.3, 219.4, 50.1 and 170.5 g of D-xylose, organosolv lignin, ethanol and superfine silica are consecutively prepared from 1000 g of rice husk. This new method is helpful to resolving the problem of pollution and waste aroused by rice husk. PMID:25768989

  15. Intake of silica nanoparticles by giant lipid vesicles: influence of particle size and thermodynamic membrane state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian G. Strobl

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of nanoparticles into cells often involves their engulfment by the plasma membrane and a fission of the latter. Understanding the physical mechanisms underlying these uptake processes may be achieved by the investigation of simple model systems that can be compared to theoretical models. Here, we present experiments on a massive uptake of silica nanoparticles by giant unilamellar lipid vesicles (GUVs. We find that this uptake process depends on the size of the particles as well as on the thermodynamic state of the lipid membrane. Our findings are discussed in the light of several theoretical models and indicate that these models have to be extended in order to capture the interaction between nanomaterials and biological membranes correctly.

  16. Prototype sphere-on-sphere silica particles for the separation of large biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Rodriguez-Aller, Marta; Cusumano, Alessandra; Hayes, Richard; Zhang, Haifei; Edge, Tony; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2016-01-29

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the possibilities offered by a prototype HPLC column packed with ∼2.5μm narrow size distribution sphere-on-sphere (SOS) silica particles bonded with C4 alkyl chains, for the analytical characterization of large biomolecules. The kinetic performance of this material was evaluated in both isocratic and gradient modes using various model analytes. The data were compared to those obtained on other widepore state-of-the-art fully core-shell and fully porous materials commonly employed to separate proteins moreover to a reference 5μm wide pore material that is still often used in QC labs. In isocratic mode, minimum reduced plate height values of hmin=2.6, 3.3 and 3.3 were observed on butylparaben, decapeptide and glucagon, respectively. In gradient elution mode, the SOS column performs very high efficiency when working with fast gradients. This prototype column was also comparable (and sometimes superior) to other widepore stationary phases, whatever the gradient time and flow rate, when analyzing the largest model protein, namely BSA. These benefits may be attributed to the SOS particle morphology, minimizing the intra-particle mass transfer resistance. Finally, the SOS column was also applied for the analytical characterization of commercial monoclonal antibody (mAb) and antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) samples. With these classes of proteins, the performance of SOS column was similar to the best widepore stationary phases available on the market. PMID:26755414

  17. The filler-rubber interface in styrene butadiene nanocomposites with anisotropic silica particles: morphology and dynamic properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tadiello, L.; D´Arienzo, M.; Di Credico, B.; Hanel, T.; Matějka, Libor; Mauri, M.; Morazzoni, F.; Simonutti, R.; Špírková, Milena; Scotti, R.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 20 (2015), s. 4022-4033. ISSN 1744-683X Grant ostatní: European Commission(XE) COST Action MP1202 HINT Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanocomposites * silica particles * polymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.029, year: 2014

  18. Oxidation and Carbidation of Laser-Ablated Amorphized Ti Particles in Carbon Monoxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jandová, Věra; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bastl, Zdeněk; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, MAY (2013), s. 104-110. ISSN 1293-2558 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanium * laser ablation * amorphization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2013

  19. Studies on tableting properties of lactose. VII. The effect of variations in primary particle size and percentage of amorphous lactose in spray dried lactose products

    OpenAIRE

    Vromans, H.; Bolhuis, G.K.; Lerk, C.F.; Biggelaar, van de, H.; Bosch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Sieve fractions of α-lactose monohydrate and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, respectively, suspended in solutions of lactose, were spray dried in order to obtain products with various amorphous lactose contents. The compactibility of the samples appeared to be a function of both the primary particle size and the amount of amorphous lactose. The lactose glass was considered to form a binding layer on the particle surface area. Its efficacy was found to be determined by the size and the consolid...

  20. Surfactant adsorption and aggregate structure of silica nanoparticles: a versatile stratagem for the regulation of particle size and surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of silica nanoparticles is incredibly polygonal. Silica particles have aroused exceptional deliberation in bio-analysis due to great progress in particular arenas, for instance, biocompatibility, unique properties of modifiable pore size and organization, huge facade areas and pore volumes, manageable morphology and amendable surfaces, elevated chemical and thermal stability. Currently, silica nanoparticles participate in crucial utilities in daily trade rationales such as power storage, chemical and genetic sensors, groceries dispensation and catalysis. Herein, the size-dependent interfacial relation of anionic silica nanoparticles with twelve altered categories of cationic surfactants has been carried out in terms of the physical chemical facets of colloid and interface science. The current analysis endeavours to investigate the virtual consequences of different surfactants through the development of the objective composite materials. The nanoparticle size controls, the surface-to-volume ratio and surface bend relating to its interaction with surfactant will also be addressed in this work. More importantly, the simulated stratagem developed in this work can be lengthened to formulate core–shell nanostructures with functional nanoparticles encapsulated in silica particles, making this approach valuable and extensively pertinent for employing sophisticated materials for catalysis and drug delivery. (papers)

  1. A one-step method to coat polystyrene particles with an organo-silica shell and their functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Tian-Song, E-mail: dengts@pku.edu.cn [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Bongard, Hans-Josef [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Marlow, Frank, E-mail: marlow@mpi-muelheim.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, 45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany); Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    A facile method of coating polystyrene (PS) particles with organo-silica and their functionalization was presented. By adding the organo-silane precursor into PS aqueous solution in presence of ammonia, an organo-silica shell could be coated on PS particles directly. This method has several characteristics. First, only one process, one precursor and one solvent were used. Second, the organic groups could be varied from methyl, propyl, vinyl, to mercaptopropyl. The third is the tunable shell thickness with a high monodispersity. The organo-silica shells are further functionalized. The PS@vinyl-SiO{sub 2} particles were used to assemble colloidal crystals, and further modified with bromine, resulting in tunable photonic band gaps. PS@mercaptopropyl-SiO{sub 2} particles allow the encapsulation of Au nanoparticles. The resulting 2.2 nm Au particles were stable at 550 °C and well-distributed in the whole SiO{sub 2} shell with a loading up to 20 wt%. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Demonstrated a one-step controllable coating method of organo-SiO{sub 2} on polystyrene. • The Br-modified PS@vinyl-SiO{sub 2} colloidal crystal has tunable photonic band gaps. • PS@mercaptopropyl-SiO{sub 2} particles allow the encapsulation of small Au nanoparticles.

  2. Effect of Concentration and Surface Property of Silica Sol on the Determination of Particle Size and Electrophoretic Mobility by Light Scattering Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal silica is used in various industrial products such as chemical mechanical polishing slurry for planarization of silicon and sapphire wafer, organic-inorganic hybrid coatings, binder of investment casting, etc. An accurate determination of particle size and dispersion stability of silica sol is demanded because it has a strong influence on surface of wafer, film of coatings or bulks having mechanical, chemical and optical properties. The study herein is discussed on the effect of measurement results of average particle size, sol viscosity and electrophoretic mobility of particle according to the volume fraction of eight types of silica sol with different size and surface properties of silica particles which are presented by the manufacturer. The measured particle size and the mobility of these sol were changed by volume fraction or particle size due to highly active surface of silica particle and change of concentration of counter ion by dilution of silica sol. While in case the measured sizes of small particles less than 60 nm are increased with increasing volume fraction, the measured sizes of larger particles than 60 nm are slightly decreased. The mobility of small particle such as 12 nm are decreased with increase of viscosity. However, the mobility of 100 nm particles under 0.048 volume fraction are increased with increasing volume fraction and then decreased over higher volume fraction

  3. Characterization of polymer-silica nanocomposite particles with core-shell morphologies using Monte Carlo simulations and small angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Jennifer A; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Schmid, Andreas; Armes, Steven P; Fairclough, J Patrick A; Ryan, Anthony J

    2011-07-01

    A two-population model based on standard small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) equations is verified for the analysis of core-shell structures comprising spherical colloidal particles with particulate shells. First, Monte Carlo simulations of core-shell structures are performed to demonstrate the applicability of the model. Three possible shell packings are considered: ordered silica shells due to either charge-dependent repulsive or size-dependent Lennard-Jones interactions or randomly arranged silica particles. In most cases, the two-population model produces an excellent fit to calculated SAXS patterns for the simulated core-shell structures, together with a good correlation between the fitting parameters and structural parameters used for the simulation. The limits of application are discussed, and then, this two-population model is applied to the analysis of well-defined core-shell vinyl polymer/silica nanocomposite particles, where the shell comprises a monolayer of spherical silica nanoparticles. Comprehensive SAXS analysis of a series of poly(styrene-co-n-butyl acrylate)/silica colloidal nanocomposite particles (prepared by the in situ emulsion copolymerization of styrene and n-butyl acrylate in the presence of a glycerol-functionalized silica sol) allows the overall core-shell particle diameter, the copolymer latex core diameter and polydispersity, the mean silica shell thickness, the mean silica diameter and polydispersity, the volume fractions of the two components, the silica packing density, and the silica shell structure to be obtained. These experimental SAXS results are consistent with electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetry, helium pycnometry, and BET surface area studies. The high electron density contrast between the (co)polymer and the silica components, together with the relatively low polydispersity of these core-shell nanocomposite particles, makes SAXS ideally suited for the characterization of this system. Moreover

  4. In vitro biocompatibility of calcined mesoporous silica particles and fetal blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Samri MT

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed T Al Samri,1,* Ankush V Biradar,2,3,* Ahmed R Alsuwaidi,1 Ghazala Balhaj,1 Suleiman Al-Hammadi,1 Safa Shehab,4 Suhail Al-Salam,5 Saeed Tariq,4 Thachillath Pramathan,1 Sheela Benedict,1 Tewodros Asefa,2,3 Abdul-Kader Souid11Department of Pediatrics, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 2Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ, USA; 4Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; 5Department of Pathology Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The biocompatibility of two forms of calcined mesoporous silica particles, labeled as MCM41-cal and SBA15-cal, with fetal blood mononuclear cells was assessed in vitro.Methods and results: Fetal mononuclear cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and exposed to 0.5 mg/mL of MCM41-cal or SBA15-cal for several hours. Transmission electron micrographs confirmed the presence of particles in the cytosol of macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes without noticeable damage to the cellular organelles. The particles (especially MCM41-cal were in close proximity to plasma, and nuclear and mitochondrial membranes. Biocompatibility was assessed by a functional assay that measured cellular respiration, ie, mitochondrial O2 consumption. The rate of respiration (kc, in µM O2 per minute per 107 cells for untreated cells was 0.42 ± 0.16 (n = 10, for cells treated with MCM41-cal was 0.39 ± 0.22 (n = 5, P > 0.966 and for cells treated with SBA15-cal was 0.44 ± 0.13 (n = 5, P >0.981.Conclusion: The results show reasonable biocompatibility of MCM41-cal and SBA15-cal in fetal blood mononuclear cells. Future studies are needed to determine the potential of collecting

  5. Crystallization of hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisko, Glenna L; Carretero-Genevrier, Adrian; Perrot, Alexandre; Gich, Martí; Gàzquez, Jaume; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Favre, Luc; Grosso, David; Boissière, Cédric; Sanchez, Clément

    2015-03-11

    Complex 3D macrostructured nanoparticles are transformed from amorphous silica into pure polycrystalline α-quartz using catalytic quantities of alkaline earth metals as devitrifying agent. Walls as thin as 10 nm could be crystallized without losing the architecture of the particles. The roles of cation size and the mol% of the incorporated devitrifying agent in crystallization behavior are studied, with Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) all producing pure α-quartz under certain conditions. PMID:25503642

  6. A general method to coat colloidal particles with titiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirors, A.F.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a general one-pot method for coating colloidal particles with amorphous titania. Various colloidal particles such as silica particles, large silver colloids, gibbsite platelets, and polystyrene spheres were successfully coated with a titania shell. Although there are several ways of coat

  7. Immobilization of pectinase on silica-based supports: Impacts of particle size and spacer arm on the activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagöz, Dilek; Tükel, S Seyhan; Yildirim, Deniz

    2016-06-01

    The pectinase was separately immobilized onto Florisil and nano silica supports through both glutaraldehyde and 3-glyoxypropyltrietoxysilane spacer arms. The effects of spacer arm, particle size of support and ionic liquids on the activities of pectinase preparations were investigated. The immobilization of pectinase onto Florisil and nano silica through 3-glyoxypropyltrietoxysilane spacer arm completely led to inactivation of enzyme; however, 10 and 75% pectinase activity were retained when it was immobilized through glutaraldehyde spacer arm onto Florisil and nano silica, respectively. The pectinase immobilized onto nano silica through glutaraldehyde spacer arm showed 6.3-fold higher catalytic efficiency than that of the pectinase immobilized onto Florisil through same spacer arm. A 2.3-fold increase in thermal stability of pectinase was provided upon immobilization onto nano silica at 35°C. The effects of IL/buffer mixture and volume ratio of IL/buffer mixture on the catalytic activities of free and immobilized pectinase preparations were also tested. All the pectinase preparations showed highest activity in 10% (v/v) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate containing medium and their activities significantly affected from the concentration of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate. PMID:26964525

  8. Preparation of novel lithium-ion conductors composed of LiSCN-AlCl{sub 3} and silica particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Koichi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro; Minami, Tsutomu

    1999-10-01

    Development of solid-state lithium-ion conducting materials is strongly desired for many kinds of electrochemical applications, such as electrolytes for solid-state lithium batteries, because of the high safety and reliability against inflammability or leakage of electrolytes. A number of performances are required for the lithium-ion solid electrolytes: high ionic conductivity, wide electrochemical window, stability and compatibility against electrodes, high transport number of lithium ions, and so on. For solid-state lithium-ion conductors, a variety of materials, such as polymers, gels, glasses, and crystals, have been widely studied. Solid-state lithium-ion conductor composites consisting of a low-temperature molten salt in the system LiSCN-AlCl{sub 3} and monodispersed silica particles derived from a sol-gel process were prepared. The appearance of the composites changed from viscous liquid to fine powder with the addition of 70 mass % silica particles to the molten salt. The crystallization of the molten salt causing a decrease of conductivity was prevented in a wide temperature range by the addition of silica particles. In spite of the significant change of appearance with the addition of the particles, conductivity of the composites with 70 mass % silica particles was higher than 1 x 10{sup {minus}4}S cm{sup {minus}1}. the conductivity value of the composites was as high as that of pure molten salt. The ion-transport number of the composites was higher than 0.9999. The value obtained by dividing the dc conductivity using nonblocking electrodes by the ac conductivity was 0.58, indicating that main conducting species was lithium ions.

  9. Size- and structure-dependent toxicity of silica particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Sanshiro; Miyaoi, Kenichi; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    Nano- and micro-particulates firmly attach with the surface of various biological systems. In some chronic pulmonary disease such as asbestosis and silicosis, causative particulates will induce chronic inflammatory disorder, followed by poor prognosis diseases. However, nano- and micro-scale specific toxicity of silica particulates is not well examined enough to recognize the risk of nano- and micro-particulates from the clinical aspect. To clarify the effect of the size and structure of silica particulates on the cellular damage and the biological response, we assessed the cytotoxicity of the various kinds of silica particles including amorphous and crystalline silica, in mouse alveolar macrophage culture, focusing on the fibrotic and inflammatory response. Our study showed that the cytotoxicity, which depends on the particle size and surface area, is correlated with their inflammatory response. By contrast, production of TGF-β, which is one of the fibrotic agents in lung, by addition of crystal silica was much higher than that of amorphous silica. We conclude that fibrosis and inflammation are induced at different phases and that the size- and structure-differences of silica particulates affect the both biological responses, caused by surface activity, radical species, and so on.

  10. Influence of particle size and preparation methods on the physical and chemical stability of amorphous simvastatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Fang; Aaltonen, Jaakko; Tian, Fang;

    2009-01-01

    using DSC in order to link the physical and chemical stability with molecular mobility. Chemical stability was studied with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Results obtained from the current study revealed that the solubility of amorphous forms prepared by both methods was enhanced...

  11. Biodegradation of organic compounds sequestered in organic solids or in nanopores within silica particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzinger, P.B.; Alexander, M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1997-11-01

    A study was conducted using model solids to determine whether the time-dependent decline in availability for biodegradation of organic pollutants in soil might result from the entrapment of these compounds in porous or nonporous solids. A strain of Pseudomonas mineralized phenanthrene in solid alkanes containing 18 to 32 carbons, three waxes, and low-molecular-weight polycaprolactone, polyethylene, and polypropylene. The rates were appreciably slower than when the substrate was not initially present within these nonporous solids. From 1.4 to 63.4% of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon added to the solids was mineralized in 90 d. The rates and extents of partitioning of phenanthrene varied markedly among the solids. The rates of partitioning and biodegradation of phenanthrene initially present in the alkanes were positively correlated. The bacterium rapidly and extensively mineralized phenanthrene provided in calcium alginate beads containing varying amounts of soluble soil organic matter. The rates and extents of phenanthrene mineralization declined as the percentage of the substrate in the nanopores within silica particles increased, but the reductions in rate, extent, or both were less pronounced than with nonporous solids. The rate of 4-nitrophenol biodegradation also declined with increasing percentages of the compound in these nanopores. The data are consistent with hypotheses that the sequestration and consequent decrease in bioavailability of organic compounds that persist in soil result from their partitioning into organic matter or their presence within nanopores in soil.

  12. Influence of pH, Temperature and Sample Size on Natural and Enforced Syneresis of Precipitated Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Wilhelm; Matthias Kind

    2015-01-01

    The production of silica is performed by mixing an inorganic, silicate-based precursor and an acid. Monomeric silicic acid forms and polymerizes to amorphous silica particles. Both further polymerization and agglomeration of the particles lead to a gel network. Since polymerization continues after gelation, the gel network consolidates. This rather slow process is known as "natural syneresis" and strongly influences the product properties (e.g., agglomerate size, porosity or internal surface)...

  13. Processing, morphology, and water uptake of Nafion/ex situ Stöber silica nanocomposite membranes as a function of particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriithi, Beatrice; Loy, Douglas A

    2012-12-01

    Because of the bicontinuous phase structure of Nafion with small hydrophilic channels, formation of composites with silica colloids to improve thermal stability, hydration, and proton conductivity should be influenced by size and surface functionality of the colloids. To test this hypothesis, we prepared batches of silica particles between 20 and 400 nm in diameter with narrow polydispersities using a modified Stöber procedure. Some particles were subsequently surface-modified using mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane. Enough particles were mixed with Nafion in alcohols to achieve 5 wt % silica in the final membranes, which were made by casting and drying. Membrane top and bottom surface and cross-section morphologies were examined with AFM and SEM to determine how the particles were dispersed. We discovered that casting the membranes from dispersions with viscosities less than 65 cPs led to larger particles floating to the top surface of the membrane where they were easily dislodged from the dry membrane. Membranes cast from more viscous solutions exhibited homogeneous distributions of particles. Water uptake was over 60% higher in nanocomposites with unmodified silica particles than for Nafion and about 15% higher than for Nafion with in situ generated silica particles, but showed no trend in water uptake correlating with particle size. Surface silated particles of all sizes appeared to have reduced water uptake relative to Nafion alone. PMID:23138476

  14. Crystallization Behavior of Amorphous Si3N4 and Particle Size Control of the Crystallized α-Si3N4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yong-Kwon; Kim, Shin-A; Koo, Jae-Hong; Oh, Hyeon-Cheol; Chi, Eun-Ok; Hahn, Jee-Hyun; Park, Chan

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous silicon nitride powder prepared by low-temperature vapor-phase reaction was heat treated at various temperatures for different periods of time to examine the crystallization behavior. The effects of the heat-treatment temperature and duration on the degree of crystallization were investigated along with the effect of the heat-up rate on the particle size, and its distribution, of the crystallized α-phase silicon nitride powder. A phase transition from amorphous to α-phase occurred at a temperature above 1400 degrees C. The crystallization. process was completed after heat treatment at 1500 degrees C for 3 h or at 1550 degrees C for 1 h. The crystallization process starts at the surface of the amorphous particle: while the outer regions of the particle become crystalline, the inner part remains amorphous. The re-arrangement of the Si and N atoms on the surface of the amorphous particle leads to the formation of hexagonal crystals that are separated from the host amorphous particle. The particle size and size distribution can be controlled by varying the heat-treatment profile (namely, the heat-treatment temperature, heating rate, and heating duration at the specified temperature), which can be used to control the relative extent of the nucleation and growth. The completion of most of the nucleation process by lowering the heat-up rate can be used to achieve a singlet particle size distribution. Bimodal particle size distribution can be achieved by fast heat-up during the crystallization process. PMID:27483939

  15. Rear-surface laser damage on 355-nm silica optics owing to Fresnel diffraction on front-surface contamination particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light intensity modulations caused by opaque obstacles (e.g., dust) on silica lenses in high-power lasers often enhance the potential for laser-induced damage. To study this effect, particles (10-250 μm) with various shapes were sputter deposited on the input surface and irradiated with a 3-ns laser beam at 355 nm. Although a clean silica surface damages at fluences above 15 J/cm2, a surface contaminated with particles can damage below 11.5 J/cm2. A pattern that conforms to the shape of the input surface particle is printed on the output surface. Repetitive illumination resulted in catastrophic drilling of the optic. The damage pattern correlated with an interference image of the particle before irradiation. The image shows that the incident beam undergoes phase (and amplitude) modulations after it passes around the particle. We modeled the experiments by calculating the light intensity distribution behind an obscuration by use of Fresnel diffraction theory. The comparison between calculated light intensity distribution and the output surface damage pattern showed good agreement. The model was then used to predict the increased damage vulnerability that results from intensity modulations as a function of particle size, shape, and lens thickness. The predictions provide the basis for optics cleanliness specifications on the National Ignition Facility to reduce the likelihood of optical damage. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America

  16. Enhanced stab resistance of armor composites with functionalized silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfuz, Hassan; Clements, Floria; Rangari, Vijaya; Dhanak, Vinod; Beamson, Graham

    2009-03-01

    Traditionally shear thickening fluid (STF) reinforced with Kevlar has been used to develop flexible armor. At the core of the STF-Kevlar composites is a mixture of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and silica particles. This mixture is often known as STF and is consisted of approximately 45 wt % PEG and 55 wt % silica. During rheological tests, STF shows instantaneous spike in viscosity above a critical shear rate. Fabrication of STF-Kevlar composites requires preparation of STF, dilution with ethanol, and then impregnation with Kevlar. In the current approach, nanoscale silica particles were dispersed directly into a mixture of PEG and ethanol through a sonic cavitation process. Two types of silica nanoparticles were used in the investigation: 30 nm crystalline silica and 7 nm amorphous silica. The admixture was then reinforced with Kevlar fabric to produce flexible armor composites. In the next step, silica particles are functionalized with a silane coupling agent to enhance bonding between silica and PEG. The performance of the resulting armor composites improved significantly. As evidenced by National Institute of Justice spike tests, the energy required for zero-layer penetration (i.e., no penetration) jumped twofold: from 12 to 25 J cm2/g. The source of this improvement has been traced to the formation of siloxane (Si-O-Si) bonds between silica and PEG and superior coating of Kevlar filaments with particles. Fourier transform infrared, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy studies were performed to examine chemical bonds, elemental composition, and particle dispersion responsible for such improvement. In summary, our experiments have demonstrated that functionalization of silica particles followed by direct dispersion into PEG resulted in superior Kevlar composites having much higher spike resistance.

  17. Laser-induced damage of fused silica at 355 and 1065 nm initiated at aluminum contamination particles on the surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genin, F.Y.; Michlitsch, K.; Furr, J.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Krulevitch, P.

    1997-01-01

    1-{mu}m thick circular dots, 10-250 {mu}m dia, were deposited onto 1.14 cm thick fused silica windows by sputtering Al through a mask. Al shavings were also deposited on the windows to investigate effects of particle-substrate adhesion. The silica windows were then illuminated repetitively using a 3-ns, 355 nm and an 8.6-ns, 1064 nm laser. The tests were conducted at near normal incidence with particles on input and output surfaces of the windows. During the first shot, a plasma ignited at the metal particle and damage initiated on the fused silica surface. The morphology of the damage at the metal dots were reproducible but different for input and output surface contamination. For input surface contamination, minor damage occurred where the particle was located; such damage ceased to grow with the removal of contaminant material. More serious damage (pits and cracks) was initiated on the output surface (especially at 355 nm) and grew to catastrophic proportions after few shots. Output surface contaminants were usually ejected on the initial shot, leaving a wave pattern on the surface. No further damage occurred with subsequent shots unless a shot (usually the first shot) cracked the surface; such behavior was mostly observed at 355 nm and occasionally for large shavings at 1064 nm. The size of the damaged area scaled with the size of the particle (except when catastrophic damage occurred). Onset of catastrophic damage on output surface occurred only when particles exceeded a critical size. Damage behavior of the sputtered dots was found to be qualitatively similar to that of the shavings. The artificial contamination technique accelerated the study by allowing better control of the test conditions.

