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Sample records for amorphous selenium flat-panel

  1. Amorphous selenium flat panel detectors for digital mammography: validation of a NPWE model observer with CDMAM observer performance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segui, Jennifer A; Zhao, Wei

    2006-10-01

    Model observers have been developed which incorporate a specific imaging task, system performance, and human observer characteristics and can potentially overcome some of the limitations in using detective quantum efficiency for optimization and comparison of detectors. In this paper, a modified nonprewhitening matched filter (NPWE) model observer was developed and validated to predict object detectability for an amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct flat-panel imager (FPI) where aliasing is severe. A preclinical a-Se digital mammography FPI with 85 microm pixel size was used in this investigation. Its physical imaging properties including modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, and DQE were fully characterized. An observer performance study was conducted by imaging the CDMAM 3.4 contrast-detail phantom designed specifically for digital mammography and presenting these images to a panel of seven observers. X-ray attenuation and scatter due to the phantom were determined experimentally for use in development of the model observer. The observer study results were analyzed via threshold averaging and signal detection theory (SDT) based techniques to produce contrast-detail curves where threshold contrast is plotted as a function of disk diameter. Validity of the model was established using SDT analysis of the experimental data. The effect of aliasing on the detectability of small diameter disks was determined using the NPWE model observer. The signal spectrum was calculated using the presampling MTF of the detector with and without including the aliased terms. Our results indicate that the NPWE model based on Fourier domain parameters provides reasonable prediction of object detectability for the signal-known-exactly task in uniform image noise for a-Se direct FPI. PMID:17089837

  2. Amorphous selenium flat panel detectors for digital mammography: Validation of a NPWE model observer with CDMAM observer performance experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Model observers have been developed which incorporate a specific imaging task, system performance, and human observer characteristics and can potentially overcome some of the limitations in using detective quantum efficiency for optimization and comparison of detectors. In this paper, a modified nonprewhitening matched filter (NPWE) model observer was developed and validated to predict object detectability for an amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct flat-panel imager (FPI) where aliasing is severe. A preclinical a-Se digital mammography FPI with 85 μm pixel size was used in this investigation. Its physical imaging properties including modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum, and DQE were fully characterized. An observer performance study was conducted by imaging the CDMAM 3.4 contrast-detail phantom designed specifically for digital mammography and presenting these images to a panel of seven observers. X-ray attenuation and scatter due to the phantom were determined experimentally for use in development of the model observer. The observer study results were analyzed via threshold averaging and signal detection theory (SDT) based techniques to produce contrast-detail curves where threshold contrast is plotted as a function of disk diameter. Validity of the model was established using SDT analysis of the experimental data. The effect of aliasing on the detectability of small diameter disks was determined using the NPWE model observer. The signal spectrum was calculated using the presampling MTF of the detector with and without including the aliased terms. Our results indicate that the NPWE model based on Fourier domain parameters provides reasonable prediction of object detectability for the signal-known-exactly task in uniform image noise for a-Se direct FPI

  3. Single-layer and dual-layer contrast-enhanced mammography using amorphous selenium flat panel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allec, N.; Abbaszadeh, S.; Karim, K. S.

    2011-09-01

    The accumulation of injected contrast agents allows the image enhancement of lesions through the use of contrast-enhanced mammography. In this technique, the combination of two acquired images is used to create an enhanced image. There exist several methods to acquire the images to be combined, which include dual energy subtraction using a single detection layer that suffers from motion artifacts due to patient motion between image acquisition. To mitigate motion artifacts, a detector composed of two layers may be used to simultaneously acquire the low and high energy images. In this work, we evaluate both of these methods using amorphous selenium as the detection material to find the system parameters (tube voltage, filtration, photoconductor thickness and relative intensity ratio) leading to the optimal performance. We then compare the performance of the two detectors under the variation of contrast agent concentration, tumor size and dose. The detectability was found to be most comparable at the lower end of the evaluated factors. The single-layer detector not only led to better contrast, due to its greater spectral separation capabilities, but also had lower quantum noise. The single-layer detector was found to have a greater detectability by a factor of 2.4 for a 2.5 mm radius tumor having a contrast agent concentration of 1.5 mg ml-1 in a 4.5 cm thick 50% glandular breast. The inclusion of motion artifacts in the comparison is part of ongoing research efforts.

  4. Single-layer and dual-layer contrast-enhanced mammography using amorphous selenium flat panel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of injected contrast agents allows the image enhancement of lesions through the use of contrast-enhanced mammography. In this technique, the combination of two acquired images is used to create an enhanced image. There exist several methods to acquire the images to be combined, which include dual energy subtraction using a single detection layer that suffers from motion artifacts due to patient motion between image acquisition. To mitigate motion artifacts, a detector composed of two layers may be used to simultaneously acquire the low and high energy images. In this work, we evaluate both of these methods using amorphous selenium as the detection material to find the system parameters (tube voltage, filtration, photoconductor thickness and relative intensity ratio) leading to the optimal performance. We then compare the performance of the two detectors under the variation of contrast agent concentration, tumor size and dose. The detectability was found to be most comparable at the lower end of the evaluated factors. The single-layer detector not only led to better contrast, due to its greater spectral separation capabilities, but also had lower quantum noise. The single-layer detector was found to have a greater detectability by a factor of 2.4 for a 2.5 mm radius tumor having a contrast agent concentration of 1.5 mg ml-1 in a 4.5 cm thick 50% glandular breast. The inclusion of motion artifacts in the comparison is part of ongoing research efforts.

  5. Single-layer and dual-layer contrast-enhanced mammography using amorphous selenium flat panel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allec, N; Abbaszadeh, S; Karim, K S, E-mail: nallec@uwaterloo.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2011-09-21

    The accumulation of injected contrast agents allows the image enhancement of lesions through the use of contrast-enhanced mammography. In this technique, the combination of two acquired images is used to create an enhanced image. There exist several methods to acquire the images to be combined, which include dual energy subtraction using a single detection layer that suffers from motion artifacts due to patient motion between image acquisition. To mitigate motion artifacts, a detector composed of two layers may be used to simultaneously acquire the low and high energy images. In this work, we evaluate both of these methods using amorphous selenium as the detection material to find the system parameters (tube voltage, filtration, photoconductor thickness and relative intensity ratio) leading to the optimal performance. We then compare the performance of the two detectors under the variation of contrast agent concentration, tumor size and dose. The detectability was found to be most comparable at the lower end of the evaluated factors. The single-layer detector not only led to better contrast, due to its greater spectral separation capabilities, but also had lower quantum noise. The single-layer detector was found to have a greater detectability by a factor of 2.4 for a 2.5 mm radius tumor having a contrast agent concentration of 1.5 mg ml{sup -1} in a 4.5 cm thick 50% glandular breast. The inclusion of motion artifacts in the comparison is part of ongoing research efforts.

  6. The x-ray time of flight method for investigation of ghosting in amorphous selenium-based flat panel medical x-ray imagers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based real-time flat-panel imagers (FPIs) are finding their way into the digital radiology department because they offer the practical advantages of digital x-ray imaging combined with an image quality that equals or outperforms that of conventional systems. The temporal imaging characteristics of FPIs can be affected by ghosting (i.e., radiation-induced changes of sensitivity) when the dose to the detector is high (e.g., portal imaging and mammography) or the images are acquired at a high frame rate (e.g., fluoroscopy). In this paper, the x-ray time-of-flight (TOF) method is introduced as a tool for the investigation of ghosting in a-Se photoconductor layers. The method consists of irradiating layers of a-Se with short x-ray pulses. From the current generated in the a-Se layer, ghosting is quantified and the ghosting parameters (charge carrier generation rate and carrier lifetimes and mobilities) are assessed. The x-ray TOF method is novel in that (1) x-ray sensitivity (S) and ghosting parameters can be measured simultaneously (2) the transport of both holes and electrons can be isolated, and (3) the method is applicable to the practical a-Se layer structure with blocking contacts used in FPIs. The x-ray TOF method was applied to an analysis of ghosting in a-Se photoconductor layers under portal imaging conditions, i.e., 1 mm thick a-Se layers, biased at 5 V/μm, were irradiated using a 6 MV LINAC x-ray beam to a total dose (ghosting dose) of 30 Gy. The initial sensitivity (S0) of the a-Se layers was 63±2 nC cm-2 cGy-1. It was found that S decreases to 30% of S0 after a ghosting dose of 5 Gy and to 21% after 30 Gy at which point no further change in S occurs. At an x-ray intensity of 22 Gy/s (instantaneous dose rate during a LINAC x-ray pulse), the charge carrier generation rate was 1.25±0.1x1022 ehp m-3 s-1 and, to a first approximation, independent of the ghosting dose. However, both hole and electron transport showed a strong

  7. TU-F-18C-02: Increasing Amorphous Selenium Thickness in Direct Conversion Flat-Panel Imagers for Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaduto, DA; Hu, Y-H; Zhao, W [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging using iodinated contrast agents requires imaging with x-ray spectra at energies greater than those used in mammography. Optimizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) flat panel imagers (FPI) for this higher energy range may increase lesion conspicuity. Methods: We compare imaging performance of a conventional FPI with 200 μm a-Se conversion layer to a prototype FPI with 300 μm a-Se layer. Both detectors are evaluated in a Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration prototype digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) system using low-energy (W/Rh 28 kVp) and high-energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) x-ray spectra. Detectability of iodinated lesions in dual-energy images is evaluated using an iodine contrast phantom. Effects of beam obliquity are investigated in projection and reconstructed images using different reconstruction methods. The ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio is used as a figure-of-merit to predict the optimal a-Se thickness for CE lesion detectability without compromising conventional full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and DBT performance. Results: Increasing a-Se thickness from 200 μm to 300 μm preserves imaging performance at typical mammographic energies (e.g. W/Rh 28 kVp), and improves the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) for high energy (W/Cu 49 kVp) by 30%. While the more penetrating high-energy x-ray photons increase geometric blur due to beam obliquity in the FPI with thicker a-Se layer, the effect on lesion detectability in FBP reconstructions is negligible due to the reconstruction filters employed. Ideal observer SNR for CE objects shows improvements in in-plane detectability with increasing a-Se thicknesses, though small lesion detectability begins to degrade in oblique projections for a-Se thickness above 500 μm. Conclusion: Increasing a-Se thickness in direct conversion FPI from 200 μm to 300 μm improves lesion detectability in CE breast imaging with virtually no cost to conventional FFDM and DBT. This work was partially

  8. Synchrotron applications of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A GE Revolution 41RT flat-panel detector (GE 41RT) from GE Healthcare (GE) has been in operation at the Advanced Photon Source for over two years. The detector has an active area of 41 cm x 41 cm with 200 (micro)m x 200 (micro)m pixel size. The nominal working photon energy is around 80 keV. The physical set-up and utility software of the detector system are discussed in this article. The linearity of the detector response was measured at 80.7 keV. The memory effect of the detector element, called lag, was also measured at different exposure times and gain settings. The modulation transfer function was measured in terms of the line-spread function using a 25 (micro)m x 1 cm tungsten slit. The background (dark) signal, the signal that the detector will carry without exposure to X-rays, was measured at three different gain settings and with exposure times of 1 ms to 15 s. The radial geometric flatness of the sensor panel was measured using the diffraction pattern from a CeO2 powder standard. The large active area and fast data-capturing rate, i.e. 8 frames s-1 in radiography mode, 30 frames s-1 in fluoroscopy mode, make the GE 41RT one of a kind and very versatile in synchrotron diffraction. The loading behavior of a Cu/Nb multilayer material is used to demonstrate the use of the detector in a strain-stress experiment. Data from the measurement of various samples, amorphous SiO2 in particular, are presented to show the detector effectiveness in pair distribution function measurements

  9. Amorphous and Polycrystalline Photoconductors for Direct Conversion Flat Panel X-Ray Image Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim S. Karim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last ten to fifteen years there has been much research in using amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors as x-ray photoconductors in various x-ray image sensor applications, most notably in flat panel x-ray imagers (FPXIs. We first outline the essential requirements for an ideal large area photoconductor for use in a FPXI, and discuss how some of the current amorphous and polycrystalline semiconductors fulfill these requirements. At present, only stabilized amorphous selenium (doped and alloyed a-Se has been commercialized, and FPXIs based on a-Se are particularly suitable for mammography, operating at the ideal limit of high detective quantum efficiency (DQE. Further, these FPXIs can also be used in real-time, and have already been used in such applications as tomosynthesis. We discuss some of the important attributes of amorphous and polycrystalline x-ray photoconductors such as their large area deposition ability, charge collection efficiency, x-ray sensitivity, DQE, modulation transfer function (MTF and the importance of the dark current. We show the importance of charge trapping in limiting not only the sensitivity but also the resolution of these detectors. Limitations on the maximum acceptable dark current and the corresponding charge collection efficiency jointly impose a practical constraint that many photoconductors fail to satisfy. We discuss the case of a-Se in which the dark current was brought down by three orders of magnitude by the use of special blocking layers to satisfy the dark current constraint. There are also a number of polycrystalline photoconductors, HgI2 and PbO being good examples, that show potential for commercialization in the same way that multilayer stabilized a-Se x-ray photoconductors were developed for commercial applications. We highlight the unique nature of avalanche multiplication in a-Se and how it has led to the development of the commercial HARP video-tube. An all solid state version of the

  10. Investigation of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector for ion radiography

    OpenAIRE

    Telsemeyer, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Using heavy ions in radiotherapy offers a good potential for targeted radiation of tumors and the ability to spare healthy tissue. Their characteristic interaction with matter holds the potential to employ ions for high-contrast radiographic imaging at a decreased dose in comparison to conventional X-ray imaging; however, it lacks simple detectors suitable for this purpose. In this study the performance of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, originally designed for photon imaging, was i...

  11. Characterization of an amorphous silicon flat panel for controlling the positioning accuracy of sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has established a method for measuring the position of the blades in a multi leaf collimator (MLC) used to measure dose portal imaging device (EPID) of amorphous silicon, and verified its accuracy using radiochromic films and measures water with diode Cuba, techniques perfectly well validated in our institution. This dose profiles are studied for each sheet and determine their position at the point which has 50% of the dose in the open field.

  12. 非晶硒平板探测器DR与CR模拟病变描述和剂量降低的对比研究%Amorphous selenium flat-panel detector digital radiography versus computed radiography: phantom study of depiction of simulated lesion and dose reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾勇明; 吴富荣; 张志伟; 欧阳羽; 谭秀洪; 金瑞

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare an amorphous selenium fiat-panel detector digital radiography(DR) with a computed radiography(CR) for the depiction of simulated pulmonary lesion,as well as for evaluation of dose reduction.Methods Simulated linear,reticular,and nodular lesion were located in all anthropomorphic chest phantom.The phantom was exposed by DR and CR with different mAs sets.The entrance surface doses were recorded for all images.Hard copy images were generated at different dose levels.Images were presented in a random order to four independent radiologists.They subjectively rated the visibility of simulated pulmonary lesion. Statistical significance of difference was analvsed with wilcoxon test.Resuits The visibility of simulated linear and reticular lesions on the images obtained with DR was superior to the images from CR at 2.0 and 3.2 mAs.P 0.05).DR was superior to CR in detection sinail nodular(diameter0.05).2.0、3.2、5.0、6.3 mAs曝光档,对于小结节(直径小于10 mm)的检测DR均优于CR(Z:-2.237,P=0.018;Z=-2.384,P=0.017;Z=-2.388,P=0.017;Z=-2.366,P=0.018).当3种模拟肺部病变都显示清楚时.用非晶硒DR系统的入射体表剂量降低约65%.结论 对微小低对比病变的描述,非晶硒平板探测器DR优于CR且明显地降低曝光剂晕.

  13. Performance of a 41x41 cm2 amorphous silicon flat panel x-ray detector designed for angiographic and R and F imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured the physical imaging performance of a 41x41 cm2 amorphous silicon flat panel detector designed for angiographic and R and F imaging applications using methods from the emerging IEC standard for the measurement of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) in digital radiographic detectors. Measurements on 12 production detectors demonstrate consistent performance. The mean DQE at the detector center is about 0.77 at zero frequency and 0.27 at the Nyquist frequency (2.5 cycles/mm) when measured with a 7 mm of Al HVL spectrum at about 3.6 μGy. The mean MTF at the center of the detector for this spectrum is 0.24 at the Nyquist frequency. For radiographic operation all 2048x2048 detector elements are read out individually. For fluoroscopy, the detector operates in two 30 frame per second modes: either the center 1024x1024 detector elements are read out or the entire detector is read out with 2x2 pixel binning. A model was developed to predict differences in performance between the modes, and measurements demonstrate agreement with the model. Lag was measured using a quasi-equilibrium exposure method and was found to be 0.044 in the first frame and less than 0.007 after 1 s. We demonstrated that it is possible to use the lag data to correct for temporal correlation in images when measuring DQE with a fluoroscopic imaging technique. Measurements as a function of position on the detector demonstrate a high degree of uniformity. We also characterized dependences on spectrum, exposure level, and direction. Finally, we measured the DQE of a current state of the art image intensifier/CCD system using the same method as for the flat panel. We found the image intensifier system to have lower DQE than the flat panel at high exposure levels and approximately equivalent DQE at fluoroscopic levels

  14. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...

  15. The x-ray sensitivity of amorphous selenium for mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the x-ray sensitivity of amorphous selenium (a-Se) for digital mammography has been performed. A uniform layer of a-Se was deposited on a glass substrate with electrodes on both surfaces. The deposition procedure was identical to that used for a-Se flat-panel detectors. A high voltage was applied to the top surface of the a-Se layer in order to establish an electric field ESe. Then the sample was exposed to x rays with 27 kVp spectra generated from an x-ray tube with a molybdenum (Mo) target. The mean x-ray energy of the spectrum used was ∼16.6 keV. The x-ray current generated by the a-Se layer was measured as a function of ESe. From the current measurement and the estimation of total x-ray energy absorbed in the a-Se, the energy required to create one electron-hole pair (EHP), W, was determined as a function of ESe. It was found that at the most commonly used ESe of 10 V/μm, W was measured as 64 eV. This is considerably higher than the widely accepted typical value of W=50 eV measured at higher x-ray photon energies (e.g., 50 keV). The dependence of W as a function of ESe can be best fitted using the empirical expression of ESe-γ. This relationship is consistent with the results obtained at higher x-ray energies. This article provides an accurate measurement of x-ray sensitivity of a-Se at mammographic energies independent of detector operation, such as the most recently developed flat-panel detectors. The results will be a useful tool for investigation and optimization of a-Se-based x-ray imaging detectors, such as determination of pixel fill-factor and optimal ESe during operation

  16. The x-ray sensitivity of amorphous selenium for mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mary F; Zhao, Wei; Jacak, Barbara V; O'Connor, Paul; Yu, Bo; Rehak, Pavel

    2002-03-01

    A study of the x-ray sensitivity of amorphous selenium (a-Se) for digital mammography has been performed. A uniform layer of a-Se was deposited on a glass substrate with electrodes on both surfaces. The deposition procedure was identical to that used for a-Se flat-panel detectors. A high voltage was applied to the top surface of the a-Se layer in order to establish an electric field E(Se). Then the sample was exposed to x rays with 27 kVp spectra generated from an x-ray tube with a molybdenum (Mo) target. The mean x-ray energy of the spectrum used was approximately 16.6 keV. The x-ray current generated by the a-Se layer was measured as a function of E(Se). From the current measurement and the estimation of total x-ray energy absorbed in the a-Se, the energy required to create one electron-hole pair (EHP), W, was determined as a function of E(Se). It was found that at the most commonly used E(Se) of 10 V/microm, W was measured as 64 eV. This is considerably higher than the widely accepted typical value of W = 50 eV measured at higher x-ray photon energies (e.g., 50 keV). The dependence of W as a function of E(Se) can be best fitted using the empirical expression of E(Se)-gamma. This relationship is consistent with the results obtained at higher x-ray energies. This article provides an accurate measurement of x-ray sensitivity of a-Se at mammographic energies independent of detector operation, such as the most recently developed flat-panel detectors. The results will be a useful tool for investigation and optimization of a-Se-based x-ray imaging detectors, such as determination of pixel fill-factor and optimal E(Se) during operation. PMID:11929014

  17. Development of an Amorphous Selenium-Based Photodetector Driven by a Diamond Cold Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Shimosawa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous-selenium (a-Se based photodetectors are promising candidates for imaging devices, due to their high spatial resolution and response speed, as well as extremely high sensitivity enhanced by an internal carrier multiplication. In addition, a-Se is reported to show sensitivity against wide variety of wavelengths, including visible, UV and X-ray, where a-Se based flat-panel X-ray detector was proposed. In order to develop an ultra high-sensitivity photodetector with a wide detectable wavelength range, a photodetector was fabricated using a-Se photoconductor and a nitrogen-doped diamond cold cathode. In the study, a prototype photodetector has been developed, and its response to visible and ultraviolet light are characterized.

  18. Large-area solid state detector for radiology using amorphous selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Rowlands, John A.

    1992-06-01

    A large area self-scanned solid-state detector is being developed for digital radiology. It consists of an x-ray sensitive flat-panel employing amorphous selenium ((alpha) )-Se) as the x- ray transducer and active matrix integrated circuit for readout. In principle such detectors could be used for all the currently applied radiological modalities -- radiography, photofluorography, and fluoroscopy. Layers of (alpha) )-Se up to 500 micrometers thick are readout with an array of thin film field effect transistors. The whole structure is integrated onto a glass plate. For all practical purposes the resolution of the system is dictated by the pixel size and readout could be in real-time (i.e., 30 frames/sec).

  19. Dose reduction in skeletal and chest radiography using a large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide: technical background, basic image quality parameters, and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two most frequently performed diagnostic X-ray examinations are those of the extremities and of the chest. Thus, dose reduction in the field of conventional skeletal and chest radiography is an important issue and there is a need to reduce man-made ionizing radiation. The large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide provides a significant reduction of radiation dose in skeletal and chest radiography compared with traditional imaging systems. This article describes the technical background and basic image quality parameters of this 43 x 43-cm digital system, and summarizes the available literature (years 2000-2003) concerning dose reduction in experimental and clinical studies. Due to its high detective quantum efficiency and dynamic range compared with traditional screen-film systems, a dose reduction of up to 50% is possible without loss of image quality. (orig.)

  20. Dose reduction in skeletal and chest radiography using a large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide: technical background, basic image quality parameters, and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voelk, Markus; Hamer, Okka W.; Feuerbach, Stefan [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053, Regensburg (Germany); Strotzer, Michael [Department of Radiology, Hospital Hohe Warte, Hohe Warte 8, 95445, Bayreuth (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    The two most frequently performed diagnostic X-ray examinations are those of the extremities and of the chest. Thus, dose reduction in the field of conventional skeletal and chest radiography is an important issue and there is a need to reduce man-made ionizing radiation. The large-area flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon and thallium-doped cesium iodide provides a significant reduction of radiation dose in skeletal and chest radiography compared with traditional imaging systems. This article describes the technical background and basic image quality parameters of this 43 x 43-cm digital system, and summarizes the available literature (years 2000-2003) concerning dose reduction in experimental and clinical studies. Due to its high detective quantum efficiency and dynamic range compared with traditional screen-film systems, a dose reduction of up to 50% is possible without loss of image quality. (orig.)

  1. Development of flat panel digital radiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed the Digital Radiography System CXDI-11 which digitizes the X-ray image in high quality by using a self-developed flat panel detector. The CXDI-11 has a large image area of 43 cm x 43 cm (17'' x 17''), and it can display the image on the pre-view monitor after only 3 seconds of exposure. In this report, we present the principle and the physical characteristics of the CXDI-11. The X-ray detector installed in the CXDI-11 is a combination of a rare-earth scintillator and an amorphous silicon flat panel detector (LANMIT). The X-ray is converted to the visible fluorescent light at the scintillator and the light is detected by the LANMIT. The image-processed data is transferred to the DICOM3.0 conformed devices such as the diagnosis work station, the archiver and the laser imager through the network. We also show some measurement results of the dynamic range, the pre-sampling Modulation Transfer Function and the tube voltage dependent sensitivity. The CXDI-11 is superior in real time operation and image quality, thus it is the digital radiography system of the next generation. (author)

  2. Flat panel display - Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified

  3. Flat panel display - Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu [Advanced Technology Planning, Sumitomo Eaton Nova Corporation, SBS Tower 9F, 10-1, Yoga 4-chome, Setagaya-ku, 158-0097 Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: suzuki_tsh@senova.co.jp

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  4. Should 3K zoom function be used for detection of pneumothorax in cesium iodide/amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiographs presented on 1K-matrix soft copies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate observer performance in the detection of pneumothorax with cesium iodide and amorphous silicon flat-panel detector radiography (CsI/a-Si FDR) presented as 1K and 3K soft-copy images. Forty patients with and 40 patients without pneumothorax diagnosed on previous and subsequent digital storage phosphor radiography (SPR, gold standard) had follow-up chest radiographs with CsI/a-Si FDR. Four observers confirmed or excluded the diagnosis of pneumothorax according to a five-point scale first on the 1K soft-copy image and then with help of 3K zoom function (1K monitor). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed for each modality (1K and 3K). The area under the curve (AUC) values for each observer were 0.7815, 0.7779, 0.7946 and 0.7066 with 1K-matrix soft copies and 0.8123, 0.7997, 0.8078 and 0.7522 with 3K zoom. Overall detection of pneumothorax was better with 3K zoom. Differences between the two display methods were not statistically significant in 3 of 4 observers (p-values between 0.13 and 0.44; observer 4: p=0.02). The detection of pneumothorax with 3K zoom is better than with 1K soft copy but not at a statistically significant level. Differences between both display methods may be subtle. Still, our results indicate that 3K zoom should be employed in clinical practice. (orig.)

  5. High performance amorphous selenium lateral photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    Lateral amorphous selenium (a-Se) detectors based on the metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) device structure have been studied for indirect detector medical imaging applications. These detectors have raised interest due to their simple structure, ease of fabrication, high-speed, low dark current, low capacitance per unit area and better light utilization. The lateral device structure has a benefit that the electrode spacing may be easily controlled to reduce the required bias for a given desired electric field. In indirect conversion x-ray imaging, the scintillator is coupled to the top of the a-Se MSM photodetector, which itself is integrated on top of the thin-film-transistor (TFT) array. The carriers generated at the top surface of the a-Se layer experience a field that is parallel to the surface, and does not initially sweep them away from the surface. Therefore these carriers may recombine or get trapped in surface states and change the field at the surface, which may degrade the performance of the photodetector. In addition, due to the finite width of the electrodes, the fill factor of the device is less than unity. In this study we examine the effect of lateral drift of carriers and the fill factor on the photodetector performance. The impact of field magnitude on the performance is also investigated.

  6. X-ray imaging with amorphous selenium: Pulse height measurements of avalanche gain fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avalanche multiplication in amorphous selenium (a-Se) can provide a large, adjustable gain for active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI), enabling quantum noise limited x-ray imaging during both radiography and fluoroscopy. In the case of direct conversion AMFPI, the multiplication factor for each x ray is a function of its depth of interaction, and the resulting variations in gain can reduce the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the system. An experimental method was developed to measure gain fluctuations by analyzing images of individual x rays that were obtained using a video camera with an a-Se target operated in avalanche mode. Pulse height spectra (PHS) of the charge produced per x ray were recorded for monoenergetic 30.9, 49.4, and 73.8 keV x-ray sources. The rapid initial decay and long tail of each PHS can be explained by a model in which positive charge dominates the initiation of avalanche. The Swank information factor quantifies the effect of gain fluctuation on DQE and was calculated from the PHS. The information factor was found to be 0.5 for a 25 μm a-Se layer with a maximum gain of ∼300. Changing the energy of the incident x ray influenced the range of the primary photoelectron and noticeably affected the tail of the experimental PHS, but did not significantly change the avalanche Swank factor

  7. Structure of amorphous selenium studied by neutron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Knudsen, Torben Steen; Carneiro, K.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements on amorphous selenium have been performed at 293 and 80 K. Careful analyses of the instrumental corrections were made to avoid systematic errors in the measured structure factor S (kappa) in the wave vector region 0 ? kappa ? 12 Å−1. As a result of the data...... treatment, the neutron scattering cross sections of selenium are determined to be sigmacoh = 8.4±0.1 b and sigmainc = 0.1±0.1 b. Using the fact that S (kappa) for large kappa's is determined by the short distances in the sample, a new method for extrapolation of the experimental S (kappa) until convergence...... considered. Finally, we give a brief discussion of the different models for the structure of amorphous selenium, taking both diffraction measurements and thermodynamic considerations into account. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  8. Design scenarios for flat panel photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of the potential of algae production for biofuel and other products at various locations throughout the world requires assessment of algae productivity under varying light conditions and different reactor layouts. A model was developed to predict algae biomass production in flat panel pho

  9. Clinical evaluation of digital radiography based on a large-area cesium iodide-amorphous silicon flat-panel detector compared with screen-film radiography for skeletal system and abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this clinical study was to compare the image quality of digital radiography using the new digital Bucky system based on a flat-panel detector with that of a conventional screen-film system for the skeletal structure and the abdomen. Fifty patients were examined using digital radiography with a flat-panel detector and screen-film systems, 25 for the skeletal structures and 25 for the abdomen. Six radiologists judged each paired image acquired under the same exposure parameters concerning three observation items for the bone and six items for the abdomen. Digital radiographic images for the bone were evaluated to be similar to screen-film images at the mean of 42.2%, to be superior at 50.2%, and to be inferior at 7.6%. Digital radiographic images for the abdomen were judged to be similar to screen-film images at the mean of 43.4%, superior at 52.4%, and inferior at 4.2%; thus, digital radiographic images were estimated to be either similar as or superior to screen-film images at over 92% for the bone and abdomen. On the statistical analysis, digital radiographic images were also judged to be preferred significantly in the most items for the bone and abdomen. In conclusion, the image quality of digital radiography with a flat-panel detector was superior to that of a screen-film system under the same exposure parameters, suggesting that dose reduction is possible with digital radiography. (orig.)

  10. Digital radiology using active matrix readout of amorphous selenium: radiation hardness of cadmium selenide thin film transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W; Waechter, D; Rowlands, J A

    1998-04-01

    A flat-panel x-ray imaging detector using active matrix readout of amorphous selenium (a-Se) is being investigated for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. The active matrix consists of a two-dimensional array of thin film transistors (TFTs). Radiation penetrating through the a-Se layer will interact with the TFTs and it is important to ensure that radiation induced changes will not affect the operation of the x-ray imaging detector. The methodology of the present work is to investigate the effects of radiation on the characteristic curves of the TFTs using individual TFT samples made with cadmium selenide (CdSe) semiconductor. Four characteristic parameters, i.e., threshold voltage, subthreshold swing, field effect mobility, and leakage current, were examined. This choice of parameters was based on the well established radiation damage mechanisms for crystalline silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), which have a similar principle of operation as CdSe TFTs. It was found that radiation had no measurable effect on the leakage current and the field effect mobility. However, radiation shifted the threshold voltage and increased the subthreshold swing. But even the estimated lifetime dose (50 Gy) of a diagnostic radiation detector will not affect the normal operation of an active matrix x-ray detector made with CdSe TFTs. The mechanisms of the effects of radiation will be discussed and compared with those for MOSFETs and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) TFTs. PMID:9571621

  11. Development of solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium for medical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuermann, James R., E-mail: James.Scheuermann@stonybrook.edu; Goldan, Amir H.; Zhao, Wei [Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Tousignant, Olivier; Léveillé, Sébastien [Analogic Canada, Montreal, Ontario H4R 2P1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Active matrix flat panel imagers (AMFPI) have limited performance in low dose applications due to the electronic noise of the thin film transistor (TFT) array. A uniform layer of avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) called high gain avalanche rushing photoconductor (HARP) allows for signal amplification prior to readout from the TFT array, largely eliminating the effects of the electronic noise. The authors report preliminary avalanche gain measurements from the first HARP structure developed for direct deposition onto a TFT array. Methods: The HARP structure is fabricated on a glass substrate in the form of p-i-n, i.e., the electron blocking layer (p) followed by an intrinsic (i) a-Se layer and finally the hole blocking layer (n). All deposition procedures are scalable to large area detectors. Integrated charge is measured from pulsed optical excitation incident on the top electrode (as would in an indirect AMFPI) under continuous high voltage bias. Avalanche gain measurements were obtained from samples fabricated simultaneously at different locations in the evaporator to evaluate performance uniformity across large area. Results: An avalanche gain of up to 80 was obtained, which showed field dependence consistent with previous measurements from n-i-p HARP structures established for vacuum tubes. Measurements from multiple samples demonstrate the spatial uniformity of performance using large area deposition methods. Finally, the results were highly reproducible during the time course of the entire study. Conclusions: We present promising avalanche gain measurement results from a novel HARP structure that can be deposited onto a TFT array. This is a crucial step toward the practical feasibility of AMFPI with avalanche gain, enabling quantum noise limited performance down to a single x-ray photon per pixel.

  12. Evaluation of an amorphous selenium array for industrial x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large market for digital x-ray imaging in medicine has driven the development of flat panel imaging devices. We evaluated one such device using the higher energy x-rays typical of industrial applications. This imager is a 360 x 430-mm array employing amorphous selenium (amSe). The defining characteristic of this technology is that electrons produced by radiation interaction in the Se are directly collected and processed. There is no intermediate scintillation or other conversion process. We compare performance to existing LLNL technology. We found: Modulation transfer function remains high as spatial frequencies approach the limit imposed by the 139 mm pixel size. Increasing x-ray energy degrades spatial resolution performance somewhat, but the amSe imager performs well in spectra as energetic as 450-kV applied potential. The MTF of this amSe imager is drops rapidly with frequency between 0.0 and 0.1 mm-1 for the heavily-filtered spectra used in this study. Secondary radiation transport in material behind the Se is a significant contributor to this attribute. Required exposure for the spectra tested ranges from 10 to 100 m Roentgen. This is 15 to 100 times less than LLNLs home-built system employing scintillating glass and a CCD camera. Cycle time for CT applications will be dominated by read and refresh time of nearly 1 minute. This will allow for great flexibility in utilizing microfocus (low power) sources or large source-to-detector distances. Except for issues of peripheral electronics, which we did not address, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that this amSe imager could offer attractive performance at x-ray energies of 3 MeV or more

  13. Design scenarios for flat panel photobioreactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of the potential of algae production for biofuel and other products at various locations throughout the world requires assessment of algae productivity under varying light conditions and different reactor layouts. A model was developed to predict algae biomass production in flat panel photobioreactors using the interaction between light and algae growth for the algae species Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The effect of location, variable sunlight and reactor layout on biomass production in single standing and parallel positioned flat panels was considered. Three latitudes were studied representing the Netherlands, France and Algeria. In single standing reactors the highest yearly biomass production is achieved in Algeria. During the year biomass production fluctuates the most in the Netherlands, while it is almost constant in Algeria. Several combinations of path lengths and biomass concentrations can result in the same optimal biomass production. The productivity in parallel place flat panels is strongly influenced by shading and diffuse light penetration between the panels. Panel orientation has a large effect on productivity and at higher latitudes the difference between north-south and east-west orientation may go up to 50%.

  14. Ultrabarrier Flexible Substrates for Flat Panel Displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, Paul E.; Graff, Gordon L.; Gross, Mark E.; Martin, Peter M.; Shi, Ming-Kun; Hall, Michael G.; Mast, Eric S.; Bonham, Charles C.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Sullivan, Michael B.

    2001-05-01

    We describe a flexible, transparent plastic substrate for flat panel display applications. Using roll-coating techniques, we apply a composite thin film barrier to commercially available polymers, which restricts moisture and oxygen permeation to undetectable levels. The barrier film can be capped with a thin film of transparent conductive oxide in the same roll-coater, yielding an engineered substrate (Barix™) for next generation, rugged, lightweight or flexible displays. The substrate is sufficiently impermeable to moisture and oxygen for application to moisture-sensitive display applications, such as organic light emitting displays (OLEDs). This enables, for the first time, lightweight and flexible emissive organic displays.

  15. Low-temperature internal friction in quenched amorphous selenium films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Thomas; Liu, Xiao; Abernathy, Matthew; Stephens, Richard

    Using ultra-high-quality-factor silicon mechanical resonators, we have measured the internal friction and shear modulus of amorphous selenium (a-Se) films at liquid helium temperatures. The glass transition temperature of selenium lies at a conveniently accessible 40 -50° C, facilitating a series of in- and ex-situ annealing and quench cycles. The a-Se films exhibit the low-temperature internal friction plateau (10-4 amorphous solids, which is a result of (and direct measure of) a broad distribution of two-level tunneling systems (TLS), whose origin is still unknown. We find a clear correlation between the post-anneal quench rate and the value of this plateau. The implications of these observations for understanding the microscopic origin of TLS will be discussed. Principally, the observed changes in the internal friction plateau could show the way in which the density of TLS could be manipulated or suppressed in other amorphous systems. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research and the University of Pennsylvania Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

  16. Treatment field specific IMRT QA using flat panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic portal imaging devices are commonly used for geometric verification of patient positioning during the treatment. However their use has been increasingly extended in extracting dosimetric information of the radiation treatment. To extend the use of flat panel for dosimetric purposes few characteristics of the flat panel like reproducibility, temporal stability, ghosting effect, dose-response relationship have to be studied. This work presents the use of flat panel for the relative verification of individual treatment field fluence for IMRT

  17. Optical limiting in hydrogenated amorphous silicon-selenium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manaa, Hacene, E-mail: hmanaa@gmail.co [Physics Department, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Al-Mulla, Abdullah; Al-Jamal, Noor [Physics Department, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Al-Dallal, Shawqi; Al-Alawi, Saleh [Physics Department, University of Bahrain, P.O. Box 32038 (Bahrain)

    2010-05-03

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-selenium alloy thin films grown by capacitively coupled radio-frequency glow-discharge are investigated. Nonlinear absorptive effects are evaluated with the help of open aperture z-scan technique in the 525 to 580 nm spectral range. The nonlinear absorption coefficient is found to be very large and reaching the value of 5.14 x 10{sup -3} cm/W at 525 nm. The origin of the optical nonlinearities is studied and found to be due mainly to two photon absorption in the case of pulsed excitation, whereas thermal effects are thought to be dominant when the sample is excited with a continuous wave laser. Optical limiting potentialities of the thin film are experimentally observed and their thresholds are found to be very low.

  18. Characterization of an amorphous silicon flat panel for controlling the positioning accuracy of sheet; Caracterizacion de un panel plano de silicio amorfo para control de la exactitud en el posicionamiento de laminas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, J.; Gonzalez, V.; Gimeno, J.; Dolores, V. de los; Pastor, V.; Crispin, V.; Guardino, C.

    2011-07-01

    It has established a method for measuring the position of the blades in a multi leaf collimator (MLC) used to measure dose portal imaging device (EPID) of amorphous silicon, and verified its accuracy using radiochromic films and measures water with diode Cuba, techniques perfectly well validated in our institution. This dose profiles are studied for each sheet and determine their position at the point which has 50% of the dose in the open field.

  19. Establishment of action levels for quality control of IMRT flat panel: experience with the algorithm iGRiMLO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algorithm has been used at our institution iGRiMLO scheduled for individual verification of treatment plans for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) step and shoot through portal dosimetry pretreatment of non-transmission, triggering the plan directly to a portal imaging device (EPID) of an amorphous silicon flat panel.

  20. Flat-panel detectors in x-ray diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For all application segments X-ray systems with flat-panel detectors increasingly enter the market. In digital radiography, mammography and cardiologic angiography flat-panel detectors are already well established while they are made ready for market introduction in general angiography and fluoroscopy. Two flat-panel detector technologies are available. One technology is based on an indirect conversion process of X-rays while the other one uses a direct conversion method.For radiography and dynamic applications the indirect method provides substantial advantages, while the direct method has some benefits for mammography. In radiography and mammography flat-panel detectors lead to clear improvements with respect to workflow, image quality and dose reduction potentials. These improvements are fostered by the immediate availability of the image, the large dynamic range and the high sensitivity to X-rays. New applications and the use of complex image processing algorithms have the potential to enlarge the present diagnostic range of applications.Up to now, image intensifiers are still the well-established technology for angiography and fluoroscopy. Nevertheless flat-panel detectors begin to enter this field, especially in cardiologic angiography.Characteristics of flat-panel detectors such as the availability of distortion-free images, the excellent contrast resolution, the large dynamic range, the high sensitivity to X-rays and the usability in magnetic fields provide the basis for improved and new diagnostic and interventional methods. (orig.)

  1. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-03-13

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will exploit an electro-optical effect, a transparent conductor and an addressing system to deliver data locally. The first need is to convert an electrical signal into a visible change. Two methods are available, the first giving emission of light, the second modulating ambient illumination. The most useful light-emitting media are semiconductors, historically exploiting III-V or II-VI compounds, but more recently organic or polymer semiconductors. Another possible effect uses gas plasma discharges. The modulating, or subtractive, effects that have been studied include liquid crystals, electrophoresis, electrowetting and electrochromism. A transparent conductor makes it possible to apply a voltage to an extended area while observing the results. The design is a compromise, since the free electrons that carry current also absorb light. The first materials used were metals, but some semiconductors, when heavily doped, give a better balance, with high transmission for a low resistance. Delivering data unambiguously to a million or so picture elements across the display area is no easy task. The preferred solution is an amorphous silicon thin-film transistor deposited at each cross-point in an X-Y matrix. Success in these endeavours has led to many applications for flat-panel displays, including television, flexible displays, electronic paper, electronic books and advertising signs. PMID:20123746

  2. The effect of amorphous selenium detector thickness on dual-energy digital breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yue-Houng, E-mail: yuehoung.hu@gmail.com; Zhao, Wei [Department of Radiology, State University of New York at Stony Brook, L-4 120 Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8460 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Contrast enhanced (CE) imaging techniques for both planar digital mammography (DM) and three-dimensional (3D) digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) applications requires x-ray photon energies higher than the k-edge of iodine (33.2 keV). As a result, x-ray tube potentials much higher (>40 kVp) than those typical for screening mammography must be utilized. Amorphous selenium (a-Se) based direct conversion flat-panel imagers (FPI) have been widely used in DM and DBT imaging systems. The a-Se layer is typically 200 μm thick with quantum detective efficiency (QDE) >87% for x-ray energies below 26 keV. However, QDE decreases substantially above this energy. To improve the object detectability of either CE-DM or CE-DBT, it may be advantageous to increase the thickness (d{sub Se}) of the a-Se layer. Increasing the d{sub Se} will improve the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at the higher energies used in CE imaging. However, because most DBT systems are designed with partially isocentric geometries, where the gantry moves about a stationary detector, the oblique entry of x-rays will introduce additional blur to the system. The present investigation quantifies the effect of a-Se thickness on imaging performance for both CE-DM and CE-DBT, discussing the effects of improving photon absorption and blurring from oblique entry of x-rays. Methods: In this paper, a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) was used to investigate the effect of d{sub Se} on the imaging performance (i.e., MTF, NPS, and DQE) of FPI in CE-DM and CE-DBT. The results from the model are used to calculate the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio, d′, which is used as a figure-of-merit to determine the total effect of increasing d{sub Se} for CE-DM and CE-DBT. Results: The results of the CLSM show that increasing d{sub Se} causes a substantial increase in QDE at the high energies used in CE-DM. However, at the oblique projection angles used in DBT, the increased length of penetration through a

  3. Electroluminescent Polymers and Carbon Nanotubes for Flat Panel Displays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Dai; Limin Dong; Mei Gao; Shaoming Huang; Oddvar Johansen; Albert W.H.Mau,Zoran Vasic; Berthold Winkler; Yongyuang Yang

    2000-01-01

    polymeric light-emitting diodes(LEDs) with sufficient brightness. efficiencies, low driving voltages, and various interesting features have been reported. The relatively short device lifetime, however, still remains as a major problem to be solved before any commercial applications will be realized. In this regard,carbon nanotubes have recently been proposed as more robust electron field emitters for flat panel displays. We have synthesised large arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, from which micropatterns of the aligned nanotubes suitable for flat panel displays were fabricated on various substrates. In this paper, we summarise our work on the synthesis and microfabrication of electroluminescent polymers and carbon nanotubes for flat panel displays with reference to other complementary work as appropriate.

  4. A camac based data acquisition system for flat-panel image array readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A readout system has been developed to facilitate the digitization and subsequent display of image data from two-dimensional, pixellated, flat-panel, amorphous silicon imaging arrays. These arrays have been designed specifically for medical x-ray imaging applications. The readout system is based on hardware and software developed for various experiments at CERN and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Additional analog signal processing and digital control electronics were constructed specifically for this application. The authors report on the form of the resulting data acquisition system, discuss aspects of its performance, and consider the compromises which were involved in its design

  5. Amorphous selenium photodetector on a flexible substrate for indirect conversion medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Majid, Shaikh H.; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    Amorphous selenium photodetectors, in both lateral and vertical structures, have been investigated for indirect conversion medical imaging applications. The low dark current, high responsivity for blue light, and possibility for gain are all among the attractive features of these devices. Typically these devices are deposited on a solid glass substrate and are read out using thin-film-transistors (TFTs). With the advent of flexible TFTs, flexible electronics have become a viable technology. This technology may be leveraged for flexible imaging, however the detection and conversion materials that serve to convert the incident x-rays to collectable charge will also need to be flexible. In this paper, we investigate the use of amorphous selenium photodetectors on flexible substrates and compare their performance with amorphous selenium photodetectors deposited on glass.

  6. Growth of amorphous selenium thin films: classical versus quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the first molecular dynamics simulation of the vacuum deposition of amorphous selenium films. We compare the classical, tight-binding and Hubbard-term corrected tight-binding molecular dynamics simulation methods. Densities, coordination defects, radial distribution functions, bond angles, dihedral angles, intrachain and interchain atomic correlations were investigated in the obtained amorphous films. Local atomic arrangements were compared to results of diffraction measurements

  7. Unipolar charge sensing using Frisch grid technique for amorphous selenium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, A. H.; Karim, K. S.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate amorphous Selenium Frisch-grid detector design to improve the spectral performance, reliability of single photon detection, and image lag for radiation imaging and detection. Incomplete charge collection due to the low electron mobility in amorphous Selenium results in depth-dependent signal variations. The slow signal rise-time for the portion of the induced charge due to electron-movement towards the anode and significant electron trapping cause ballistic deficit. This phenomenon can be observed from spectrum tailing (also called "electron tailing" for a-Se) and the wide Gaussian spectrum at low photon energies. The implications of this analysis for the design of new Selenium-based photoconductors are discussed, and some preliminary simulation results of the theory are presented.

  8. Digital radiography with large-area flat-panel detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotter, E.; Langer, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Freiburg University Hospital, Hugstetterstrasse 55, 79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Large-area flat-panel detectors with active readout mechanisms have been on the market for the past 2 years. This article describes different detector technologies. An important distinction is made between detectors with direct and those with indirect conversion of X-rays into electrical charges. Detectors with indirect conversion are built with unstructured or structured scintillators, the latter resulting in less lateral diffusion of emitted light. Some important qualities of flat-panel detectors are discussed. The first phantom and clinical studies published report an image quality at least comparable to that of screen-film systems and a potential for dose reduction. The available studies are summarised in this article. (orig.)

  9. Digital radiography with large-area flat-panel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-area flat-panel detectors with active readout mechanisms have been on the market for the past 2 years. This article describes different detector technologies. An important distinction is made between detectors with direct and those with indirect conversion of X-rays into electrical charges. Detectors with indirect conversion are built with unstructured or structured scintillators, the latter resulting in less lateral diffusion of emitted light. Some important qualities of flat-panel detectors are discussed. The first phantom and clinical studies published report an image quality at least comparable to that of screen-film systems and a potential for dose reduction. The available studies are summarised in this article. (orig.)

  10. Modeling the radiation ionization energy and energy resolution of trigonal and amorphous selenium from first principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbandi, A; Devoie, É; Di Matteo, O; Rubel, O

    2012-11-14

    Advances in the development of amorphous selenium-based direct conversion photoconductors for high-energy radiation critically depend on the improvement of its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, which is directly related to the pair production energy. Traditionally, theories for the pair production energy have been based on the parabolic band approximation and do not provide a satisfactory agreement with experimental results for amorphous selenium. Here we present a calculation of the pair creation energy in trigonal and amorphous selenium based on its electronic structure. In indirect semiconductors, such as trigonal selenium, the ionization threshold energy can be as low as the energy gap, resulting in a lower pair creation energy, which is a favorable factor for sensitivity. Also, the statistics of photogenerated charge carriers is studied in order to evaluate the theoretical value of the Fano factor and its dependence on recombination processes. We show that recombination can significantly compromise the detector's energy resolution as a result of an increase in the Fano factor. PMID:23085846

  11. Modeling the radiation ionization energy and energy resolution of trigonal and amorphous selenium from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the development of amorphous selenium-based direct conversion photoconductors for high-energy radiation critically depend on the improvement of its sensitivity to ionizing radiation, which is directly related to the pair production energy. Traditionally, theories for the pair production energy have been based on the parabolic band approximation and do not provide a satisfactory agreement with experimental results for amorphous selenium. Here we present a calculation of the pair creation energy in trigonal and amorphous selenium based on its electronic structure. In indirect semiconductors, such as trigonal selenium, the ionization threshold energy can be as low as the energy gap, resulting in a lower pair creation energy, which is a favorable factor for sensitivity. Also, the statistics of photogenerated charge carriers is studied in order to evaluate the theoretical value of the Fano factor and its dependence on recombination processes. We show that recombination can significantly compromise the detector’s energy resolution as a result of an increase in the Fano factor.

  12. Experimental evaluation of a-Se and CdTe flat-panel x-ray detectors for digital radiography and fluoroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Susumu; Hori, Naoyuki; Sato, Kenji; Tokuda, Satoshi; Sato, Toshiyuki; Uehara, Kazuhiro; Izumi, Yoshihiro; Nagata, Hisashi; Yoshimura, Youji; Yamada, Satoshi

    2000-04-01

    Described are two types of direct-detection flat-panel X-ray detectors utilizing amorphous selenium (a-Se) and cadmium telluride (CdTe). The a-Se detector is fabricated using direct deposition onto a thin film transistor (TFT) substrate, whereas the CdTe detector is fabricated using a novel hybrid method, in which CdTe is pre-deposited onto a glass substrate and then connected to a TFT substrate. The detector array format is 512 X 512 with a pixel pitch of 150 micrometer. The imaging properties of both detectors have been evaluated with respect to X-ray sensitivity, lag, spatial resolution, and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) measured at 1 lp/mm were 0.96 for a- Se and 0.65 for CdTe. The imaging lags after 33 ms were about 4% for a-Se and 22% for CdTe. The DQE values measured at zero spatial frequency were 0.75 for a-Se and 0.22 for CdTe. The results indicate that the a-Se and CdTe detectors have high potential as new digital X-ray imaging devices for both radiography and fluoroscopy.

  13. Effect on image data resampling in evaluation of the basic imaging properties for a digital radiographic system based on a flat panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the effect on image data resampling in an evaluation of the basic imaging properties for a digital radiographic system based on a flat panel detector (FPD). One of the latest digital radiographic systems was used in this study. This system was based on a direct-conversion FPD of amorphous selenium. The basic imaging properties of the system were evaluated by measuring characteristic curve, presampled modulation transfer function (MTF), and Wiener spectrum (WS) using Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image with a matrix size of 2048 x 2048. The evaluations were performed under two conditions because matrix size automatically changes according to the selection of imaging size. One of the conditions was a different matrix size between image data acquired on the FPD and the output image (DICOM image for which resampling was performed). The other condition was that these matrices be the same size (DICOM image with no resampling performed). Resampling did not affect the characteristic curves. However, MTF and the WS obtained from the resampled data were different from those of the one not resampled, which is considered to be the 'inherent' basic imaging properties, and this phenomenon was remarkable, especially in terms of the MTFs. Our study indicates that the effect on resampling should not be disregarded in evaluating the basic imaging properties of digital radiographic systems. Therefore, it is mandatory to use DICOM images for which no resampling was performed in order to evaluate the inherent basic imaging properties for digital radio graphic systems. (author)

  14. Amorphous selenium detector utilizing a Frisch grid for photon-counting imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, A. H.; Fang, Y.; Karim, K. S.; Tousignant, O.; Mani, H.; Laperrière, L.

    2009-02-01

    Incomplete charge collection due to poor electron mobility in amorphous selenium (a-Se) results in depth-dependent signal variations. The slow signal rise-time for the portion of the induced charge due to electron-movement towards the anode and significant electron trapping cause ballistic deficit. In this paper, we investigate Frisch-grid detector design to reduce the depth dependent noise, increase the photon count-rate, and improve the spectral performance of positively biased amorphous selenium radiation detectors. In addition, we analyze the impact of using the Frisch grid detector design on x-ray sensitivity, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), modulation transfer function (MTF), and image lag of integrating-mode a-Se radiation detectors. Preliminary results based on theory are presented for emerging digital medical imaging modalities such as mammography tomosynthesis and fluoroscopy.

  15. Optimization of the presampling modulation transfer function of flat-panel detectors for digital radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, John A.; Ji, Winston G.

    1999-05-01

    Large area, flat panel solid state detectors are being investigated for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. These detectors employ an x-ray imaging layer of either photoconductor ('direct' conversion method) or phosphor ('indirect' conversion method) to detect x-rays. In both cases the image formed at the surface of the layer is read out in situ using an active matrix array. Depending upon the resolution of the layer compared to the pixel size, undersampling of the image and hence aliasing may occur. Aliasing is always present regardless of the pixel size in direct detectors based on amorphous selenium because of its high intrinsic resolution. Aliasing gives rise to increased noise which results in reduction of detective quantum efficiency DQE at high spatial frequencies. The aliasing can be reduced or even eliminated by blurring prior to pixel sampling (e.g., by scattering in a phosphor layer). However, blurring, which may be quantified by the spatial frequency f dependent modulation transfer function MTF(f), also has a deleterious effect: the imaging system becomes much more susceptible to noise for example that arising in the charge amplifiers or secondary quantum statistics. Note that in principle, the system MTF can be corrected to any desired values in a digital system thus MTF has no predictive value for the quality of an imaging system, rather it is the DQE(f) which determines the overall signal to noise ratio independently of the MTF enhancement chosen. Nevertheless, determining the ideal level of presampling blurring (i.e., the Presampling Modulation Transfer function) is not straightforward. A problem caused by blurring is that the degree of blurring often depends on the depth of absorption of the x-ray in the imaging layer. In such cases (as pointed out by Lubberts) additional noise is transferred to the image. The predictions of a Lubberts model will be compared with published measurements of DQE for both direct and indirect detectors. A preliminary

  16. Evaluation of flat panel PMT for gamma ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first position sensitive PMT, Hamamatsu R2486, developed in 1985, represented a strong technological advance for gamma-ray imaging. Hamamatsu H8500 Flat Panel PMT is the last generation position sensitive PMT: extremely compact with 2 in. active area. Its main features are: minimum peripheral dead zone (1 mm) and height of 12 mm. It was designed to be assembled in array to cover large detection area. It can represent a technical revolution for many applications in the field of gamma-ray imaging as for example nuclear medicine. This tube is based on metal channel dynode for charge multiplication and 8x8 anodes for charge collection and position calculation. In this paper we present a preliminary evaluation of the imaging performances addressed to nuclear medicine application. To this aim we have taken into account two different electronic readouts: resistive chain with Anger Camera principle and multianode readout. Flat panel PMT was coupled to CsI(Tl) and NaI(Tl) scintillation arrays. The results were also compared with the first generation PSPMT

  17. Rapid, room-temperature synthesis of amorphous selenium/protein composites using Capsicum annuum L extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shikuo; Shen, Yuhua; Xie, Anjian; Yu, Xuerong; Zhang, Xiuzhen; Yang, Liangbao; Li, Chuanhao

    2007-10-01

    We describe the formation of amorphous selenium (α-Se)/protein composites using Capsicum annuum L extract to reduce selenium ions (SeO32-) at room temperature. The reaction occurs rapidly and the process is simple and easy to handle. A protein with a molecular weight of 30 kDa extracted from Capsicum annuum L not only reduces the SeO32- ions to Se0, but also controls the nucleation and growth of Se0, and even participates in the formation of α-Se/protein composites. The size and shell thickness of the α-Se/protein composites increases with high Capsicum annuum L extract concentration, and decreases with low reaction solution pH. The results suggest that this eco-friendly, biogenic synthesis strategy could be widely used for preparing inorganic/organic biocomposites. In addition, we also discuss the possible mechanism of the reduction of SeO32- ions by Capsicum annuum L extract.

  18. Mechanically Strain-Induced Modification of Selenium Powders in the Amorphization Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the fabrication of particles designed in the nanoscale structure, or the nanostructural modification of particles using mechanical grinding process, selenium powders ground by a planetary ball mill at various rotational speeds have been investigated. Structural analyses, such as particle size distributions, crystallite sizes, lattice strains and nearest neighbour distances were performed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and dynamical light scattering.By grinding powder particles became spherical composites consisting of nanocrystalline and amorphous phase, and had a distribution with the average size of 2.7 μm. Integral intensities of diffraction peaks of annealed crystal selenium decreased with increasing grinding time, and these peaks broadened due to lattice strains and reducing crystallite size during the grinding. The ground powder at 200 rpm did not have the lattice strain and showed amorphization for the present grinding periods. It indicates that the amorphization of Se by grinding accompanies the lattice strain, and the lattice strain arises from a larger energy concerning intermolecular interaction. In this process, the impact energy is spent on thermal and structural changes according to energy accumulation in macroscopic (the particle size distribution) and microscopic (the crystallite size and the lattice strain) range

  19. Quantitative digital radiography with two dimensional flat panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Attenuation law relates radiographic images to irradiated object thickness and chemical composition. Film radiography exploits qualitatively this property for diagnosis. Digital radiographic flat panels present large dynamic range, reproducibility and linearity properties which open the gate for quantification. We will present, through two applications (mammography and bone densitometry), an approach to extract quantitative information from digital 2D radiographs. Material and method: The main difficulty for quantification is X-rays scatter, which superimposes to acquisition data. Because of multiple scatterings and 3D geometry dependence, it cannot be directly exploited through an exact analytical model. Therefore we have developed an approach for its estimation and subtraction from medical radiographs, based on approximations and derivations of analytical models of scatter formation in human tissues. Results: In digital mammography, the objective is to build a map of the glandular tissue thickness. Its separation from fat tissue is based on two equations: height of compression and attenuation. This last equation needs X-Rays scatter correction. In bone densitometry, physicians look for quantitative bone mineral density. Today, clinical DEXA systems use collimated single or linear detectors to eliminate scatter. This scanning technology induces poor image quality. By applying our scatter correction approach, we have developed a bone densitometer using a digital flat panel (Lexxos, DMS). It provides with accurate and reproducible measurements while presenting radiological image quality. Conclusion: These applications show how information processing, and especially X-Rays scatter processing, enables to extract quantitative information from digital radiographs. This approach, associated to Computer Aided Diagnosis algorithms or reconstructions algorithms, gives access to useful information for diagnosis. (author)

  20. EMI investigation and modeling of a flat panel display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Satyajeet

    It is often important to carry out EMI analysis in the design phase of an electronic product to predict the radiated emissions. An EMI analysis is important to predict if the product complies with the FCC regulations as well as to gain an understanding of the noise coupling and radiation mechanisms. EMI analysis and prediction of radiated emissions in electronic products that have an electrically large chassis, pose a challenge due to the presence of multiple resonant structures and noise-coupling mechanisms. The study focusses on the investigation of the main noise coupling mechanisms, the approach and methods used for the modeling of a flat panel display. Full-wave simulation models are a powerful tool for the prediction of radiated emissions and the visualization of coupling paths within the product. The first part deals with the measurement of radiated emissions from the display under standard test conditions and the identification of the main noise sources using near-field scanning. The contribution of the chassis components - frame, back cover and the back panel, to the radiated emission is analyzed using shielding measurements. Noise coupling from the main board, flex cables, display driver boards and the display is analyzed from measurements. The second part deals with the full-wave modeling of the components - main board, flex cables, chassis and the display driver boards. The modeling approach is demonstrated by highlighting some of the challenges in modeling larger structures having many details. The simulation model contains the main components of the TV that contribute to far-field radiation. The full-wave modeling is done using the CST Microwave Studio. Two sets of simulation models are described - the common mode models and the complete models. The use of the common mode models for the identification of the resonant structures is demonstrated. The far-field radiated emissions along with the coupling mechanism within the flat panel display can be

  1. Frustration of photocrystallization in amorphous selenium films and film-polymer structures near the glass transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, G. P.; Tallman, R. E.; Abbaszadeh, S.; Karim, K. S.; Rowlands, J. A.; Reznik, A.; Weinstein, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the stability against photo-induced crystallization (PiC) and photo-induced darkening (PiD) in a series of amorphous selenium (a-Se) films grown with and without polyimide buffer layers[1] for temperatures below and above the glass transition (Tg ˜ 313 K). The a-Se films are bulk-like (˜16.5 μm thick), and contain a low concentration of As (< 0.2%). We find that due to strain relief, a thin layer (˜1 μm) of polyimide greatly stabilizes the samples against PiC and reduces the effect of PiD.

  2. Comparison of flat-panel radiography and computed radiography in urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of digital flat-panel radiography in uro-radiology the i.v. urograms of patients who had been examined with computed radiography and digital flat-panel radiography were compared regarding image quality. Methods: 50 patients who underwent clinically indicated i.v. urography were examined with digital flat-panel radiography and computed radiography. In order to avoid unnecessary double exposure to X-rays, patients were examined either by flat-panel or computed radiography before injection of contrast media. Each further clinically indicated exposure after administration of contrast media was done by alternating the other examination technique. The digital images were compared by 4 radiologists regarding image quality for the detection of defined anatomic structures. Results: Digital flat-panel radiography showed an image quality of the liver, spleen and both kidneys that was similar to computed radiography. The urinary tract, lumbar spine, pelvis and psoas muscle were significantly better visible on flat-panel radiography images. Conclusions: Compared to computed radiography there is no loss of image information by using digital flat-panel radiography in uro-radiology. On the contrary, some anatomic structures on abdominal survey images show better image quality. In conclusion, digital flat-panel radiography has the potential to replace computed radiography in uroradiologic examinations. (orig.)

  3. 75 FR 51286 - Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... importation of certain flat panel digital televisions and components thereof by reason of infringement of... mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to the Commission should...

  4. High-pressure behavior of amorphous selenium from ultrasonic measurements and Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-pressure behavior of melt-quenched amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been investigated via ultrasonic measurements and Raman scattering at room temperature. The ultrasonic measurements were conducted on a-Se in a multi-anvil apparatus with two different sample assemblies at pressures of up to 4.5 and 4.8 GPa. We discovered that similar kinks occur in the slopes of the pressure dependence characteristics of the travel time and the sound velocity in both shear and longitudinal waves in the 2.0–2.5 GPa range. These kinks are independent of the sample assemblies, indicating an intrinsic transformation of the a-Se. Additionally, we deduced the pressure-volume relationship of a-Se from the sound velocity characteristics using the Birch–Murnaghan equation of state, and the results agreed well with those of previous reports. In situ high-pressure Raman scattering measurements of a-Se were conducted in a diamond anvil cell with an 830 nm excitation line up to a pressure of 4.3 GPa. We found that the characteristic band of a-Se at ∼250 cm−1 experienced a smooth shift to a lower frequency with pressure, but a sharp slope change in the band intensity versus pressure occurred near 2.5 GPa. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicate that the samples remain in their amorphous states after decompression. Thus, we proposed that the abnormal compression behavior of a-Se in the 2.0–2.5 GPa range can be attributed to pressure-induced local atomic reconfiguration, implying an amorphous-amorphous transition of the elementary selenium.

  5. High-pressure behavior of amorphous selenium from ultrasonic measurements and Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.; Liu, X. R.; Hong, S. M., E-mail: hpswjtu@gmail.com, E-mail: smhong@home.swjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of High Pressure Physics, Southwest Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education of China, Chengdu 610031 (China); Wang, Z. G. [National Key Laboratory for Shock Wave and Detonation Physics Research, Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhu, H. Y. [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Peng, J. P. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2014-07-07

    The high-pressure behavior of melt-quenched amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been investigated via ultrasonic measurements and Raman scattering at room temperature. The ultrasonic measurements were conducted on a-Se in a multi-anvil apparatus with two different sample assemblies at pressures of up to 4.5 and 4.8 GPa. We discovered that similar kinks occur in the slopes of the pressure dependence characteristics of the travel time and the sound velocity in both shear and longitudinal waves in the 2.0–2.5 GPa range. These kinks are independent of the sample assemblies, indicating an intrinsic transformation of the a-Se. Additionally, we deduced the pressure-volume relationship of a-Se from the sound velocity characteristics using the Birch–Murnaghan equation of state, and the results agreed well with those of previous reports. In situ high-pressure Raman scattering measurements of a-Se were conducted in a diamond anvil cell with an 830 nm excitation line up to a pressure of 4.3 GPa. We found that the characteristic band of a-Se at ∼250 cm{sup −1} experienced a smooth shift to a lower frequency with pressure, but a sharp slope change in the band intensity versus pressure occurred near 2.5 GPa. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicate that the samples remain in their amorphous states after decompression. Thus, we proposed that the abnormal compression behavior of a-Se in the 2.0–2.5 GPa range can be attributed to pressure-induced local atomic reconfiguration, implying an amorphous-amorphous transition of the elementary selenium.

  6. Investigation of the dosimetric properties of an a-Si flat panel epid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are primarily used as an electronic replacement for film to verify the set-up of radiotherapy patients based on imaged anatomy. There has recently been much interest in the use of amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat panel EPIDs for dosimetric verification in radiotherapy. The work presented here has been carried out to determine their suitability for dosimetric applications by investigating some of the basic response characteristics and the implications these might have. The measurements reported in this paper were performed using 6-MV photon beams from an Elekta Precise linear accelerator fitted with Elekta iViewGT amorphous silicon flat panel EPIDs. Measurements were performed to investigate the response of the EPID as a function of exposure and field size. Similar measurements were made with an ionisation chamber for comparison. Further measurements were carried out to investigate the response of the EPID to multiple low dose exposures (e.g. 5x2 MU) such as might be encountered in Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT). This was compared with the response to a single high dose exposure (e.g. 10 MU) and repeated for a range of exposures. The results show the response of the EPID, to a good approximation, to be linear with dose over the range of 1 -200 MU. However, 'under-responses' in the EPID of up to 5% were seen at the lowest exposures. For multiple low dose segments the sum of the EPID responses was found to be less than the response to the same total exposure in a single large segment. This effect reduces with increase in the magnitude of the low dose segments. The variation in EPID response with field size was found to be greater than that indicated by the ionisation chamber. The results show that the a-Si detector responds to dose, to a good approximation, in a linear manner. The EPID under-response at low doses is thought to be related to the so called ghosting effect. Each image frame has a residual

  7. Sarnoff JND Vision Model for Flat-Panel Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Michael H.; Lubin, Jeffrey

    1998-01-01

    This document describes adaptation of the basic Sarnoff JND Vision Model created in response to the NASA/ARPA need for a general-purpose model to predict the perceived image quality attained by flat-panel displays. The JND model predicts the perceptual ratings that humans will assign to a degraded color-image sequence relative to its nondegraded counterpart. Substantial flexibility is incorporated into this version of the model so it may be used to model displays at the sub-pixel and sub-frame level. To model a display (e.g., an LCD), the input-image data can be sampled at many times the pixel resolution and at many times the digital frame rate. The first stage of the model downsamples each sequence in time and in space to physiologically reasonable rates, but with minimum interpolative artifacts and aliasing. Luma and chroma parts of the model generate (through multi-resolution pyramid representation) a map of differences-between test and reference called the JND map, from which a summary rating predictor is derived. The latest model extensions have done well in calibration against psychophysical data and against image-rating data given a CRT-based front-end. THe software was delivered to NASA Ames and is being integrated with LCD display models at that facility,

  8. Characteristics and applications of a flat panel computer tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to assess a new flat panel volume computed tomography (FP-VCT) with very high isotropic spatial resolution as well as high Z-axis coverage. Materials and Methods: The prototype of an FP-VCT scanner with a detector cell size of 0.2 mm was used for numerous phantom studies, specimen examinations, and animal research projects. Results: The high spatial resolution of the new system can be used to accurately determine solid tumor volume, thus allowing for earlier assessment of the therapeutic response. In animal experimentation, whole-body perfusion mapping of mice is feasible. The high spatial resolution also improves the classification of coronary artery atherosclerotic plaques in the isolated post mortem human heart. With the depiction of intramyocardial segments of the coronary arteries, investigations of myocardial collateral circulation are feasible. In skeletal applications, an accurate analysis of the smallest bony structures, e.g., petrous bone and dental preparations, can be successfully performed, as well as investigations of repetitive studies of fracture healing and the treatment of osteoporosis. Conclusion: The introduction of FP-VCT opens up new applications for CT, including the field of molecular imaging, which are highly attractive for future clinical applications. Present limitations include limited temporal resolution and necessitate further improvement of the system. (orig.)

  9. Flat-panel electronic displays: a triumph of physics, chemistry and engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Hilsum, Cyril

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the history and science behind the development of modern flat-panel displays, and assesses future trends. Electronic displays are an important feature of modern life. For many years the cathode ray tube, an engineering marvel, was universal, but its shape was cumbersome and its operating voltage too high. The need for a flat-panel display, working at a low voltage, became imperative, and much research has been applied to this need. Any versatile flat-panel display will ex...

  10. Flat-panel detectors: how much better are they?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional and fluoroscopic imaging procedures for pediatric patients are becoming more prevalent because of the less-invasive nature of these procedures compared to alternatives such as surgery. Flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPD) for fluoroscopy are a new technology alternative to the image intensifier/TV (II/TV) digital system that has been in use for more than two decades. Two major FPD technologies have been implemented, based on indirect conversion of X-rays to light (using an X-ray scintillator) and then to proportional charge (using a photodiode), or direct conversion of X-rays into charge (using a semiconductor material) for signal acquisition and digitization. These detectors have proved very successful for high-exposure interventional procedures but lack the image quality of the II/TV system at the lowest exposure levels common in fluoroscopy. The benefits for FPD image quality include lack of geometric distortion, little or no veiling glare, a uniform response across the field-of-view, and improved ergonomics with better patient access. Better detective quantum efficiency indicates the possibility of reducing the patient dose in accordance with ALARA principles. However, first-generation FPD devices have been implemented with less than adequate acquisition flexibility (e.g., lack of tableside controls/information, inability to easily change protocols) and the presence of residual signals from previous exposures, and additional cost of equipment and long-term maintenance have been serious impediments to purchase and implementation. Technological advances of second generation and future hybrid FPD systems should solve many current issues. The answer to the question ''how much better are they?'' is ''significantly better'', and they are certainly worth consideration for replacement or new implementation of an imaging suite for pediatric fluoroscopy. (orig.)

  11. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, A R; Kengyelics, S M; Davies, A G

    2008-05-01

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H. PMID:18374710

  12. An asynchronous, pipelined, electronic acquisition system for Active Matrix Flat-Panel Imagers (AMFPIs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a full-custom electronic acquisition system designed for readout of large-area active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays is reported. The arrays, which comprise two-dimensional matrices of pixels utilizing amorphous silicon thin-film transistors, are themselves under development for a wide variety of X-ray imaging applications. The acquisition system was specifically designed to facilitate detailed, quantitative investigations of the properties of these novel imaging arrays and contains significant enhancements compared to a previously developed acquisition system. These enhancements include pipelined preamplifier circuits to allow faster readout speed, expanded addressing capabilities allowing a maximum of 4096 array data lines, and on-board summing of image frames. The values of many acquisition system parameters, including timings and voltages, may be specified and downloaded from a host computer. Once acquisition is enabled, the system operates asynchronously of its host computer. The system allows image capture in both radiographic mode (corresponding to the capture of individual X-ray images), and fluoroscopic mode (corresponding to the capture of a continual series of X-ray images). A detailed description of the system architecture and the underlying motivations for the design is reported in this paper. (author)

  13. Solid-state, flat-panel, digital radiography detectors and their physical imaging characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid-state, digital radiography (DR) detectors, designed specifically for standard projection radiography, emerged just before the turn of the millennium. This new generation of digital image detector comprises a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material combined with an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a thin film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). DR detectors can offer both efficient (low-dose) x-ray image acquisition plus on-line readout of the latent image as electronic data. To date, solid-state, flat-panel, DR detectors have come in two principal designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator-based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor-based) types. This review describes the underlying principles and enabling technologies exploited by these designs of detector, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing performance both against each other and computed radiography (CR). In standard projection radiography indirect conversion DR detectors currently offer superior physical image quality and dose efficiency compared with direct conversion DR and modern point-scan CR. These conclusions have been confirmed in the findings of clinical evaluations of DR detectors. Future trends in solid-state DR detector technologies are also briefly considered. Salient innovations include WiFi-enabled, portable DR detectors, improvements in x-ray absorber layers and developments in alternative electronic media to a-Si:H

  14. A performance comparison of direct- and indirect-detection flat-panel imagers

    CERN Document Server

    Partridge, M; Müller, L

    2002-01-01

    A comparison of the performance of a direct- and an indirect-detection amorphous silicon flat-panel X-ray imager is presented for a 6 MV beam. Experimental measurements of the noise characteristics, image lag, spectral response, spatial resolution and quantum efficiency are described, compared and discussed. The two systems are comprised of 512x512 pixel, 400 mu m pitch, arrays of a-Si:H p-i-n photodiodes and thin-film transistors. In the direct-detection system, X-rays interact to produce electron/hole pairs directly in the silicon photodiodes. For the indirect-detection system, a phosphor screen converts energy from the incident X-rays into visible light, which is then detected by the photodiodes. Both systems are shown to be quantum noise limited, with the total electronic noise in the detector 10-15 times smaller than the Poisson noise level in detected signal. The measured lag for both systems is 1.0+-0.1% or less in the first frame with subsequent signals decaying exponentially with frame read-out, with...

  15. Design and performance characteristics of a digital flat-panel computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computed tomography (CT) applications continue to expand, and they require faster data acquisition speeds and improved spatial resolution. Achieving isotropic resolution, by means of cubic voxels, in combination with longitudinal coverage beyond 20 mm would represent a substantial advance in clinical CT because few commercially available scanners are capable of this at present. To achieve this goal, a prototype CT system incorporating a movable array of 20 cmx20 cm, 200-μm-pitch amorphous silicon flat-panel x-ray detectors and a conventional CT x-ray source was constructed at the General Electric Global Research Center and performance tested at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The device was designed for preclinical imaging applications and has a scan field of 13 to 33 cm, with a magnification of 1.5. Image quality performance measurements, such as spatial and contrast resolutions, were obtained using both industry standard and custom phantoms. Spatial resolution, quantified by the system's modulation transfer function, indicated improvement by a factor of 2.5 to 5 in isotropic spatial resolution over current commercially available systems, with 10% modulation transfer function modulations at frequencies from 19 to 31 lp/cm. Low-contrast detectability results were obtained from industry-standard phantoms and were comprised of embedded contrast regions of 0.3%, 0.5%, and 1.0% over areas of several mm2. Performance was sufficient to easily distinguish 1.0% contrast regions down to 2 mm in diameter relative to the background. On the basis of scans of specialized hydroxyapatite phantoms, the system response is extremely linear (R2=0.990) in bone-equivalent density regimens. Standard CT dose index CTDI100 and CTDIW measurements were also conducted to assess dose delivery using a 16-cm-CTDI phantom and a 120 kV 120 mAs scan technique. The CTDIW ranged from 30 mGy (one-panel mode) to 113 mGy (two-panel mode) for this system. Lastly, several in vivo

  16. Rapid, room-temperature synthesis of amorphous selenium/protein composites using Capsicum annuum L extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Shikuo; Shen Yuhua; Xie Anjian; Yu Xuerong; Zhang Xiuzhen; Yang Liangbao; Li Chuanhao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)

    2007-10-10

    We describe the formation of amorphous selenium ({alpha}-Se)/protein composites using Capsicum annuum L extract to reduce selenium ions (SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) at room temperature. The reaction occurs rapidly and the process is simple and easy to handle. A protein with a molecular weight of 30 kDa extracted from Capsicum annuum L not only reduces the SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ions to Se{sup 0}, but also controls the nucleation and growth of Se{sup 0}, and even participates in the formation of {alpha}-Se/protein composites. The size and shell thickness of the {alpha}-Se/protein composites increases with high Capsicum annuum L extract concentration, and decreases with low reaction solution pH. The results suggest that this eco-friendly, biogenic synthesis strategy could be widely used for preparing inorganic/organic biocomposites. In addition, we also discuss the possible mechanism of the reduction of SeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ions by Capsicum annuum L extract.

  17. Digital radiography with a large-scale electronic flat-panel detector vs screen-film radiography: observer preference in clinical skeletal diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The imaging performance of a recently developed digital flat-panel detector system was compared with conventional screen-film imaging in an observer preference study. In total, 34 image pairs of various regions of the skeleton were obtained in 24 patients; 30 image pairs were included in the study. The conventional images were acquired with 250- and 400-speed screen-film combinations, using the standard technique of our department. Within hours, the digital images were obtained using identical exposure parameters. The digital system employed a large-area (43 x 43 cm) flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon (Trixell Pixium 4600), integrated in a Bucky table. Six radiologists independently evaluated the image pairs with respect to image latitude, soft tissue rendition, rendition of the periosteal and enosteal border of cortical bone, rendition of cancellous bone and the visibility of potentially present pathological changes, using a subjective five-point scale. The digital images were rated significantly (p=0.001) better than the screen-film images with respect to soft tissue rendition and image latitude. Also the rendition of the cancellous bone and the periosteal and enosteal border of the cortical bone was rated significantly (p=0.05) better for the flat-panel detector. The visibility of pathological lesions was equivalent; only large-area sclerotic lesions (n=2) were seen superiorly on screen-film images. The new digital flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon appears to be at least equivalent to conventional screen-film combinations for skeletal examinations, and in most respects even superior. (orig.)

  18. Display elements and gaps: a comparison of flat panel display characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Spenkelink, G.P.J.; Besuijen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The relation between typical flat panel display characteristics and display quality was studied. Subjective preferences were obtained with respect to simulated black-on-white flat panel displays. The displays differed in the sort of separation between the display elements and the shape of these elements. Further, the height/width ratio of the front was studied in relation with a fixed font matrix. The preferences were obtained through a paired comparison of all possible pairs of simulated dis...

  19. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seong-Rin [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, 2017 Kemper Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Schoenung, Julie M., E-mail: jmschoenung@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, 2017 Kemper Hall, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  20. Human health and ecological toxicity potentials due to heavy metal content in waste electronic devices with flat panel displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Display devices such as cathode-ray tube (CRT) televisions and computer monitors are known to contain toxic substances and have consequently been banned from disposal in landfills in the State of California and elsewhere. New types of flat panel display (FPD) devices, millions of which are now purchased each year, also contain toxic substances, but have not previously been systematically studied and compared to assess the potential impact that could result from their ultimate disposal. In the current work, the focus is on the evaluation of end-of-life toxicity potential from the heavy metal content in select FPD devices with the intent to inform material selection and design-for-environment (DfE) decisions. Specifically, the metals antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, vanadium, and zinc in plasma TVs, LCD (liquid crystal display) TVs, LCD computer monitors and laptop computers are considered. The human health and ecotoxicity potentials are evaluated through a life cycle assessment perspective by combining data on the respective heavy metal contents, the characterization factors in the U.S. EPA Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and other environmental Impacts (TRACI), and a pathway and impact model. Principal contributors to the toxicity potentials are lead, arsenic, copper, and mercury. Although the heavy metal content in newer flat panel display devices creates less human health toxicity potential than that in CRTs, for ecological toxicity, the new devices are worse, especially because of the mercury in LCD TVs and the copper in plasma TVs.

  1. Experimental verification of ion range calculation in a treatment planning system using a flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Ackermann, Benjamin; Ecker, Swantje; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2014-07-01

    Heavy ion-beam therapy is a highly precise radiation therapy exploiting the characteristic interaction of ions with matter. The steep dose gradient of the Bragg curve allows the irradiation of targets with high-dose and a narrow dose penumbra around the target, in contrast to photon irradiation. This, however, makes heavy ion-beam therapy very sensitive to minor changes in the range calculation of the treatment planning system, as it has a direct influence on the outcome of the treatment. Our previous study has shown that ion radiography with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector allows the measurement of the water equivalent thickness (WET) of an imaging object with good accuracy and high spatial resolution. In this study, the developed imaging technique is used to measure the WET distribution of a patient-like phantom, and these results are compared to the WET calculation of the treatment planning system. To do so, a measured two-dimensional map of the WET of an anthropomorphic phantom was compared to WET distributions based on x-ray computed tomography images as used in the treatment planning system. It was found that the WET maps agree well in the overall shape and two-dimensional distribution of WET values. Quantitatively, the ratio of the two-dimensional WET maps shows a mean of 1.004 with a standard deviation of 0.022. Differences were found to be concentrated at high WET gradients. This could be explained by the Bragg-peak degradation, which is measured in detail by ion radiography with the flat-panel detector, but is not taken into account in the treatment planning system. Excluding pixels exhibiting significant Bragg-peak degradation, the mean value of the ratio was found to be 1.000 with a standard deviation of 0.012. Employment of the amorphous silicon flat-panel detector for WET measurements allows us to detect uncertainties of the WET determination in the treatment planning process. This makes the investigated technique a very helpful tool to study

  2. A study of factors limiting spatial resolution using a 25 micron pixel pitch direct-detection amorphous selenium imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chris C.; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    An amorphous selenium direct detector with a 25 μm pixel pitch is studied for mammography and fluoroscopy applications. In this paper we analyze spatial resolution by examining the main contributions to the inherent modulation transfer function (MTF) of amorphous selenium, such as primary photoelectron range and x-ray beam obliquity; and determine their significance relative to aperture MTF. Improvements in spatial resolution provided by a move to a small pixel size are complicated by deep carrier trapping. Trapped carriers cause residual charge induction across the pixel plane. We examine the significance of this effect on spatial resolution. The potential improvements of moving from a larger pixel pitch to a 25 μm pixel pitch are studied, including all significant effects, at selected pixel pitches.

  3. Amorphous selenium direct detection CMOS digital x-ray imager with 25 micron pixel pitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christopher C.; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Ghanbarzadeh, Sina; Allan, Gary; Farrier, Michael; Cunningham, Ian A.; Karim, Karim S.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a high resolution amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detection imager using a large-area compatible back-end fabrication process on top of a CMOS active pixel sensor having 25 micron pixel pitch. Integration of a-Se with CMOS technology requires overcoming CMOS/a-Se interfacial strain, which initiates nucleation of crystalline selenium and results in high detector dark currents. A CMOS-compatible polyimide buffer layer was used to planarize the backplane and provide a low stress and thermally stable surface for a-Se. The buffer layer inhibits crystallization and provides detector stability that is not only a performance factor but also critical for favorable long term cost-benefit considerations in the application of CMOS digital x-ray imagers in medical practice. The detector structure is comprised of a polyimide (PI) buffer layer, the a-Se layer, and a gold (Au) top electrode. The PI layer is applied by spin-coating and is patterned using dry etching to open the backplane bond pads for wire bonding. Thermal evaporation is used to deposit the a-Se and Au layers, and the detector is operated in hole collection mode (i.e. a positive bias on the Au top electrode). High resolution a-Se diagnostic systems typically use 70 to 100 μm pixel pitch and have a pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF) that is significantly limited by the pixel aperture. Our results confirm that, for a densely integrated 25 μm pixel pitch CMOS array, the MTF approaches the fundamental material limit, i.e. where the MTF begins to be limited by the a-Se material properties and not the pixel aperture. Preliminary images demonstrating high spatial resolution have been obtained from a frst prototype imager.

  4. Evaluation of image quality and appropriate X-ray exposure of a flat panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated image quality and necessary patient exposure when using the CXDI-11 (Canon Inc.) flat panel detector (FPD). This detector, which consists of a rare earth fluorescent screen (Gd2O2S: Tb) and amorphous silicon sensor, was compared with the FCR-5000 (Fuji Film Medical Co., Ltd.) CR and the UR-3/HGM2 (Fuji Film Medical Co., Ltd.) film-screen (F/S) combination. Comparisons of both physical imaging characteristics and clinical image quality were carried out. The final MTF of the FPD was found to be similar to or better than those of the CR and F/S systems. For identical exposures, the overall Wiener spectrum of the FPD was found to be slightly poorer than that of the F/S combination. The NEQ of the FPD was found to be similar to or better than those of the CR and F/S systems. Comparison of chest images showed that the FPD produced images with quality comparable to or higher than those of the CR system. Similarly, evaluation of abdominal and bone images using a 5-scale method showed that the FPD produced images with quality comparable to or higher than those of the CR system. As with CR, the x-ray quantum mottle in FPD images becomes noticeable at low exposures. Clinical images were therefore taken with a 30% increase in exposure, giving a Wiener spectrum for the FPD images similar to that obtained with the F/S images. This is probably not a significant increase in exposure, given the improvement in image quality and increased ease of use provided by the CXDI system. Further, future improvements in hardware and image processing may allow images to be taken with the same exposure used for F/S images. Our evaluation of both image quality and x-ray exposure has therefore indicated the value of the FPD in the clinical environment. (author)

  5. Integration of an amorphous silicon passive pixel sensor array with a lateral amorphous selenium detector for large area indirect conversion x-ray imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Keshavarzi, Rasoul; Shin, Kyung-Wook; Hristovski, Christos; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Chen, Feng; Majid, Shaikh Hasibul; Karim, Karim S.

    2011-03-01

    Previously, we reported on a single-pixel detector based on a lateral a-Se metal-semiconductor-metal structure, intended for indirect conversion X-ray imaging. This work is the continuous effort leading to the first prototype of an indirect conversion X-ray imaging sensor array utilizing lateral amorphous selenium. To replace a structurally-sophisticated vertical multilayer amorphous silicon photodiode, a lateral a-Se MSM photodetector is employed which can be easily integrated with an amorphous silicon thin film transistor passive pixel sensor array. In this work, both 2×2 macro-pixel and 32×32 micro-pixel arrays were fabricated and tested along with discussion of the results.

  6. Charge transport model in solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium and defect suppression design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Miranda, Yesenia; Liu, Hongyu; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) in a layer of High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) is being investigated for its use in large area medical imagers. Avalanche multiplication of photogenerated charge requires electric fields greater than 70 V μm-1. For a-Se to withstand this high electric field, blocking layers are used to prevent the injection of charge carriers from the electrodes. Blocking layers must have a high injection barrier and deep trapping states to reduce the electric field at the interface. In the presence of a defect in the blocking layer, a distributed resistive layer (DRL) must be included into the structure to build up space charge and reduce the electric field in a-Se and the defect. A numerical charge transport model has been developed to optimize the properties of blocking layers used in various HARP structures. The model shows the incorporation of a DRL functionality into the p-layer can reduce dark current at a point defect by two orders of magnitude by reducing the field in a-Se to the avalanche threshold. Hole mobility in a DRL of ˜10-8 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 100 V μm-1 as demonstrated by the model can be achieved experimentally by varying the hole mobility of p-type organic or inorganic semiconductors through doping, e.g., using Poly(9-vinylcarbozole) doped with 1%-3% (by weight) of poly(3-hexylthiopene).

  7. Modeling of photocurrent and lag signals in amorphous selenium x-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiquee, Sinchita; Kabir, M. Z., E-mail: kabir@encs.concordia.ca [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 Blvd. de Maisonneuve West, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8 (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    A mathematical model for transient photocurrent and lag signal in x-ray imaging detectors has been developed by considering charge carrier trapping and detrapping in the energy distributed defect states under exponentially distributed carrier generation across the photoconductor. The model for the transient and steady-state carrier distributions and hence the photocurrent has been developed by solving the carrier continuity equation for both holes and electrons. The residual (commonly known as lag signal) current is modeled by solving the trapping rate equations considering the thermal release and trap filling effects. The model is applied to amorphous selenium (a-Se) detectors for both chest radiography and mammography. The authors analyze the dependence of the residual current on various factors, such as x-ray exposure, applied electric field, and temperature. The electron trapping and detrapping mostly determines the residual current in a-Se detectors. The lag signal is more prominent in chest radiographic detector than in mammographic detectors. The model calculations are compared with the published experimental data and show a very good agreement.

  8. A data acquisition system for flat-panel imaging arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electronic data acquisition system for pixelated, two-dimensional, amorphous silicon x-ray imaging arrays has been developed. The system was designed in a modular fashion with digital control provided by field-programmable logic devices. This approach allows sections of the design to be upgraded with little impact on other aspects of the system. Good analog noise performance was obtained by matching the preamplifier design to the characteristics of the array outputs. The design of this system is presented and its performance quantified

  9. Development of a direct-conversion-type flat-panel detector for radiography and fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the X-ray flat-panel detector technology which will be able to take the place of all conventional X-ray detector technologies. Hospitals are rapidly changing from handling information with analogue systems to using digital systems, accompanying the advances being made in this digital information age. The X-ray flat-panel detector will convert 2D distribution of X-ray intensity to digital image data instantly. Until now, there has not been an X-ray flat-panel detector that can completely take the place of analogue X-ray films with screens (S-F) and can acquire high-speed dynamic X-ray images with high image quality, but we have realized this by developing a direct-conversion-type flat-panel detector. The latest research result confirmed the increase of X-ray absorption capability, spatial resolution which exceeded a regular type of S-F and images without distortion in a large field of view. This detector is a compact size, just like an X-ray cassette, and can be used for both radiography and fluoroscopy, which can take the place not only of S-F but also Imaging Intensifier (I.I.) -TV. The X-ray flat-panel detector will cause dramatic changes to all X-ray systems and we can say specially that the direct-type flat-panel detector has proven to be a step toward the coming era of real full-digital hospitals. (author)

  10. Optimal radiographic techniques for digital mammograms obtained with an amorphous selenium detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael J.; Dodge, Charles; Peck, Donald J.; Swinford, Ann

    2003-06-01

    Traditional film/screen mammograms are obtained using Molybdenum or Rhodium target x-ray tubes. The energy spectrum from these sources matches the limited latitude of film/screen systems. For digital imaging systems, the latitude is linear over a wide range of exposures and arbitrary H&D curves can be obtained with image processing. This allows the recorded contrast to noise ratio (CNR) to be optimized by considering a wide range of radiographic techniques. For this work, we modeled the radiographic process for a digital (amorphous selenium) mammography system. The optimal CNR relative to dose was determined for several target/filter combinations, for a wide range of kVp values, and for varying breast thickness. The target/filter combinations included: Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh, Rh/Rh, W/Al, W/Mo, W/Ag, and W/Sn. As breast thickness increased, the use of a tungsten target with a tin filter resulted in a 34% improvement in CNR for the same dose to the breast when compared to the use of a Molybdenum target with a Molybdenum filter. Notably, the W/Sn target/filter combination resulted in a significantly lower mA-s for the same breast dose (2/3 to 1/5 lower for a breast thickness from 4 to 8cm). In mammography applications, use of a Tungsten tube rather than the traditional Molybdenum tube should lead to significant reductions in exposure time and tube heat while maintaining similar image quality and dose.

  11. Digital radiography using amorphous selenium: photoconductively activated switch (PAS) readout system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Nikita; Komljenovic, Philip T; Germann, Stephen; Rowlands, John A

    2008-03-01

    A new amorphous selenium (a-Se) digital radiography detector is introduced. The proposed detector generates a charge image in the a-Se layer in a conventional manner, which is stored on electrode pixels at the surface of the a-Se layer. A novel method, called photoconductively activated switch (PAS), is used to read out the latent x-ray charge image. The PAS readout method uses lateral photoconduction at the a-Se surface which is a revolutionary modification of the bulk photoinduced discharge (PID) methods. The PAS method addresses and eliminates the fundamental weaknesses of the PID methods--long readout times and high readout noise--while maintaining the structural simplicity and high resolution for which PID optical readout systems are noted. The photoconduction properties of the a-Se surface were investigated and the geometrical design for the electrode pixels for a PAS radiography system was determined. This design was implemented in a single pixel PAS evaluation system. The results show that the PAS x-ray induced output charge signal was reproducible and depended linearly on the x-ray exposure in the diagnostic exposure range. Furthermore, the readout was reasonably rapid (10 ms for pixel discharge). The proposed detector allows readout of half a pixel row at a time (odd pixels followed by even pixels), thus permitting the readout of a complete image in 30 s for a 40 cm x 40 cm detector with the potential of reducing that time by using greater readout light intensity. This demonstrates that a-Se based x-ray detectors using photoconductively activated switches could form a basis for a practical integrated digital radiography system. PMID:18404939

  12. 75 FR 51285 - In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Flat Panel Digital Televisions and Components Thereof; Notice of... United States after importation of certain flat panel digital televisions and components thereof by...-1810. Persons with mobility impairments who will need special assistance in gaining access to...

  13. Implementation of a program of quality assurance of image in an imaging system of flat panel portal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (IGRT) image-guided radiation therapy is the one in which images are used to locate the area of treatment. Modern irradiation systems are equipped with different modalities for obtaining images, such as flat panel systems, systems conebeam, tomoimagen, etc. This paper describes the start-up and the experience of a quality assurance program based on a flat panel portal Imaging System. (Author)

  14. Amorphous selenium lateral Frisch photodetector and photomultiplier for high performance medical x-ray and gamma-ray imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, A. H.; Wang, K.; Chen, F.; Karim, K. S.

    2010-04-01

    We propose a new indirect x-ray and gamma-ray detector which is comprised of a scintillating crystal coupled with an amorphous selenium (a-Se) metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector. A lateral Frisch grid is embedded between the anode and the cathode to provide (1) unipolar charge sensing and (2) avalanche multiplication gain during hole transport inside the detection region. Unipolar charge sensing operation reduces the persistent photocurrent lag and increases the speed of the photodetector because most of the pixel charge is induced during carrier transport inside the detection region. Also, with proper biasing of the electrodes, we can create a high-field region between the lateral Frisch grid and the cathode for avalanche multiplication gain. Thus, we can convert the photodetector into a photomultiplier for higher signal-to-noise ratio and single photon-counting gamma-ray imaging. We present for the first time, a fabricated amorphous selenium lateral Frisch photodetector and present preliminary results of the measured photocurrents in response to a blue light emitting diode.

  15. Full dynamic resolution low lower DA-Converters for flat panel displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Saas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stepwise charging can reduce the power dissipated in the source drivers of a flat panel display. However the solution presented only provided a dynamic resolution of 3 bits which is not sufficient for obtaining a full color resolution display. In this work a further development of the basic idea is presented. The stepwise charging is increased to 4 bits and supplemented by a current source to provide an output signal which represents an 8 bit value with sufficient accuracy. Within this work the application is an AM-OLED flat panel display, but the concept can easily be applied to other display technologies like TFT-LCD as well.

  16. Competing Technologies and Industry Evolution: The Benefits of Making Mistakes in the Flat Panel Display Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Eggers, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Managers at firms facing uncertain competing technologies evolving concurrently face a complex decision set, including options to invest in one technology or other, both technologies, or to wait to invest. This study investigates the role that experience, learning and timing play in affecting the firm-level pros and cons of each of these four strategies in a technological competition situation. Using a unique data set on the evolution of the global flat panel display industry, this study offe...

  17. Structural deviation calibration and parameters obtaining algorithm for flat panel detector CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviation of geometric parameter from its design value of flat panel detector computed tomography (CT) would result in image quality degradation. A structural deviation calibration and parameters obtaining algorithm based on projections was developed to improve the accuracy. The algorithm uses a simple calibration phantom and serial projections to adjust the system structure and analytically estimate the geometric CT parameters. Calculations demonstrate that the algorithm is very accurate with the error less than 0.5%, and experiments show high quality images. (authors)

  18. Attenuated phase-shift mask (PSM) blanks for flat panel display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Kagehiro; Mochizuki, Satoru; Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Shigeru

    2015-10-01

    The fine pattern exposure techniques are required for Flat Panel display applications as smart phone, tablet PC recently. The attenuated phase shift masks (PSM) are being used for ArF and KrF photomask lithography technique for high end pattern Semiconductor applications. We developed CrOx based large size PSM blanks that has good uniformity on optical characteristics for FPD applications. We report the basic optical characteristics and uniformity, stability data of large sized CrOx PSM blanks.

  19. Establishment of action levels for quality control of IMRT flat panel: experience with the algorithm iGRiMLO; Establecimiento de niveles de accion para el control de calidad de IMRT con panel plano: experiencia con el algoritmo iGRiMLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, V.; Dolores, VV. de los; Pastor, V.; Martinez, J.; Gimeno, J.; Guardino, C.; Crispin, V.

    2011-07-01

    Algorithm has been used at our institution iGRiMLO scheduled for individual verification of treatment plans for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) step and shoot through portal dosimetry pretreatment of non-transmission, triggering the plan directly to a portal imaging device (EPID) of an amorphous silicon flat panel.

  20. Development and evaluation of a portable amorphous silicon flat-panel x-ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Minoru; Mochizuki, Chiori; Kameshima, Toshio; Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Court, Laurence; Hayashida, Shinsuke; Morishita, Masakazu; Ohta, Shin-ichi

    2001-06-01

    The design, development and evaluation of a portable x-ray detector are described. The completed detector has a pixel pitch of 100 micrometers , an active imaging area of 22.5 x 27.5 cm2 (9 x 11 inch2), package outer dimensions of 32.5 x 32.5 cm2, a thickness of only 20 mm, and a weight of around 2.8 kg. A number of significant advances in the design and production processes were needed to produce such a compact detector with such a small pixel pitch, while maintaining the image quality achieved a current detector (CXDI-22) which has a 160 mm pixel pitch. These include the development of a low power readout IC, advances in detector packaging design, concentrating on lightweight and strong components, and redesign of the pixel structure to improve the fill-factor. A comparison is made of the imaging characteristics of this new detector with the CXDI-22 detector, and it is shown that the new detector demonstrates improved CTF, and NEQ. The new detector is also shown to demonstrate superior performance in a contrast-detail phantom evaluation. This new detector should be useful for limb and joint examinations as it offers high spatial resolution, combined with the same freedom in positioning provided by conventional screen-film cassettes.

  1. Portable low-cost flat panel detectors for real-time digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray inspection is one of the most common used non-destructive testing methods in industry applications, but for the portable X-ray digital solution are not so many accessible, low-cost and versatile detection devices. The efficiency of a non-destructive X-ray portable device is represented by the quality of digital images, by its low acquisition time combined with a high resolution, in condition of low noise and at an affordable cost. The paper presents two X-ray portable imaging systems developed by us, suitable also for aerospace NDT applications, which are also very versatile for being easily adapted for other fields that requires mobile solutions. The first device described in the paper represent a portable large-size (210 mm X 550 mm) and high-resolution (27/54 microns) flat panel detector based on linear translation of a X-Ray TDI detector, destined for various components/parts real-time transmission measurements. The second system it is also a flat panel detectors, with a size of 510 mm X 610 mm, with the detector size from 0.2 mm until 1.5 mm, which can operate by applying the dual-energy method, very useful for discriminating materials by evaluating their Atomic effective number. The high resolution and low-cost of this flat-panels widens their applicability by covering large requirements, from identifying unwanted materials within a structure until detection of very thin cracks in complex components.

  2. Rotational flat-panel computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerfler, A.; Struffert, T.; Engelhorn, T.; Richter, C. [Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Originally aimed at improving standard radiography by providing higher absorption efficiency and a wider dynamic range than available with X-ray film or film-screen combinations, flat-panel detector technology has become widely accepted for neuroangiographic imaging. In particular flat-panel detector computed tomography (FD-CT) which uses rotational C-arm-mounted flat-panel detector technology is capable of volumetric imaging with high spatial resolution. As ''Angiographic CT'' FD-CT may be helpful during many diagnostic and neurointerventional procedures, i.e. intracranial stenting for cerebrovascular stenoses, stent-assisted coil embolization of wide-necked cerebral aneurysms and embolizations of arteriovenous malformations. By providing morphologic, CT-like images of the brain within the angio suite, FD-CT is able to rapidly visualize periprocedural hemorrhage and may thus improve rapid complication management without the need for patient transfer. In addition, myelography and postmyelographic FD-CT imaging can be carried out using a single machine. Spinal interventions, such as kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty might also benefit from FD-CT. This paper briefly reviews the technical principles of FD technology and then focuses on possible applications in diagnostic and interventional neuroradiology. (orig.)

  3. Portable low-cost flat panel detectors for real-time digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iovea, Mihai; Neagu, Marian; Stefanescu, Bogdan; Mateiasi, Gabriela; Porosnicu, Ioana; Angheluta, Elena [Accent Pro 2000 S.R.L., Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-07-01

    The X-ray inspection is one of the most common used non-destructive testing methods in industry applications, but for the portable X-ray digital solution are not so many accessible, low-cost and versatile detection devices. The efficiency of a non-destructive X-ray portable device is represented by the quality of digital images, by its low acquisition time combined with a high resolution, in condition of low noise and at an affordable cost. The paper presents two X-ray portable imaging systems developed by us, suitable also for aerospace NDT applications, which are also very versatile for being easily adapted for other fields that requires mobile solutions. The first device described in the paper represent a portable large-size (210 mm X 550 mm) and high-resolution (27/54 microns) flat panel detector based on linear translation of a X-Ray TDI detector, destined for various components/parts real-time transmission measurements. The second system it is also a flat panel detectors, with a size of 510 mm X 610 mm, with the detector size from 0.2 mm until 1.5 mm, which can operate by applying the dual-energy method, very useful for discriminating materials by evaluating their Atomic effective number. The high resolution and low-cost of this flat-panels widens their applicability by covering large requirements, from identifying unwanted materials within a structure until detection of very thin cracks in complex components.

  4. Flat panel computed tomography of human ex vivo heart and bone specimens: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaou, Konstantin; Becker, Christoph R.; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Flohr, Thomas; Stierstorfer, Karl [CT Division, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this technical investigation was the detailed description of a prototype flat panel detector computed tomography system (FPCT) and its initial evaluation in an ex vivo setting. The prototype FPCT scanner consists of a conventional radiographic flat panel detector, mounted on a multi-slice CT scanner gantry. Explanted human ex vivo heart and foot specimens were examined. Images were reformatted with various reconstruction algorithms and were evaluated for high-resolution anatomic information. For comparison purposes, the ex vivo specimens were also scanned with a conventional 16-detector-row CT scanner (Sensation 16, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim, Germany). With the FPCT prototype used, a 1,024 x 768 resolution matrix can be obtained, resulting in an isotropic voxel size of 0.25 x 0.25 x 0.25 mm at the iso-center. Due to the high spatial resolution, very small structures such as trabecular bone or third-degree, distal branches of coronary arteries could be visualized. This first evaluation showed that flat panel detector systems can be used in a cone-beam computed tomography scanner and that very high spatial resolutions can be achieved. However, there are limitations for in vivo use due to constraints in low contrast resolution and slow scan speed. (orig.)

  5. High-performance flat-panel solar thermoelectric generators with high thermal concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Daniel; Poudel, Bed; Feng, Hsien-Ping; Caylor, J Christopher; Yu, Bo; Yan, Xiao; Ma, Yi; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Dezhi; Muto, Andrew; McEnaney, Kenneth; Chiesa, Matteo; Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang

    2011-07-01

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity has been dominated by photovoltaic and solar thermal power generation. Photovoltaic cells are deployed widely, mostly as flat panels, whereas solar thermal electricity generation relying on optical concentrators and mechanical heat engines is only seen in large-scale power plants. Here we demonstrate a promising flat-panel solar thermal to electric power conversion technology based on the Seebeck effect and high thermal concentration, thus enabling wider applications. The developed solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) achieved a peak efficiency of 4.6% under AM1.5G (1 kW m(-2)) conditions. The efficiency is 7-8 times higher than the previously reported best value for a flat-panel STEG, and is enabled by the use of high-performance nanostructured thermoelectric materials and spectrally-selective solar absorbers in an innovative design that exploits high thermal concentration in an evacuated environment. Our work opens up a promising new approach which has the potential to achieve cost-effective conversion of solar energy into electricity. PMID:21532584

  6. Performance of a novel 43-cm x 43-cm flat-panel detector with CsI:Tl scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Nokita, Makoto; Okada, Satoshi; Hayashida, Shinsuke; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2004-05-01

    We have developed a novel flat-panel detector with CsI:Tl scintillator. The detector consists of a single piece 43cm x 43cm amorphous silicon thin-film transistor (TFT) array with MIS (metal-insulator-semiconductor) photoelectric converter having a pixel pitch of 160μm coated with a needle-like crystal CsI:Tl scintillator. Signal chain was totally revised from current detector utilizing an innovative sensor technology. The novel detector and current detector were equipped to a digital radiography system allowing a quantitative and comparative study. Results show that the novel detector has a linear response covering the radiographic exposure range. It has a moderate modulation transfer function (MTF) sufficient to the radiography tasks and effective to suppress the aliasing. The detective quantum efficiency (DQE) was almost twice than the current detector. The result of contrast-detail phantom exposed with a 1/2x dose level is equivalent to that of current detector with a 1x dose level. These results show that performance of novel detector is superior to and expected to reduce the patient dose in half than current detector due to higher DQE and innovative sensor technology.

  7. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyung Cha, Bo [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang-Woo [Department of Radiation Convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Keedong [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Seongchae, E-mail: sarim@keri.re.kr [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Young [Advanced Medical Device Research Center, Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80–120 kVp, and different current (10–50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  8. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80–120 kVp, and different current (10–50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally

  9. Preliminary performance of image quality for a low-dose C-arm CT system with a flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyung Cha, Bo; Seo, Chang-Woo; Yang, Keedong; Jeon, Seongchae; Huh, Young

    2015-06-01

    Digital flat panel imager (FPI)-based cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been widely used in C-arm imaging for spine surgery and interventional procedures. The system provides real-time fluoroscopy with high spatial resolution and three-dimensional (3D) visualization of anatomical structure without the need for patient transportation in interventional suite. In this work, a prototype CBCT imaging platform with continuous single rotation about the gantry was developed by using a large-area flat-panel detector with amorphous Si-based thin film transistor matrix. The different 2D projection images were acquired during constant gantry velocity for reconstructed images at a tube voltage of 80-120 kVp, and different current (10-50 mA) conditions. Various scan protocols were applied to a chest phantom human by changing the number of projection images and scanning angles. The projections were then reconstructed into a volumetric data of sections by using a 3D reconstruction algorithm (e.g., filtered back projection). The preliminary quantitative X-ray performance of our CBCT system was investigated by using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine CT phantom in terms of spatial resolution, contrast resolution, and CT number linearity for mobile or fixed C-arm based CBCT application with limited rotational geometry. The novel results of the projection data with different scanning angles and angular increments in the orbital gantry platform were acquired and evaluated experimentally.

  10. Performance of a volumetric CT scanner based upon a flat-panel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Drake, Douglas G.

    1999-05-01

    To characterize the performance of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system based upon an indirect- detection, amorphous silicon flat-panel imager (FPI). Tomographic images obtained using the FPI are presented, and the signal and noise characteristics of reconstructed images are quantified. Specifically, the spatial uniformity, CT linearity, contrast performance, noise characteristics, spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visualization are examined. Finally, the performance of the FPI-based CT system is discussed in relation to existing clinical technologies. A table-top measurements system was constructed to allow investigation of FPI performance in CBCT within a precisely controlled and reproducible geometry. The FPI incorporates a 512 X 512 active matrix array of a-Si:H thin-film transistors and photodiodes in combination with an overlying (133 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb) phosphor. The commercially available prototype FPI has a pixel pitch of 400 micrometer, a fill factor of approximately 80%, can be read at a maximum frame rate of 5 fps, and provides 16 bit digitization. Mounted upon an optical bench are the x-ray tube (in a rigid support frame), the object to be imaged (upon a precision rotation/translation table), and the FPI (mounted upon a precision translation table). The entire setup is directed under computer control, and volumetric imaging is accomplished by rotating the object incrementally over 360 degrees, delivering a radiographic x-ray pulse (e.g., 100 - 130 kVp, approximately 0.1 - 10 mAs), and acquiring a projection image at each increment. Prior to reconstruction, dark and flood- field corrections are applied to account for stationary nonuniformities in detector response and dark current. Tomographic images are reconstructed from the projections using the Feldkamp filtered back-projection algorithm for CBCT. The linearity of the CBCT system was compared to that of a commercial scanner (Philips SR-7000) using materials ranging in CT number from

  11. A semiempirical linear model of indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shih-Ying; Yang Kai; Abbey, Craig K.; Boone, John M. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 0505, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 0505, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 92106 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, California 95616 (United States) and Department of Radiology, University of California, Davis, Medical Center, 4860 Y Street, Ambulatory Care Center Suite 3100, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: It is important to understand signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector when developing and optimizing imaging systems. For optimization where simulating images is necessary, this study introduces a semiempirical model to simulate projection images with user-defined x-ray fluence interaction. Methods: The signal and noise transfer in the indirect, flat-panel x-ray detectors is characterized by statistics consistent with energy-integration of x-ray photons. For an incident x-ray spectrum, x-ray photons are attenuated and absorbed in the x-ray scintillator to produce light photons, which are coupled to photodiodes for signal readout. The signal mean and variance are linearly related to the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum by empirically determined factors. With the known first- and second-order statistics, images can be simulated by incorporating multipixel signal statistics and the modulation transfer function of the imaging system. To estimate the semiempirical input to this model, 500 projection images (using an indirect, flat-panel x-ray detector in the breast CT system) were acquired with 50-100 kilovolt (kV) x-ray spectra filtered with 0.1-mm tin (Sn), 0.2-mm copper (Cu), 1.5-mm aluminum (Al), or 0.05-mm silver (Ag). The signal mean and variance of each detector element and the noise power spectra (NPS) were calculated and incorporated into this model for accuracy. Additionally, the modulation transfer function of the detector system was physically measured and incorporated in the image simulation steps. For validation purposes, simulated and measured projection images of air scans were compared using 40 kV/0.1-mm Sn, 65 kV/0.2-mm Cu, 85 kV/1.5-mm Al, and 95 kV/0.05-mm Ag. Results: The linear relationship between the measured signal statistics and the energy-integrated x-ray spectrum was confirmed and incorporated into the model. The signal mean and variance factors were linearly related to kV for each filter material (r

  12. Designing, Modeling, Constructing, and Testing a Flat Panel Speaker and Sound Diffuser for a Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project was to design, model, build, and test a flat panel speaker and frame for a spherical dome structure being made into a simulator. The simulator will be a test bed for evaluating an immersive environment for human interfaces. This project focused on the loud speakers and a sound diffuser for the dome. The rest of the team worked on an Ambisonics 3D sound system, video projection system, and multi-direction treadmill to create the most realistic scene possible. The main programs utilized in this project, were Pro-E and COMSOL. Pro-E was used for creating detailed figures for the fabrication of a frame that held a flat panel loud speaker. The loud speaker was made from a thin sheet of Plexiglas and 4 acoustic exciters. COMSOL, a multiphysics finite analysis simulator, was used to model and evaluate all stages of the loud speaker, frame, and sound diffuser. Acoustical testing measurements were utilized to create polar plots from the working prototype which were then compared to the COMSOL simulations to select the optimal design for the dome. The final goal of the project was to install the flat panel loud speaker design in addition to a sound diffuser on to the wall of the dome. After running tests in COMSOL on various speaker configurations, including a warped Plexiglas version, the optimal speaker design included a flat piece of Plexiglas with a rounded frame to match the curvature of the dome. Eight of these loud speakers will be mounted into an inch and a half of high performance acoustic insulation, or Thinsulate, that will cover the inside of the dome. The following technical paper discusses these projects and explains the engineering processes used, knowledge gained, and the projected future goals of this project

  13. Dual-exposure technique for extending the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an approach to extend the dynamic range of x-ray flat panel detectors by combining two acquisitions of the same sample taken with two different x-ray photon flux levels and the same beam spectral configuration. In order to combine both datasets, the response of detector pixels was modelled in terms of mean and variance using a linear model. The model was extended to take into account the effect of pixel saturation. We estimated a joint probability density function (j-pdf) of the pixel values by assuming that each dataset follows an independent Gaussian distribution. This j-pdf was used for estimating the final pixel value of the high-dynamic-range dataset using a maximum likelihood method. The suitability of the pixel model for the representation of the detector signal was assessed using experimental data from a small-animal cone-beam micro-CT scanner equipped with a flat panel detector. The potential extension in dynamic range offered by our method was investigated for generic flat panel detectors using analytical expressions and simulations. The performance of the proposed dual-exposure approach in realistic imaging environments was compared with that of a regular single-exposure technique using experimental data from two different phantoms. Image quality was assessed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, and analysis of profiles drawn on the images. The dynamic range, measured as the ratio between the exposure for saturation and the exposure equivalent to instrumentation noise, was increased from 76.9 to 166.7 when using our method. Dual-exposure results showed higher contrast-to-noise ratio and contrast resolution than the single-exposure acquisitions for the same x-ray dose. In addition, image artifacts were reduced in the combined dataset. This technique to extend the dynamic range of the detector without increasing the dose is particularly suited to image samples that contain both low and high attenuation regions. (paper)

  14. Daily quality control of collimator multi-leaf for IMRT static through flat panel (EPID)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When techniques are employed such as radiotherapy for intensity modulated (IMRT) is necessary to establish a proper quality assurance program. According to national and international recommendations, such a program must include, in addition to verification of treatment for each patient, a multi-leaf collimator quality control daily, easy to perform and analyze, to ensure the quality of the given treatments daily. This paper intends to make such quality control through the irradiation of a number of fields in the imaging system flat panel portal and its subsequent analysis. (Author)

  15. A flat-panel x-ray detector for digital radiography and fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Flat-Panel X-ray detector is widely used for digital radiography and fluoroscopy. The outline of the detectors such as the structure, working principle, performance and clinical applications that are newly developed using this digital X-ray detector are described. An X-ray detector applying CdZnTe film which is expected to high detective efficiency is also reported. The characteristics of poly crystalline CdZnTe films, namely grain boundary affect the detector performance. To improve performance of the CdZnTe detector, control of the poly crystalline structure is required. (author)

  16. Evaluation of stent visibility by flat panel detector CT in patients treated for intracranial aneurysms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarencon, Frederic [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Paris (France); Piotin, Michel; Pistocchi, Silvia; Blanc, Raphael [Fondation A. de Rothschild, Paris (France); Babic, Drazenko [Philips Healthcare, Best (Netherlands)

    2012-10-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the visibility of stents using high-resolution computed tomography (CT) acquisitions acquired with flat panel detector (XperCT, Allura series, Philips Healthcare, The Netherlands) for endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms. On a 24-month period, 48 patients endovascularly treated by coiling and stenting (59 stents) for intracranial aneurysms were explored by flat panel detector CT technique. A sequence of 620 2D images was acquired over an angle of 240 using a 1,024 x 1,024 pixel matrix detector within a 48-cm field of view. The images were retrospectively analyzed independently by two neuroradiologists. Evaluation criteria were percentage of visualization of the stents and stent deployment (kinking or unsatisfactory deployment of the stent). Evaluation of the stent was feasible for all the patients. Stent visibility by XperCT was overall estimated at 76% of the stent length. Difficulties to analyze the stents were related to coil artifacts but not to packing density or aneurysm location. Stent length visualization was higher when the acquisition was performed before additional coiling (P < 0.0001). Mild kinking/misdeployment was noticed in 22% of the cases. XperCT technique provides multiplanar and 3D reconstructions that allows for a satisfying visualization of intracranial stents. This CT-like acquisition should be performed after the stent deployment and before coiling, in order to obtain better stent visualization. (orig.)