  18. Pulmonary toxicity of polyvinyl chloride particles after a single intratracheal instillation in rats. Time course and comparison with silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous in vitro studies indicated that emulsion polyvinyl chloride (PVC) particles (PVC-E3), with a mean diameter of 2 μm, exhibited a moderate toxicity in different pulmonary cell cultures. The in vitro cytotoxicity and pro-inflammatory potential of PVC-E3 particles were reduced when the additives had been 'washed off' (PVC-W3), indicating that PVC-particle associated toxicity is probably related to the residual additives. In the present study, male Wistar rats (230 ± 18 g) received a single intratracheal instillation of vehicle, crystalline silica particles [Min-U-Sil, 10 mg/kg body weight (BW)], PVC-E3 (10 or 50 mg/kg BW), or PVC-W3 (10 or 50 mg/kg BW). After 2, 7, 28, or 90 days, the rats were sacrificed (n = 6) and pulmonary injury and inflammation were determined by measuring lung weight, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and protein concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), differential BALF cell count, and histopathology. Silica exposure resulted in pulmonary inflammation and damage at all time points with a progressive deterioration. Exposure to high concentrations of PVC particles caused pulmonary inflammation and damage, which were similar to the silica-exposed group at 2 days, but at 90 days, most parameters had returned to the control level, except for minor histopathological lesions. PVC-E3 did not induce more damage than PVC-W3. Two days after exposure, PVC-W3 caused less neutrophil but more eosinophil influx than PVC-E3. Although the pulmonary toxicity of both PVC-E3 and PVC-W3 appeared limited, this in vivo study has not confirmed the conclusion from the in vitro toxicity tests that removal of residual additives reduces the toxicity of PVC-E3 particles

  19. Laser-induced damage of fused silica at 355 and 1065 nm initiated at aluminum contamination particles on the surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1-μm thick circular dots, 10-250 μm dia, were deposited onto 1.14 cm thick fused silica windows by sputtering Al through a mask. Al shavings were also deposited on the windows to investigate effects of particle-substrate adhesion. The silica windows were then illuminated repetitively using a 3-ns, 355 nm and an 8.6-ns, 1064 nm laser. The tests were conducted at near normal incidence with particles on input and output surfaces of the windows. During the first shot, a plasma ignited at the metal particle and damage initiated on the fused silica surface. The morphology of the damage at the metal dots were reproducible but different for input and output surface contamination. For input surface contamination, minor damage occurred where the particle was located; such damage ceased to grow with the removal of contaminant material. More serious damage (pits and cracks) was initiated on the output surface (especially at 355 nm) and grew to catastrophic proportions after few shots. Output surface contaminants were usually ejected on the initial shot, leaving a wave pattern on the surface. No further damage occurred with subsequent shots unless a shot (usually the first shot) cracked the surface; such behavior was mostly observed at 355 nm and occasionally for large shavings at 1064 nm. The size of the damaged area scaled with the size of the particle (except when catastrophic damage occurred). Onset of catastrophic damage on output surface occurred only when particles exceeded a critical size. Damage behavior of the sputtered dots was found to be qualitatively similar to that of the shavings. The artificial contamination technique accelerated the study by allowing better control of the test conditions

  20. Characterization of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride particles and coatings obtained in a CH4/N2 radiofrequency discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN x:H) particles and coatings have been prepared in a CH4/N2 13.56 MHz radiofrequency discharge. Particles and films have been examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy for different nitrogen contents. SEM micrographs show that the dust particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.2-4 μm. The surface morphology of the particles is strongly modified with the increase of the nitrogen content in the gas mixture. In the particle and film IR spectra, four predominant absorption bands have been observed. They reveal the presence of C-H, C=C, C=N and/or N-H (1300-1800 cm-1), -C≡N and -N≡C (2000-2300 cm-1), C-H (2800-3100 cm-1) and N-H and/or O-H (3200-3600 cm-1) bonds. These absorption bands are studied in order to determine the influence of the nitrogen incorporation

  1. Immobilization of Styrene-acrylamide Co-polymer on Either Silica Particles or Inner Surface of Silica Capillary for the Separation of D-Glucose Anomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Styrene-acrylamide co-polymer was immobilized on porous partially sub-2 μm silica monolith particles and inner surface of fused silica capillary (50 μm ID and 28 cm length) to result in μLC and CEC stationary phases, respectively, for separation of anomeric D-glucose derivatives. Reversed addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization was incorporated to induce surface polymerization. Acrylamide was employed to incorporate amide-functionality in the stationary phase. The resultant μLC and CEC stationary phases were able to separate isomers of D-glucose derivatives with high selectivity and efficiency. The mobile phase of 75/ 25 (v/v) acetonitrile (ACN)/water with 0.1% TFA, was used for HPLC with a packed column (1 mm ID, 300 mm length). The effects of pH and ACN composition on anomeric separation of D-glucose in CEC have been examined. A mobile phase of 85/15 (v/v) ACN/30 mM sodium acetate pH 6.7 was found the optimized mobile phase for CEC. The CEC stationary phase also gave good separation of other saccharides such as maltotriose and Dextran 1500 (MW∼1500) with good separation efficiency (number of theoretical plates ∼300,000/m)

  2. Immobilization of Styrene-acrylamide Co-polymer on Either Silica Particles or Inner Surface of Silica Capillary for the Separation of D-Glucose Anomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Faiz; Kim, Yune Sung; Cheong, Won Jo [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Styrene-acrylamide co-polymer was immobilized on porous partially sub-2 μm silica monolith particles and inner surface of fused silica capillary (50 μm ID and 28 cm length) to result in μLC and CEC stationary phases, respectively, for separation of anomeric D-glucose derivatives. Reversed addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization was incorporated to induce surface polymerization. Acrylamide was employed to incorporate amide-functionality in the stationary phase. The resultant μLC and CEC stationary phases were able to separate isomers of D-glucose derivatives with high selectivity and efficiency. The mobile phase of 75/ 25 (v/v) acetonitrile (ACN)/water with 0.1% TFA, was used for HPLC with a packed column (1 mm ID, 300 mm length). The effects of pH and ACN composition on anomeric separation of D-glucose in CEC have been examined. A mobile phase of 85/15 (v/v) ACN/30 mM sodium acetate pH 6.7 was found the optimized mobile phase for CEC. The CEC stationary phase also gave good separation of other saccharides such as maltotriose and Dextran 1500 (MW∼1500) with good separation efficiency (number of theoretical plates ∼300,000/m)

  3. Novel magnetite-silica nanocomposite (Fe3O4-SBA-15) particles for DNA binding and gene delivery aided by a magnet array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Humphrey H P; McBain, Stuart C; Lethbridge, Zoe A D; Lees, Martin R; Palona, Iryna; Olariu, Cristina I; Dobson, Jon

    2011-04-01

    Novel magnetite-silica nanocomposite particles were prepared using SBA-15 nanoporous silica as template. Magnetite nanoparticles were impregnated into the nanopore array of the silica template through thermal decomposition of iron(III) acetylacetonate, Fe(AcAc)3 at 200 degrees C. These composite particles were characterized using TEM, XRD and SQUID magnetometry. The TEM images showed that the size of composite particles was around 500 nm and the particles retained the nanoporous array of SBA-15. The formation of magnetite nanoparticles was confirmed by the powder XRD study. These composite particles also exhibited ferrimagnetic properties. By coating with short chain polyethyleneimine (PEI), these particles are capable of binding DNA molecules for gene delivery and transfection. With an external magnetic field, the transfection efficiency was shown to have an increase of around 15%. The results indicated that these composite nanoparticles may be further developed as a new tool for nanomagnetic gene transfection. PMID:21776740

  4. Fabrication and charaterization of silica nanocoatings on ZnS phosphor particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the addition of the cationic surfactant, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), continuous and uniform silica nanocoatings on ZnS phosphors have been successfully obtained. The coatings are proven to cover ZnS phosphors completely by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The XPS and Fourier transform infrared red (FT-IR) spectroscopy results provide evidence of the presence of Zn-O-Si bonds between the silica coatings and ZnS phosphors. It is suggested that the bridging effect of CTAC favours the formation of silica coatings, and Zn-O-Si bonds are formed during the annealing procedure

  5. Silica in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sargent, B A; Tayrien, C; McClure, M K; Li, A; Basu, A R; Manoj, P; Watson, D M; Bohac, C J; Furlan, E; Kim, K H; Green, J D; Sloan, G C

    2008-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectra of a few T Tauri stars (TTS) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope show prominent narrow emission features indicating silica (crystalline silicon dioxide). Silica is not a major constituent of the interstellar medium; therefore, any silica present in the circumstellar protoplanetary disks of TTS must be largely the result of processing of primitive dust material in the disks surrouding these stars. We model the silica emission features in our spectra using the opacities of various polymorphs of silica and their amorphous versions computed from earth-based laboratory measurements. This modeling indicates that the two polymorphs of silica, tridymite and cristobalite, which form at successively higher temperatures and low pressures, are the dominant forms of silica in the TTS of our sample. These high temperature, low pressure polymorphs of silica present in protoplanetary disks are consistent with a grain composed mostly of tridymite named Ada found...

  6. Large Mesopore Generation in an Amorphous Silica-Alumina by Controlling the Pore Size with the Gel Skeletal Reinforcement and Its Application to Catalytic Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nasu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetraethoxy orthosilicate (TEOS was used not only as a precursor of silica, but also as an agent which reinforces the skeleton of silica-gel to prepare an aerogel and resultant silica and silica-alumina with large pore size and pore volume. In this gel skeletal reinforcement, the strength of silica aerogel skeleton was enhanced by aging with TEOS/2-propanol mixed solution to prevent the shrink of the pores. When silica aerogel was reinforced by TEOS solution, the pore diameter and pore volume of calcined silica could be controlled by the amount of TEOS solution and reached 30 nm and 3.1 cm3/g. The results from N2 adsorption measurement indicated that most of pores for this silica consisted of mesopores. Silica-alumina was prepared by the impregnation of an aluminum tri-sec-butoxide/2-butanol solution with obtained silica. Mixed catalysts were prepared by the combination of β-zeolite (26 wt% and prepared silica-aluminas with large mesopore (58 wt% and subsequently the effects of their pore sizes on the catalytic activity and the product selectivity were investigated in catalytic cracking of n-dodecane at 500 °C. The mixed catalysts exhibited not only comparable activity to that for single zeolite, but also unique selectivity where larger amounts of branched products were formed.

  7. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  8. Double-Layer Magnetic Nanoparticle-Embedded Silica Particles for Efficient Bio-Separation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Kyeong

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs based nanomaterials have been exploited in various biotechnology fields including biomolecule separation. However, slow accumulation of Fe3O4 NPs by magnets may limit broad applications of Fe3O4 NP-based nanomaterials. In this study, we report fabrication of Fe3O4 NPs double-layered silica nanoparticles (DL MNPs with a silica core and highly packed Fe3O4 NPs layers. The DL MNPs had a superparamagnetic property and efficient accumulation kinetics under an external magnetic field. Moreover, the magnetic field-exposed DL MNPs show quantitative accumulation, whereas Fe3O4 NPs single-layered silica nanoparticles (SL MNPs and silica-coated Fe3O4 NPs produced a saturated plateau under full recovery of the NPs. DL MNPs are promising nanomaterials with great potential to separate and analyze biomolecules.

  9. Presence of nano-sized silica during in vitro digestion of foods containing silica as a food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ruud; Kramer, Evelien; Oomen, Agnes G; Rivera, Zahira E Herrera; Oegema, Gerlof; Tromp, Peter C; Fokkink, Remco; Rietveld, Anton; Marvin, Hans J P; Weigel, Stefan; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Bouwmeester, Hans

    2012-03-27

    The presence, dissolution, agglomeration state, and release of materials in the nano-size range from food containing engineered nanoparticles during human digestion is a key question for the safety assessment of these materials. We used an in vitro model to mimic the human digestion. Food products subjected to in vitro digestion included (i) hot water, (ii) coffee with powdered creamer, (iii) instant soup, and (iv) pancake which either contained silica as the food additive E551, or to which a form of synthetic amorphous silica or 32 nm SiO(2) particles were added. The results showed that, in the mouth stage of the digestion, nano-sized silica particles with a size range of 5-50 and 50-500 nm were present in food products containing E551 or added synthetic amorphous silica. However, during the successive gastric digestion stage, this nano-sized silica was no longer present for the food matrices coffee and instant soup, while low amounts were found for pancakes. Additional experiments showed that the absence of nano-sized silica in the gastric stage can be contributed to an effect of low pH combined with high electrolyte concentrations in the gastric digestion stage. Large silica agglomerates are formed under these conditions as determined by DLS and SEM experiments and explained theoretically by the extended DLVO theory. Importantly, in the subsequent intestinal digestion stage, the nano-sized silica particles reappeared again, even in amounts higher than in the saliva (mouth) digestion stage. These findings suggest that, upon consumption of foods containing E551, the gut epithelium is most likely exposed to nano-sized silica. PMID:22364219

  10. A novel green approach for the chemical modification of silica particles based on deep eutectic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tongnian; Zhang, Mingliang; Chen, Jia; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2015-06-18

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs), as a novel class of green solvents, were successfully applied as eco-friendly and sustainable reaction media for fast surface modification of spherical porous silica, resulting in stationary phases for high-performance liquid chromatography. The new reaction media were advantageous over organic solvents in many aspects, such as the high dispersibility of silica spheres and their non-volatility. PMID:25985926

  11. Room-temperature amorphous alloy field-effect transistor exhibiting particle and wave electronic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The realization of room-temperature macroscopic field effect transistors (FETs) will lead to new epoch-making possibilities for electronic applications. The Id-Vg characteristics of the millimeter-sized aluminum-oxide amorphous alloy (Ni0.36Nb0.24Zr0.40)90H10 FETs were measured at a gate-drain bias voltage of 0–60 μV in nonmagnetic conditions and under a magnetic fields at room temperature. Application of dc voltages to the gate electrode resulted in the transistor exhibiting one-electron Coulomb oscillation with a period of 0.28 mV, Fabry-Perot interference with a period of 2.35 μV under nonmagnetic conditions, and a Fano effect with a period of 0.26 mV for Vg and 0.2 T under a magnetic field. The realization of a low-energy controllable device made from millimeter-sized Ni-Nb-Zr-H amorphous alloy throws new light on cluster electronics

  12. Room-temperature amorphous alloy field-effect transistor exhibiting particle and wave electronic transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuhara, M., E-mail: fukuhara@niche.tohoku.ac.jp [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kawarada, H. [Research and Development Center, Waseda University, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan)

    2015-02-28

    The realization of room-temperature macroscopic field effect transistors (FETs) will lead to new epoch-making possibilities for electronic applications. The I{sub d}-V{sub g} characteristics of the millimeter-sized aluminum-oxide amorphous alloy (Ni{sub 0.36}Nb{sub 0.24}Zr{sub 0.40}){sub 90}H{sub 10} FETs were measured at a gate-drain bias voltage of 0–60 μV in nonmagnetic conditions and under a magnetic fields at room temperature. Application of dc voltages to the gate electrode resulted in the transistor exhibiting one-electron Coulomb oscillation with a period of 0.28 mV, Fabry-Perot interference with a period of 2.35 μV under nonmagnetic conditions, and a Fano effect with a period of 0.26 mV for Vg and 0.2 T under a magnetic field. The realization of a low-energy controllable device made from millimeter-sized Ni-Nb-Zr-H amorphous alloy throws new light on cluster electronics.

  13. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophobic silicas. 584.700 Section 584.700 Food... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 584.700 Hydrophobic silicas. (a) Product. Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica or precipitated hydrophobic silica (CAS Reg. No....

  14. Light induced heterogeneous ozone processing on the pesticides adsorbed on silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, J.; Désert, M.; Quivet, E.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    In France, in 2010, the sales of pesticides reached 1.8 billion euros for 61 900 tons of active ingredients, positioning France as a first European consumer of pesticides, as reported by the European Crop Protection Association. About 19 million hectares of crops are sprayed annually with pesticides, i.e., 35% of the total surface area of France. This corresponds to an average pesticide dose of 3.2 kg ha-1. The consumption of herbicide and fungicide is favoured in comparison to the use of insecticides in France and the other European countries, as well. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences the atmospheric fate of these compounds such as their photo-chemical degradation. There is much uncertainty concerning the behavior of the pesticides in the atmosphere. Especially, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the degradation of the pesticides induced by heterogeneous reactions in absence and especially in presence of solar light. Considering that most of the pesticides currently used are semi-volatile, it is of crucial importance to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of particulate pesticides with light and with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and OH radical. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the light induced heterogeneous ozonation of suspended pesticide particles. 8 pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin and tetraconazole) were chosen for their physico-chemical properties and their concentration levels in the PACA (Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) region, France. Silica particles with well-known properties were chosen as model particles of atmospheric relevance. Kinetic rate constants were determined to allow estimate the atmospheric lifetimes relating to ozone. The rate constants were determined as follows: k = (6.6 × 0.2) 10-19, (7.2 × 0.3) 10-19, (5.1 × 0.5) 10-19, (3.9 × 0.3) 10-19 [cm3 molecules-1 s-1] for Cyprodinil

  15. Excitation of the aromatic infrared emission bands: Chemical energy in hydrogenated amorphous carbon particles?

    CERN Document Server

    Duley, Walter W

    2011-01-01

    We outline a model for the heating of hydrogenated amorphous (HAC) dust via the release of stored chemical energy and show that this energy (~12 kJ/mole) is sufficient to heat dust grains of classical size (50-1000 {\\AA}) to temperatures at which they can emit at 3.3 {\\mu}m and other "UIR" wavelengths. Using laboratory data, we show that this heating process is consistent with a concentration of a few percent of dangling bonds in HAC and may be initiated by the recombination of trapped H atoms. We suggest that the release of chemical energy from dust represents an additional source of excitation for the UIR bands relaxing the previous requirement that only stochastically heated molecules having fewer than ~ 50 atoms can produce emission at 3.3 {\\mu}m.

  16. Critical roles of cationic surfactants in the preparation of colloidal mesostructured silica nanoparticles: control of mesostructure, particle size, and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hironori; Urata, Chihiro; Higashitamori, Sayuri; Aoyama, Yuko; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2014-03-12

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles are promising materials for various applications, such as drug delivery and catalysis, but the functional roles of surfactants in the formation and preparation of mesostructured silica nanoparticles (MSN-as) remain to be seen. It was confirmed that the molar ratio of cationic surfactants to Si of alkoxysilanes (Surf/Si) can affect the degree of mesostructure formation (i.e., whether the mesochannels formed inside the nanoparticles actually pass through the outer surface of the particles), the particle diameter, and the dispersibility of MSN-as. Wormhole-like mesostructures formed with low Surf/Si ratios; however, the mesopores did not pass through the outer surface of the particles completely. At high Surf/Si ratios, the mesostructures extended. The particle diameter was 100 nm or larger at low Surf/Si ratios, and the primary particle diameter decreased as the Surf/Si ratio increased. This was because the surfactants enhanced the dispersity of the alkoxysilanes in water and the hydrolysis rate of the alkoxysilanes became faster, leading to an increased nucleation as compared to the particle growth. Moreover, primary particles aggregated at low Surf/Si ratios because of the hydrophobic interactions among the surfactants that were not involved in the mesostructure formation but were adsorbed onto the nanoparticles. At high Surf/Si ratios, the surfactant micelles were adsorbed on the surface of primary particles (admicelles), resulting in the dispersion of the particles due to electrostatic repulsion. In particular, molar ratios of 0.13 or higher were quite effective for the preparation of highly dispersed MSN-as. Surfactants played important roles in the mesostructure formation, decreasing the particle diameters, and the dispersibility of the particles. All of these factors were considerably affected by the Surf/Si ratio. The results suggested novel opportunities to control various colloidal mesostructured nanoparticles from the

  17. Amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles interacting with water vapor: conceptual framework and experimental evidence for restructuring, phase transitions and kinetic limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Koop

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions with water are crucial for the properties, transformation and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. Here we present a conceptual framework for the interaction of amorphous aerosol particles with water vapor, outlining characteristic features and differences in comparison to crystalline particles. We used a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA to characterize the hydration and dehydration of crystalline ammonium sulfate, amorphous oxalic acid and amorphous levoglucosan particles (diameter ~100 nm, relative humidity 5–95% at 298 K. The experimental data and accompanying Köhler model calculations provide new insights into particle microstructure, surface adsorption, bulk absorption, phase transitions and hygroscopic growth. The results of these and related investigations lead to the following conclusions:

    (1 Many organic substances, including carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and proteins, tend to form amorphous rather than crystalline phases upon drying of aqueous solution droplets. Depending on viscosity and microstructure, the amorphous phases can be classified as glasses, rubbers, gels or viscous liquids.

    (2 Amorphous organic substances tend to absorb water vapor and undergo gradual deliquescence and hygroscopic growth at lower relative humidity than their crystalline counterparts.

    (3 In the course of hydration and dehydration, certain organic substances can form rubber- or gel-like structures (supramolecular networks and undergo transitions between swollen and collapsed network structures.

    (4 Organic gels or (semi-solid amorphous shells (glassy, rubbery, ultra-viscous with low molecular diffusivity can kinetically limit the uptake and release of water and may influence the hygroscopic growth and activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and ice nuclei (IN. Moreover, (semi-solid amorphous phases may influence the uptake of gaseous photo

  18. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm$^3$ developed using our production technique were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel w...

  19. Mesoporous Silica Coated CeF3:Tb3+ Particles for Drug Release

    OpenAIRE

    Deyan Kong; Piaoping Yang; Zhenling Wang; Ping Chai; Shanshan Huang; Hongzhou Lian; Jun Lin

    2008-01-01

    CeF3:Tb3+ nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a polyol process using diethylene glycol (DEG) as solvent. After being coated with dense silica, these CeF3:Tb3+ nanoparticles can be coated with mesoporous silica using nonionic triblock copolymer EO20PO70EO20 (P 123) as structure-directing agent. The composite can load ibuprofen and release the drug in the PBS. The composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen absorption/desorpti...

  20. Fluorescent boronic acid terminated polymer grafted silica particles synthesized via click chemistry for affinity separation of saccharides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boronic acids are important for effective separation of biological active cis-diols. For the purpose of constructing a new type of saccharide-sensitive material which can not only provide convenient separation but also improve the access of boronic acid to guest molecules, the fluorogenic boronic acid terminated, thermo-sensitive polymers (BA-polyNIPAm) were grafted to an alkyne modified silica gel through the exploitation of click chemistry. The BA-polyNIPAm grafted silica gel (BA-polyNIPAm-SG) was characterized by FT-IR, fluorescence spectra, fluorescence microscopy, elemental analysis (EA), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and so on. BA-polyNIPAm-SG displayed affinity binding ability for saccharides under physiological pH value and allowed saccharides to be conveniently separated from solution. The maximum binding capacities for fructose and glucose are 83.2 μmol/g and 70.4 μmol/g polymer, respectively. The intensity of fluorescence emission of BA-polyNIPAm-SG increased with the increasing of fructose concentration. The present study provides a new kind of composite material which contains moveable and flexible grippers for recognizing and binding guest molecules. - Highlights: • Fluorogenic boronic acid terminated polymers were conjugated to silica particle. • The prepared material can conveniently separate saccharides from solution. • The prepared material displays increased fluorescence emission upon binding fructose

  1. Fluorescent boronic acid terminated polymer grafted silica particles synthesized via click chemistry for affinity separation of saccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhifeng, E-mail: 897061147@qq.com; Deng, Peihong; Tang, Siping; Li, Junhua

    2014-07-01

    Boronic acids are important for effective separation of biological active cis-diols. For the purpose of constructing a new type of saccharide-sensitive material which can not only provide convenient separation but also improve the access of boronic acid to guest molecules, the fluorogenic boronic acid terminated, thermo-sensitive polymers (BA-polyNIPAm) were grafted to an alkyne modified silica gel through the exploitation of click chemistry. The BA-polyNIPAm grafted silica gel (BA-polyNIPAm-SG) was characterized by FT-IR, fluorescence spectra, fluorescence microscopy, elemental analysis (EA), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and so on. BA-polyNIPAm-SG displayed affinity binding ability for saccharides under physiological pH value and allowed saccharides to be conveniently separated from solution. The maximum binding capacities for fructose and glucose are 83.2 μmol/g and 70.4 μmol/g polymer, respectively. The intensity of fluorescence emission of BA-polyNIPAm-SG increased with the increasing of fructose concentration. The present study provides a new kind of composite material which contains moveable and flexible grippers for recognizing and binding guest molecules. - Highlights: • Fluorogenic boronic acid terminated polymers were conjugated to silica particle. • The prepared material can conveniently separate saccharides from solution. • The prepared material displays increased fluorescence emission upon binding fructose.

  2. Studies on tableting properties of lactose. VII. The effect of variations in primary particle size and percentage of amorphous lactose in spray dried lactose products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vromans, H.; Bolhuis, G.K.; Lerk, C.F.; Biggelaar, van de H.; Bosch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Sieve fractions of α-lactose monohydrate and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, respectively, suspended in solutions of lactose, were spray dried in order to obtain products with various amorphous lactose contents. The compactibility of the samples appeared to be a function of both the primary particle

  3. Mechanisms of silica-induced IL-8 release from A549 cells: Initial kinase-activation does not require EGFR activation or particle uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding how mineral particles trigger cellular responses is crucial in order to elucidate what characteristics determine their harmful effects. It is not clear whether cellular effects are triggered through the cell membrane or require particle uptake. However, studies with asbestos suggest that activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may be important. We have previously reported that crystalline silica-induced interleukin (IL)-8 release from human lung epithelial cells (A549) was regulated through Src family kinases (SFKs) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1 and -2. The present study shows that SFK and p38 phosphorylation increased almost immediately upon crystalline silica exposure, whereas ERK1/2 phosphorylation increased after 10 min of exposure. The p38 inhibitor SB202190 increased the silica-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that p38 activity may attenuate activation of ERK1/2. Scanning electron microscopy showed that some silica particles were phagocytosed between 1 and 4 h of exposure, but that the majority remained bound by microvilli on the cell surface. The EGFR inhibitor AG1478 attenuated both silica-induced IL-8 release and phosphorylation of SFKs and ERK1/2. However, AG1478 also inhibited the respective background levels, and the EGFR was not phosphorylated at the onset of silica exposure. The results suggest that crystalline silica triggers p38 and SFK-ERK1/2 signaling through interactions with membrane components as both pathways were rapidly activated prior to particle internalization. However, the silica-induced up-regulation of IL-8 release through the SFK-ERK1/2 pathway does not appear to be initiated through activation of the EGFR, although basal EGFR activity may affect the magnitude of the responses

  4. Organic-inorganic nanocomposite films made from polyurethane dispersions and colloidal silica particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Serkis, Magdalena; Špírková, Milena; Kredatusová, Jana; Hodan, Jiří; Bureš, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 2 (2016), s. 157-173. ISSN 0927-6440 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06700S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : polyurethane dispersion * colloidal silica * composite s Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.726, year: 2014

  5. Detection of charged particles and X-rays by scintillator layers coupled to amorphous silicon photodiode arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) p-i-n diodes with transparent metallic contacts are shown to be suitable for detecting charged particles, electrons, and X-rays. When coupled to a suitable scintillator using CsI(Tl) as the scintillator we show a capability to detect minimum ionizing particles with S/N ∼20. We demonstrate such an arrangement by operating a p-i-n diode in photovoltaic mode (reverse bias). Moreover, we show that a p-i-n diode can also work as a photoconductor under forward bias and produces a gain yield of 3-8 higher light sensitivity for shaping times of 1 μs. n-i-n devices have similar optical gain as the p-i-n photoconductor for short integrating times ( < 10μs). However, n-i-n devices exhibit much higher gain for a long term integration (10ms) than the p-i-n ones. High sensitivity photosensors are very desirable for X-ray medical imaging because radiation exposure dose can be reduced significantly. The scintillator CsI layers we made have higher spatial resolution than the Kodak commercial scintillator screens due to their internal columnar structure which can collimate the scintillation light. Evaporated CsI layers are shown to be more resistant to radiation damage than the crystalline bulk CsI(Tl)

  6. Fabrication of quantum dot/silica core-shell particles immobilizing Au nanoparticles and their dual imaging functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Matsudo, Hiromu; Li, Ting-ting; Shibuya, Kyosuke; Kubota, Yohsuke; Oikawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tomohiko; Gonda, Kohsuke

    2016-03-01

    The present work proposes preparation methods for quantum dot/silica (QD/SiO2) core-shell particles that immobilize Au nanoparticles (QD/SiO2/Au). A colloid solution of QD/SiO2 core-shell particles with an average size of 47.0 ± 6.1 nm was prepared by a sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of the QDs with an average size of 10.3 ± 2.1 nm. A colloid solution of Au nanoparticles with an average size of 17.9 ± 1.3 nm was prepared by reducing Au3+ ions with sodium citrate in water at 80 °C. Introduction of amino groups to QD/SiO2 particle surfaces was performed using (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (QD/SiO2-NH2). The QD/SiO2/Au particles were fabricated by mixing the Au particle colloid solution and the QD/SiO2-NH2 particle colloid solution. Values of radiant efficiency and computed tomography for the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution were 2.23 × 107 (p/s/cm2/sr)/(μW/cm2) at a QD concentration of 8 × 10-7 M and 1180 ± 314 Hounsfield units and an Au concentration of 5.4 × 10-2 M. The QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was injected into a mouse chest wall. Fluorescence emitted from the colloid solution could be detected on the skin covering the chest wall. The colloid solution could also be X-ray-imaged in the chest wall. Consequently, the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was found to have dual functions, i.e., fluorescence emission and X-ray absorption in vivo, which makes the colloid solution suitable to function as a contrast agent for dual imaging processes.

  7. Adsorption and desorption characteristics of DNA onto the surface of amino functional mesoporous silica with various particle morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikosaka, Ryouichi; Nagata, Fukue; Tomita, Masahiro; Kato, Katsuya

    2016-04-01

    Recently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) adsorption on solid materials has been reported for applications such as genetic diagnosis of diseases, gene delivery, and biosensors. Mesoporous silica (MPS) is an excellent carrier because of its high surface area and large pore volume. Functionalization of the MPS surface can be controlled by silane coupling reagents, and the MPS particle morphology can be easily changed by the synthetic conditions. In this study, to evaluate the ability of DNA adsorption on MPS, the MPS surface was functionalized using four reagents, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (-NH2), N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (-2ENH2), N-(6-aminohexyl)aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (-2HNH2), and (3-trimethoxysilylpropyl)diethylenetriamine (-3NH2), each having a different number of amino groups and alkyl chain lengths. Moreover, we prepared three types of MPSs with different particle morphologies: sheet-type structure (MPS sheet), spherical MPS (MCM-41s), and nonporous spherical silica. A high adsorption capacity was observed in MPS sheets with -2HNH2 (sheet-2HNH2) and -3NH2 (sheet-3NH2), as well as MCM-41s with -3NH2 (41s-3NH2). The adsorption and desorption rates of DNA on these three MPSs were then examined and the best results were obtained with 41s-3NH2. These results demonstrate that the amino functionalized MPS materials are useful DNA adsorbents. PMID:26764114

  8. Collection of trace metals with cationic surfactant-silica particles followed by flotation with an anionic surfactant for seawater analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kitakata, Kengo; Hiraide, Masataka

    2012-02-01

    The analysis of seawater for trace metals is important for pollution monitoring and better understanding of marine systems. The present paper describes an efficient preconcentration method for the determination of trace metals in seawater. Trace metals [Ni(II), Cu(II), Ga(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Bi(III)] in 1,000 mL of seawater sample were complexed with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and sorbed onto silica particles covered with cetyltrimethylammonium chloride. After the addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate, the particles were floated to the solution surface by bubbling and then collected by suction. The trace metals were desorbed with dilute nitric acid and determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The rapid 200-fold preconcentration was demonstrated with certified seawater samples. PMID:22159468

  9. Porosity of silica Stöber particles determined by spin-echo small angle neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, S R; Washington, A L; Parnell, A J; Walsh, A; Dalgliesh, R M; Li, F; Hamilton, W A; Prevost, S; Fairclough, J P A; Pynn, R

    2016-05-25

    Stöber silica particles are used in a diverse range of applications. Despite their widespread industrial and scientific uses, information on the internal structure of the particles is non-trivial to obtain and is not often reported. In this work we have used spin-echo small angle neutron scattering (SESANS) in conjunction with ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) and pycnometry to study an aqueous dispersion of Stöber particles. Our results are in agreement with models which propose that Stöber particles have a porous core, with a significant fraction of the pores inaccessible to solvent. For samples prepared from the same master sample in a range of H2O : D2O ratio solutions we were able to model the SESANS results for the solution series assuming monodisperse, smooth surfaced spheres of radius 83 nm with an internal open pore volume fraction of 32% and a closed pore fraction of 10%. Our results are consistent with USAXS measurements. The protocol developed and discussed here shows that the SESANS technique is a powerful way to investigate particles much larger than those studied using conventional small angle scattering methods. PMID:27021920

  10. Designing, construction, assessment, and efficiency of local exhaust ventilation in controlling crystalline silica dust and particles, and formaldehyde in a foundry industry plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morteza, Mortezavi Mehrizi; Hossein, Kakooi; Amirhossein, Matin; Naser, Hasheminegad; Gholamhossein, Halvani; Hossein, Fallah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design and assess the efficiency of a local exhaust ventilation system used in a foundry operation to control inhalable dust and particles, microcrystal particles, and noxious gases and vapours affecting workers during the foundry process. It was designed based on recommendations from the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene. After designing a local exhaust ventilation system (LEV), we prepared and submitted the implementation plan to the manufacturer. High concentrations of crystalline silica dust and formaldehyde, which are common toxic air pollutants in foundries, were ultimately measured as an indicator for studying the efficiency of this system in controlling inhalable dust and particles as well as other air pollutants. The level of occupational exposure to silica and formaldehyde as major air pollutants was assessed in two modes: first, when the LEV was on, and second, when it was off. Air samples from the exposure area were obtained using a personal sampling pump and analysed using the No. 7601 method for crystal silica and the No. 2541 method for formaldehyde of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Silica and formaldehyde concentrations were determined by visible absorption spectrophotometry and gas chromatography. The results showed that local exhaust ventilation was successful in preserving the crystal silica particles in the work environment at a level below the NIOSH maximum allowed concentration (0.05 mg m-3). In contrast, formaldehyde exceeded the NIOSH limit (1 ppm or 1.228 mg m-3). PMID:23585164

  11. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm$^3$ developed using our production technique were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment.