  17. Physical properties of a new flat panel detector with cesium-iodide technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Andreas; Penchev, Petar; Fiebich, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Flat panel detectors have become the standard technology in projection radiography. Further progress in detector technology will result in an improvement of MTF and DQE. The new detector (DX-D45C; Agfa; Mortsel/Belgium) is based on cesium-iodine crystals and has a change in the detector material and the readout electronics. The detector has a size of 30 cm x 24 cm and a pixel matrix of 2560 x 2048 with a pixel pitch of 124 μm. The system includes an automatic exposure detector, which enables the use of the detector without a connection to the x-ray generator. The physical properties of the detector were determined following IEC 62220-1-1 in a laboratory setting. The MTF showed an improvement compared to the previous version of cesium-iodine based flat-panel detectors. Thereby the DQE is also improved especially for the higher frequencies. The new detector showed an improvement in the physical properties compared to the previous versions. This enables a potential for further dose reductions in clinical imaging.

  18. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source

  19. Dose rate and beam profile measurement of proton beam using a flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Min

    2015-10-01

    A 20-MeV or 100-MeV proton beam is provided to users for their proton beam irradiation experiments at KOrea Multi-Purpose Accelerator Complex. Radiochromic film (Gafchromic / HDV2) has been used to measure the dose rate and the profile of an incident proton beam during irradiation experiments. However, such measurements using radiochromic film have some inconveniences because an additional scanning process of is required to quantify the film's image. Therefore, we tried to measure the dose rate and beam profile by using a flat panel detector (FPD), which was developed for X-ray radiography as a substitute for radiochromic film because the FPD can measure the beam profile and the dose rate directly through a digitized image with a high spatial resolution. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of using a FPD as a substitute for radiochromic film. The preliminary results for the beam profile and the dose rate measured by using the flat panel detector are reported in the paper.

  20. Evaluation of parallactic unsharpness caused by flat panel detector in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the parallactic unsharpness caused by flat panel detector in digital radiography using different incident angle of central ray. Methods: R-l square-wave phantom was exposed by Kodak DR3000 system with X-ray tube angled 0°, 10°, 20°, 30°, and 40 respectively. Then, presampled modulation transfer function (MTF) was calculated for each case above. Subsequently, experimental data were processed and Wilcoxon signed ranks test were performed by statistic software SPSS 10.0, in which P<0.05 was considered as statistically significant difference. Results: The presampled MTF curves of incident angle of 0°-40° degree, were presented orderly from top to bottom, especially the incident angle of 40° was obviously the lowest. The incident angle of 0° was considered as a control group and other groups were compared against it. There was no statistically significant difference for MTF of incident angle of 10° (Z=-1.893, P=0.058), while there were significant difference for MTF of incident angle of 20°, 30°, and 40° (Z=-2.547, -2.666, -2.666, P<0.05). Conclusions: For flat panel detector in digital radiography, the bigger the incident angle of central ray, the larger the parallactic unsharpness. In addition, this effect has less influence on structures of low spatial frequency than those of high spatial frequency. (authors)

  1. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun, E-mail: stscjun@mail.sysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Physics and Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Li, Ziping [The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng [State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Display Material and Technology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); School of Microelectronics, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China)

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  2. Determination of the detective quantum efficiency of a prototype, megavoltage indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mohri, Y; Jee, K W; Antonuk, L E; Maolinbay, M; Zhao, Q

    2001-12-01

    After years of aggressive development, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) have recently become commercially available for radiotherapy imaging. In this paper we report on a comprehensive evaluation of the signal and noise performance of a large-area prototype AMFPI specifically developed for this application. The imager is based on an array of 512 x 512 pixels incorporating amorphous silicon photodiodes and thin-film transistors offering a 26 x 26 cm2 active area at a pixel pitch of 508 microm. This indirect detection array was coupled to various x-ray converters consisting of a commercial phosphor screen (Lanex Fast B, Lanex Regular, or Lanex Fine) and a 1 mm thick copper plate. Performance of the imager in terms of measured sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is reported at beam energies of 6 and 15 MV and at doses of 1 and 2 monitor units (MU). In addition, calculations of system performance (NPS, DQE) based on cascaded-system formalism were reported and compared to empirical results. In these calculations, the Swank factor and spatial energy distributions of secondary electrons within the converter were modeled by means of EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations. Measured MTFs of the system show a weak dependence on screen type (i.e., thickness), which is partially due to the spreading of secondary radiation. Measured DQE was found to be independent of dose for the Fast B screen, implying that the imager is input-quantum-limited at 1 MU, even at an extended source-to-detector distance of 200 cm. The maximum DQE obtained is around 1%--a limit imposed by the low detection efficiency of the converter. For thinner phosphor screens, the DQE is lower due to their lower detection efficiencies. Finally, for the Fast B screen, good agreement between calculated and measured DQE was observed. PMID:11797959

  3. Determination of the detective quantum efficiency of a prototype, megavoltage indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After years of aggressive development, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) have recently become commercially available for radiotherapy imaging. In this paper we report on a comprehensive evaluation of the signal and noise performance of a large-area prototype AMFPI specifically developed for this application. The imager is based on an array of 512x512 pixels incorporating amorphous silicon photodiodes and thin-film transistors offering a 26x26 cm2 active area at a pixel pitch of 508 μm. This indirect detection array was coupled to various x-ray converters consisting of a commercial phosphor screen (Lanex Fast B, Lanex Regular, or Lanex Fine) and a 1 mm thick copper plate. Performance of the imager in terms of measured sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is reported at beam energies of 6 and 15 MV and at doses of 1 and 2 monitor units (MU). In addition, calculations of system performance (NPS, DQE) based on cascaded-system formalism were reported and compared to empirical results. In these calculations, the Swank factor and spatial energy distributions of secondary electrons within the converter were modeled by means of EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations. Measured MTFs of the system show a weak dependence on screen type (i.e., thickness), which is partially due to the spreading of secondary radiation. Measured DQE was found to be independent of dose for the Fast B screen, implying that the imager is input-quantum-limited at 1 MU, even at an extended source-to-detector distance of 200 cm. The maximum DQE obtained is around 1%--a limit imposed by the low detection efficiency of the converter. For thinner phosphor screens, the DQE is lower due to their lower detection efficiencies. Finally, for the Fast B screen, good agreement between calculated and measured DQE was observed

  4. Performance evaluation of flat panel detector in x-ray fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Flat panel detectors are currently replacing the conventional image intensifiers in R-F imaging. We evaluated the performance of a biplane cardiac imaging system (Siemens Axiom Artis dBC), the image acquisition was based on a 25 cm diagonal digital fiat panel detector. Performance characteristics included image quality, typical patient entrance dose and measurement of input to the surface of flat detector. The results were compared with conventional image intensifier systems (Siemens Hicor Unit and Toshiba DPF 2000 A Biplane Unit) used in cardiac imaging at Westmead. Image quality and dose measurements were performed following standard protocols using Westmead test object and 20 cm solid water as absorber in the beam. For measurement of input to the surface of flat detector, 2 mm copper was placed on the collimator. Radcal 3cc and 180 cc ion chambers were used for dose measurements. Image quality: Our measurements on flat panel system indicate that high contrast resolution and threshold contrast is not affected by changing field size. This is expected due to minimum loss of signal in the imaging chain of digital systems and the independence of detector pixel size with change in field of view. While low contrast resolution was found to be similar to conventional systems, high contrast resolution was significantly superior using flat detector system for large and intermediate field of view (25-28 1p/cm against 18-20). Typical patient dose as measured using flat detector system was similar to the conventional Toshiba pulsed fluoroscopy system( ∼ 3 - 8 mGy/min depending on the field size). This was 40-50 % lower than our old Siemens hicore unit. Input to the surface of flat detector was found to vary with field size as is the case with a conventional II system. As described elsewhere, although there is no necessity to increase exposure or video gain in a digital magnification, digital data interpolation process introduces noise. As a result system

  5. A typical flat-panel membrane bioreactor with a composite membrane for sulfur removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Xiao, Yuan; Song, Jimin; Miao, Junhe

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this work was to provide a concrete study to understand the effects of operation on biofilm morphology and microstructure and degradation efficiency for the disposal of sulfur dioxide produced by coal-fired power plants. For this purpose, a flat-panel reactor-membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a composite membrane consisting of a dense layer and a support layer was designed; the membrane bioreactors inoculated with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were further conducted for the removal of sulfur dioxide. Dry weight, active biomass, pressure drop, removal efficiency, morphology and structure of the formed biofilms were investigated and analyzed over period of biofilm formation. The results found that the dry weight, biomass, pressure drops and removal efficiency increased rapidly during biofilm formation, remained relatively stable in the stabilization period of biofilm growth, and finally reached 0.085 g, 7.00 μg, 180 Pa, and 78%, respectively. Our results suggested the MBR is available for flue-gas desulfurization.

  6. Investigation of Vertical Drag and Periodic Airloads Acting on Flat Panels in a Rotor Slipstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makofski, Robert A; Menkick, George F

    1956-01-01

    Tests have been conducted on the Langley helicopter test tower to determine the vertical drag and pressure distributions on flat panels mounted below a helicopter rotor. Calculations of the vertical drag by use of a strip-analysis procedure outlined in the paper and the assumption of a fully contracted wake agreed well with the experimental results over the range from 0.2 to 0.64 rotor radius beneath the plane of zero flapping. The pressure increase caused by the passage of the blade over the panel is a maximum at about the 0.8 radius spanwise station. At this station, the pressure decreases from 10 times the disk loading per blade at 0.05 radius beneath the rotor plane of zero flapping to one-half of the disk loading per blade at 0.64 radius beneath the plane of zero flapping.

  7. Development of next generation digital flat panel catheterization system: design principles and validation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, B.; Betraoui, F.; Dhawale, P.; Gopinath, P.; Tegzes, Pal; Vagvolgyi, B.

    2006-03-01

    The design principles that drove the development of a new cardiovascular x-ray digital flat panel (DFP) detector system are presented, followed by assessments of imaging and dose performance achieved relative to other state of the art FPD systems. The new system (GE Innova 2100 IQ TM) incorporates a new detector with substantially improved DQE at fluoroscopic (73%@1μR) and record (79%@114uR) doses, an x-ray tube with higher continuous fluoro power (3.2kW), a collimator with a wide range of copper spectral filtration (up to 0.9mm), and an improved automatic x-ray exposure management system. The performance of this new system was compared to that of the previous generation GE product (Innova 2000) and to state-of-the art cardiac digital x-ray flat panel systems from two other major manufacturers. Performance was assessed with the industry standard Cardiac X-ray NEMA/SCA and I phantom, and a new moving coronary artery stent (MCAS) phantom, designed to simulate cardiac clinical imaging conditions, composed of an anthropomorphic chest section with stents moving in a manner simulating normal coronary arteries. The NEMA/SCA&I phantom results showed the Innova 2100 IQ to exceed or equal the Innova 2000 in all of the performance categories, while operating at 28% lower dose on average, and to exceed the other DFP systems in most of the performance categories. The MCAS phantom tests showed the Innova 2100 IQ to be significantly better (p << 0.05) than the Innova 2000, and significantly better than the other DFP systems in most cases at comparable or lower doses, thereby verifying excellent performance against design goals.

  8. Distal Radius in Adolescent Girls with Anorexia Nervosa: Trabecular Structure Analysis with High-Resolution Flat-Panel Volume CT

    OpenAIRE

    Bredella, Miriam A.; Misra, Madhusmita; Miller, Karen K.; Madisch, Ijad; Sarwar, Ammar; Cheung, Arnold; Klibanski, Anne; Gupta, Rajiv

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine trabecular microarchitecture with high-resolution flat-panel volume computed tomography (CT) and bone mineral density (BMD) with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa (AN) and to compare these results with those in normal-weight control subjects.

  9. Comparing Ovarian Radiation Doses in Flat-Panel and Conventional Angiography During Uterine Artery Embolization: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uterine artery embolization (UAE) is a minimally invasive procedure performed under fluoroscopy for the treatment of uterine fibroids and accompanied by radiation exposure. To compare ovarian radiation doses during uterine artery embolization (UAE) in patients using conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) with those using digital flat-panel technology. Thirty women who were candidates for UAE were randomly enrolled for one of the two angiographic systems. Ovarian doses were calculated according to in-vitro phantom study results using entrance and exit doses and were compared between the two groups. The mean right entrance dose was 1586±1221 mGy in the conventional and 522.3±400.1 mGy in the flat panel group (P=0.005). These figures were 1470±1170 mGy and 456±396 mGy, respectively for the left side (P=0.006). The mean right exit dose was 18.8±12.3 for the conventional and 9.4±6.4 mGy for the flat panel group (P=0.013). These figures were 16.7±11.3 and 10.2±7.2 mGy, respectively for the left side (P=0.06). The mean right ovarian dose was 139.9±92 in the conventional and 23.6±16.2 mGy in the flat panel group (P<0.0001). These figures were 101.7±77.6 and 24.6±16.9 mGy, respectively for the left side (P=0.002). Flat panel system can significantly reduce the ovarian radiation dose during UAE compared with conventional DSA

  10. Assessment of image quality and radiation dose on a modern flat panel angiography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Angiographic procedures are often associated with high patient and staff dose that can be reduced without image quality deterioration. This work is on assessment of image quality and patient doses on a modern flat panel angiography unit. Because of the limited number of digital systems in Bulgaria, quality control protocol for testing these units does not exist currently and this work is aimed to develop and test the methodology. Methods and materials. A GE Innova 4100 Flat Panel Detector angiography unit was examined. Low and high contrast resolutions were assessed using FL18 test object placed at the isocentre between the sheets of a PMMA phantom with total thickness varying from 16 to 30 cm for FOV of 16 to 40 cm at pulsed fluoro mode of 30 frames/s. The image detector was set up at 5 cm above the 30 cm PMAA phantom. The Entrance Surface Dose Rate was measured by Mult-O-Meter dosimeter (Unfors, Sweden). The Incident Dose rate and Dose Area Product were measured with Diamentor M4-KDK (PTW, Germany) for the same FOVs and phantom thicknesses. The quality of images at acquisition mode was examined also using DIGI 13 test object (Wellhofer, Germany). The homogeneity, dynamic range, alignment, high contrast spatial resolution and low contrast resolution and signal-to-noise ratio were measured. The digital subtraction angiography image quality was examined using RoVi-8 test tool (Wellhofer, Germany). Results and discussion. The Entrance Surface Dose Rate measured for 20 cm PMAA and the 40 cm FOV, 30 frames/s was 11,29 mGy.min-1 and 5,58 mGy.min-1 for the 'normal' and 'low' mode, respectively. The dosimetric results obtained via both dosimeters are used for calculation of calibration coefficients for the DAP and ESD values shown by the system on the display monitor at the control console. The low contrast sensitivity varies from 1,6% to 6,6% depending on the thickness of PMAA phantom and FOV, as the limiting spatial resolution is changing from 2,24 to 1,12 lp

  11. Detector evaluation of a prototype amorphous selenium-based full field digital mammography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesneck, Jonathan L.; Saunders, Robert S.; Samei, Ehsan; Xia, Jessie Q.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2005-04-01

    This study evaluated the physical performance of a selenium-based direct full-field digital mammography prototype detector (Siemens Mammomat NovationDR), including the pixel value vs. exposure linearity, the modulation transfer function (MTF), the normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The current detector is the same model which received an approvable letter from FDA for release to the US market. The results of the current prototype are compared to those of an earlier prototype. Two IEC standard beam qualities (RQA-M2: Mo/Mo, 28 kVp, 2 mm Al; RQA-M4: Mo/Mo, 35 kVp, 2 mm Al) and two additional beam qualities (MW2: W/Rh, 28 kVp, 2 mm Al; MW4: W/Rh, 35 kVp, 2 mm Al) were investigated. To calculate the modulation transfer function (MTF), a 0.1 mm Pt-Ir edge was imaged at each beam quality. Detector pixel values responded linearly against exposure values (R2 0.999). As before, above 6 cycles/mm Mo/Mo MTF was slightly higher along the chest-nipple axis compared to the left-right axis. MTF was comparable to the previously reported prototype, with slightly reduced resolution. The DQE peaks ranged from 0.71 for 3.31 μC/kg (12.83 mR) to 0.4 for 0.48 μC/kg (1.86 mR) at 1.75 cycles/mm for Mo/Mo at 28 kVp. The DQE range for W/Rh at 28 kVP was 0.81 at 2.03 μC/kg (7.87 mR) to 0.50 at 0.50 μC/kg (1.94 mR) at 1 cycle/mm. NNPS tended to increase with greater exposures, while all exposures had a significant low-frequency component. Bloom and detector edge artifacts observed previously were no longer present in this prototype. The new detector shows marked noise improvement, with slightly reduced resolution. There remain artifacts due to imperfect gain calibration, but at a reduced magnitude compared to a prototype detector.

  12. Dynamic chest radiography with a flat-panel detector (FPD): ventilation-perfusion study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, R.; Sanada, S.; Fujimura, M.; Yasui, M.; Tsuji, S.; Hayashi, N.; Okamoto, H.; Nanbu, Y.; Matsui, O.

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and blood flow are reflected in dynamic chest radiographs as changes in X-ray translucency, i.e., pixel values. This study was performed to investigate the feasibility of ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) study based on the changes in pixel value. Sequential chest radiographs of a patient with ventilation-perfusion mismatch were obtained during respiration using a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD) system. The lung area was recognized and average pixel value was measured in each area, tracking and deforming the region of interest. Inter-frame differences were then calculated, and the absolute values were summed in each respiratory phase. The results were visualized as ventilation, blood flow, V/Q ratio distribution map and compared to distribution of radioactive counts on ventilation and perfusion scintigrams. In the results, abnormalities were appeared as a reduction of changes in pixel values, and a correlation was observed between the distribution of changes in pixel value and those of radioactivity counts (Ventilation; r=0.78, Perfusion; r=0.77). V/Q mismatch was also indicated as mismatch of changes in pixel value, and a correlation with V/Q calculated by radioactivity counts (r=0.78). These results indicated that the present method is potentially useful for V/Q study as an additional examination in conventional chest radiography.

  13. Transition from image intensifier to flat panel detector in interventional cardiology: Impact of radiation dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan S Livingstone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Flat panel detector (FPD technology in interventional cardiology is on the increase due to its varied advantages compared to the conventional image intensifier (II systems. It is not clear whether FPD imparts lower radiation doses compared to II systems though a few studies support this finding. This study intends to compare radiation doses from II and FPD systems for coronaryangiography (CAG and Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA performed in a tertiary referral center. Radiation doses were measured using dose area product (DAP meter from patients who underwent CAG (n = 222 and PTCA (n = 75 performed using FPD angiography system. The DAP values from FPD were compared with earlier reported data using II systems from the same referral center where the study was conducted. The mean DAP values from FPD system for CAG and PTCA were 24.35 and 63.64 Gycm 2 and those from II system were 27.71 and 65.44 Gycm 2 . Transition from II to FPD system requires stringent dose optimization strategies right from the initial period of installation.

  14. Flat panel CT following stapes prosthesis insertion: an experimental and clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anatomical information of the middle and inner ear is becoming increasingly important in post-operative evaluation especially after stapesplasty with unsuccessful improvement of the air-bone gap (ABG). So far computed tomography (CT) has been the first choice for detection of reasons for recurrent hearing loss. CT has the disadvantage of metal-induced artefacts after insertion of middle ear implants and of a relatively high irradiation dose. Flat panel CT (fpCT) was performed in three temporal bone specimen after experimental insertion of different stapes prostheses, aiming to validate the accuracy of fpCT of the middle and inner ear. Additionally, 28 consecutive patients, supplied with different stapes prostheses underwent post-operative fpCT to compare the pre- and post-operative hearing results with the determined prosthesis position in the middle and inner ear. In all cases, fpCT showed a statistically significant correlation between hearing improvement and prosthesis position. This technique provided detailed post-operative information of the implant position in patients and temporal bone specimen. The new imaging technique of fpCT allows the immediate and almost artefact-free evaluation of surgical results following stapesplasty. Further benefits are a lower irradiation dose and higher isovolumetric resolution compared with standard CT. (orig.)

  15. Point spread function modeling method for x-ray flat panel detector imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Shi, Yikai; Huang, Kuidong; Yu, Qingchao

    2012-10-01

    Flat panel detector (FPD) has been widely used as the imaging unit in the current X-ray digital radiography (DR) systems and Computed Tomography (CT) systems. Point spread function (PSF) is an important indicator of the FPD imaging system, but also the basis for image restoration. For the problem of poor accuracy of the FPD's PSF measurement with the original pinhole imaging for DR systems, a new PSF measuring method with the pinhole imaging based on the image restoration is proposed in this paper. Firstly, some images collected with the pinhole imaging are averaged to one image to reducing the noise. Then, the original pinhole image is calculated according to the energy conservation principle of point spread. Finally, the PSF of the FPD is obtained using the operation of image restoration. On this basis, through the fitting of the characteristic parameters of the PSF on different scan conditions, the computational model of the PSF is established for any scan conditions. Experimental results show that the method can obtain a more accurate PSF of the FPD, and the PSF of the same system under any scan conditions can be directly calculated with the PSF model.

  16. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. W.; Youn, H.; Kim, D.; Kam, S.; Jeon, H.; Kim, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance.

  17. Clinical investigation of flat panel CT following middle ear reconstruction: a study of 107 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After middle ear reconstruction using partial or total ossicular replacement prostheses (PORP/TORP), an air-bone gap (ABG) may persist because of prosthesis displacement or malposition. So far, CT of the temporal bone has played the main role in the diagnosis of reasons for postoperative insufficient ABG improvement. Recent experimental and clinical studies have evaluated flat panel CT (fpCT) as an alternative imaging technique that provides images with high isovolumetric resolution, fewer metal-induced artefacts and lower irradiation doses. One hundred and seven consecutive patients with chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma underwent reconstruction by PORP (n = 52) or TORP (n = 55). All subjects underwent preoperative and postoperative audiometric testing and postoperative fpCT. Statistical evaluation of all 107 patients as well as the sole sub-assembly groups (PORP or TORP) showed a highly significant correlation between hearing improvement and fpCT-determined prosthesis position. FpCT enables detailed postoperative information on patients with middle ear reconstruction. FpCT is a new imaging technique that provides immediate feedback on surgical results after reconstructive middle ear surgery. Specific parameters evaluated by fpCT may serve as a predictive tool for estimated postoperative hearing improvement. Therefore this imaging technique is suitable for postoperative quality control in reconstructive middle ear surgery. (orig.)

  18. Practical expressions describing detective quantum efficiency in flat-panel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In radiology, image quality excellence is a balance between system performance and patient dose, hence x-ray systems must be designed to ensure the maximum image quality is obtained for the lowest consistent dose. The concept of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used to quantify, understand, measure, and predict the performance of x-ray detectors and imaging systems. Cascaded linear-systems theory can be used to estimate DQE based on the system design parameters and this theoretical DQE can be utilized for determining the impact of various physical processes, such as secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, reabsorption noise, and others. However, the prediction of DQE usually requires tremendous efforts to determine each parameter consisting of the cascaded linear-systems model. In this paper, practical DQE formalisms assessing both the photoconductor- and scintillator-based flat-panel detectors under quantum-noise-limited operation are described. The developed formalisms are experimentally validated and discussed for their limits. The formalisms described in this paper would be helpful for the rapid prediction of the DQE performances of developing systems as well as the optimal design of systems.

  19. Compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch operating at 295 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krielaart, M. A. R.; Vermeer, C. H.; Vanapalli, S.

    2015-11-01

    Heat switches are devices that can change from a thermally conducting (on-) state to an insulating (off-) state whenever the need arises. They enable adaptive thermal management strategies in which cooling rates are altered either spatially or temporally, leading to a substantial reduction in the energy and mass budget of a large range of systems. State-of-the-art heat switches are only rarely employed in thermal system architectures, since they are rather bulky and have a limited thermal performance (expressed as the heat transfer ratio between the on- and off-state heat conductance). Using selective laser melting additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D printing, we developed a compact flat-panel gas-gap heat switch that offers superior thermal performance, is simpler and more economic to produce and assemble, contains no moving parts, and is more reliable because it lacks welded joints. The manufactured rectangular panel heat switch has frontal device dimensions of 10 cm by 10 cm, thickness of 3.2 mm and weighs just 121 g. An off heat conductance of 0.2 W/K and on-off heat conductance ratio of 38 is observed at 295 K.

  20. Planar cone-beam computed tomography with a flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a dedicated x-ray inspection of printed-circuit boards (PCBs), a bench-top planar cone-beam computed tomography (pCT) system with a flat-panel detector has been built in the laboratory. The system adopts the tomosynthesis technique that can produce cross-sectional images parallel to the axis of rotation for a limited angular range. For the optimal operation of the system and further improvement in the next design, we have evaluated imaging performances, such as modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and noise-equivalent number of quanta. The performances are comparatively evaluated with the coventional cone-beam CT (CBCT) acquisition for various scanning angular ranges, applied tube voltages, and geometrical magnification factors. The pCT scan shows a poorer noise performance than the conventional CBCT scan because of less number of projection views used for reconstruction. However, the pCT shows a better spatial-resolution performance than the CBCT. Because the image noise can be compensated by an elevated exposure level during scanning, the pCT can be a useful modality for the PCB inspection that requires higher spatial-resolution performance

  1. Thermal Reactor Model for Large-Scale Algae Cultivation in Vertical Flat Panel Photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Christian H; Roth, Arne; Brück, Thomas B

    2016-04-01

    Microalgae can grow significantly faster than terrestrial plants and are a promising feedstock for sustainable value added products encompassing pharmaceuticals, pigments, proteins and most prominently biofuels. As the biomass productivity of microalgae strongly depends on the cultivation temperature, detailed information on the reactor temperature as a function of time and geographical location is essential to evaluate the true potential of microalgae as an industrial feedstock. In the present study, a temperature model for an array of vertical flat plate photobioreactors is presented. It was demonstrated that mutual shading of reactor panels has a decisive effect on the reactor temperature. By optimizing distance and thickness of the panels, the occurrence of extreme temperatures and the amplitude of daily temperature fluctuations in the culture medium can be drastically reduced, while maintaining a high level of irradiation on the panels. The presented model was developed and applied to analyze the suitability of various climate zones for algae production in flat panel photobioreactors. Our results demonstrate that in particular Mediterranean and tropical climates represent favorable locations. Lastly, the thermal energy demand required for the case of active temperature control is determined for several locations. PMID:26950078

  2. Potential Applications of Flat-Panel Volumetric CT in Morphologic, Functional Small Animal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Greschus

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive radiologic imaging has recently gained considerable interest in basic, preclinical research for monitoring disease progression, therapeutic efficacy. In this report, we introduce flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT as a powerful new tool for noninvasive imaging of different organ systems in preclinical research. The three-dimensional visualization that is achieved by isotropic high-resolution datasets is illustrated for the skeleton, chest, abdominal organs, brain of mice. The high image quality of chest scans enables the visualization of small lung nodules in an orthotopic lung cancer model, the reliable imaging of therapy side effects such as lung fibrosis. Using contrast-enhanced scans, fpVCT displayed the vascular trees of the brain, liver, kidney down to the subsegmental level. Functional application of fpVCT in dynamic contrast-enhanced scans of the rat brain delivered physiologically reliable data of perfusion, tissue blood volume. Beyond scanning of small animal models as demonstrated here, fpVCT provides the ability to image animals up to the size of primates.

  3. Flat panel CT following stapes prosthesis insertion: an experimental and clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaoui, K. [University-Hospital Heidelberg, Ludwig-Karls-University Heidelberg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kromeier, J. [St.-Josefs-Hospital, RkK, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Neudert, M.; Zahnert, T. [University-Hospital Dresden, Technical-University Dresden, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Boedeker, C.C.; Laszig, R.; Offergeld, C. [University-Hospital Freiburg, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    Anatomical information of the middle and inner ear is becoming increasingly important in post-operative evaluation especially after stapesplasty with unsuccessful improvement of the air-bone gap (ABG). So far computed tomography (CT) has been the first choice for detection of reasons for recurrent hearing loss. CT has the disadvantage of metal-induced artefacts after insertion of middle ear implants and of a relatively high irradiation dose. Flat panel CT (fpCT) was performed in three temporal bone specimen after experimental insertion of different stapes prostheses, aiming to validate the accuracy of fpCT of the middle and inner ear. Additionally, 28 consecutive patients, supplied with different stapes prostheses underwent post-operative fpCT to compare the pre- and post-operative hearing results with the determined prosthesis position in the middle and inner ear. In all cases, fpCT showed a statistically significant correlation between hearing improvement and prosthesis position. This technique provided detailed post-operative information of the implant position in patients and temporal bone specimen. The new imaging technique of fpCT allows the immediate and almost artefact-free evaluation of surgical results following stapesplasty. Further benefits are a lower irradiation dose and higher isovolumetric resolution compared with standard CT. (orig.)

  4. Clinical investigation of flat panel CT following middle ear reconstruction: a study of 107 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaoui, K. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Ruprecht Karls University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kromeier, J. [St. Josefs Hospital, RkK, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Neudert, M.; Beleites, T.; Zahnert, T. [University Hospital Dresden, Technical University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Laszig, R.; Offergeld, C. [University Hospital Freiburg, Albert Ludwigs University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    After middle ear reconstruction using partial or total ossicular replacement prostheses (PORP/TORP), an air-bone gap (ABG) may persist because of prosthesis displacement or malposition. So far, CT of the temporal bone has played the main role in the diagnosis of reasons for postoperative insufficient ABG improvement. Recent experimental and clinical studies have evaluated flat panel CT (fpCT) as an alternative imaging technique that provides images with high isovolumetric resolution, fewer metal-induced artefacts and lower irradiation doses. One hundred and seven consecutive patients with chronic otitis media with or without cholesteatoma underwent reconstruction by PORP (n = 52) or TORP (n = 55). All subjects underwent preoperative and postoperative audiometric testing and postoperative fpCT. Statistical evaluation of all 107 patients as well as the sole sub-assembly groups (PORP or TORP) showed a highly significant correlation between hearing improvement and fpCT-determined prosthesis position. FpCT enables detailed postoperative information on patients with middle ear reconstruction. FpCT is a new imaging technique that provides immediate feedback on surgical results after reconstructive middle ear surgery. Specific parameters evaluated by fpCT may serve as a predictive tool for estimated postoperative hearing improvement. Therefore this imaging technique is suitable for postoperative quality control in reconstructive middle ear surgery. (orig.)

  5. Ultra-high resolution flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, design architecture, and system characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital flat-panel-based volume CT (VCT) represents a unique design capable of ultra-high spatial resolution, direct volumetric imaging, and dynamic CT scanning. This innovation, when fully developed, has the promise of opening a unique window on human anatomy and physiology. For example, the volumetric coverage offered by this technology enables us to observe the perfusion of an entire organ, such as the brain, liver, or kidney, tomographically (e.g., after a transplant or ischemic event). By virtue of its higher resolution, one can directly visualize the trabecular structure of bone. This paper describes the basic design architecture of VCT. Three key technical challenges, viz., scatter correction, dynamic range extension, and temporal resolution improvement, must be addressed for successful implementation of a VCT scanner. How these issues are solved in a VCT prototype and the modifications necessary to enable ultra-high resolution volumetric scanning are described. The fundamental principles of scatter correction and dose reduction are illustrated with the help of an actual prototype. The image quality metrics of this prototype are characterized and compared with a multi-detector CT (MDCT). (orig.)

  6. Dynamic chest radiography: flat-panel detector (FPD) based functional X-ray imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Rie

    2016-07-01

    Dynamic chest radiography is a flat-panel detector (FPD)-based functional X-ray imaging, which is performed as an additional examination in chest radiography. The large field of view (FOV) of FPDs permits real-time observation of the entire lungs and simultaneous right-and-left evaluation of diaphragm kinetics. Most importantly, dynamic chest radiography provides pulmonary ventilation and circulation findings as slight changes in pixel value even without the use of contrast media; the interpretation is challenging and crucial for a better understanding of pulmonary function. The basic concept was proposed in the 1980s; however, it was not realized until the 2010s because of technical limitations. Dynamic FPDs and advanced digital image processing played a key role for clinical application of dynamic chest radiography. Pulmonary ventilation and circulation can be quantified and visualized for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases. Dynamic chest radiography can be deployed as a simple and rapid means of functional imaging in both routine and emergency medicine. Here, we focus on the evaluation of pulmonary ventilation and circulation. This review article describes the basic mechanism of imaging findings according to pulmonary/circulation physiology, followed by imaging procedures, analysis method, and diagnostic performance of dynamic chest radiography. PMID:27294264

  7. Ultra-high resolution flat-panel volume CT: fundamental principles, design architecture, and system characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Rajiv; Brady, Tom [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Founders House, FND-2-216, Boston, MA (United States); Grasruck, Michael; Suess, Christoph; Schmidt, Bernhard; Stierstorfer, Karl; Popescu, Stefan; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany); Bartling, Soenke H. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    Digital flat-panel-based volume CT (VCT) represents a unique design capable of ultra-high spatial resolution, direct volumetric imaging, and dynamic CT scanning. This innovation, when fully developed, has the promise of opening a unique window on human anatomy and physiology. For example, the volumetric coverage offered by this technology enables us to observe the perfusion of an entire organ, such as the brain, liver, or kidney, tomographically (e.g., after a transplant or ischemic event). By virtue of its higher resolution, one can directly visualize the trabecular structure of bone. This paper describes the basic design architecture of VCT. Three key technical challenges, viz., scatter correction, dynamic range extension, and temporal resolution improvement, must be addressed for successful implementation of a VCT scanner. How these issues are solved in a VCT prototype and the modifications necessary to enable ultra-high resolution volumetric scanning are described. The fundamental principles of scatter correction and dose reduction are illustrated with the help of an actual prototype. The image quality metrics of this prototype are characterized and compared with a multi-detector CT (MDCT). (orig.)

  8. Average power scaling of UV excimer lasers drives flat panel display and lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Ludolf; Delmdahl, Ralph F.; Paetzel, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    Average power scaling of 308nm excimer lasers has followed an evolutionary path over the last two decades driven by diverse industrial UV laser microprocessing markets. Recently, a new dual-oscillator and beam management concept for high-average power upscaling of excimer lasers has been realized, for the first time enabling as much as 1.2kW of stabilized UV-laser average output power at a UV wavelength of 308nm. The new dual-oscillator concept enables low temperature polysilicon (LTPS) fabrication to be extended to generation six glass substrates. This is essential in terms of a more economic high-volume manufacturing of flat panel displays for the soaring smartphone and tablet PC markets. Similarly, the cost-effective production of flexible displays is driven by 308nm excimer laser power scaling. Flexible displays have enormous commercial potential and can largely use the same production equipment as is used for rigid display manufacturing. Moreover, higher average output power of 308nm excimer lasers aids reducing measurement time and improving the signal-to-noise ratio in the worldwide network of high altitude Raman lidar stations. The availability of kW-class 308nm excimer lasers has the potential to take LIDAR backscattering signal strength and achievable altitude to new levels.

  9. Development of patient collation system by kinetic analysis for chest dynamic radiogram with flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie

    2006-03-01

    In the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) environment, it is important that all images be stored in the correct location. However, if information such as the patient's name or identification number has been entered incorrectly, it is difficult to notice the error. The present study was performed to develop a system of patient collation automatically for dynamic radiogram examination by a kinetic analysis, and to evaluate the performance of the system. Dynamic chest radiographs during respiration were obtained by using a modified flat panel detector system. Our computer algorithm developed in this study was consisted of two main procedures, kinetic map imaging processing, and collation processing. Kinetic map processing is a new algorithm to visualize a movement for dynamic radiography; direction classification of optical flows and intensity-density transformation technique was performed. Collation processing consisted of analysis with an artificial neural network (ANN) and discrimination for Mahalanobis' generalized distance, those procedures were performed to evaluate a similarity of combination for the same person. Finally, we investigated the performance of our system using eight healthy volunteers' radiographs. The performance was shown as a sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity for our system were shown 100% and 100%, respectively. This result indicated that our system has excellent performance for recognition of a patient. Our system will be useful in PACS management for dynamic chest radiography.

  10. A real-time flat-panel X-ray pixel imaging system for low-dose medical diagnostics and craniofacial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, D; Dimcovski, Z; Grigoriev, E; Grob, E; Ligier, Y; Pachoud, M; Riondel, F; Rüfenacht, D; Sayegh, C; Terrier, F; Valley, J F; Verdun, F R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate on-line performance of a real-time digital imaging system based on amorphous silicon technology and to compare it with conventional film-screen equipment. The digital detecting imager consists of (1) a converter, which transforms the energy of the incident X rays into light; (2) a real-time digital detecting system, capable of producing as many as 10 pictures per second using a large-area pixel matrix (20 x 20 cm2) based on solid-state amorphous silicon sensor technology with a pitch of 400 microns; and (3) appropriate computer tools for control, real-time image treatment, data representation, and off-line analysis. Different phantoms were used for qualitative comparison with the conventional film-screen technique, with images obtained with both systems at the normal dose (used as a reference), as well as with dose reduction by a factor of 10 to 100. Basic image quality parameters evaluated showed that the response of the detector is linear in a wide range of entrance air kerma; the dynamic range is higher compared with the conventional film-screen combination; the spatial resolution is 1.25 lp per millimeter, as expected from the pixel size; and good image quality is ensured at doses substantially lower than for the film-screen technique. The flat-panel X-ray imager based on amorphous silicon technology implemented in standard radiographic equipment permits acquisition of real-time images in radiology (as many as 10 images per second) of diagnostic quality with a marked reduction of dose (as much as 100 times) and better contrast compared with the standard film technique. Preliminary results obtained with a 100-micron pitch imager based on the same technology show better quality but a less substantial dose reduction. Applications in craniofacial surgery look promising. PMID:11314093

  11. Clinical evaluation of digital angiographic system equipped with the Safire' flat-panel detector of a direct conversion type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a report on clinical evaluation of our newly developed flat-panel X-ray detector of a direct conversion type, designed to provide images of a resolution higher than, or at least equal to, that ensured by X-ray photographic films, in clinical digital X-ray cinematography. This new detector was named 'Safire' the acronym of 'Shimadzu advanced flat imaging receptor', emphasizing its high technological level, such as the capability to ensure high quality of images. The clinical evaluation of Shimadzu DIGITEX Premier digital angiography system, equipped with this new flat-panel X-ray detector of a direct conversion type, has been started in March, 2003, at the Kokura Memorial Hospital in Kyushu, Japan. (author)

  12. Standard practice for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials used in aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice is intended to be used as a supplement to Practices E 1742, E 1255, and E 2033. 1.2 This practice describes procedures for radiologic examination of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials made entirely or in part from fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites. Radiologic examination is: a) radiographic (RT) with film, b) Computed Radiography (CR) with Imaging Plate, c) Digital Radiology (DR) with Digital Detector Array’s (DDA), and d) Radioscopic (RTR) Real Time Radiology with a detection system such as an Image Intensifier. The composite materials under consideration typically contain continuous high modulus fibers (> 20 GPa), such as those listed in 1.4. 1.3 This practice describes established radiological examination methods that are currently used by industry that have demonstrated utility in quality assurance of flat panel composites and sandwich core materials during product process design and optimization, process control, after manufacture inspection, in service exami...

  13. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Ho Kyung; Chun, In Kon; Cho, Myung Hye; Lee, Soo Yeol; Cho, Min Hyoung

    2003-12-21

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:T1 (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 microm3 and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 1p/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 1p/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented. PMID:14727760

  14. Semi-Automatic Classification of Skeletal Morphology in Genetically Altered Mice Using Flat-Panel Volume Computed Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Dullin; Jeannine Missbach-Guentner; Vogel, Wolfgang F.; Eckhardt Grabbe; Frauke Alves

    2007-01-01

    Rapid progress in exploring the human and mouse genome has resulted in the generation of a multitude of mouse models to study gene functions in their biological context. However, effective screening methods that allow rapid noninvasive phenotyping of transgenic and knockout mice are still lacking. To identify murine models with bone alterations in vivo, we used flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT) for high-resolution 3-D imaging and developed an algorithm with a computational intelli...

  15. Application of flat panel OLED display technology for the point-of-care detection of circulating cancer biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Katchman, Benjamin A; Smith, Joseph T.; Uwadiae Obahiagbon; Sailaja Kesiraju; Yong-Kyun Lee; Barry O’Brien; Korhan Kaftanoglu; Jennifer Blain Christen; Anderson, Karen S.

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care molecular diagnostics can provide efficient and cost-effective medical care, and they have the potential to fundamentally change our approach to global health. However, most existing approaches are not scalable to include multiple biomarkers. As a solution, we have combined commercial flat panel OLED display technology with protein microarray technology to enable high-density fluorescent, programmable, multiplexed biorecognition in a compact and disposable configuration with cli...

  16. Women with Anorexia Nervosa: Finite Element and Trabecular Structure Analysis by Using Flat-Panel Volume CT

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Conor J.; Phan, Catherine M.; Misra, Madhusmita; Bredella, Miriam A.; Miller, Karen K.; Fazeli, Pouneh K.; Bayraktar, Harun H.; Klibanski, Anne; Gupta, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    We have shown reduced failure load and stiffness of the distal radius in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) compared with age-matched control subjects by using finite element models created from 150-μm resolution flat-panel volume CT; reductions in trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular number, and bone mineral density and an increase in trabecular separation were observed in the AN group.

  17. A flat-panel detector based micro-CT system: performance evaluation for small-animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dedicated small-animal x-ray micro computed tomography (micro-CT) system has been developed to screen laboratory small animals such as mice and rats. The micro-CT system consists of an indirect-detection flat-panel x-ray detector with a field-of-view of 120 x 120 mm2, a microfocus x-ray source, a rotational subject holder and a parallel data processing system. The flat-panel detector is based on a matrix-addressed photodiode array fabricated by a CMOS (complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) process coupled to a CsI:Tl (thallium-doped caesium iodide) scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. Principal imaging performances of the micro-CT system have been evaluated in terms of image uniformity, voxel noise and spatial resolution. It has been found that the image non-uniformity mainly comes from the structural non-uniform sensitivity pattern of the flat-panel detector and the voxel noise is about 48 CT numbers at the voxel size of 100 x 100 x 200 μm3 and the air kerma of 286 mGy. When the magnification ratio is 2, the spatial resolution of the micro-CT system is about 14 lp/mm (line pairs per millimetre) that is almost determined by the flat-panel detector showing about 7 lp/mm resolving power. Through low-contrast phantom imaging studies, the minimum resolvable contrast has been found to be less than 36 CT numbers at the air kerma of 95 mGy. Some laboratory rat imaging results are presented

  18. CAS 132-2006 Standard for Flat Panel Display TV Set Installation Service Formulating and Enforcing Main Point Explanation and Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ CAS 132-2006 formulation background and work courses Flat panel display technology is maturing alongside the development of science and technology. The prices of flat panel display TV sets are becoming lower and lower. Flat panel display TV sets have begun entering the mainstream and are now the first choice of some consumers when making new TV purchases.Display TV Set Installation Service Point Explanation and AnalysisRepair, Retreat and Change Duty Stipulations. Peculiar use conditions, usage environments, and the practical circumstances of user consumption service requirements, etc., were also taken into account on the basis of extensive investigation, testing, and verification.

  19. The effect of discontinuous airlift mixing in outdoor flat panel photobioreactors on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leupold, Marco; Hindersin, Stefan; Kerner, Martin; Hanelt, Dieter

    2013-11-01

    Discontinuous airlift mixing was realized by injecting pressured air at time intervals with a frequency between 0.033 and 0.25 Hz (at 80 kPa; i.e., every 4-30 s; valve opening time 800 ms) into outdoor flat panel photobioreactors ([Formula: see text]). This caused a flow velocity between 2 and 20 cm s(-1) of the culture medium within the photobioreactor and the mixing time was between 38 and 103.5 s, requiring 0.175-1.340 L(gas volume) L(photobioreactor volume)(-1) min(-1) pressured air. In order to detect the effect on growth of Scenedesmus obliquus during outdoor experiments and to be able to compare obtained results, a batch run with an airlift frequency of 0.25 Hz was simultaneously used as control. Growth at different airlift frequencies was measured by the increase of cell dry weight (CDW) during 3-5 days and biomass yield on light energy was calculated. With increasing airlift frequencies, growth increased from 52 to 91 % compared to the control. When CDW was at around 1.0-1.5 g L(-1), airlift frequency had no effect on growth, indicating that mass transfer gradients of nutrients and gas were not the limiting factors of growth. Above 1.5 g CDW L(-1), growth increased with increasing airlift frequency and light limitation for a single cell occurred. This effect was observed during low and high irradiance and it is concluded that a higher mean flow causes a better light distribution, resulting in an enhanced growth. Biomass productivity and demand of pressured air are correlated logarithmically, which enables to save mixing energy during cultivation. PMID:23494400

  20. Optimization of outdoor cultivation in flat panel airlift reactors for lipid production by Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münkel, Ronja; Schmid-Staiger, Ulrike; Werner, Achim; Hirth, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Microalgae are discussed as a potential renewable feedstock for biofuel production. The production of highly concentrated algae biomass with a high fatty acid content, accompanied by high productivity with the use of natural sunlight is therefore of great interest. In the current study an outdoor pilot plant with five 30 L Flat Panel Airlift reactors (FPA) installed southwards were operated in 2011 in Stuttgart, Germany. The patented FPA reactor works on the basis of an airlift loop reactor and offers efficient intermixing for homogeneous light distribution. A lipid production process with the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris (SAG 211-12), under nitrogen and phosphorous deprivation, was established and evaluated in regard to the fatty acid content, fatty acid productivity and light yield. In the first set of experiments limitations caused by restricted CO₂ availability were excluded by enriching the media with NaOH. The higher alkalinity allows a higher CO₂ content of supplied air and leads to doubling of fatty acid productivity. The second set of experiments focused on how the ratio of light intensity to biomass concentration in the reactor impacts fatty acid content, productivity and light yield. The specific light availability was specified as mol photons on the reactor surface per gram biomass in the reactor. This is the first publication based on experimental data showing the quantitative correlation between specific light availability, fatty acid content and biomass light yield for a lipid production process under nutrient deprivation and outdoor conditions. High specific light availability leads to high fatty acid contents. Lower specific light availability increases fatty acid productivity and biomass light yield. An average fatty acid productivity of 0.39 g L⁻¹  day⁻¹ for a 12 days batch process with a final fatty acid content of 44.6% [w/w] was achieved. Light yield of 0.4 g mol photons⁻¹ was obtained for the first 6 days of

  1. Cone Beam Breast CT with a Flat Panel Detector- Simulation, Implementation and Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Chris; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mastafa; Tu, Shuju; Wang, Tian-Peng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Cheenu Kappadath, S; Meng, Yang; Liu, Xinming

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes our experiences in the simulation, implementation and application of a flat panel detector based cone beam computed tomography (CT) imaging system for dedicated 3-D breast imaging. In our simulation study, the breast was analytically modeled as a cylinder of breast tissue loosely molded into cylindrical shape with embedded soft tissue masses and calcifications. Attenuation coefficients for various types of breast tissue, soft tissue masses and calcifications were estimated for various kVp's to generate simulated image signals. Projection images were computed to incorporate x-ray attenuation, geometric magnification, x-ray detection, detector blurring, image pixelization and digitization. Based on the x-ray kVp/filtration used, transmittance through the phantom, detective quantum efficiency (DQE), exposure level, and imaging geometry, the photon fluence was estimated and used to compute the quantum noise level on a pixel-by-pixel basis for various dose levels at the isocenter. This estimated noise level was then used with a random number generator to generate and add a fluctuation component to the noiseless transmitted image signal. The noise carrying projection images were then convolved with a Gaussian-like kernel, computed from measured 1-D line spread function (LSF) to simulate detector blurring. Additional 2-D Gaussian filtering was applied to the projection images and tested for improving the detection of soft tissue masses and calcifications in the reconstructed images. Reconstruction was performed using the Feldkamp filtered backprojection algorithm. All simulations were performed on a 24 PC (2.4 GHz Dual-Xeon CPU) cluster with MPI parallel programming. PMID:17281227

  2. Selenium Nanoparticles Prepared from Reverse Microemulsion Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zhu LIU; Sheng Yi ZHANG; Yu Hua SHEN; Ming Liang ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    Selenium nanoparticles were prepared by a reverse microemulsion system. Sodium selenosulfate was used as selenium source. The results showed that hydrochloric acid concentration and reaction temperature had great influence on the morphology of products. The crystalline selenium nanowires and amorphous selenium nanorods were obtained in given condition.

  3. Analysis of a free-running synchronization artifact correction for MV-imaging with aSi:H flat panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz [Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg 5020, Austria and University Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Landeskrankenhaus Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Salzburg 5020 (Austria); Huber, Stefan [Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies (radART), Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg 5020 (Austria)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Solid state flat panel electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are widely used for megavolt (MV) photon imaging applications in radiotherapy. In addition to their original purpose in patient position verification, they are convenient to use in quality assurance and dosimetry to verify beam geometry and dose deposition or to perform linear accelerator (linac) calibration procedures. However, native image frames from amorphous silicon (aSi:H) detectors show a range of artifacts which have to be eliminated by proper correction algorithms. When a panel is operated in free-running frame acquisition mode, moving vertical stripes (periodic synchronization artifacts) are a disturbing feature in image frames. Especially for applications in volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) or motion tracking, the synchronization (sync) artifacts are the limiting factor for potential and accuracy since they become even worse at higher frame rates and at lower dose rates, i.e., linac pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs). Methods: The authors introduced a synchronization correction method which is based on a theoretical model describing the interferences of the panel's readout clocking with the linac's dose pulsing. Depending on the applied PRF, a certain number of dose pulses is captured per frame which is readout columnwise, sequentially. The interference of the PRF with the panel readout is responsible for the period and the different gray value levels of the sync stripes, which can be calculated analytically. Sync artifacts can then be eliminated multiplicatively in precorrected frames without additional information about radiation pulse timing. Results: For the analysis, three aSi:H EPIDs of various types were investigated with 6 and 15 MV photon beams at varying PRFs of 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 pulses per second. Applying the sync correction at panels with gadolinium oxysulfide scintillators improved single frame flood field image quality drastically

  4. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragusin, O.; Bosmans, H.; Pappas, C.; Desmet, W.

    2008-09-01

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 μGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK ~40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s-1, detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 μGy/im to 0.17 μGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters the quality of the

  5. System performance of a prototype flat-panel imager operated under mammographic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an empirical and theoretical investigation of the performance of a high-resolution, active matrix flat-panel imager performed under mammographic conditions are reported. The imager is based upon a prototype, indirect detection active matrix array incorporating a discrete photodiode in each pixel and a pixel-to-pixel pitch of 97 μm. The investigation involved three imager configurations corresponding to the use of three different x-ray converters with the array. The converters were a conventional Gd2O2S-based mammographic phosphor screen (Min-R) and two structured CsI:Tl scintillators: one optimized for high spatial resolution (FOS-HR) and the other for high light output (FOS-HL). Detective quantum efficiency for mammographic exposures ranging from ∼2 to ∼40 mR at 26 kVp were determined for each imager configuration through measurements of x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise power spectrum (NPS). All configurations were found to provide significant presampling MTF at frequencies beyond the Nyquist frequency of the array, ∼5.2 mm-1, consistent with the high spatial resolution of the converters. In addition, the effect of additive electronic noise on the NPS was found to be significantly larger for the configuration with lower system gain (FOS-HR) than for the configurations with higher gain (Min-R, FOS-HL). The maximum DQE values obtained with the CsI:Tl scintillators were considerably greater than those obtained with the Min-R screen due to the significantly lower Swank noise of the scintillators. Moreover, DQE performance was found to degrade with decreasing exposure, although this exposure-dependence was considerably reduced for the higher gain configurations. Theoretical calculations based on the cascaded systems model were found to be in generally good agreement with these empirically determined NPS and DQE values. In this study, we provide an example of how cascaded systems modeling can be used to identify

  6. System performance of a prototype flat-panel imager operated under mammographic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jee, Kyung-Wook; Antonuk, Larry E; El-Mohri, Youcef; Zhao, Qihua

    2003-07-01

    The results of an empirical and theoretical investigation of the performance of a high-resolution, active matrix flat-panel imager performed under mammographic conditions are reported. The imager is based upon a prototype, indirect detection active matrix array incorporating a discrete photodiode in each pixel and a pixel-to-pixel pitch of 97 microm. The investigation involved three imager configurations corresponding to the use of three different x-ray converters with the array. The converters were a conventional Gd2O2S-based mammographic phosphor screen (Min-R) and two structured CsI:Tl scintillators: one optimized for high spatial resolution (FOS-HR) and the other for high light output (FOS-HL). Detective quantum efficiency for mammographic exposures ranging from approximately 2 to approximately 40 mR at 26 kVp were determined for each imager configuration through measurements of x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise power spectrum (NPS). All configurations were found to provide significant presampling MTF at frequencies beyond the Nyquist frequency of the array, approximately 5.2 mm(-1) , consistent with the high spatial resolution of the converters. In addition, the effect of additive electronic noise on the NPS was found to be significantly larger for the configuration with lower system gain (FOS-HR) than for the configurations with higher gain (Min-R, FOS-HL). The maximum DQE values obtained with the CsI:Tl scintillators were considerably greater than those obtained with the Min-R screen due to the significantly lower Swank noise of the scintillators. Moreover, DQE performance was found to degrade with decreasing exposure, although this exposure-dependence was considerably reduced for the higher gain configurations. Theoretical calculations based on the cascaded systems model were found to be in generally good agreement with these empirically determined NPS and DQE values. In this study, we provide an example of how cascaded

  7. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragusin, O; Bosmans, H; Pappas, C; Desmet, W

    2008-09-21

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 microGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK approximately 40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s(-1), detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 microGy/im to 0.17 microGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters

  8. Measurement of joint kinematics using a conventional clinical single-perspective flat-panel radiography system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seslija, Petar; Teeter, Matthew G.; Yuan Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Bourne, Robert B.; MacDonald, Steven J.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W. [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) and Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Western Ontario and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Western Ontario and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The ability to accurately measure joint kinematics is an important tool in studying both normal joint function and pathologies associated with injury and disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, accuracy, precision, and clinical safety of measuring 3D joint motion using a conventional flat-panel radiography system prior to its application in an in vivo study. Methods: An automated, image-based tracking algorithm was implemented to measure the three-dimensional pose of a sparse object from a two-dimensional radiographic projection. The algorithm was tested to determine its efficiency and failure rate, defined as the number of image frames where automated tracking failed, or required user intervention. The accuracy and precision of measuring three-dimensional motion were assessed using a robotic controlled, tibiofemoral knee phantom programmed to mimic a subject with a total knee replacement performing a stair ascent activity. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the measurements of the single-plane radiographic tracking technique to those of an optical tracking system, and quantified by the measurement discrepancy between the two systems using the Bland-Altman technique. Precision was assessed through a series of repeated measurements of the tibiofemoral kinematics, and was quantified using the across-trial deviations of the repeated kinematic measurements. The safety of the imaging procedure was assessed by measuring the effective dose of ionizing radiation associated with the x-ray exposures, and analyzing its relative risk to a human subject. Results: The automated tracking algorithm displayed a failure rate of 2% and achieved an average computational throughput of 8 image frames/s. Mean differences between the radiographic and optical measurements for translations and rotations were less than 0.08 mm and 0.07 Degree-Sign in-plane, and 0.24 mm and 0.6 Degree-Sign out-of-plane. The repeatability of kinematics measurements performed

  9. An investigation of flat panel equipment variables on image quality with a dedicated cardiac phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Image quality (IQ) evaluation plays a key role in the process of optimization of new x-ray systems. Ideally, this process should be supported by real clinical images, but ethical issues and differences in anatomy and pathology of patients make it impossible. Phantom studies might overcome these issues. This paper presents the IQ evaluation of 30 cineangiographic films acquired with a cardiac flat panel system. The phantom used simulates the anatomy of the heart and allows the circulation of contrast agent boluses through coronary arteries. Variables investigated with influence on IQ and radiation dose are: tube potential, detector dose, added Copper filters, dynamic density optimization (DDO) and viewing angle. The IQ evaluation consisted of scoring 4 simulated calcified lesions located on different coronary artery segments in terms of degree of visualization. Eight cardiologists rated the lesions using a five-point scale ((1) lesion not visible to (5) very good visibility). Radiation doses associated to the angiograms are expressed in terms of incident air kerma (IAK) and effective dose that has been calculated with PCXMX software (STUK, Finland) from the exposure settings assuming a standard sized patient of 70 Kg. Mean IQ scores ranged from 1.68 to 4.88. The highest IQ scores were obtained for the angiograms acquired with tube potential 80 kVp, no added Cu filters, DDO 60%, RAO and LAO views and the highest entrance detector dose that has been used in the present study, namely 0.17 μGy/im. Radiation doses (IAK ∼40 mGy and effective dose of 1 mSv) were estimated for angiograms acquired at 15 frames s-1, detector field-of-view 20 cm, and a length of 5 s. The following parameters improved the IQ factor significantly: a change in tube potential from 96 to 80 kVp, detector dose from 0.10 μGy/im to 0.17 μGy/im, the absence of Copper filtration. DDO variable which is a post-processing parameter should be carefully evaluated because it alters the quality of the

  10. Impact and Penetration of Thin Aluminum 2024 Flat Panels at Oblique Angles of Incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Emmerling, William; Queitzsch, Gilbert K., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    under more extreme conditions, using a projectile with a more complex shape and sharp contacts, impacting flat panels at oblique angles of incidence.

  11. Calibration model of a dual gain flat panel detector for 2D and 3D x-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuing research and further development in flat panel detector technology have led to its integration into more and more medical x-ray systems for two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) imaging, such as fixed or mobile C arms. Besides the obvious advantages of flat panel detectors, like the slim design and the resulting optimum accessibility to the patient, their success is primarily a product of the image quality that can be achieved. The benefits in the physical and performance-related features as opposed to conventional image intensifier systems (e.g., distortion-free reproduction of imaging information or almost linear signal response over a large dynamic range) can be fully exploited, however, only if the raw detector images are correctly calibrated and postprocessed. Previous procedures for processing raw data contain idealizations that, in the real world, lead to artifacts or losses in image quality. Thus, for example, temperature dependencies or changes in beam geometry, as can occur with mobile C arm systems, have not been taken into account up to this time. Additionally, adverse characteristics such as image lag or aging effects have to be compensated to attain the best possible image quality. In this article a procedure is presented that takes into account the important dependencies of the individual pixel sensitivity of flat panel detectors used in 2D or 3D imaging and simultaneously minimizes the work required for an extensive recalibration. It is suitable for conventional detectors with only one gain mode as well as for the detectors specially developed for 3D imaging with dual gain read-out technology

  12. Circle plus Partial Helical Scan Scheme for a Flat Panel Detector-Based Cone Beam Breast X-Ray CT

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Yang; Ruola Ning; Weixing Cai

    2009-01-01

    Flat panel detector-based cone beam breast CT (CBBCT) can provide 3D image of the scanned breast with 3D isotropic spatial resolution, overcoming the disadvantage of the structure superimposition associated with X-ray projection mammography. It is very difficult for Mammography to detect a small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size) when the tumor is occult or in dense breast. CBBCT featured with circular scan might be the most desirable mode in breast imaging due to its simple geometrical co...

  13. A 25 kW solar photovoltaic flat panel power supply for an electrodialysis water desalination unit in New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. R.; Crutcher, J. L.

    1980-06-01

    The stand-alone system consists of a flat panel array employing silicon ribbon solar cells, used in conjunction with a lead-acid battery bank. Electrodialysis is an energy-conservative process for the desalination of water, in which ions are transferred from one solution through a membrane into another solution by imposition of a direct electrical current. The system design is intended to be prototypical of part of the drinking water supply for a remote village. The specific task of this system is to aid in the restoration of an aquifer following a uranium leaching operation.

  14. Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6 mA/cm2 could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10 V/μm to 20 V/μm. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO2 insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate

  15. Dynamic modeling of the microalgae cultivation phase for energy production in open raceway ponds and flat panel photobioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eMarsullo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model of microalgae cultivation phase is presented in this work. Two cultivation technologies are taken into account: the open raceway pond and the flat panel photobioreactor. For each technology, the model is able to evaluate the microalgae areal and volumetric productivity and the energy production and consumption. Differently from the most common existing models in literature, which deal with a specific part of the overall cultivation process, the model presented here includes all physical and chemical quantities that mostly affect microalgae growth: the equation of the specific growth rate for the microalgae is influenced by CO2 and nutrients concentration in the water, light intensity, temperature of the water in the reactor and by the microalgae species being considered. All these input parameters can be tuned to obtain reliable predictions. A comparison with experimental data taken from the literature shows that the predictions are consistent, slightly overestimating the productivity in case of closed photobioreactor. The results obtained by the simulation runs are consistent with those found in literature, being the areal productivity for the open raceway pond between 50 and 70 t/(ha*year in Southern Spain (Sevilla and Brazil (Petrolina and between 250 and 350 t/(ha*year for the flat panel photobioreactor in the same locations.

  16. Empirical and theoretical investigation of the noise performance of indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) for diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, J H; Antonuk, L E; el-Mohri, Y; Yorkston, J; Huang, W; Boudry, J M; Cunningham, I A

    1997-01-01

    Noise properties of active matrix, flat-panel imagers under conditions relevant to diagnostic radiology are investigated. These studies focus on imagers based upon arrays with pixels incorporating a discrete photodiode coupled to a thin-film transistor, both fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon. These optically sensitive arrays are operated with an overlying x-ray converter to allow indirect detection of incident x rays. External electronics, including gate driver circuits and preamplification circuits, are also required to operate the arrays. A theoretical model describing the signal and noise transfer properties of the imagers under conditions relevant to diagnostic radiography, fluoroscopy, and mammography is developed. This frequency-dependent model is based upon a cascaded systems analysis wherein the imager is conceptually divided into a series of stages having intrinsic gain and spreading properties. Predictions from the model are compared with x-ray sensitivity and noise measurements obtained from individual pixels from an imager with a pixel format of 1536 x 1920 pixels at a pixel pitch of 127 microns. The model is shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements obtained with diagnostic x rays using various phosphor screens. The model is used to explore the potential performance of existing and hypothetical imagers for application in radiography, fluoroscopy, and mammography as a function of exposure, additive noise, and fill factor. These theoretical predictions suggest that imagers of this general design incorporating a CsI: Tl intensifying screen can be optimized to provide detective quantum efficiency (DQE) superior to existing screen-film and storage phosphor systems for general radiography and mammography. For fluoroscopy, the model predicts that with further optimization of a-Si:H imagers, DQE performance approaching that of the best x-ray image intensifier systems may be possible. The results of this analysis suggest strategies for

  17. The design and imaging characteristics of dynamic, solid-state, flat-panel x-ray image detectors for digital fluoroscopy and fluorography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic, flat-panel, solid-state, x-ray image detectors for use in digital fluoroscopy and fluorography emerged at the turn of the millennium. This new generation of dynamic detectors utilize a thin layer of x-ray absorptive material superimposed upon an electronic active matrix array fabricated in a film of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Dynamic solid-state detectors come in two basic designs, the indirect-conversion (x-ray scintillator based) and the direct-conversion (x-ray photoconductor based). This review explains the underlying principles and enabling technologies associated with these detector designs, and evaluates their physical imaging characteristics, comparing their performance against the long established x-ray image intensifier television (TV) system. Solid-state detectors afford a number of physical imaging benefits compared with the latter. These include zero geometrical distortion and vignetting, immunity from blooming at exposure highlights and negligible contrast loss (due to internal scatter). They also exhibit a wider dynamic range and maintain higher spatial resolution when imaging over larger fields of view. The detective quantum efficiency of indirect-conversion, dynamic, solid-state detectors is superior to that of both x-ray image intensifier TV systems and direct-conversion detectors. Dynamic solid-state detectors are playing a burgeoning role in fluoroscopy-guided diagnosis and intervention, leading to the displacement of x-ray image intensifier TV-based systems. Future trends in dynamic, solid-state, digital fluoroscopy detectors are also briefly considered. These include the growth in associated three-dimensional (3D) visualization techniques and potential improvements in dynamic detector design

  18. ELA-beam shaping systems for flat panel display prepared by LTPS%用于平板显示 LTPS制备的 ELA光束整形系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹广玥; 游利兵; 方晓东

    2016-01-01

    介绍了多晶硅薄膜较非晶硅薄膜在平板显示领域的优势以及准分子激光晶化制备多晶硅膜的结晶过程。介绍了透镜阵列实现匀光的原理。阐述了典型的准分子激光退火线型光束整形系统的扩束、匀光、投影等结构。并介绍了连续横向固化技术在准分子激光制备低温多晶硅领域的应用。讨论了准分子激光退火光学系统的发展现状,指出了其在平板显示行业的重要意义。%The advantages to poly silicon film instead of amorphous silicon film in the field of flat panel display were introduced .Crystallization process of poly silicon film by using excimer laser crystallization system was studied .The principle of how lens array achieve the uniformity of output laser energy density was described .The structure of typical excimer laser annealing(ELA) line beam shaping system, which included beam expanding unit , beam energy homogenizing unit , projection unit and so on was focused on .Finally the application of sequential lateral solidification technology in the area of low temperature poly silicon ( LTPS ) using excimer laser nnealing was introduced .The status of ELA optical system was discussed and its significance in flat panel display industry was pointed out .

  19. Cone-Beam CT with Flat-Panel-Detector Digital Angiography System: Early Experience in Abdominal Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system equipped with a large flat-panel detector. Data obtained by 200o rotation imaging are reconstructed by means of CBCT to generate three-dimensional images. We report the use of CBCT angiography using CBCT in 10 patients with 8 liver malignancies and 2 hypersplenisms during abdominal interventional procedures. CBCT was very useful for interventional radiologists to confirm a perfusion area of the artery catheter wedged on CT by injection of contrast media through the catheter tip, although the image quality was slightly degraded, scoring as 2.60 on average by streak artifacts. CBCT is space-saving because it does not require a CT system with a gantry, and it is also time-saving because it does not require the transfer of patients

  20. Robot arm based flat panel CT-guided electromagnetic tracked spine interventions: phantom and animal model experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, Tobias; Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Mahnken, Andreas H. [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, Aachen (Germany); RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Wiemann, Christian; Guenther, Rolf W. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen University Hospital, Aachen (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis; Kalender, Willi A. [Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [RWTH Aachen University, Applied Medical Engineering, Helmholtz-Institute Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate accuracy and procedure times of electromagnetic tracking (EMT) in a robotic arm mounted flat panel setting using phantom and animal cadaveric models. A robotic arm mounted flat panel (RMFP) was used in combination with EMT to perform anthropomorphic phantom (n = 90) and ex vivo pig based punctures (n = 120) of lumbar facet joints (FJ, n = 120) and intervertebral discs (IVD, n = 90). Procedure accuracies and times were assessed and evaluated. FJ punctures were carried out with a spatial accuracy of 0.8 {+-} 0.9 mm (phantom) and 0.6 {+-} 0.8 mm (ex vivo) respectively. While IVD punctures showed puncture deviations of 0.6 {+-} 1.2 mm (phantom) and 0.5 {+-} 0.6 mm (ex vivo), direct and angulated phantom based punctures had accuracies of 0.8 {+-} 0.9 mm and 1.0 {+-} 1.3 mm. Planning took longer for ex vivo IVD punctures compared to phantom model interventions (39.3 {+-} 17.3 s vs. 20.8 {+-} 5.0 s, p = 0.001) and for angulated vs. direct phantom FJ punctures (19.7 {+-} 5.1 s vs. 28.6 {+-} 7.8 s, p < 0.001). Puncture times were longer for ex vivo procedures when compared to phantom model procedures in both FJ (37.9 {+-} 9.0 s vs. 23.6 {+-} 7.2 s, p = 0.001) and IVD punctures (43.9 {+-} 16.1 s vs. 31.1 {+-} 6.4 s, p = 0.026). The combination of RMFP with EMT provides an accurate method of navigation for spinal interventions such as facet joint punctures and intervertebral disc punctures. (orig.)

  1. A low Z linac and flat panel imager: comparison with the conventional imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and Monte Carlo simulations were conducted for an Elekta Ltd Precise Treatment System linac fitted with a low Z insert of sufficient thickness to remove all primary electrons. A variety of amorphous silicon based panels employing different scintillators were modelled to determine their response to a variety of x-ray spectra and produce an optimized portal imaging system. This study has shown that in a low Z configuration the vast majority of x-rays are produced in the nickel electron window, and with a combination of a carbon insert and caesium iodide based XVI-panel, significant improvement in the object contrast was achieved. For thin, head and neck-type geometries, contrast is 4.62 times greater for 1.6 cm bone in 5.8 cm water than the standard 6 MV/iViewGT system. For thicker, pelvis-type geometries contrast increases by a factor of 1.3 for 1.6 cm of bone in 25.8 cm water. To obtain images with the same signal-to-noise ratio as the 6 MV/iViewGT system, dose reductions of a factor of 15 and 4.2 are possible for 5.8 cm and 25.8 cm phantoms respectively. This design has the advantage of being easily implemented on a standard linac and provides a portal image directly from the therapy beam aperture.

  2. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z.; Møller, Per;

    2016-01-01

    of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scaleusing a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that...

  3. Columnar recombination for X-ray generated electron-holes in amorphous selenium and its significance in a-Se x-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubon, O.; Jandieri, K.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Kasap, S. O.; Reznik, A.

    2016-03-01

    Although amorphous selenium (a-Se) has a long and successful history of application in optical and X-ray imaging, some of its fundamental properties are still puzzling. In particularly, the mechanism of carrier recombination following x-ray excitation and electric field and temperature dependences of the electron-hole pair creation energy (Wehp) remain unclear. Using the combination of X-ray photocurrent and pulse height spectroscopy measurements, we measure Wehp in a wide range of temperatures (218-320 K) and electric fields (10-100 V/µm) and show that the conventional columnar recombination model which assumes Langevin recombination within a column (a primary electron track) fails to explain experimental results in a wide range of electric fields and temperatures. The reason for the failure of the conventional model is revealed in this work, and the theory of the columnar recombination is modified to include the saturation of the recombination rate at high electric field in order to account for the experimental results in the entire range of fields and temperatures.

  4. Implementation of a program of quality assurance of image in an imaging system of flat panel portal; Puesta en marcha de un programa de garantia de calidad de imagen en un sistema de imagen portal de panel plano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Benitez, J. A.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    (IGRT) image-guided radiation therapy is the one in which images are used to locate the area of treatment. Modern irradiation systems are equipped with different modalities for obtaining images, such as flat panel systems, systems conebeam, tomoimagen, etc. This paper describes the start-up and the experience of a quality assurance program based on a flat panel portal Imaging System. (Author)

  5. Investigation of the signal behavior at diagnostic energies of prototype, direct detection, active matrix, flat-panel imagers incorporating polycrystalline HgI2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active matrix, flat-panel x-ray imagers based on a-Si:H thin-film transistors offer many advantages and are widely utilized in medical imaging applications. Unfortunately, the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of conventional flat-panel imagers incorporating scintillators or a-Se photoconductors is significantly limited by their relatively modest signal-to-noise ratio, particularly in applications involving low x-ray exposures or high spatial resolution. For this reason, polycrystalline HgI2 is of considerable interest by virtue of its low effective work function, high atomic number and the possibility of large-area deposition. In this study, a detailed investigation of the properties of prototype, flat-panel arrays coated with two forms of this high-gain photoconductor are reported. Encouragingly, high x-ray sensitivity, low dark current and spatial resolution close to the theoretical limits were observed from a number of prototypes. In addition, input-quantum-limited DQE performance was measured from one of the prototypes at relatively low exposures. However, high levels of charge trapping, lag and polarization, as well as pixel-to-pixel variations in x-ray sensitivity are of concern. While the results of the current study are promising, further development will be required to realize prototypes exhibiting the characteristics necessary to allow practical implementation of this approach. Publisher's note: The title was changed from: 'Signal behavior of polycrystalline HgI2 at diagnostic energies of prototype, direct detection, active matrix, flat-panel imagers' to 'Investigation of the signal behavior at diagnostic energies of prototype, direct detection, active matrix, flat-panel imagers incorporating polycrystalline HgI2' 24 hours after initial publication to correct a mistake

  6. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China 300072 (China); Gang, G. J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Siewerdsen, J. H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (σ{sub Q}), electronic noise (σ{sub E}), and view aliasing (σ{sub view}). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (N{sub proj}), dose (D{sub tot}), and voxel size (b{sub vox}). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andN{sub proj} at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing N{sub proj} due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime N{sub proj} <∼200, above which noise increased with N{sub proj} due to increased electronic noise. View sampling effects were shown to depend on the heterogeneity of the object in a direct analytical relationship to power-law anatomical clutter of the form κ/f {sup β}—and a general model of individual noise components (σ{sub Q}, σ{sub E}, and σ{sub view}) demonstrated agreement with measurements over a broad range in N{sub proj}, D{sub tot}, and b{sub vox}. Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeN{sub proj} ∼ 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in N{sub proj} than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis

  7. Noise, sampling, and the number of projections in cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of the number of projection views on image noise in cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector. Methods: This fairly fundamental consideration in CBCT system design and operation was addressed experimentally (using a phantom presenting a uniform medium as well as statistically motivated “clutter”) and theoretically (using a cascaded systems model describing CBCT noise) to elucidate the contributing factors of quantum noise (σQ), electronic noise (σE), and view aliasing (σview). Analysis included investigation of the noise, noise-power spectrum, and modulation transfer function as a function of the number of projections (Nproj), dose (Dtot), and voxel size (bvox). Results: The results reveal a nonmonotonic relationship between image noise andNproj at fixed total dose: for the CBCT system considered, noise decreased with increasing Nproj due to reduction of view sampling effects in the regime Nproj proj due to increased electronic noise. View sampling effects were shown to depend on the heterogeneity of the object in a direct analytical relationship to power-law anatomical clutter of the form κ/f β—and a general model of individual noise components (σQ, σE, and σview) demonstrated agreement with measurements over a broad range in Nproj, Dtot, and bvox. Conclusions: The work elucidates fairly basic elements of CBCT noise in a manner that demonstrates the role of distinct noise components (viz., quantum, electronic, and view sampling noise). For configurations fairly typical of CBCT with a flat-panel detector (FPD), the analysis reveals a “sweet spot” (i.e., minimum noise) in the rangeNproj ∼ 250–350, nearly an order of magnitude lower in Nproj than typical of multidetector CT, owing to the relatively high electronic noise in FPDs. The analysis explicitly relates view aliasing and quantum noise in a manner that includes aspects of the object (“clutter”) and imaging chain (including nonidealities of

  8. High-resolution dynamic angiography using flat-panel volume CT: feasibility demonstration for neuro and lower limb vascular applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehndiratta, Amit [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); University of Oxford, Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Keble College, Oxford (United Kingdom); Indian Institute of Technology Delhi and All India Institute of Medical Science, Centre for Biomedical Engineering, New Delhi (India); Rabinov, James D. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Interventional Neuroradiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Grasruck, Michael [Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany); Liao, Eric C. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Center for Regenerative Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Crandell, David [Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA (United States); Gupta, Rajiv [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    This paper evaluates a prototype flat-panel volume CT (fpVCT) for dynamic in vivo imaging in a variety of neurovascular and lower limb applications. Dynamic CTA was performed on 12 patients (neuro = 8, lower limb = 4) using an fpVCT with 120 kVp, 50 mA, rotation time varying from 8 to 19 s, and field of view of 25 x 25 x 18 cm{sup 3}. Four-dimensional data sets (i.e. 3D images over time) were reconstructed and reviewed. Dynamic CTA demonstrated sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to elucidate first-pass and recirculation dynamics of contrast bolus through neurovasclar pathologies and phasic blood flow though lower-limb vasculature and grafts. The high spatial resolution of fpVCT resulted in reduced partial volume and metal beam-hardening artefacts. This facilitated assessment of vascular lumen in the presence of calcified plaque and evaluation of fractures, especially in the presence of fixation hardware. Evaluation of arteriovenous malformation using dynamic fpVCT angiography was of limited utility. Dynamic CTA using fpVCT can visualize time-varying phenomena in neuro and lower limb vascular applications and has sufficient diagnostic imaging quality to evaluate a number of pathologies affecting these regions. (orig.)

  9. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Kawajiri, Satoshi; Arai, Hiroshi; Higashino, Yoshifumi; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2016-05-15

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel's cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel's cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments. PMID:27041633

  10. High-resolution dynamic angiography using flat-panel volume CT: feasibility demonstration for neuro and lower limb vascular applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates a prototype flat-panel volume CT (fpVCT) for dynamic in vivo imaging in a variety of neurovascular and lower limb applications. Dynamic CTA was performed on 12 patients (neuro = 8, lower limb = 4) using an fpVCT with 120 kVp, 50 mA, rotation time varying from 8 to 19 s, and field of view of 25 x 25 x 18 cm3. Four-dimensional data sets (i.e. 3D images over time) were reconstructed and reviewed. Dynamic CTA demonstrated sufficient spatio-temporal resolution to elucidate first-pass and recirculation dynamics of contrast bolus through neurovasclar pathologies and phasic blood flow though lower-limb vasculature and grafts. The high spatial resolution of fpVCT resulted in reduced partial volume and metal beam-hardening artefacts. This facilitated assessment of vascular lumen in the presence of calcified plaque and evaluation of fractures, especially in the presence of fixation hardware. Evaluation of arteriovenous malformation using dynamic fpVCT angiography was of limited utility. Dynamic CTA using fpVCT can visualize time-varying phenomena in neuro and lower limb vascular applications and has sufficient diagnostic imaging quality to evaluate a number of pathologies affecting these regions. (orig.)

  11. X-ray flat panel detectors and X-ray tubes contributing to development of X-ray diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray flat panel detectors (FPDs) and X-ray tubes are key devices allowing X-ray diagnostic systems to support more sophisticated medical care. FPDs provide valuable information for the diagnosis of various diseases through the conversion of X-ray images of the human body into electronic signals, while X-ray tubes are used in a wide range of applications such as computed tomography (CT), angiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, and dental systems. Toshiba Electron Tubes and Devices Co., Ltd. has developed and commercialized FPDs providing high-quality diagnostic X-ray images with low dose exposure through the development of cutting-edge technologies including a fine crystal formation technology for cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators, thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays with photodiodes, and so on. In the field of X-ray tubes that can generate a high output of X-rays, we have developed a liquid metal hydrodynamic bearing (LM bearing) technology for various diagnostic systems including medical CT systems with a long lifetime and high rotation speed, and cardiovascular imaging systems with quiet operation. Furthermore, LM bearing technology reduces the burden on the environment by replacing insulating oil with water coolant for the cooling system and making the X-ray tubes more compact. (author)

  12. Development and evaluation of a digital radiography system using a large-area flat-panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Katsumi; Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Ishikawa, Ken; Iinuma, Gen; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Konno, Yasutaka

    2002-05-01

    A new DR system using a large-area flat panel detector (FPD) with a 40 by 30 cm active area and a 194 micrometers pixel pitch, has been developed to compare with a conventional image intensifier and charge-coupled device camera type DR system. After measuring basic characteristics of the new DR system such as signal-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function, and detective quantum efficiency, we applied the FPD to a Gastro-Intestinal study with contrast media, and discussed its potential for clinical use with a medical doctor. In radiography mode, the new DR system with a large-are FPD has superior image quality compared with the conventional I.I.- CCD camera type DR system because of high SNR and DQE. In fluoroscopy mode, the SNR of the new DR system at the exposure range of over 2(mu) R/frame is similar with the conventional I.I.-CCD camera type DR system. As a result, we considered that new DR system with a large-area FPD could be applied to a clinical study replacing an I.I.-CCD camera type. In the evaluation using various clinical images taken with the new DR system by a medical doctor, the new DR system with a large-are FPD performed sufficiently for a GI study.

  13. Embedded nonvolatile memory devices with various silicon nitride energy band gaps on glass used for flat panel display applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices with a nitride–nitride–oxynitride stack structure on a rough poly-silicon (poly-Si) surface were fabricated using a low-temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistor technology on glass substrates for application of flat panel display (FPD). The plasma-assisted oxidation/nitridation method is used to form a uniform oxynitride with an ultrathin tunneling layer on a rough LTPS surface. The NVMs, using a Si-rich silicon nitride film as a charge-trapping layer, were proposed as one of the solutions for the improvement of device performance such as the program/erase speed, the memory window and the charge retention characteristics. To further improve the vertical scaling and charge retention characteristics of NVM devices, the high-κ high-density N-rich SiNx films are used as a blocking layer. The fabricated NVM devices have outstanding electrical properties, such as a low threshold voltage, a high ON/OFF current ratio, a low subthreshold swing, a low operating voltage of less than ±9 V and a large memory window of 3.7 V, which remained about 1.9 V over a period of 10 years. These characteristics are suitable for electrical switching and data storage with in FPD application

  14. Circle Plus Partial Helical Scan Scheme for a Flat Panel Detector-Based Cone Beam Breast X-Ray CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Flat panel detector-based cone beam breast CT (CBBCT can provide 3D image of the scanned breast with 3D isotropic spatial resolution, overcoming the disadvantage of the structure superimposition associated with X-ray projection mammography. It is very difficult for Mammography to detect a small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size when the tumor is occult or in dense breast. CBBCT featured with circular scan might be the most desirable mode in breast imaging due to its simple geometrical configuration and potential applications in functional imaging. An inherited large cone angle in CBBCT, however, will yield artifacts in the reconstruction images when only a single circular scan is employed. These artifacts usually manifest themselves as density drop and object geometrical distortion that are more noticeable in the reconstructed image areas that are further away from the circular scanning plane. In order to combat this drawback, a circle plus partial helical scan scheme is proposed. An exact circle plus straight line scan scheme is also conducted in computer simulation for the purpose of comparison. Computer simulations using a numerical breast phantom demonstrated the practical feasibility of this new scheme and correction to those artifacts to a certain degree.

  15. Cross Talk Study to the Single Photon Response of a Flat Panel PMT for the RICH Upgrade at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnaboldi, C; Calvi, M; Fanchini, E; Gotti, C; Maino, M; Matteuzzi, C; Perego, D L; Pessina, G; Wang, J C

    2009-01-01

    The Ring Imaging CHerenkov, RICH, detector at LHCb is now readout by Hybrid Photon Detectors. In view of its upgrade a possible option is the adoption of the flat panel Photon Multipliers Tubes, PMT. An important issue for the good determination of the rings produced in the sensitive media is a negligible level of cross talk. We have experimentally studied the cross talk from the 64x64 pixels of the H9500 PMT from Hamamatsu. Results have shown that at the single photon signal level, as expected at LHCb, the statistics applied to the small number of electrons generated at the first dynode of the PMT chain leads to a cross talk mechanism that must be interpreted in term of the percentage of the number of induced signals rather than on the amplitude of the induced signals. The threshold to suppress cross talk must be increased to a significant fraction of the single photon signal for the worst case. The number of electrons generated at the first dynode is proportional to the biasing voltage. Measurements have sh...

  16. Percutaneous Glycerol Rhizotomy for Trigeminal Neuralgia Using a Single-Plane, Flat Panel Detector Angiography System: Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARISHIMA, Hidetaka; KAWAJIRI, Satoshi; ARAI, Hiroshi; HIGASHINO, Yoshifumi; KODERA, Toshiaki; KIKUTA, Ken-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous treatments for trigeminal neuralgia (TN) including glycerol rhizotomy (GR), radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RT), and balloon compression (BC) are effective for patients with medical comorbidities and risk factors of microvascular decompression (MVD). These procedures are usually performed under fluoroscopy. Surgeons advance the needle to the trigeminal plexus through the foramen ovale while observing landmarks of fluoroscopic images; however, it is sometimes difficult to appropriately place the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. We present the technical details of percutaneous GR using a single-plane, flat panel detector angiography system to check the needle positioning. When the needle tip may be located near the trigeminal cistern, three-dimensional (3-D) bone images are taken with cone-beam computed tomography (CT). These images clearly show the position of the needle tip in Meckel’s cave. If it is difficult to place it through the foramen ovale, surgeons perform cone beam CT to observe the actual position of the needle tip at the skull base. After confirming the positional relation between the needle tip and foramen ovale, surgeons can advance it in the precise direction. In 10 procedures, we could place the nerve-block needle in about 14.5 minutes on average without complications. We think that our method is simple and convenient for percutaneous treatments for TN, and it may be helpful for surgeons to perform such treatments. PMID:27041633

  17. Visualization of novel microstents in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms with contrast-enhanced flat panel detector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncyljusz, Wojciech, E-mail: wponcyl@poczta.onet.pl [Departament of Interventional Radiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Neurointerventional Cath Lab MSW Hospital, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland); Zwarzany, Łukasz, E-mail: zwarzany@gmail.com [Departament of Interventional Radiology, Pomeranian Medical University, Neurointerventional Cath Lab MSW Hospital, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland); Safranow, Krzysztof, E-mail: chrissaf@mp.pl [Department of Biochemistry and Chemistry, Pomeranian Medical University, Al. Powst. Wielkopolskich 72, 70-111 Szczecin (Poland)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We examine the feasibility of FPDCT for visualizing intracranial microstents. • Stent deployment and its apposition to the vessel wall are easily assessable. • Coil streaking artifacts hamper the assessment of stent visibility. - Abstract: Objectives: The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of contrast-enhanced flat panel detector CT (FPDCT) for visualizing the novel microstents implanted in patients with unruptured wide-necked intracranial aneurysms. Methods: Forty-four cases of patients who underwent stent assisted coiling at our department were retrospectively analyzed. In each case, FPDCT images were performed after stent and coils deployment and then assessed in the terms of stent struts and all radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility separately using a 3-grade scale (1 – inadequate, 2 – good, 3 – excellent). Results: Stent struts visibility was assessed to be inadequate for evaluation in all cases. All radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility was excellent in 61.4% and good in 38.6% of cases. We observed 4 (9.09%) cases of incomplete stent opening. Treated aneurysm size <10 mm was an independent predictor of excellent stent all radiopaque markers and tantalum strands visibility (ρ = 0.014). Conclusions: Contrast-enhanced FPDCT is feasible for visualizing stents implanted in patients with intracranial aneurysms as it gives precise visualization of the relationships between the stent tantalum strands and the vessel wall. Stents used in the treatment of aneurysms ≥10 mm in size are worse visualized because of the coil streaking artifacts.

  18. Enhanced solution velocity between dark and light areas with horizontal tubes and triangular prism baffles to improve microalgal growth in a flat-panel photo-bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zongbo; Cheng, Jun; Xu, Xiaodan; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-07-01

    Novel horizontal tubes and triangular prism (HTTP) baffles that generate flow vortices were developed to increase solution velocity between dark and light areas and thus improve microalgal growth in a flat-panel photo-bioreactor. Solution velocity, mass-transfer coefficient, and mixing time were measured with a particle-imaging velocimeter, dissolved oxygen probes, and pH probes. The solution mass-transfer coefficient increased by 30% and mixing time decreased by 21% when the HTTP baffles were used. The solution velocity between dark and light areas increased from ∼0.9cm/s to ∼3.5cm/s, resulting in a decreased dark-light cycle period to one-fourth. This enhanced flashing light effect with the HTTP baffles dramatically increased microalgae biomass yield by 70% in the flat-panel photo-bioreactor. PMID:27038260

  19. Design and performance of a low noise, 128-channel ASIC preamplifier for readout of active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Maolinbay, M; Yarema, R J; Antonuk, L E; El-Mohri, Y; Yeakey, M

    2002-01-01

    Design architecture and performance measurements of a low noise, 128-channel application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC) preamplifier are reported. The ASIC was designed for readout of active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) arrays. Such arrays, which presently can be made as large as 41 cmx41 cm and with pixel-to-pixel pitches down to approx 70 mu m, require large numbers of low noise, high density, custom integrated readout circuits. The design of this new chip is specifically tailored for research and development of active matrix flat-panel arrays for various medical imaging applications. The design architecture includes the following features: (1) Programmable signal gain which allows acquisition of a wide range of signal sizes from various array designs so as to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio; (2) Correlated double sampling (CDS) which significantly reduces certain noise components; (3) Pipelined readout (simultaneously sampling and multiplexing signals) which reduces image acquisition time; (4) P...

  20. Clinical evaluation of digital angiographic system equipped with the Safire' flat-panel detector of a direct conversion type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Yoshiaki; Miura, Yusuke; Goto, Keiichi [Shimadzu Corporation, Medical Systems Division, Research and Development, Kyoto (JP)] [and others

    2003-06-01

    This report presents a report on clinical evaluation of our newly developed flat-panel X-ray detector of a direct conversion type, designed to provide images of a resolution higher than, or at least equal to, that ensured by X-ray photographic films, in clinical digital X-ray cinematography. This new detector was named 'Safire' the acronym of 'Shimadzu advanced flat imaging receptor', emphasizing its high technological level, such as the capability to ensure high quality of images. The clinical evaluation of Shimadzu DIGITEX Premier digital angiography system, equipped with this new flat-panel X-ray detector of a direct conversion type, has been started in March, 2003, at the Kokura Memorial Hospital in Kyushu, Japan. (author)

  1. Aplicación del Método de Monte Carlo en el Análisis de Materiales Utilizados en Detectores Flat Panel para Obtener Espectros de Rayos X.

    OpenAIRE

    Pozuelo, Fausto; Querol Vives, Andrea; Gallardo Bermell, Sergio; Ródenas Diago, José; Verdú Martín, Gumersindo Jesús

    2013-01-01

    En este trabajo se propone el uso de un detector flat panel junto a una cuña de polimetilmetacrilato (PMMA) para estimar el espectro de rayos X utilizando el método de Monte Carlo y técnicas de reconstrucción. El código MCNP5 se ha utilizado para modelar distintos flat panel y obtener las curvas de dosis y las funciones respuesta del sistema. La mayor parte de los flat panel actuales utilizan materiales que presentan discontinuidades debidas al borde K en el coeficiente másico de absorción de...

  2. Volumetric cone-beam CT system based on a 41x41 cm2 flat-panel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffray, David A.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2001-06-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) based upon large-area flat-panel imager (FPI) technology is a flexible and adaptable technology that offers large field-of-view (FOV), high spatial resolution, and soft-tissue imaging. The imaging performance of FPI-based cone-beam CT has been evaluated on a computer-controlled bench-top system using an early prototype FPI with a small FOV (20.5 X 20.5 cm2). These investigations demonstrate the potential of this exciting technology. In this report, imaging performance is evaluated using a production grade large-area FPI (41 X 41 cm2) for which the manufacturer has achieved a significant reduction in additive noise. This reduction in additive noise results in a substantial improvement in detective quantum efficiency (DQE) at low exposures. The spatial resolution over the increased FOV of the cone-beam CT system is evaluated by imaging a fine steel wire placed at various locations within the volume of reconstruction. The measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system demonstrates spatial frequency pass beyond 1 mm-1 (10% modulation) with a slight degradation at points off the source plane. In addition to investigations of imaging performance, progress has also been made in the integration of this technology with a medical linear accelerator for on-line image-guided radiation therapy. Unlike the bench-top system, this implementation must contend with significant geometric non-idealities caused by gravity-induced flex of the x-ray tube and FPI support assemblies. A method of characterizing and correcting these non-idealities has been developed. Images of an anthropomorphic head phantom qualitatively demonstrate the excellent spatial resolution and large FOV achievable with the cone-beam approach in the clinical implementation.

  3. SU-D-12A-04: Investigation of a 2D Antiscatter Grid for Flat Panel Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To improve CT number accuracy and contrast sensitivity, a novel 2D antiscatter grid (ASG) for flat panel detector (FPD) based CBCT imaging was evaluated. Experiments were performed to characterize the scatter rejection and contrast sensitivity performance of ASG. The reduction in primary transmission for various ASG geometries was also evaluated by a computational model. Methods: The 2D ASG design was based on multi-hole collimators used in Nuclear Medicine. It consisted of abutted hexagon shaped apertures with 2.5 mm pitch and 32 mm height, and separated by 0.25 mm thick lead septa. Scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and mean primary transmission were measured using a benchtop FPD/x-ray source system. Acrylic slabs of varying thicknesses were imaged with a contrast-detail phantom to measure CNR and SPR under different scatter conditions. Primary transmission was also measured by averaging pixel values in flood field images without the phantom. We additionally explored variation of primary transmission with pitch and septum thickness using a computational model of our ASG. Results: Our 2D ASG reduced the SPR from 3.3 to 0.12, and improved CNR by 50% in 20 cm thick slab phantom projections acquired at 120 kVp. While the measured primary transmission was 72.8%, our simulations show that primary transmission can be increased to 86% by reducing the septum thickness to 0.1 mm. Primary transmission further increases to 93% if septum thickness of 0.1 mm is used in conjunction with an increased pitch of 4 mm. Conclusion: The 2D ASG appears to be a promising scatter rejection device, offering both superior scatter rejection and improved contrast sensitivity. Though its lead footprint reduced primary transmission, our work shows that optimization of aperture pitch and septum thickness can significantly improve the primary transmission

  4. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  5. Semi-automatic classification of skeletal morphology in genetically altered mice using flat-panel volume computed tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dullin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid progress in exploring the human and mouse genome has resulted in the generation of a multitude of mouse models to study gene functions in their biological context. However, effective screening methods that allow rapid noninvasive phenotyping of transgenic and knockout mice are still lacking. To identify murine models with bone alterations in vivo, we used flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT for high-resolution 3-D imaging and developed an algorithm with a computational intelligence system. First, we tested the accuracy and reliability of this approach by imaging discoidin domain receptor 2- (DDR2- deficient mice, which display distinct skull abnormalities as shown by comparative landmark-based analysis. High-contrast fpVCT data of the skull with 200 microm isotropic resolution and 8-s scan time allowed segmentation and computation of significant shape features as well as visualization of morphological differences. The application of a trained artificial neuronal network to these datasets permitted a semi-automatic and highly accurate phenotype classification of DDR2-deficient compared to C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Even heterozygous DDR2 mice with only subtle phenotypic alterations were correctly determined by fpVCT imaging and identified as a new class. In addition, we successfully applied the algorithm to classify knockout mice lacking the DDR1 gene with no apparent skull deformities. Thus, this new method seems to be a potential tool to identify novel mouse phenotypes with skull changes from transgenic and knockout mice on the basis of random mutagenesis as well as from genetic models. However for this purpose, new neuronal networks have to be created and trained. In summary, the combination of fpVCT images with artificial neuronal networks provides a reliable, novel method for rapid, cost-effective, and noninvasive primary screening tool to detect skeletal phenotypes in mice.

  6. Percutaneous sacroplasty with the use of C-arm flat-panel detector CT: technical feasibility and clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sung Eun; Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Joo Hyung; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kun Woo; Yeom, Jin S. [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Sacroplasty for sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) has been performed mostly under computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopy guidance. The purposes of this study are to describe technical tips and clinical outcomes of sacroplasty under C-arm flat panel detector CT (C-arm CT) guidance, and to compare the cement distributions shown on C-arm CT with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT). This study consisted of patients who underwent sacroplasty for SIF using C-arm CT from May 2006 to May 2009. Technical success was assessed in terms of cement filling and leakage. Clinical outcome was assessed at short-term (less than 1 month) and long-term (more than 1 month) follow-up using a four-grade patient satisfaction scale: poor, fair, good, and excellent. After sacroplasty, all patients underwent MDCT and three radiologists compared MDCT images with C-arm CT images in consensus, focusing on the cement distribution and cement leakage. Sacroplasties were performed on both sacral alae in all 8 patients (male:female = 2:6, mean age = 76.9, range = 63-82). The technical success rate was 100%. At short-term follow up, 6 patients (87.5%) reported significant improvement. Five patients (62.5%) were available for long-term follow-up and all 5 patients reported a reduced pain and an improved ability to ambulate. Using MDCT as the standard of reference, the cement distribution was visualized equally well by C-arm CT. Sacroplasty under C-arm CT showed excellent technical success and good clinical outcome. There was an excellent correlation between C-arm CT and MDCT in evaluating cement distribution and cement leakage. (orig.)

  7. Novel Na(+) doped Alq3 hybrid materials for organic light-emitting diode (OLED) devices and flat panel displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, S A; Borghate, S V; Kalyani, N Thejo; Dhoble, S J

    2015-05-01

    Pure and Na(+) -doped Alq3 complexes were synthesized by a simple precipitation method at room temperature, maintaining a stoichiometric ratio. These complexes were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV/Vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra. The X-ray diffractogram exhibits well-resolved peaks, revealing the crystalline nature of the synthesized complexes, FTIR confirms the molecular structure and the completion of quinoline ring formation in the metal complex. UV/Vis absorption and PL spectra of sodium-doped Alq3 complexes exhibit high emission intensity in comparison with Alq3 phosphor, proving that when doped in Alq3 , Na(+) enhances PL emission intensity. The excitation spectra of the synthesized complexes lie in the range 242-457 nm when weak shoulders are also considered. Because the sharp excitation peak falls in the blue region of visible radiation, the complexes can be employed for blue chip excitation. The emission wavelength of all the synthesized complexes lies in the bluish green/green region ranging between 485 and 531 nm. The intensity of the emission wavelength was found to be elevated when Na(+) is doped into Alq3 . Because both the excitation and emission wavelengths fall in the visible region of electromagnetic radiation, these phosphors can also be employed to improve the power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells by using the solar spectral conversion principle. Thus, the synthesized phosphors can be used as bluish green/green light-emitting phosphors for organic light-emitting diodes, flat panel displays, solid-state lighting technology - a step towards the desire to reduce energy consumption and generate pollution free light. PMID:25045087

  8. SU-E-J-45: The Correlation Between CBCT Flat Panel Misalignment and 3D Image Guidance Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenton, O; Valdes, G; Yin, L; Teo, B [The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brousmiche, S; Wikler, D [Ion Beam Application, Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To simulate the impact of CBCT flat panel misalignment on the image quality, the calculated correction vectors in 3D image guided proton therapy and to determine if these calibration errors can be caught in our QA process. Methods The X-ray source and detector geometrical calibration (flexmap) file of the CBCT system in the AdaPTinsight software (IBA proton therapy) was edited to induce known changes in the rotational and translational calibrations of the imaging panel. Translations of up to ±10 mm in the x, y and z directions (see supplemental) and rotational errors of up to ±3° were induced. The calibration files were then used to reconstruct the CBCT image of a pancreatic patient and CatPhan phantom. Correction vectors were calculated for the patient using the software’s auto match system and compared to baseline values. The CatPhan CBCT images were used for quantitative evaluation of image quality for each type of induced error. Results Translations of 1 to 3 mm in the x and y calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector errors of equal magnitude. Similar 10mm shifts were seen in the y-direction; however, in the x-direction, the image quality was too degraded for a match. These translational errors can be identified through differences in isocenter from orthogonal kV images taken during routine QA. Errors in the z-direction had no effect on the correction vector and image quality.Rotations of the imaging panel calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector rotations of the patient images. These rotations also resulted in degraded image quality which can be identified through quantitative image quality metrics. Conclusion Misalignment of CBCT geometry can lead to incorrect translational and rotational patient correction vectors. These errors can be identified through QA of the imaging isocenter as compared to orthogonal images combined with monitoring of CBCT image quality.

  9. Trabecular structure analysis using C-arm CT: comparison with MDCT and flat-panel volume CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses interscan, interreader, and intrareader variability of C-arm CT and compares it to that of flat-panel volume-CT (fpVCT) and high-definition multi-detector-CT (HD-MDCT). Five cadaver knee specimens were imaged using C-arm-CT, fpVCT, and HD-MDCT. Apparent (app.) trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), app. trabecular number (TbN), app. trabecular spacing (TbSp), and app. trabecular thickness (TbTh) of the proximal tibia were measured by three readers. Interreader, intrareader, and interscan variability for C-arm CT was expressed as coefficient of variation (CV), standard deviation (SD), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). With the exception of app.TbSp (CV: 7.05-9.35%, SD: 0.06-0.09, ICC: 0.89-0.94), the variability of C-arm CT was low (CV: 2.41-6.43%, SD: 0.01-0.048, ICC: 0.65-0.98). Its interreader reliability (CV: 2.66-4.55%, SD: 0.01-0.03, ICC: 0.81-0.95) was comparable to that of HD-MDCT (CV: 2.41-4.08%, SD: 0.014-0.016, ICC: 0.95-0.96), and fpVCT (CV: 3.13-5.63%, SD: 0.009-0.036, ICC: 0.64-0.98) for all parameters except app.TbSp. C-arm CT is a reliable method for assessing trabecular bone architectural parameters with the exception of app.TbSp due to spatial resolution limitation. (orig.)

  10. SU-E-J-45: The Correlation Between CBCT Flat Panel Misalignment and 3D Image Guidance Accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose To simulate the impact of CBCT flat panel misalignment on the image quality, the calculated correction vectors in 3D image guided proton therapy and to determine if these calibration errors can be caught in our QA process. Methods The X-ray source and detector geometrical calibration (flexmap) file of the CBCT system in the AdaPTinsight software (IBA proton therapy) was edited to induce known changes in the rotational and translational calibrations of the imaging panel. Translations of up to ±10 mm in the x, y and z directions (see supplemental) and rotational errors of up to ±3° were induced. The calibration files were then used to reconstruct the CBCT image of a pancreatic patient and CatPhan phantom. Correction vectors were calculated for the patient using the software’s auto match system and compared to baseline values. The CatPhan CBCT images were used for quantitative evaluation of image quality for each type of induced error. Results Translations of 1 to 3 mm in the x and y calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector errors of equal magnitude. Similar 10mm shifts were seen in the y-direction; however, in the x-direction, the image quality was too degraded for a match. These translational errors can be identified through differences in isocenter from orthogonal kV images taken during routine QA. Errors in the z-direction had no effect on the correction vector and image quality.Rotations of the imaging panel calibration resulted in corresponding correction vector rotations of the patient images. These rotations also resulted in degraded image quality which can be identified through quantitative image quality metrics. Conclusion Misalignment of CBCT geometry can lead to incorrect translational and rotational patient correction vectors. These errors can be identified through QA of the imaging isocenter as compared to orthogonal images combined with monitoring of CBCT image quality

  11. Percutaneous sacroplasty with the use of C-arm flat-panel detector CT: technical feasibility and clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacroplasty for sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) has been performed mostly under computed tomography (CT) or fluoroscopy guidance. The purposes of this study are to describe technical tips and clinical outcomes of sacroplasty under C-arm flat panel detector CT (C-arm CT) guidance, and to compare the cement distributions shown on C-arm CT with those on multi-detector CT (MDCT). This study consisted of patients who underwent sacroplasty for SIF using C-arm CT from May 2006 to May 2009. Technical success was assessed in terms of cement filling and leakage. Clinical outcome was assessed at short-term (less than 1 month) and long-term (more than 1 month) follow-up using a four-grade patient satisfaction scale: poor, fair, good, and excellent. After sacroplasty, all patients underwent MDCT and three radiologists compared MDCT images with C-arm CT images in consensus, focusing on the cement distribution and cement leakage. Sacroplasties were performed on both sacral alae in all 8 patients (male:female = 2:6, mean age = 76.9, range = 63-82). The technical success rate was 100%. At short-term follow up, 6 patients (87.5%) reported significant improvement. Five patients (62.5%) were available for long-term follow-up and all 5 patients reported a reduced pain and an improved ability to ambulate. Using MDCT as the standard of reference, the cement distribution was visualized equally well by C-arm CT. Sacroplasty under C-arm CT showed excellent technical success and good clinical outcome. There was an excellent correlation between C-arm CT and MDCT in evaluating cement distribution and cement leakage. (orig.)

  12. Nonlinear statistical reconstruction for flat-panel cone-beam CT with blur and correlated noise models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-03-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications.

  13. Trabecular structure analysis using C-arm CT: comparison with MDCT and flat-panel volume CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phan, Catherine M.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Yoo, Albert J.; Hirsch, Joshua A.; Gupta, Rajiv [Massachusetts General Hospital Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Macklin, Eric A. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Biostatistics Center, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Dadrich, Monica; Flechsig, Paul [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    This paper assesses interscan, interreader, and intrareader variability of C-arm CT and compares it to that of flat-panel volume-CT (fpVCT) and high-definition multi-detector-CT (HD-MDCT). Five cadaver knee specimens were imaged using C-arm-CT, fpVCT, and HD-MDCT. Apparent (app.) trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), app. trabecular number (TbN), app. trabecular spacing (TbSp), and app. trabecular thickness (TbTh) of the proximal tibia were measured by three readers. Interreader, intrareader, and interscan variability for C-arm CT was expressed as coefficient of variation (CV), standard deviation (SD), and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). With the exception of app.TbSp (CV: 7.05-9.35%, SD: 0.06-0.09, ICC: 0.89-0.94), the variability of C-arm CT was low (CV: 2.41-6.43%, SD: 0.01-0.048, ICC: 0.65-0.98). Its interreader reliability (CV: 2.66-4.55%, SD: 0.01-0.03, ICC: 0.81-0.95) was comparable to that of HD-MDCT (CV: 2.41-4.08%, SD: 0.014-0.016, ICC: 0.95-0.96), and fpVCT (CV: 3.13-5.63%, SD: 0.009-0.036, ICC: 0.64-0.98) for all parameters except app.TbSp. C-arm CT is a reliable method for assessing trabecular bone architectural parameters with the exception of app.TbSp due to spatial resolution limitation. (orig.)

  14. Nonlinear Statistical Reconstruction for Flat-Panel Cone-Beam CT with Blur and Correlated Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Steven; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Stayman, J. Webster

    2016-01-01

    Flat-panel cone-beam CT (FP-CBCT) is a promising imaging modality, partly due to its potential for high spatial resolution reconstructions in relatively compact scanners. Despite this potential, FP-CBCT can face difficulty resolving important fine scale structures (e.g, trabecular details in dedicated extremities scanners and microcalcifications in dedicated CBCT mammography). Model-based methods offer one opportunity to improve high-resolution performance without any hardware changes. Previous work, based on a linearized forward model, demonstrated improved performance when both system blur and spatial correlations characteristics of FP-CBCT systems are modeled. Unfortunately, the linearized model relies on a staged processing approach that complicates tuning parameter selection and can limit the finest achievable spatial resolution. In this work, we present an alternative scheme that leverages a full nonlinear forward model with both system blur and spatially correlated noise. A likelihood-based objective function is derived from this forward model and we derive an iterative optimization algorithm for its solution. The proposed approach is evaluated in simulation studies using a digital extremities phantom and resolution-noise trade-offs are quantitatively evaluated. The correlated nonlinear model outperformed both the uncorrelated nonlinear model and the staged linearized technique with up to a 86% reduction in variance at matched spatial resolution. Additionally, the nonlinear models could achieve finer spatial resolution (correlated: 0.10 mm, uncorrelated: 0.11 mm) than the linear correlated model (0.15 mm), and traditional FDK (0.40 mm). This suggests the proposed nonlinear approach may be an important tool in improving performance for high-resolution clinical applications. PMID:27110051

  15. Quantitative kinetic analysis of lung nodules by temporal subtraction technique in dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung cancer is one of the most effective means to reduce cancer mortality; chest X-ray radiography has been widely used as a screening examination or health checkup. The new examination method and the development of computer analysis system allow obtaining respiratory kinetics by the use of flat panel detector (FPD), which is the expanded method of chest X-ray radiography. Through such changes functional evaluation of respiratory kinetics in chest has become available. Its introduction into clinical practice is expected in the future. In this study, we developed the computer analysis algorithm for the purpose of detecting lung nodules and evaluating quantitative kinetics. Breathing chest radiograph obtained by modified FPD was converted into 4 static images drawing the feature, by sequential temporal subtraction processing, morphologic enhancement processing, kinetic visualization processing, and lung region detection processing, after the breath synchronization process utilizing the diaphragmatic analysis of the vector movement. The artificial neural network used to analyze the density patterns detected the true nodules by analyzing these static images, and drew their kinetic tracks. For the algorithm performance and the evaluation of clinical effectiveness with 7 normal patients and simulated nodules, both showed sufficient detecting capability and kinetic imaging function without statistically significant difference. Our technique can quantitatively evaluate the kinetic range of nodules, and is effective in detecting a nodule on a breathing chest radiograph. Moreover, the application of this technique is expected to extend computer-aided diagnosis systems and facilitate the development of an automatic planning system for radiation therapy.

  16. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Traylor Building, Room 718, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  17. SU-E-I-49: Simulation Study for Removing Scatter Radiation in Cesium-Iodine Based Flat Panel Detector System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study aims to identify the feasibility of a novel cesium-iodine (CsI)-based flat-panel detector (FPD) for removing scatter radiation in diagnostic radiology. Methods: The indirect FPD comprises three layers: a substrate, scintillation, and thin-film-transistor (TFT) layer. The TFT layer has a matrix structure with pixels. There are ineffective dimensions on the TFT layer, such as the voltage and data lines; therefore, we devised a new FPD system having net-like lead in the substrate layer, matching the ineffective area, to block the scatter radiation so that only primary X-rays could reach the effective dimension.To evaluate the performance of this new FPD system, we conducted a Monte Carlo simulation using MCNPX 2.6.0 software. Scatter fractions (SFs) were acquired using no grid, a parallel grid (8:1 grid ratio), and the new system, and the performances were compared.Two systems having different thicknesses of lead in the substrate layer—10 and 20μm—were simulated. Additionally, we examined the effects of different pixel sizes (153×153 and 163×163μm) on the image quality, while keeping the effective area of pixels constant (143×143μm). Results: In case of 10μm lead, the SFs of the new system (∼11%) were lower than those of the other system (∼27% with no grid, ∼16% with parallel grid) at 40kV. However, as the tube voltage increased, the SF of new system (∼19%) was higher than that of parallel grid (∼18%) at 120kV. In the case of 20μm lead, the SFs of the new system were lower than those of the other systems at all ranges of the tube voltage (40–120kV). Conclusion: The novel CsI-based FPD system for removing scatter radiation is feasible for improving the image contrast but must be optimized with respect to the lead thickness, considering the system’s purposes and the ranges of the tube voltage in diagnostic radiology. This study was supported by a grant(K1422651) from Institute of Health Science, Korea University

  18. Initial performance evaluation of an indirect-detection, active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) prototype for megavoltage imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The development of the first prototype active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) capable of radiographic and fluoroscopic megavoltage operation is reported. The signal and noise performance of individual pixels is empirically quantified. Results of an observer-dependent study of imaging performance, using a contrast-detail phantom, are detailed and radiographic patient images are shown. Finally, a theoretical investigation of the zero-frequency detective quantum efficiency (DQE) performance of such imagers, using a cascaded systems formalism, is presented. Methods and Materials: The imager is based on a 508-μm pitch, 26 x 26 cm2 array which detects radiation indirectly via an overlying copper plate + phosphor screen converter. Results: Due to its excellent optical coupling, the imager exhibits sensitivity superior to that of video-based systems. With an ∼133 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb screen the system is x-ray quantum-noise-limited down to ∼0.3 cGy, conservatively, and extensions of this behavior to even lower doses by means of reduced additive electronic noise is predicted. The observer-dependent study indicates performance superior to that of conventional radiotherapy film while the patient images demonstrate good image quality at 1 to 4 MU. The theoretical studies suggest that, with a 133 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb screen, the system would provide DQE performance equivalent to that of video-based systems and that almost a factor of two improvement in DQE is achievable through the incorporation of a 400 mg/cm2 screen. Conclusion: The reported prototype imager is the first megavoltage AMFPI having performance characteristics consistent with practical clinical operation. The superior contrast-detail sensitivity of the imager allows the capture of high-quality 6- and 15-MV images at minimal dose. Moreover, significant performance improvements, including extension of the operational range up to full portal doses, appear feasible. Such capabilities could be of considerable

  19. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O`Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  20. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules

  1. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O' Sullivan, Andrew W. [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Catherall, David [Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63103 (United States); Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Tai, Yuan-Chuan, E-mail: taiy@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2015-09-11

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm{sup 3} with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm{sup 2}. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with {sup 68}Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  2. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between an image-intensifier system and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system - technical phantom measurements and evaluation of clinical imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, Meike; Hagelstein, Claudia; Diehm, Theo; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Neff, K.W. [University Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Mannheim (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Many image-intensifier fluoroscopy systems have been replaced by flat-panel detectors in recent years. To compare the level of contrast, image resolution and radiation dose between an image-intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system in a pediatric radiology unit. We compared two systems - a conventional image intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel system. We measured image quality and radiation dose using a technical phantom. Additionally, we retrospectively compared age-matched fluoroscopic pediatric voiding cystourethrography (n = 15) and upper gastrointestinal investigations (n = 25). In phantom studies image contrast was equal while image resolution was higher and mean radiation dose lower using the flat-panel system (P < 0.0001). In pediatric investigations, mean dose area product was significantly reduced on the flat-panel system for upper gastrointestinal investigation (45 ± 38 μGy*m{sup 2} vs. 11 ± 9 μGy*m{sup 2}; P < 0.0001) and for voiding cystourethrography (18 ± 20 μGy*m{sup 2} vs. 10 ± 12 μGy*m{sup 2}; P = 0.04). The newer flat-panel system performs at lower dose levels with equal to better image quality and therefore seems to be the more suitable technique for pediatric fluoroscopy in comparison to image-intensifier systems. (orig.)