  12. Association and migration of uranium and thorium with silica colloidal particles in saturated subsurface zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigate the influence of silica colloids on the migration of radionuclides (U and Th) in the subsurface medium. Colloidal suspension of silica was generated from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and spiked with U and Th in the concentration range of 10-100 µg mL-1. Concentration of U and Th recovered out of the experimental soil column in case of colloidal assisted migration was 84.5 and 16.1 % respectively whereas the same was 27.2 and 15.9 % for ionic solution. Mean linear attenuation coefficient as evaluated experimentally for colloidal assisted migration was 0.07 and 0.12 cm-1 for U and Th respectively whereas the same in case of ionic solution was 0.13 and 0.17 cm-1. (author)

  13. Silica aerogel for capturing intact interplanetary dust particles for the Tanpopo experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawai, Hideyuki; Imai, Eiichi; Kawaguchi, Yuko; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we report the progress in developing a silica-aerogel-based cosmic dust capture panel for use in the Tanpopo experiment on the International Space Station (ISS). Previous studies revealed that ultralow-density silica aerogel tiles, comprising two layers with densities of 0.01 and 0.03 g/cm(3) developed using our production technique, were suitable for achieving the scientific objectives of the astrobiological mission. A special density configuration (i.e., box framing) aerogel with a holder was designed to construct the capture panels. Qualification tests for an engineering model of the capture panel as an instrument aboard the ISS were successful. Sixty box-framing aerogel tiles were manufactured in a contamination-controlled environment. PMID:25794831

  14. Bioactive vapor deposited calcium-phosphate silica sol-gel particles for directing osteoblast behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Katherine L; Holmes, Hallie R; McCarthy, Connor; Rajachar, Rupak M

    2016-09-01

    Silica-based materials are being developed and used for a variety of applications in orthopedic tissue engineering. In this work, we characterize the ability of a novel silica sol vapor deposition system to quickly modify biomaterial substrates and modulate surface hydrophobicity, surface topography, and composition. We were able to show that surface hydrophobicity, surface roughness, and composition could be rapidly modified. The compositional modification was directed towards generating apatitic-like surface mineral compositions (Ca/P ratios ∼1.30). Modified substrates were also capable of altering cell proliferation and differentiation behavior of preosteoblasts (MC3T3) and showed potential once optimized to provide a simple means to generate osteo-conductive substrates for tissue engineering. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2135-2148, 2016. PMID:27087349

  15. Porous structure and particle size of silica and hydrotalcite catalyst precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Titulaer, M.K.

    1993-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the control of the porous structure of catalyst bodies. The first part deals with silica, that can be utilized as catalyst support with many industrially important catalytic reactions. The second part of the thesis deals with the preparation and characterization of solid catalysts having a tubular or a platelet microstructure. The success of zeolites in catalytic reactions is due to the fact that the shape of the porous structure can be controlled on an atomic sc...

  16. Preparation of monodisperse porous silica particles using poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres as a template

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grama, Silvia; Horák, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 64, Suppl. 1 (2015), S11-S17. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : microspheres * monodisperse * silica Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.293, year: 2014 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/64%20Suppl%201/64_S11.pdf

  17. Silica Aerogels' nano structure studied using small angle neutron scattering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique has been widely employed in probing the microstructure of amorphous materials in the nanometer range. In aerogels system, the size range of 1 - 100 nm is of particular interest since the structural units, such as the pores and particles, often fall in this range. In a typical scattering experiment, scattered neutron intensity is measured as a function of the scattering angle. Various plots of intensity I(Q) and scattering vector, Q, can provide information about fractal dimensions, and particle and cluster sizes. In this study, SANS facilities, at Nuclear Malaysia and Badan Tenaga Atom Nasional (BATAN), Indonesia were used to analyse particle and cluster size of silica aerogels and titanium containing silica aerogels. Results from NM showed that silica aerogels have surface fractal dimension while titanium containing silica aerogels have mass fractal dimension. On the other hand, results from BATAN showed that both silica aerogels and titanium containing silica aerogels have mass fractal dimension. The particle size for silica aerogels and titanium containing silica aerogels samples obtained by NM were 11.18 ± 0.03 and 9.19 ± 0.06 nm, respectively while the respective values obtained from BATAN measurements were 11.78 ± 0.06 and 10.57 ± 0.07 nm. (author)

  18. Microporous silica membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boffa, Vittorio; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability is a crucial factor for the application of microporous silica-based membranes in industrial processes. Indeed, it is well established that steam exposure may cause densification and defect formation in microporous silica membranes, which are detrimental to both membrane...... permeability and selectivity. Numerous previous studies show that microporous transition metal doped-silica membranes are hydrothermally more stable than pure silica membranes, but less permeable. Here we present a quantitative study on the impact of type and concentration of transition metal ions on the...... microporous structure, stability and permeability of amorphous silica-based membranes, providing information on how to design chemical compositions and synthetic paths for the fabrication of silica-based membranes with a well accessible and highly stabile microporous structure....

  19. Particle Restabilization in Silica/PEG/Ethanol Suspensions: How Strongly do Polymers Need To Adsorb To Stabilize Against Aggregation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F. (UIUC)

    2014-09-24

    We study the effects of increasing the concentration of a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol on the stability of 44 nm diameter silica nanoparticles suspended in ethanol. Polymer concentration, c{sub p}, is increased from zero to that characterizing the polymer melt. Particle stability is accessed through measurement of the particle second-virial coefficient, B{sub -2}, performed by light scattering and ultrasmall angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The results show that at low polymer concentration, c{sub p} < 3 wt %, B{sub -2} values are positive, indicating repulsive interactions between particles. B{sub -2} decreases at intermediate concentrations (3 wt % < c{sub p} < 50 wt %), and particles aggregates are formed. At high concentrations (50 wt % < c{sub p}) B{sub -2} increases and stabilizes at a value expected for hard spheres with a diameter near 44 nm, indicating the particles are thermodynamically stable. At intermediate polymer concentrations, rates of aggregation are determined by measuring time-dependent changes in the suspension turbidity, revealing that aggregation is slowed by the necessity of the particles diffusing over a repulsive barrier in the pair potential. The magnitude of the barrier passes through a minimum at c{sub p} {approx} 12 wt % where it has a value of {approx}12kT. These results are understood in terms of a reduction of electrostatic repulsion and van der Waals attractions with increasing c{sub p}. Depletion attractions are found to play a minor role in particle stability. A model is presented suggesting displacement of weakly adsorbed polymer leads to slow aggregation at intermediate concentration, and we conclude that a general model of depletion restabilization may involve increased strength of polymer adsorption with increasing polymer concentration.

  20. The effect of initial particle size distributions on the melting kinetics of soda-lime-silica glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional glass melting processes by high temperature melting are usually divided into three interdependant stages: batch-free state, fining, and homogenization. In this research, the initial stage of melting has been evaluated, i.e., the batch-free process which involves the conversion of all crystalline raw materials into the liquid state. Effects of initial partical size distributions on the reaction kinetics of a typical soda-lime-silica glass system have been studied. High temperature X-ray diffraction measures provided a unique, dynamic analytical tool for monitoring the reaction pathways in-situ. The initial particle size distribution of a glass batch will have a significant effect on the melting kinetics. The two distributions compared in this report, show that different intermediate phases will form as the overall particle size distribution varies. This is a direct result of local environments or particle/particle contact within the batch as the temperature is raised. These intermediate phases can either enhance or suppress the last stage dissolution process leading to increased or reduced melting efficiencies. Table 3 summarizes the major differences between the FFF and MMM distributions. The two distributions behave in a similar manner during the initial 700 degree C. The similar steps include the two phases transformations of Na2CO3 and the initial decomposition of CaCO3 as evident by the formation of CaO. Major differences between the distributions occur after 700 degree C

  1. Characterization of silica particles prepared via urease-catalyzed urea hydrolysis and activity of urease in sol–gel silica matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Silica precipitation occurred via urease-catalytic reactions. ► Higher urease activity for silica synthesis enables mesostructure of silica–urease composites. ► Urease encapsulating in silica matrix retained high activity. - Abstract: Urease templated precipitation of silica synthesized by sol–gel chemistry produces a composite material allowing high urease activity. This study investigates the structural properties of the composite material that allow for the retention of the urease hydrolysis activity. Scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy reveal that the composite has a mesoporous structure composed of closely packed spherical structures ∼20–50 nm in diameter. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis revealed that the surface area and pore volume of the composite prepared under the conditions of 50 mM urea and 25 °C is relatively high (324 m2/g and 1.0 cm3/g). These values are equivalent to those of usual mesoporous silica materials synthesized from the self-assembly of triblock copolymers as organic templates. In addition, after encapsulating in a sol–gel silica matrix, urease retained high activity (∼90% of the activity compared with native urease). Our results suggest a new method for synthesizing mesoporous silica materials with highly tunable pore sizes and shapes under mild conditions.

  2. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl4-C3H6-H2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm3 by Archimedes' principle.

  3. Effects of adsorption onto silica sand particles on the hydrolysis of tetracycline antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Joong; Lim, Mi-Young; Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    2012-07-01

    Due to high usage of tetracycline antibiotics, concerns have been raised about their environmental fate. In this study, potential changes in the pseudo-first-order hydrolysis rate constants for three tetracyclines, tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC), were evaluated by measuring the rate constants in batch and column leaching experiments. The first-order hydrolysis rate constants were measured at pH 5, 7, and 9 using batch tests. The values were highest at pH 7 for all three tetracyclines (0.0030 ± 0.0004, 0.0042 ± 0.0001, and 0.0323 ± 0.0003 h(-1) for TC, OTC, and CTC, respectively), indicating relatively short environmental half-lives of tetracyclines. Interestingly, it was found that the rates of degradation of the parent tetracyclines were much faster when silica sand was present in a batch solution or when the solution was passed through a silica column. For example, the ratios of the first-order degradation rate constants obtained in the column experiments to those in batch experiments were 13.2, 2.1, and 2.0 for TC, OTC, and CTC at a volumetric flow rate of 0.08 mL h(-1), with an observed tendency for this ratio to increase with an increased flow rate. This indicates that the silica surface may serve as a catalyst for hydrolysis and that the actual environmental half-lives of tetracycline antibiotics could be shorter than those estimated from laboratory hydrolysis rate constants using the standard batch protocol. Furthermore, the toxicity of the column effluent containing hydrolysis metabolites was assessed using bioluminescence inhibition in Vibrio fischeri. It was estimated that the toxicity of the metabolites of CTC was lower than that of their parent compound, whereas the toxicity of metabolites of TC and OTC was as high as or higher than that of their parent compounds. PMID:22555157

  4. The Effect of Silica Particle Size on the Performance of Color Ink-jet Printing Paper%二氧化硅对彩色喷墨打印纸性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘烨; 陈蕴智

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,the effects of four sorts of silica with the particle size range of 4-10um on coated paper properties and printing performance were studied.The results showed that the smaller particle size silica can provide the coated paper with higher density and contrast,better definition and good printing performance.

  5. I. Hydrophobic nanoporous silica particles for biomedical applications II. Novel approaches to two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumaru, Claudiu Stelian

    Many highly effective drugs display serious side-effects. To limit them, one can contain the drug in tiny containers, which are subsequently delivered toward targets inside the body. The entrapment of drug molecules prevents them from coming in contact with and thus causing damage to normal cells. Inherently, it is difficult to reach 100% efficiency of drug trapping and release when employing physical caps to seal the vehicles. Instead, we propose drug trapping inside the nanopores of hydrophobic silica particles by "hydrophobic trapping". This phenomenon is associated with the repulsive "force field" generated inside nanometer-sized hydrophobic channels that completely prevents aqueous solutions from entering the channels. We demonstrate the excellent trapping efficiency using C18-modified silica particles with 10 nm pores and the anticancer drug doxorubicin. The major challenge in using hydrophobic particles in biological applications is their tendency to cluster in aqueous media. To overcome it, we use surfactants as solubilization means. We have developed protocols that effectively solubilize the outer surface of the particles while preventing surfactant micelles from entering nanopores. Consequently, particles become well-dispersible in aqueous solutions, with the pre-loaded drug safely contained inside nanopores. Nanomaterials exhibit heterogeneity on their surfaces that impact their functional applications. Although techniques such as atomic force microscopy are great tools for studying nanomaterials with their excellent spatial resolution, they cannot probe the inner surface of porous structures. We have established a method of single-molecule ratiometric imaging that is currently the only technique able to provide the nanopolarity of adsorption sites located on the pore surface. We analyze the polarity distribution of adsorptions events for the solvatochromic probe Nile Red at the C18/acetonitrile interface and discover at least two different populations

  6. Progress in development of silica aerogel for particle- and nuclear-physics experiments at J-PARC

    CERN Document Server

    Tabata, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the advancement in hydrophobic silica aerogel development for use as Cherenkov radiators and muonium production targets. These devices are scheduled for use in several particle- and nuclear-physics experiments that are planned in the near future at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. Our conventional method to produce aerogel tiles with an intermediate index of refraction of approximately 1.05 is extended so that we can now produce aerogel tiles with lower indices of refraction (i.e., 1.03-1.04) and higher indices of refraction (i.e., 1.075-1.08); each with excellent transparency. A new production method, called pin drying, was optimized to produce larger area aerogels consistently with an ultrahigh index of refraction (>1.10). In addition, for use as a thermal-muonium-emitting material at room temperature, dedicated low-density aerogels were fabricated using the conventional method.

  7. Effects of Silica and Titanium Oxide Particles on a Human Neural Stem Cell Line: Morphology, Mitochondrial Activity, and Gene Expression of Differentiation Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouki Fujioka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Several in vivo studies suggest that nanoparticles (smaller than 100 nm have the ability to reach the brain tissue. Moreover, some nanoparticles can penetrate into the brains of murine fetuses through the placenta by intravenous administration to pregnant mice. However, it is not clear whether the penetrated nanoparticles affect neurogenesis or brain function. To evaluate its effects on neural stem cells, we assayed a human neural stem cell (hNSCs line exposed in vitro to three types of silica particles (30 nm, 70 nm, and <44 µm and two types of titanium oxide particles (80 nm and < 44 µm. Our results show that hNSCs aggregated and exhibited abnormal morphology when exposed to the particles at concentrations = 0.1 mg/mL for 7 days. Moreover, all the particles affected the gene expression of Nestin (stem cell marker and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NF-H, neuron marker at 0.1 mg/mL. In contrast, only 30-nm silica particles at 1.0 mg/mL significantly reduced mitochondrial activity. Notably, 30-nm silica particles exhibited acute membrane permeability at concentrations =62.5 µg/mL in 24 h. Although these concentrations are higher than the expected concentrations of nanoparticles in the brain from in vivo experiments in a short period, these thresholds may indicate the potential toxicity of accumulated particles for long-term usage or continuous exposure.

  8. Effects of nanosized metallic palladium loading and calcination on characteristics of composite silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴玉程; 吴侠; 李广海; 张立德

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of nanosized metallic palladium loading and calcination on the characteristics of composite silica,the silica was prepared by sol-gel technique,leading to an amorphous solid with mesoporosity,and the pore size distribution is narrow,centered at 3-5 nm.The composite silica was formed by impregnating palladium precursor into the porous network with sequel calcination in hydrogen.The results show that the nanosized palladium as guest phase in the composite silica is subjected to the mesoporous structure and calcination,resulting in the changes of optical adsorption that red-shifted to higher wavelength with the palladium loading and the heating temperature.The tailoring of the optical properties can be ascribed to the effect of the nanosized metal particles and interactions occurred between palladium and silica.

  9. Mechanism of cellular uptake of genotoxic silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Qingshan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mechanisms for cellular uptake of nanoparticles have important implications for nanoparticulate drug delivery and toxicity. We have explored the mechanism of uptake of amorphous silica nanoparticles of 14 nm diameter, which agglomerate in culture medium to hydrodynamic diameters around 500 nm. In HT29, HaCat and A549 cells, cytotoxicity was observed at nanoparticle concentrations ≥ 1 μg/ml, but DNA damage was evident at 0.1 μg/ml and above. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed entry of the silica particles into A549 cells exposed to 10 μg/ml of nanoparticles. The particles were observed in the cytoplasm but not within membrane bound vesicles or in the nucleus. TEM of cells exposed to nanoparticles at 4°C for 30 minutes showed particles enter cells when activity is low, suggesting a passive mode of entry. Plasma lipid membrane models identified physical interactions between the membrane and the silica NPs. Quartz crystal microbalance experiments on tethered bilayer lipid membrane systems show that the nanoparticles strongly bind to lipid membranes, forming an adherent monolayer on the membrane. Leakage assays on large unilamellar vesicles (400 nm diameter indicate that binding of the silica NPs transiently disrupts the vesicles which rapidly self-seal. We suggest that an adhesive interaction between silica nanoparticles and lipid membranes could cause passive cellular uptake of the particles.

  10. Effects of silica sol on bentonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Compacted bentonite will be used in Sweden as an engineered barrier in the disposal of nuclear waste, mainly due to bentonites sorption and swelling capacity, where the latter property is warranted in order to seal possible future intersecting fractures. However during the actual construction and deposition period other grouting agents must be used in order to seal already existing fractures. In Sweden Silica sol is currently being investigated in situ at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory as a fine fracture (< 100 μm) grouting agent by injection. During this period, there is a plausible risk of Silica sol coming into contact with bentonite. The effect of Silica sol, either in colloidal form or as a gel, on the chemical and physical properties of bentonite has not been properly addressed and has to be further investigated. The Silica sol (Meyco MP320, EKA Chemicals) consists of amorphous SiO2 particles, average size approximately 20 nm. Due to the small particle size Silica sol can penetrate and seal finer fractures than more coarse grouting agents commonly used. Upon injection NaCl (approx 0.3 M) is used as a gel accelerator, leading to a hydrological barrier in the form of a ductile gel after < 1 hour, which then hardens with time (months) increasing its strength significantly, depending on water content, ionic strength and temperature. Upon aggregation, either due to high ionic strength or drying, the silica colloids aggregate seemingly irreversible forming siloxane bonds by condensation of the silanol surface groups. These silanol groups can react at the montmorillonite edges in a similar way. In a worst case scenario the Silica sol would act as an inorganic glue, creating a pillared montmorillonite or modify the edges of the clay particles. Such effects would irreversibly reduce the overall swelling capacity of the affected bentonite. An experimental program has been developed to characterize the Silica sol

  11. Methanol Decomposition over Palladium Particles Supported on Silica: Role of Particle Size and Co-Feeding Carbon Dioxide on the Catalytic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokenek, Selma; Kuhn, John N. (USF)

    2012-10-23

    Monodisperse palladium particles of six distinct and controlled sizes between 4-16 nm were synthesized in a one-pot polyol process by varying the molar ratios of the two palladium precursors used, which contained palladium in different oxidation states. This difference permitted size control by regulation of the nucleation rate because low oxidation state metals ions nucleate quickly relative to high oxidation state ions. After immobilization of the Pd particles on silica by mild sonication, the catalysts were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and applied toward catalytic methanol decomposition. This reaction was determined as structure sensitive with the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency) increasing with increasing particle size. Moreover, observed catalytic deactivation was linked to product (carbon monoxide) poisoning. Co-feeding carbon dioxide caused the activity and the amount of deactivation to decrease substantially. A reaction mechanism based on the formation of the {pi}-bond between carbon and oxygen as the rate-limiting step is in agreement with antipathetic structure sensitivity and product poisoning by carbon monoxide.

  12. Development of an Interaction Assay between Single-Stranded Nucleic Acids Trapped with Silica Particles and Fluorescent Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Maeda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Biopolymers are easily denatured by heating, a change in pH or chemical substances when they are immobilized on a substrate. To prevent denaturation of biopolymers, we developed a method to trap a polynucleotide on a substrate by hydrogen bonding using silica particles with surfaces modified by aminoalkyl chains ([A-AM silane]/SiO2. [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was synthesized by silane coupling reaction of N-2-(aminoethyl-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (A-AM silane with SiO2 particles with a diameter of 5 μm at 100 °C for 20 min. The surface chemical structure of [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations. The surface of the silica particles was modified with A-AM silane and primary amine groups were formed. [A-AM silane]/SiO2 was trapped with single-stranded nucleic acids [(Poly-X; X = A (adenine, G (guanine and C (cytosine] in PBS solution at 37 °C for 1 h. The single-stranded nucleic acids were trapped on the surface of the [A-AM silane]/SiO2 by hydrogen bonding to form conjugated materials. The resulting complexes were further conjugated by derivatives of acridine orange (AO as fluorescent labels under the same conditions to form [AO:Poly-X:A-AM silane]/SiO2 complexes. Changes in the fluorescence intensity of these complexes originating from interactions between the single-stranded nucleic acid and aromatic compounds were also evaluated. The change in intensity displayed the order [AO: Poly-G: A-AM silane]/SiO2 > [AO:Poly-A:A-AM silane]/SiO2 >> [AO:Poly-C:A-AM silane]/SiO2. This suggests that the single-stranded nucleic acids conjugated with aminoalkyl chains on the surfaces of SiO2 particles and the change in fluorescence intensity reflected the molecular interaction between AO and the nucleic-acid base in a polynucleotide.

  13. Mesoporous silica particle-PLA-PANI hybrid scaffolds for cell-directed intracellular drug delivery and tissue vascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokry, Hussein; Vanamo, Ulriika; Wiltschka, Oliver; Niinimäki, Jenni; Lerche, Martina; Levon, Kalle; Linden, Mika; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2015-08-01

    Instructive materials are expected to revolutionize stem cell based tissue engineering. As many stem cell cues have adverse effects on normal tissue homeostasis, there is a need to develop bioactive scaffolds which offer locally retained and cell-targeted drug delivery for intracellular release in targeted cell populations. Further, the scaffolds need to support vascularization to promote tissue growth and function. We have developed an electrospun PLA-PANI fiber scaffold, and incorporated mesoporous silica nanoparticles within the scaffold matrix to obtain cell-targeted and localized drug delivery. The isotropy of the scaffold can be tuned to find the optimal morphology for a given application and the scaffold is electroactive to support differentiation of contractile tissues. We demonstrate that there is no premature drug release from particles under physiological conditions over a period of one week and that the drug is released upon internalization of particles by cells within the scaffold. The scaffold is biocompatible, supports muscle stem cell differentiation and cell-seeded scaffolds are vascularized in vivo upon transplantation on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryos. The scaffold is a step towards instructive biomaterials for local control of stem cell differentiation, and tissue formation supported by vascularization and without adverse effects on the homeostasis of adjacent tissues due to diffusion of biological cues.Instructive materials are expected to revolutionize stem cell based tissue engineering. As many stem cell cues have adverse effects on normal tissue homeostasis, there is a need to develop bioactive scaffolds which offer locally retained and cell-targeted drug delivery for intracellular release in targeted cell populations. Further, the scaffolds need to support vascularization to promote tissue growth and function. We have developed an electrospun PLA-PANI fiber scaffold, and incorporated mesoporous silica nanoparticles within

  14. Polystyrene Core-Silica Shell Particles with Defined Nanoarchitectures as a Versatile Platform for Suspension Array Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Dominik; Gawlitza, Kornelia; Rurack, Knut

    2016-04-19

    The need for rapid and high-throughput screening in analytical laboratories has led to significant growth in interest in suspension array technologies (SATs), especially with regard to cytometric assays targeting a low to medium number of analytes. Such SAT or bead-based assays rely on spherical objects that constitute the analytical platform. Usually, functionalized polymer or silica (SiO2) microbeads are used which each have distinct advantages and drawbacks. In this paper, we present a straightforward synthetic route to highly monodisperse SiO2-coated polystyrene core-shell (CS) beads for SAT with controllable architectures from smooth to raspberry- and multilayer-like shells by varying the molecular weight of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), which was used as the stabilizer of the cores. The combination of both organic polymer core and a structurally controlled inorganic SiO2 shell in one hybrid particle holds great promises for flexible next-generation design of the spherical platform. The particles were characterized by electron microscopy (SEM, T-SEM, and TEM), thermogravimetry, flow cytometry, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption, offering comprehensive information on the composition, size, structure, and surface area. All particles show ideal cytometric detection patterns and facile handling due to the hybrid structure. The beads are endowed with straightforward modification possibilities through the defined SiO2 shells. We successfully implemented the particles in fluorometric SAT model assays, illustrating the benefits of tailored surface area which is readily available for small-molecule anchoring. Very promising assay performance was shown for DNA hybridization assays with quantification limits down to 8 fmol. PMID:27018430

  15. Surface modification of amorphous nanosilica particles suppresses nanosilica-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA damage in various mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Tokuyuki [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo, E-mail: yasuo@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuyama, Keigo; Nakazato, Yasutaro; Tochigi, Saeko; Hirai, Toshiro; Kondoh, Sayuri [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagano, Kazuya [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); Abe, Yasuhiro [Cancer Biology Research Center, Sanford Research/USD, 2301 E. 60th Street N, Sioux Falls, SD 57104 (United States); Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi [Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nabeshi, Hiromi [Division of Foods, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1, Kamiyoga, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Tomoaki [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Tsutsumi, Yasuo, E-mail: ytsutsumi@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Toxicology and Safety Science, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Laboratory of Biopharmaceutical Research, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, 7-6-8 Saitoasagi, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0085 (Japan); The Center for Advanced Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There is increasing concern regarding the potential health risks of nanomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluated the effect of surface properties of nanomaterials on cellular responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We showed that the surface properties play an important in determining its safety. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These data provide useful information for producing safer nanomaterials. -- Abstract: Recently, nanomaterials have been utilized in various fields. In particular, amorphous nanosilica particles are increasingly being used in a range of applications, including cosmetics, food technology, and medical diagnostics. However, there is concern that the unique characteristics of nanomaterials might induce undesirable effects. The roles played by the physical characteristics of nanomaterials in cellular responses have not yet been elucidated precisely. Here, by using nanosilica particles (nSPs) with a diameter of 70 nm whose surface was either unmodified (nSP70) or modified with amine (nSP70-N) or carboxyl groups (nSP70-C), we examined the relationship between the surface properties of nSPs and cellular responses such as cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and DNA damage. To compare the cytotoxicity of nSP70, nSP70-N, or nSP70-C, we examined in vitro cell viability after nSP treatment. Although the susceptibility of each cell line to the nSPs was different, nSP70-C and nSP70-N showed lower cytotoxicity than nSP70 in all cell lines. Furthermore, the generation of ROS and induction of DNA damage in nSP70-C- and nSP70-N-treated cells were lower than those in nSP70-treated cells. These results suggest that the surface properties of nSP70 play an important role in determining its safety, and surface modification of nSP70 with amine or carboxyl groups may be useful for the development of safer nSPs. We hope that our results will contribute to the development of safer nanomaterials.

  16. Surface modification of amorphous nanosilica particles suppresses nanosilica-induced cytotoxicity, ROS generation, and DNA damage in various mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► There is increasing concern regarding the potential health risks of nanomaterials. ► We evaluated the effect of surface properties of nanomaterials on cellular responses. ► We showed that the surface properties play an important in determining its safety. ► These data provide useful information for producing safer nanomaterials. -- Abstract: Recently, nanomaterials have been utilized in various fields. In particular, amorphous nanosilica particles are increasingly being used in a range of applications, including cosmetics, food technology, and medical diagnostics. However, there is concern that the unique characteristics of nanomaterials might induce undesirable effects. The roles played by the physical characteristics of nanomaterials in cellular responses have not yet been elucidated precisely. Here, by using nanosilica particles (nSPs) with a diameter of 70 nm whose surface was either unmodified (nSP70) or modified with amine (nSP70-N) or carboxyl groups (nSP70-C), we examined the relationship between the surface properties of nSPs and cellular responses such as cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and DNA damage. To compare the cytotoxicity of nSP70, nSP70-N, or nSP70-C, we examined in vitro cell viability after nSP treatment. Although the susceptibility of each cell line to the nSPs was different, nSP70-C and nSP70-N showed lower cytotoxicity than nSP70 in all cell lines. Furthermore, the generation of ROS and induction of DNA damage in nSP70-C- and nSP70-N-treated cells were lower than those in nSP70-treated cells. These results suggest that the surface properties of nSP70 play an important role in determining its safety, and surface modification of nSP70 with amine or carboxyl groups may be useful for the development of safer nSPs. We hope that our results will contribute to the development of safer nanomaterials.