  3. Comparison of image quality and radiation dose between an image-intensifier system and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system - technical phantom measurements and evaluation of clinical imaging in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many image-intensifier fluoroscopy systems have been replaced by flat-panel detectors in recent years. To compare the level of contrast, image resolution and radiation dose between an image-intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel detector system in a pediatric radiology unit. We compared two systems - a conventional image intensifier and a newer-generation flat-panel system. We measured image quality and radiation dose using a technical phantom. Additionally, we retrospectively compared age-matched fluoroscopic pediatric voiding cystourethrography (n = 15) and upper gastrointestinal investigations (n = 25). In phantom studies image contrast was equal while image resolution was higher and mean radiation dose lower using the flat-panel system (P < 0.0001). In pediatric investigations, mean dose area product was significantly reduced on the flat-panel system for upper gastrointestinal investigation (45 ± 38 μGy*m2 vs. 11 ± 9 μGy*m2; P < 0.0001) and for voiding cystourethrography (18 ± 20 μGy*m2 vs. 10 ± 12 μGy*m2; P = 0.04). The newer flat-panel system performs at lower dose levels with equal to better image quality and therefore seems to be the more suitable technique for pediatric fluoroscopy in comparison to image-intensifier systems. (orig.)

  4. Performance of a prototype 32×32 pixel indirect x-ray imager based on a lateral selenium passive pixel sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Rasoul; Wang, Kai; Yazdandoost, Mohammad Y.; Shin, Kyung-Wook; Chen, Feng; Majid, Shaikh Hasibul; Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    An interface has been developed to capture frames taken by X-ray array imagers up to 64×64 pixels. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designed solely for X-ray flat panel imaging readout circuitry, manufactured by FLIR® called Indigo (also known as ISC9717), was used as part of charge-amplifier block. An Altera Cyclone II FPGA is used to serve three purposes: Create pulses required for gate-driver block, Receive fast-stream data coming from the Indigo chip, and Send data through RS-232 protocol over a serial cable to a personal computer. Initial results for a 32×32 passive pixel sensor (PPS) with lateral amorphous Selenium metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetector were presented in [1]. This work focuses more on methods used to improve the images obtained from the array. Sharper images produced in sync with the light source are presented. In addition, insight into array readout circuitry and capturing a frame from an array is discussed.

  5. The feasibility and clinical application of flat-panel detector computer tomography in evaluating cerebral blood volume: an initial prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and clinical value of the determination of cerebral blood volume (CBV) map by using flat-panel detector computer tomography (FDCT) angiography system. Methods: A prospective self-control clinical trial was conducted in 20 patients with cerebral ischemia who were encountered during the period from June 2010 to March 2011. All the patients were diagnosed as cerebral ischemic diseases and were scheduled to take interventional procedures. All patients underwent cerebral perfusion computer tomography (PCT) and CBV map exam which was performed by flat-panel detector computer tomography (FDCT-CBV). The CBV values obtained by the two exam types were analyzed and compared with each other by using statistic methods. Results: All PCT and FDCT-CBV exams were successfully accomplished in all the twenty patients. A significant correlation existed between the CBV images and CBV values obtained by the two exam types. The correlation coefficient was 0.68 (P<0.01). The Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -0.25±2.79 between FDCT-CBV and PCT-CBV, indicating that FDCT-CBV values were only slightly lower than those of PCT-CBV. Conclusion: CBV exam by using flat-panel detector angiography system is clinically feasible and the results of FDCT-CBV is comparable to those of PCT-CBV. As the FDCT-CBV can offer functional images of the whole brain within the catheter lab, this technique is very helpful in making the reasonable operation plan and in improving the safety of endovascular procedures in neurosurgery. (authors)

  6. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbijewski, W., E-mail: wzbijewski@jhu.edu; Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  7. [Correlation between basic imaging properties and subjective evaluations of two digital radiographic X-ray systems based on direct-conversion flat panel detector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Taro; Katayama, Reiji; Morishita, Junji; Sakai, Shinji; Kuroki, Hidefumi; Ohkubo, Seiji; Maeda, Takashi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2010-11-20

    The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between the basic imaging properties of two digital radiographic X-ray systems with a direct conversion flat-panel detector and their image qualities, which were evaluated by the observer in hard copy and soft copy studies. The subjective image quality was evaluated and compared in terms of the low-contrast detectability and image sharpness in the two digital radiographic X-ray systems. We applied the radiographs of a contrast detail phantom to the evaluation of low-contrast detectability and analyzed the contrast detail diagrams. Finally, low-contrast detectability was evaluated by the image quality figure (IQF) calculated from the contrast detail diagrams. Also, the subjective image sharpness of human dry bones of two systems was examined and evaluated by the normalized-rank method. The results indicated that System A tended to provide superior subjective image quality compared to System B in both observer studies. We also found high correlations between IQFs and basic imaging properties, such as the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the noise equivalent quantum (NEQ). In conclusion, the low-contrast detectability of the two digital radiographic X-ray systems with a direct conversion flat-panel detector corresponded to the NPS and the NEQ in both outputs (soft copy and hard copy). On the other hand, the subjective image sharpness of human dry bones was affected by their noise properties. PMID:21099176

  8. Image Quality of Digital Direct Flat-Panel Mammography Versus an Indirect Small-Field CCD Technique Using a High-Contrast Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Barbara Krug

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the detection of microcalcifications on mammograms of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired by a direct digital flat-panel detector mammography system (FPM versus a stereotactic breast biopsy system utilizing CCD (charge-coupled device technology with either a 1024 or 512 acquisition matrix (1024 CCD and 512 CCD. Materials and Methods. Randomly distributed silica beads (diameter 100–1400 m and anthropomorphic scatter bodies were applied to 48 transparent films. The test specimens were radiographed on a direct digital FPM and by the indirect 1024 CCD and 512 CCD techniques. Four radiologists rated the monitor-displayed images independently of each other in random order. Results. The rate of correct positive readings for the “number of detectable microcalcifications” for silica beads of 100–199 m in diameter was 54.2%, 50.0% and 45.8% by FPM, 1024 CCD and 512 CCD, respectively. The inter-rater variability was most pronounced for silica beads of 100–199 m in diameter. The greatest agreement with the gold standard was observed for beads >400 m in diameter across all methods. Conclusion. Stereotactic spot images taken by 1024 matrix CCD technique are diagnostically equivalent to direct digital flat-panel mammograms for visualizing simulated microcalcifications >400 m in diameter.

  9. Design and performance of a low noise, 128-channel ASIC preamplifier for readout of active matrix flat-panel imaging arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design architecture and performance measurements of a low noise, 128-channel application-specific-integrated-circuit (ASIC) preamplifier are reported. The ASIC was designed for readout of active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) arrays. Such arrays, which presently can be made as large as 41 cmx41 cm and with pixel-to-pixel pitches down to ∼70 μm, require large numbers of low noise, high density, custom integrated readout circuits. The design of this new chip is specifically tailored for research and development of active matrix flat-panel arrays for various medical imaging applications. The design architecture includes the following features: (1) Programmable signal gain which allows acquisition of a wide range of signal sizes from various array designs so as to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio; (2) Correlated double sampling (CDS) which significantly reduces certain noise components; (3) Pipelined readout (simultaneously sampling and multiplexing signals) which reduces image acquisition time; (4) Programmable bandwidth controls which balance noise and acquisition speed; and (5) Two selectable modes of output multiplexing (64:1, 16:1) for slow or fast readout. In this paper, detailed measurements of various performance parameters are presented. These measurements include noise characteristics, the relationship between bandwidth and noise, signal response linearity, channel-to-channel and pipeline cross-talk, signal gain and gain variation across channels, and the effect of sampling methods on noise. These characterizations indicate that the performance of the ASIC has achieved the original design goals

  10. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Tang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  11. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array

  12. Impact of flat panel-imager veiling glare on scatter-estimation accuracy and image quality of a commercial on-board cone-beam CT imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purposes of this study is to measure the low frequency drop (LFD) of the modulation transfer function (MTF), associated with the long tails of the detector point spread function (PSF) of an on-board flat panel imager and study its impact on cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality and scatter measurement accuracy. Methods: Two different experimental methods were used to characterize LFD and its associated PSF of a Varian OBI flat-panel detector system: the edge response function (ERF) method and the disk transfer function (DTF) method. PSF was estimated by fitting parametric models to these measurements for four values of the applied voltage (kVp). The resultant PSF was used to demonstrate the effect of LFD on image contrast and CT number accuracy in CBCT images reconstructed from synthetic datasets, as well as, accuracy of scatter measurements with the beam-stop method. Results: The MTFs derived from the measured ERF data revealed LFDs varying from 8% (at 60 kVp) to 10.5% (at 120 kVp), while the intensity of the long PSF tails was found to increase with increasing kVp. The veiling glare line spread functions derived from the ERF and DTF methods were in excellent agreement. Uncorrected veiling glare reduced contrast and the image intensity in CBCT reconstruction, near the phantom periphery (by 67 Hounsfield units in a 20 cm-in-diameter water phantom) and (to a smaller degree) near inhomogeneities. Use of the bow-tie filter mitigated these effects. Veiling glare also resulted in about 10%–15% overestimation of the scatter-to-primary ratio when measured with the beam-stop or beam-stop array method. Conclusions: The long tails of the detector PSF were found to have a modest dependence of beam spectrum, which is reflected on the MTF curve LFD. Our findings show that uncorrected veiling glare can affect quantitative accuracy and contrast in CBCT imaging, based on flat panel imager. In addition, it results in overestimation of the scatter-to-primary ratio

  13. The physics of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition for large-area coating: industrial application to flat panel displays and solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designing plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactors to coat large-area glass plates (∼1 m2) for flat panel display or solar cell manufacturing raises challenging issues in physics and chemistry as well as mechanical, thermal, and electrical engineering, and material science. In such reactive glow discharge plasma slabs, excited at RF frequency (from 13.56 MHz up to ∼100 MHz), the thin-film deposition uniformity is determined by the gas flow distribution, as well as the RF voltage distribution along the electrodes, and by local plasma perturbations at the reactor boundaries. All these aspects can be approached by analytical and numerical modelling. Moreover, the film properties are largely determined by the plasma chemistry involving the neutral radicals contributing to film growth, the effect of ion bombardment, and the formation and trapping of dust triggered by homogeneous nucleation. This paper will review progress in this field, with particular emphasis on modelling developments. (author)

  14. The physics of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition for large-area coating: industrial application to flat panel displays and solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrin, Jerome [Unaxis-Balzers A.G., Central R and D, PO Box 1000, FL-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); Schmitt, Jacques [Unaxis-France S.A., Display Technology, 5 rue Leon Blum, F-91120, Palaiseau (France); Hollenstein, Christoph; Howling, Alan; Sansonnens, Laurent [Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PPH Ecublens, CH - 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2000-12-01

    Designing plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) reactors to coat large-area glass plates ({approx}1 m{sup 2}) for flat panel display or solar cell manufacturing raises challenging issues in physics and chemistry as well as mechanical, thermal, and electrical engineering, and material science. In such reactive glow discharge plasma slabs, excited at RF frequency (from 13.56 MHz up to {approx}100 MHz), the thin-film deposition uniformity is determined by the gas flow distribution, as well as the RF voltage distribution along the electrodes, and by local plasma perturbations at the reactor boundaries. All these aspects can be approached by analytical and numerical modelling. Moreover, the film properties are largely determined by the plasma chemistry involving the neutral radicals contributing to film growth, the effect of ion bombardment, and the formation and trapping of dust triggered by homogeneous nucleation. This paper will review progress in this field, with particular emphasis on modelling developments. (author)

  15. Dose performance evaluation of a charge coupled device and a flat-panel digital fluoroscopy system recently installed in an Interventional Cardiology laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the dose performance of a flat-panel (FP) and an image intensifier (II) charge coupled device (CCD) digital fluoroscopy X-ray systems newly installed in an Interventional Cardiology (IC) department. Filter entrance dose rate, detector dose rate (during fluoroscopy) and filter entrance dose per image were measured at 70 cm from the focus using 2 mm copper sheets to mimic normal size patient. Image quality was also evaluated. The patient dose survey included 277 patients, which had either a Coronary Angiography (CA) or a Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA). Dose area product (DAP), fluoroscopy time (T) and total number of frames (F) values were also collected. The results showed that both systems performed within international recommendations with the exception of higher cine radiation doses, stressing the fact that neither specific protocols of measurement nor reference values for digital equipment were provided by the official bodies. (authors)

  16. The Usage of Flat Panel Solar Heater Balcony Style%平板式阳台壁挂太阳能应用浅析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张子涵

    2014-01-01

    随着世界范围内的能源短缺和人们环保意识的增强,新能源和可再生能源技术将是21世纪世界经济发展中最具有决定性影响的技术领域之一,而太阳能作为取之不尽、生态学上纯净的和不改变地球上燃料平衡的能源,有着能源总量大,又容易实现小型化的优点,被认为是21世纪最重要的新能源。太阳能热水器将会成为改变人们生活的一大重要产品。平板式阳台壁挂太阳能成功解决了传统太阳能热水器安装中存在的瓶颈问题,成功实现了建筑一体化。本文就平板式阳台壁挂太阳能的应用方面做了一些探索研究。%Along with the shortage of energy and enhance of environment protection, renewable energy industry has become one of the most effective ones in the new century which can greatly affect people's life. As a clean and renewable energy, solar energy has been consid-ered as the most important new energy with the characteristics of renewable, endless and easy to reach. Flat panel solar heater greatly im-proved the traditional solar heaters shortcomings and realized the perfect combination with tal buildings. In this text, we have some study of the usage of flat panel solar heaters.

  17. Radiation exposure to operating staff during rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiation exposure for operating personel associated with rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam CT. Materials and methods: Using a dedicated angiography-suite, 2D and 3D examinations of the liver were performed on a phantom to generate scattered radiation. Exposure was measured with a dosimeter at predefined heights (eye, thyroid, breast, gonads and knee) at the physician's location. Analysis included 3D procedures with a field of view (FOV) of 24 cm × 18 cm (8 s/rotation, 20 s/rotation and 5 s/2 rotations), and 47 cm × 18 cm (16 s/2 rotations) and standard 2D angiography (10 s, FOV 24 cm × 18 cm). Results: Measurements showed the highest radiation dose at the eye and thyroid level. In comparison to 2D-DSA (3.9 μSv eye-exposure), the 3D procedures caused an increased radiation exposure both in standard FOV (8 s/rotation: 28.0 μSv, 20 s/rotation: 79.3 μSv, 5 s/2 rotations: 32.5 μSv) and large FOV (37.6 μSv). Proportional distributions were measured for the residual heights. With the use of lead glass, irradiation of the eye lens was reduced to 0.2 μSv (2D DSA) and 10.6 μSv (3D technique with 20 s/rotation). Conclusion: Rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam applications significantly increase radiation exposure to the attending operator in comparison to 2D angiography. Our study indicates that the physician should wear protective devices and leave the examination room when performing 3D examinations.

  18. The influence of liquid crystal display monitors on observer performance for the detection of interstitial lung markings on both storage phosphor and flat-panel-detector chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare observer performance with a flat-panel liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor and with a high-resolution gray-scale cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor in the detection of interstitial lung markings using a silicon flat-panel-detector direct radiography (DR) and storage phosphor computed radiography (CR) in a clinical setting. Materials and methods: We displayed 39 sets of posteroanterior chest radiographs from the patients who were suspected of interstitial lung disease. Each sets consisted of DR, CR and thin-section CT as the reference standard. Image identities were masked, randomly sorted, and displayed on both five mega pixel (2048 x 2560 x 8 bits) LCD and CRT monitors. Ten radiologists independently rated their confidence in detection for the presence of linear opacities in the four fields of the lungs; right upper, left upper, right lower, and left lower quadrant. Performance of a total 6240 (39 sets x 2 detector systems x 2 monitor system x 4 fields x 10 observers) observations was analyzed by multi-reader multi-case receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Differences between monitor systems in combinations of detector systems were compared using ANOVA and paired-samples t-test. Results: Area under curves (AUC) for the presence of linear opacities measured by ROC analysis was higher on the LCDs than CRTs without statistical significance (p = 0.082). AUC was significantly higher on the DR systems than CR systems (p = 0.006). AUC was significantly higher on the LCDs than CRTs for DR systems (p = 0.039) but not different for CR systems (p = 0.301). Conclusion: In clinical conditions, performance of the LCD monitor appears to be better for detecting interstitial lung markings when interfaced with DR systems.

  19. Radiation exposure to operating staff during rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam computed tomography (CT) applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Boris, E-mail: boris.schell@googlemail.com [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Heidenreich, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.heidenreich@roentgen-consult.de [Röntgen-Consult Company, Schulhausstrasse 37, 79199 Kirchzarten (Germany); Heidenreich, Monika, E-mail: info@roentgen-consult.de [Röntgen-Consult Company, Schulhausstrasse 37, 79199 Kirchzarten (Germany); Eichler, Katrin, E-mail: k.eichler@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Thalhammer, Axel, E-mail: axel.thalhammer@kgu.de [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Naeem, Naguib Nagy Naguib, E-mail: nagynnn@yahoo.com [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Vogl, Thomas Josef, E-mail: T.Vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany); Zangos, Stefan, E-mail: Zangos@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiation exposure for operating personel associated with rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam CT. Materials and methods: Using a dedicated angiography-suite, 2D and 3D examinations of the liver were performed on a phantom to generate scattered radiation. Exposure was measured with a dosimeter at predefined heights (eye, thyroid, breast, gonads and knee) at the physician's location. Analysis included 3D procedures with a field of view (FOV) of 24 cm × 18 cm (8 s/rotation, 20 s/rotation and 5 s/2 rotations), and 47 cm × 18 cm (16 s/2 rotations) and standard 2D angiography (10 s, FOV 24 cm × 18 cm). Results: Measurements showed the highest radiation dose at the eye and thyroid level. In comparison to 2D-DSA (3.9 μSv eye-exposure), the 3D procedures caused an increased radiation exposure both in standard FOV (8 s/rotation: 28.0 μSv, 20 s/rotation: 79.3 μSv, 5 s/2 rotations: 32.5 μSv) and large FOV (37.6 μSv). Proportional distributions were measured for the residual heights. With the use of lead glass, irradiation of the eye lens was reduced to 0.2 μSv (2D DSA) and 10.6 μSv (3D technique with 20 s/rotation). Conclusion: Rotational flat-panel angiography and C-arm cone beam applications significantly increase radiation exposure to the attending operator in comparison to 2D angiography. Our study indicates that the physician should wear protective devices and leave the examination room when performing 3D examinations.

  20. Selenium essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Sams, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who wants to migrate from Selenium RC or any other automation tool to Selenium WebDriver, then this book is for you. Knowledge of automation tools is necessary to follow the examples in this book.

  1. SU-C-16A-01: In Vivo Source Position Verification in High Dose Rate (HDR) Prostate Brachytherapy Using a Flat Panel Imager: Initial Clinical Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We report our initial clinical experience with a novel position-sensitive source-tracking system based on a flat panel imager. The system has been trialled with 4 prostate HDR brachytherapy patients (8 treatment fractions) in this initial study. Methods: The flat panel imaging system was mounted under a customised carbon fibre couch top assembly (Figure 1). Three gold fiducial markers were implanted into the prostate of each patient at the time of catheter placement. X-ray dwell position markers were inserted into three catheters and a radiograph acquired to locate the implant relative to the imaging device. During treatment, as the HDR source dwells were delivered, images were acquired and processed to determine the position of the source in the patient. Source positions measured by the imaging device were compared to the treatment plan for verification of treatment delivery. Results: Measured dwell positions provided verification of relative dwell spacing within and between catheters, in the coronal plane. Measurements were typically within 2.0mm (0.2mm – 3.3mm, s.d. 0.8mm) of the planned positions over 60 dwells (Figure 2). Discrimination between larger dwell intervals and catheter differentiation were clear. This confirms important delivery attributes such as correct transfer tube connection, source step size, relative catheter positions and therefore overall correct plan selection and delivery. The fiducial markers, visible on the radiograph, provided verification of treatment delivery to the correct anatomical location. The absolute position of the dwells was determined by comparing the measured dwell positions with the x-ray markers from the radiograph, validating the programmed treatment indexer length. The total impact on procedure time was less than 5 minutes. Conclusion: The novel, noninvasive HDR brachytherapy treatment verification system was used clinically with minor impact on workflow. The system allows verification of correct treatment

  2. Difference in dose area product between analog image intensifier and digital flat panel detector in peripheral angiography and the effect of BMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesinger, B.; Kirchner, S.; Schmehl, J.; Claussen, C.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Blumenstock, G. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Biometrie; Herz, K. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz und Isotopenlabor; Wiskirchen, J. [Franziskus Krankenhaus, Bielefeld (Germany). Radiologische Klinik

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Comparison of dose area products (DAP) in diagnostic angiography procedures between an image intensifier (II) and a flat panel detector (FPD) angiography system and the evaluation of DAP/body mass index (BMI) dependency. Materials and Methods: An image intensifier system or a flat panel detector system was used to perform 571 diagnostic angiographies (n = 328 and n = 243, respectively) of 5 different types: peripheral arterial, venous, single leg, abdominal and upper extremity. The results were retrospectively analyzed. The DAP, fluoroscopy time (t) and the number of series of the respective interventions as calculated by the respective machines was compared for all interventions and for the respective subtypes and machines. The BMI dependency was calculated separately for both machines for all interventions by subdividing the patients into 6 BMI classes defined by the WHO. Results: The average DAP for all diagnostic interventions was 1958.9 cGy x cm{sup 2} (t = 384.6 s, n = 7.85 series) for the II and 2927.4 cGy x cm{sup 2} (t = 267.4 s, n = 7.02 series) for the FPD. Group-dependent differences ranged between + 21 and + 252 % when using the FPD system. After time standardization, the respective increases were found to be 120 % for the FPD system. The DAPs increased considerably in patients with higher BMIs (766.7 cGy x cm{sup 2} - 6892.6 cGy x cm{sup 2}, II machine, 950.5 cGy x cm{sup 2} - 12 487.7 cGy x cm{sup 2}, FPD machine) with a greater DAP gain seen for the FPD. The average duration of the interventions was higher using the II machine. Conclusion: The use of an FPD system led to higher DAP values compared to the II system in diagnostic angiographic procedures. In addition, increased BMI values led to higher DAPs, especially for the FPD machine. However, the average fluoroscopy times were shorter. (orig.)

  3. SU-E-I-07: Response Characteristics and Signal Conversion Modeling of KV Flat-Panel Detector in Cone Beam CT System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The flat-panel detector response characteristics are investigated to optimize the scanning parameter considering the image quality and less radiation dose. The signal conversion model is also established to predict the tumor shape and physical thickness changes. Methods: With the ELEKTA XVI system, the planar images of 10cm water phantom were obtained under different image acquisition conditions, including tube voltage, electric current, exposure time and frames. The averaged responses of square area in center were analyzed using Origin8.0. The response characteristics for each scanning parameter were depicted by different fitting types. The transmission measured for 10cm water was compared to Monte Carlo simulation. Using the quadratic calibration method, a series of variable-thickness water phantoms images were acquired to derive the signal conversion model. A 20cm wedge water phantom with 2cm step thickness was used to verify the model. At last, the stability and reproducibility of the model were explored during a four week period. Results: The gray values of image center all decreased with the increase of different image acquisition parameter presets. The fitting types adopted were linear fitting, quadratic polynomial fitting, Gauss fitting and logarithmic fitting with the fitting R-Square 0.992, 0.995, 0.997 and 0.996 respectively. For 10cm water phantom, the transmission measured showed better uniformity than Monte Carlo simulation. The wedge phantom experiment show that the radiological thickness changes prediction error was in the range of (-4mm, 5mm). The signal conversion model remained consistent over a period of four weeks. Conclusion: The flat-panel response decrease with the increase of different scanning parameters. The preferred scanning parameter combination was 100kV, 10mA, 10ms, 15frames. It is suggested that the signal conversion model could effectively be used for tumor shape change and radiological thickness prediction. Supported by

  4. Hydrogen production by the engineered cyanobacterial strain Nostoc PCC 7120 ΔhupW examined in a flat panel photobioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Marcus; Heidorn, Thorsten; Lindblad, Peter

    2015-12-10

    Nitrogenase based hydrogen production was examined in a ΔhupW strain of the filamentous heterocystous cyanobacterium Nostoc PCC 7120, i.e., cells lacking the last step in the maturation system of the large subunit of the uptake hydrogenase and as a consequence with a non-functional uptake hydrogenase. The cells were grown in a developed flat panel photobioreactor system with 3.0L culture volume either aerobically (air) or anaerobically (Ar or 80% N2/20% Ar) and illuminated with a mixture of red and white LED. Aerobic growth of the ΔhupW strain of Nostoc PCC 7120 at 44μmolar photons m(-2)s(-1) PAR gave the highest hydrogen production of 0.7mL H2 L(-1)h(-1), 0.53mmol H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 1.2%. Anaerobic growth using 100% argon showed a maximal hydrogen production of 1.7mLL(-1)h(-1), 0.85mmol per mg chlorophyll a(-1) h(-1), and a light energy conversion efficiency of 2.7%. Altering between argon/N2 (20/80) and 100% argon phases resulted in a maximal hydrogen production at hour 128 (100% argon phase) with 6.2mL H2L(-1)h(-1), 0.71mL H2 mg chlorophyll a(-1)h(-1), and a light energy efficiency conversion of 4.0%. The highest buildup of hydrogen gas observed was 6.89% H2 (100% argon phase) of the total photobioreactor system with a maximal production of 4.85mL H2 L(-1)h(-1). The present study clearly demonstrates the potential to use purpose design cyanobacteria in developed flat panel photobioreactor systems for the direct production of the solar fuel hydrogen. Further improvements in the strain used, environmental conditions employed, and growth, production and collection systems used, are needed before a sustainable and economical cyanobacterial based hydrogen production can be realized. PMID:26325196

  5. Cascaded-Systems Analysis of Flat-Panel Sandwich Detectors for Single-Shot Dual-Energy X-ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed the cascaded-systems model to investigate the signal and noise characteristics in the flat-panel sandwich detector which was developed for the preclinical single-shot dual-energy x-ray imaging. The model incorporates parallel branches to include direct interaction of x-rays in photodiode that is unavoidable in the sandwich structure with a corresponding potential increase in image noise. The model has been validated in comparison with the experimental. The cascaded-systems analysis shows that direct x-ray interaction noise behaves as additive electronic noise that is white in the frequency domain; hence it is harmful to the DQE at higher frequencies where the number of secondary quanta lessens. Even at zero frequency, the direct x-ray interaction noise can reduce the DQE of the detectors investigated in this study by ∼20% for the 60 kV x-ray spectrum. The DQE of rear detector in the sandwich structure is sensitive to additive electronic noise because of the enhancement in the number of electronic noise quanta relative to that of x-ray quanta that are attenuated through the front layers including the intermediate filter layer (i.e. incident photon fluence times transmission factor)

  6. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Marlies, E-mail: marlies.wagner@kgu.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis, E-mail: yiannis.kyriakou@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Health Care Sector (Germany); Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du, E-mail: mesnil@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Singer, Oliver C., E-mail: o.singer@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Department of Neurology (Germany); Berkefeld, Joachim, E-mail: berkefeld@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  7. Non-destructive, preclinical evaluation of root canal anatomy of human teeth with flat-panel detector volume CT (FD-VCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Successful endodontic diagnostics and therapy call for adequate depiction of the root canal anatomy with multimodal diagnostic imaging. The aim of the present study is to evaluate visualization of the endodont with flat-panel detector volume CT (FD-VCT). Materials and methods: 13 human teeth were examined with the prototype of a FD-VCT. After data acquisition and generation of volume data sets in volume rendering technology (VRT), the findings obtained were compared to conventional X-rays and cross-section preparations of the teeth. Results: The anatomical structures of the endodont such as root canals, side canals and communications between different root canals as well as dentricles could be detected precisely with FD-VCT. The length of curved root canals was also determined accurately. The spatial resolution of the system is around 140 μm. Only around 73% of the main root canals detected with FD-VCT and 87% of the roots could be visualized with conventional dental X-rays. None of the side canals, shown with FD-VCT, was detectable on conventional X-rays. In all cases the enamel and dentin of the teeth could be well delineated. No differences in image quality could be discerned between stored and freshly extracted teeth, or between primary and adult teeth. (orig.)

  8. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy

  9. Embedded LTPS flash cells with oxide-nitride-oxynitride stack structure for realization of multi-function mobile flat panel displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, embedded flash (eFlash) cells were fabricated for realization of multi-functions, such as systems on panels (SOPs) and threshold voltage (VTH) stabilization of flat panel displays (FPDs). Fabrication was via low temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin film transistor (TFT) technology and an oxide-nitride-oxynitride (ONOn) stack structure on glass. Poly-silicon (poly-Si) on glass, which was annealed via an excimer laser, has a very rough surface. To fabricate LTPS eFlash cells on glass with a very rough poly-Si surface, plasma-assisted oxynitridation was performed; nitrous oxide (N2O) served as a reactive gas. LTPS eFlash cells have excellent TFT electrical properties, such as VTH, a high On/Off current ratio and a low sub-threshold swing (S). The results demonstrate that eFlash cells fabricated on glass with a rough silicon surface, via an ONOn stack structure, have switching characteristics suitable for data storage, such as a low operating voltage (TH, which exceeds 2.3 V, between the programming and erasing (P/E) states, over a period of 10 years, and the capacity to retain the initial ΔVTH over a period of 105 P/E operations. (fast track communication)

  10. Embedded LTPS flash cells with oxide-nitride-oxynitride stack structure for realization of multi-function mobile flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sungwook; Kim, Jaehong; Son, Hyukjoo; Jang, Kyungsoo; Cho, Jaehyun; Kim, Kyunghae; Choi, Byoungdeog; Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yi@yurim.skku.ac.kr

    2008-09-07

    In this paper, embedded flash (eFlash) cells were fabricated for realization of multi-functions, such as systems on panels (SOPs) and threshold voltage (V{sub TH}) stabilization of flat panel displays (FPDs). Fabrication was via low temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) thin film transistor (TFT) technology and an oxide-nitride-oxynitride (ONOn) stack structure on glass. Poly-silicon (poly-Si) on glass, which was annealed via an excimer laser, has a very rough surface. To fabricate LTPS eFlash cells on glass with a very rough poly-Si surface, plasma-assisted oxynitridation was performed; nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) served as a reactive gas. LTPS eFlash cells have excellent TFT electrical properties, such as V{sub TH}, a high On/Off current ratio and a low sub-threshold swing (S). The results demonstrate that eFlash cells fabricated on glass with a rough silicon surface, via an ONOn stack structure, have switching characteristics suitable for data storage, such as a low operating voltage (<{+-}10 V) suitable for mobile FPDs, a threshold voltage window, {delta}V{sub TH}, which exceeds 2.3 V, between the programming and erasing (P/E) states, over a period of 10 years, and the capacity to retain the initial {delta}V{sub TH} over a period of 10{sup 5} P/E operations. (fast track communication)

  11. A study on 100 MeV O7+ irradiated SnO2/Ag/SnO2 multilayer as transparent electrode for flat panel display application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Satyavir; Asokan, K.; Sachdev, Kanupriya

    2016-07-01

    The multilayer thin films of SnO2/Ag/SnO2 were deposited using electron-beam and thermal evaporation for flat panel display application. The as-prepared SnO2/Ag/SnO2 specimen was irradiated with 100 MeV O7+ ions by varying the fluences 1 × 1012 and 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. The pristine and irradiated films were investigated using XRD, SEM, AFM and Raman to find out modification in the structure and surface morphology of the films. UV-Vis and Hall measurement techniques were used to investigate the optical and electrical properties respectively. It was observed that the roughness of the film after irradiation (for the fluence of 1 × 1012 ions/cm2) ​ decreased to 0.68 nm from 1.6 nm and showed an increase in roughness to 1.35 nm on increasing the fluence to 5 × 1012 ions/cm2. This oxide/metal/oxide structure fulfills the basic requirements of a TCE, like high-transmittance >75% for pristine and >80% for the fluence of 1 × 1012 ions/cm2 over a broad spectrum of visible light for practical applications. The multilayer structure shows change in the electrical resistivity from 1.6 × 10-3 Ω cm to 6.3 × 10-3 Ω cm after irradiation.

  12. Detectability of simulated pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs: Comparison between irradiation side sampling indirect flat-panel detector and computed radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To compare the detectability of simulated pulmonary nodules on chest radiographs between an irradiation side sampling indirect flat-panel detector (ISS-FPD) and computed radiography (CR). Materials and methods: This study was an observer performance study. Simulated pulmonary nodules of 8 mm in diameter were superimposed on an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Chest radiographs were acquired under 2 exposure levels (4 and 3.2 mAs) with the ISS-FPD and the CR. Six thoracic radiologists evaluated all 40 images (10 patterns × 2 different exposure doses × 2 different systems) for the presence or absence of a lesion over each of 12 defined areas on a 3-megapixel monochrome liquid-crystal display. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were obtained for observation in predefined 480 areas. A jackknife method was used for statistical analysis. Differences with a P value of <0.05 were considered significant. Results: The analysis of the observer detection of simulated pulmonary nodules showed larger areas under the ROC curve (AUC) by the ISS-FPD than by the CR. There was a statistically significant difference between the two systems at 3.2 mAs (P = 0.0330). Conclusion: The ISS-FPD was superior to the CR for the detection of simulated pulmonary nodules at 3.2 mAs

  13. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner. We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy. The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences. Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  14. Comparison of Multidetector Computed Tomography and Flat-Panel Computed Tomography Regarding Visualization of Cortical Fractures, Cortical Defects, and Orthopedic Screws: A Phantom Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jakob; Benndorf, Matthias; Lang, Hannah; Lampert, Florian; Kemna, Lars; Konstantinidis, Lukas; Neubauer, Claudia; Reising, Kilian; Zajonc, Horst; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Goerke, Sebastian M

    2015-08-01

    To compare the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws in a dedicated extremity flat-panel computed tomography (FPCT) scanner and a multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanner.We used feet of European roe deer as phantoms for cortical fractures, cortical defects, and implanted orthopedic screws. FPCT and MDCT scans were performed with equivalent dose settings. Six observers rated the scans according to number of fragments, size of defects, size of defects opposite orthopedic screws, and the length of different screws. The image quality regarding depiction of the cortical bone was assessed. The gold standard (real number of fragments) was evaluated by autopsy.The correlation of reader assessment of fragments, cortical defects, and screws with the gold standard was similar for FPCT and MDCT. Three readers rated the subjective image quality of the MDCT to be higher, whereas the others showed no preferences.Although the image quality was rated higher in the MDCT than in the FPCT by 3 out of 6 observers, both modalities proved to be comparable regarding the visualization of cortical fractures, cortical defects, and orthopedic screws and of use to musculoskeletal radiology regarding fracture detection and postsurgical evaluation in our experimental setting. PMID:26252281

  15. Cascaded-Systems Analysis of Flat-Panel Sandwich Detectors for Single-Shot Dual-Energy X-ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Kyung; Kim, Dong Woon; Kim, Junwoo; Youn, Hanbean [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    We have developed the cascaded-systems model to investigate the signal and noise characteristics in the flat-panel sandwich detector which was developed for the preclinical single-shot dual-energy x-ray imaging. The model incorporates parallel branches to include direct interaction of x-rays in photodiode that is unavoidable in the sandwich structure with a corresponding potential increase in image noise. The model has been validated in comparison with the experimental. The cascaded-systems analysis shows that direct x-ray interaction noise behaves as additive electronic noise that is white in the frequency domain; hence it is harmful to the DQE at higher frequencies where the number of secondary quanta lessens. Even at zero frequency, the direct x-ray interaction noise can reduce the DQE of the detectors investigated in this study by ∼20% for the 60 kV x-ray spectrum. The DQE of rear detector in the sandwich structure is sensitive to additive electronic noise because of the enhancement in the number of electronic noise quanta relative to that of x-ray quanta that are attenuated through the front layers including the intermediate filter layer (i.e. incident photon fluence times transmission factor)

  16. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safafar, Hamed; Hass, Michael Z; Møller, Per; Holdt, Susan L; Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids), tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry. PMID:27483291

  17. High-EPA Biomass from Nannochloropsis salina Cultivated in a Flat-Panel Photo-Bioreactor on a Process Water-Enriched Growth Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Safafar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nannochloropsis salina was grown on a mixture of standard growth media and pre-gasified industrial process water representing effluent from a local biogas plant. The study aimed to investigate the effects of enriched growth media and cultivation time on nutritional composition of Nannochloropsis salina biomass, with a focus on eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA. Variations in fatty acid composition, lipids, protein, amino acids, tocopherols and pigments were studied and results compared to algae cultivated on F/2 media as reference. Mixed growth media and process water enhanced the nutritional quality of Nannochloropsis salina in laboratory scale when compared to algae cultivated in standard F/2 medium. Data from laboratory scale translated to the large scale using a 4000 L flat panel photo-bioreactor system. The algae growth rate in winter conditions in Denmark was slow, but results revealed that large-scale cultivation of Nannochloropsis salina at these conditions could improve the nutritional properties such as EPA, tocopherol, protein and carotenoids compared to laboratory-scale cultivated microalgae. EPA reached 44.2% ± 2.30% of total fatty acids, and α-tocopherol reached 431 ± 28 µg/g of biomass dry weight after 21 days of cultivation. Variations in chemical compositions of Nannochloropsis salina were studied during the course of cultivation. Nannochloropsis salina can be presented as a good candidate for winter time cultivation in Denmark. The resulting biomass is a rich source of EPA and also a good source of protein (amino acids, tocopherols and carotenoids for potential use in aquaculture feed industry.

  18. The influence of antiscatter grids on soft-tissue detectability in cone-beam computed tomography with flat-panel detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of antiscatter x-ray grids on image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CT) is evaluated through broad experimental investigation for various anatomical sites (head and body), scatter conditions (scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) ranging from ∼10% to 150%), patient dose, and spatial resolution in three-dimensional reconstructions. Studies involved linear grids in combination with a flat-panel imager on a system for kilovoltage cone-beam CT imaging and guidance of radiation therapy. Grids were found to be effective in reducing x-ray scatter 'cupping' artifacts, with heavier grids providing increased image uniformity. The system was highly robust against ring artifacts that might arise in CT reconstructions as a result of gridline shadows in the projection data. The influence of grids on soft-tissue detectability was evaluated quantitatively in terms of absolute contrast, voxel noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in cone-beam CT reconstructions of 16 cm 'head' and 32 cm 'body' cylindrical phantoms. Imaging performance was investigated qualitatively in observer preference tests based on patient images (pelvis, abdomen, and head-and-neck sites) acquired with and without antiscatter grids. The results suggest that although grids reduce scatter artifacts and improve subject contrast, there is little strong motivation for the use of grids in cone-beam CT in terms of CNR and overall image quality under most circumstances. The results highlight the tradeoffs in contrast and noise imparted by grids, showing improved image quality with grids only under specific conditions of high x-ray scatter (SPR>100%), high imaging dose (Dcenter>2 cGy), and low spatial resolution (voxel size ≥1 mm)

  19. Usefulness of DICOM headers in the analysis of two biplane X-ray systems setting (image intensifier and flat panel) used in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The setting of two biplane X ray systems were evaluated (image intensifier (II) and flat panel (PP)), through DICOM tags from 32 images created during the characterization of both systems. The technical parameters adjusted for systems were: 63,8 to 80,0 kV and 15,0 to 388,0 mA, for the system with II and 52,0 to 77,0 kV and 25,0 to 476,0 mA, for the system with PP detector. Both equipment presented a different mA adjustment, when moving from fluoroscopy modes low dose (FL), medium dose (FM) and high dose (FH) to cine mode (CI). Two dosimetric quantities were evaluated, the first one was the dose-area product (DAP) which gave as a result for FB mode, between 0,03 to 0,35 uGycm2/image (II) and from 0,05 a 0,69 uGycm2/image (PP), when the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) thickness was incremented from 4 to 16 cm. In cine mode the DAP quantity showed, percentage values from 24 to -1 % for the same PMMA increment. Skin cumulative dose was the second quantity evaluated and showed an increment of incident air kerma (KAI)/image in factors from 17 to 35 (II) and 15 to 28 (PP) when used in CI mode instead of FB mode, to the different PMMA thicknesses used. This dose increment for CI mode must be considered by cardiologists, to use the fluoroscopic run as an alternative to document part of the procedures when there is no need to use a high quality image (author)

  20. Amorphous silicon sensor arrays for X-ray and document imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large area amorphous silicon image sensor arrays are important for X-ray medical imaging and document scanning as well as a variety of other applications where large sensor size is required. The paper first summarizes the present state of the flat panel X-ray imager technology, and compares the two main approaches for X-ray detection. The authors then describe the performance of a new, large area, high resolution, radiographic imager based o a single amorphous silicon array with 2,304 x 3,200 pixels, and an active area of 30 x 40 cm (12 x 16 inches)

  1. An investigation of signal performance enhancements achieved through innovative pixel design across several generations of indirect detection, active matrix, flat-panel arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Active matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) technology is being employed for an increasing variety of imaging applications. An important element in the adoption of this technology has been significant ongoing improvements in optical signal collection achieved through innovations in indirect detection array pixel design. Such improvements have a particularly beneficial effect on performance in applications involving low exposures and/or high spatial frequencies, where detective quantum efficiency is strongly reduced due to the relatively high level of additive electronic noise compared to signal levels of AMFPI devices. In this article, an examination of various signal properties, as determined through measurements and calculations related to novel array designs, is reported in the context of the evolution of AMFPI pixel design. For these studies, dark, optical, and radiation signal measurements were performed on prototype imagers incorporating a variety of increasingly sophisticated array designs, with pixel pitches ranging from 75 to 127 μm. For each design, detailed measurements of fundamental pixel-level properties conducted under radiographic and fluoroscopic operating conditions are reported and the results are compared. A series of 127 μm pitch arrays employing discrete photodiodes culminated in a novel design providing an optical fill factor of ∼80% (thereby assuring improved x-ray sensitivity), and demonstrating low dark current, very low charge trapping and charge release, and a large range of linear signal response. In two of the designs having 75 and 90 μm pitches, a novel continuous photodiode structure was found to provide fill factors that approach the theoretical maximum of 100%. Both sets of novel designs achieved large fill factors by employing architectures in which some, or all of the photodiode structure was elevated above the plane of the pixel addressing transistor. Generally, enhancement of the fill factor in either discrete or continuous

  2. SU-E-I-11: Cascaded Linear System Model for Columnar CsI Flat Panel Imagers with Depth Dependent Gain and Blur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, B; Lubinsky, A; Zheng, H; Zhao, W [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Teymurazyan, A [Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a depth dependent gain and blur cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for optimizing columnar structured CsI indirect conversion flat panel imager (FPI) for advanced imaging applications. Methods: For experimental validation, depth dependent escape efficiency, e(z), was extracted from PHS measurement of different CsI scintillators (thickness, substrate and light output). The inherent MTF and DQE of CsI was measured using high resolution CMOS sensor. For CLSM, e(z) and the depth dependent MTF(f,z), were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation (Geant4) of optical photon transport through columnar CsI. Previous work showed that Monte Carlo simulation for CsI was hindered by the non-ideality of its columnar structure. In the present work we allowed variation in columnar width with depth, and assumed diffusive reflective backing and columns. Monte Carlo simulation was performed using an optical point source placed at different depth of the CsI layer, from which MTF(z,f) and e(z) were computed. The resulting e(z) with excellent matching with experimental measurements were then applied to the CLSM, Monte Carlo simulation was repeated until the modeled MTF, DQE(f) also match experimental measurement. Results: For a 150 micron FOS HL type CsI, e(z) varies between 0.56 to 0.45, and the MTF at 14 cycles/mm varies between 62.1% to 3.9%, from the front to the back of the scintillator. The overall MTF and DQE(f) at all frequencies are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements at all frequencies. Conclusion: We have developed a CLSM for columnar CsI scintillators with depth dependent gain and MTF, which were estimated from Monte Carlo simulation with novel optical simulation settings. Preliminary results showed excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental measurements. Future work is aimed at extending this approach to optimize CsI screen optic design and sensor structure for achieving higher DQE(f) in cone-beam CT, which uses

  3. Volume CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile, isocentric C-arm: Pre-clinical investigation in guidance of minimally invasive surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) has been modified in our laboratory to include a large area flat-panel detector (in place of the x-ray image intensifier), providing multi-mode fluoroscopy and cone-beam computed tomography (CT) imaging capability. This platform represents a promising technology for minimally invasive, image-guided surgical procedures where precision in the placement of interventional tools with respect to bony and soft-tissue structures is critical. The image quality and performance in surgical guidance was investigated in pre-clinical evaluation in image-guided spinal surgery. The control, acquisition, and reconstruction system are described. The reproducibility of geometric calibration, essential to achieving high three-dimensional (3D) image quality, is tested over extended time scales (7 months) and across a broad range in C-arm angulation (up to 45 deg.), quantifying the effect of improper calibration on spatial resolution, soft-tissue visibility, and image artifacts. Phantom studies were performed to investigate the precision of 3D localization (viz., fiber optic probes within a vertebral body) and effect of lateral projection truncation (limited field of view) on soft-tissue detectability in image reconstructions. Pre-clinical investigation was undertaken in a specific spinal procedure (photodynamic therapy of spinal metastases) in five animal subjects (pigs). In each procedure, placement of fiber optic catheters in two vertebrae (L1 and L2) was guided by fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT. Experience across five procedures is reported, focusing on 3D image quality, the effects of respiratory motion, limited field of view, reconstruction filter, and imaging dose. Overall, the intraoperative cone-beam CT images were sufficient for guidance of needles and catheters with respect to bony anatomy and improved surgical performance and confidence through 3D visualization and verification of transpedicular trajectories and tool placement

  4. COCHLEAR LENGTH DETERMINATION IN TEMPORAL BONE SPECIMENS USING HISTOLOGICAL SERIAL MICRO GRINDING IMAGING, MICRO COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND FLAT-PANEL VOLUMETRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Würfel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The cochlear length virtually describes the length of the cochlea in a straight line. Several theoretical options for measuring the length of the cochlea are conceivable. In choosing the type of cochlear implant electrode, this can play a crucial role. A wide range of electrodes is available, especially among the models designed to preserve residual hearing and structural integrity. It is believed that the depth of cochlear implant electrode insertion has an influence on the functional hearing based on the area of the cochlea that is electrically stimulated. Method: Imaging of nine human temporal bone specimens was performed using histological serial microgrinding imaging, micro computed tomography (microCT and experimental flat-panel volumetric computed tomography (fpVCT. Measurements were then performed by outlining the cochlea in OsiriX (Pixmeo, Los Angeles USA. Results: The cochlear length of 9 human temporal bones was determined in each histological serial microgrinding imaging, fpVCT and microCT. Cochlear length ranges in histological serial grinding imaging from 45.3 mm to 38.7 mm, in microCT from 46.1 mm to 39.3 mm and in fpVCT from 45.8 mm to 39.8 mm. Significant inter- and intraindividual differences in the cochlear length were observed. The presented methodology is capable of determining the cochlear length in each imaging modality. Discussion: A methodology to experimentally determine the cochlear length is interesting from both clinical and preclinical perspectives. Insertion studies are highly relevant to the development and evaluation of new electrode arrays. This study presents a measurement methodology that allows for individualized cochlear length measurement based on three established imaging modalities. The data presented here confirm differences in cochlear length. The method described here can be used to evaluate a cochlea in an experimental setting. This allows an individualized, pre-interventional evaluation of the

  5. Daily quality control of collimator multi-leaf for IMRT static through flat panel (EPID); Control de calidad diario del colimador multilamina para IMRT estatica mediante panel plano (EPID)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Barrado, A.; Benitez Serrano, J. A.; Sanchez Jimenez, E.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-07-01

    When techniques are employed such as radiotherapy for intensity modulated (IMRT) is necessary to establish a proper quality assurance program. According to national and international recommendations, such a program must include, in addition to verification of treatment for each patient, a multi-leaf collimator quality control daily, easy to perform and analyze, to ensure the quality of the given treatments daily. This paper intends to make such quality control through the irradiation of a number of fields in the imaging system flat panel portal and its subsequent analysis. (Author)

  6. Dose reduction of radiographs of the pediatric pelvis for diagnosing hip dysplasia using a digital flat-panel detector system; Dosisreduktion bei Roentgenaufnahmen des kindlichen Beckenskelettes zur Diagnostik der Hueftgelenksdysplasie unter Verwendung eines digitalen Flachdetektorsystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, K.; Ahlers, K.; Kloska, S.; Vieth, V.; Meier, N.; Heindel, W. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ. Muenster (Germany); Sandmann, C.; Gosheger, G. [Orthopaedische Klinik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a possible dose reduction in pediatric pelvic radiographs in congenital hip dysplasia using a digital flat-panel system instead of a phosphor-storage system. Materials and Methods: During a six-month period, all pediatric patients referred for pelvic radiography for the evaluation of congenital hip dysplasia were randomely assigned to be examined by either a phosphor-storage system or a digital flat-panel system, whereby the latter system was operated with half the radiation dose. Thirty pairs of radiographs were assessed for the visibility of 16 anatomic details and for 5 orthopedic-radiographic measurements (5-point scale with 1 = excellent; three independent observers). The projection indices of Ball and Kommenda and of Toennis and Brunken were calculated for all radiographs. The Student's t-test was used to compare the flat-panel and the phosphor-storage radiographs for observers' assessments, patients' age and projection indices. Results: In a total of 7560 observations, the scores for the visibility of anatomic details and orthopedic-radiographic measurements were respectively 2.72 and 2.64 for the flat-panel system and 2.93 and 2.79 for the phosphor-storage system. No significant differences were found between both systems (p > 0.05) and between patient age and projection indices (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Pediatric pelvic radiographs can be obtained with a digital flat-panel system using half the radiation dose instead of a phosphor-storage system without sacrificing relevant information in the diagnosis of congenital hip dysplasia. (orig.) [German] Zielsetzung: Evaluation einer moeglichen Dosisreduktion bei kindlichen Beckenroentgenaufnahmen zur Diagnostik der Hueftgelenksdysplasie mit einem digitalen Flachdetektorsystem im Vergleich zu einem digitalen Speicherfoliensystem. Material und Methoden: Prospektiv wurden alle ueber einen Zeitraum von 6 Monaten zur Roentgenaufnahme des Beckenskelettes im Rahmen der Diagnostik der

  7. Dry Etching Characteristics of Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑艳彬; 李光; 王文龙; 李秀昌; 姜志刚

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplane technology is the best candidate for flat panel displays (FPDs). In this paper, a-IGZO TFT structures are described. The effects of etch parameters (rf power, dc-bias voltage and gas pressure) on the etch rate and etch profile are discussed. Three kinds of gas mixtures are compared in the dry etching process of a-IGZO thin films. Lastly, three problems are pointed out that need to be addressed in the dry etching process of a-IGZO TFTs.

  8. Electron field emission from amorphous semiconductor thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flat panel display market requires new and improved technologies in order to keep up with the requirements of modem lifestyles. Electron field emission from thin film amorphous semiconductors is potentially such a technology. For this technology to become viable, improvements in the field emitting properties of these materials must be achieved. To this end, it is important that a better understanding of the emission mechanisms responsible is attained. Amorphous carbon thin films, amorphous silicon thin films and other materials have been deposited, in-house and externally. These materials have been characterised using ellipsometry, profilometry, optical absorption, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. An experimental system for evaluating the electron field emitting performance of thin films has been developed. In the process of developing thin film cathodes in this study, it has been possible to add a new and potentially more useful semiconductor, namely amorphous silicon, to the family of cold cathode emitters. Extensive experimental field emission data from amorphous carbon thin films, amorphous silicon thin films and other materials has been gathered. This data has been used to determine the mechanisms responsible for the observed electron emission. Preliminary computer simulations using appropriate values for the different material properties have exhibited emission mechanisms similar to those identified by experiment. (author)

  9. Selenium and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Selenium is an essential element for human health and it is toxic at high concentrations. Selenium is a constituent component of selenoproteins that have enzymatic and structural roles in human biochemistry. Selenium is a best antioxidant and catalyst for production of thyroid hormone. This element has the key role in the immune function; prevention of AIDS progression and the deactivity of toxins. Furthermore, selenium is essential for sperm motility and can reduce abortions. Selenium deficiency was also associated with adverse mood states. The findings regarding cardiovascular disease risk related to selenium deficiency is unclear, though other conditions such as vascular inflammation, oxidative stress and selenium deficiency can cause this disease too. Moreover, consuming of 60 mg of selenium per day may be associated with reduction of cancer risk. In this study, a review of studies has been performed on the biochemical function of selenium toxicity, and its effects on human health. Furthermore, certain identified cancers associated with selenium have been discussed to absorb more attention to the status of this element and also as a guide for further studies. Selenium plays the dual character (useful and harmful in human health, and then it is necessary to determine the concentration of this element in body fluids and tissues. An appropriate method for routine measurement of selenium in clinical laboratories is electro thermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS with very low detection limit and good precision.

  10. Comparison between radiation exposure levels using an image intensifier and a flat-panel detector-based system in image-guided central venous catheter placement in children weighing less than 10 kg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, Roberto; Maruzzelli, Luigi; Cortis, Kelvin; Gerasia, Roberta; Maggio, Simona; Luca, Angelo [Diagnostic and Therapeutic Services, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy); Piazza, Marcello [Department of Anesthesia, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy); Tuzzolino, Fabio [Department of Information Technology, Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Palermo (Italy)

    2014-09-10

    Ultrasound-guided central venous puncture and fluoroscopic guidance during central venous catheter (CVC) positioning optimizes technical success and lowers the complication rates in children, and is therefore considered standard practice. The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation exposure levels recorded during CVC placement in children weighing less than 10 kg in procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) to those performed in a flat-panel detector-based interventional suite (FPDS). A retrospective review of 96 image-guided CVC placements, between January 2008 and October 2013, in 49 children weighing less than 10 kg was performed. Mean age was 8.2 ± 4.4 months (range: 1-22 months). Mean weight was 7.1 ± 2.7 kg (range: 2.5-9.8 kg). The procedures were classified into two categories: non-tunneled and tunneled CVC placement. Thirty-five procedures were performed with the IIDS (21 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC); 61 procedures were performed with the FPDS (47 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC). For non-tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 113.5 ± 126.7 cGy cm{sup 2} with the IIDS and 15.9 ± 44.6 cGy . cm{sup 2} with the FPDS (P < 0.001). For tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 84.6 ± 81.2 cGy . cm{sup 2} with the IIDS and 37.1 ± 33.5 cGy cm{sup 2} with the FPDS (P = 0.02). The use of flat-panel angiographic equipment reduces radiation exposure in small children undergoing image-guided CVC placement. (orig.)

  11. Comparison between radiation exposure levels using an image intensifier and a flat-panel detector-based system in image-guided central venous catheter placement in children weighing less than 10 kg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasound-guided central venous puncture and fluoroscopic guidance during central venous catheter (CVC) positioning optimizes technical success and lowers the complication rates in children, and is therefore considered standard practice. The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation exposure levels recorded during CVC placement in children weighing less than 10 kg in procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) to those performed in a flat-panel detector-based interventional suite (FPDS). A retrospective review of 96 image-guided CVC placements, between January 2008 and October 2013, in 49 children weighing less than 10 kg was performed. Mean age was 8.2 ± 4.4 months (range: 1-22 months). Mean weight was 7.1 ± 2.7 kg (range: 2.5-9.8 kg). The procedures were classified into two categories: non-tunneled and tunneled CVC placement. Thirty-five procedures were performed with the IIDS (21 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC); 61 procedures were performed with the FPDS (47 non-tunneled CVC, 14 tunneled CVC). For non-tunneled CVC, mean DAP was 113.5 ± 126.7 cGy cm2 with the IIDS and 15.9 ± 44.6 cGy . cm2 with the FPDS (P 2 with the IIDS and 37.1 ± 33.5 cGy cm2 with the FPDS (P = 0.02). The use of flat-panel angiographic equipment reduces radiation exposure in small children undergoing image-guided CVC placement. (orig.)

  12. Selenium adsorption to aluminum-based water treatment residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum-based water treatment residuals (WTR) can adsorb water- and soil-borne P, As(V), As(III), and perchlorate, and may be able to adsorb excess environmental selenium. WTR, clay minerals, and amorphous aluminum hydroxide were shaken for 24 hours in selenate or selenite solutions at pH values o...

  13. Average glandular dose with amorphous silicon full-field digital mammography - clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Determination of average glandular dose with a full-field digital mammography system using a flat-panel X-ray detector based on amorphous silicon technology for a large group of patients. Material and Methods: The patient group includes women who were examined in a 4-month period with the digital mammographic system Senographe 2000D. The number of women was 591 and the number of exposures was 1116; only cranio-caudal projections were considered. Various quantities, including entrance surface air kerma, tube loading, and compressed breast thickness, were determined during actual mammography. Average glandular dose was determined using conversion factors g for standard breast composition. Results: The mean average glandular dose was 1.51 mGy (0.66-4.05 mGy) for a single view. The mean compressed breast thickness was 55.7 mm. The mean age of patients was 55 years (34-81 years). Conclusion: The results demonstrate that full-field digital mammography with a flat-panel detector based on amorphous silicon needs about 25% less dose in comparison with conventional screen-film mammography. (orig.)

  14. Research on Field Emission Flat Panel Display Based on Carbon Nanotube%基于碳纳米管的场发射平板显示器研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏

    2014-01-01

    碳纳米管因具有良好的电子发射特性而成为理想的场发射阴极材料。本文概述了碳纳米管的特性、分类及制备;介绍了碳纳米管场发射平板显示器的结构、工作原理及制备,分析了碳纳米管场发射平板显示器的优缺点,针对其缺点提出了一些改进的思路并对其发展趋势作了展望。%Carbon nanotube is considered as an ideal ifeld emission cathode material for its good electron emission characteristic.This paper describes the characteristics,classiifcation and preparation of carbon nanotube,introduces the structure,working principle and preparation of carbon nanotube field emission flat panel display,analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of it,puts forward some improvement ideas,and prospects its development trend.

  15. Why Nature Chose Selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Hans J; Hondal, Robert J

    2016-04-15

    The authors were asked by the Editors of ACS Chemical Biology to write an article titled "Why Nature Chose Selenium" for the occasion of the upcoming bicentennial of the discovery of selenium by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jacob Berzelius in 1817 and styled after the famous work of Frank Westheimer on the biological chemistry of phosphate [Westheimer, F. H. (1987) Why Nature Chose Phosphates, Science 235, 1173-1178]. This work gives a history of the important discoveries of the biological processes that selenium participates in, and a point-by-point comparison of the chemistry of selenium with the atom it replaces in biology, sulfur. This analysis shows that redox chemistry is the largest chemical difference between the two chalcogens. This difference is very large for both one-electron and two-electron redox reactions. Much of this difference is due to the inability of selenium to form π bonds of all types. The outer valence electrons of selenium are also more loosely held than those of sulfur. As a result, selenium is a better nucleophile and will react with reactive oxygen species faster than sulfur, but the resulting lack of π-bond character in the Se-O bond means that the Se-oxide can be much more readily reduced in comparison to S-oxides. The combination of these properties means that replacement of sulfur with selenium in nature results in a selenium-containing biomolecule that resists permanent oxidation. Multiple examples of this gain of function behavior from the literature are discussed. PMID:26949981

  16. Amorphous Silicon: Flexible Backplane and Display Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Kalluri R.

    Advances in the science and technology of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H, also referred to as a-Si) and the associated devices including thin-film transistors (TFT) during the past three decades have had a profound impact on the development and commercialization of major applications such as thin-film solar cells, digital image scanners and X-ray imagers and active matrix liquid crystal displays (AMLCDs). Particularly, during approximately the past 15 years, a-Si TFT-based flat panel AMLCDs have been a huge commercial success. a-Si TFT-LCD has enabled the note book PCs, and is now rapidly replacing the venerable CRT in the desktop monitor and home TV applications. a-Si TFT-LCD is now the dominant technology in use for applications ranging from small displays such as in mobile phones to large displays such as in home TV, as well-specialized applications such as industrial and avionics displays.

  17. Increase of brightness and transmission efficiency in flat panel display through serial synchronous scanning mode with double buffers%串行同步双缓冲扫描提高平板显示器的显示亮度和传送利用率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈章进; 陈峰; 冉峰; 徐美华; 郑方

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a serial synchronous scanning mode in flat panel display(FPD)by adding a latch buffer between the seriaiizer and the driving buffer.Comparing with conventional techniques,the proposed structure can efficiently reduce the brightness loss and improve the transmission performance.Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the ratio between the lightest weight display time and the relative transmission time is a tradeoff between brightness loss and transmission efficiency.

  18. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazzato, Roberto Luigi, E-mail: r.cazzato@unicampus.it; Buy, Xavier, E-mail: x.buy@bordeaux.unicancer.fr; Alberti, Nicolas, E-mail: nicoalbertibdx@gmail.com; Fonck, Mariane, E-mail: m.fonk@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié 229 Cours de l’Argonne, Department of Radiology (France); Grasso, Rosario Francesco, E-mail: r.grasso@unicampus.it [Università “Campus Bio-Medico di Roma”, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Italy); Palussière, Jean, E-mail: j.palussiere@bordeaux.unicancer.fr [Institut Bergonié 229 Cours de l’Argonne, Department of Radiology (France)

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible.

  19. Radiation Exposure in Biliary Procedures Performed to Manage Anastomotic Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients: Comparison Between Radiation Exposure Levels Using an Image Intensifier and a Flat-Panel Detector-Based System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miraglia, Roberto, E-mail: rmiraglia@ismett.edu; Maruzzelli, Luigi [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy); Tuzzolino, Fabio [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Information Technology (Italy); Indovina, Pietro Luigi [Medical Physic ISMETT Consultant, Fismeco (Italy); Luca, Angelo [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate radiation exposure in pediatric liver transplants recipients who underwent biliary interventional procedures and to compare radiation exposure levels between biliary interventional procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) and a flat panel detector-based interventional system (FPDS). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 34 consecutive pediatric liver transplant recipients with biliary strictures between January 2008 and March 2013 with a total of 170 image-guided procedures. The dose-area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time was recorded for each procedure. The mean age was 61 months (range 4-192), and mean weight was 17 kg (range 4-41). The procedures were classified into three categories: percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary catheter placement (n = 40); cholangiography and balloon dilatation (n = 55); and cholangiography and biliary catheter change or removal (n = 75). Ninety-two procedures were performed using an IIDS. Seventy-eight procedures performed after July 2010 were performed using an FPDS. The difference in DAP between the two angiographic systems was compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: Mean DAP in the three categories was significantly greater in the group of procedures performed using the IIDS compared with those performed using the FPDS. Statistical analysis showed a p value = 0.001 for the PTBD group, p = 0.0002 for the cholangiogram and balloon dilatation group, and p = 0.00001 for the group with cholangiogram and biliary catheter change or removal. Conclusion: In our selected cohort of patients, the use of an FPDS decreases radiation exposure.

  20. Radiation Exposure in Biliary Procedures Performed to Manage Anastomotic Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients: Comparison Between Radiation Exposure Levels Using an Image Intensifier and a Flat-Panel Detector-Based System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate radiation exposure in pediatric liver transplants recipients who underwent biliary interventional procedures and to compare radiation exposure levels between biliary interventional procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) and a flat panel detector-based interventional system (FPDS). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 34 consecutive pediatric liver transplant recipients with biliary strictures between January 2008 and March 2013 with a total of 170 image-guided procedures. The dose-area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time was recorded for each procedure. The mean age was 61 months (range 4–192), and mean weight was 17 kg (range 4–41). The procedures were classified into three categories: percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary catheter placement (n = 40); cholangiography and balloon dilatation (n = 55); and cholangiography and biliary catheter change or removal (n = 75). Ninety-two procedures were performed using an IIDS. Seventy-eight procedures performed after July 2010 were performed using an FPDS. The difference in DAP between the two angiographic systems was compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: Mean DAP in the three categories was significantly greater in the group of procedures performed using the IIDS compared with those performed using the FPDS. Statistical analysis showed a p value = 0.001 for the PTBD group, p = 0.0002 for the cholangiogram and balloon dilatation group, and p = 0.00001 for the group with cholangiogram and biliary catheter change or removal. Conclusion: In our selected cohort of patients, the use of an FPDS decreases radiation exposure

  1. Flat-Panel Cone-Beam Ct-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Very Small (≤1.5 cm) Liver Tumors: Technical Note on a Preliminary Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeThe aim of the present study was to investigate the technical feasibility of flat-panel cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of very small (<1.5 cm) liver tumors.Materials and MethodsPatients included were candidates for hepatic percutaneous RFA as they had single biopsy-proven hepatic tumors sized ≤1.5 cm and poorly defined on ultrasonography. Following apnea induction, unenhanced CBCT scans were acquired and used to deploy the RF electrode with the aid of a virtual navigation system. If the tumor was not clearly identified on the unenhanced CBCT scan, a right retrograde arterial femoral access was established to carry out hepatic angiography and localize the tumor. Patients’ lesions and procedural variables were recorded and analyzed.ResultsThree patients (2 male and 1 female), aged 68, 76, and 87 years were included; 3 lesions (2 hepato-cellular carcinoma and 1 metastasis from colorectal cancer) were treated. One patient required hepatic angiography. Cycles of apnea used to acquire CBCT images and to deploy the electrode lasted <120 s. Mean fluoroscopic time needed to deploy the electrode was 36.6 ± 5.7 min. Mean overall procedural time was 66.0 ± 22.9 min. No peri- or post-procedural complications were noted. No cases of incomplete ablation were noted at 1-month follow-up.ConclusionPercutaneous CBCT-guided liver RFA with or without arterial hepatic angiography is technically feasible

  2. Software Simulates Sight: Flat Panel Mura Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In the increasingly sophisticated world of high-definition flat screen monitors and television screens, image clarity and the elimination of distortion are paramount concerns. As the devices that reproduce images become more and more sophisticated, so do the technologies that verify their accuracy. By simulating the manner in which a human eye perceives and interprets a visual stimulus, NASA scientists have found ways to automatically and accurately test new monitors and displays. The Spatial Standard Observer (SSO) software metric, developed by Dr. Andrew B. Watson at Ames Research Center, measures visibility and defects in screens, displays, and interfaces. In the design of such a software tool, a central challenge is determining which aspects of visual function to include while accuracy and generality are important, relative simplicity of the software module is also a key virtue. Based on data collected in ModelFest, a large cooperative multi-lab project hosted by the Optical Society of America, the SSO simulates a simplified model of human spatial vision, operating on a pair of images that are viewed at a specific viewing distance with pixels having a known relation to luminance. The SSO measures the visibility of foveal spatial patterns, or the discriminability of two patterns, by incorporating only a few essential components of vision. These components include local contrast transformation, a contrast sensitivity function, local masking, and local pooling. By this construction, the SSO provides output in units of "just noticeable differences" (JND) a unit of measure based on the assumed smallest difference of sensory input detectable by a human being. Herein is the truly amazing ability of the SSO, while conventional methods can manipulate images, the SSO models human perception. This set of equations actually defines a mathematical way of working with an image that accurately reflects the way in which the human eye and mind behold a stimulus. The SSO is intended for a wide variety of applications, such as evaluating vision from unmanned aerial vehicles, measuring visibility of damage to aircraft and to the space shuttles, predicting outcomes of corrective laser eye surgery, inspecting displays during the manufacturing process, estimating the quality of compressed digital video, evaluating legibility of text, and predicting discriminability of icons or symbols in a graphical user interface.

  3. Biological selenium removal from wastewaters

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, microbial conversion of water-soluble, highly toxic forms of selenium (selenate, selenite) to less bioavailable elemental selenium was investigated. By the exploitation of different groups of microorganisms (selenium-respiring, nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, methanogenic archaea) the operational window of conventional and new hybrid anaerobic bioreactors treating selenium containing anthropogenic waste streams has been determined. A special focus was given to ...

  4. Biological selenium removal from wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, microbial conversion of water-soluble, highly toxic forms of selenium (selenate, selenite) to less bioavailable elemental selenium was investigated. By the exploitation of different groups of microorganisms (selenium-respiring, nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria, methanog

  5. 平板集热太阳热电器件建模及结构优化%Modelling and structure optimization of flat-panel thermal concentrated solar thermoelectric device∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊†; 张锁良; 马亚坤; 吴国浩; 郑树凯; 王永青

    2013-01-01

      太阳能热电转换是光伏效应外另一种直接将太阳辐射转变为电能的途径,近年来已经成为太阳能利用的热点之一.本文以Bi2Te3材料为基础构建平板集热太阳热电器件模型,采用有限元法分析AM1.5辐射条件下器件温度分布情况,并结合基于温度的物性参数计算集热比、热臂截面积与长度变化等因素对器件的开路电压、最大输出功率及转化效率的影响.研究发现:集热比与热臂长度的变化对器件性能有显著影响,热臂截面积的变化对器件转化效率影响相对较弱;在这一模型中,平板集热太阳热电器件的转化效率达到1.56%.%Solar thermoelectric conversion is another way to convert solar radiation directly into electricity besides photovoltaic technology, and has become a new hot spot of solar energy utilization in recent years. In this paper a model of flat-panel thermal concentrated solar thermoelectric device is built based on the material of Bi2Te3. And finite element analysis is used to analyze the temperature distribution of the device under AM1.5 illumination. Furthermore, the influences of thermal concentration, cross section area and length of thermal legs on open voltage, maximum output power and conversion efficiency of the device are calculated based on temperature-dependent physical parameters. The results indicate that thermal concentration and length of thermal legs haved a significant influence on device performance, while the cross section area changes the conversion efficiency of device relatively weakly, and the conversion efficiency of the device reaches 1.56%in this model.

  6. Design and construction of a flat-panel-based cone-beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system through the adaptation of a commercially available CT system: recent data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, David L.; Ning, Ruola

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how a commercially available spiral CT has been modified for use as the electro-mechanical scanner hardware for a prototype flat panel detector-based cone beam computed tomography (FPD-CBCT) imaging system. FPD-CBCT has the benefits of isotropic high resolution, low contrast sensitivity and 3D visualization. In contrast to spiral CT, which acquires a series of narrow slices, FPD-CBCT acquires a full volume of data (limited by the cone angle and the FPD active area) in one scan. Our goal was to use a GE HighSpeed Advantage (HSA) CT system as the basis for an FPD-CBVCT imaging prototype for performing phantom, animal and patient imaging studies. Specific electromechanical and radiographic subsystems controlled include: gantry rotation and tilt, patient table positioning, rotor control, mA control, the high frequency generator (kVp, exposure time, repetition rate) and image data acquisition. Also, a 2D full field FPD replaced the 1D detector, as well as the existing slit collimator was retrofitted to a full field collimator to allow x-ray exposure over the entire active area of the FPD. In addition, x-ray projection data was acquired at 30 fps. Power and communication signals to control modules on the rotating part of the gantry were transmitted through integrated slip rings on the gantry. A stationary host computer controlled mechanical motion of the gantry and sent trigger signals to on-board electronic interface modules to control data acquisition and radiographic functions. Acquired image data was grabbed to the system memory of an on-board industrial computer, saved to hard disk and downloaded through a network connection to the stationary computer for 3D reconstruction. Through the synchronized control of the pulsed x-ray exposures, data acquisition, and gantry rotation the system achieved a circle cone beam image acquisition protocol. With integrated control of the gantry tilt and of the position and translation speed

  7. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detector was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873

  8. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M; Ionita, C; Bednarek, D; Rudin, S [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation.

  9. SU-E-I-53: Comparison of Kerma-Area-Product Between the Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscope (MAF) and a Flat Panel Detector (FPD) as Used in Neuro-Endovascular Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Nagesh, S Setlur; Xiong, Z; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the reduction of integral dose to the patient when using the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF) compared to when using the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) for the techniques used during neurointerventional procedures. Methods: The MAF is a small field-of-view, high resolution x-ray detector which captures 1024 x 1024 pixels with an effective pixel size of 35μm and is capable of real-time imaging up to 30 frames per second. The MAF was used in neuro-interventions during those parts of the procedure when high resolution was needed and the FPD was used otherwise. The technique parameters were recorded when each detector was used and the kerma-area-product (KAP) per image frame was determined. KAP values were calculated for seven neuro interventions using premeasured calibration files of output as a function of kVp and beam filtration and included the attenuation of the patient table for the frontal projections to be more representative of integral patient dose. The air kerma at the patient entrance was multiplied by the beam area at that point to obtain the KAP values. The ranges of KAP values per frame were determined for the range of technique parameters used during the clinical procedures. To appreciate the benefit of the higher MAF resolution in the region of interventional activity, DA technique parameters were generally used with the MAF. Results: The lowest and highest values of KAP per frame for the MAF in DA mode were 4 and 50 times lower, respectively, compared to those of the FPD in pulsed fluoroscopy mode. Conclusion: The MAF was used in those parts of the clinical procedures when high resolution and image quality was essential. The integral patient dose as represented by the KAP value was substantially lower when using the MAF than when using the FPD due to the much smaller volume of tissue irradiated. This research was supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grant R01EB002873.

  10. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced) and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. Introduction: many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurysmal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. Methods: forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuro radiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. Results: inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1). Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1) and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1). Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%), which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between contrast

  11. A comparison between magnetic resonance angiography at 3 teslas (time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced and flat-panel digital subtraction angiography in the assessment of embolized brain aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme S. Nakiri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the time-of-flight and contrast-enhanced- magnetic resonance angiography techniques in a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance unit with digital subtraction angiography with the latest flat-panel technology and 3D reconstruction in the evaluation of embolized cerebral aneurysms. INTRODUCTION: Many embolized aneurysms are subject to a recurrence of intra-aneurismal filling. Traditionally, imaging surveillance of coiled aneurysms has consisted of repeated digital subtraction angiography. However, this method has a small but significant risk of neurological complications, and many authors have advocated the use of noninvasive imaging methods for the surveillance of embolized aneurysms. METHODS: Forty-three aneurysms in 30 patients were studied consecutively between November 2009 and May 2010. Two interventional neuroradiologists rated the time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography, the contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography, and finally the digital subtraction angiography, first independently and then in consensus. The status of aneurysm occlusion was assessed according to the Raymond scale, which indicates the level of recanalization according to degrees: Class 1: excluded aneurysm; Class 2: persistence of a residual neck; Class 3: persistence of a residual aneurysm. The agreement among the analyses was assessed by applying the Kappa statistic. RESULTS: Inter-observer agreement was excellent for both methods (K = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.84-1. Inter-technical agreement was almost perfect between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography (K = 0.98; 95 % CI: 0.93-1 and between time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and contrast-enhanced-magnetic resonance angiography (K = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.93-1. Disagreement occurred in only one case (2.3%, which was classified as Class I by time-of-flight-magnetic resonance angiography and Class II by digital subtraction angiography. The agreement between

  12. SU-D-204-05: Quantitative Comparison of a High Resolution Micro-Angiographic Fluoroscopic (MAF) Detector with a Standard Flat Panel Detector (FPD) Using the New Metric of Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: In endovascular image-guided neuro-interventions, visualization of fine detail is paramount. For example, the ability of the interventionist to visualize the stent struts depends heavily on the x-ray imaging detector performance. Methods: A study to examine the relative performance of the high resolution MAF-CMOS (pixel size 75µm, Nyquist frequency 6.6 cycles/mm) and a standard Flat Panel Detector (pixel size 194µm, Nyquist frequency 2.5 cycles/mm) detectors in imaging a neuro stent was done using the Generalized Measured Relative Object Detectability (GM-ROD) metric. Low quantum noise images of a deployed stent were obtained by averaging 95 frames obtained by both detectors without changing other exposure or geometric parameters. The square of the Fourier transform of each image is taken and divided by the generalized normalized noise power spectrum to give an effective measured task-specific signal-to-noise ratio. This expression is then integrated from 0 to each of the detector’s Nyquist frequencies, and the GM-ROD value is determined by taking a ratio of the integrals for the MAF-CMOS to that of the FPD. The lower bound of integration can be varied to emphasize high frequencies in the detector comparisons. Results: The MAF-CMOS detector exhibits vastly superior performance over the FPD when integrating over all frequencies, yielding a GM-ROD value of 63.1. The lower bound of integration was stepped up in increments of 0.5 cycles/mm for higher frequency comparisons. As the lower bound increased, the GM-ROD value was augmented, reflecting the superior performance of the MAF-CMOS in the high frequency regime. Conclusion: GM-ROD is a versatile metric that can provide quantitative detector and task dependent comparisons that can be used as a basis for detector selection. Supported by NIH Grant: 2R01EB002873 and an equipment grant from Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation

  13. Selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim; Grøn, P.; Langhoff, Otto;

    1991-01-01

    In a case-referent study on the possible role of selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis, serum selenium was found to be 79 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 66 cases and 81 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 93 referents. An internal trend in serum selenium was observed among cases (TNM stage I 81 +/- 11 micrograms....../l and TNM stage II 76 +/- 13 micrograms selenium/l), indicating disease-mediated changes. The evaluation of selenium as a risk indicator in human breast cancer was therefore restricted to TNM stage I patients (n = 36). Multiple logistic regression analyses including variables associated with selenium...... levels revealed no association between selenium levels and breast cancer risk....

  14. Prospective crystallization of amorphous Si films for new Si TFTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Takashi [University of the Ryukyus, Fuculty of Engineering, Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Prospective crystallization results of amorphous silicon film are reviewed and are discussed. Silicon TFTs are playing an important role for Active-Matrix Flat Panel Displays (AM-FPD) based on amorphous or poly-Si thin-film transistors (TFTs). Poly-Si TFTs provide a possibility to develop highly functional system on pane (SoP) applications. In order to get a high performance TFT, large poly-crystal grains or high cystallinity for the film is required. Two basic crystallization techniques namely solid phase crystallization (SPC) and excimer laser crystallization (ELC) are reviewed and relating issues are described. A grain growth technique has been developed based on the two crystallization techniques, so far. In order to mount a poly-Si TFT system on a flexible panel such as a plastic, an excimer laser of UV pulse beam has an advantage for the TFT channel as well as for the source and drain contacts as a ultra-low temperature poly-Si (U-LTPS) process. To realize a high performance TFT of uniform and high carrier mobility, location control crystallization had been proposed. Some of the distinctive results for crystal orientation control of (100) and (111) face using the laser crystallization techniques are described. In the future, single-crystalline Si TFT of a functional 3D structure is expected to realize an advanced SoP for ubiquitous electronics era. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Evolution of charge emission for amorphous silicon FETs exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large area flat panel radiation imagers are currently based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (α-Si:H) devices. For extended use in medical applications and most industrial applications the properties of the panels can be altered by the high dose the panels experience. One characteristic of these panels is a dark offset due to emission of charge from deep trap states (detrapping currents) of the α-Si:H FETs. We report on a method of isolating the contribution of channel and contact (source/drain) silicon in a standard inverted gate FET to the total charge emission current and directly measure the time evolution of both. Additionally, we investigate changes in the charge emission coming from FETs on the imager panel as a function of radiation dose up to 15 Mrad (150 kGy) absorbed in the α-Si:H of the FETs

  16. The possibility of using dc conductivity for investigating phase transition in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different formulas have been applied to deduce the effective or the generalized electrical conductivity of double phase systems. These formulas have been revised and fitted to the experimental data of the binary systems amorphous-crystal (a-c) and liquid-crystal (l-c) for pure elementary selenium and selenium doped by different other elements. Both connected medium and statistical mixture theories can be applied depending on the nature of the system under investigation. (author)

  17. Selenium elimination in pigs after an outbreak of selenium toxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson-York, D; Galey, F D; Blanchard, P; Gardner, I A

    1999-07-01

    In May 1996, 150 grower pigs in 5 California counties were exposed to selenium-contaminated feed distributed by a single feed company. Feed samples from 20 herds had a mean selenium concentration of 121.7 ppm dry weight (range, 22.1-531 ppm). In San Luis Obispo County, 52 pigs in 24 herds were exposed to the feed, and 8 pigs died with signs of paralysis. Bilateral symmetrical poliomyelomalacia involving the ventral horns of the cervical and lumbar intumescence was evident on histologic examination of spinal cord from affected pigs. Of 44 surviving exposed pigs, 33 (75%) exhibited signs of selenosis, including anorexia, alopecia, and hoof lesions. Thirty-nine of 44 pigs (88.6%) had elevated (>1 ppm) blood selenium concentrations. Surviving exposed pigs were changed to a standard commercial ration containing approximately 0.5 ppm (dry weight) selenium. Blood selenium concentrations were determined weekly for 46 days following removal of the contaminated feed and were compared with values of 20 control pigs fed a standard commercial ration. Mean (+/-SD) blood selenium concentrations of exposed pigs were 3.2 +/- 2.6 ppm at the initial sampling and 0.4 +/- 0.1 ppm after 46 days. Mean blood selenium concentrations of Muscle and liver samples of 22 of the 44 exposed pigs were collected at slaughter approximately 72 days after withdrawal of the selenium-contaminated feed. Muscle samples had a mean selenium concentration of 0.36 ppm (wet weight). Liver samples had a mean selenium concentration of 1.26 ppm (wet weight). One liver sample had a selenium value in the toxic range for pigs (3.3 ppm wet weight; reference range, 0.4-1.2 ppm). A 1-compartment pharmacokinetic model of selenium elimination in exposed pigs was generated, and the geometric mean blood selenium elimination half-life was estimated to be 12 days. The 60-day withdrawal time recommended by the Food Animal Residue Avoidance Database was considered sufficient to allow safe human consumption of tissues from

  18. Selenium and immune functions in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Arvilommi, H; Poikonen, K; Jokinen, I; Muukkonen, O; Räsänen, L.; Foreman, J; Huttunen, J K

    1983-01-01

    Earlier animal experiments have shown that selenium depletion may decrease immune functions. In this human study, 40 volunteers from a population with low serum selenium concentrations were supplemented with selenium or placebo for 11 weeks. Blood samples were drawn at intervals for analysis of selenium status and immune function. At the end of the supplementation period, plasma selenium levels were 74 ng/ml in the placebo group and 169 ng/ml in the supplemented group. The improvement in sele...

  19. Biochemistry of Selenium in Pariette Wetlands, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Colleen P.

    2014-01-01

    The Pariette Wetlands was constructed to provide wildlife habitat in an arid environment. Elevated levels of selenium (Se) have been detected in water, soil, and biota. Selenium concentrations have ranged from below detection limit to four times the water quality criterium limit. Here we report on three interrelated research topics: 1) selenium mass balance and flux in water, 2) selenium accumulation, concentration and volatilization of water and plant tissues; and 3) selenium sorption by upl...

  20. Reduction of selenite by Azospirillum brasilense with the formation of selenium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugarova, Anna V; Vetchinkina, Elena P; Loshchinina, Ekaterina A; Burov, Andrei M; Nikitina, Valentina E; Kamnev, Alexander A

    2014-10-01

    The ability to reduce selenite (SeO(3)(2-)) ions with the formation of selenium nanoparticles was demonstrated in Azospirillum brasilense for the first time. The influence of selenite ions on the growth of A. brasilense Sp7 and Sp245, two widely studied wild-type strains, was investigated. Growth of cultures on both liquid and solid (2 % agar) media in the presence of SeO(3)(2-) was found to be accompanied by the appearance of the typical red colouration. By means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XFA), intracellular accumulation of elementary selenium in the form of nanoparticles (50 to 400 nm in diameter) was demonstrated for both strains. The proposed mechanism of selenite-to-selenium (0) reduction could involve SeO(3)(2-) in the denitrification process, which has been well studied in azospirilla, rather than a selenite detoxification strategy. The results obtained point to the possibility of using Azospirillum strains as endophytic or rhizospheric bacteria to assist phytoremediation of, and cereal cultivation on, selenium-contaminated soils. The ability of A. brasilense to synthesise selenium nanoparticles may be of interest to nanobiotechnology for "green synthesis" of bioavailable amorphous red selenium nanostructures. PMID:24863127

  1. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn–Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer–Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo–Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann–Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  2. Trace Element Analysis of Selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present thesis divided into four chapters as follows:Chapter (1):This chapter contains an introduction on different oxidation states of organic and inorganic species for selenium in environmental and biological samples, the process for separation of selenium from these samples and the importance of selenium as a component for these samples. Also gives notes about the techniques which are used in the elemental analysis for selenium species and the detection limits for selenium in these techniques, selenium species in human body and the importance of these species in protecting the body from the different types of cancer and the sources of selenium in environmental samples (soil and water) and distribution levels of selenium in these samples.Chapter (2):This chapter is divided into two parts :The first part deals with the sample collection process for environmental samples (underground water, soil) and the wet digestion ( microwave digestion ) process of soil samples. It also contains the theory of work of the closed microwave digestion system.The second part contains detailed information concerning the theoretical considerations of the used analytical techniques. These techniques include Hydride generation - Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (HG-AAS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA).Chapter (3): This chapter includes the methods of sampling, sample preparation, and sample digesition. The measures of quality assurance are disscused in this chapter. It describes in details the closed microwave digestion technique and the analytical methods used in this study which are present in Central Laboratory for Elemental and Isotopic Analysis (CLEIA) and the Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2). The described techniques are Atomic Absorption Spectrometer (AAS 6 vario, Analytical Jena GmbH, Germany), JMS-PLASMAX2 Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) and the Egypt Second Research Reactor (NAA).

  3. Determination of optical absorption edge in amorphous thin films of selenium and selenium dopped with sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transmittance and the reflectance of three thin films of S-Se alloys have been determined for different wavelengths in the range 5000-11000 A. Accurate methods had been used to calculate the optical constants n and k as well as the absorption coefficient K. The determined absorption edges for S-Se alloys shifts to higher photon energies by increasing the concentration of sulphur content. (author)

  4. Selenium bioaccessibility and speciation in biofortified Pleurotus mushrooms grown on selenium-rich agricultural residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Poonam; Aureli, Federica; D'Amato, Marilena; Prakash, Ranjana; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh; Nagaraja, Tejo Prakash; Cubadda, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    Cultivation of saprophytic fungi on selenium-rich substrates can be an effective means to produce selenium-fortified food. Pleurotus florida, an edible species of oyster mushrooms, was grown on wheat straw from the seleniferous belt of Punjab (India) and its potential to mobilize and accumulate selenium from the growth substrate was studied. Selenium concentration in biofortified mushrooms was 800 times higher compared with control samples grown on wheat straw from non selenium-rich areas (141 vs 0.17 μg Se g(-1) dry weight). Seventy-five percent of the selenium was extracted after in vitro simulated gastrointestinal digestion and investigation of the selenium molecular fractions by size exclusion HPLC-ICP-MS revealed that proteins and any other high molecular weight selenium-containing molecule were hydrolyzed to peptides and low molecular weight selenocompounds. Analysis of the gastrointestinal hydrolysates by anion exchange HPLC-ICP-MS showed that the bioaccessible selenium was mainly present as selenomethionine, a good bioavailable source of selenium, which accounted for 73% of the sum of the detected species. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing selenium-biofortified edible mushrooms using selenium-rich agricultural by-products as growth substrates. The proposed approach can be used to evaluate whether selenium-contaminated plant waste materials harvested from high-selenium areas may be used to produce selenium-biofortified edible mushrooms based on the concentration, bioaccessibility and speciation of selenium in the mushrooms. PMID:23578637

  5. Deletion of Selenoprotein P Upregulates Urinary Selenium Excretion and Depresses Whole-body Selenium Content

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond F Burk; Hill, Kristina E.; Motley, Amy K.; Austin, Lori M.; Norsworthy, Brooke K.

    2006-01-01

    Deletion of the mouse selenoprotein P gene (Sepp1) lowers selenium concentrations in many tissues. We examined selenium homeostasis in Sepp1−/− and Sepp1+/+ mice to assess the mechanism of this. The liver produces and exports selenoprotein P, which transports selenium to peripheral tissues, and urinary selenium metabolites, which regulate whole-body selenium. At intakes of selenium near the nutritional requirement, Sepp1−/− mice had whole-body selenium concentrations 72 to 75% of Sepp1+/+ mic...

  6. Dietary Selenium and Whole Blood Selenium in Young Women in Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Ýr Guðmundsdóttir 1969

    2011-01-01

    Background: Selenium is essential for life, and in adequate amount it is required for optimal human health. Environmental conditions and agricultural practices greatly affect selenium content of foods. Nutritional bioavailability of selenium depends on the concentration and chemical forms ingested. The National Food Composition Database is an important tool in estimating intake of minerals, such as selenium, and needs regular updates with respect to selenium content of foods. Significant chan...

  7. Geiten krijgen meestal te veel selenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, E.A.A.; Govaerts, W.; Eekeren, van N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Geiten gaan efficiënt om met selenium. Mede daardoor zijn de bloedwaardes voor selenium bij geiten vaak hoog, en soms te hoog, zo bleek na bloedonderzoek op dertien biologische geitenbedrijven binnen het project Biogeit. Te veel selenium is schadelijk voor geiten.

  8. Study on selenium extraction from anode slime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU; Heng

    2005-01-01

    Taking a copper anode slime as the raw material, a novel process for selenium extraction was studied. The primary selenium recovery can reach above 88.5 % and the quality index of selenium product can be up to 99.5 %. The economic benefit resulted is remarkable and environment has been protected.

  9. Amorphous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    agents constructed by engineered cells, but we have few ideas for programming them effectively: How can one engineer prespecified, coherent behavior from the cooperation of immense numbers of unreliable parts that are interconnected in unknown, irregular, and time-varying ways? This is the challenge of Amorphous Computing.

  10. Effect of selenium on uranium biosorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of selenium on uranium biosorption were examined using 67 microorganisms (17 bacteria, 19 actinomycetes, 18 fungi, and 13 yeasts). The growth suppression by selenium in the medium was observed in most of the microorganisms tested. The amounts of selenium taken up in microbial cells differ with different species and groups of microorganisms. The marked enhancement of uranium adsorbing ability by Se-loading was only found in yeasts, such as Candida utilis. The amounts of uranium adsorbed by the cells were increased with increasing selenium in the cells. Thus, it is assumed that the selenium in the cells will play an important role in uranium binding. (author)

  11. Performance of a novel wafer scale CMOS active pixel sensor for bio-medical imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito, M; Anaxagoras, T; Konstantinidis, AC; Zheng, Y.; Speller, RD; Evans, PM; Allinson, NM; Wells, K.

    2014-01-01

    Recently CMOS Active Pixels Sensors (APSs) have become a valuable alternative to amorphous Silicon and Selenium Flat Panel Imagers (FPIs) in bio-medical imaging applications. CMOS APSs can now be scaled up to the standard 20 cm diameter wafer size by means of a reticle stitching block process. However despite wafer scale CMOS APS being monolithic, sources of non-uniformity of response and regional variations can persist representing a significant challenge for wafer scale sensor response. Non...

  12. Selenium in pregnancy: is selenium an active defective ion against environmental chemical stress?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transportation of selenium from mother to fetus and its possible effects on mother's zinc, copper, cadmium, and mercury levels were studied together during the first trimester and at term in 216 mothers. Mothers came from three geographical places with different selenium intakes. The role of selenium as a biomarker for the vital function was estimated by studying the associations between tissue or blood selenium content and placental cytochrome P450 enzyme activities and the newborn's birth weight. Regardless of the selenium intake of the mothers, higher concentrations were found in the cord blood than in mother's blood reflecting active transportation of selenium to the fetus. Active smoking was associated with higher placental selenium concentrations like it is associated with higher placental zinc concentrations. When the cadmium concentrations were high in placenta, as in smokers, the transfer of selenium from blood to placenta was increased, decreasing the selenium levels in blood. On the other hand, the high selenium concentrations in blood were connected to lower cadmium concentrations in placenta also in nonsmokers. Selenium had correlations with copper and zinc. ECOD activity in placental tissue, mercury in mothers' hair, mothers' age, and selenium concentrations in cord blood and placental selenium all seem to have connections with xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes linked effects among mothers. These data suggest that selenium has an active role in the mother's defense systems against the toxicity of environmental pollutants and the constituents of cigarette smoke

  13. Selenium, apoptosis, and colorectal adenomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Connelly-Frost, Alexandra; Poole, Charles; Satia, Jessie A.; Kupper, Lawrence L.; Millikan, Robert C.; Sandler, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary modulation of carcinogenesis-related pathwaysDietary item or component studied:seleniumPathways studied:apoptosisStudy type (in vitro, animals, humans): humansStudy design (if human):cross-sectional studyStudy size (if human):803 participantsTissue/biological material/sample size: serum, 2 colon biopsiesMode of exposure (if in vivo) (acute, chronic, root of exposure):dietary & lifestyle questionnairesImpact on pathway (including dose-response):for 50-120 μgr/l selenium Pe~0.5-0.3For ...

  14. Selenium in Cattle: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Youcef Mehdi; Isabelle Dufrasne

    2016-01-01

    This review article examines the role of selenium (Se) and the effects of Se supplementation especially in the bovine species. Selenium is an important trace element in cattle. Some of its roles include the participation in the antioxidant defense the cattle farms. The nutritional requirements of Se in cattle are estimated at 100 μg/kg DM (dry matter) for beef cattle and at 300 μg/kg DM for dairy cows. The rations high in fermentable carbohydrates, nitrates, sulfates, calcium or hydrogen cyan...

  15. Selenium Content in Seafood in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Iida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans, and seafood is one of the major selenium sources, as well as red meat, grains, eggs, chicken, liver and garlic. A substantial proportion of the total amount of selenium is present as selenium containing imidazole compound, selenoneine, in the muscles of ocean fish. In order to characterize the selenium content in seafood, the total selenium levels were measured in the edible portions of commercially important fish and shellfish species. Among the tested edible portions, alfonsino muscle had the highest selenium levels (concentration of 1.27 mg/kg tissue. High levels of selenium (1.20–1.07 mg/kg were also found in the salted ovary products of mullet and Pacific herring. In other fish muscles, the selenium levels ranged between 0.12 and 0.77 mg/kg tissue. The selenium levels were closely correlated with the mercury levels in the white and red muscles in alfonsino. The selenium content in spleen, blood, hepatopancreas, heart, red muscle, white muscle, brain, ovary and testis ranged between 1.10 and 24.8 mg/kg tissue in alfonsino.

  16. Shedding Light on Selenium Biomineralization: Proteins Associated with Bionanominerals ▿

    OpenAIRE

    M. Lenz; Kolvenbach, B.; Gygax, B.; Moes, S; Corvini, P. F. X.

    2011-01-01

    Selenium reducing microorganisms produce elemental selenium nanoparticles with particular physico-chemical properties being due to an associated organic fraction. This study identified high affinity proteins being associated with such bionanominerals and with non-biogenic elemental selenium. Proteins with an anticipated functional role in selenium reduction, such as a metalloid reductase, were found associated with nanoparticles formed by one selenium respirer, Sulfurospirillum barnesii.

  17. Colloidally stable selenium@copper selenide core@shell nanoparticles as selenium source for manufacturing of copper-indium-selenide solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hailong; Quintilla, Aina; Cemernjak, Marco; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Ahlswede, Erik; Feldmann, Claus

    2014-02-01

    Selenium nanoparticles with diameters of 100-400nm are prepared via hydrazine-driven reduction of selenious acid. The as-prepared amorphous, red selenium (a-Se) particles were neither a stable phase nor were they colloidally stable. Due to phase transition to crystalline (trigonal), grey selenium (t-Se) at or even below room temperature, the particles merged rapidly and recrystallized as micronsized crystal needles. As a consequence, such Se particles were not suited for layer deposition and as a precursor to manufacture thin-film CIS (copper indium selenide/CuInSe2) solar cells. To overcome this restriction, Se@CuSe core@shell particles are presented here. For these Se@CuSe core@shell nanoparticles, the phase transition a-Se→t-Se is shifted to temperatures higher than 100°C. Moreover, a spherical shape of the particles is retained even after phase transition. Composition and structure of the Se@CuSe core@shell nanostructure are evidenced by electron microscopy (SEM/STEM), DLS, XRD, FT-IR and line-scan EDXS. As a conceptual study, the newly formed Se@CuSe core@shell nanostructures with CuSe acting as a protecting layer to increase the phase-transition temperature and to improve the colloidal stability were used as a selenium precursor for manufacturing of thin-film CIS solar cells and already lead to conversion efficiencies up to 3%. PMID:24267336

  18. Chemical Form of Selenium in Naturally Selenium-Rich Lentils (Lens Culinaris L.) From Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thavarajah, D.; Vandenberg, A.; George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-06-04

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86--95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5--14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  19. The use of high-selenium yeast to raise selenium status: how does it measure up?

    OpenAIRE

    Rayman, MP

    2004-01-01

    Selenium-enriched yeast (Se-yeast) is a common form of selenium used to supplement dietary intake of this important trace mineral. However, its availability within the EU is under threat owing to concerns expressed by the EC Scientific Committee on Food that Se-yeast supplements are poorly characterised and could potentially cause the build up of selenium in tissues to toxic levels. This review examines the validity of these concerns. Diagrams of the biosynthesis and metabolism of selenium co...

  20. Deposition station for selenium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Isotopic tracing of nanoparticles mostly involved in environmental and metabolic processes, industrial, and agricultural technologies, attracts an increasing attention nowadays. As an experimental goal, for proposed tracing studies selenium was chosen, which is an essential trace element for the nutrition of almost all living organisms, since it plays a crucial role in the antioxidant activity of seleno-enzymes. Selenium in forms of nanoparticles being synthesized by wet chemical or microbial dissimilatory processes, turned out to possess new functionality as examplified in affecting semiconductor properties, toxicity, and growth factors, which are important for both nutritional supplements and potential cancer therapy agents. Stable isotope tracing of selenium nanoparticles under in vivo conditions would then yield relevant information on biodistributions, efficiency and safety issues of applications. A prototype version of a deposition station for enrichment of stable selenium isotopes was constructed and installed downstream to the sector magnet of the DiSP isotope separator. The deposition of the isotopic beam particles was carried out with the use of selfsputtering technique. The beam with a kinetic energy of 25-30 keV was first guided through electrostatic elements, where it was focused and decelerated to 300-500 eV (Fig. 1). The geometry of the electrostatic lenses was designed with the simulation code SIMION 8. The outcoming beam impinged upon the surface of a tungsten disc, on which recombination and selfsputtering of selenium ions occurred. Sputtering yields and efficiencies were measured as a function of beam intensities. It was concluded that emission of the selenium atoms can be predominantly attributed to heat spike mechanism due to large differences in evaporation characteristics of selenium and tungsten. The selenium atoms were then deposited as a thin film on a polypropylene (PP) surface with a conical geometry

  1. Does selenium supplementation affect thyroid function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Cold, Frederik;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Selenium is present in the active site of proteins important for thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of selenium supplementation in different doses on thyroid function, under conditions of suboptimal dietary selenium intake......, and after 6 months, and 5 years of supplementation. RESULTS: Plasma selenium concentrations increased significantly and dose-dependently in treatment groups receiving selenium (P<0.001). Serum TSH and FT4 concentrations decreased significantly and dose-dependently by 0.066 mIU/l (P=0.010) and 0.......11 pmol/l (P=0.015), respectively, per 100 μg/day increase, with insignificant differences between 6 months and 5 years. No significant effects were found for FT3 and FT3:FT4 ratio. CONCLUSIONS: In euthyroid subjects, selenium supplementation minutely and dose-dependently affects thyroid function, when...

  2. Selenium in Oncology: From Chemistry to Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Micke; Lutz Schomburg; Jens Buentzel; Klaus Kisters; Ralph Muecke

    2009-01-01

    The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a con...

  3. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldan, A. H. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794-8460 (United States); Rowlands, J. A. [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Tousignant, O. [ANRAD Corporation, 4950 Levy Street, Saint-Laurent, Quebec H4R 2P1 (Canada); Karim, K. S. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-06-14

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  4. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, A. H.; Rowlands, J. A.; Tousignant, O.; Karim, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  5. Selenium levels in breads from Sakarya, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülfen, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an important trace element for human and animal health. It accumulates in wheat and corn, which is consumed mostly as bread. The Turkish population consumes mainly white wheat, whole wheat (brown bread) and corn breads. In this study, samples of these breads were collected from six different bakeries in the city of Sakarya, and their selenium levels were determined by ICP-OES after a chemical digestion. It was found that average selenium levels in white wheat, whole wheat and corn breads were 1149, 1204 and 2023 µg/kg, respectively. The results are compared with daily recommended intake and upper tolerable levels for selenium. PMID:24779690

  6. Corrosion resistant amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publication data on corrosion resistance of amorphous alloys and the methods of amorphization of surface layers of massive materials (laser treatment, iron implantation, detonation-gas spraying, cathode and ion sputtering, electrodeposition) was made. A study was made on corrosion properties of Fe66Cr11B10Si4 alloy in cast state and after laser irradiation, rendering the surface amorphous as well as the samples of Arenco iron and steel 20 with ion-plasma coatings of Fe-Cr-Ni-Ti alloy. It was established that amorphous coatings posses much higher corrosion resistance as compared to crystalline alloys on the same base

  7. Selenium Speciation in Arabidopsis Thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoou

    2011-01-01

    Selenium has been proved as an essential micronutrient and is beneficial to animals and humans. It is a structural component of the important antioxidant enzyme, glutathione peroxidase, which catalyzes reactions to detoxify reactive oxygen species. However, the essentiality of Se in plants remains controversial and the protective role of Se in plants has rarely been investigated. In this study, Arabidopsis thaliana was grown in controlled environments having selenate or selenite enriched medi...

  8. Selenium determination by fluorimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fluorimetric method to determine selenium both in vegetable samples and blood serum is developed. The method consists of a radioisotope 75Se initially in order to optimize the determination of analytical conditions. Three samples digestion processes and also some factors related to methodology is studied. The nitric-percloric digestion process for 40 samples and the analytical process is shown. (M.J.C.)

  9. Usefulness of DICOM headers in the analysis of two biplane X-ray systems setting (image intensifier and flat panel) used in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile;Utilidad de las cabeceras DICOM en el analisis de la configuracion de dos sistemas de rayos X biplano (intensificador de imagen y panel plano) utilizados en cardiologia intervencionista pediatrica en Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, C.; Vergara, F. [Universidad de Tarapaca, Arica (Chile). Dept. de Ciencias Clinicas; Vano, E. [Universidad Complutense, Madrid, (Spain). Hospital Clinico San Carlos. Dept. de Radiologia; Miranda, P. [Hospital Luis Calvo Mackenna, Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Hemodinamia; Valenzuela, E. [Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Hospital Clinico. Servicio de Hemodinamia; Leyton, F. [Instituto de Salud Publica de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2009-07-01

    The setting of two biplane X ray systems were evaluated (image intensifier (II) and flat panel (PP)), through DICOM tags from 32 images created during the characterization of both systems. The technical parameters adjusted for systems were: 63,8 to 80,0 kV and 15,0 to 388,0 mA, for the system with II and 52,0 to 77,0 kV and 25,0 to 476,0 mA, for the system with PP detector. Both equipment presented a different mA adjustment, when moving from fluoroscopy modes low dose (FL), medium dose (FM) and high dose (FH) to cine mode (CI). Two dosimetric quantities were evaluated, the first one was the dose-area product (DAP) which gave as a result for FB mode, between 0,03 to 0,35 uGycm{sup 2}/image (II) and from 0,05 a 0,69 uGycm{sup 2}/image (PP), when the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) thickness was incremented from 4 to 16 cm. In cine mode the DAP quantity showed, percentage values from 24 to -1 % for the same PMMA increment. Skin cumulative dose was the second quantity evaluated and showed an increment of incident air kerma (KAI)/image in factors from 17 to 35 (II) and 15 to 28 (PP) when used in CI mode instead of FB mode, to the different PMMA thicknesses used. This dose increment for CI mode must be considered by cardiologists, to use the fluoroscopic run as an alternative to document part of the procedures when there is no need to use a high quality image (author)

  10. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  11. Learning selenium testing tools with Python

    CERN Document Server

    Gundecha, Unmesh

    2014-01-01

    If you are a quality testing professional, or a software or web application developer looking to create automation test scripts for your web applications, with an interest in Python, then this is the perfect guide for you. Python developers who need to do Selenium testing need not learn Java, as they can directly use Selenium for testing with this book.

  12. Advanced prostate cancer risk in relation to toenail selenium levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geybels, M.S.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goldbohm, A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selenium may prevent advanced prostate cancer (PCa), but most studies on this topic were conducted in populations with moderate to high selenium status. We investigated the association of toenail selenium, reflecting long-term selenium exposure, and advanced PCa risk in a population from

  13. Determination of selenium species in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essential nature of selenium as well as its toxicity depend on the concentration and the chemical forms in which this element is present in a given sample. Dissolved inorganic selenium can be found in natural water and soil as selenides, selenite and selenate. Organoselenium compounds present in air, soil and plants are volatile methylselenides, trimethylselenonium ion and several selenoamino acids. This review is a summary of recent research on the determination of selenium species in environmental samples such as water, air, soil and plants. Stability of selenium species in solutions and their storage is also discussed. In the metabolic pathway in the body selenide could act as the common intermediate for inorganic and organic Se sources as well as the checkpoint between further utilization and excretion of selenium. (author)

  14. Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Significant changes have been reported in dietary habits and food availability in Iceland that would be expected to compromise selenium intake and status, especially among young people. These include substantial decreases in the consumption of fish and milk, as well as the selenium content of imported wheat. The aim of this study was to assess selenium in the diet and whole blood of adolescent girls, as well as define the most important foods contributing to intake and blood concentrations of selenium. Design: The subjects were 96 randomly selected girls, aged 16–20, who answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ for dietary assessment. Selenium intake from each food group was calculated in µg/day. Blood samples were collected for measurement of whole blood selenium. Results: Mean dietary selenium was 51±25 µg/day. Milk/dairy products, including cheese, contributed 36±14% of total dietary selenium; fish 18±12%; and bread/cereal products 13±6%. Mean whole blood selenium was 117±12 µg/l (range 90–208; nearly 90% of subjects were above the optimal level of 100 µg/l. Fish and bread/cereal products were the only foods significantly correlated with selenium in blood (r=0.32; P = 0.002 and r=0.22; P = 0.04, respectively while no correlation was found with milk and dairy products in spite of their greater contribution to total selenium intake. Conclusion: In this population of Icelandic adolescent girls, selenium intake and status seem acceptable. Judging from associations between intake and blood levels, fish and cereals may be the most important contributors to blood selenium.

  15. Biosynthesis of selenium nanoparticles by Pantoea agglomerans and their antioxidant activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bio-reduction of selenite (Se (IV)) generates nanoparticles with sizes ranging between 30 and 300 nm. Biologic properties of Se nanoparticles, e.g., antioxidant activity, are dependent on the nanoparticle size; smaller particles have greater activity. In this study, the bio-reduction of selenite by Pantoea agglomerans strain UC-32 under aerobic conditions and room temperature to produce bioactive Se nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm was demonstrated. Isolation and purification of the nanoparticles was performed by alkaline lysis. These purified nanoparticles were stabilized with l-cysteine (4 mM). The visualization and characterization of nanoparticles were performed by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The antioxidant activity of nanoparticles was determined by production of reactive oxygen species using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed the accumulation of spherical selenium nanoparticles as intracellular and extracellular deposits. The size of Se nanoparticles varied with incubation time. Amorphous Se nanoparticles with size in the order of 100 nm were obtained before 24 h of incubation; but, at 24 h of incubation, the size of the majority of the nanoparticles was in the desirable order of 100 nm and they were not aggregated. Energy dispersive spectroscopy spectra indicated that nanoparticles were composed entirely of selenium. Antioxidant activity of stabilized selenium nanoparticles demonstrated high antioxidant activity when compared to selenite and selenium nanoparticles without stabilization. Stabilized biologically synthetized selenium (0) nanoparticles with size less than 100 nm have a potential application as a food additive with antioxidant properties relevant to human health.

  16. Biosynthesis of selenium nanoparticles by Pantoea agglomerans and their antioxidant activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, S. K.; Campos, V. L., E-mail: vcampos@udec.cl; Leon, C. G. [Universidad de Concepcion, Laboratorio de Microbiologia Ambiental, Departamento de Microbiologia (Chile); Rodriguez-Llamazares, S. M. [Centro de Investigacion de Polimeros Avanzados (CIPA) (Chile); Rojas, S. M.; Gonzalez, M. [Universidad de Concepcion, Laboratorio de Fisiologia Vascular, Departamento de Fisiologia (Chile); Smith, C. [Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Microbiologia (Chile); Mondaca, M. A. [Universidad de Concepcion, Laboratorio de Microbiologia Ambiental, Departamento de Microbiologia (Chile)

    2012-11-15

    The bio-reduction of selenite (Se (IV)) generates nanoparticles with sizes ranging between 30 and 300 nm. Biologic properties of Se nanoparticles, e.g., antioxidant activity, are dependent on the nanoparticle size; smaller particles have greater activity. In this study, the bio-reduction of selenite by Pantoea agglomerans strain UC-32 under aerobic conditions and room temperature to produce bioactive Se nanoparticles smaller than 100 nm was demonstrated. Isolation and purification of the nanoparticles was performed by alkaline lysis. These purified nanoparticles were stabilized with l-cysteine (4 mM). The visualization and characterization of nanoparticles were performed by transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The antioxidant activity of nanoparticles was determined by production of reactive oxygen species using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy images showed the accumulation of spherical selenium nanoparticles as intracellular and extracellular deposits. The size of Se nanoparticles varied with incubation time. Amorphous Se nanoparticles with size in the order of 100 nm were obtained before 24 h of incubation; but, at 24 h of incubation, the size of the majority of the nanoparticles was in the desirable order of 100 nm and they were not aggregated. Energy dispersive spectroscopy spectra indicated that nanoparticles were composed entirely of selenium. Antioxidant activity of stabilized selenium nanoparticles demonstrated high antioxidant activity when compared to selenite and selenium nanoparticles without stabilization. Stabilized biologically synthetized selenium (0) nanoparticles with size less than 100 nm have a potential application as a food additive with antioxidant properties relevant to human health.

  17. Selenium in Cattle: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Youcef; Dufrasne, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    This review article examines the role of selenium (Se) and the effects of Se supplementation especially in the bovine species. Selenium is an important trace element in cattle. Some of its roles include the participation in the antioxidant defense the cattle farms. The nutritional requirements of Se in cattle are estimated at 100 μg/kg DM (dry matter) for beef cattle and at 300 μg/kg DM for dairy cows. The rations high in fermentable carbohydrates, nitrates, sulfates, calcium or hydrogen cyanide negatively influence the organism's use of the selenium contained in the diet. The Se supplementation may reduce the incidence of metritis and ovarian cysts during the postpartum period. The increase in fertility when adding Se is attributed to the reduction of the embryonic death during the first month of gestation. A use of organic Se in feed would provide a better transfer of Se in calves relative to mineral Se supplementation. The addition of Se yeasts in the foodstuffs of cows significantly increases the Se content and the percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in milk compared to the addition of sodium selenite. The enzyme 5-iodothyronine deiodinase is a seleno-dependent selenoprotein. It is one of the last proteins to be affected in the event of Se deficiency. This delay in response could explain the fact that several studies did not show the effect of Se supplementation on growth and weight gain of calves. Enrichment of Se in the diet did not significantly affect the slaughter weight and carcass yield of bulls. The impact and results of Se supplementation in cattle depend on physiological stage, Se status of animals, type and content of Se and types of Se administration. Further studies in Se supplementation should investigate the speciation of Se in food and yeasts, as well as understanding their metabolism and absorption. This constitute a path to exploit in order to explain certain different effects of Se. PMID:27120589

  18. Selenium in Cattle: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review article examines the role of selenium (Se and the effects of Se supplementation especially in the bovine species. Selenium is an important trace element in cattle. Some of its roles include the participation in the antioxidant defense the cattle farms. The nutritional requirements of Se in cattle are estimated at 100 μg/kg DM (dry matter for beef cattle and at 300 μg/kg DM for dairy cows. The rations high in fermentable carbohydrates, nitrates, sulfates, calcium or hydrogen cyanide negatively influence the organism’s use of the selenium contained in the diet. The Se supplementation may reduce the incidence of metritis and ovarian cysts during the postpartum period. The increase in fertility when adding Se is attributed to the reduction of the embryonic death during the first month of gestation. A use of organic Se in feed would provide a better transfer of Se in calves relative to mineral Se supplementation. The addition of Se yeasts in the foodstuffs of cows significantly increases the Se content and the percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in milk compared to the addition of sodium selenite. The enzyme 5-iodothyronine deiodinase is a seleno-dependent selenoprotein. It is one of the last proteins to be affected in the event of Se deficiency. This delay in response could explain the fact that several studies did not show the effect of Se supplementation on growth and weight gain of calves. Enrichment of Se in the diet did not significantly affect the slaughter weight and carcass yield of bulls. The impact and results of Se supplementation in cattle depend on physiological stage, Se status of animals, type and content of Se and types of Se administration. Further studies in Se supplementation should investigate the speciation of Se in food and yeasts, as well as understanding their metabolism and absorption. This constitute a path to exploit in order to explain certain different effects of Se.