  17. Incorporation of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles inside the channels of SBA-15 silica rods by a “two solvents” reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xia [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lian yungang 222005 (China); Yu, Hongxia; Zheng, Da [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wang, Xuesong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huaihai Institute of Technology, Lian yungang 222005 (China); Li, Jiansheng, E-mail: lijsh@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Wang, Lianjun, E-mail: wanglj@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2013-08-15

    A new reduction method named a “two solvents” reduction technique was developed for incorporation of nanoscale zero-valent iron particles (NZVIs) inside the channels of SBA-15 silica rods under mild conditions. The resulting NZVIs/SBA-15 composites were compared with the ones prepared by the conventional liquid phase reduction method in structure, morphology and reactivity. All the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and all-direct-reading plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall zero-valent iron particles were synthesized and well dispersed in the mesopores of SBA-15 silica rods by the new reduction technique, whereas larger iron particles were supported and aggregated on the surface of the silica rods by conventional reduction method. Batch experiment demonstrated that NZVIs incorporated inside the silica channels had higher reactivity for the removal of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution than those supported on the surface.

  18. A potentially new type of nonchondritic interplanetary dust particle with hematite, organic carbon, amorphous Na,Ca-aluminosilicate, and FeO-spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Valles-González, Maria Pilar

    2012-02-01

    We used a combination of different analytical techniques to study particle W7190-D12 using microinfrared spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The particle consists mainly of hematite (α-Fe2O3) with considerable variations in structural disorder. It further contains amorphous (Na,K)-bearing Ca,Al-silicate and organic carbon. Iron-bearing spherules (cloud. Atmospheric entry flash-heating caused (1) the formation of microenvironments of reduced iron oxide when indigenous carbon materials reacted with hematite covering its surface resulting in the formation of FeO-spheres and (2) Na-loss from Na,Al-plagioclase. The particle of this study, and other similar particles on this collector, may represent a potentially new type of nonchondritic IDPs associated with Jupiter family comets, although an origin in the asteroid belt cannot be ignored.

  19. Formation of metallic particles during temperature-programmed reduction of silica-supported platinum and nickel chlorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jentys, A.; Lercher, J.A. (Technische Universitaet Wien, Vienna (Australia)); Haller, G.L. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

    1993-01-14

    The formation of (bi-) metallic particles during temperature-programmed reduction of silica-supported mixtures of Pt and Ni chlorides was followed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The concentration and composition of the metal particles in the final catalysts were derived from the results of the EXAFS analysis. The reduction kinetics followed by XANES were related to the formation of ordered metallic phases. During temperature-programmed reduction, most of the bimetallic phase was formed simultaneously with the reduction of the catalyst precursor. The bimetallic catalysts consisted of at least one bimetallic phase and of the pure phase of the metal in excess. For catalysts containing more than 50 atom % Ni, the authors concluded that there was either an enrichment of the bimetallic phase in Ni or the formation of a second bimetallic phase (Ni[sub 3]Pt). For catalysts containing 50 atom % Ni or less the authors concluded that the stoichiometric NiPt phase was the only bimetallic phase. 19 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Luminescence properties of Eu-complex formations into ordered mesoporous silica particles obtained by the spray pyrolysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Lucas A; Freiria, Janaina do C; Caiut, José Maurício A; Ribeiro, Sidney J L; Messaddeq, Younes; Verelst, Marc; Dexpert-Ghys, Jeannette

    2015-08-21

    Ordered mesoporous, highly luminescent SiO2 particles have been synthesized by spray pyrolysis from solutions containing tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), Eu(NO3)3.6H2O, and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as structure-directing agents. The 1,10-phenantroline (Phen) molecules were coordinated in a post-synthesis step by a simple wet impregnation method. In addition, other matrices were also prepared by the encapsulation of europium complex Eu(fod)3 (where fod = 6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluoro-2,2-dimethyl-3,5-octanedionato) into mesoporous silica, and then the Phen molecules were encapsulated by different impregnation steps, after which the luminescence properties were investigated. The obtained materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Powders with polydisperse spherical grains were obtained, displaying an ordered hexagonal array of mesochannels. Luminescence results revealed that Phen molecules had been successfully coordinated as an additional ligand in the Eu(fod)3 complex into the channels of the mesoporous particles without disrupting the structure. PMID:26222799

  1. Properties of silica fume procured from natural diatomite and its usage in the production of vacuum insulation panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Selyaev

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of the research of silica fume particles procured from diatomite from Atemar deposit by means of separating silicic acid from colloidal dissolved state into the sediment. The objective of the work was to define thermal-physical and structural characteristics of the silica fume. The research included IR-spectrometry, granulometry, thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray structural analysis, optical microscopy, and small angle X-Ray scattering. As a result of the research, the silica fume was defined to predominantly consist of amorphous silicon dioxide and had the developed pore structure of particles. A large number of nanosized particles and pores decreases heat transmission and increases reactive capability, that gives opportunity of using the powder silica fume as an active agent in dry mixes and concrete composites, as a component of sponge-glass, and as a filler material in vacuum insulation panel.

  2. MECHANISMS CONTROLLING Ca ION RELEASE FROM SOL-GEL DERIVED IN SITU APATITE-SILICA NANOCOMPOSITE POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Latifi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ca ion release from bioactive biomaterials could play an important role in their bioactivity and osteoconductivity properties. In order to improve hydroxyapatite (HA dissolution rate, in situ apatite-silica nanocomposite powders with various silica contents were synthesized via sol-gel method and mechanisms controlling the Ca ion release from them were investigated. Obtained powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM techniques, acid dissolution test, and spectroscopy by atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS. Results indicated the possible incorporation of (SiO44- into the HA structure and tendency of amorphous silica to cover the surface of HA particles. However, 20 wt. % silica was the lowest amount that fully covered HA particles. All of the nanocomposite powders showed more Ca ion release compared with pure HA, and HA - 10 wt. % silica had the highest Ca ion release. The crystallinity, the crystallite size, and the content of HA, along with the integrity, thickness, and ion diffusion possibility through the amorphous silica layer on the surface of HA, were factors that varied due to changes in the silica content and were affected the Ca ion release from nanocomposite powders.

  3. Gold nano-particles fixed on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We produced wear resistant gold–ruby coatings on amorphous substrates. ► Thin sputtered gold layers were covered by or embedded in silica coatings. ► Annealing above Tg of the substrate glass led to the formation of gold nano particles. ► A 1 1 1-texture of the gold particles is observed via XRD and EBSD. ► EBSD-patterns can be acquired from crystals covered by a thin layer of glass. - Abstract: A simple process for producing wear resistant gold nano-particle coatings on transparent substrates is proposed. Soda-lime-silica glasses were sputtered with gold and subsequently coated with SiO2 using a combustion chemical vapor deposition technique. Some samples were first coated with silica, sputtered with gold and then coated with a second layer of silica. The samples were annealed for 20 min at either 550 or 600 °C. This resulted in the formation of round, well separated gold nano-particles with sizes from 15 to 200 nm. The color of the coated glass was equivalent to that of gold–ruby glasses. Silica/gold/silica coatings annealed at 600 °C for 20 min were strongly adherent and scratch resistant. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to describe the crystal orientations of the embedded particles. The gold particles are preferably oriented with their (1 1 1) planes perpendicular to the surface.

  4. Particle Size, Surface Area, and Amorphous Content as Predictors of Solubility and Bioavailability for Five Commercial Sources of Ferric Orthophosphate in Ready-To-Eat Cereal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin S. Dickmann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Ferric orthophosphate (FePO4 has had limited use as an iron fortificant in ready-to-eat (RTE cereal because of its variable bioavailability, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. Even though FePO4 has desirable sensory properties as compared to other affordable iron fortificants, few published studies have well-characterized its physicochemical properties. Semi-crystalline materials such as FePO4 have varying degrees of molecular disorder, referred to as amorphous content, which is hypothesized to be an important factor in bioavailability. The objective of this study was to systematically measure the physicochemical factors of particle size, surface area, amorphous content, and solubility underlying the variation in FePO4 bioavailability. Five commercial FePO4 sources and ferrous sulfate were added to individual batches of RTE cereal. The relative bioavailability value (RBV of each iron source, determined using the AOAC Rat Hemoglobin Repletion Bioassay, ranged from 51% to 99% (p < 0.05, which is higher than typically reported. Solubility in dilute HCl accurately predicted RBV (R2 = 0.93, p = 0.008. Amorphous content measured by Dynamic Vapor Sorption ranged from 1.7% to 23.8% and was a better determinant of solubility (R2 = 0.91; p = 0.0002 than surface area (R2 = 0.83; p = 0.002 and median particle size (R2 = 0.59; p = 0.12. The results indicate that while solubility of FePO4 is highly predictive of RBV, solubility, in turn, is strongly linked to amorphous content and surface area. This information may prove useful for the production of FePO4 with the desired RBV.

  5. The reactivity of volatized silica on volatized silica-alumina-aluminous cement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of volatized silica as surface agent on the low and ultra-low cement castables, is responsible for changes in the hydration kinetics and the kind of hydrated phases, as well as leading to packing enhancement. Besides, it can be responsible or not for the alterations in the phase assembly after firing the mixes at temperatures around 1350 C. Due its amorphous character and submicrometer particle size (0.1um), it would be expected a high reactivity of this material. Apparently this is not the case contrarily to what was reported in the literature. The phases were characterized by X-ray diffraction. (author)

  6. Test of a Silica Aerogel Threshold Cherenkov Counter for the TJNAF Hall A Spectrometers with 1-GeC/c - 4-GeV/c Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The silica aerogel threshold Cherenkov counter for the Jefferson Lab Hall A spectrometers has been tested at CERN with a beam of positrons, pions and protons in order to characterize its efficiencies to particle detection in the 1 to 4 GeV/c momentum range. A detection efficiency to particles above the Cherenkov threshold (e+ and π+) greater than 95% and to particles below the threshold (p) of about 5% has been quoted in the whole momentum range explored. The detection efficiency to protons is due both to induced (delta)-rays production (3.5%), and to accidentals due to the high counting rate

  7. Mesoporous Silicas with Tunable Morphology for the Immobilization of Laccase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gascón

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Siliceous ordered mesoporous materials (OMM are gaining interest as supports for enzyme immobilization due to their uniform pore size, large surface area, tunable pore network and the introduction of organic components to mesoporous structure. We used SBA-15 type silica materials, which exhibit a regular 2D hexagonal packing of cylindrical mesopores of uniform size, for non-covalent immobilization of laccase. Synthesis conditions were adjusted in order to obtain supports with different particle shape, where those with shorter channels had higher loading capacity. Despite the similar isoelectric points of silica and laccase and the close match between the size of laccase and the pore dimensions of these SBA-15 materials, immobilization was achieved with very low leaching. Surface modification of macro-/mesoporous amorphous silica by grafting of amine moieties was proved to significantly increase the isoelectric point of this support and improve the immobilization yield.

  8. Application of SAXS to the study of particle-size-dependent thermal conductivity in silica nanofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Gang, E-mail: cheng3@ohio.ed [Ohio University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Yu Wenhua [Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division (United States); Singh, Dileep [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering Division (United States); Cookson, David [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Australian Synchrotron Research Program (United States); Routbort, Jules [Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Knowledge of the size and distribution of nanoparticles in solution is critical to understanding the observed enhancements in thermal conductivity and heat transfer of nanofluids. We have applied small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to the characterization of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (10-30 nm) uniformly dispersed in a water-based fluid using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Size distributions for the suspended nanoparticles were derived by fitting experimental data to an established model. Thermal conductivity of the SiO{sub 2} nanofluids was also measured, and the relation between the average particle size and the thermal conductivity enhancement was established. The experimental data contradict models based on fluid interfacial layers or Brownian motion but support the concept of thermal resistance at the liquid-particle interface.

  9. Application of SAXS to study particle-size-dependent thermal conductivity in silica nanofluids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G.; Yu, W.; Singh, D.; Cookson, D.; Routbort, J.; Energy Systems; Australian Synchrotron Research Program; Ohio Univ.

    2008-10-01

    Knowledge of the size and distribution of nanoparticles in solution is critical to understanding the observed enhancements in thermal conductivity and heat transfer of nanofluids. We have applied small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to the characterization of SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (10-30 nm) uniformly dispersed in a water-based fluid using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Size distributions for the suspended nanoparticles were derived by fitting experimental data to an established model. Thermal conductivity of the SiO{sub 2} nanofluids was also measured, and the relation between the average particle size and the thermal conductivity enhancement was established. The experimental data contradict models based on fluid interfacial layers or Brownian motion but support the concept of thermal resistance at the liquid-particle interface.

  10. INFLUENCE OF RESIN TO BIND SILICA PARTICLES ON THE COTTON FABRIC

    OpenAIRE

    BOU-BEDA Eva; BONET Maria Angeles; MONLLOR PÉREZ Pablo; GISBERT PAYÁ Jaime; DÍAZ GARCÍA Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Fictionalization of textiles has been the aim of many studies in the field of intelligent materials. The application of nanoparticles on the fabric is one of approaches used for get textile fictionalization. Normally, there is no attraction between inorganic particles and polymeric materials such as textiles. The difference between surface energy of two aforementioned organic and inorganic materials causes a kind of repellency in their interfaces. This problem is intensified by using nanopart...

  11. Emulsion Combustion and Flame Spray Synthesis of Zinc Oxide/Silica Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two flame spray methods, emulsion combustion method (ECM) and flame spray pyrolysis (FSP), were compared for synthesis of pure and mixed SiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles. The effect of silicon precursor was investigated using liquid hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) or SiO2 sol, while for ZnO zinc acetate (ZA) was used. Gas phase reaction took place when using HMDSO as Si precursor, forming nanoparticles, whereas the SiO2 sol used as Si source was not evaporated in the flame, creating large aggregates of the sol particles (e.g. 1 μm). The FSP of ZA produced ZnO homogeneous nanoparticles. Lower flame temperatures in ECM than in FSP resulted in mixed gas and liquid phase reaction, forming ZnO particles with inhomogeneous sizes. The FSP of HMDSO and ZA led to intimate gas-phase mixing of Zn and Si, suppressing each other's particle growth, forming nanoparticles of 19 nm in BET-equivalent average primary particle diameter. Nucleation of ZnO and SiO2 occurred independently by ECM of HMDSO and ZA as well as by FSP of the SiO2 sol and ZA, creating a ZnO and SiO2 mixture. The reaction of ZnO with SiO2 was likely to be enhanced by ECM of the SiO2 sol and ZA where both Zn and Si species were not evaporated completely, resulting in ZnO, β-willemite and Zn1.7SiO4 mixed phase

  12. Monitoring the recrystallisation of amorphous xylitol using Raman spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomäki, Emmi; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Ehlers, Henrik; Svedström, Kirsi; Huotari, Simo; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2016-07-11

    In this paper we present a fast model system for monitoring the recrystallization of quench-cooled amorphous xylitol using Raman spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering. The use of these two methods enables comparison between surface and bulk crystallization. Non-ordered mesoporous silica micro-particles were added to the system in order to alter the rate of crystallization of the amorphous xylitol. Raman measurements showed that adding silica to the system increased the rate of surface crystallization, while X-ray measurements showed that the rate of bulk crystallization decreased. Using this model system it is possible to measure fast changes, which occur in minutes or within a few hours. Raman-spectroscopy and wide-angle X-ray scattering were found to be complementary techniques when assessing surface and bulk crystallization of amorphous xylitol. PMID:27163527

  13. Experimental and numerical investigations on the performance of dehumidifying desiccant beds composed of silica-gel and thermal energy storage particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, M. A.

    2009-03-01

    Enhanced efficiency of the adsorption process in the dehumidifier is a key element for improved performance of desiccant cooling systems. Due to the exothermic nature of the adsorption process, the dehumidification and cooling capacity are limited by significant temperature changes in the adsorption column. In the present study, the effects of integration of sensible and latent heat storage particles in the desiccant bed for in situ management of released adsorption heat are investigated. For this purpose, column experiments are performed using an initially dry granular bed made of silica-gel particles or a homogeneous mixture of silica gel and inert sensible or latent heat storage particles. The packed bed is subject to a sudden uniform air flow at selected values of temperature and humidity. Also, a packed bed numerical model is developed that includes the coupled non-equilibrium heat and moisture transfer in the solid and gas phases. Investigations of the heat and mass transfer characteristics are reported using the composite structure and the results are compared with the base case of simple silica gel bed. Improved desiccant cooling system performance can be obtained by appropriate adjustment of desiccant cycle operation and proper choice of the volume ratio of thermal energy storage particles.

  14. Interactions Between Biogenic Silica (BSiO2) and Organic Carbon (POC) During the Recycling of Sinking Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriceau, B.; Goutx, M.; Guigue, C.; Tamburini, C.; Lee, C.; Armstrong, R. A.; Duflos, M.; Charriere, B.; Ragueneau, O.

    2006-12-01

    Despite recent progress in understanding the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle, we are not yet able to predict the response of ecosystems to climate change and feedbacks of the ocean onto atmospheric CO2. In particular, particle flux dynamics must be represented more faithfully in ocean models. We know that particulate organic carbon (POC) flux is associated with ballast minerals (BSiO2, CaCO3), but the processes controlling the interactions between carbon and ballast minerals during decomposition must be explored further. The present study aims to provide a better understanding of interactions between carbon and BSiO2 during mineralization of sinking particles. Previous studies have provided evidence that the degradation of the external membrane by bacteria increase the BSiO2 dissolution rate. Alternatively, it has been hypothesized that biogenic silica could protect carbon from degradation. To test this hypothesis, an in-vitro batch experiment using the diatom Skeletonema costatum was conducted. In this experiment, carbon degradation, bacterial growth, and BSiO2 dissolution were followed simultaneously. To identify the processes involved and the types of carbon that eventually interact with BSiO2 during mineralization, the concentrations of different lipids and amino acids were also measured. A strong increase of the degradation rate constant of the POC and PON was observed after dissolution of 40 % of initial BSiO2. This increase is associated to a peak of glycine in total amino acids and a switch between free and attached bacteria. These results suggest that carbon degradation is increased when enough of the frustule is dissolved to uncover the glycine contain inside the frustule, this amino acid may trigger an increase in the concentration of attached bacteria, which may in turn increase the degradation rate constant of organic carbon.

  15. Uniform Surface Modification of 3D Bioglass®-Based Scaffolds with Mesoporous Silica Particles (MCM-41) for Enhancing Drug Delivery Capability

    OpenAIRE

    Boccardi, Elena; Philippart, Anahí; Juhasz-Bortuzzo, Judith A.; Beltrán, Ana M.; Novajra, Giorgia; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Spiecker, Erdmann; Boccaccini , Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    The design and characterization of a new family of multifunctional scaffolds based on bioactive glass (BG) of 45S5 composition for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications are presented. These BG-based scaffolds are developed via a replication method of polyurethane packaging foam. In order to increase the therapeutic functionality, the scaffolds were coated with mesoporous silica particles (MCM-41), which act as an in situ drug delivery system. These sub-micron spheres are char...

  16. Tuning the self-assembled monolayer formation on nanoparticle surfaces with different curvatures: investigations on spherical silica particles and plane-crystal-shaped zirconia particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feichtenschlager, Bernhard; Lomoschitz, Christoph J; Kickelbick, Guido

    2011-08-01

    The ordering of dodecyl-chain self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on different nanoscopic surfaces was investigated by FT-IR studies. As model systems plane-crystal-shaped ZrO(2) nanoparticles and spherical SiO(2) nanoparticles were examined. The type of capping agent was chosen dependent on the substrate, therefore dodecylphosphonic acid and octadecylphosphonic acid were used for ZrO(2) and dodecyltrimethoxysilane for SiO(2) samples. The plane ZrO(2) nanocrystals yielded more ordered alkyl-chain structures whereas spherical SiO(2) nanoparticles showed significantly lower alkyl-chain ordering. Submicron-sized silica spheres revealed a significantly higher alkyl chain ordering, comparable to an analogously prepared SAM on a non-curved plane oxidized Si-wafer. In the case of ZrO(2) nanocrystals an intense alkyl-chain alignment could be disturbed by decreasing the grafting density from the maximum of 2.1 molecules/nm(2) through the variation of coupling agent concentration to lower values. Furthermore, the co-adsorption of a different coupling agent, such as phenylphosphonic acid for ZrO(2) and phenyltrimethoxysilane for SiO(2), resulted in a significantly lower alkyl-chain ordering for ZrO(2) plane crystals and for large SiO(2) spherical particles at high grafting density. An increasing amount of order-disturbing molecules leads to a gradual decrease in alkyl-chain alignment on the surface of the inorganic nanoparticles. In the case of the ZrO(2) nanoparticle system it is shown via dynamic light scattering (DLS) that the mixed monolayer formation on the particle surface impacts the dispersion quality in organic solvents such as n-hexane. PMID:21549385

  17. Role of surface functionality on the formation of raspberry-like polymer/silica composite particles: Weak acid–base interaction and steric effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Core–shell structured polymer/SiO2 was obtained with carboxylic-functionalized templates. • Raspberry-like structure was observed with carboxylic and poly(ethylene glycol) hybrid-functionalized polymer microspheres. • Carboxylic groups contributed to the nucleation and the poly(ethylene glycol) chains was used to control the growth of silica particles. • Super-hydrophobic surface was obtained and the contact angle of water on the dual-sized structured surface was up to 160°. - Abstract: The surface functionality of polymer microspheres is the crucial factor to determine the nucleation and growth of silica particles and to construct the organic/inorganic hierarchical structures. The objective of this work was to evaluate the surface functionality and hierarchical morphology relationship via in situ sol–gel reaction. Carboxylic-functionalized poly (styrene-co-maleic anhydride) [P(S-co-MA)], poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized poly(styrene-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) [P(S-co-PEGMA)], and hybrid functionalized poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) [P(S-co-MA-co-PEGMA)] microspheres were synthesized by emulsifier-free polymerization and used as templates. The morphologies of the composite particles were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that core–shell structure was obtained with P(S-co-MA) as templates; raspberry-like structure was observed by using P(S-co-MA-co-PEGMA) as templates; and no silica particles were attached onto the surface of P(S-co-PEGMA) microspheres. These results indicated that the carboxylic groups on the surface formed by hydrolysis of anhydride groups were the determinate factor to control the nucleation of silica nanoparticles, and the PEG chains on the surface can affect the growth of silica particles. In addition, the particulate films were constructed by assembling these

  18. Role of surface functionality on the formation of raspberry-like polymer/silica composite particles: Weak acid–base interaction and steric effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lan [Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environment-Friendly Polymer Materials, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Song, LinYong, E-mail: songsly@ustc.edu.cn [Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environment-Friendly Polymer Materials, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Bioengineering Research Center, University of Kansas, 1530 W, 15th Street, Lawrence, KS 66045-7609 (United States); Chao, ZhiYin; Chen, PengPeng [Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environment-Friendly Polymer Materials, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Nie, WangYan, E-mail: wynie@126.com [Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environment-Friendly Polymer Materials, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Zhou, YiFeng [Anhui Province Key Laboratory of Environment-Friendly Polymer Materials, School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Core–shell structured polymer/SiO{sub 2} was obtained with carboxylic-functionalized templates. • Raspberry-like structure was observed with carboxylic and poly(ethylene glycol) hybrid-functionalized polymer microspheres. • Carboxylic groups contributed to the nucleation and the poly(ethylene glycol) chains was used to control the growth of silica particles. • Super-hydrophobic surface was obtained and the contact angle of water on the dual-sized structured surface was up to 160°. - Abstract: The surface functionality of polymer microspheres is the crucial factor to determine the nucleation and growth of silica particles and to construct the organic/inorganic hierarchical structures. The objective of this work was to evaluate the surface functionality and hierarchical morphology relationship via in situ sol–gel reaction. Carboxylic-functionalized poly (styrene-co-maleic anhydride) [P(S-co-MA)], poly(ethylene glycol)-functionalized poly(styrene-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) [P(S-co-PEGMA)], and hybrid functionalized poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride-co-poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate) [P(S-co-MA-co-PEGMA)] microspheres were synthesized by emulsifier-free polymerization and used as templates. The morphologies of the composite particles were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that core–shell structure was obtained with P(S-co-MA) as templates; raspberry-like structure was observed by using P(S-co-MA-co-PEGMA) as templates; and no silica particles were attached onto the surface of P(S-co-PEGMA) microspheres. These results indicated that the carboxylic groups on the surface formed by hydrolysis of anhydride groups were the determinate factor to control the nucleation of silica nanoparticles, and the PEG chains on the surface can affect the growth of silica particles. In addition, the particulate films were constructed by assembling

  19. Low-temperature behavior of core-softened models: Water and silica behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A core-softened model of a glass forming fluid is numerically studied in the limit of very low temperatures. The model shows two qualitatively different behaviors depending on the strength of the attraction between particles. For no or low attraction, the changes of density as a function of pressure are smooth, although hysteretic due to mechanical metastabilities. For larger attraction, sudden changes of density upon compressing and decompressing occur. This global mechanical instability is correlated to the existence of a thermodynamic first-order amorphous-amorphous transition. The two different behaviors obtained correspond qualitatively to the different phenomenology observed in silica and water

  20. Shock-wave equation-of-state measurements in fused silica up to 1600 GPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, C. A.; Gregor, M. C.; Polsin, D. N.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2016-06-01

    The properties of silica are important to geophysical and high-pressure equation-of-state research. Its most-prevalent crystalline form, α-quartz, has been extensively studied to TPa pressures. This article presents Hugoniot measurements on amorphous silica, commonly referred to as fused silica, over a range from 200 to 1600 GPa using laser-driven shocks and an α-quartz standard. These results extend the measured Hugoniot of fused silica to higher pressures. In the 200- to 600-GPa range, the data are in very good agreement with those obtained by Qi et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 062706 (2015)] using magnetically driven aluminum impactors and aluminum as a standard material. A new shock velocity/particle velocity relation is derived to fit the experimental data.

  1. FITC Doped Rattle-Type Silica Colloidal Particle-Based Ratiometric Fluorescent Sensor for Biosensing and Imaging of Superoxide Anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Ding, Jie; Liang, Tingxizi; Abdel-Halim, E S; Jiang, Liping; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-03-16

    Fluorescent nanosensors have been widely applied in recognition and imaging of bioactive small molecules; however, the complicated surface modification process and background interference limit their applications in practical biological samples. Here, a simple, universal method was developed for ratiometric fluorescent determination of general small molecules. Taking superoxide anion (O2(•-)) as an example, the designed sensor was composed of three main moieties: probe carrier, rattle-type silica colloidal particles (mSiO2@hmSiO2 NPs); reference fluorophore doped into the core of NPs, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescent probe for superoxide anion, hydroethidine (HE). In the absence of O2(•-), the sensor just emitted green fluorescence of FITC at 518 nm. When released HE was oxidized by O2(•-), the oxidation product exhibited red fluorescence at 570 nm and the intensity was linearly associated with the concentration of O2(•-), while that of reference element remained constant. Accordingly, ratiometric determination of O2(•-) was sensitively and selectively achieved with a linear range of 0.2-20 μM, and the detection limit was calculated as low as 80 nM. Besides, the technique was also successfully applied for dual-emission imaging of O2(•-) in live cells and realized visual recognition with obvious fluorescence color change in normal conditions or under oxidative stress. As long as appropriate reference dyes and sensing probes are selected, ratiometric biosensing and imaging of bioactive small molecules would be achieved. Therefore, the design could provide a simple, accurate, universal platform for biological applications. PMID:26910878

  2. Time-response relationship of nano and micro particle induced lung inflammation. Quartz as reference compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roursgaard, Martin; Poulsen, Steen S; Poulsen, Lars K;

    2010-01-01

    -response profiles of nano- and micro-sized particles. The potency of the two samples cannot be compared; during the milling process, a substantial part of the quartz was converted to amorphous silica and contaminated with corundum. For screening, BALF PMN, either TNF-a or IL-1ß at 16 hours post instillation may...

  3. Development and characterization of stabilized, polymerized phospholipid bilayers on silica particles for specific immobilization of His-tagged proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seid M Adem

    2015-04-01

    Stabilized phospholipid bilayer (PLB) coated silica microspheres were prepared via polymerization of lipid monomers. These lipid coated silica microspheres are stable to both extended storage in solution at 4°C and dry storage at room temperature. These stabilized lipid coated microspheres have also been functionalized with nickel-chelating lipids, a commonly used tool for immobilizing polyhistidine-tagged proteins. It is shown that 6xHis-EGFP interacts with (poly)bis-SorbPC/DOGS-NTA-Ni2+ coated silica and this interaction was interrupted by washing with imidazole indicating the reversibility of the interaction. No interaction was observed between the functionalized silica substrate and EGFP, which lacks the 6xHis-tag. Furthermore, these biocompatible (poly)bis-SorbPC coated microspheres were able to minimize non-specific protein adsorption.