  19. Selenium in Oncology: From Chemistry to Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Micke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a constituent of the small group of selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins and elicits important structural and enzymatic functions. Selenium deficiency has been linked to increased infection risk and adverse mood states. It has been shown to possess cancer-preventive and cytoprotective activities in both animal models and humans. It is well established that Se has a key role in redox regulation and antioxidant function, and hence in membrane integrity, energy metabolism and protection against DNA damage. Recent clinical trials have shown the importance of selenium in clinical oncology. Our own clinical study involving 48 patients suggest that selenium has a positive effect on radiation-associated secondary lymphedema in patients with limb edemas, as well as in the head and neck region, including endolaryngeal edema. Another randomized phase III study of our group was performed to examine the cytoprotective properties of selenium in radiation oncology. The aim was to evaluate whether sodium selenite is able to compensate a preexisting selenium deficiency and to prevent radiation induced diarrhea in adjuvant radiotherapy for pelvic gynecologic malignancies. Through this study, the significant benefits of sodium selenite supplementation with regards to selenium deficiency and radiotherapy induced diarrhea in patients with cervical and uterine cancer has been shown for the first time in a prospective randomized trial. Survival data imply that supplementation with

  20. Selenium in oncology: from chemistry to clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micke, Oliver; Schomburg, Lutz; Buentzel, Jens; Kisters, Klaus; Muecke, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a constituent of the small group of selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins and elicits important structural and enzymatic functions. Selenium deficiency has been linked to increased infection risk and adverse mood states. It has been shown to possess cancer-preventive and cytoprotective activities in both animal models and humans. It is well established that Se has a key role in redox regulation and antioxidant function, and hence in membrane integrity, energy metabolism and protection against DNA damage. Recent clinical trials have shown the importance of selenium in clinical oncology. Our own clinical study involving 48 patients suggest that selenium has a positive effect on radiation-associated secondary lymphedema in patients with limb edemas, as well as in the head and neck region, including endolaryngeal edema. Another randomized phase III study of our group was performed to examine the cytoprotective properties of selenium in radiation oncology. The aim was to evaluate whether sodium selenite is able to compensate a preexisting selenium deficiency and to prevent radiation induced diarrhea in adjuvant radiotherapy for pelvic gynecologic malignancies. Through this study, the significant benefits of sodium selenite supplementation with regards to selenium deficiency and radiotherapy induced diarrhea in patients with cervical and uterine cancer has been shown for the first time in a prospective randomized trial. Survival data imply that supplementation with selenium does not

  1. Amorphous silicon thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon glass resistance thermometers (CGRT) shows an unstable drift by heat cycles. Since we were looking for a more stable element of thermometer for cryogenic and high magnetic field environments, we selected amorphous silicon as a substitute for CGRT. The resistance of many amorphous samples were measured at 4K, at 77K, and 300K. We eventually found an amorphous silicon (Si-H) alloy whose the sensitivity below 77K was comparable to that of the germanium resistance thermometer with little magnetic field influence. (author)

  2. Revised reference values for selenium intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, A P; Strohm, D; Brigelius-Flohé, R; Schomburg, L; Bechthold, A; Leschik-Bonnet, E; Heseker, H

    2015-10-01

    The German, Austrian and Swiss nutrition societies are the joint editors of the 'reference values for nutrient intake'. They have revised the reference values for the intake of selenium and published them in February 2015. The saturation of selenoprotein P (SePP) in plasma is used as a criterion for the derivation of reference values for selenium intake in adults. For persons from selenium-deficient regions (China) SePP saturation was achieved with a daily intake of 49μg of selenium. When using the reference body weights the D-A-CH reference values are based upon, the resulting estimated value for selenium intake is 70μg/day for men and 60μg/day for women. The estimated value for selenium intake for children and adolescents is extrapolated using the estimated value for adults in relation to body weight. For infants aged 0 to under 4 months the estimated value of 10μg/day was derived from the basis of selenium intake via breast milk. For infants aged 4 to under 12 months this estimated value was used and taking into account the differences regarding body weight an estimated value of 15μg/day was derived. For lactating women compared to non-lactating women a higher reference value of 75μg/day is indicated due to the release of selenium with breast milk. The additional selenium requirement for pregnant women is negligible, so that no increased reference value is indicated. PMID:26302929

  3. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT)

    OpenAIRE

    Nicastro, Holly L.; Dunn, Barbara K

    2013-01-01

    The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was ...

  4. Nuclear transformations studies in selenium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compilation is made with regard to the chemical effects produced by nuclear transformations, such as the chemical effects of the beta decay and the chemical effects of the reaction (n,γ) in selenium radioisotopes. As a particular case the chemical effect of the isomeric transition of sup(81m)Se(VI) in potassium selenate crystals marked with radioactive selenium is studied experimentally and the method of adsorption in activated carbon is applied for the analytical separation of the traces of the nuclear isomer tetravalent sup(81b)Se(IV) of one fraction which contains the mixture of the selenium radioisotopes. (author)

  5. Incorporation of selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) on uranyl peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) on uranium peroxide has been studied considering the sorption kinetics, the sorption isotherms and the effect of pH. Selenium sorption on studtite is fitted with a pseudosecond order reaction model; in addition, two different mechanisms seem to influence the sorption process: micropore diffusion and intra-particle diffusion. Both selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) are sorbed on studtite through a monolayer coverage. Sorption is higher at acidic pH than at alkaline pH. This behaviour is consistent with the chemical speciation of selenium in solution and with the acid-base properties of the solid. (author)

  6. Encapsulation of selenium in chitosan nanoparticles improves selenium availability and protects cells from selenium-induced DNA damage response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium, an essential mineral, plays important roles in optimizing human health. Chitosan is an effective, naturally oriented material for synthesizing nanoparticles with polyanions and exhibit preferable properties such as biocompatibility, biodegradation and resistance to certain enzymes. We have...

  7. Selenium: environmental significance, pollution, and biological treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lea Chua; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element needed for all living organisms. Despite its essentiality, selenium is a potential toxic element to natural ecosystems due to its bioaccumulation potential. Though selenium is found naturally in the earth's crust, especially in carbonate rocks and volcanic and sedimentary soils, about 40% of the selenium emissions to atmospheric and aquatic environments are caused by various industrial activities such as mining-related operations. In recent years, advances in water quality and pollution monitoring have shown that selenium is a contaminant of potential environmental concern. This has practical implications on industry to achieve the stringent selenium regulatory discharge limit of 5μgSeL(-1) for selenium containing wastewaters set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Over the last few decades, various technologies have been developed for the treatment of selenium-containing wastewaters. Biological selenium reduction has emerged as the leading technology for removing selenium from wastewaters since it offers a cheaper alternative compared to physico-chemical treatments and is suitable for treating dilute and variable selenium-laden wastewaters. Moreover, biological treatment has the advantage of forming elemental selenium nanospheres which exhibit unique optical and spectral properties for various industrial applications, i.e. medical, electrical, and manufacturing processes. However, despite the advances in biotechnology employing selenium reduction, there are still several challenges, particularly in achieving stringent discharge limits, the long-term stability of biogenic selenium and predicting the fate of bioreduced selenium in the environment. This review highlights the significance of selenium in the environment, health, and industry and biotechnological advances made in the treatment of selenium contaminated wastewaters. The challenges and future perspectives are overviewed considering recent

  8. Selenium status of idiopathic infertile Nigerian males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Arowojolu, A O; Shittu, O B; Adejuwon, C A; Osotimehin, Babatunde

    2005-04-01

    Selenium concentration in the sera and seminal plasma of 60 infertile males (40 oligospermia and 20 azoospermia) and 40 males with proven evidence of fertility (normospermia; control group) were estimated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results were correlated with spermatogram and hormonal levels in order to determine their relationship and significance in male infertility. The mean serum concentrations of selenium was found to be significantly increased in oligospermic compared to azoospermic subjects and controls (p physiological balance in the distribution of selenium in serum and seminal plasma compartment of control males. A disturbance in this balance has a significant influence on spermatogenesis. Selenium appears to have a positive influence on Leydig cells, thus influencing the secretion of testosterone. PMID:15851828

  9. Selenium supplementation induces mitochondrial biogenesis in trophoblasts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khera, A.; Dong, L. F.; Holland, O.; Vanderlelie, J.; Pasdar, E.A.; Neužil, Jiří; Perkins, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 8 (2015), s. 363-369. ISSN 0143-4004 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Selenium * Reactive oxygen species * Mitochondrial biogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.710, year: 2014

  10. Reproductive impacts of elevated selenium levels

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this study were to: 1. Evaluate selenium levels in Neotropical migrants and riparian obligate birds on Imperial National Wildlife Refuge. 2....

  11. Biofortification and phytoremediation of selenium in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofortification is an agricultural process that increases the uptake and accumulation of specific nutrients, e.g. selenium (Se), in agricultural food products through plant breeding, genetic engineering, and manipulation of agronomic practices. The development and uses of biofortified agricultural ...

  12. Selenium supplementation for patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism (the GRASS trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Cramon, Per; Bjorner, Jakob Bue;

    2013-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is an autoimmune disease causing hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. The concentration of selenium is high in the thyroid gland and two important groups of enzymes within the thyroid are selenoproteins, that is, they depend on selenium. Selenium may have beneficial effects...... on autoimmune hypothyroidism and on Graves' orbitopathy, but the effects of selenium on Graves' hyperthyroidism is unknown.We hypothesize that adjuvant selenium may be beneficial in the treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The objective is to investigate if selenium supplementation plus standard...

  13. Selenium and functional constipation in children

    OpenAIRE

    Marlina Tanjung; Supriatmo Supriatmo; Melda Deliana; Ade Rachmat Yudiyanto; Atan Baas Sinuhaji

    2016-01-01

    Background Constipation is a common problem in children, with approximately 90 to 95% of constipation cases having functional constipation. Oxidative stress may be a causative factor in gastrointestinal diseases, alleved by intervention with antioxidants. Selenium is an essential trace element and acts as a cofactor of gluthathione peroxidase, which protects membranes from oxidative damage.Objective To determine the effect of selenium on functional constipation in children.Methods We conducte...

  14. The role of selenium in predicting preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Ghaemi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preeclampsia is a common disorder that is a leading cause of perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality; however its specific etiology has still remained obscure.The first step in preventing preeclampsia is early detection of women at risk. Since there is no valid and reliable screening test, appropriate diagnostic and screening tests are necessary, which are inexpensive, non-invasive and beneficial for pregnant women. Therefore, regarding the role of selenium as an antioxidant in the prevention preeclampsia, this study was designed which aimed to determine the prognostic value of plasma selenium levels in the diagnosis of preeclampsia in primigravida women Methods: In a nested case control design, a sample of 650 normal primigravida women of 24-28 weeks participated in the study. Subjects who involved the case group were followed up for 3 months and 38 were affected by preeclampsia. Blood samples were obtained from these 38patients as well as from 38 subjects as their matched controls. Moreover, the amount of selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: The mean level of selenium in blood plasma of the cases was significantly lower than in their matched controls. The present study findings revealed that pregnant women with serum Se < 66.1 μg/L had a significantly increased risk of preeclampsia. Conclusion: Lower plasma selenium level in women destines to suffering from preeclampsia which confirms the destructive effect of selenium deficiency as an antioxidant in etiopathology of preeclampsia. Measurement of plasma selenium can improve the prediction of preeclampsia; thus, it seems that plasma selenium level test owns an acceptable sensitivity and specificity for predicting preeclampsia.

  15. Selenium in Gluten-free Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicka, Iga; Krawczyk, Magdalena; Stanisz, Ewa; Gliszczyńska-Świgło, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The nutritional value of gluten-free products is the subject of interest for food technologists and nutritionists, as the only effective treatment for celiac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet. As selenium deficiencies in celiac disease are observed, the aim of the study was to determine the selenium content in 27 grain gluten-free products available on the European Union (EU) market. Moreover, selenium content in products based on popular gluten-free cereals like corn, rice, and buckwheat and in relatively new or less popular products based on oat, amaranth, teff, and quinoa was compared. Selenium content in the tested products ranged from 0.9 to 24.5 μg/100 g. The average content of selenium in products based on popular gluten-free cereals was 2.8 μg/100 g and in products based on oat, amaranth, teff, and quinoa was 10.8 μg/100 g. It indicates that products based on less popular grains, especially on oat, should be more frequently chosen as a source of selenium by people on gluten-free diet than traditionally consumed gluten-free grains. PMID:25690718

  16. Self-aligned top-gate amorphous indium zinc oxide thin-film transistors exceeding low-temperature poly-Si transistor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Chul; Lee, Ho-Nyeon; Im, Seongil

    2013-08-14

    Thin-film transistor (TFT) is a key component of active-matrix flat-panel displays (AMFPDs). These days, the low-temperature poly silicon (LTPS) TFTs are to match with advanced AMFPDs such as the active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) display, because of their high mobility for fast pixel switching. However, the manufacturing process of LTPS TFT is quite complicated, costly, and scale-limited. Amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) TFT technology is another candidate, which is as simple as that of conventioanl amorphous (a)-Si TFTs in fabrication but provides much superior device performances to those of a-Si TFTs. Hence, various AOSs have been compared with LTPS for active channel layer of the advanced TFTs, but have always been found to be relatively inferior to LTPS. In the present work, we clear the persistent inferiority, innovating the device performaces of a-IZO TFT by adopting a self-aligned coplanar top-gate structure and modifying the surface of a-IZO material. Herein, we demonstrate a high-performance simple-processed a-IZO TFT with mobility of ∼157 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), SS of ∼190 mV dec(-1), and good bias/photostabilities, which overall surpass the performances of high-cost LTPS TFTs. PMID:23823486

  17. SPECIATION OF SELENIUM COMPOUNDS FROM HIGH SELENIUM BROCCOLI IS AFFECTED BY THE EXTRACTING SOLUTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The speciation of selenium compounds from high selenium broccoli (876 ¿g/g) depends on the extraction conditions. Twenty-seven extraction conditions were explored involving nine different buffering systems between pH 1 and pH 9. In non-buffered extractions of broccoli, more than 40% of the spiked ...

  18. Determination of the content of selenium in selenium yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The auther succeeded in cultivating brewers yeast, saccharomyces cerevisia, containing various concentrations of sodium selenite in glucose-glycine-yeast (GGY) extract medium. The content of selenium in selenium yeast was determined by NAA. The results indicate that this method is accurate and needs less time than other methods

  19. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200–500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation

  20. Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dietary Guidelines for Americans . Foods contain vitamins , minerals , dietary fiber and other substances that benefit health. In some cases, fortified foods and dietary supplements may provide nutrients that otherwise may be ...

  1. Fabrication of amorphous InGaZnO thin-film transistor-driven flexible thermal and pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we present the results concerning the use of amorphous indium–gallium–zinc–oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistor (TFT) as a driving transistor of the flexible thermal and pressure sensors which are applicable to artificial skin systems. Although the a-IGZO TFT has been attracting much attention as a driving transistor of the next-generation flat panel displays, no study has been performed about the application of this new device to the driving transistor of the flexible sensors yet. The proposed thermal sensor pixel is composed of the series-connected a-IGZO TFT and ZnO-based thermistor fabricated on a polished metal foil, and the ZnO-based thermistor is replaced by the pressure sensitive rubber in the pressure sensor pixel. In both sensor pixels, the a-IGZO TFT acts as the driving transistor and the temperature/pressure-dependent resistance of the ZnO-based thermistor/pressure-sensitive rubber mainly determines the magnitude of the output currents. The fabricated a-IGZO TFT-driven flexible thermal sensor shows around a seven times increase in the output current as the temperature increases from 20 °C to 100 °C, and the a-IGZO TFT-driven flexible pressure sensors also exhibit high sensitivity under various pressure environments. (paper)

  2. Amorphous silicon thin film transistor active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays fabricated on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jonathan A.

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays are of immense interest because they have several advantages over liquid crystal displays, the current dominant flat panel display technology. OLED displays are emissive and therefore are brighter, have a larger viewing angle, and do not require backlights and filters, allowing thinner, lighter, and more power efficient displays. The goal of this work was to advance the state-of-the-art in active-matrix OLED display technology. First, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were designed and fabricated on glass substrates. The devices operated at low voltages and demonstrated that lower performance TFTs could be utilized in active-matrix OLED displays, possibly allowing lower cost processing and the use of polymeric substrates. Attempts at designing more control into the display at the pixel level were also made. Bistable (one bit gray scale) active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were designed and fabricated. Such pixels could be used in novel applications and eventually help reduce the bandwidth requirements in high-resolution and large-area displays. Finally, a-Si:H TFT active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were fabricated on a polymeric substrate. Displays fabricated on a polymeric substrates would be lightweight; flexible, more rugged, and potentially less expensive to fabricate. Many of the difficulties associated with fabricating active-matrix backplanes on flexible substrates were studied and addressed.

  3. New challenge in the speciation of selenium. Measurement and production on nano selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. We have found that several species of probiotic bacteria also used in food industry for making yogurts is capable of producing spherical elemental selenium nanospheres having an average diameter in the range of 50-500 nm when 1-1000 mg/L selenium was added to the medium in the form of selenite ions. Elemental selenium produced thereby has a high degree of purity, is spherical, and its size and crystalline form depends on the bacterium species applied. We have found that some species of the probiotic yogurt bacteria (e.g. Bifidobacterium bifidum or Bifidobacterium longum) are capable of producing the grey crystalline form of elemental selenium which is so far unprecedented in the art for any bacteria capable of producing elemental selenium nanoparticles. Our finding, therefore, enables the first time the development of economical industrial bacterial fermentation based processes for the production of a high quality elemental selenium material comprising uniformly sized grey or red nanospheres having an average diameter in the range of 50-500 nm. The size and the crystalline form of the produced nanosized (50-500 nm) spherical particles is defined by the selected microorganism. This genetic pre-determination result in reproducible production of a material having individual characteristics which can be used in numerous fields of industry and research. The produced nano selenium could be a good raw material for a production of certified reference materials. The measurement of the produced elemental nanoselenium is a new challenge for the speciation analysis. A sample preparation and measurement method was developed and investigated for the analysis of different selenium forms by HPLC-AFS system. The atomic fluorescence (AFS) was a reliable and simple detection method for the elemental nano selenium. The elemental selenium can produce hydride in the system or can be converted to selenite with HCl/H2O2 digestion.

  4. Selenium bioavailability from naturally produced high-selenium peas and oats in selenium-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Johnson, LuAnn K

    2011-06-01

    This study determined the bioavailability of selenium (Se) from yellow peas and oats harvested from the high-Se soil of South Dakota, United States. The Se concentrations were 13.5 ± 0.2 and 2.5 ± 0.1 mg/kg (dry weight) for peas and oats, respectively. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were depleted of Se by feeding them a 30% Torula yeast-based diet (4.1 μg Se/kg) for 56 days, and then they were replenished with Se for an additional 50 days by feeding them the same diet supplemented with 20, 30, or 40 μg Se/kg from peas or oats, respectively. Selenium bioavailability was determined on the basis of the restoration of Se-dependent enzyme activities and tissue Se concentrations in Se-depleted rats, comparing those responses for yellow peas and oats to those for l-selenomethionine (SeMet; used as a reference) by using a slope-ratio method. Dietary supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in glutathione peroxidase activities in blood and liver and in thioredoxin reductase activity in liver. Supplementation with peas or oats resulted in linear or log-linear, dose-dependent increases in Se concentrations of plasma, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and kidneys. The overall bioavailability was approximately 88% for Se from yellow peas and 92% from oats, compared to SeMet. It was concluded that Se from naturally produced high-Se yellow peas or oats is highly bioavailable in this model and that these high-Se foods may be a good dietary source of Se. PMID:21553810

  5. Electrochemical behavior of chemically synthesized selenium thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, A M; Kumbhar, V S; Chodankar, N R; Lokhande, A C; Lokhande, C D

    2016-05-01

    The facile and low cost simple chemical bath deposition (CBD) method is employed to synthesize red colored selenium thin films. These selenium films are characterized for structural, morphological, topographical and wettability studies. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed the crystalline nature of selenium thin film with hexagonal crystal structure. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study displays selenium nanoparticles ranging from 20 to 475nm. A specific surface area of 30.5m(2)g(-1) is observed for selenium nanoparticles. The selenium nanoparticles hold mesopores in the range of 1.39nm, taking benefits of the good physicochemical stability and excellent porosity. Subsequently, the electrochemical properties of selenium thin films are deliberated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The selenium thin film shows specific capacitance (Cs) of 21.98Fg(-1) with 91% electrochemical stability. PMID:26896773

  6. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Marrs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  7. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Michael A; Raupp, Gregory B

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm² and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  8. Dietary guidance of selenium supplementation for incipient idiopathic scoliotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-li GUO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The study found that there was a correlation between trace element Se and idiopathic scoliosis, and selenium deficiency was probably one of the precipitating factor. According to Chinese dietary reference intakes and selenium content in different food, the plan for filling selenium is conducted, the dietary guidance of filing selenium for incipient idiopathic scoliotic patients is provided, and the disease development is observed so that the basis for etiology and prevention of idiopathic scoliosis can be provided.

  9. NAIL KERATIN AS MONITOR-TISSUE FOR SELENIUM EXPOSURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNOORD, PAH; MAAS, MJ; DEBRUIN, M

    1992-01-01

    Nail clippings might provide a way to monitor exposure to selenium in the recent past of an individual, since a clipping collected from a toe would reflect exposures months before actual clipping date. The relation between levels of exogenous selenium exposure and selenium levels in nail keratin was

  10. EURRECA—Estimating Selenium Requirements for Deriving Dietary Reference Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurst, R.; Collings, R.; Harvey, L.J.; King, M.; Hooper, L.; Bouwman, J.; Gurinovic, M.; Fairweather-Tait, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Current reference values for selenium, an essential micronutrient, are based on the intake of selenium that is required to achieve maximal glutathione peroxidase activity in plasma or erythrocytes. In order to assess the evidence of relevance to setting dietary reference values for selenium, the EUR

  11. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Germano B. O. N. Freitas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Data sources: Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO. Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. Data synthesis: The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition. The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Conclusions: Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity.

  12. Selenistasis: Epistatic Effects of Selenium on Cardiovascular Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Loscalzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although selenium metabolism is intricately linked to cardiovascular biology and function, and deficiency of selenium is associated with cardiac pathology, utilization of selenium in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease remains an elusive goal. From a reductionist standpoint, the major function of selenium in vivo is antioxidant defense via its incorporation as selenocysteine into enzyme families such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases. In addition, selenium compounds are heterogeneous and have complex metabolic fates resulting in effects that are not entirely dependent on selenoprotein expression. This complex biology of selenium in vivo may underlie the fact that beneficial effects of selenium supplementation demonstrated in preclinical studies using models of oxidant stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction, have not been consistently observed in clinical trials. In fact, recent studies have yielded data that suggest that unselective supplementation of selenium may, indeed, be harmful. Interesting biologic actions of selenium are its simultaneous effects on redox balance and methylation status, a combination that may influence gene expression. These combined actions may explain some of the biphasic effects seen with low and high doses of selenium, the potentially harmful effects seen in normal individuals, and the beneficial effects noted in preclinical studies of disease. Given the complexity of selenium biology, systems biology approaches may be necessary to reach the goal of optimization of selenium status to promote health and prevent disease.

  13. Bio-induced solid selenium for recovery from water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium in the form of selenate or selenite in wastewater needs to be removed due to its potential toxicity in the environment. Also, selenium is a valuable element that is used in several industries and current selenium resources are likely to be exhausted in less than 50 years. Waste streams cont

  14. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly L. Nicastro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was surprising given the strong preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting chemopreventive activity of selenium. Potential explanations for the null findings include the agent formulation and dose, the characteristics of the cohort, and the study design. It is likely that only specific subpopulations may benefit from selenium supplementation; therefore, future studies should consider the baseline selenium status of the participants, age of the cohort, and genotype of specific selenoproteins, among other characteristics, in order to determine the activity of selenium in cancer prevention.

  15. Speciation of selenium dietary supplements; formation of S-(methylseleno)cysteine and other selenium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speciation of selenium is of interest because it is both essential and toxic to humans, depending on the species and the amount ingested. Following indications that selenium supplementation could reduce the incidence of some cancers, selenium-enriched yeast and other materials have been commercialized as supplements. Most dramatically however, the SELECT trial that utilized L-selenomethionine as the active supplement was terminated in 2008 and there is much debate regarding both the planning and the results of efficacy studies. Further, since dietary supplements are not regulated as pharmaceuticals, there are concerns about the quality, storage conditions, stability and selenium content in selenium supplements. Enzymatic hydrolysis enabled selenium speciation profiles to be obtained by high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and following derivatization gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED). Coated fiber solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used to extract volatile selenium species for determination by GC-AED and GC-MS. Similar speciation patterns were observed between yeast-based supplements subject to extended storage and those heated briefly at elevated temperatures. All the yeast-based supplements and one yeast-free supplement formed S-(methylseleno)cysteine on heating. Evidence was obtained in support of the hypotheses that S-(methylseleno)cysteine is formed from a reaction between dimethyldiselenide and cysteine or cystine.

  16. Speciation of selenium dietary supplements; formation of S-(methylseleno)cysteine and other selenium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoako, Prince O. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States); Uden, Peter C., E-mail: pcuden@chem.umass.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States); Tyson, Julian F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States)

    2009-10-12

    Speciation of selenium is of interest because it is both essential and toxic to humans, depending on the species and the amount ingested. Following indications that selenium supplementation could reduce the incidence of some cancers, selenium-enriched yeast and other materials have been commercialized as supplements. Most dramatically however, the SELECT trial that utilized L-selenomethionine as the active supplement was terminated in 2008 and there is much debate regarding both the planning and the results of efficacy studies. Further, since dietary supplements are not regulated as pharmaceuticals, there are concerns about the quality, storage conditions, stability and selenium content in selenium supplements. Enzymatic hydrolysis enabled selenium speciation profiles to be obtained by high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and following derivatization gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED). Coated fiber solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used to extract volatile selenium species for determination by GC-AED and GC-MS. Similar speciation patterns were observed between yeast-based supplements subject to extended storage and those heated briefly at elevated temperatures. All the yeast-based supplements and one yeast-free supplement formed S-(methylseleno)cysteine on heating. Evidence was obtained in support of the hypotheses that S-(methylseleno)cysteine is formed from a reaction between dimethyldiselenide and cysteine or cystine.

  17. Selenium speciation using HPLC-ICP-MS in selenium-enriched duckweed (Lemna minor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The HPLC-ICP-MS for speciation analysis of selenium was developed and applied to selenium enriched duckweed (Lemna minor). The duckweed in Hoagland's E-medium containing Se from sodium selenate in the concentration of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mg/L was cultured. The effect of selenium supplemented concentration and cultured periods (0-8 days) were studied. The results revealed that the optimum concentration of supplemented Se and cultured period were 10 mg/L and 6 days, respectively. The Se-enriched duckweed samples (whole plant) were dried and homogenized. The 0.1 M HCl in 10% methanol extracts were analyzed. Selenium speciation was carried out by ion-pairing HPLC (2.5 mM sodium 1-butanesulfonate, 8 mM tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide and trifluoro acetic acid at pH 4.5). The organic selenium species found in the extract was selenomethylcysteine, selenomethionine and others unknown species. The percentage contributions of selenium in both species of the total selenium were 0.6 and 1.0%, respectively. It can be seen that Se-enriched duckweed can feasibility be a dietary source of Se. The authors would like to thank Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry (PERCH-CIC), Commission on Higher Education, Ministry of Education for financial support.

  18. Selenium balance in the adult cat in relation to intake of dietary sodium selenite and organically bound selenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todd, S.E.; Thomas, D.G.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    The response of cats to dietary sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) and organically bound selenium was studied in two separate studies with four cats per treatment and three levels of selenium supplementation (targets 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 µg/g DM) for each Se source. Whole blood and plasma selenium concentrations

  19. XAFS of supercritical fluid selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transition from liquid to vapor phase via supercritical state is investigated for fluid slenium using XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) from the point of view of structural change as well as changes in electric conductivity and optical properties. XAFS measurements were done at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in the pressure range up to 600 bar and temperature range up to 1700degC using a sapphire chamber. The results indicated that fluid selenium at the density of 1.3-1.4 g/cm3 showing XAFS spectrum characteristic of two atomic molecules changed at the density of 2 g/cm3 into that of long chain molecules. Simultaneously, change in the electric properties occurred to become metallic which was accompanied by local structural change evidenced from XAFS spectroscopy. Atomic rearrangement processes of metal to insulator transition at near supercritical density are discussed. Further progress will be made since experimental measurements are now available up to the pressure of 2000 bar at Spring-8 facility. In addition, small angle X-ray scattering data are to be made available in a beam line BLO4B2 of the facility. (S.Ohno)

  20. Impact of Selenium Supplementation on Growth and Selenium Accumulation on Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Azadeh SAFFARYAZDI; Mehrdad LAHOUTI; Ali GANJEALI; Hassan BAYAT

    2012-01-01

    Selenium (Se) has been proved to be an essential element for humans and animals. However, less is known about its effects on plants. A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of selenium on growth, selenium accumulation and some physiological characteristics of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. �Missouri�) plants. Plants were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution amended with sodium selenite at 0 (control), 1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mg.L-1 for 28 days. Growth parameters like sh...

  1. Selenium supplementation for critically ill adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Afshari, Arash

    2015-01-01

    originally published in 2004 updated in 2007 and again 2015. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to examine the effect of nutrition supplemented with selenium or ebselen on mortality in critically ill patients.The secondary objective was to examine the relationship between selenium or ebselen...... supplementation and number of infections, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay and length of hospital stay. SEARCH METHODS: In this update, we searched the current issue of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 5); MEDLINE (Ovid SP...... sequential analysis. MAIN RESULTS: We included six new RCTs in this review update. In total we included 16 RCTs (2084 participants) in this review. Most trials were at high risk of bias. The availability of outcome data was limited and trials involving selenium supplementation were, with the exception of one...

  2. Comparison of the electrical and optical properties of direct current and radio frequency sputtered amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical and optical properties of direct current and radio frequency (RF) sputtered amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) films are compared. It is found that the RF sputtered a-IGZO films have better stoichiometry (In:Ga:Zn:O = 1:1:1:2.5–3.0), lower electrical conductivity (σ < 8 S/cm), higher refractive index (n = 1.9–2.0) and larger band gap (Eg = 3.02–3.29 eV), and show less shift of Fermi level (△ EF ∼ 0.26 eV) and increased concentration of electrons (△ Ne ∼ 104) in the conduction band with the reduction concentration of oxygen vacancy (VO). Although a-IGZO has intensively been studied for a semiconductor channel material of thin film transistors in next-generation flat panel displays, its fundamental material parameters have not been thoroughly reported. In this work, the work function (φ) of a-IGZO films is tested with the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that the φ of a-IGZO films is in the range of 4.0–5.0 eV depending on the VO. - Highlights: ► Amorphous InGaZnO4 (a-IGZO) films were prepared with different sputtering modes. ► Electrical and optical properties of the different films were compared. ► Fermi level (△EF) shift in a-IGZO films were tested by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. ► The relation of △EF with the properties of a-IGZO films were discussed. ► Work function was tested by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

  3. Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of selenium following oral administration of elemental selenium nanoparticles or selenite in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Hansen, Marianne;

    2014-01-01

    A suspension of nanoparticles of BSA-stabilized red amorphous elemental selenium (Se) or an aqueous solution of sodium selenite was repeatedly administered by oral gavage for 28 days at 0.05 mg/kg bw/day (low dose) or at 0.5 mg/kg bw/day (high dose) as Se to female rats. Prior to administration......, the size distribution of the Se nanoparticles was characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy, which showed that the particles’ mean diameter was 19 nm and ranged in size from 10-80 nm. Following administration of the high dose of Se nanoparticles or selenite the...... concentration of Se was determined by ICP-MS in liver, kidney, urine, feces, stomach, lungs, plasma at µg/g level and in brain and muscle tissue at sub-µg/g level. In order to test if any elemental Se was present in liver, kidney or feces, an in situ derivatization selective to elemental Se was made by...

  4. Selenium supplementation in radiotherapy patients: do we need to measure selenium levels in serum or blood regularly prior radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the review by Puspitasari and colleagues, an additional discussion of the endpoints of the Se supplementation studies described would be helpful. In our view, selenium can safely be given to selenium-deficient cancer patients prior to and during radiotherapy. Therefore, in order to help the radiation oncologist in decision making, we strongly advocate to determine the selenium status prior to and during a potential adjuvant selenium supplementation, e.g. when trying to ease the side-effects of radiation treatment or in the aftercare situation when the selenium status may become insufficient

  5. Selenium content in tissues and meat quality in rabbits fed selenium yeast

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dokoupilová, A.; Marounek, Milan; Skřivanová, V.; Březina, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2007), s. 165-169. ISSN 1212-1819 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : rabbits * selenium * meat Subject RIV: GH - Livestock Nutrition Impact factor: 0.633, year: 2007

  6. Bij geiten selenium meestal (te) hoog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, E.A.A.; Eekeren, van N.J.M.; Govaerts, W.

    2010-01-01

    In het project Biogeit zijn op 13 biologische geitenbedrijven bloedmonsters onderzocht op GSH-Px als maat voor de seleniumvoorziening. Een deel van de monsters werd genomen na het toedienen van een mineralenbolus met selenium aan drachtige geiten. De bloedwaarden bij geiten zijn hoog, soms te hoog.

  7. Normal mode calculations of trigonal selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; McMurry, H. L.

    1980-01-01

    The phonon dispersion relations for trigonal selenium have been calculated on the basis of a short range potential field model. Electrostatic long range forces have not been included. The force field is defined in terms of symmetrized coordinates which reflect partly the symmetry of the space group...

  8. 21 CFR 573.920 - Selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... reproduction of livestock and poultry; and (5) the manufacture and use of selenium at such levels cannot... follows: (1) In complete feed for chickens, swine, turkeys, sheep, cattle, and ducks at a level not to... not to exceed an intake of 0.7 milligram per head per day. (ii) Beef cattle: At a level not to...

  9. Genetic Determinants of Responses to Selenium Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a cohort of healthy adults (106 M, 155 W) in eastern North Dakota, we determined the relationships of five biomarkers of selenium (Se) status (plasma Se, serum selenoprotein P [SePP], plasma glutathione peroxidase [GPX3] activity, buccal cell Se, urine Se) to genotype for four selenoproteins (cyt...

  10. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  11. Amorphous silicon based particle detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N; Franco, A; Riesen, Y.; Despeisse, M; S. Dunand; Powolny, F; Jarron, P.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation hard monolithic particle sensors can be fabricated by a vertical integration of amorphous silicon particle sensors on top of CMOS readout chip. Two types of such particle sensors are presented here using either thick diodes or microchannel plates. The first type based on amorphous silicon diodes exhibits high spatial resolution due to the short lateral carrier collection. Combination of an amorphous silicon thick diode with microstrip detector geometries permits to achieve micromete...

  12. Species and distribution of inorganic selenium in the Bohai Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    For studying geochemical behavior of selenium, a marine investigation was conducted in September 1998 cruise in the Bohai Sea. Horizontal and vertical distributions of inorganic selenium and selenite were studied. The inorganic selenium varied from 0.73 to 2.41 nmol/L, with an average of 1.31 nmol/L; while selenite varied from 0.18 to 0.72 nmol/L with an average of 0.47 nmol/L. The average ratio of selenite to selenate was 0.68, and selenate was the predominant species of inorganic selenium in the most study area. Concentrations of inorganic selenium and selenite decreased with distance from the coast. No apparent variations of the concentration between surface and bottom was shown. There were two water masses in the area, one from the Huanghe (Yellow) River and other from the Yellow Sea. Of the two,Huanghe River was the major source of inorganic selenium.

  13. Selenium Recycling in the United States in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Micheal W.; Wagner, Lorie A.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of selenium consumption in the United States is in dissipative uses, such as alloys, animal feeds, fertilizers, glass decolorizer, and pigments. The nondissipative use as a photoreceptor for xerographic copiers is declining. As a result of a lack of a substantial supply of selenium-containing scrap, there are no longer selenium recycling facilities in the United States. Selenium-containing materials collected for recycling, primarily selenium-containing photocopier drums, are exported for processing in other countries. Of the estimated 350 metric tons (t) of selenium products that went to the U.S. market in 2004, an estimated 300 t went to dissipative uses. An estimated 4 t was recovered from old scrap and exported for recycling.

  14. The effects of selenium on lycopersicon esculentum mill. seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was planned to contribute the views examining the physiological mechanisms of selenium-induced growth reductions with regard to selenium and plant nutrient interactions. Growth inhibition in the seedlings and the changes in nutrient compositions of epidermal cells with administration of increasing concentrations of selenium were investigated at the initial growth stage, which is the most stress-sensitive stage, of plant. The effects of selenium on Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. seedlings were investigated by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis) analysis of the regions, approximately 450 mm x 500 mm in size, with use of low-vacuum (24 Pascal) Scanning Electron Microscope, and SEM images were obtained. Increasing concentrations of selenium in the nutrient solution led to decreased cell growth particularly in the hypocotyl and roots, and to increased selenium content in the cells. The growth inhibitions were found at the selenium concentrations of 100 ppm. Development of the glandular hairs in the hypocotyl epidermal system was significantly reduced with the administration of 200 ppm of selenium. Development of the absorbing hairs in the roots was decreased in parallel with the increasing selenium concentrations in the nutrient solution; and because the development of the root is often limited to only to the development of radicula at the selenium concentrations of 500 and 1000 ppm, no absorbing hairs was found in these roots. Some macro- and micronutrient contents of radicle and hypocotyl epidermal cells were changed in response to selenium toxicity. In conclusion, 200 ppm of selenium administered in the form of SeO/sub 2/ was certainly toxic for the initial growth period of Lycopersicon esculentum cv. H-2274. (author)

  15. Synthesis and characterization of single crystalline selenium nanowire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordered selenium nanowire arrays with diameters about 40 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition using anodic porous alumina templates. As determined by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selenium nanowires have uniform diameters, which are fully controllable. Single crystalline trigonal selenium nanowires have been obtained after postannealing at 180 deg. C. These nanowires are perfect with a c-axis growth orientation. The optical absorption spectra reveal two types of electron transition activity

  16. Test Automation Selenium WebDriver using TestNG

    OpenAIRE

    Bindal, Purnima; Gupta, Sonika

    2014-01-01

    Test automation tools (softwares) are used to control the execution of tests (Application Under Test) and then comparing actual outcomes to the predicted outcomes. Examples of Test Automation tools are HP Quick Test Professional, Selenium, Test Complete, SOAP UI etc. Selenium is a suite of tools for cross-platform automated testing of web applications. It runs on many browsers and operating systems and can be controlled by many programming languages and testing frameworks. Selenium W...

  17. Selenium Poisoning of Wildlife and Western Agriculture: Cause and Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.

    2000-02-01

    This project examined the hypothesis that selenium contamination is not the principal cause of the decline of endemic fish species in the Upper Colorado Basin. Activities employed to test this hypothesis included a reconnaissance of locations altered by recent road construction, a re-interpretation of available literature regarding selenium toxicity, and the interpretation of unpublished data obtained from the Upper Colorado Basin Fish Recovery Program. The project demonstrates that most of the evidence implicating selenium is circumstantial.

  18. Distribution of Selenium in Corn and Its Relationship With Soil Selenium in Yutangba Mini—Landscape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱建明; 毛大均; 等

    2000-01-01

    Within the range of 0.01 km2 mini-landscape in Yutangba,Enshi,Hubei Province,the content of Se in corn is very high,The average Se contents in root,stem,leaf and seed of corn were estimated to be 4.36±3.27mg.kg,3.08±2.24mg/kg,9.74±7.62mg/kg,and 8.07±5.02mg/kg,respectively.The research results show that there is a significantly poistive correlation between corn selenium and soil selenium,and thus according to the distribtuion of Se in corn.Three subregions can be divided in Yutangba,The content of selenium in corn is controlled by that of soil.A little variation in selenium content in soil will lead to a considerable corresponding variation in corn.So it is deduced that the organs that contain relatively high Se in plants may be used as a sensitive selenium indicator of Se levels in the environment.

  19. Mercury and selenium levels, and selenium:mercury molar ratios of brain, muscle and other tissues in bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) from New Jersey, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn; Gochfeld, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A number of contaminants affect fish health, including mercury and selenium, and the selenium: mercury molar ratio. Recently the protective effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity have been publicized, particularly for consumption of saltwater fish. Yet the relative ameliorating effects of selenium on toxicity within fish have not been examined, nor has the molar ratio in different tissues, (i.e. brain). We examined mercury and selenium levels in brain, kidney, liver, red and white musc...

  20. DETERMINING OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF SELENIUM THIN FILMS USING THE ENVELOPE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehad M. Tashtoush

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two Selenium thin films were deposited on glass substrates using thermal evaporation technique. The optical constants (refractive index, absorption coefficient and extinction coefficient and energy gap were calculated using the Transmittance (T spectrums of the films in the spectral range of 500-900 nm. The envelope method was used to determine optical constants. The calculated refractive index was found to be in the range of 2.60 to 2.85 and the Energy gap (Eg was found to be 1.8 eV which are in agreement with other studies made using other procedures. The films were found to be amorphous according to the results obtained by XRD technique. This method can be used to have a good results for many tranparent thin films with more mathematical tools.

  1. Absorption and retention of selenium from shrimps in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugel, S. H.; Sandstrom, B.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the bioavailability of selenium in shrimps, a possible good source of selenium, by measurements of the absorption and retention of selenium and the effects on plasma selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity. Twelve healthy young subjects (9F...... commencement of the study, after 2, 4, and 6 weeks. The selenium intake increased from 39.4 +/- 15.3 mug/d to 127 +/- 5.5 mug/d with the addition of shrimps. The apparent absorption of selenium from shrimps was 83 +/- 4%, Faecal and urinary selenium excretion was 32.5 +/- 17.0 mug/d and 21.2 +/- 9.0 mug/d, re...... spectively and the total retention of selenium was 3.1 +/- 1.1 mg. Plasma selenium concentrations were 95.2 +/- 9.7 mug/L and 101.5 +/- 9.7 mug/L before and after six weeks of shrimp intake, respectively (p...

  2. Conceptual Model for Selenium Cycling in the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. P.; Conover, M. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Adams, J.

    2006-12-01

    The conceptual model for Selenium cycling in the Great Salt Lake was developed to guide investigations in support of determining an open water selenium standard for the Great Salt Lake. The motivation to determine this particular selenium standard derives from public concern for a plan to allow disposal of reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate in the GSL, which would contain elevated concentrations of major and trace elements, including selenium. The development of an open water standard for selenium requires a working knowledge of the biological significance of existing selenium concentrations in the Great Salt Lake, as well as a working understanding of the likely changes of these concentrations over time given existing and proposed loads to the system. This working knowledge" is being represented in a conceptual model that accounts for selenium in various stocks" in the system (e.g. water, sediment, biota) and the flow" of selenium between stocks (e.g., precipitation and settling, volatilization, bioconcentration). It illustrates the critical pathway of selenium in the Great Salt Lake from water, to microorganisms, to brine shrimp and brine flies, to birds, and to their eggs. It also addresses the complexity of the GSL system: a) Spatially diverse, being comprised by four distinct bays and two layers, with major differences in salinity among their waters. b) Temporally dynamic, due to seasonal and inter-annual variations in runoff. The conceptual model is presently descriptive, but will serve as the basis for a semi-quantitative model that will be fed by data accumulated during subsequent investigations.

  3. Volatile Selenium Flux in the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Volatilization of selenium has been proven to be the major source of selenium vapor from oceans and estuaries and it may be the major mechanism of permanent selenium removal from the Great Salt Lake (other than brine shrimp harvest). However, the volatilization flux of selenium from the Great Salt Lake has not been previously measured due to challenges of analysis in this hyper-saline environment. This work presents results from recent field studies examining the spatial distribution of volatile selenium (geographical and with depth) in the South Arm (main body) of the Great Salt Lake. The analyses involved collection of volatile selenium in a cryo-focusing trap system via sparging with helium. The cryo-trapped volatile selenium was digested with nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-MS. The results show concentrations of volatile selenium that are much greater than values reported for marine estuaries and oceans. Volatile selenium flux to the atmosphere was determined using mass transport equations corrected to simulate the highly saline environment of the South Arm of the Great Salt Lake.

  4. Ecological Importance of Insects in Selenium Biogenic Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Golubkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element for animal and human beings. Despite the importance of insects in most ecosystems and their significant contribution to the biological cycling of trace elements due to high abundance, population productivity, and diverse ecosystem functions, surprisingly little information is available on selenium bioaccumulation by these arthropods. This review considers selenium essentiality and toxicity to insects as well as insects’ contribution to selenium trophic transfer through the food chains. Data on Se accumulation by insects of the Dniester River Valley with no anthropogenic Se loading reveal typically low Se content in necrophagous insects compared to predators and herbivores and seasonal variations in Se accumulation.

  5. Accumulation and metabolism of selenium by yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław; Gientka, Iwona; Bzducha-Wróbel, Anna

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines the process of selenium bioaccumulation and selenium metabolism in yeast cells. Yeast cells can bind elements in ionic from the environment and permanently integrate them into their cellular structure. Up to now, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida utilis, and Yarrowia lipolytica yeasts have been used primarily in biotechnological studies to evaluate binding of minerals. Yeast cells are able to bind selenium in the form of both organic and inorganic compounds. The process of bioaccumulation of selenium by microorganisms occurs through two mechanisms: extracellular binding by ligands of membrane assembly and intracellular accumulation associated with the transport of ions across the cytoplasmic membrane into the cell interior. During intracellular metabolism of selenium, oxidation, reduction, methylation, and selenoprotein synthesis processes are involved, as exemplified by detoxification processes that allow yeasts to survive under culture conditions involving the elevated selenium concentrations which were observed. Selenium yeasts represent probably the best absorbed form of this element. In turn, in terms of wide application, the inclusion of yeast with accumulated selenium may aid in lessening selenium deficiency in a diet. PMID:26003453

  6. X-ray-responsive selenium nanoparticles for enhanced cancer chemo-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Liu, Ting; Du, Yanxin; Luo, Zuandi; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Tianfeng

    2016-03-01

    Resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy is one of the important reasons of clinical treatment failure and recurrence. Chemoradiation is an optional method to over-coming of radioresistance and chemoresistance. Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with special chemical and physical properties, has been identified as a novel nanocarrier and therapy agent with broad-spectrum anticancer activities due to generate ROS in cells. Herein, X-ray responsive selenium nanoparticles were facilely fabricated by using PEG as surface decorator and template. This nanosystem (PEG-SeNPs) demonstrated X-ray responsive property that was attributed to its amorphous characteristic. Interestingly, the nanosystem demonstrated significant radiosensitization effects with X-ray. Specifically, co-treatment of cancer cells with PEG-SeNPs and X-ray significantly and synergistically enhanced the cells growth inhibition through induction of cell apoptosis, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation and activation of caspase-3. In the cell model, we found that internalized nanoparticles could degrade upon X-ray exposure, which further confirm the X-ray responsive property of the nanoparticles. Moreover, the nanosystem could significantly induced intracellular ROS generation in a time-dependent manner, which peaked at about 40min and gradually decreased thereafter. As a results, ROS overproduction led to mitochondria fragmentation and the cell apoptosis. Taken together, this study provides a novel strategy for rational design and facile synthesis of chemo-radio therapeutic radiosensitization nanomaterials. PMID:26709976

  7. Evaluation of the nutritional quality of veal supplemented with organic selenium and its effect on selenium status of people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klára Vavrišínová

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the first stage of our research we found out a higher content of selenium in the meat of calves of experimental group (with added the organic form of selenium to the feed mixture compared to control group (fed without organic form of selenium. In the second stage of our research we focused on monitoring the impact of selenium enriched veal meat and on selenium concentration in blood serum and the selected biochemical parameters of lipid spectrum of the experimental group of volunteers. Ten people who were participating in the research were at the age range between 29 - 56 years. All the volunteers consumed veal meat enriched with organic selenium for 4 weeks. Before starting the experiment we took venous blood of the volunteers and this blood was considered as a control sample of selenium in blood serum of the experimental group. Selenium concentration in blood serum of the examined group was determined by an average of 58.31 ±5.36 mg.L.-1 and none of them reached the optimal level of selenium. Consequently, we carried out the additional blood sampling after 2 and 4 weeks of the consumption of veal meat. There was registered a slight increasing of selenium status, whereas after the finishing the consumption, we determined the average selenium concentration in blood serum of the experimental group 60.73 ±4.05 mg.L-1. The evaluation of lipid profile of the experimental group showed (after input blood sampling higher values of total cholesterol level and lower levels of HDL cholesterol. This fact shows the higher risk of starting the cardiovascular diseases. Reported research results didn't show statistically significant changes of blood lipid spectrum of the experimental group. We concluded that the consumption of supplemented veal meat can positively affect the level of selenium in our body and thereby increase it can increase the protective effect against the influence of free radicals.

  8. Improvement of Selenium Status of Pasture Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Selenium was applied to pasture crops in a field experiment (1) by foliar application of 10 g Se/ha as selenite in the spring, (2) or by 5 g Se/ha in the spring plus 5 g in early August, (3) as selenite-enriched calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) at 4 g Se/ha after each cut, and (4) as 4 g Se after...

  9. Biofortification of food chain with selenium

    OpenAIRE

    Seppänen, Mervi; Kontturi, Juha; Hartikainen, Helinä

    2010-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for humans and animals which is circulated to food chain via crop plants. Agronomic biofortification with Se is used in areas where the soil Se content is low and Se deficiency causes health problems. Brassica species are efficient in accumulation of soil Se and therefore an attractive choice of species for biofortification. Se uptake and translocation was studied in B. rapa and B. napus in field experiments applied with 0, 6 or 20 mg...

  10. Impact of Selenium Supplementation on Growth and Selenium Accumulation on Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh SAFFARYAZDI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se has been proved to be an essential element for humans and animals. However, less is known about its effects on plants. A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of selenium on growth, selenium accumulation and some physiological characteristics of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. �Missouri� plants. Plants were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution amended with sodium selenite at 0 (control, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mg.L-1 for 28 days. Growth parameters like shoot and root fresh weight, shoot and root dry weight, total dry weight, shoot and root length increased by 17, 15, 38, 19, 18 and 34 percent in response to the lowest concentration of Se (1 mg L-1, respectively over control. However, application of higher Se concentrations reduced these parameters as compared to control. Selenium up to 1 mg L-1 enhanced the levels of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b by 87 and 165 percent, respectively, while higher levels of Se exert toxic effects. Total phenolic compounds in leaves increased directly by increasing the level of Se and plants treated with 10 mg. L-1 Se had the highest values. Selenium, sodium and calcium content increased, while potassium content decreased, by increasing selenium treatments. The highest amounts of Se in shoots (3.89 mg g-1 DW and roots (4.27 mg g-1 DW were obtained for the highest concentration of Se (10 mg L-1. The present results suggested the beneficial effects of Se on spinach growth and also its contribute ion to improving the nutritional value of spinach for livestock and human nutrition.

  11. Selenium protection from cadmium and chromium poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of selenium with cadmium and chromium was studied in 168 chicken-broilers (DWCxWR) divided into four equal groups. Eight-week old control animals received an intravenous dose of /sup 115m/Cd Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group I), or 51Cr Chloride 370 KBq/Kg (Group II). The kinetics of these isotopes were studied by scintillation spectrometry (NaI/TI) carried out for whole blood, plasma, plasma proteins, urine, feces and homogenates of all organs at various time intervals. Animals in Groups III and IV received eight subcutaneous doses of sodium selenate (5ug) at 8-week intervals prior to /sup 115m/Cd or 51Cr. The kinetics of these elements were studied as in the previous two groups. It was found that selenium affected those kinetics in two ways: (a) by increasing the excretion of Cd by 11 +/- 3% (P < 0.001) and that of Cr by 7 +/- 1% (P < 0.001); and (b) by favoring redistribution of those elements, with significant (P < 0.001) reductions in liver, endocrine glands and kidney and increases (P < 0.01) in bone. The study suggests that selenium protects the animals' vital organs from environmental pollutants, such as cadmium and chromium

  12. Zinc and selenium nutritional status in vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, Maritsa Carla; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato

    2009-03-01

    A vegetarian diet may have beneficial effects on human health, however when it is not well-balanced may be deficient in some nutrients, as minerals for example. The aim of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of zinc and selenium in vegetarians in the city of São Paulo. A cross-sectional study was performed, and the inclusion criteria were age > or = 18 years, both gender, no use of food or pharmaceutical supplements. Thirty vegetarian, of both genders, mean age of 27 years and 4.5 years of vegetarianism had performed the study, and their mean BMI was 21.5. Zinc plasma concentration was 71 and 62.5 microg/dL for men and women and erythrocyte concentration was 37 microg/gHb for both genders. Selenium concentration was 73.5 and 77.3 microg/L in plasma and 51.4 and 66.9 microg/L in erythrocytes for men and women, respectively. These biochemical values show that, according to the references, selenium blood levels are adequate and zinc concentration in erythrocytes is deficient in the studied population. For this reason, vegetarians should be constantly assessed and receive nutritional support to reduce the effects of inadequate zinc status. PMID:18953504

  13. Sulfur and selenium isotope separation by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfur and selenium isotopes are used for labeled compounds and as precursors for radioisotope production; however, both limited availability and high costs are problems. A new method is needed for large-scale separation of these isotopes. Experimental distillation columns were used to measure isotopic separations for sulfur and selenium compounds. The maximum total isotope separation of 32S vs. 34S were 1.127 for H2S, 1.048 for COS, 0.838 for SF4, and 1.058 for CH3SH. Relative volatilities of 32S vs. 34S are 1.0006 for COS and 0.9976 for SF4. There is a reverse isotope effect for carbon in COS. No isotopic separation was observed for dimethyl selenide. The lower mass selenium isotopes in H2Se are more volatile. Distillation is a promising method for separating sulfur isotopes on a production scale. Existing distillation technology produced separated isotopes with an effect similar to that found for sulfur in SF4. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  14. Selenium in biology: facts and medical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhrl, J; Brigelius-Flohé, R; Böck, A; Gärtner, R; Meyer, O; Flohé, L

    2000-01-01

    Several decades after the discovery of selenium as an essential trace element in vertebrates approximately 20 eukaryotic and more than 15 prokaryotic selenoproteins containing the 21st proteinogenic amino acid, selenocysteine, have been identified, partially characterized or cloned from several species. Many of these proteins are involved in redox reactions with selenocysteine acting as an essential component of the catalytic cycle. Enzyme activities have been assigned to the glutathione peroxidase family, to the thioredoxin reductases, which were recently identified as selenoproteins, to the iodothyronine deiodinases, which metabolize thyroid hormones, and to the selenophosphate synthetase 2, which is involved in selenoprotein biosynthesis. Prokaryotic selenoproteins catalyze redox reactions and formation of selenoethers in (stress-induced) metabolism and energy production of E. coli, of the clostridial cluster XI and of other prokaryotes. Apart from the specific and complex biosynthesis of selenocysteine, selenium also reversibly binds to proteins, is incorporated into selenomethionine in bacteria, yeast and higher plants, or posttranslationally modifies a catalytically essential cysteine residue of CO dehydrogenase. Expression of individual eukaryotic selenoproteins exhibits high tissue specificity, depends on selenium availability, in some cases is regulated by hormones, and if impaired contributes to several pathological conditions. Disturbance of selenoprotein expression or function is associated with deficiency syndromes (Keshan and Kashin-Beck disease), might contribute to tumorigenesis and atherosclerosis, is altered in several bacterial and viral infections, and leads to infertility in male rodents. PMID:11076017

  15. Cytotoxicity of selenium nanoparticles in rat dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos JF

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Joseph F Ramos,1 Thomas J Webster21School of Engineering, Center of Biomedical Engineering, 2School of Engineering and Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USABackground: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a deadly nosocomial infection caused by contaminated endotracheal tubes. It has been shown that polyvinyl chloride (PVC, the endotracheal tube substrate coated with elemental selenium nanoparticles reduces bacterial adherence and proliferation on PVC by over 99%. However, it is not known if selenium nanoparticles elicit a cytotoxic effect in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects of PVC coated with selenium nanoparticles on fibroblasts, which are mammalian cells central to endotracheal tube intubation.Methods: Different concentrations of selenium nanoparticles were precipitated onto the PVC surface by reduction of selenium salts using glutathione. Characterization of PVC coated with selenium nanoparticles was done by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray, and contact angle measurements. For the cytotoxicity experiments, fibroblasts were seeded at a density of 5000 cm2 onto PVC coated with three different concentrations of selenium nanoparticles (high, medium, low and incubated for 4 hours (adhesion as well as for 24 hours and 72 hours (proliferation. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 value was determined after 72 hours using an ultrahigh concentration. MTT assays were used to assess cell viability at the indicated time points.Results: The three concentrations of selenium nanoparticles did not elicit a cytotoxic effect after 72 hours (P < 0.01, n = 3. It was found that the IC50 value was at the ultrahigh concentration of selenium nanoparticles. The nanoparticulate elemental selenium concentration previously shown to decrease the function of bacteria was shown not to cause a cytotoxic effect on fibroblasts in vitro.Conclusion: These findings demonstrate

  16. Shear amorphization of boron suboxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report for the first time the shear-induced local amorphization of boron suboxide subjected to nanoindentation. The amorphous bands have a width of ∼1–3 nm and a length of 200–300 nm along the (01¯11) crystal plane. We show direct experimental evidence that the amorphous shear bands of boron suboxide are driven from the coalescence of dislocation loops under high shear stresses. These observations provide insights into the microscopic deformation and failure of high-strength and lightweight ceramics

  17. Simulation in Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous Silicon Carbide Pin Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Dora; Fernandes, Miguel; Louro, Paula; Fantoni, Alessandro; Vieira, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Part 21: Electronics: Devices International audience Photodiodes are devices used as image sensors, reactive to polychromatic light and subsequently color detecting, and they are also used in optical communication applications. To improve these devices performance it is essential to study and control their characteristics, in fact their capacitance and spectral and transient responses. This study considers two types of diodes, an amorphous silicon pin and an amorphous silicon carbide pi...