  4. Preparation and characterization of titania-entrapped silica hollow particles: effective dye removal and evidence of selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohhasurayotin, Kritapas; Viboonratanasri, Duangkamon

    2013-06-28

    A titania-entrapped silica hollow nanostructure was prepared using two consecutive coating processes, followed by calcination. The hydrothermal treatment of D-glucose assisted by polyethylene glycol was used to form a carbon layer over the titania surface. The resulting composite was used to fabricate a silica layer on top by hydrolyzing tetraethyl orthosilicate in strong base. The titania nanoparticles were then released but still trapped inside the silica hollow after calcination. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques were employed to determine the morphology of the obtained product; nitrogen gas adsorption and X-ray diffraction methods were also used. Photocatalytic studies on five organic dyes showed that efficient dye-removal due to photocatalysis and adsorption with selectivity based on the charge-charge interaction between the dye and silica surface was possible. Other factors including the structures of the dyes and their molecular interaction also influenced the observed removal efficiency. PMID:23673686

  5. Silica Transport, Deposition and Porosity Evolution in a Fracture : Insights from Hydrothermal Flow-through Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, A.; Yamada, R.; Saishu, H.; Tsuchiya, N.

    2014-12-01

    Geofluids contain a large amount of silica, which solubility changes depending on temperature and pressure. Ubiquitous occurrences of various silica deposits (quartz veins, silica sinter, scales) suggest that silica precipitation plays an important role on temporal and spatial variation of hydrological properties of the Earth's crusts. A pressure drop, for example, induced by seismicity, is one of the driving forces for silica precipitation within the crusts. In spite of the importance of silica depositions in fractures, how porosity and permeability evolution during silica precipitation is still poorly understood. In this study, we conducted the hydrothermal experiments for silica precipitation from supersaturated solutions in vapor (370˚C, 20 MPa) and supercritical (420 ˚C, 30 MPa) conditions with flow rate of 1 g/min. After the experiments, we analyzed the 3-D porosity structures by X-ray CT, and then by making thin section. We developed a tube-in-tube vessel, which is composed of main vessel (made of SUS316), and inner alumina tube (6 mm inner diameter), to make a horizontal flow path. We did not used rock/mineral substrates, and alumina balls (1 mm diameter) are closely packed in the inner tube. In both situations, a significant amount of silica deposited within a week, showing contrasting porosity structures between vapor and supercritical conditions. In vapor conditions, the precipitates are fine-grained quartz aggregate, and the most deposited at around 38 mm from the inlet. The pores were filled from the bottom to the top in the tube. In contrast, in the supercritical conditions, the precipitates are composites of amorphous silica and quartz; which accumulated around the alumina balls uniformly. Quartz grains are formed in amorphous silica layers, and the most porosity reduction occurred at around 25 mm from the inlet. A simple model of cellular automaton involving particle flow, adsorption, settling and deposition reveals that the relative magnitude of

  6. In search of the chemical basis of the hemolytic potential of silicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Cristina; Tomatis, Maura; Ghiazza, Mara; Rabolli, Virginie; Bolis, Vera; Lison, Dominique; Fubini, Bice

    2013-08-19

    The membranolytic activity of silica particles toward red blood cells (RBCs) has been known for a long time and is sometimes associated with silica pathogenicity. However, the molecular mechanism and the reasons why hemolysis differs according to the silica form are still obscure. A panel of 15 crystalline (pure and commercial) and amorphous (pyrogenic, precipitated from aqueous solutions, vitreous) silica samples differing in size, origin, morphology, and surface chemical composition were selected and specifically prepared. Silica particles were grouped into six groups to compare their potential in disrupting RBC membranes so that one single property differed in each group, while other features were constant. Free radical production and crystallinity were not strict determinants of hemolytic activity. Particle curvature and morphology modulated the hemolytic effect, but silanols and siloxane bridges at the surface were the main actors. Hemolysis was unrelated to the overall concentration of silanols as fully rehydrated surfaces (such as those obtained from aqueous solution) were inert, and one pyrogenic silica also lost its membranolytic potential upon progressive dehydration. Overall results are consistent with a model whereby hemolysis is determined by a defined surface distribution of dissociated/undissociated silanols and siloxane groups strongly interacting with specific epitopes on the RBC membrane. PMID:23819533

  7. A facile and efficient method of enzyme immobilization on silica particles via Michael acceptor film coatings: immobilized catalase in a plug flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayramoglu, Gulay; Arica, M Yakup; Genc, Aysenur; Ozalp, V Cengiz; Ince, Ahmet; Bicak, Niyazi

    2016-06-01

    A novel method was developed for facile immobilization of enzymes on silica surfaces. Herein, we describe a single-step strategy for generating of reactive double bonds capable of Michael addition on the surfaces of silica particles. This method was based on reactive thin film generation on the surfaces by heating of impregnated self-curable polymer, alpha-morpholine substituted poly(vinyl methyl ketone) p(VMK). The generated double bonds were demonstrated to be an efficient way for rapid incorporation of enzymes via Michael addition. Catalase was used as model enzyme in order to test the effect of immobilization methodology by the reactive film surface through Michael addition reaction. Finally, a plug flow type immobilized enzyme reactor was employed to estimate decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide. The highly stable enzyme reactor could operate continuously for 120 h at 30 °C with only a loss of about 36 % of its initial activity. PMID:26879642

  8. Uniform surface modification of 3D Bioglass®-based scaffolds with mesoporous silica particles (MCM-41 for enhancing drug uptake capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eBoccardi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The design and characterization of a new family of multifunctional scaffolds based on bioactive glass (BG of 45S5 composition for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications is presented. These BG-based scaffolds are developed via a replication method of polyurethane packaging foam. In order to increase the therapeutic functionality, the scaffolds were coated with mesoporous silica particles (MCM-41, which act as an in-situ drug delivery system. These sub-micron spheres are characterized by large surface area and pore volume with a narrow pore diameter distribution. The solution used for the synthesis of the silica mesoporous particles was designed to obtain at the same time a high ordered mesoporous structure and spherical shape, both are key factors for achieving the desired controlled drug release. The MCM-41 particles were synthesized directly inside the BG-based scaffolds and the drug release capability of this combined system was evaluated. Moreover the effect of MCM-41 particle coating on the bioactivity of the BG-based scaffolds was assessed. The results indicate that it is possible to obtain a multifunctional scaffold system characterized by high and interconnected porosity, high bioactivity and sustained drug delivery capability.

  9. Uniform Surface Modification of 3D Bioglass®-Based Scaffolds with Mesoporous Silica Particles (MCM-41) for Enhancing Drug Delivery Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Elena; Philippart, Anahí; Juhasz-Bortuzzo, Judith A.; Beltrán, Ana M.; Novajra, Giorgia; Vitale-Brovarone, Chiara; Spiecker, Erdmann; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    The design and characterization of a new family of multifunctional scaffolds based on bioactive glass (BG) of 45S5 composition for bone tissue engineering and drug delivery applications are presented. These BG-based scaffolds are developed via a replication method of polyurethane packaging foam. In order to increase the therapeutic functionality, the scaffolds were coated with mesoporous silica particles (MCM-41), which act as an in situ drug delivery system. These sub-micron spheres are characterized by large surface area and pore volume with a narrow pore diameter distribution. The solution used for the synthesis of the silica mesoporous particles was designed to obtain a high-ordered mesoporous structure and spherical shape – both are key factors for achieving the desired controlled drug release. The MCM-41 particles were synthesized directly inside the BG-based scaffolds, and the drug-release capability of this combined system was evaluated. Moreover, the effect of MCM-41 particle coating on the bioactivity of the BG-based scaffolds was assessed. The results indicate that it is possible to obtain a multifunctional scaffold system characterized by high and interconnected porosity, high bioactivity, and sustained drug delivery capability. PMID:26594642

  10. Rapid reductive degradation of aqueous p-nitrophenol using nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica with enhanced antioxidation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was doped in mesoporous silica (SBA-15). • High capacity and fast rate for the removal of p-nitrophenol. • Better antioxidant ability of nZVI/SBA-15 than nZVI. • p-Nitrophenol removal depended heavily on immobilized nZVI amount. • Mechanism of PNP removal by nZVI/SBA-15 was proposed. - Abstract: In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica (nZVI/SBA-15) were successfully prepared for effective degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). The nZVI/SBA-15 composites were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall nanoscale zero-valent iron particles were formed and well dispersed on mesoporous silica (SBA-15). Batch experiments revealed that PNP removal declined from 96.70% to 16.14% as solution pH increased from 3.0 to 9.0. Besides, degradation equilibrium was reached within 5 min, which was independent of initial PNP concentration. Furthermore, only a little PNP elimination on SBA-15 indicated that nZVI immobilized on mesoporous silica was mainly responsible for the target contaminant removal. The UV–vis spectrum and XPS measurement confirmed that the PNP removal was a reductive degradation process, which was further proved by the detected intermediates using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The excellent antioxidation ability had been discovered with more than 80% of PNP being removed by nZVI/SBA-15 treated with 30 days’ exposure to air. These results demonstrated the feasible and potential application of nZVI/SBA-15 composites in organic wastewater treatment

  11. Rapid reductive degradation of aqueous p-nitrophenol using nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica with enhanced antioxidation effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lin, E-mail: tanglin@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Tang, Jing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Yang, Guide; Xie, Xia; Zhou, Yaoyu [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Pang, Ya [Department of Biological Engineering and Environmental Science, Changsha College, Changsha 410003 (China); Fang, Yan; Wang, Jiajia [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Xiong, Weiping [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was doped in mesoporous silica (SBA-15). • High capacity and fast rate for the removal of p-nitrophenol. • Better antioxidant ability of nZVI/SBA-15 than nZVI. • p-Nitrophenol removal depended heavily on immobilized nZVI amount. • Mechanism of PNP removal by nZVI/SBA-15 was proposed. - Abstract: In this study, nanoscale zero-valent iron particles immobilized on mesoporous silica (nZVI/SBA-15) were successfully prepared for effective degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP). The nZVI/SBA-15 composites were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that abundant ultrasmall nanoscale zero-valent iron particles were formed and well dispersed on mesoporous silica (SBA-15). Batch experiments revealed that PNP removal declined from 96.70% to 16.14% as solution pH increased from 3.0 to 9.0. Besides, degradation equilibrium was reached within 5 min, which was independent of initial PNP concentration. Furthermore, only a little PNP elimination on SBA-15 indicated that nZVI immobilized on mesoporous silica was mainly responsible for the target contaminant removal. The UV–vis spectrum and XPS measurement confirmed that the PNP removal was a reductive degradation process, which was further proved by the detected intermediates using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The excellent antioxidation ability had been discovered with more than 80% of PNP being removed by nZVI/SBA-15 treated with 30 days’ exposure to air. These results demonstrated the feasible and potential application of nZVI/SBA-15 composites in organic wastewater treatment.

  12. Removing and Recovering Phosphate from Poultry Wastewater Using Amorphous Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Youhui Xie; Qin Li; Xianzhi Zhao; Yi Luo; Yangming Wang; Xiangwei Peng; Qigui Wang; Jian Su; Yin Lu

    2014-01-01

    A novel and effective technique for phosphate from poultry wastewater was developed using amorphous ceramics. Amorphous ceramics, which showed high performance for phosphate removal and recovery from poultry wastewater, were synthesized using unlimitedly available, inexpensive materials such as silica fume and lime. Dissolved phosphate in poultry wastewater can be deposited as a solid on the surface of amorphous ceramics. Phosphate content on the surface of amorphous ceramics could reach 14.2...

  13. Application of X-ray microtomography for the characterisation of hollow polymer-stabilised spray dried amorphous dispersion particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, John F; Terada, Masako; Holzner, Christian; Lavery, Leah; Nicholson, Sarah J; Timmins, Peter; Tobyn, Mike

    2016-08-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of X-ray microtomography to obtain information relating to powder characteristics such as wall thickness and solid volume fraction for hollow, polymer-stabilised spray dried dispersion (SDD) particles. SDDs of varying particle properties, with respect to shell wall thickness and degree of particle collapse, were utilised to assess the capability of the approach. The results demonstrate that the approach can provide insight into the morphological characteristics of these hollow particles, and thereby a means to understand/predict the processability and performance characteristics of the bulk material. Quantitative assessments of particle wall thickness, particle/void volume and thereby solid volume fraction were also demonstrated to be achievable. The analysis was also shown to be able to qualitatively assess the impact of the drying rate on the morphological nature of the particle surfaces, thus providing further insight into the final particle shape. The approach demonstrated a practical means to access potentially important particle characteristics for SDD materials which, in addition to the standard bulk powder measurements such as particle size and bulk density, may enable a better understanding of such materials, and their impact on downstream processability and dosage form performance. PMID:27262271

  14. Ce+3-and Tb+3-luminescence in glasses. Ce+3-activated bulk silica and silica thin films. An α-particle detector based on a Ce+3-activated silica thin film. A Ce+3-Tb+3-energy transfer in a high melting point phosphate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While many Ce+3-activated glasses of different type emit strongly under UV (253,7 nm) and β-ray excitation, only the commercial silicate glass NE 905 shows an useful emission when exposed to α-particles. Only phosphate glasses have give the green Tb+3-emission, when doped by it, under UV and α and β radiation. Sputtered films of Ce+3-activated silica have appropriate luminescence properties, adherence to the substrate and a perfect chemical resistance to hot nitric acid. An α-particle detector has been built which has permitted the quantitative detection of plutonium in the presence of other radiative ions

  15. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti, Winardi, Sugeng

    2016-02-01

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  16. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  17. Silica, Silicosis and Autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Michael Pollard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases SLE, SSc and RA. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However numerous questions remain unanswered.

  18. Elaboration by ion implantation of cobalt nano-particles in silica layers and modifications of their properties by electron and swift heavy ion irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to investigate the capability of ion irradiations to elaborate magnetic nano-particles in silica layers, and to modify their properties. Co+ ions have been implanted at 160 keV at fluences of 2.1016, 5.1016 and 1017 at/cm2, and at temperatures of 77, 295 and 873 K. The dependence of the particle size on the implantation fluence, and more significantly on the implantation temperature has been shown. TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) observations have shown a mean diameter varying from 1 nm for implantations at 2.1016 Co+/cm2 at 77 K, to 9.7 nm at 1017 Co+/cm2 at 873 K. For high temperature implantations, two regions of particles appear. Simulations based on a kinetic 3-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo method reproduce quantitatively the features observed for implantations. Thermal treatments induce the ripening of the particles. Electron irradiations at 873 K induce an important increase in mean particle sizes. Swift heavy ion irradiations also induce the ripening of the particles for low fluences, and an elongation of the particles in the incident beam direction for high fluences, resulting in a magnetic anisotropy. Mechanisms invoked in thermal spike model could also explain this anisotropic growth. (author)

  19. Silica coated magnetic particles using microwave synthesis for removal of dyes from natural water samples: Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium, isotherm and kinetics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Salwa A.; Soliman, Ezzat M.

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring pollutants in water samples is a challenge to analysts. So, the removal of Napthol blue black (NBB) and Erichrome blue black R (EBBR) from aqueous solutions was investigated using magnetic chelated silica particles. Magnetic solids are widely used in detection and analytical systems because of the performance advantages they offer compared to similar solids that lack magnetic properties. In this context, a fast, simple and clean method for modification of magnetic particles (Fe3O4) with silica gel was developed using microwave technique to introduce silica gel coated magnetic particles (SG-MPs) sorbent. The magnetic sorbent was characterized by the FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scan electron microscope (SEM) analyses. The effects of pH, time, weight of sorbent and initial concentration of dye were evaluated. It was interesting to find from results that SG-MPs exhibits high percentage extraction of the studied dyes (100% for NBB and 98.75% for EBBR) from aqueous solutions. The Freundlich isotherm with r2 = 0.973 and 0.962 and Langmuir isotherms with r2 = 0.993 and 0.988 for NBB and EBBR, respectively were used to describe adsorption equilibrium. Also, adsorption kinetic experiments have been carried out and the data have been well fitted by a pseudo-second-order equation r2 = 1.0 for NBB and 0.999 for EBBR. The prepared sorbent with rapid adsorption rate and separation convenience was applied for removal of NBB and EBBR pollutants from natural water samples with good precision (RSD% = 0.05-0.3%).

  20. Silica coated magnetic particles using microwave synthesis for removal of dyes from natural water samples: Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium, isotherm and kinetics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Salwa A., E-mail: salwa_kasem2003@yahoo.com; Soliman, Ezzat M.

    2013-11-01

    Monitoring pollutants in water samples is a challenge to analysts. So, the removal of Napthol blue black (NBB) and Erichrome blue black R (EBBR) from aqueous solutions was investigated using magnetic chelated silica particles. Magnetic solids are widely used in detection and analytical systems because of the performance advantages they offer compared to similar solids that lack magnetic properties. In this context, a fast, simple and clean method for modification of magnetic particles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) with silica gel was developed using microwave technique to introduce silica gel coated magnetic particles (SG-MPs) sorbent. The magnetic sorbent was characterized by the FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scan electron microscope (SEM) analyses. The effects of pH, time, weight of sorbent and initial concentration of dye were evaluated. It was interesting to find from results that SG-MPs exhibits high percentage extraction of the studied dyes (100% for NBB and 98.75% for EBBR) from aqueous solutions. The Freundlich isotherm with r{sup 2} = 0.973 and 0.962 and Langmuir isotherms with r{sup 2} = 0.993 and 0.988 for NBB and EBBR, respectively were used to describe adsorption equilibrium. Also, adsorption kinetic experiments have been carried out and the data have been well fitted by a pseudo-second-order equation r{sup 2} = 1.0 for NBB and 0.999 for EBBR. The prepared sorbent with rapid adsorption rate and separation convenience was applied for removal of NBB and EBBR pollutants from natural water samples with good precision (RSD% = 0.05–0.3%).

  1. Silica coated magnetic particles using microwave synthesis for removal of dyes from natural water samples: Synthesis, characterization, equilibrium, isotherm and kinetics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring pollutants in water samples is a challenge to analysts. So, the removal of Napthol blue black (NBB) and Erichrome blue black R (EBBR) from aqueous solutions was investigated using magnetic chelated silica particles. Magnetic solids are widely used in detection and analytical systems because of the performance advantages they offer compared to similar solids that lack magnetic properties. In this context, a fast, simple and clean method for modification of magnetic particles (Fe3O4) with silica gel was developed using microwave technique to introduce silica gel coated magnetic particles (SG-MPs) sorbent. The magnetic sorbent was characterized by the FT-IR, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scan electron microscope (SEM) analyses. The effects of pH, time, weight of sorbent and initial concentration of dye were evaluated. It was interesting to find from results that SG-MPs exhibits high percentage extraction of the studied dyes (100% for NBB and 98.75% for EBBR) from aqueous solutions. The Freundlich isotherm with r2 = 0.973 and 0.962 and Langmuir isotherms with r2 = 0.993 and 0.988 for NBB and EBBR, respectively were used to describe adsorption equilibrium. Also, adsorption kinetic experiments have been carried out and the data have been well fitted by a pseudo-second-order equation r2 = 1.0 for NBB and 0.999 for EBBR. The prepared sorbent with rapid adsorption rate and separation convenience was applied for removal of NBB and EBBR pollutants from natural water samples with good precision (RSD% = 0.05–0.3%).

  2. Characterization of 13 and 30 mum thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon diodes deposited over CMOS integrated circuits for particle detection application

    CERN Document Server

    Despeisse, M; Commichau, S C; Dissertori, G; Garrigos, A; Jarron, P; Miazza, C; Moraes, D; Shah, A; Wyrsch, N; Viertel, Gert M

    2004-01-01

    We present the experimental results obtained with a novel monolithic silicon pixel detector which consists in depositing a n-i-p hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) diode straight above the readout ASIC (this technology is called Thin Film on ASIC, TFA). The characterization has been performed on 13 and 30mum thick a-Si:H films deposited on top of an ASIC containing a linear array of high- speed low-noise transimpedance amplifiers designed in a 0.25mum CMOS technology. Experimental results presented have been obtained with a 600nm pulsed laser. The results of charge collection efficiency and charge collection speed of these structures are discussed.

  3. Silica in alkaline brines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  4. Atomic force microscopy indentation to determine mechanical property for polystyrene–silica core–shell hybrid particles with controlled shell thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positively charged polystyrene (PS) particles with a size of ca. 200 nm were synthesized by soap-free polymerization. The PS cores were coated with silica shells of tunable thickness employing the modified Stöber method. The PS cores were removed by thermal decomposition at 500 °C, resulting in well-defined silica hollow spheres (10–30 nm in shell thickness). The elastic response of the as-synthesized samples was probed by an atomic force microscope (AFM). A point load was applied to the particle surface through a sharp AFM tip, and the force–displacement curves were recorded. Elastic moduli (E) for the PS particles (2.01 ± 0.70 GPa) and the core–shell structured hybrid particles were determined on the basis of Hertzian contact model. The calculated E values of composites exhibited a linear dependence on the silica shell thickness. While the shell thickness increased from ca. 10 to 15 and 20 nm, the E values of composites increased from 4.42 ± 0.27 to 5.88 ± 0.48 and 9.07 ± 0.94 GPa. For core–shell structured organic/inorganic composites, the E values of the hybrid particles were much lower than those of inorganic shells, while these values were much close to those of organic cores. Moreover, the moduli of elasticity of the composites appeared to be determined by the properties of the polymer cores, the species of inorganic shells and the thickness of shells. Besides, the inorganic shells enhanced the mechanical properties of the polymer cores. This work will provide essential experimental and theoretical basis for the design and application of core–shell structured organic/inorganic composite abrasives in chemical mechanical polishing/planarization. - Highlights: • The elastic moduli (E) of the PS/SiO2 hybrid particles were probed by AFM. • The E values of composites exhibited a linear dependence on the shell thickness. • The elasticity appeared to be determined by the properties of the organic cores. • The E values were affected by the

  5. Atomic force microscopy indentation to determine mechanical property for polystyrene–silica core–shell hybrid particles with controlled shell thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yang, E-mail: cy.jpu@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Qian, Cheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213164 (China); Miao, Naiming [School of Mechanical Engineering, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu 213016 (China)

    2015-03-31

    The positively charged polystyrene (PS) particles with a size of ca. 200 nm were synthesized by soap-free polymerization. The PS cores were coated with silica shells of tunable thickness employing the modified Stöber method. The PS cores were removed by thermal decomposition at 500 °C, resulting in well-defined silica hollow spheres (10–30 nm in shell thickness). The elastic response of the as-synthesized samples was probed by an atomic force microscope (AFM). A point load was applied to the particle surface through a sharp AFM tip, and the force–displacement curves were recorded. Elastic moduli (E) for the PS particles (2.01 ± 0.70 GPa) and the core–shell structured hybrid particles were determined on the basis of Hertzian contact model. The calculated E values of composites exhibited a linear dependence on the silica shell thickness. While the shell thickness increased from ca. 10 to 15 and 20 nm, the E values of composites increased from 4.42 ± 0.27 to 5.88 ± 0.48 and 9.07 ± 0.94 GPa. For core–shell structured organic/inorganic composites, the E values of the hybrid particles were much lower than those of inorganic shells, while these values were much close to those of organic cores. Moreover, the moduli of elasticity of the composites appeared to be determined by the properties of the polymer cores, the species of inorganic shells and the thickness of shells. Besides, the inorganic shells enhanced the mechanical properties of the polymer cores. This work will provide essential experimental and theoretical basis for the design and application of core–shell structured organic/inorganic composite abrasives in chemical mechanical polishing/planarization. - Highlights: • The elastic moduli (E) of the PS/SiO{sub 2} hybrid particles were probed by AFM. • The E values of composites exhibited a linear dependence on the shell thickness. • The elasticity appeared to be determined by the properties of the organic cores. • The E values were affected

  6. Effect of field strength and temperature on viscoelastic properties of electrorheological suspensions of urea-modified silica particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belza, T.; Pavlínek, V.; Sáha, P.; Quadrat, Otakar

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 316, 1-3 (2008), s. 89-94. ISSN 0927-7757 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : Electrorheology * Viscoelasticity * Silica Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.926, year: 2008

  7. High-Silica Rocks and Soils at Gusev Crater, Mars: Distribution, Spectra, and Implications for Past Hydrothermal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, M. S.; Bell, J. F.; Wang, A.; Cloutis, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit has discovered surprisingly high concentrations of amorphous silica in the Inner Basin of the Columbia Hills. As described by Squyres et al. (2008, Science, 320, 1063), within a topographic lowland called Eastern Valley, Spirit's Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) measured a composition of >90 wt.% silica at the soil feature "Gertrude Weise", a record high for Mars. The Mössbauer spectrum of this target is featureless. APXS measurements of light-toned nodular outcrops also show high silica concentrations (up to ~72 wt.%), which in some locations co-exist with sulfur-rich soils. Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) results from the soils and nodules are consistent with opal-A. These deposits have been found adjacent to "Home Plate", a layered plateau interpreted as the product of explosive volcanism. The silica-rich soils and nodules are consistent with sinters and/or residues formed in a hydrothermal system, and may be related to the same hydrovolcanic activity that produced Home Plate. We have begun to map the distribution of high-silica materials in Gusev Crater more extensively using remote sensing, in order to understand the regional extent of possible hydrothermal activity. Spirit's Pancam instrument has collected visible to near-infrared relative reflectance spectra of the region in 11 unique wavelengths. We find that a distinct absorption feature at the longest Pancam wavelength (1009 nm) appears to be characteristic of the high-silica soils and nodules. By mapping the occurrence of this feature with other spectral parameters in Pancam images, we can remotely identify potential amorphous silica deposits elsewhere in the Columbia Hills. Here we present a map with our proposed regional distribution of silica-rich materials within the rover's Gusev Crater traverse area. The mineralogic origin of the 1009nm feature is enigmatic; reflectance spectra of amorphous silica are typically featureless in near

  8. Aggregation/dispersion of ultrafine silica in flotagent solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The aggregation/dispersion of ultrafine particles is of interest for both fundamental and practical perspective. These behaviors of ultrafine silica in flotagent solution and the heter-coagulation of silica and alumina were examined using particle size analyzer, electrokinetic potential, contact angle measurements. The flotation reagents have a pronounced effect on the aggregation or dispersion behaviors of ultrafine silica suspensions. Collector dodecylamine chloride renders silica surfaces hydrophobic and the aggregation between silica particles takes place. Modifier tripolyphosphate makes the silica surface completely hydrophilic and enhances the stability of silica suspension. These experimental results can be explained based on the extended DLVO theory by considering polar interfacial interaction between particle surfaces.

  9. Graphene-coated materials using silica particles as a framework for highly efficient removal of aromatic pollutants in water

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Kaijie; Chen, Baoliang; Zhu, Lizhong

    2015-01-01

    The substantial aggregation of pristine graphene nanosheets decreases its powerful adsorption capacity and diminishes its practical applications. To overcome this shortcoming, graphene-coated materials (GCMs) were prepared by loading graphene onto silica nanoparticles (SiO2). With the support of SiO2, the stacked interlamination of graphene was held open to expose the powerful adsorption sites in the interlayers. The adsorption of phenanthrene, a model aromatic pollutant, onto the loaded grap...

  10. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for cell labeling: flux synthesis of manganite particles and novel functionalization of silica shell

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kačenka, Michal; Kaman, Ondřej; Kikerlová, S.; Pavlů, B.; Jirák, Zdeněk; Jirák, D.; Herynek, Vít; Černý, J.; Chaput, F.; Laurent, S.; Lukeš, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, Jun (2015), s. 97-106. ISSN 0021-9797 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0807; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : manganites * magnetic nanoparticles * molten salt synthesis * silica coating * dual probes * MRI * cell labeling Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.368, year: 2014

  11. Amorphous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    Digital computers have always been constructed to behave as precise arrangements of reliable parts, and our techniques for organizing computations depend upon this precision and reliability. Two emerging technologies, however, are begnning to undercut these assumptions about constructing and programming computers. These technologies -- microfabrication and bioengineering -- will make it possible to assemble systems composed of myriad information- processing units at almost no cost, provided: 1) that not all the units need to work correctly; and 2) that there is no need to manufacture precise geometrical arrangements or interconnection patterns among them. Microelectronic mechanical components are becoming so inexpensive to manufacture that we can anticipate combining logic circuits, microsensors, actuators, and communications devices integrated on the same chip to produce particles that could be mixed with bulk materials, such as paints, gels, and concrete. Imagine coating bridges or buildings with smart paint that can sense and report on traffic and wind loads and monitor structural integrity of the bridge. A smart paint coating on a wall could sense vibrations, monitor the premises for intruders, or cancel noise. Even more striking, there has been such astounding progress in understanding the biochemical mechanisms in individual cells, that it appears we'll be able to harness these mechanisms to construct digital- logic circuits. Imagine a discipline of cellular engineering that could tailor-make biological cells that function as sensors and actuators, as programmable delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals, as chemical factories for the assembly of nanoscale structures. Fabricating such systems seem to be within our reach, even if it is not yet within our grasp Fabrication, however, is only part of the story. We can envision producing vast quantities of individual computing elements, whether microfabricated particles, engineered cells, or macromolecular computing

  12. TRIMETHYLSILYLATED SILICA AS RHEOLOGY MODIFIER FOR SILICONE RESINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Huang; Ying Huang; Yunzhao Yu

    2000-01-01

    Trimethylsilylated silica was synthesized through hydrolytic condensation of tetraethoxysilane followed by trimethylsilylation. Rheological properties of the silicone resin with trimethylsilylated silica as modifier were studied. It turned out that the particle size of silica was important to the rheological behavior of the modified resin. Trimethylsilylated silica of medium particle size shows the strongest tendency of forming physical network in the resin.

  13. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alshatwi, Ali A., E-mail: alshatwi@ksu.edu.sa; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica.

  14. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120 °C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and convenient process • Amorphous and spherical with 10–30 nm size SiO2 nanoparticles were fabricated. • Biogenic silica nanoparticles showed biocompatibility. • bSNPs are an alternative to synthetic forms of silica

  15. Study of Molecular Conformation and Activity-Related Properties of Lipase Immobilized onto Core-Shell Structured Polyacrylic Acid-Coated Magnetic Silica Nanocomposite Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilnejad-Ahranjani, Parvaneh; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Singh, Gurvinder; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-04-01

    A facile approach for the preparation of core-shell structured poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated Fe3O4 cluster@SiO2 nanocomposite particles as the support materials for the lipase immobilization is reported. Low- or high-molecular-weight (1800 and 100 000, respectively) PAA molecules were covalently attached onto the surface of amine-functionalized magnetic silica nanoacomposite particles. The successful preparation of particles were verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential measurement, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) techniques. Once lipase is covalently immobilized onto the particles with an average diameter of 210 ± 50 nm, resulting from high binding sites concentrations on the low- and high-molecular-weight PAA-coated particles, high lipase immobilization efficiencies (86.2% and 89.9%, respectively), and loading capacities (786 and 816 mg g(-1), respectively) are obtained. Results from circular dichroism (CD) analysis and catalytic activity tests reveal an increase in the β-sheet content of lipase molecules upon immobilization, along with an enhancement in their activities and stabilities. The lipases immobilized onto the low- and high-molecular-weight PAA-coated particles show maximum activities at 55 and 50 °C, respectively, which are ∼28% and ∼15% higher than that of the free lipase at its own optimum temperature (40 °C), respectively. The immobilized lipases exhibit excellent performance at broader temperature and pH ranges and high thermal and storage stabilities, as well as superior reusability. These prepared magnetic nanocomposite particles can be offered as suitable support materials for efficient immobilization of enzymes and improvement of the immobilized enzymes properties. PMID:26986897

  16. Encapsulation of biomolecules for bioanalytical purposes: Preparation of diclofenac antibody-doped nanometer-sized silica particles by reverse micelle and sol-gel processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the sol-gel technique has attracted increasing interest as a unique approach to immobilize biomolecules for bioanalytical applications as well as biochemical and biophysical studies. For this purpose, crushed biomolecule-doped sol-gel glass monoliths have been widely used. In the present work, for the first time, the encapsulation of anti-diclofenac antibodies in silica nanoparticles was carried out by a combination of reverse micelle and sol-gel technique. Cyclohexane was used for the preparation of the microemulsion as organic solvent, while surfactant Igepal CO-520 was found to be the optimal stabilizer. The antibody source was a purified IgG fraction originating from a polyclonal rabbit antiserum. Tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) was used as precursor. Rather uniform, monodispersed and spherical silica particles of about 70 nm diameter size were fabricated, as was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (SEM/EDX). The biological activity of the encapsulated antibodies was evaluated by incubation of the nanoparticles with a diclofenac standard solution and analysis of the filtrate and followed washing solutions by a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using non-doped particles as blanks. While only about 6% of the added diclofenac was nonspecifically retained by the blank, the corresponding amount of about 66% was much higher with the antibody-doped particles. An obvious advantage of this approach is the general applicability of the developed technique for a mild immobilization of different antibody species

  17. Encapsulation of biomolecules for bioanalytical purposes: preparation of diclofenac antibody-doped nanometer-sized silica particles by reverse micelle and sol-gel processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkogeorgas, Fotios; Ochsenkühn-Petropoulou, Maria; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2006-07-28

    In recent years, the sol-gel technique has attracted increasing interest as a unique approach to immobilize biomolecules for bioanalytical applications as well as biochemical and biophysical studies. For this purpose, crushed biomolecule-doped sol-gel glass monoliths have been widely used. In the present work, for the first time, the encapsulation of anti-diclofenac antibodies in silica nanoparticles was carried out by a combination of reverse micelle and sol-gel technique. Cyclohexane was used for the preparation of the microemulsion as organic solvent, while surfactant Igepal CO-520 was found to be the optimal stabilizer. The antibody source was a purified IgG fraction originating from a polyclonal rabbit antiserum. Tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) was used as precursor. Rather uniform, monodispersed and spherical silica particles of about 70nm diameter size were fabricated, as was demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (SEM/EDX). The biological activity of the encapsulated antibodies was evaluated by incubation of the nanoparticles with a diclofenac standard solution and analysis of the filtrate and followed washing solutions by a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using non-doped particles as blanks. While only about 6% of the added diclofenac was nonspecifically retained by the blank, the corresponding amount of about 66% was much higher with the antibody-doped particles. An obvious advantage of this approach is the general applicability of the developed technique for a mild immobilization of different antibody species. PMID:17723516

  18. Amorphous nanosilica induce endocytosis-dependent ROS generation and DNA damage in human keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Toshiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clarifying the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials is crucial for hazard assessment and the safe application of these substances. With this in mind, we analyzed the relationship between particle size and the in vitro effect of amorphous nanosilica (nSP. Specifically, we evaluated the relationship between particle size of nSP and the in vitro biological effects using human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT. Results Our results indicate that exposure to nSP of 70 nm diameter (nSP70 induced an elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to DNA damage. A markedly reduced response was observed using submicron-sized silica particles of 300 and 1000 nm diameter. In addition, cytochalasin D-treatment reduced nSP70-mediated ROS generation and DNA damage, suggesting that endocytosis is involved in nSP70-mediated cellular effects. Conclusions Thus, particle size affects amorphous silica-induced ROS generation and DNA damage of HaCaT cells. We believe clarification of the endocytosis pathway of nSP will provide useful information for hazard assessment as well as the design of safer forms of nSPs.

  19. Preparation and evaluation of monodispersed, submicron, non-porous silica particles functionalized with β-CD derivatives for chiral-pressurized capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yangfang, Lu; Hui, Wang; Yun, Xue; Xue, Gu; Yan, Wang; Chao, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Submicron, non-porous, chiral silica stationary phase has been prepared by the immobilization of functionalized β-CD derivatives to isocyanate-modified silica via chemical reaction and applied to the pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) enantio-separation of various chiral compounds. The submicron, non-porous, cyclodextrin-based chiral stationary phases (sub_μm-CSP2) exhibited excellent chiral recognition of a wide range of analytes including clenbuterol hydrochloride, mexiletine hydrochloride, chlorpheniramine maleate, esmolol hydrochloride, and metoprolol tartrate. The synthesized submicron particles were regularly spherical and uniformly non-porous with an average diameter of around 800 nm and a mean pore size of less than 2 nm. The synthesized chiral stationary phase was packed into 10 cm × 100 μm id capillary columns. The sub_μm-CSP2 column used in the pCEC system showed better separation of the racemates and at a higher rate compared to those used in the capillary liquid chromatography mode (cLC) system. The sub_μm-CSP2 possessed high mechanical strength, high stereoselectivity, and long lifespan, demonstrating rapid enantio-separation and good resolution of samples. The column provided an efficiency of up to 170,000 plates/m for n-propylbenzene. PMID:25990895

  20. New antifouling silica hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Osuna, Ángela A; Cao, Bin; Cheng, Gang; Jana, Sadhan C; Espe, Matthew P; Lama, Bimala

    2012-06-26

    In this work, a new antifouling silica hydrogel was developed for potential biomedical applications. A zwitterionic polymer, poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) (pCBMA), was produced via atom-transfer radical polymerization and was appended to the hydrogel network in a two-step acid-base-catalyzed sol-gel process. The pCBMA silica aerogels were obtained by drying the hydrogels under supercritical conditions using CO(2). To understand the effect of pCBMA on the gel structure, pCBMA silica aerogels with different pCBMA contents were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and the surface area from Brauner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurements. The antifouling property of pCBMA silica hydrogel to resist protein (fibrinogen) adsorption was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). SEM images revealed that the particle size and porosity of the silica network decreased at low pCBMA content and increased at above 33 wt % of the polymer. The presence of pCBMA increased the surface area of the material by 91% at a polymer content of 25 wt %. NMR results confirmed that pCBMA was incorporated completely into the silica structure at a polymer content below 20 wt %. A protein adsorption test revealed a reduction in fibrinogen adsorption by 83% at 25 wt % pCBMA content in the hydrogel compared to the fibrinogen adsorption in the unmodified silica hydrogel. PMID:22607091

  1. Altered Gene Transcription in Human Cells Treated with Ludox® Silica Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Fede

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Silica (SiO2 nanoparticles (NPs have found extensive applications in industrial manufacturing, biomedical and biotechnological fields. Therefore, the increasing exposure to such ultrafine particles requires studies to characterize their potential cytotoxic effects in order to provide exhaustive information to assess the impact of nanomaterials on human health. The understanding of the biological processes involved in the development and maintenance of a variety of pathologies is improved by genome-wide approaches, and in this context, gene set analysis has emerged as a fundamental tool for the interpretation of the results. In this work we show how the use of a combination of gene-by-gene and gene set analyses can enhance the interpretation of results of in vitro treatment of A549 cells with Ludox® colloidal amorphous silica nanoparticles. By gene-by-gene and gene set analyses, we evidenced a specific cell response in relation to NPs size and elapsed time after treatment, with the smaller NPs (SM30 having higher impact on inflammatory and apoptosis processes than the bigger ones. Apoptotic process appeared to be activated by the up-regulation of the initiator genes TNFa and IL1b and by ATM. Moreover, our analyses evidenced that cell treatment with LudoxÒ silica nanoparticles activated the matrix metalloproteinase genes MMP1, MMP10 and MMP9. The information derived from this study can be informative about the cytotoxicity of Ludox® and other similar colloidal amorphous silica NPs prepared by solution processes.

  2. Conception and modelling of photo-detection pixels. PIN photodiodes conceived in amorphous silicon for particles detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research done has revealed that the a-Si:H is a material ideally suited for the detection of particles, while being resistant to radiation. It also has a low manufacturing cost, is compatible with existing technology and can be deposited over large areas. Thus, despite the low local mobility of charges (30 cm2/V/s), a-Si:H is a material of particular interest for manufacturing high-energy particle detection pixels. As a consequence of this, we have studied the feasibility of an experimental pixel stacked structure based on a-Si:H as a basic sensor element for an electromagnetic calorimeter. The structure of such a pixel consists of different components. First, a silicon PIN diode in a-Si:H is fabricated, followed by a bias resistor and a decoupling capacitor. Before such a structure is made and in order to optimize its design, it is essential to have an efficient behavioural model of the various components. Thus, our primary goal was to develop a two-dimensional physical model of the PIN diode using the SILVACO finite element calculation software. This a-Si:H PIN diode two-dimensional physical model allowed us to study the problem of crosstalk between pixels in a matrix structure of detectors. In particular, we concentrated on the leakage current and the current generated in the volume between neighbouring pixels. The successful implementation of this model in SPICE ensures its usefulness in other professional simulators and especially its integration into a complete electronic structure (PIN diode, bias resistor, decoupling capacity and low noise amplifier). Thanks to these modelling tools, we were able to simulate PIN diode structures in a-Si:H with different thicknesses and different dimensions. These simulations have allowed us to predict that the thicker structures are relevant to the design of the pixel detectors for high energy physics. Applications in astronomy, medical imaging and the analysis of the failure of silicon integrated circuits, can also be

  3. Magnetic silica colloids for catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Claesson, E.M.; Mehendale, N.C.; Klein Gebbink, R. J. M.; van Koten, G; Philipse, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Monodisperse magnetizable colloidal silica particles in a stable dispersion have been functionalized with a homogeneous catalyst: a PCP–pincer Pd-complex. In a proof-of-principle experiment we demonstrate the catalytic activity of the colloids in a C–C bond formation reaction. Advantages of the magnetic silica carriers are the large surface-to-volume ratio and the easy recovery by magnetic separation. After magnetic separation, the catalyst-loaded particles are readily redispersed for further...

  4. Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles in the Detection and Control of the Growth of Pathogen

    OpenAIRE

    Kethirabalan Chitra; Gurusamy Annadurai

    2013-01-01

    In this present study the bioconjugated fluorescent silica nanoparticles give an efficient fluorescent-based immunoassay for the detection of pathogen. The synthesized silica nanoparticles were polydispersed and the size of the silica nanoparticles was in the range of 114–164 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer showed the presence of silica at 1.8 kev and the selected area diffractometer showed amorphous nature of silica nanoparticles. The FTIR spectrum confirmed the attachment ...

  5. Amorphous powders for inhalation drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lan; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-05-01

    For inhalation drug delivery, amorphous powder formulations offer the benefits of increased bioavailability for poorly soluble drugs, improved biochemical stability for biologics, and expanded options of using various drugs and their combinations. However, amorphous formulations usually have poor physicochemical stability. This review focuses on inhalable amorphous powders, including the production methods, the active pharmaceutical ingredients and the excipients with a highlight on stabilization of the particles. PMID:26780404

  6. Effect of pH, citrate treatment and silane-coupling agent concentration on the magnetic, structural and surface properties of functionalized silica-coated iron oxide nanocomposite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Beigi, H.; Yaghmaei, S.; Roostaazad, R.; Bardania, H.; Arpanaei, A.

    2011-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation of iron chloride salts at various pH values (9, 10, 11 and12) that were adjusted using an ammonia solution. Increasing the pH from 9 to 12 led to decreases in the size of iron oxide nanoparticles from 7.9±1.4 to 5±0.6 nm and the saturation magnetization ( Ms) from 82.73 to 67.14 emu/g, respectively, when analyzed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). X-ray diffraction patterns as well as Ms values showed that magnetite is the dominantly synthesized phase in the examined pH values. Unmodified iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with silica via the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), designated P1 particles. The size distribution diagram of P1 particles showed two regions with mean sizes of 143.3±15.4 and 216.9±13.7 nm corresponding to silica and iron oxide@silica particles, respectively. Stabilization of iron oxide nanoparticles using sodium citrate prior to coating with silica (P2 particles) resulted in nanocomposites with a mean size of 275±16.1 nm and an Ms value of 2.9 emu/g. Subsequently, the surface of P2 particles was functionalized by amine groups using N-(2-aminoethyl)-3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EDS). Results obtained from the measurement of zeta potential revealed that the highest value of isoelectric point (PI) change, indicating a more efficient surface functionalization, occurs when the EDS concentration of 90 mM is used, as compared to that for particles aminated using 25 and 180 mM EDS.

  7. Reappraisal of the work hardening behavior of bulk amorphous matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the origin of work hardening in amorphous composites by directly measuring the hardness variations of crystalline particles and amorphous matrices at various strains. The work hardening of the amorphous composites was caused predominantly by hardening of the amorphous matrices, rather than of the crystalline particles. The hardening mechanism was explained based on the kinetics and thermodynamics.

  8. Separation of lanthanides and actinides using magnetic silica particles bearing covalently attached tetra-CMPO-calix[4]arenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, Volker; Dozol, Jean-François; Grüttner, Cordula; Liger, Karine; Matthews, Susan E; Rudershausen, Sandra; Saadioui, Mohamed; Wang, Pingshan

    2004-08-21

    Calix[4]arene tetraethers in the cone conformation bearing four -NH-CO-CH2-P(O)Ph2 (= CMPO) residues on their wide rim and one, two or four omega-amino alkyl residues of various lengths at the narrow rim were synthesized. Reaction with dichlorotriazinyl (DCT) functionalized magnetic particles led to complete coverage of the available surface by covalently linked CMPO-calix[4]arenes in all cases. Magnetically assisted removal of Eu(iii) and Am(iii) from acidic solutions was distinctly more efficient with these particles in comparison to analogous particles bearing the same amount of analogous single-chain CMPO-functions. The best result, an increase of the extraction efficiency by a factor of 140-160, was obtained for attachment via two propyl spacers. The selectivity Am/Eu was in the range of 1.9-2.8. No decrease of the extraction ability was observed, when the particles were repeatedly used, after simple back extraction with water. PMID:15305214

  9. AMORPHOUS MATTER IN KAOLINS AND ITS GEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Selective dissolution with ammonium oxalate was carried out toextract amorphous matter in some kaolins from China.Ammonium oxalate extraction is an effective method to extract amorphous constituents without destroying the kaolinite crystalline structure.The study showed that,absolute amounts of amorphous constituents in kaolins are in the order Al>Si>Fe,but that relative amounts are in the order Fe>Al>Si.The amorphous phases are probably mainly in the form of separate particles,or colloidal particles absorbed on the surface of kaolinite particles.Compared to older kaolins,younger kaolins contain much more amorphous iron content.

  10. Airborne silica levels in an urban area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the exposure levels of the general population we studied the concentrations of silica particles in the inhalable particulate fraction (PM10) in different meteorological-climate periods in an urban area of Rome. In order to determine the concentration and the granulometric spectrum of silica particles, PM10 sampled by a cascade impactor was analysed by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and by scanning electron microscopy equipped with a thin-window system for X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDX). Over the period September 2004-October 2005 the abundance of silica particles as evaluated by SEM/EDX ranged from 1.6 to 10.4% of the total PM10 particulate, with a weight concentration of free crystalline silica, evaluated by XRD, in the range 0.25-2.87 μg/m3. The mean diameter of silica particles ranged from 0.3 to 10.5 μm, with more than 87% of particles having a diameter of less than 2.5 μm. The correlations between SEM/EDX and XRD data seem to suggest that the airborne silica particles in the urban location studied were mainly in the form crystalline silica. A strong relationship was found between the meteorological-climate conditions and the concentration level of free crystalline silica. This result suggests that the Southern winds from the Sahara desert carry an important amount of silica particles into Mediterranean Europe

  11. Biocompatibility assessment of rice husk-derived biogenic silica nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-02-01

    Synthetic forms of silica have low biocompatibility, whereas biogenic forms have myriad beneficial effects in current toxicological applications. Among the various sources of biogenic silica, rice husk is considered a valuable agricultural biomass material and a cost-effective resource that can provide biogenic silica for biomedical applications. In the present study, highly pure biogenic silica nanoparticles (bSNPs) were successfully harvested from rice husks using acid digestion under pressurized conditions at 120°C followed by a calcination process. The obtained bSNPs were subjected to phase identification analysis using X-ray diffraction, which revealed the amorphous nature of the bSNPs. The morphologies of the bSNPs were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed spherical particles 10 to 30 nm in diameter. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of the bSNPs with human lung fibroblast cells (hLFCs) was investigated using a viability assay and assessing cellular morphological changes, intracellular ROS generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential and oxidative stress-related gene expression. Our results revealed that the bSNPs did not have any significant incompatibility in these in vitro cell-based approaches. These preliminary findings suggest that bSNPs are biocompatible, could be the best alternative to synthetic forms of silica and are applicable to food additive and biomedical applications. PMID:25492167

  12. Characterization of laser-induced plasmas associated with energetic laser cleaning of metal particles on fused silica surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Candace D; Shen, Nan; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Demos, Stavros G; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2015-11-15

    Time-resolved plasma emission spectroscopy was used to characterize the energy coupling and temperature rise associated with single, 10-ns pulsed laser ablation of metallic particles bound to transparent substrates. Plasma associated with Fe(I) emission lines originating from steel microspheres was observed to cool from >24,000 to ~15,000 K over ~220 ns as τ(-0.28), consistent with radiative losses and adiabatic gas expansion of a relatively free plasma. Simultaneous emission lines from Si(II) associated with the plasma etching of the SiO(2) substrate were observed yielding higher plasma temperatures, ~35,000 K, relative to the Fe(I) plasma. The difference in species temperatures is consistent with plasma confinement at the microsphere-substrate interface as the particle is ejected, and is directly visualized using pump-probe shadowgraphy as a function of pulsed laser energy. PMID:26565837

  13. Immobilization of CGTases from Bacillus circulans and Bacillus pseudalcaliphilus on aminosilane and PEI modified magnetic nanoparticles and modified silica particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivanova, V.; Tonkova, A.; Atanassova, N.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Hristov, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2010), s. 278-288. ISSN 2035-1755. [1st Conference on Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials. Naples, 23.11.2009-08.12.2009] R&D Projects: GA MPO(CZ) 2A-1TP1/094 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : cyclodextrin glucanotransferase * immobilization * magnetic particles Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  14. Improvements in geothermal electric power and silica production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J.H.; Fulk, M.M.

    Electricity is generated from hot geothermal solution by extracting heat therefrom, mineral solids which form in a so cooled geothermal solution are separated to recover minerals and facilitate reinjection of the solution into the ground. The separated solids are treated to recover silica by addition of an acid (amorphous silica precipitates) or a base (other minerals precipitate and soulble silicates are formed which are subsequently precipitated by acid neutralization). If desired, after silica is separated, other minerals can be separated and recovered.

  15. Synthesis and silica coating of calcia-doped ceria/mica nanocomposite by seeded polymerization technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)]. E-mail: el-toni@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Yin, Shu [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    Calcia-doped ceria is of potential interest as an ultraviolet (UV) radiation blocking material in personal care products because of the excellent UV light absorption property and low catalytic ability for the oxidation of organic materials superior to undoped ceria. In order to reduce the oxidation catalytic activity further, calcia-doped ceria was coated with amorphous silica by means of seeded polymerization technique. Generally, nanoparticles of inorganic materials do not provide a good coverage for human skin because of the agglomeration of the particles. The platy particles are required to enhance the covering ability of inorganic materials. This can be accomplished by synthesis of calcia-doped ceria/mica nanocomposite with subsequent silica coating to control catalytic activity of calcia-doped ceria. Calcia-doped ceria/mica nanocomposite was prepared by soft solution chemical method followed by silica coating via seeded polymerization technique. Silica coated calcia-doped ceria/mica nanocomposite was characterized by X-ray diffraction, SEM, TEM, XPS and FT-IR.

  16. Bimodal porous silica microspheres decorated with polydopamine nano-particles for the adsorption of methylene blue in fixed-bed columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataei-Germi, Taher; Nematollahzadeh, Ali

    2016-05-15

    Bimodal meso/macro-porous silica microspheres (MSM) were synthesized by a modified sol-emulsion-gel method and then the surface was coated with polydopamine (PDA) nano-particles of 39nm in size. Focusing on the encouraging properties of the synthesized adsorbent, such as high specific surface area (612.3m(2)g(-1), because of mesopores), fast mass transfer (0.9-2.67×10(-3)mLmin(-1)mg, because of macropores), and abundant "adhesive" functional groups of PDA, it was used for the removal of methylene blue (MB) from aqueous solution in a fixed-bed column. The effect of different parameters such as pH, initial concentration, and flow rate was studied. The results revealed that an appropriate sorption condition is an alkaline solution of MB (e.g., pH 10) at low flow rate (less than 5mLmin(-1)). Furthermore, the compatibility of the experimental data with mathematical models such as Thomas and Adams-Bohart was investigated. Both of the models showed a good agreement with the experimental data (R(2)=0.9954-0.9994), and could be applied for the prediction of the column properties and breakthrough curves. Regeneration of the column was performed by using HCl solution with a concentration of 0.1M as an eluent. PMID:26943002

  17. Silica nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramani, N

    2010-07-01

    Occupational exposure to heavy metals, organic solvents and silica is associated with a variety of renal manifestations. Improved understanding of occupational renal disease provides insight into environmental renal disease, improving knowledge of disease pathogenesis. Silica (SiO2) is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. Workers exposed to silica include sandblasters, miners, quarry workers, masons, ceramic workers and glass manufacturers. New cases of silicosis per year have been estimated in the US to be 3600-7300. Exposure to silica has been associated with tubulointerstitial disease, immune-mediated multisystem disease, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. A rare syndrome of painful, nodular skin lesions has been described in dialysis patients with excessive levels of silicon. Balkan endemic nephropathy is postulated to be due to chronic intoxication with drinking water polluted by silicates released during soil erosion. The mechanism of silica nephrotoxicity is thought to be through direct nephrotoxicity, as well as silica-induced autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus. The renal histopathology varies from focal to crescentic and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with aneurysm formation suggestive of polyarteritis nodosa. The treatment for silica nephrotoxicity is non-specific and depends on the mechanism and stage of the disease. It is quite clear that further research is needed, particularly to elucidate the pathogenesis of silica nephropathy. Considering the importance of diagnosing exposure-related renal disease at early stages, it is imperative to obtain a thorough occupational history in all patients with renal disease, with particular emphasis on exposure to silica, heavy metals, and solvents. PMID:23022796

  18. Silica Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ghahramani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to heavy metals, organic solvents and silica is associated with a variety of renal manifestations. Improved understanding of occupational renal disease provides insight into environmental renal disease, improving knowledge of disease pathogenesis. Silica (SiO2 is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. Workers exposed to silica include sandblasters, miners, quarry workers, masons, ceramic workers and glass manufacturers. New cases of silicosis per year have been estimated in the US to be 3600–7300. Exposure to silica has been associated with tubulointerstitial disease, immune-mediated multisystem disease, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. A rare syndrome of painful, nodular skin lesions has been described in dialysis patients with excessive levels of silicon. Balkan endemic nephropathy is postulated to be due to chronic intoxication with drinking water polluted by silicates released during soil erosion. The mechanism of silica nephrotoxicity is thought to be through direct nephrotoxicity, as well as silica-induced autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus. The renal histopathology varies from focal to crescentic and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with aneurysm formation suggestive of polyarteritis nodosa. The treatment for silica nephrotoxicity is non-specific and depends on the mechanism and stage of the disease. It is quite clear that further research is needed, particularly to elucidate the pathogenesis of silica nephropathy. Considering the importance of diagnosing exposure-related renal disease at early stages, it is imperative to obtain a thorough occupational history in all patients with renal disease, with particular emphasis on exposure to silica, heavy metals, and solvents.

  19. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  20. Raman spectrum and structure of silica aerogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman spectra have been obtained from silica aerogel, a porous low-density material having grain sizes near 70 A. The Raman spectra are qualitatively similar to those from fused silica, thus indicating that the aerogel is amorphous. However, a greatly intensified peak (relative to ordinary fused silica) occurs near 478 cm-1 and is assigned to small rings, e.g., six (3-SiO) or eight (4-SiO) membered. Such rings may be more important in the aerogel than in fused silica, but the observed absence of the 600 cm-1 ring peak indicates that only one ring type, e.g., eight membered, is predominant. Other marked frequency and intensity changes in the Si--O--Si bending and Si--O stretching region, compared to fused silica, were also observed

  1. In situ extraction and analysis of volatiles and simple molecules in interplanetary dust particles, contaminants, and silica aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmetz, C. P.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Blanford, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented for the analyses of eight interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) for the volatile elements H, C, N, O, and S and their molecular species, as well as of the volatiles associated with contaminants (i.e., the compounds used during the collection and curation of IDPs), which were carried out using a laser microprobe interfaced with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was found that the volatile species from contaminants were always present in the spectra of IDPs. Despite the contamination problems, several indigenous molecular species could be identified, including OH, CO2 or C2H4, C and CS2, CO2 along with CO (possibly indicating the presence of carbonate), H2S, SO, COS, SO2, and CS2. In some cases, the sulfur components can be attributed to aerosols; however, in one of the IDPs, the presence of H2S, SO, COS, and SO2 indicates the possible presence of elemental sulfur.

  2. Applications in the oil sands industry for Particlear{sup R} silica microgel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffett, B. [DuPont Chemical Solutions Enterprise, Wilmington, DE (United States)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation demonstrated the use of Particlear{sup R} silica microgel in the oil sands industry. The silica-based coagulant is an amorphous silicon dioxide microgel solution. The surface area of a football field can be obtained using 2.7 grams of the substance. The coagulation mechanism is achieved by charge neutralization and inter-particle bridging. The microgel is manufactured at the point of use from commodity chemicals, water, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Applications for the microgel include potable water treatment, paper retention, and animal processing wastewater. In the oil sands industry, Particlear{sup R} can be used in tailings flocculation, thickened tailings drying, steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) water treatment, and enhanced bitumen recovery. It was concluded that the microgel can be used in many oil sands processing and liquid-solid separation processes in order to remove dissolved solids and organics and increase the rate of solids dewatering. tabs., figs.

  3. Structural changes in precipitated silica induced by external forces

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, G. J.; Göritz, D.

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of pure precipitated silica, silica filled in polydimethylsiloxane rubber, and silica filled in styrene butadiene rubber was studied by means of small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. The silica at a length scale of a few nanometers consists of primary particles, which form aggregates, and clusters with aggregates as basic units. It is evidenced that the aggregate branching, represented by the mass fractal dimension, and the aggregate diameter are different if pure silica an...

  4. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell–core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell–core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost. (paper)

  5. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurtono, Tantular; Suprana, Yayang Ade; Latif, Abdul; Dewa, Restu Mulya; Machmudah, Siti; Widiyastuti,, E-mail: widi@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Winardi, Sugeng [Chemical Engineering Department, Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm.

  6. The effect of impeller type on silica sol formation in laboratory scale agitated tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multiphase polymerization reaction of the silica sol formation produced from silicic acid and potassium hydroxide solutions in laboratory scale agitated tank was studied. The reactor is equipped with four segmental baffle and top entering impeller. The inside diameter of reactor is 9 cm, the baffle width is 0.9 cm, and the impeller position is 3 cm from tank bottom. The diameter of standard six blades Rushton and three blades marine propeller impellers are 5 cm. The silicic acid solution was made from 0.2 volume fraction of water glass (sodium silicate) solution in which the sodium ion was exchanged by hydrogen ion from cation resin. The reactor initially filled with 286 ml silicic acid solution was operated in semi batch mode and the temperature was kept constant in 60 °C. The 3 ml/minute of 1 M potassium hydroxide solution was added into stirred tank and the solution was stirred. The impeller rotational speed was varied from 100 until 700 rpm. This titration was stopped if the solution in stirred tank had reached the pH of 10-The morphology of the silica particles in the silica sol product was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The size of silica particles in silica sol was measured based on the SEM image. The silica particle obtained in this research was amorphous particle and the shape was roughly cylinder. The flow field generated by different impeller gave significant effect on particle size and shape. The smallest geometric mean of length and diameter of particle (4.92 µm and 2.42 µm, respectively) was generated in reactor with marine propeller at 600 rpm. The reactor with Rushton impeller produced particle which the geometric mean of length and diameter of particle was 4.85 µm and 2.36 µm, respectively, at 150 rpm

  7. Utilization of tin and titanium incorporated rice husk silica nanocomposite as photocatalyst and adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Farook; Appaturi, Jimmy Nelson; Khanam, Zakia; Thankappan, Radhika; Nawi, Mohd. Asri Mohd

    2013-01-01

    A series of tin and titanium incorporated rice husk silica have been synthesized via sol-gel method using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the structure directing agent. The samples were labeled as RHA-Silica, RHA-10Sn, RHA-10Ti, and RHA-10Sn10Ti. The BET specific surface areas of these catalysts were found to be 315, 607, 439 and 255 (m2 g-1) with type IV isotherms, respectively. The catalysts were found to be X-ray amorphous and the particle size was found to be in the nano range. Calcination of RHA-10Sn at 500 °C gave silica-tin nanotubes. RHA-10Sn10Ti showed the highest activity in the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB). The adsorption of MB on these catalysts was found to fit the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The adsorption rate was found to be strongly dependent on the pH of the solution.

  8. Biomimetic synthesized chiral mesoporous silica: Structures and controlled release functions as drug carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work initially illustrated the formation mechanism of chiral mesoporous silica (CMS) in a brand new insight named biomimetic synthesis. Three kinds of biomimetic synthesized CMS (B-CMS, including B-CMS1, B-CMS2 and B-CMS3) were prepared using different pH or stirring rate condition, and their characteristics were tested with transmission electron microscope and small angle X-ray diffraction. The model drug indomethacin was loaded into B-CMS and drug loading content was measured using ultraviolet spectroscopy. The result suggested that pH condition influenced energetics of self-assembly process, mainly packing energetics of the surfactant, while stirring rate was the more dominant factor to determine particle length. In application, indomethacin loading content was measured to be 35.3%, 34.8% and 35.1% for indomethacin loaded B-CMS1, indomethacin loaded B-CMS2 and indomethacin loaded B-CMS3. After loading indomethacin into B-CMS carriers, surface area, pore volume and pore diameter of B-CMS carriers were reduced. B-CMS converted crystalline state of indomethacin to amorphous state, leading to the improved indomethacin dissolution. B-CMS1 controlled drug release without burst-release, while B-CMS2 and B-CMS3 released indomethacin faster than B-CMS1, demonstrating that the particle length, the ordered lever of multiple helixes, the curvature degree of helical channels and pore diameter greatly contributed to the release behavior of indomethacin loaded B-CMS. - Highlights: • Chiral mesoporous silica was synthesized using biomimetic method. • pH influenced energetics of self-assembly process of chiral mesoporous silica. • Stirring rate determined the particle length of chiral mesoporous silica. • Controlled release behaviors of chiral mesoporous silica varied based on structures

  9. Biomimetic synthesized chiral mesoporous silica: Structures and controlled release functions as drug carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Xu, Lu, E-mail: xl2013109@163.com; Yang, Baixue; Bao, Zhihong; Pan, Weisan; Li, Sanming, E-mail: li_sanming2013@163.com

    2015-10-01

    This work initially illustrated the formation mechanism of chiral mesoporous silica (CMS) in a brand new insight named biomimetic synthesis. Three kinds of biomimetic synthesized CMS (B-CMS, including B-CMS1, B-CMS2 and B-CMS3) were prepared using different pH or stirring rate condition, and their characteristics were tested with transmission electron microscope and small angle X-ray diffraction. The model drug indomethacin was loaded into B-CMS and drug loading content was measured using ultraviolet spectroscopy. The result suggested that pH condition influenced energetics of self-assembly process, mainly packing energetics of the surfactant, while stirring rate was the more dominant factor to determine particle length. In application, indomethacin loading content was measured to be 35.3%, 34.8% and 35.1% for indomethacin loaded B-CMS1, indomethacin loaded B-CMS2 and indomethacin loaded B-CMS3. After loading indomethacin into B-CMS carriers, surface area, pore volume and pore diameter of B-CMS carriers were reduced. B-CMS converted crystalline state of indomethacin to amorphous state, leading to the improved indomethacin dissolution. B-CMS1 controlled drug release without burst-release, while B-CMS2 and B-CMS3 released indomethacin faster than B-CMS1, demonstrating that the particle length, the ordered lever of multiple helixes, the curvature degree of helical channels and pore diameter greatly contributed to the release behavior of indomethacin loaded B-CMS. - Highlights: • Chiral mesoporous silica was synthesized using biomimetic method. • pH influenced energetics of self-assembly process of chiral mesoporous silica. • Stirring rate determined the particle length of chiral mesoporous silica. • Controlled release behaviors of chiral mesoporous silica varied based on structures.

  10. Extraction of total nucleic acid based on silica-coated magnetic particles for RT-qPCR detection of plant RNA virus/viroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ning; Deng, Congliang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qi; Ge, Guanglu; Liu, Yi; Yan, Wenlong; Xia, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a nucleic acid extraction method based on silica-coated magnetic particles (SMPs) and RT-qPCR assay was developed to detect Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), Lily symptomless virus (LSV), Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) and grape yellow speckle viroid 1 (GYSVd-1). The amplification sequences of RT-qPCR were reversely transcribed in vitro as RNA standard templates. The standard curves covered six or seven orders of magnitude with a detection limit of 100 copies per each assay. Extraction efficiency of the SMPs method was evaluated by recovering spiked ssRNAs from plant samples and compared to two commercial kits (TRIzol and RNeasy Plant mini kit). Results showed that the recovery rate of SMPs method was comparable to the commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from lily leaves, whereas it was two or three times higher than commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from grapevine leaves. SMPs method was also used to extract viral nucleic acid from15 ArMV-positive lily leaf samples and 15 LSV-positive lily leaf samples. SMPs method did not show statistically significant difference from other methods on detecting ArMV, but LSV. The SMPs method has the same level of virus load as the TRIzol, and its mean virus load of was 0.5log10 lower than the RNeasy Plant mini kit. Nucleic acid was extracted from 19 grapevine-leaf samples with SMPs and the two commercial kits and subsequently screened for HSVd and GYSVd-1 by RT-qPCR. Regardless of HSVd or GYSVd-1, SMPs method outperforms other methods on both positive rate and the viroid load. In conclusion, SMPs method was able to efficiently extract the nucleic acid of RNA viruses or viroids, especially grapevine viroids, from lily-leaf or grapevine-leaf samples for RT-qPCR detection. PMID:24291163

  11. Structural Effects of Heat-Treated Silica Xerogel Induced by Incorporation of Chlorophyll Species

    OpenAIRE

    J. R. Martínez; G. Martínez-Castañón; Ortega-Zarzosa, G.; de la Cruz-Mendoza, J. A.; Facundo Ruiz; S. A. Palomares-Sánchez

    2007-01-01

    Composites containing chlorophyll aggregates dispersed in amorphous silica are of interest because of their optical attractive properties. The silica powders added with chlorophyll species, prepared by the sol-gel method, were studied using X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and differential temperature analysis. Silica xerogel samples were prepared using an ethanol/H2O/TEOS molar ratio of 4:11.6:1 and loaded with extracts from frozen spinach leaves. The silica xerogel microstructure of the p...

  12. Silica Pigments for Glossy Ink Jet Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Qi; Michael R. Sestrick; Yoshi Sugimoto; William A. Welsh

    2004-01-01

    Silica is a versatile pigment for ink jet media. Micronized silica gel is the worldwide standard for high performance matte ink jet media. For glossy ink jet media, several different forms of silica are widely used. Submicron silica gel dispersions, with either anionic or cationic surfaces, can be employed in either absorptive basecoat layers or in the glossy ink receptive top layer. Colloidal silica, with a variety of particle sizes and surface modifications, is utilized extensively in glossy top layers. It will show how various silica pigments can be utilized in glossy ink receptive coatings, both in cast based glossy media and RC based glossy media. Several novel silica pigments will be examined by relating the physical properties of the pigments and the formula variables to the print quality of the ink jet media.

  13. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 μm) and thick (>30μm) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and γ rays. For x-ray, γ ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs

  14. Influence of hydrochloric acid concentrations on the formation of AgCl-doped iron oxide-silica coreshell structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mahmed, N.; Heczko, Oleg; Hannula, S.-P.

    Zurich: Trans Tech Publications, 2013 - (Vincenzini, P.; Hahn, Y.; Iannotta, S.; Lendlein, A.; Palermo, V.; Paul, S.; Sibilia, C.; Silva, S.; Srinivasan, G.), s. 184-189. (Advances in Science and Technology. 77). ISBN 978-3-908158-63-9. ISSN 1662-0356. [Symposium A on Adaptive, Active and Multifunctional Smart Materials Systems of CIMTEC / International Conference on Smart Materials, Structures and Systems /4./. Montecatini Terme (IT), 10.06.2012-14.06.2012] Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : amorphous silica * magnetic particles * silver chloride * Stöber method Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://www.scientific.net/AST.77.184

  15. Silica-based cationic bilayers as immunoadjuvants

    OpenAIRE

    Carmona-Ribeiro Ana M; da Costa Maria; Faquim-Mauro Eliana; Santana Mariana RA; Lincopan Nilton

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Silica particles cationized by dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer were previously described. This work shows the efficiency of these particulates for antigen adsorption and presentation to the immune system and proves the concept that silica-based cationic bilayers exhibit better performance than alum regarding colloid stability and cellular immune responses for vaccine design. Results Firstly, the silica/DODAB assembly was characterized at 1 mM NaCl, pH 6...

  16. Gemstone silica veins in Kremenjacha volcanic rocks (Serbia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jeshevac volcanic complex located in central Serbia is made up of various Tertiary volcanic rocks. Kremenjacha hill is situated on the SW rim of the Jeshevac volcanic complex. Silica veins found in this site are made up of chalcedony varieties and crystalline quartz. Jasper veins are examined more thoroughly in this paper. Microscopic analysis has shown it is made up of cryptocrystalline silica with fluidal structure. X-ray powder diffraction analysis of the samples has shown crystalline silica-quartz, ruling out the presence of amorphous silica-opal. The results of spectrochemical analysis have indicated the presence of colouring agents originating mostly from ultramafic and mafic rocks. (Author)

  17. Encapsulation of diclofenac sodium within polymer beads by silica species via vapour-phase synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierys, Agnieszka; Kasperek, Regina; Krasucka, Patrycja; Goworek, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    The present study concerns the preparation of ternary composites via the in situ encapsulation of solid dispersion of diclofenac sodium within the acrylic polymer beads. The encapsulating species were produced through the hydrolysis and condensation of the silica precursors (tetraethoxysilane or ethyltriethoxysilane) introduced into the solid dispersion. The transformation of precursors occurred in the vapor phase of ammonia. A great advantage of the presented vapor-phase method is preventing the desorption of the highly soluble drug during gelation of silica precursors, which stands in contrast to the conventional sol-gel processes occurring in the solution. The conducted studies, involving the low temperature N2 sorption together with spectroscopic techniques, provide insight into the structural differences of drug loaded particles. They reveal that the formation of silica gel accompanies the conversion of the drug into its amorphous form. Finally, the desorption profiles of diclofenac sodium demonstrate that the deposition of silica gel successfully diminishes the degree of the initial drug desorption while significantly modifying its release rate. PMID:26925723

  18. Silica Transport and Cementation in Quartz Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pebble, C.; Farver, J.; Onasch, C.; Winslow, D.

    2008-12-01

    Silica transport and cementation in quartz aggregates have been experimentally investigated. Starting materials include a natural quartz arenite (Pocono sandstone), sized clasts of synthetic quartz, and sized grains of disaggregated natural sandstones. Experimental charges consisted of amorphous silica powder (~25 mg), AlCl3 powder (~3 mg), 25 wt% NaCl brine solution (~20 mg), and the starting material (~150 mg). The charges were weld-sealed in gold capsules and run in cold-seal pressure vessels at 300°C to 600°C at 150 MPa confining pressure for up to 4 weeks. Detailed calibrations of the furnaces indicate the maximum temperature variation across the length of the sample charges (3-7mm) was vacuum impregnated with epoxy containing a blue dye and sawn in half along the long axis of the sample charge. The nature and amount of silica transport and cementation in the samples was determined by a combination of Cathodoluminescence (CL), Light Microscopy (LM), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Photomosaics of the samples were collected and the amount of cement, porosity, and average grain sizes were determined by point-counting. The cement was easily recognized from the quartz grains by the difference in luminescence. The experiments indicate that the presence of amorphous silica results in rapid silica cementation in quartz aggregates (e.g., up to 12% cement by volume in 4 weeks at 450°C). The amount of cementation is a function of substrate type, time, temperature, and ionic strength of the brine. The rate of silica transport through the length of the experimental charge appears to be limited by the silica solubility and its rapid depletion by cementation. Although most of the cement was derived from the amorphous silica, evidence for local dissolution-precipitation was observed. The experiments demonstrate that the mobility of silica, and consequent precipitation of cement, does not require a temperature or pressure gradient as is commonly assumed. Rather

  19. Quantification of surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy: the concept of effective amorphous surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Jeffrey; Burnett, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the use of dispersive surface energy in quantifying surface amorphous content, and the concept of effective amorphous surface area is introduced. An equation is introduced employing the linear combination of surface area normalized square root dispersive surface energy terms. This equation is effective in generating calibration curves when crystalline and amorphous references are used. Inverse gas chromatography is used to generate dispersive surface energy values. Two systems are investigated, and in both cases surface energy data collected for physical mixture samples comprised of amorphous and crystalline references fits the predicted response with good accuracy. Surface amorphous content of processed lactose samples is quantified using the calibration curve, and interpreted within the context of effective amorphous surface area. Data for bulk amorphous content is also utilized to generate a thorough picture of how disorder is distributed throughout the particle. An approach to quantifying surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy is presented. Quantification is achieved by equating results to an effective amorphous surface area based on reference crystalline, and amorphous materials. PMID:21725707

  20. Cathodoluminescence microcharacterization of ballen silica in impactites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ballen silica shows fairly weak (faint) CL with homogeneous feature in its grain exhibiting almost same spectral pattern with two broad band peaks at around 390 and 650 nm, which might be assigned to self-trapped excitons (STE) or an intrinsic and nonbridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), respectively, recognized in amorphous and crystalline silica. In addition, ballen silica from Lappajaervi crater shows bright and heterogeneous CL with a broad band centered at around 410 nm, presumably attributed to [AlO4/M+]0 centers or self-trapped excitons (STE). Micro-Raman and micro-XRD analyses show that fairly homogeneous CL part is α-quartz and heterogeneous CL part is composed of α-cristobalite and α-quartz. These indicate that ballen silica could be formed in the quenching process from relatively high temperature.

  1. Nanoparticle-doped radioluminescent silica optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, J.; Nikl, M.; Kasik, I.; Podrazky, O.; Aubrecht, J.; Beitlerova, A.

    2014-05-01

    This contribution deals with the preparation and characterization of the silica optical fibers doped by nanocrystalline zinc silicate. The sol-gel approach was employed to prepare colloidal solution of zinc silicate precursors. Prepared sol was thermally treated to form nanocrystalline zinc silicate disperzed inside amorphous silica matrix or soaked inside the porous silica frit deposed inside the silica substrate tube which was collapsed into preform and drawn into optical fiber. Single mode optical fiber with the core diameter 15 μm and outer diamer 125 μm was prepared. Optical and waveguiding properties of the fiber were analyzed. Concentration of the zinc silicate in the fiber was 0.93 at. %. Radioluminescence properties of nanocrystalline zinc silicate powder and of the prepared optical fiber were investigated. The nanoparticle doped samples appear a emission maximum at 390 nm.

  2. Silica reinforced triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theunissen, E.; Overbergh, N.; Reynaers, H.;

    2004-01-01

    scattering at very low q, but no structure and formfactor information. However, on heating above the viscoelastic to plastic transition, the 'typical' scattering pattern of the copolymer gel builds-up. All reinforced gels are strengthened by the addition of the reinforcing agent. The transitions from a...... viscoclastic rubber to a plastic fluid and from a plastic fluid to a viscoelastic liquid are shifted to more elevated temperatures when silica is added to the triblock copolymer gel. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......The effect of silica and polymer coated silica particles as reinforcing agents on the structural and mechanical properties of polystyrene-poly(ethylene/butylene)-polystyrene (PS-PEB-PS) triblock gel has been investigated. Different types of chemically modified silica have been compared in order to...

  3. Yb2O3-doped YAG nano-crystallites in silica-based core glass matrix of optical fiber preform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yb2O3-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) nano-crystals within the silicate glass-based optical fiber preforms were obtained through the conventional-modified chemical vapour deposition (MCVD) and solution doping technique. Nano-crystals were developed with soaking of the porous phospho-silica or pure silica core layer in a solution containing the ytterbium, yttrium and other co-dopants, including fluorine using 10-15% fluorosilicic acid, and through post-annealing of the preform at a temperature of around 1450 deg. C. The size, shape and nature of Yb2O3-doped phase-separated nano-crystallites were evaluated from HRTEM images along with the electron diffraction pattern based on the doping levels of phosphorous and fluorine. The size of nano-crystallites was maintained within 6-10 nm when doped with 0.25 mole% of fluorine. X-ray analyses EDX data reveals that the nano-particles are rich in Yb:YAG, and uniformly dispersed into the amorphous silica glass matrix. The novelty of this technique involves the direct synthesis of rare-earth doped phase-separated nano-crystallites within the core region of silica glass preforms. This class of fibers containing the nano-particles with or without Yb:YAG crystalline nature will keep the advantage of the mechanical properties as well as good lasing properties under high power application compared to the Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

  4. Influence of phosphate and silica on U(VI) precipitation from acidic and neutralized wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Masakazu; Perdrial, Nicolas; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A

    2014-06-01

    Uranium speciation and physical-chemical characteristics were studied in solids precipitated from synthetic acidic to circumneutral wastewaters in the presence and absence of dissolved silica and phosphate to examine thermodynamic and kinetic controls on phase formation. Composition of synthetic wastewater was based on disposal sites 216-U-8 and 216-U-12 Cribs at the Hanford site (WA, USA). In the absence of dissolved silica or phosphate, crystalline or amorphous uranyl oxide hydrates, either compreignacite or meta-schoepite, precipitated at pH 5 or 7 after 30 d of reaction, in agreement with thermodynamic calculations. In the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica representative of groundwater concentrations, amorphous phases dominated by compreignacite precipitated rapidly at pH 5 or 7 as a metastable phase and formation of poorly crystalline boltwoodite, the thermodynamically stable uranyl silicate phase, was slow. In the presence of phosphate (3 mM), meta-ankoleite initially precipitated as the primary phase at pH 3, 5, or 7 regardless of the presence of 1 mM dissolved silica. Analysis of precipitates by U LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicated that "autunite-type" sheets of meta-ankoleite transformed to "phosphuranylite-type" sheets after 30 d of reaction, probably due to Ca substitution in the structure. Low solubility of uranyl phosphate phases limits dissolved U(VI) concentrations but differences in particle size, crystallinity, and precipitate composition vary with pH and base cation concentration, which will influence the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of these phases. PMID:24754743

  5. Amorphous silicon based betavoltaic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N; Riesen, Y.; Franco, A; S. Dunand; Kind, H.; Schneider, S.; Ballif, C.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon betavoltaic devices are studied both by simulation and experimentally. Devices exhibiting a power density of 0.1 μW/cm2 upon Tritium exposure were fabricated. However, a significant degradation of the performance is taking place, especially during the first hours of the exposure. The degradation behavior differs from sample to sample as well as from published results in the literature. Comparisons with degradation from beta particles suggest an effect of tritium...

  6. Effectiveness of silica based Sol-gel microencapsulation Method for odorants and flavours leading to sustainable Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel; Khan, Ayesha Masood; Sarfraz, Maliha; Ahmad, Mushtaq

    2015-08-01

    Microencapsulation has become a hot topic in chemical research. Technology mainly used for control release and protection purposes. The sol-gel micro encapsulation approach for fragrance and aroma in porous silica-based materials leads to sustainable odorant and flavored materials with novel and unique beneficial properties. Sol-gel encapsulation of silica based micro particles considered economically cheap as capital investment in manufacturing is very low and environmentally friendly. Amorphous sol-gel SiO2 is non-toxic and safe, whereas the sol-gel entrapment of delicate chemicals in its inner pores results in pronounced chemical and physical stabilization of the entrapped actives, thereby broadening the practical utilization of chemically unstable essential oils. Reviewing progress in the fabrication of diverse odorant and flavoured sol-gels, shows us how different synthetic strategies are appropriate for practical application with important health and environmental benefits.

  7. Nuclear relaxation of deuterium--tritium adsorbed onto silica aerogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The longitudinal nuclear relaxation times of tritons in equilibrium deuterium--tritium (eD--T, actually D2--DT--T2 ) adsorbed onto amorphous silica aerogel has been measured from 4.2 to 23 K from 0.5 to 6.2 monolayers of coverage. Below 7 K, the relaxation time dramatically increases with decreasing temperature, especially for low coverages. A value of 16 s for 0.5 monolayer at 4.2 K may be compared with the usual electric quadrupole--quadrupole (EQQ) determined relaxation time of 0.1 s. It is shown that absorption of 10% of the tritium beta particle energy occurs in aerogel fully loaded with D--T. This decreases the concentration of J=1 T2 and increases the nuclear relaxation time. Similar energy absorption calculations in the thin layers shows that long relaxation times are expected, and that the measured values must be caused by spin--lattice relaxation with the aerogel surface. Both (temperature)-7 and exponential mechanisms are considered with no final decision being possible. Electric field gradients from the aerogel walls are considered the likely relaxation mechanism. These findings suggest that a long triton relaxation time may be achievable in ultrapure DT in the silica aerogel. Such a result would be of considerable importance to nuclear polarized inertial confinement fusion targets

  8. Characterization of 13 and 30 $\\mu$m thick hydrogenated amorphous silicon diodes deposited over CMOS integrated circuits for particle detection application

    CERN Document Server

    Despeisse, M; Commichau, S C; Dissertori, G; Garrigos, A; Jarron, P; Miazza, C; Moraes, D; Shah, A; Viertel, G; Wyrsch, N; 10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.022

    2004-01-01

    We present the experimental results obtained with a novel monolithic silicon pixel detector which consists in depositing an n-i-p hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) diode straight above the readout ASIC (this technology is called thin film on ASIC, TFA). The characterization has been performed on 13 and 30 mu m thick a-Si:H films deposited on top of an ASIC containing a linear array of high- speed low-noise transimpedance amplifiers designed in a 0.25 mu m CMOS technology. Experimental results presented have been obtained with a 600 nm pulsed laser. The results of charge collection efficiency and charge collection speed of these structures are discussed.

  9. Facile synthesis and high anode performance of carbon fiber-interwoven amorphous nano-SiOx/graphene for rechargeable lithium batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan Thien; Nguyen, Cao Cuong; Kim, Jong-Seon; Kim, Je Young; Song, Seung-Wan

    2013-11-13

    We present the first report on carbon fiber-interwoven amorphous nano-SiOx/graphene prepared by a simple and facile room temperature synthesis of amorphous SiOx nanoparticles using silica, followed by their homogeneous dispersion with graphene nanosheets and carbon fibers in room temperature aqueous solution. Transmission and scanning electron microscopic imaging reveal that amorphous SiOx primary nanoparticles are 20-30 nm in diameter and carbon fibers are interwoven throughout the secondary particles of 200-300 nm, connecting SiOx nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets. Carbon fiber-interwoven nano-SiO0.37/graphene electrode exhibits impressive cycling performance and rate-capability up to 5C when evaluated as a rechargeable lithium battery anode, delivering discharge capacities of 1579-1263 mAhg(-1) at the C/5 rate with capacity retention of 80% and Coulombic efficiencies of 99% over 50 cycles, and nearly sustained microstructure. The cycling performance is attributed to synergetic effects of amorphous nano-SiOx, strain-tolerant robust microstructure with maintained particle connectivity and enhanced electrical conductivity. PMID:24111701

  10. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  11. Molten salt synthesis of mullite nanowhiskers using different silica sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Yang; Peng-long Qiu; Mei Zhang; Kuo-Chih Chou; Xin-mei Hou; Bai-jun Yan

    2015-01-01

    Mullite nanowhiskers with Al-rich structure were prepared by molten salt synthesis at 1000°C for 3 h in air using silica, amor-phous silica, and ultrafine silica as the silica sources. The phase and morphology of the synthesized products were investigated by X-ray dif-fraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. A thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis was carried out to determine the reaction mechanism. The results reveal that the silica sources play an important role in determining the morphology of the obtained mullite nanowhiskers. Clusters and disordered arrangements are obtained using common silica and amorphous silica, respectively, whereas the use of ultrafine silica leads to highly ordered mullite nanowhiskers that are 80−120 nm in diameter and 20−30μm in length. Considering the growth mechanisms, mullite nanowhiskers in the forms of clusters and highly ordered arrangements can be attributed to heterogeneous nucleation, whereas disordered mullite nanowhiskers are obtained by homogenous nuclea-tion.

  12. Extracting silica from rice husk treated with potassium permanganate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an agro-waste material the rice husk is abundantly available is rice growing areas. In many areas rice husk after burning involves disposal problems because of higher quantities of silica present in it. Rice husk contains about 20 per cent silica, which is present in hydrated amorphous form. On thermal treatment the silica converts into crystobalite, which is a crystalline form of silica. However amorphous silica can be produced under controlled conditions ensuring high reactivity and large surface area. Leaching the rice husk with organic acids and alkalies removes the metallic impurities from its surface. How a dilute solution of potassium permanganate affects the rice husk is the subject of this research paper. The rice husk was treated with the dilute solution of potassium permanganate at room temperature and then analyzed by SEM, TGA and the ash by analytical treatment after burning under controlled temperature. The SEM results revealed that the protuberances of the rice husk were eaten away by the solution of potassium permanganate. Pyrolysis of rice husks showed that the thermal degradation of the treated rice husk was faster than the untreated rice husk where as analytical results confirmed the presence of more amorphous silica than untreated rice husk. (author)

  13. Experimental and numerical evaluation of the permeability of silica sol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The permeability of silica sol to narrow rock fracture and low permeable sand layer was studied by means of laboratory tests and numerical analysis. Parallel plate tests and sand column tests were conducted to evaluate penetrability of silica sol. Particle size distribution tests revealed that the silica sol was comprised of particles which were larger than the aperture of the rock fracture or the void diameter of sand, and clogging may have reduced the penetration length of silica sol. The measured penetration lengths were properly reproduced by the flow analysis which took into account the variations in the viscosity over time and the permeability reduction by clogging of grout particles. (author)

  14. Exoelectron analysis of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekhtyar, Yu. D.; Vinyarskaya, Yu. A.

    1994-04-01

    The method based on registration of photothermostimulated exoelectron emission (PTSE) is used in the proposed new field of investigating the structural defects in amorphous silicon (a-Si). This method can be achieved if the sample under investigation is simultaneously heated and illuminated by ultraviolet light. The mechanism of PTSE from a-Si has been studied in the case of a hydrogenized amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film grown by glow discharge method. The electronic properties and annealing of defects were analyzed in the study. It has been shown from the results that the PTSE from a-Si:H takes place as a prethreshold single-photon external photoeffect. The exoemission spectroscopy of a-Si:H was shown to be capable in the study of thermally and optically stimulated changes in the electronic structure of defects, their annealing, as well as diffusion of atomic particles, such as hydrogen.

  15. Escaping the Tyranny of Carbothermal Reduction: Fumed Silica from Sustainable, Green Sources without First Having to Make SiCl4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Eongyu; Hyde, Clare E; Sun, Kai; Laine, Richard M

    2016-02-12

    Fumed silica is produced in 1000 tons per year quantities by combusting SiCl4 in H2 /O2 flames. Given that both SiCl4 and combustion byproduct HCl are corrosive, toxic and polluting, this route to fumed silica requires extensive safeguards that may be obviated if an alternate route were found. Silica, including rice hull ash (RHA) can be directly depolymerized using hindered diols to generate distillable spirocyclic alkoxysilanes or Si(OEt)4 . We report here the use of liquid-feed flame spray pyrolysis (LF-FSP) to combust the aforementioned precursors to produce fumed silica very similar to SiCl4 -derived products. The resulting powders are amorphous, necked, <50 nm average particle sizes, with specific surface areas (SSAs) of 140-230 m(2)  g(-1) . The LF-FSP approach does not require the containment constraints of the SiCl4 process and given that the RHA silica source is produced in million ton per year quantities worldwide, the reported approach represents a sustainable, green and potentially lower-cost alternative. PMID:26699804

  16. Solubility of fused silica in sub- and supercritical water: Estimation from a thermodynamic model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásek, Pavel; Šťavíková, Lenka; Planeta, Josef; Hohnová, Barbora; Roth, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 83, NOV (2013), s. 72-77. ISSN 0896-8446 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP106/12/0522 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : amorphous silica * fused silica * supercritical water * aqueous solubility Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.571, year: 2013

  17. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M.

    2015-12-01

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O-Si-O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O-O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O-O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies.

  18. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izvekov, Sergei, E-mail: sergiy.izvyekov.civ@mail.mil; Rice, Betsy M. [Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O–Si–O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O–O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O–O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies.

  19. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M

    2015-12-28

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O-Si-O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O-O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O-O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies. PMID:26723691

  20. A new parameter-free soft-core potential for silica and its application to simulation of silica anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A core-softening of the effective interaction between oxygen atoms in water and silica systems and its role in developing anomalous thermodynamic, transport, and structural properties have been extensively debated. For silica, the progress with addressing these issues has been hampered by a lack of effective interaction models with explicit core-softening. In this work, we present an extension of a two-body soft-core interatomic force field for silica recently reported by us [S. Izvekov and B. M. Rice, J. Chem. Phys. 136(13), 134508 (2012)] to include three-body forces. Similar to two-body interaction terms, the three-body terms are derived using parameter-free force-matching of the interactions from ab initio MD simulations of liquid silica. The derived shape of the O–Si–O three-body potential term affirms the existence of repulsion softening between oxygen atoms at short separations. The new model shows a good performance in simulating liquid, amorphous, and crystalline silica. By comparing the soft-core model and a similar model with the soft-core suppressed, we demonstrate that the topology reorganization within the local tetrahedral network and the O–O core-softening are two competitive mechanisms responsible for anomalous thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors observed in liquid and amorphous silica. The studied anomalies include the temperature of density maximum locus and anomalous diffusivity in liquid silica, and irreversible densification of amorphous silica. We show that the O–O core-softened interaction enhances the observed anomalies primarily through two mechanisms: facilitating the defect driven structural rearrangements of the silica tetrahedral network and modifying the tetrahedral ordering induced interactions toward multiple characteristic scales, the feature which underlies the thermodynamic anomalies

  1. Hybrid Polyamide/Silica Nanocomposites : Synthesis and Mechanical Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zyl, Werner E. van; García, Monserrat; Schrauwen, Bernard A.G.; Kooi, Bart J.; Hosson, Jeff Th.M. De; Verweij, Henk

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid inorganic-polymer composite was formed through nanosize silica filler particles (<30 nm) that were incorporated inside a nylon-6 matrix. The composite was microtomed and examined with TEM which revealed that the silica particles were well dispersed and non-aggregated. Optimization of the sy

  2. Hybrid Polyamide/Silica Nanocomposites: Synthesis and Mechanical Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zyl, van Werner E.; Garcia, Monserrat; Schrauwen, Bernard A.G.; Kooi, Bart J.; Hosson, de Jeff Th.M.; Verweij, Henk

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid inorganic-polymer composite was formed through nanosize silica filler particles (< 30 nm) that were incorporated inside a nylon-6 matrix. The composite was microtomed and examined with TEM which revealed that the silica particles were well dispersed and non-aggregated. Optimization of the s

  3. Synthesis of Silica Decorated MWCNTs for Field Emission Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈正瀚; 彭毓航; 林鸿明; 罗吉宗

    2006-01-01

    A novel route to nanocomposites containing surface modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by silica thin film is reported. The effect of chemical oxidation on the surface of MWCNTs by using different acid-treatments is studied.The acidic processes are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetry analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. MWCNTs can be coated homogeneously with silica film by using tetraethoxysilane (TEOS)as a precursor in a sol-gel process. Varying the shell thickness of amorphous silica coating layers on MWCNTs exhibits excellent thermal stability, reliability, and lifetime of field emission properties, especially down to less than 10 nm.

  4. Multiscale Computer Simulation of Tensile and Compressive Strain in Polymer- Coated Silica Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2009-01-01

    While the low thermal conductivities of silica aerogels have made them of interest to the aerospace community as lightweight thermal insulation, the application of conformal polymer coatings to these gels increases their strength significantly, making them potentially useful as structural materials as well. In this work we perform multiscale computer simulations to investigate the tensile and compressive strain behavior of silica and polymer-coated silica aerogels. Aerogels are made up of clusters of interconnected particles of amorphous silica of less than bulk density. We simulate gel nanostructure using a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) procedure, which produces aggregates that exhibit fractal dimensions similar to those observed in real aerogels. We have previously found that model gels obtained via DLCA exhibited stress-strain curves characteristic of the experimentally observed brittle failure. However, the strain energetics near the expected point of failure were not consistent with such failure. This shortcoming may be due to the fact that the DLCA process produces model gels that are lacking in closed-loop substructures, compared with real gels. Our model gels therefore contain an excess of dangling strands, which tend to unravel under tensile strain, producing non-brittle failure. To address this problem, we have incorporated a modification to the DLCA algorithm that specifically produces closed loops in the model gels. We obtain the strain energetics of interparticle connections via atomistic molecular statics, and abstract the collective energy of the atomic bonds into a Morse potential scaled to describe gel particle interactions. Polymer coatings are similarly described. We apply repeated small uniaxial strains to DLCA clusters, and allow relaxation of the center eighty percent of the cluster between strains. The simulations produce energetics and stress-strain curves for looped and nonlooped clusters, for a variety of densities and

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and applications of organic-inorganic hybrid mesoporous silica materials

    OpenAIRE

    Yasmin, Tahira

    2010-01-01

    Silica gels have been the most widely used stationary phase as they are very stable at high pressure, and they yield reproducible separation efficiencies. However, the chromatographic silicas which are commercially available are amorphous, and have low surface area and broad pore size distribution. They also have certain limitations, such as adsorptivity towards basic analytes due to interactions with the silanol groups as well as lack of pH stability. The improvement of the starting silica m...

  6. Characteristic optical properties and synthesis of gold-silica core-shell colloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the synthesis of a gold-silica core-shell colloid that could be a building block for optical instruments such as photonic crystals and plasmonic waveguides. It was possible to directly coat gold nanoparticles with uniform shells of amorphous silica via a simplified process that did not use a silane coupling agent. The thickness of the silica shells could be varied from tens to several hundred nanometers by controlling the precipitation time and concentration of tetraethoxysilane

  7. Nanoporous Silica-Based Protocells at Multiple Scales for Designs of Life and Nanomedicine

    OpenAIRE

    Jie Sun; Eric Jakobsson; Yingxiao Wang; Jeffrey Brinker, C.

    2015-01-01

    Various protocell models have been constructed de novo with the bottom-up approach. Here we describe a silica-based protocell composed of a nanoporous amorphous silica core encapsulated within a lipid bilayer built by self-assembly that provides for independent definition of cell interior and the surface membrane. In this review, we will first describe the essential features of this architecture and then summarize the current development of silica-based protocells at both micro- and nanoscale...

  8. Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped YAG nano-crystallites in silica-based core glass matrix of optical fiber preform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, M.C., E-mail: paulmukul@hotmail.com [Fiber Optics Laboratory, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), CSIR 196, Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata-32 (India); Bysakh, S. [SEM-ESCA Laboratory, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), CSIR 196, Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata-32 (India); Das, S.; Bhadra, S.K.; Pal, M. [Fiber Optics Laboratory, Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CGCRI), CSIR 196, Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata-32 (India); Yoo, S.; Kalita, M.P.; Boyland, A.J.; Sahu, J.K. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-25

    Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) nano-crystals within the silicate glass-based optical fiber preforms were obtained through the conventional-modified chemical vapour deposition (MCVD) and solution doping technique. Nano-crystals were developed with soaking of the porous phospho-silica or pure silica core layer in a solution containing the ytterbium, yttrium and other co-dopants, including fluorine using 10-15% fluorosilicic acid, and through post-annealing of the preform at a temperature of around 1450 deg. C. The size, shape and nature of Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped phase-separated nano-crystallites were evaluated from HRTEM images along with the electron diffraction pattern based on the doping levels of phosphorous and fluorine. The size of nano-crystallites was maintained within 6-10 nm when doped with 0.25 mole% of fluorine. X-ray analyses EDX data reveals that the nano-particles are rich in Yb:YAG, and uniformly dispersed into the amorphous silica glass matrix. The novelty of this technique involves the direct synthesis of rare-earth doped phase-separated nano-crystallites within the core region of silica glass preforms. This class of fibers containing the nano-particles with or without Yb:YAG crystalline nature will keep the advantage of the mechanical properties as well as good lasing properties under high power application compared to the Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

  9. Stimuli-responsive polyaniline coated silica microspheres and their electrorheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dae Eun; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Vu, Cuong Manh

    2016-05-01

    Silica/polyaniline (PANI) core–shell structured microspheres were synthesized by coating the surface of silica micro-beads with PANI and applied as a candidate inorganic/polymer composite electrorheological (ER) material. The silica micro-beads were initially modified using N-[(3-trimethoxysilyl)-propyl] aniline to activate an aniline functional group on the silica surface for a better PANI coating. The morphology of the PANI coating on the silica surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy and the silica/PANI core–shell structure was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The chemical structure of the particles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Rotational rheometry was performed to confirm the difference in the ER properties between pure silica and silica/PANI microsphere-based ER fluids when dispersed in silicone oil.

  10. Corrosion resistant amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publication data on corrosion resistance of amorphous alloys and the methods of amorphization of surface layers of massive materials (laser treatment, iron implantation, detonation-gas spraying, cathode and ion sputtering, electrodeposition) was made. A study was made on corrosion properties of Fe66Cr11B10Si4 alloy in cast state and after laser irradiation, rendering the surface amorphous as well as the samples of Arenco iron and steel 20 with ion-plasma coatings of Fe-Cr-Ni-Ti alloy. It was established that amorphous coatings posses much higher corrosion resistance as compared to crystalline alloys on the same base

  11. A highly efficient nano-Fe3O4 encapsulated-silica particles bearing sulfonic acid groups as a solid acid catalyst for synthesis of 1,8-dioxo-octahydroxanthene derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The functionalization of silica-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2) using chlorosulfonic acid were afforded sulfonic acid-functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2–SO3H) that can be applied as an organic–inorganic hybrid heterogeneous catalyst. The used Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are 18–30 nm sized that was rapidly functionalized and can be used as catalyst in organic synthesis. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, magnetization curve, scanning electron microscope, dynamic laser scattering, and FT-IR measurements. The resulting immobilized catalysts have been successfully used in the synthesis of 1,8‐dioxo-octahydroxanthene derivatives under solvent free condition. This procedure has many advantages such as; a much milder method, a shorter reaction time, a wide range of functional group tolerance, and absence of any tedious workup or purification. Other remarkable features include the catalyst can be reused at least five times without any obvious change in its catalytic activity. This procedure also avoids hazardous reagents/solvents, and thus can be an eco-friendly alternative to the existing methods.Graphical AbstractA highly efficient nano-Fe3O4 encapsulated-silica particles bearing sulfonic acid groups as a solid acid catalyst for synthesis of 1,8-dioxo-octahydroxanthene derivatives

  12. Synthesis of Various Silica Nanoparticles for Foam Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of the non-porous silica nanoparticles with uniform sizes has been reported through the Sto ber method, the synthesis of meso porous silica nanoparticles with a specific morphology such as core-shell, rod-like, and hexagonal shapes is not so common. As a synthetic strategy for controlling the particle size, shape, and porosity, the synthesis of core-shell silicas with meso porous shells formed on silica particle cores through the self-assembly of silica precursor and organic templates or spherical meso porous silicas using modified Sto ber method was also reported. Recently, in an effort to reduce the amount of radioactive waste and enhance the decontamination efficiency during the decontamination process of nuclear facilities contaminated with radionuclides, a few research for the preparation of the decontamination foam containing solid nanoparticles has been reported. In this work, the silica nanoparticles with various sizes, shapes, and structures were synthesized based on the previous literatures. The resulting silica nanoparticles were used to investigate the effect of the nanoparticles on the foam stability. In a study on the foam stability using various silica nanoparticles, the results showed that the foam volume and liquid volume in foam was enhanced when using a smaller size and lower density of the silica nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles with various sizes, shapes, and structures such as a non-porous, meso porous core-shell, and meso porous silica were synthesized to investigate the effect of the foam stability. The sizes and structural properties of the silica nanoparticles were easily controlled by varying the amount of silica precursor, surfactant, and ammonia solution as a basic catalyst. The foam prepared using various silica nanoparticles showed that foam the volume and liquid volume in the foam were enhanced when using a smaller size and lower density of the silica nanoparticles

  13. Synthesis of Various Silica Nanoparticles for Foam Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Bon; Yoon, Inho; Jung, Chonghun; Kim, Chorong; Choi, Wangkyu; Moon, Jeikwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The synthesis of the non-porous silica nanoparticles with uniform sizes has been reported through the Sto ber method, the synthesis of meso porous silica nanoparticles with a specific morphology such as core-shell, rod-like, and hexagonal shapes is not so common. As a synthetic strategy for controlling the particle size, shape, and porosity, the synthesis of core-shell silicas with meso porous shells formed on silica particle cores through the self-assembly of silica precursor and organic templates or spherical meso porous silicas using modified Sto ber method was also reported. Recently, in an effort to reduce the amount of radioactive waste and enhance the decontamination efficiency during the decontamination process of nuclear facilities contaminated with radionuclides, a few research for the preparation of the decontamination foam containing solid nanoparticles has been reported. In this work, the silica nanoparticles with various sizes, shapes, and structures were synthesized based on the previous literatures. The resulting silica nanoparticles were used to investigate the effect of the nanoparticles on the foam stability. In a study on the foam stability using various silica nanoparticles, the results showed that the foam volume and liquid volume in foam was enhanced when using a smaller size and lower density of the silica nanoparticles. Silica nanoparticles with various sizes, shapes, and structures such as a non-porous, meso porous core-shell, and meso porous silica were synthesized to investigate the effect of the foam stability. The sizes and structural properties of the silica nanoparticles were easily controlled by varying the amount of silica precursor, surfactant, and ammonia solution as a basic catalyst. The foam prepared using various silica nanoparticles showed that foam the volume and liquid volume in the foam were enhanced when using a smaller size and lower density of the silica nanoparticles.

  14. FABRICATION AND CHARACTERATION OF NANOPOROUS SILICA FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷明志; 张良莹; 姚熹

    2003-01-01

    Colloidal silica sol is formed by a novel hydrolyzing procedure of tetraethyl-orthosilicate(TEOS) catalyzing with NH3*H2O in aqueous mediums. Glycerol, combining with the hydrolyzed intermediates of TEOS, controls growing of the silica particles; poly(vinyl-vinyl alcohol makes the colloidal silica sol with polymeric structure and spinning, thermal strain makes the gel silica film changed into a nanoporous structure with diameter ranging 50-150 nm. Morphologies of the nanoporous silica film have been characterized; the porosities (%) is 32-64; the average dielectric constant at 1MHz region is 2.0 and 2.1; the thermal conductivity is less than 0.8. Chemical mechanism of the sol-gel process is discussed.

  15. Fabrication of semi-transparent super-hydrophobic surface based on silica hierarchical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study successfully develops a versatile method of producing superhydrophobic surfaces with micro/nano-silica hierarchical structures on glass surfaces. Optically transparent super hydrophobic silica thin films were prepared by spin-coating silica particles suspended in a precursor solution of silane, ethanol, and H2O with molar ratio of 1:4:4. The resulting super hydrophobic films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical transmission, and contact angle measurements. The glass substrates in this study were modified with different particles: micro-silica particles, nano-silica particles, and hierarchical structures. This study includes SEM micrographs of the modified glass surfaces with hierarchical structures at different magnifications

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Nanodroplets on Silica Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambrano, Harvey A; Walther, Jens Honore; Jaffe, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Wetting is essential and ubiquitous in a variety of natural and technological processes.1,2,3 Silicon dioxides-water systems are abundant in nature and play fundamental roles in a vast variety of novel science and engineering activities such as silicon based devices, nanoscale lab on a chip systems...... amorphous silica-water systems....

  17. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  18. Silica Microcapsules Prepared by Interfacial Reaction Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M; Fujiwara; K; Shiokawa; Y; Nakahara

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Silica spherical particles with hollow structure are directly prepared by interfacial reaction methods using W/O/W emulsion (schematic diagram in Fig.1)[1].Fig.1 Silica microcapsule formationThe mixing of W/O emulsion consisting of sodium silicate solution (inner water phase) and n-hexane solution (oil phase) to outer water phase dissolving NH4HCO3 or other salts affords silica microcapsules.The critical feature of this method is the direct formation of hollow structure.Therefore,the core com...

  19. Study of the structure and optical properties of rare-earth-doped aluminate particles prepared by an amorphous citrate sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium aluminate, doped with neodymium and europium ions, was prepared by a citrate polymeric precursor sol-gel method. The influence of the synthesis mixture composition and the thermal treatment parameters on the structure, morphology and optical properties of the material were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance, emission and excitation spectroscopy. The amount of organic component in the precursor had an effect on the crystal structure and the morphology of the material particles. The thermal treatment had no direct influence on the optical properties of material. Polymeric precursors treated at 1000 deg. C gave white aluminate powder, with absorption bands due to the rare earth ions and the host levels. Luminescence from the Eu3+ ion levels gave emission spectra with sharp peak at 611 nm and color purity. Energy transfer was observed from the excited state of the host to the Eu3+ ion levels

  20. Use of silica aerogel in Cherenkov counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silica aerogel has been widely used as a radiator for Cherenkov detectors. The review is devoted to the consideration of various aspects concerning aerogel: its production methods, optical and physical properties, including transparency, absorption, and scattering lengths, the number of photoelectrons and also factors affecting the accuracy of particle identification. The use of silica aerogel in various threshold Cherenkov counters as BELLE (KEK), TASSO (DESY), KEDR (VEPP-4M) is described

  1. Microstructural and chemical variation in silica-rich precipitates at the Hellisheiði geothermal power plant

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Meier; Einar Gunnlaugsson; Ingvi Gunnarsson; Björn Jamtveit; Caroline L. Peacock; Liane G. Benning

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation of amorphous silica (SiO2) in geothermal power plants, although a common factor limiting the efficiency of geothermal energy production, is poorly understood and no universally applicable mitigation strategy to prevent or reduce precipitation is available. This is primarily due to the lack of understanding of the precipitation mechanism of amorphous silica in geothermal systems. In the present study data are presented about microstructures and compositions of precipitates fo...

  2. Mesoporous silica-coated NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} particles for drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong Deyan; Fan Yong; Zhang Cuimiao; Lin Jun, E-mail: jlin@ciac.jl.c [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry (China)

    2010-02-15

    NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} nanoparticles were successfully prepared by a polyol process using diethyleneglycol (DEG) as solvent. These NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} nanoparticles can be coated with mesoporous silica using nonionic triblock copolymer EO{sub 20}PO{sub 70}EO{sub 20} (P 123) as structure-directing agent and other materials. The composites can load ibuprofen and release the drug in the phosphate buffer solution (PBS). The composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nitrogen absorption/desorption isotherms, fluorescence spectra, and UV/Vis absorption spectra, respectively. The composites have the mesoporous structure. In addition, the composites emit red fluorescence (from Er{sup 3+}) under 980 nm near infrared laser excitation, which can be used as fluorescent probes in the drug-delivery system.

  3. Selective elimination of the free fatty acid fraction from esterified fatty acids in rat plasma through chemical derivatization and immobilization on amino functionalized silica nano-particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Lyu, Qiang; Yang, Mingqing; Chen, Zhi; He, Junhui

    2016-01-29

    A high throughput and low cost approach to separate free fatty acids (FFAs) from phospholipid and acylglycerols (esterified fatty acids, EFAs) has been demonstrated, which may be widely used as a sample preparation method in the metabolomics and lipid research. The optimal conditions for FFAs reacting with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) only need 10min at room temperature to obtain a 93.5% yield of FFAs-NHS ester. The rest 6% FFA transformed into N-cyclohexyl-fatty acid-amide which is stable to methyl esterification adopted for fatty acids analysis. 10min are taken for FFAs-NHS ester to react with amino functionalized silica nanoparticles to immobilize the FFAs. The separation of FFAs from EFAs could be carried out readily by centrifugation. The whole process including derivatization, immobilization, and centrifugation takes less than 40min. Much more accurate fatty acids composition of rat plasma EFAs could be obtained by this approach than the previous reported methods. PMID:26774120

  4. Facile synthesis of hollow silica nanospheres employing anionic PMANa templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yan; Takai, Chika; Shirai, Takashi; Fuji, Masayoshi, E-mail: fuji@nitech.ac.jp [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Advanced Ceramic Research Center (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    This article presents a facile and green route to the synthesis of hollow silica particles by means of anionic particles of poly(sodium methacrylate) (PMANa) as templates. This method was composed of the following three steps: formation of PMANa particles in ethanol by nanoprecipitation, the deposition of silica shell on the polymer cores through sol–gel process of tetraethylorthosilicate under catalysis of ammonia, and removal of the polymer templates by washing with water. The templates’ size can be controlled in the range of about 70–140 nm by altering the ratio of ethanol to water, the polymer solution concentration, the ethanol amount in polymer solution, and the silica shell thickness can be adjusted between 15 and 30 nm by varying the ratio of silica precursor to the polymer cores. A tentative interpretation about the silica-coating process on the anionic PMANa particles was also proposed according to the experimental results.

  5. Facile synthesis of hollow silica nanospheres employing anionic PMANa templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a facile and green route to the synthesis of hollow silica particles by means of anionic particles of poly(sodium methacrylate) (PMANa) as templates. This method was composed of the following three steps: formation of PMANa particles in ethanol by nanoprecipitation, the deposition of silica shell on the polymer cores through sol–gel process of tetraethylorthosilicate under catalysis of ammonia, and removal of the polymer templates by washing with water. The templates’ size can be controlled in the range of about 70–140 nm by altering the ratio of ethanol to water, the polymer solution concentration, the ethanol amount in polymer solution, and the silica shell thickness can be adjusted between 15 and 30 nm by varying the ratio of silica precursor to the polymer cores. A tentative interpretation about the silica-coating process on the anionic PMANa particles was also proposed according to the experimental results

  6. Shape matters when engineering mesoporous silica-based nanomedicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nanjing; Li, Laifeng; Tang, Fangqiong

    2016-04-22

    Mesoporous silica nanomaterials have been successfully employed in the development of novel carriers for drug delivery. Numerous studies have been reported on engineering mesoporous silica-based carriers for drug loading, release, cellular uptake, and biocompatibility. A number of design parameters that govern the in vitro and in vivo performance of the carriers, including particle diameter, surface chemistry, and pore size, have been tuned to optimize nanomedicine efficacy. However, particle shape, which may generate a high impact on nanomedicine performance, has still not been thoroughly investigated. This is probably due to the limited availability of strategies and techniques to produce non-spherical mesoporous silica nanomaterials. Recent breakthroughs in controlling the particle shape of mesoporous silica nanomaterials have confirmed the important roles of shape on nanomedicine development. This review article introduces various fabrication methods for non-spherical mesoporous silica nanomaterials, including rod, ellipsoid, film, platelet/sheet, and cube, and the roles of particle shape in nanomedicine applications. PMID:26818852

  7. Micro Fluidic Channel Machining on Fused Silica Glass Using Powder Blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Sam Park

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, micro fluid channels are machined on fused silica glass via powder blasting, a mechanical etching process, and the machining characteristics of the channels are experimentally evaluated. In the process, material removal is performed by the collision of micro abrasives injected by highly compressed air on to the target surface. This approach can be characterized as an integration of brittle mode machining based on micro crack propagation. Fused silica glass, a high purity synthetic amorphous silicon dioxide, is selected as a workpiece material. It has a very low thermal expansion coefficient and excellent optical qualities and exceptional transmittance over a wide spectral range, especially in the ultraviolet range. The powder blasting process parameters affecting the machined results are injection pressure, abrasive particle size and density, stand-off distance, number of nozzle scanning, and shape/size of the required patterns. In this study, the influence of the number of nozzle scanning, abrasive particle size, and pattern size on the formation of micro channels is investigated. Machined shapes and surface roughness are measured using a 3-dimensional vision profiler and the results are discussed.

  8. Linear low-density polyethylene/silica micro- and nanocomposites: dynamic rheological measurements and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE based composites were prepared by melt compounding with 1, 2, 3 and 4 vol% of various kinds of amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2 micro- and nanoparticles. Dynamic rheological tests in parallel plate configuration were conducted in order to detect the role of the filler morphology on the rheological behaviour of the resulting micro- and nanocomposites. A strong dependence of the rheological parameters from the filler surface area was highlighted, with a remarkable enhancement of the storage shear modulus (G′ and of the viscosity (η in fumed silica nanocomposites and in precipitated silica microcomposites, while glass microbeads only marginally affected the rheological properties of the LLDPE matrix. This result was explained considering the formation of a network structure arising from particle-particle interactions due to hydrogen bonding between silanol groups. A detailed analysis of the solid like behaviour for the filled samples at low frequencies was conducted by fitting viscosity data with a new model, based on a modification of the original De Kee-Turcotte expression performed in order to reach a better modelling of the high-frequency region.

  9. Synthesis and Characterizations of Fine Silica Powder from Rice Husk Ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The silica content of rice husk ash obtained from the uncontrolled burning temperature of gasifier was 90.4%. The obtained rice husk ash was an amorphous form of silica with low crystallization by XRD. The sodium hydroxide solution, 1.5N, 2N, 2.5N and 3N, respectively was used to prepare sodium silicate solution by extraction method. The product silica was produced by acid precipitation method used 4.5N, 5.5N and 6.5N sulphuric acid solution. The highest yield percent of product silica extraced by 2.5N sodium hydroxide solution at 5N sulphuric acid solution was 88.84%. The crystallize size of product silica containing silicalite as a source of silica was 86nm at this condition. The fine silica powder was produced by acid refluxing mothod used 5.5N, 6N and 6.5N hydrochloric acid solution. 98% of pure fine silica powder can be produced from the product silica by refluxing method. The crystallize size of fine silica powder was 54nm. The distribution of the crystallize size of product silica powder could be found uniform in size and agglomeration. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra indicate the hydrogen bonded silinol groups and siloxane groups in product silica and fine silica powder.

  10. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co......-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in...... studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from...

  11. Behaviour of 29Si NMR and infrared spectra of aqueous sodium and potassium silica solutions as a function of (SiO2/M2+O) ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium and potassium solutions of silica with silica concentration of 1,4 mo/kg and Rms = SiO2/M+2O ratios of 4.56 to 1.6 were obtained by depolymerization of amorphous silica gel in sodium and potassium hydroxide. Solutions have been characterized by 29Si NMR and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that Na+ and K+ exhibit the same behaviour during the depolymerization of silica. (authors). 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Amorphous silicon thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon glass resistance thermometers (CGRT) shows an unstable drift by heat cycles. Since we were looking for a more stable element of thermometer for cryogenic and high magnetic field environments, we selected amorphous silicon as a substitute for CGRT. The resistance of many amorphous samples were measured at 4K, at 77K, and 300K. We eventually found an amorphous silicon (Si-H) alloy whose the sensitivity below 77K was comparable to that of the germanium resistance thermometer with little magnetic field influence. (author)

  13. Characterization of sulfonated silica nanocomposite electrolyte membranes for fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deuk-Ju; Nam, Sang-Yong

    2014-12-01

    Sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (SPAES) and sulfonated silica (silica-SO3H) prepared via sol-gel reaction are used as an organic polymer matrix and inorganic nanoparticles. The contents of the silica-SO3H particles in the composite membranes are controlled at 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 wt.% in order to evaluate the appropriate content for high proton conductivity. Randomly dispersed silica particles are obtained from all composite membranes as a result of the hydrophilic domains in the polymer and silica-SO3H. In this study, the optimum silica-SO3H content for high proton conductivity is 3 wt.% in fully hydrated conditions and 0.5 wt.% in low humidity conditions. PMID:25970990