  18. Ultrafast defect dynamics: A new approach to all optical broadband switching employing amorphous selenium thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rituraj Sharma

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Optical switches offer higher switching speeds than electronics, however, in most cases utilizing the interband transitions of the active medium for switching. As a result, the signal suffers heavy losses. In this article, we demonstrate a simple and yet efficient ultrafast broadband all-optical switching on ps timescale in the sub-bandgap region of the a-Se thin film, where the intrinsic absorption is very weak. The optical switching is attributed to short-lived transient defects that form localized states in the bandgap and possess a large electron-phonon coupling. We model these processes through first principles simulation that are in agreement with the experiments.

  19. 21 CFR 522.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or deep intramuscular injection in divided doses in 2 or more sites in the gluteal or cervical... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E injection. 522.2100 Section... § 522.2100 Selenium, vitamin E injection. (a)(1) Specifications. The drug is an emulsion containing...

  20. ESR Measurements on the Polymerization of Liquid Selenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Wolput, J.H.M.C. van; Rieter, P.C.U.

    1971-01-01

    In an earlier communication ESR measurements on de-oxygenized selenium were announced. The present paper reports on further ESR measurements on liquid de-oxygenized selenium carried out in a temperature interval 240}o{C < T < 420}o{C. The g-value of the ESR signal is found to be 2.03 +/- 0.02. The t

  1. Selenium enrichment pattern in flowering Chinese cabbage, cabbage and asparagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mo, H.Z.; Yang Zhu, Yang; Zhang, M.

    2006-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS - Within a certain range, selenium accumulation in three studied vegetables was lineally correlated with spraying concentration. However, a too high concentration caused the reduction of vegetable output and damage in quality. - Twice spraying with lower concentration of selenium was a b

  2. Importance of selenium status in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Ebner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Overactivity of the immune system may be a worthwhile therapeutic target for implementing prognostic improvements. Therefore the impact of lipopolysaccharide (LPS desensitization on survival may help in the development of novel therapies. An understanding of the pathophysiology of the trace element selenium may complement such approaches, as recent data suggest that inflammatory responses are selenium-dependent.

  3. Mercury and selenium in wild and experimental seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van de W.S.M.; Koeman, J.H.; Svenson, A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the tissue distribution of inorganic mercury, organic mercury selenium in Dutch and British seals as well as in seals which were dosed with methylmercury under experimental conditions. In the experimental animals, a time-related increase of both mercury and selenium was found in

  4. CANOLA CROP TAKES UP SELENIUM PROVIDES BIOFUEL AND FEED SUPPLEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many of the Brassica plant taxi that are candidates for phytoremediation of selenium also produce products that be used for refining into biodiesel, as well as selenium enriched animal feeds. These include canola (Brassica napus) that is planted in the Westside soils of central California (Oxalis si...

  5. Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) as a source of dietary selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter discusses the nutritional value of lentils, with a focus on factors affecting lentils as a source of dietary selenium. It addresses the chemical nature of lentil-selenium, pointing out that more than 90% is present in organic compounds which are generally well absorbed by humans. The se...

  6. Ionic liquid-induced synthesis of selenium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple wet chemical method has been used to synthesize selenium nanoparticles by the reaction of ionic liquid with sodium selenosulphate, a selenium precursor, in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol stabilizer, in aqueous medium. The method is capable of producing spherical selenium nanoparticles in the size range of 76-150 nm under ambient conditions. This is a first report on the production of nano-selenium assisted by an ionic liquid. The synthesized nanoparticles can be separated easily from the aqueous sol by a high-speed centrifuge machine, and can be re-dispersed in an aqueous medium. The synthesized selenium nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy techniques.

  7. Level of selenium intake the region of algiers ration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this present work, we have measured the selenium content in different food frequently consumed in the region of Algiers, a nutritional deficiency in selenium may be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, the function mainly as a protection agent against the toxic effects of free radicals, selenium are related to its presence at the active site of the enzyme glutathion peroxidase. Freeze-dried samples of food were put in cell and measured by INAA (Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis). We have established the annual consumption of selenium for five socio-professional categories (private employers, high commissioned officers, medium commissioned officers, workers, maneuvers ), on the basis of data given by government agencies. We have determined as mean daily consumption of selenium by people in region of Algiers was 130 ug per day

  8. Genome-wide association study of serum selenium concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Jian; Hsu, Li; Harrison, Tabitha;

    2013-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated this...... hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). We...... tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO) 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p < 1 × 10−5. None of these 41 SNPs reached the significant threshold (p = 0.05/15 regions = 0...

  9. Extraction-X-ray fluorescence determination of selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easy to use, rapid x-ray fluorescence method of selenium determination is developed. The method is based on preliminary extraction of Se with dithiophosphoric acid and evaporation of the extract on a porous matrix. To choose the optimal conditions of extraction the effect of organic reagent concentration, of the pH aqueous phase and the shaking up time on selenium extraction volume is studied. Selenium quantitative extraction is observed in the process of selenium extraction from highly acid media. It is shown that the optimal conditions for Se(4) extraction by means of ammonium diethyldithiophosphate are the following: reagent concentration is 1x10-3 M; pH 0-1.5; the shaking up time is 20 min. The given methods are applied for selenium determination in the bottoms the formations of the Noksa river. The absolute detection limit is 0.1 μg

  10. [Selenium determination in blood plasma samples of high performance athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, E; Krützfeldt, B; Rokitzki, L

    1989-01-01

    Cooperating with the department "Sport- und Leistungsmedizin" of the university hospital of Freiburg/Brsg. we investigated the problem whether endurance stress leads to a significant change in the selenium blood concentration of athletes. We took blood samples of 13 test persons (11 men, 2 women) before, immediately after and 2 hours following a marathon course. The analyses of the concentration of selenium in plasma were performed by atomic absorption spectrometry AAS (molybdenum-coated graphite tube technique with L'vov platform as well as matrix modification with nickel nitrate in order to thermally stabilize the selenium). The selenium level of the plasma samples ranged between 41 and 153 micrograms/L. Our experiments have shown that running a marathon course does not lead to significant changes in the standard selenium plasma concentrations of the athletes. PMID:2818554

  11. Amorphous drugs and dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, K.; Priemel, P.;

    2013-01-01

    The transformation to an amorphous form is one of the most promising approaches to address the low solubility of drug compounds, the latter being an increasing challenge in the development of new drug candidates. However, amorphous forms are high energy solids and tend to recry stallize. New...... formulation principles are needed to ensure the stability of amorphous drug forms. The formation of solid dispersions is still the most investigated approach, but additional approaches are desirable to overcome the shortcomings of solid dispersions. Spatial separation by either coating or the use of micro......-containers has shown potential to prevent or delay recrystallization. Another recent approach is the formation of co-amorphous mixtures between either two drugs or one drug and one low molecular weight excipient. Molecular interactions between the two molecules provide an energy barrier that has to be overcome...

  12. Selenium content in wheat and estimation of the selenium daily intake in different regions of Algeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we have measured the selenium content in wheat produced locally in eight different regions of Algeria from east to west, and we have established the annual consumption of selenium for five socio-professional categories. Instrumental neutron activation analysis is used. The selenium levels in wheat samples varied from 21 (Tiaret) to 153 μg/kg (Khroub), with a mean value about 52 μg/kg. The mean of selenium daily consumption from ingestion of wheat per person in the eight regions varied from 32 to 52 μg/day which is close to the minimal FAO recommendation. - Highlights: ► Cereals and cereal products represent a staple food in Algeria. ► The objective of this study is to determine the Se intake in wheat produced locally. ► The concentration of Se in the wheat reflects the level of the Se in regional soils. ► The mean of Se daily consumption is close to the minimal WHO/FAO recommendation.

  13. Selenium species bioaccessibility in enriched radish (Raphanus sativus): a potential dietary source of selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero, Zoyne; Madrid, Yolanda; Cámara, Carmen

    2006-03-22

    An in vitro gastrointestinal method was employed to predict the potential bioavailability of selenium and its species from radish, belonging to the Brassicaceae family, grown in hydroponics media in the presence of inorganic selenium, such as Na2SeO3 and Na2SeO4. A low transformation of Se into organic forms was observed in radish plants grown in Se(VI)-enriched culture media. On the contrary, in those plants exposed to selenite, >95% of the total selenium was found as selenocystine (SeCys2), selenomethionine (SeMet), and Se-methylselenocysteine (SeMetSeCys). The concentrations of these species in fresh samples remained almost unaltered after a simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Therefore, a high selenium content of Se-methylselenocysteine (65%), previously reported as a cancer chemopreventive species, remained in the potentially bioabsorbable fraction. As these plants usually undergo a short development cycle, these results suggest that radish enriched in selenite could be a good choice as an organoselenium supplement for the human diet and animal feed. PMID:16536627

  14. Selenium and Preeclampsia: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Guo, Dan; Gu, Hao; Zhang, Li; Lv, Shuyan

    2016-06-01

    Conflicting results exist between selenium concentration and preeclampsia. The role of selenium in the development of preeclampsia is unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the blood selenium level in patients with preeclampsia and healthy pregnant women, and to determine the effectiveness of selenium supplementation in preventing preeclampsia. We searched PubMed, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane Library, and relevant references for English language literature up to November 25, 2014. Mean difference from observational studies and relative risk from randomized controlled trials were meta-analyzed by a random-effect model. Thirteen observational studies with 1515 participants and 3 randomized controlled trials with 439 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Using a random-effect model, a statistically significant difference in blood selenium concentration of -6.47 μg/l (95 % confidence interval (CI) -11.24 to -1.7, p = 0.008) was seen after comparing the mean difference of observational studies. In randomized controlled trials, using a random-effect model, the relative risk for preeclampsia was 0.28 (0.09 to 0.84) for selenium supplementation (p = 0.02). Evidence from observational studies indicates an inverse association of blood selenium level and the risk of preeclampsia. Supplementation with selenium significantly reduces the incidence of preeclampsia. However, more prospective clinical trials are required to assess the association between selenium supplementation and preeclampsia and to determine the dose, beginning time, and duration of selenium supplementation. PMID:26516080

  15. Aqueous, solid and gaseous partitioning of selenium in an oxic sandy soil under different microbiological states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darcheville, O. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology (LRE), IRSN/DEI/SECRE, Building 186, Cadarache, B.P. 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)], E-mail: olivia.darcheville@irsn.fr; Fevrier, L. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology (LRE), IRSN/DEI/SECRE, Building 186, Cadarache, B.P. 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)], E-mail: laureline.fevrier@irsn.fr; Haichar, F.Z. [CEA Cadarache, DSV/IBEB/SBVME/LEMIRE, UMR 6191 CNRS/CEA/Univ Aix-Marseille, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: feth-el-zahar.haichar@cea.fr; Berge, O. [CEA Cadarache, DSV/IBEB/SBVME/LEMIRE, UMR 6191 CNRS/CEA/Univ Aix-Marseille, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: odile.berge@cea.fr; Martin-Garin, A. [Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology (LRE), IRSN/DEI/SECRE, Building 186, Cadarache, B.P. 3, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)], E-mail: arnaud.martin-garin@irsn.fr; Renault, P. [INRA, UMR 1114 INRA-UAPV Climat, Sol et Environnement, Domaine Saint Paul, Site Agroparc, 84914 Avignon (France)], E-mail: pierre.renault@avignon.inra.fr

    2008-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of microorganisms on the behaviour of selenium in natural soil maintained under strictly aerobic conditions. Six-day batch experiments were performed with soils constrained to different microbiological states, either by sterilisation or by adding organic substrates. Selenium was added to the soil as selenite. The distribution of selenium in the gaseous, liquid and solid phases of the batch was measured. Selenium partitioning between the various solid phases was investigated by chemical sequential extractions. Active microorganisms played major effects on the distribution of selenium within the soil. On the one hand, microorganisms could promote selenium volatilisation (in relatively small amounts), leading to the spreading of selenium compounds outside the soil. On the other hand, microbial activities increased both amount of selenium retained by the soil and the strength of its retention (less exchangeable selenium), making selenium less susceptible to remobilisation.

  16. Iodine and selenium migration through argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep argillaceous formations are considered as potential host rock for high-level radioactive waste repository. Based on safety assessment calculations, active selenium (79Se) and iodine (129I) from high level radioactive waste might be ones of the major dose contributors due to their longevity and their anionic character. However, because of their high sensitivity to redox condition, a special attention to the oxidation state of these elements is required. A comparative study on the diffusion properties of selenium and iodine through argillaceous rocks was realized with the aim to determine the effects of both the redox conditions and the mineralogy on the migration of these two elements. For these purposes, we have studied two argillaceous rocks: Toarcian argillite from Tournemire (France) and Opalinus clay (OPA) from the Mont-Terri (Switzerland). The study of the iodide migration allowed to confirm the control on the iodide retention of both oxidized pyrite and natural organic matter. A kinetic control of the iodide sorption is also suspected. We focus the selenium study on the more oxidized species, Se(IV) and Se(VI). The Se(IV) migration is strongly dependant from oxido-reduction processes. Indeed, the Se(IV) diffusion experiments through Tournemire argillite and OPA indicated a significant reduction associated to Fe(II). The Se(VI) study evidenced a behavior dependant from the initial concentration: at the highest concentration, no significant retention was observed while the retention is significant at the lowest concentration. Furthermore, spectroscopic analyses tend to show a low Se(VI) reduction at the Fe contact. However, biotic origin cannot be excluded. (author)

  17. Distinct reactivities on segmented selenium nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Han; Chen, Yun-Wen; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Wang, C R Chris

    2015-09-18

    We demonstrate a new approach to synthesize several unique nanostructures by tuning the selective reactivities on individual symmetry-breaking segmented selenium nanorods (SBS-SeNRs). The segment-selective reactions from thiolated silane endowed the formation of float-like SBS-SeNR@SiO2 with a silica coating on the t-Se segment. Several other unique nanostructures were further synthesized by applying other selective reactions, such as Se chemical removal and nanogold deposition. Such a segmented nanomaterial of SBS-SeNRs acts as a new chemical template for preparing various segmented nanocomposites. PMID:26236788

  18. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  19. Preliminary Study on the Standard of Selenium Content in Agricultural Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-yuan; YOU Yong; GUO Qing-quan; WANG Yong-hong; DENG Shi-lin

    2012-01-01

    With the improvement of living standards, people pay more attention to the agricultural products with health protection function, and the selenium-rich agricultural products attract more and more consumers. The main biological role of selenium is to resist oxidation and inflammatory response, mainly focusing on resisting aging, preventing cardiovascular disease, protecting eyesight, counteracting or destroying the toxic properties, preventing cancer and thyroid disease. In most areas of China, there is a widespread shortage of selenium, thus producing selenium-rich agricultural products to provide natural selenium-rich health food to the areas in need of selenium, has gradually become a new hot spot of China’s health food industry, but high content of selenium in food is detrimental to human body, even leads to selenium intoxication, and artificially adding inorganic selenium is difficult to guarantee that the selenium content of agricultural products is not exceeded. According to human body’s daily demand for selenium in dietetics and the content of selenium in agricultural products in the Chinese food composition table, we put forward the recommendations on the standard of selenium in agricultural products, in order to provide the basis for China to formulate the health standard of selenium content in selenium-rich agricultural products.

  20. Commentary: selenium study on endangered razorback sucker is flawed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Steven J

    2005-07-01

    The razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) is listed as federally endangered throughout its range. A massive recovery effort by the Recovery Implementation Program for Endangered Fish Species in the Upper Colorado River Basin has focused its efforts in the upper Colorado River. The upper Colorado River basin also has two locations that have been identified by the National Irrigation Water Quality Program as having substantial selenium contamination. Selenium is toxic to fishes, affecting reproductive success. Thus, there is concern about potential effects of selenium on the endangered razorback sucker. Two sets of studies have investigated the effects of selenium on razorback suckers, but study results are conflicting. This commentary evaluates studies that claim selenium is not a problem for razorback sucker. We find that study bias was so pervasive that purported conclusions were unwarranted. Contaminated control water, older life stages of fish tested, lack of methodology for analysis of selenium in water, diet, or fish, use of rotifer food, low feeding rates, low growth rates of fish, and improper storage of site waters resulted in an apparent erroneous linkage of high selenium in whole-body residues with no adverse effects. PMID:15922797

  1. Regulation of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism by Selenium during diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongping; Qiu, Qinqin; Zou, Caiyan; Dou, Lianjun; Liang, Jun

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we have tried to unravel the role of Selenium supplementation in containing hyperglycemia by regulating enzymes activities involved in carbohydrate metabolism in liver of diabetic animals. Male wistar rats were divided into four groups: normal control, diabetic, Selenium treated control and Selenium treated diabetic group. Diabetes was induced in the animals by injecting alloxan intraperitoneally at a dose level of 150 mg/kg body weight. Selenium in the form of sodium selenite was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 1 PPM in drinking water, ad libitum for two time durations of 2 and 4 weeks. Animals were sacrificed and livers were excised for the analyses of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism as well as the levels of glycogen. In-vitro (14)C-d glucose uptake and its turnover were also assessed in liver slices of all the treatment groups using radiorespirometry. Selenium supplementation to the diabetic rats normalized the enzyme activities of glucose-6-phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and glycogen phosphorylase as well as restored the glycogen levels to within the normal limits which were altered during diabetes. Interestingly, when Selenium was supplemented to diabetic rats, (14)C-d glucose uptake and its turnover showed a statistically significant increase in their values which however, were decreased in diabetic rats. In conclusion, Selenium mediates insulin-like role during diabetes by tending to normalize the altered activities of glucose metabolizing enzymes and also improves the glucose uptake and its metabolism by the liver. PMID:25779343

  2. COMPARISON OF DETERMINING METHODS REGARDING SELENIUM CONTENT IN WHEAT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Monica Stanciu-Burileanu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As a metallic chemical element, selenium has received special attention from biologists because of its dual role as a trace element essential and toxic. The important part of enzymes that protect cells against the effects of free radicals that are produced during normal metabolism of oxygen. Also, selenium is essential for normal immune system and thyroid gland, The concentration of selenium in the soil, which varies by region, determines the default concentration of selenium in plants growing in the soil.The purpose of this paper is to present methods of comparison, dry oxidation at 450ºC and wet digestion – digestion with acids in high concentrations at microwave system digestion, for determining selenium content from wheat samples collected from the south-eastern part of Romania, namely Bărăgan Plain and Central-South Dobrogea. Selenium separation and dosage from obtained extracts carry out through a selective hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. With the software SURFER, a tendency map of selenium distribution was drawn.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study of Serum Selenium Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Peters

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated this hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI. We tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p < 1 × 10−5. None of these 41 SNPs reached the significant threshold (p = 0.05/15 regions = 0.003 in the second stage (WHI. Three SNPs had p < 0.05 in the second stage (rs1395479 and rs1506807 in 4q34.3/AGA-NEIL3; and rs891684 in 17q24.3/SLC39A11 and had p between 2.62 × 10−7 and 4.04 × 10−7 in the combined analysis (PLCO + WHI. Additional studies are needed to replicate these findings. Identification of genetic variation that impacts selenium concentrations may contribute to a better understanding of which genes regulate circulating selenium concentrations.

  4. Selenium Nanoparticles for Stress-Resilient Fish and Livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Biplab; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Daware, Akshay; Tribedi, Prosun; Krishnani, K. K.; Minhas, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    The fisheries and livestock sectors capture the highest share of protein-rich animal food and demonstrate accelerated growth as an agriculture subsidiary. Environmental pollution, climate change, as well as pathogenic invasions exert increasing stress impacts that lead the productivity momentum at a crossroads. Oxidative stress is the most common form of stress phenomenon responsible for the retardation of productivity in fisheries and livestock. Essential micronutrients play a determinant role in combating oxidative stress. Selenium, one of the essential micronutrients, appears as a potent antioxidant with reduced toxicity in its nanoscale form. In the present review, different methods of synthesis and characterization of nanoscale selenium have been discussed. The functional characterization of nano-selenium in terms of its effect on growth patterns, feed digestibility, and reproductive system has been discussed to elucidate the mechanism of action. Moreover, its anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant potentiality, antimicrobial and immunomodulatory efficacy, and fatty acid reduction in liver have been deciphered as the new phenomena of nano-selenium application. Biologically synthesized nano-selenium raises hope for pharmacologically enriched, naturally stable nanoscale selenium with high ecological viability. Hence, nano-selenium can be administered with commercial feeds for improvising stress resilience and productivity of fish and livestock.

  5. Serum Selenium and Ceruloplasmin in Nigerians with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilu M. Karaye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine if selenium deficiency, serum ceruloplasmin and traditional birth practices are risk factors for peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM, in Kano, Nigeria. This is a case-control study carried out in three hospitals, and PPCM patients were followed up for six months. Critically low serum selenium concentration was defined as <70 µg/L. A total of 39 PPCM patients and 50 controls were consecutively recruited after satisfying the inclusion criteria. Mean serum selenium in patients (61.7 ± 14.9 µg/L was significantly lower than in controls (118.4 ± 45.6 µg/L (p < 0.001. The prevalence of serum selenium <70 µg/L was significantly higher among patients (76.9% than controls (22.0% (p < 0.001. The mean ceruloplasmin and prevalence of socio-economic indices, multiparity, pregnancy-induced hypertension, obesity and twin pregnancy were not different between the groups (p > 0.05. Logistic regression showed that rural residency significantly increased the odds for serum selenium <70 µg/L by 2.773-fold (p = 0.037. Baseline serum levels of selenium and ceruloplasmin were not associated with six-month mortality. This study has shown that selenium deficiency is a risk factor for PPCM in Kano, Nigeria, and is related to rural residency. However, serum ceruloplasmin, customary birth practices and some other characteristics were not associated with PPCM in the study area.

  6. Selenoprotein P. A selenium-rich extracellular glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, R F; Hill, K E

    1994-10-01

    Selenoprotein P is a glycoprotein that has been purified from rat and human plasma. In selenium-replete rats it contains 65% of the plasma selenium and its concentration is 25-30 mg protein/L. In selenium-deficient rats its concentration is life of 75Se in selenoprotein P is 3 to 4 h, indicating a rapid turnover. Purified rat selenoprotein P contains 7.5 +/- 1 selenium atoms per molecule as selenocysteine. The sequence of the cloned cDNA predicts 10 selenocysteine residues, which suggests that the protein in plasma is a modification of the predicted one. Deduced amino acid sequence identity between rats and humans is 72%. The 3' untranslated region of selenoprotein P cDNA contains two predicted stem loops of the type essential for selenocysteine incorporation. Northern analysis indicates that selenoprotein P is expressed by many tissues. Hepatic selenoprotein P mRNA level, but not its transcription, decreases during selenium deficiency. The decrease is less than the decrease of glutathione peroxidase mRNA, however. Selenoprotein P is postulated to serve as an extracellular oxidant defense because its presence correlates with selenium protection of selenium-deficient rats against diquat-induced lipid peroxidation and liver necrosis. More research will be required to test this hypothesis and to establish the biochemical function of selenoprotein P. PMID:7931697

  7. Selenium toxicosis in wild aquatic birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Kilness, A.W.; Simmons, J.L.; Stroud, R.K.; Hoffman, D.J.; Moore, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Severe gross and microscopic lesions and other changes were found in adult aquatic birds and in embryos from Kesterson Reservoir (a portion of Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge), Merced County, Calif., during 1984. Adult birds from that area were emaciated, had subacute to extensive chronic hepatic lesions, and had excess fluid and fibrin in the peritoneal cavity. Biochemical changes in their livers included elevated glycogen and non-protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations and glutathione peroxidase activity but lowered protein, total sulfhydryl, and protein-bound sulfhydryl concentrations. Congenital malformations observed grossly in embryos were often multiple and included anophthalmia, microphthalmia, abnormal beaks, amelia, micromelia, ectrodactyly, and hydrocephaly. Mean concentrations of selenium in livers (94.4 ppm, dry weight) and kidneys (96.6 ppm) of birds collected at the Kesterson ponds were about 10 times those found at a nearby control area (8.3 and 12.2 ppm). We conclude that selenium present in the agricultural drainage water supplied to the Kesterson ponds accumulated in the food chain of aquatic birds to toxic concentrations and caused the lesion and other changes observed.

  8. Selenium and tellurium as carbon substitutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1980-01-01

    This review has summarized structure-activity studies with /sup 75/Se- and /sup 123m/Te-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in which the selenium or tellurium heteroatom has been inserted between carbon-carbon bonds. The agents that have been investigated in most detail include steroids for adrenal imaging and long-chain fatty acids, and a variety of other unique agents have also been studied. Because of the great versatility of the organic chemistry of selenium and tellurium, there is continuing interest in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with /sup 75/Se, /sup 73/Se, and /sup 123m/Te. There are two important factors which will determine the extent of future interest in such agents. These include the necessity of a decrease in the cost of highly enriched /sup 122/Te to make the reactor production of /sup 123m/Te cost effective. In addition, the potential preparation of large amounts of /sup 73/Se should stimulate the development of /sup 73/Se-labeled radiopharmaceuticals.

  9. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  10. Selenium for the Prevention of Cutaneous Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Grossman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of selenium (Se supplementation in cancer prevention is controversial; effects often depend on the nutritional status of the subject and on the chemical form in which Se is provided. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models to study two unique therapeutic windows for intervention in the process of cutaneous melanomagenisis, and to examine the utility of two different chemical forms of Se for prevention and treatment of melanoma. We studied the effects of Se in vitro on UV-induced oxidative stress in melanocytes, and on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in melanoma cells. In vivo, we used the HGF transgenic mouse model of UV-induced melanoma to demonstrate that topical treatment with l-selenomethionine results in a significant delay in the time required for UV-induced melanoma development, but also increases the rate of growth of those tumors once they appear. In a second mouse model, we found that oral administration of high dose methylseleninic acid significantly decreases the size of human melanoma xenografts. Our findings suggest that modestly elevation of selenium levels in the skin might risk acceleration of growth of incipient tumors. Additionally, certain Se compounds administered at very high doses could have utility for the treatment of fully-malignant tumors or prevention of recurrence.

  11. Biofortification and phytoremediation of selenium in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilin eWu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential trace element for humans and animals but at high concentrations, Se becomes toxic to organisms due to Se replacing sulfur in proteins. Selenium biofortification is an agricultural process that increases the accumulation of Se in crops, through plant breeding, genetic engineering, or use of Se fertilizers. While Se phytoremediation is a green biotechnology to clean up Se-contaminated environments, primarily through phytoextraction and phytovolatilization. By integrating Se phytoremediation and biofortification technologies, Se-enriched plant materials harvested from Se phytoremediation can be used as Se-enriched green manures or other supplementary sources of Se for producing Se-biofortified agricultural products. Earlier studies primarily aimed at enhancing efficacy of phytoremediation and biofortification of Se based on natural variation in progenitor or identification of unique plant species. In this review, we discuss promising approaches to improve biofortification and phytoremediation of Se using knowledge acquired from model crops. We also explored the feasibility of applying biotechnologies such as inoculation of microbial strains for improving the efficiency of biofortification and phytoremediation of Se. The key research and practical challenges that remain in improving biofortification and phytoremediation of Se have been highlighted, and the future development and uses of Se-biofortified agricultural products in China has also been discussed.

  12. Selenium and tellurium as carbon substitutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review has summarized structure-activity studies with 75Se- and /sup 123m/Te-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in which the selenium or tellurium heteroatom has been inserted between carbon-carbon bonds. The agents that have been investigated in most detail include steroids for adrenal imaging and long-chain fatty acids, and a variety of other unique agents have also been studied. Because of the great versatility of the organic chemistry of selenium and tellurium, there is continuing interest in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with 75Se, 73Se, and /sup 123m/Te. There are two important factors which will determine the extent of future interest in such agents. These include the necessity of a decrease in the cost of highly enriched 122Te to make the reactor production of /sup 123m/Te cost effective. In addition, the potential preparation of large amounts of 73Se should stimulate the development of 73Se-labeled radiopharmaceuticals

  13. [Selenium in selected species of mushrooms from Poland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falandysz, Jerzy

    2003-01-01

    The selenium was quantified in the caps, stalks or a whole fruiting bodies of king bolete (Boletus edulis), brown birch scaber stalk (Leccinum scabrum), parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera), fly agaric (Amanita muscaria) and poison pax (Paxillus involutus) collected at the various regions of Poland in 1998-2001. King bolete, parasol mushroom and fly agaric were a much more abundant in selenium than brown birch scaber stalk or poison pax. Some differences were observed between the selenium content of the particular species collected at different sites as well as depending on anatomical part of the fruiting body. PMID:14755851

  14. Microgravimetric Studies of Selenium Electrodeposition Onto Different Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik R.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of selenium electrodeposition from sulfuric acid solution on different substrates was studied with the electrochemical techniques. The cyclic voltammetry was combined with the quartz crystal microbalance technique to analyze selenium deposition process. The electrochemical reduction of selenous acid on gold, silver and copper electrodes was investigated. It was found that reduction of selenous acid is a very complex process and it strongly depends from the applied substrate. The voltammetric measurements indicate the range of potentials in which the process of reduction of selenous acids on the applied substrate is possible. Additionally, the microgravimetric data confirm the deposition of selenium and they reveal the mechanism of the deposition process.

  15. An Introduction to Testing Web Applications with twill and Selenium

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Titus; Huggins, Jason

    2007-01-01

    This Short Cut is an introduction tobuilding automated web tests using twotools, twill and Selenium. twill is a simpleweb scripting language that can be usedto automate web tests, while Selenium isa web testing framework that runs in anybrowser and can be used to test complexweb sites that make extensive use ofJavaScript. The best way to use this Short Cut is torun through the examples. We expectthat within an hour you can start writingyour own functional tests in either twillor Selenium, and within a day you willunderstand most, if not all, of the possibilitiesand the limitations of these t

  16. Fundamentals of amorphous solids structure and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2014-01-01

    Long awaited, this textbook fills the gap for convincing concepts to describe amorphous solids. Adopting a unique approach, the author develops a framework that lays the foundations for a theory of amorphousness. He unravels the scientific mysteries surrounding the topic, replacing rather vague notions of amorphous materials as disordered crystalline solids with the well-founded concept of ideal amorphous solids. A classification of amorphous materials into inorganic glasses, organic glasses, glassy metallic alloys, and thin films sets the scene for the development of the model of ideal amorph

  17. Identification of a Novel Selenium-containing Compound, Selenoneine, as the Predominant Chemical Form of Organic Selenium in the Blood of Bluefin Tuna*

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita

    2010-01-01

    A novel selenium-containing compound having a selenium atom in the imidazole ring, 2-selenyl-Nα,Nα,Nα-trimethyl-l-histidine, 3-(2-hydroseleno-1H-imidazol-5-yl)-2-(trimethylammonio)propanoate, was identified from the blood and other tissues of the bluefin tuna, Thunnus orientalis. The selenium-containing compound was purified from the tuna blood ...

  18. 75Selenium-labeled sheep plasma: the time course of changes in 75selenium distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheep fed rations containing 0.1 ppm selenium were labeled by intravenous injection of radioactive sodium selenite or selenocystine. Gel filtration of serially collected plasma samples indicated that, with time, there was a transition from mercaptan sensitive to high mol wt mercaptan and protein solubilizer resistant selenoproteins. Radiolabeled plasma samples collected from selenite and selenocystine labeled sheep were dialyzed against buffer containing 2-mercaptoethanol or protein solubilizer. No difference in the stability between selenite- and selenocystine-labeled plasma could be detected

  19. The selenium content of SEPP1 versus selenium requirements in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Penglase, Samuel; Hamre, Kristin; Ellingsen, Ståle

    2015-01-01

    Selenoprotein P (SEPP1) distributes selenium (Se) throughout the body via the circulatory system. For vertebrates, the Se content of SEPP1 varies from 7 to 18 Se atoms depending on the species, but the reason for this variation remains unclear. Herein we provide evidence that vertebrate SEPP1 Sec content correlates positively with Se requirements. As the Se content of full length SEPP1 is genetically determined, this presents a unique case where a nutrient requirement can be predicted based o...

  20. Amorphous yttrium-iron alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic properties of amorphous yttrium-iron alloys Ysub(1-x)Fesub(x) have been studied over a wide concentration range 0.32 2Fe17 alloys, lead in the amorphous state to spin-glass behaviour and asperomagnetic order. The dominant positive interactions produce short-range ferromagnetic correlations which persist up to room temperature. However magnetic saturation cannot be achieved for any of the alloys in applied fields of up to 180 kOe, indicating that strong negative interactions are also present. Exchange interactions become increasingly positive with increasing x, and the magnetic properties of iron-rich alloys approach those of a normal ferromagnet. (author)

  1. Iron - based bulk amorphous alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Babilas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents a structure characterization, thermal and soft magnetic properties analysis of Fe-based bulk amorphous materials in as-cast state and after crystallization process. In addition, the paper gives some brief review about achieving, formation and structure of bulk metallic glasses as a special group of amorphous materials.Design/methodology/approach: The studies were performed on Fe72B20Si4Nb4 metallic glass in form of ribbons and rods. The amorphous structure of tested samples was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM methods. The thermal properties of the glassy samples were measured using differential thermal analysis (DTA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The magnetic properties contained initial and maximum magnetic permeability, coercive force and magnetic after-effects measurements were determined by the Maxwell-Wien bridge and VSM methods.Findings: The X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy investigations revealed that the studied as-cast bulk metallic glasses in form of ribbons and rods were amorphous. Two stage crystallization process was observed for studied bulk amorphous alloy. The differences of crystallization temperature between ribbons and rods with chosen thickness are probably caused by different amorphous structures as a result of the different cooling rates in casting process. The SEM images showed that studied fractures could be classified as mixed fractures with indicated two zones contained “river” and “smooth” areas. The changing of chosen soft magnetic properties (μr, Bs, Hc obtained for samples with different thickness is a result of the non-homogenous amorphous structure of tested metallic glasses. The annealing process in temperature range from 373 to 773 K causes structural relaxation of tested amorphous materials, which leads to changes in their physical properties. The qualitative

  2. Hidden structure in amorphous solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inam, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Lewis, James P. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Drabold, D.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Trinity College, Cambridge CB2 1TQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Recent theoretical studies of amorphous silicon (a-Si) [Pan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 206403 (2008)] have revealed subtle but significant structural correlations in network topology: the tendency for short (long) bonds to be spatially correlated with other short (long) bonds. These structures were linked to the electronic band tails in the optical gap. In this paper, we further examine these issues for a-Si, and demonstrate that analogous correlations exist in amorphous SiO{sub 2}, and in the organic molecule, {beta}-carotene. We conclude with a discussion of the origin of the effects and its possible generality. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. Selenium and nutrition. The accuracy and variability of the selenium content in commercial supplements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selenium is a required trace-element that has been found to be protective against serious chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease in some, but not all, epidemiological studies using both case-control and intervention designs. As a result, the fraction of the adult U.S. population now taking a daily selenium supplement is steadily increasing. 10 or more replicate Se supplement tablets were analyzed, from each of 15 different products representing 12 different brand names with most being sampled at two different times separated by approximately 30 months. Two chemical forms, seleno-yeast and selenate were tested in 50, 100 and 200 μg/tablet dosages (seleno-yeast) and 25 and 200 μg/tablet dosages (selenate). Variations in contemporary lots were evaluated at both sampling periods. The Se content provided on the product label is generally understated. One tablet contained 2.5 times more selenium than the stated dose. Selenate supplements are less accurately labeled and more highly variable compared to yeast supplements. One popular multivitamin, labeled at 200 μg/tablet, contained tablets in excess of 300 μg. Many subjects using this supplement will exceed the 400 μg/day tolerable upper limit of intake, recently established, for Se by the Institute of Medicine's Food and Nutrition Board. (author)

  4. Selenium and selenium-sulfur cathode materials for high-energy rechargeable magnesium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao-Karger, Zhirong; Lin, Xiu-Mei; Bonatto Minella, Christian; Wang, Di; Diemant, Thomas; Behm, R. Jürgen; Fichtner, Maximilian

    2016-08-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an attractive metallic anode material for next-generation batteries owing to its inherent dendrite-free electrodeposition, high capacity and low cost. Here we report a new class of Mg batteries based on both elemental selenium (Se) and selenium-sulfur solid solution (SeS2) cathode materials. Elemental Se confined into a mesoporous carbon was used as a cathode material. Coupling the Se cathode with a metallic Mg anode in a non-nucleophilic electrolyte, the Se cathode delivered a high initial volumetric discharge capacity of 1689 mA h cm-3 and a reversible capacity of 480 mA h cm-3 was retained after 50 cycles at a high current density of 2 C. The mechanistic insights into the electrochemical conversion in Mg-Se batteries were investigated by microscopic and spectroscopic methods. The structural transformation of cyclic Se8 into chainlike Sen upon battery cycling was revealed by ex-situ Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the promising battery performance with a SeS2 cathode envisages the perspective of a series of SeSn cathode materials combining the benefits of both selenium and sulfur for high energy Mg batteries.

  5. Selenium content of milk and milk products of Turkey. II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanardağ, R; Orak, H

    1999-04-01

    Selenium content of 1028 milk and milk products of Turkey are presented in this study. The selenium content of human milk (colostrum, transitional, and mature milk), various kinds of milk [cow, sheep, goat, buffalo, paper boxes (3%, 1.5%, 0.012% fat), bottled milk, condensed milk (10% fat), mineral added milk (1.6%), and banana, strawberry, and chocolate milk] and milk products (kefir, yogurt, Ayran, various cheese, coffee cream, ice cream, butter, margarine, milk powder, and fruit yogurt) in Turkey were determined by a spectrofluorometric method. The selenium levels of cow milks collected from 57 cities in Turkey were also determined. Selenium levels in cow milk varied with geographical location in Turkey and were found to be lowest for Van and highest for Aksaray. The results [milk (cow, sheep, goat, buffalo and human) and milks products] were compared with literature data from different countries. PMID:10208658

  6. Selenium-Mediated Synthesis of Tetrasubstituted Naphthalenes through Rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    James Tancock; Thomas Wirth

    2015-01-01

    New β-keto ester substituted stilbene derivatives have been synthesized and cyclized with selenium electrophiles in the presence of Lewis acids. This now allows access to 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted naphthalene derivatives as cyclization and rearrangement products.

  7. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Iowa: Avian selenium study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2006 and 2007, we tested selenium concentrations in the eggs and nestling carcasses of tree swallows attracted to artificial nest boxes installed around Union...

  8. Investigation of the selenium metabolism in cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunøe, Kristoffer; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Stürup, Stefan; Andresen, Lars; Skov, Søren; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different selenium species for their ability to induce cell death in different cancer cell lines, while investigating the underlying chemistry by speciation analysis. A prostate cancer cell line (PC-3), a colon cancer cell line (HT-29) and a leukaemia cell line...... incubated with cells for 24 h and the induction of cell death was measured using flow cytometry. The amounts of total selenium in cell medium, cell lysate and the insoluble fractions was determined by ICP-MS. Speciation analysis of cellular fractions was performed by reversed phase, anion exchange and size...... exclusion chromatography and ICP-MS detection. The selenium compounds exhibited large differences in their ability to induce cell death in the three cell lines and the susceptibilities of the cell lines were different. Full recovery of selenium in the cellular fractions was observed for all Se compounds...

  9. Selenium- or tellurium- containing bile acids and derivatives thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to the preparation of selenium and tellurium derivatives, particularly γ-emitting radioactive derivatives of bile acids and bile salts. Such compounds are valuable in the examination of body function, especially small bowel function. (author)

  10. Selenium in aquatic habitats at Imperial National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During 1991 and 1992, selenium levels were studied in aquatic communities at Imperial National Wildlife Refuge on the lower Colorado River. Composite samples of...

  11. Selenium derivatives of thyroxine and tri-iodothyronine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel selenium derivatives of thyroxine and tri-iodothyronine are described. They preferably contain at least one 75Se atom. The compounds are useful in dual isotope assays of thyroid function. (U.K.)

  12. Amorphous-silicon cell reliability testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The work on reliability testing of solar cells is discussed. Results are given on initial temperature and humidity tests of amorphous silicon devices. Calibration and measurement procedures for amorphous and crystalline cells are given. Temperature stress levels are diagrammed.

  13. Selenium and lung cancer: a systematic review and meta analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Fritz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenium is a natural health product widely used in the treatment and prevention of lung cancers, but large chemoprevention trials have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review of selenium for lung cancers, and assessed potential interactions with conventional therapies. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two independent reviewers searched six databases from inception to March 2009 for evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of selenium for lung cancers. Pubmed and EMBASE were searched to October 2009 for evidence on interactions with chemo- or radiation-therapy. In the efficacy analysis there were nine reports of five RCTs and two biomarker-based studies, 29 reports of 26 observational studies, and 41 preclinical studies. Fifteen human studies, one case report, and 36 preclinical studies were included in the interactions analysis. Based on available evidence, there appears to be a different chemopreventive effect dependent on baseline selenium status, such that selenium supplementation may reduce risk of lung cancers in populations with lower baseline selenium status (serum<106 ng/mL, but increase risk of lung cancers in those with higher selenium (≥ 121.6 ng/mL. Pooling data from two trials yielded no impact to odds of lung cancer, OR 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.61-1.43; other cancers that were the primary endpoints of these trials, OR 1.51 (95%CI 0.70-3.24; and all-cause-death, OR 0.93 (95%CI 0.79-1.10. In the treatment of lung cancers, selenium may reduce cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and side effects associated with radiation therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Selenium may be effective for lung cancer prevention among individuals with lower selenium status, but at present should not be used as a general strategy for lung cancer prevention. Although promising, more evidence on the ability of selenium to reduce cisplatin and radiation therapy toxicity is required to ensure that therapeutic efficacy is maintained before

  14. Web自动化测试工具SELENIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德申; 秦红亮

    2013-01-01

    本文主要介绍了网页测试工具SELENIUM的配置、选择及使用。结合一个测试案例,介绍了在C#中如何使用SELENIUM,在PHP中如何使用SELENIUM,并列举了相应代码。最后对SELENIUM的应用范围进行了总结。

  15. Benchmarking configurations for web-testing:Selenium versus Watir

    OpenAIRE

    Kuutila, M. (Miikka)

    2016-01-01

    Benefits of testing automation according to current literature are reusability, repeatability and effort saved in test execution, while some of the current difficulties lie in maintainability, initial investment and test case creation. This thesis presents a brief literature review on the state of testing automation and a larger literature review on the use of Selenium and Watir in web context. Literature review on the use of Selenium and Watir contains an introduction to the history and u...

  16. Simulation of Selenium Remobolisation and cycling in sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Palm, Erik

    1997-01-01

    Lake Macquarie is the largest estuarine lake in New South Wales and is located on the eastern seaboard of Australia, approximately 85 km north of Sydney.The study of heavy metal concentrations in surficial sediments, sediment cores, seagrasses and fish conducted by the New South Wales Department of Mines in 1974 revealed that significant heavy metal contamination of Lake Macquarie has occurred. The metalloid selenium was found in elevated concentrations in 1987. Selenium has a complex chemist...

  17. Hepatoprotective effects of selenium during diabetes in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C; Qiu, Q; Chen, H; Dou, L; Liang, J

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigated the hepatoprotective role of selenium during alloxan-induced diabetes in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups, namely, normal control, selenium treated, diabetic, and selenium-treated diabetic. Diabetes was induced in the animals by injecting alloxan intraperitoneally at a dose rate of 150 mg/kg body weight. Selenium in the form of sodium selenite was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 1 ppm in drinking water, ad libitum for two time durations of 2 and 4 weeks. The effects of different treatments were studied on various parameters in rat liver, which included serum glucose levels, serum insulin levels, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), lipid peroxidation (LPO), glutathione reduced (GSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG), total glutathione (TG), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, metallothionein (MT), and histoarchitecture. A significant increase in the serum glucose levels, LPO levels, and in enzyme activities of ALP, ALT, and AST was observed in diabetic rats which, however, got decreased significantly upon supplementation with selenium. On the contrary, decreased enzyme activities of GSSG, SOD, and CAT and depressed levels of GSH as well as serum insulin levels were observed in diabetic rats which got improved following selenium supplementation. Interestingly, MT levels were increased both in diabetic and selenium-treated diabetic rats. Further, marked alterations in histoarchitecture were seen in diabetic rats with the prominent features being congestion in sinusoids, lipid accumulation, and centrilobular hepatocyte degeneration. However, selenium treatment to diabetic rats showed overall improvement in the hepatic histoarchitecture. PMID:25820154

  18. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  19. Heat treatment to prevent image defect occurrence in amorphous Se doped with Te avalanche multiplication photoconductive film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkawa, Yuji; Matsubara, Tomoki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Kubota, Misao; Egami, Norifumi [NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya-ku, 157-8510 Tokyo (Japan); Miyakawa, Kazunori [NHK Engineering Services, Inc., 157-8540 Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, Akira [Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 438-0193 Shizuoka (Japan)

    2011-09-15

    We have been developing an amorphous selenium (a-Se) avalanche multiplication photoconductive film, named HARP (high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor), for the purpose of making a high-sensitivity video camera useful for broadcasting, x-ray medical diagnosis, etc. The HARP film used for the red channel in a colour camera is doped with tellurium (Te) to improve its red-light sensitivity. However, doping a-Se with Te generates impurity levels that trap electrons, and the built-in-field formed by these trapped electrons causes image defects. We devised a heat treatment to prevent the occurrence of these defects. We suppose that the thermal energy of the heat treatment releases the originally trapped electrons, and that the energy makes it difficult for moving electrons to be trapped during operation. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Investigation of Sb diffusion in amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Csik, A.; Langer, G A; Erdelyi, G.; Beke, D. L.; Erdelyi, Z.; Vad, K.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous silicon materials and its alloys become extensively used in some technical applications involving large area of the microelectronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the amorphous-crystalline transition, segregation and diffusion processes still have numerous unanswered questions. In this work we study the Sb diffusion into an amorphous Si film by means of Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS). Amorphous Si/Si1-xSbx/Si tri-layer samples with 5 at% antimony concentration were...

  1. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  2. Atomistic Models of Amorphous Semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarolimek, K.

    2011-01-01

    Crystalline silicon is probably the best studied material, widely used by the semiconductor industry. The subject of this thesis is an intriguing form of this element namely amorphous silicon. It can contain a varying amount of hydrogen and is denoted as a-Si:H. It completely lacks the neat long ran

  3. Biological effects of selenium and relationships with carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diplock, A.T.

    1984-01-01

    Selenium is an element that is both essential, at low levels of dietary intake, and toxic, at high levels, to man and a wide range of animals. The purpose of the communication is to review the evidence for the involvement of hyper- and hypo-selenosis in the etiology of cancer. High levels of selenium intake have been blamed for an increase in cancer, dental caries and an array of other conditions. Critical evaluation of the evidence, however, leads to the conclusion that such claims have little substance. On the other hand, low levels of selenium intake may be associated with an increased incidence of certain forms of cancer and there appears to be an inverse relationship between blood selenium levels and cancer death rate in the US. Keshan Disease, in the People's Republic of China has only been shown to occur in populations severely depleted of selenium. In well nourished populations there is no evidence to indicate that selenium supplements have any prophylactic or therapeutic benefit against human diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease or cystic fibrosis. 33 references.

  4. Serum selenium level and risk of lung cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suadicani, P; Hein, H O; Gyntelberg, F

    2011-01-01

    (chronic bronchitis and peak flow), referencing the lowest level of serum selenium HRs were 1.17(0.79-1.75), and 1.43(0.96-2.14), respectively. Among heavy smokers a high serum selenium was associated with a significantly increased risk of lung cancer mortality after taking into account all potential......Serum selenium has been implicated as a risk factor for lung cancer, but the issue remains unsettled. We tested in a cohort of 3,333 males aged 53 to 74 years the hypothesis that a low serum selenium would be associated with an increased risk of lung cancer mortality.During 16 years, 167 subjects(5......, referencing the lowest level of serum selenium hazard ratios with 95% CI (HR) for medium and high levels of serum selenium were 0.97(0.66-1.43), and 0.99(0.68-1.45), respectively. Taking into account pack years of smoking, spirits intake, dietary markers (salt and fat preferences), and health measures...

  5. Nuclear-based methods for the study of selenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The essentiality of selenium to the human being and in particular its deficiency state, associated with prolonged inadequate dietary intake, have received considerable attention. In addition, the possible relationship between selenium and cancer and the claim that selenium may possess cancer-prevention properties have focused research effort. It has been observed in a number of studies on laboratory animals that selenium supplementation protects the animals against carcinogen-induced neoplastic growth in various organ sites, reduces the incidence of spontaneous mammary tumors, and suppresses the growth of transplanted tumor cells. In these research programs on the relationship between trace element levels and senile dementia and depression and the elemental changes in blood associated with selenium supplementation in a normal group of volunteers, it became obvious that in addition to establishing normal levels of elements in the population of interest, there was a more fundamental requirement for methods to be developed that would allow the study of the distribution of selenium in the body and its binding sites. The authors propose emission tomography and perturbed angular correlation as techniques worth exploring

  6. Daily dietary selenium intake of selected Brazilian population groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its essential characteristics, the daily dietary selenium intake of individuals should be monitored accurately. Daily selenium intake of different Brazilian population groups based on duplicate portion diet analysis was evaluated and compared with the new estimated average requirement values (EAR), to assess if selenium deficiency or excess could be observed in these groups. Selenium content was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). The average daily dietary selenium intake found was 26.3 (±8.3) μg/day for children from the city of Sao Paulo, 37.4 (±16.0) μg/day for children from Belem, 107 (±107) μg/day for children from Macapa, 28.4 (±7.5) μg/day for institutionalized elderly, 32 (±6) μg/day for non-institutionalized elderly and 37 (±17) μg/day for university students from Sao Paulo. Most daily dietary selenium intake range observed were below the EAR values. The values obtained for children groups from Belem and Macapa cities, whose intake levels were much higher than the recommendation, were an exception. (author)

  7. [Feed supplementation with selenium in relation to the vitamin E-selenium deficiency syndrome in pigs (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, K B; Simesen, M G

    1977-01-01

    After the addition of selenium to swine feed (max. 0.1 ppm) was legalized in Denmark in 1975, a marked reduction has occurred in the incidence of hepatosis dietetica (HD) in the material received at the State Veterinary Serum Laboratory for diagnostic examination, while the incidence of mulberry heart disease (MHD) appears to be unchanged (Table I). In a material collected before the addition of selenium to swine feed was permitted, the selenium content in liver and heart was found to be significantly lower in the pigs that had died of MHD than in normal pigs, but higher than in pigs that had died of HD (Table II). These observations tend to support the view that feed supplementation with selenium is more effective to prevent HD than MHD. PMID:866121

  8. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  9. Determinants of selenium status in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeg Antonia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selenium (Se status in non-deficient subjects is typically assessed by the Se contents of plasma/serum. That pool comprises two functional, specific selenoprotein components and at least one non-functional, non-specific components which respond differently to changes in Se intake. A more informative means of characterizing Se status in non-deficient individuals is needed. Methods Multiple biomarkers of Se status (plasma Se, serum selenoprotein P [SEPP1], plasma glutathione peroxidase activity [GPX3], buccal cell Se, urinary Se were evaluated in relation to selenoprotein genotypes (GPX1, GPX3, SEPP1, SEP15, dietary Se intake, and parameters of single-carbon metabolism in a cohort of healthy, non-Se-deficient men (n = 106 and women (n = 155. Conclusions Plasma Se concentration was 142.0 ± 23.5 ng/ml, with GPX3 and serum-derived SEPP1 calculated to comprise 20% and 34%, respectively, of that total. The balance, comprised of non-specific components, accounted for virtually all of the interindividual variation in total plasma Se. Buccal cell Se was associated with age and plasma homocysteine (hCys, but not plasma Se. SEPP1 showed a quadratic relationship with body mass index, peaking at BMI 25-30. Urinary Se was greater in women than men, and was associated with metabolic body weight (kg0.75, plasma folate, vitamin B12 and hCys (negatively. One GPX1 genotype (679T/T was associated with significantly lower plasma Se levels than other allelic variants. Selenium intake, estimated from food frequency questionnaires, did not predict Se status as indicated by any biomarker. These results show that genotype, methyl-group status and BMI contribute to variation in Se biomarkers in Se-adequate individuals.

  10. Laser-Induced Gas-Phase Pyrolysis of Dimethyl Selenium: Chemical Deposition of Selenium and Poly(selenoformaldehyde)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Dana; Urbanová, Markéta; Bastl, Zdeněk; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 2 (2004), s. 635-644. ISSN 0165-2370 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072107; GA MŠk OC 523.60 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921; CEZ:AV0Z4032918; CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : dimethyl selenium * laser pyrolysis * selenium films Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.352, year: 2004

  11. Copper and selenium supplementation in the diet of Brangus steers on the nutritional characteristics of meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlindo Saran Netto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-eight Brangus cattle were used to determine the effect of copper and selenium supplementation on the carcass characteristics, fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle and on the copper and selenium concentrations in the liver. The treatments were: no supplementation of copper or selenium; 2 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite; 40 mg Cu/kg DM as copper sulfate; and 2 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite and 40 mg Cu/kg DM as copper sulfate. The fat thickness, rib eye area and fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle were not affected by treatments. There was no effect on carcass yield and cooling loss with the supplementation of copper, selenium or selenium × copper in the levels studied. For the ether extract concentration in the longissimus dorsi muscle, no differences were found according to the treatments with selenium, copper or selenium × copper. The treatments with selenium and selenium × copper showed higher selenium concentrations in the liver than the control and copper treatments. For the copper concentration in the liver, the copper and selenium × copper treatments showed higher values than the control and selenium treatments. Despite the little effect on the meat composition, the results of this experiment demonstrate no interaction between selenium and copper in the levels studied.

  12. Selenium levels in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and controls in lower Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, I; Hartmann, T; Brustbauer, R; Minear, G; Dam, K

    2014-09-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) is one of the most common autoimmune diseases; genetic as well as environmental factors contribute to its pathogenesis. The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium content per unit weight. Selenium status appears to have an impact on the development of thyroid pathologies. We investigated a possible difference of selenium serum levels as a marker of nutritional selenium supply between patients with AIT in central Lower Austria and a matched group of healthy persons living in the same region. Selenium serum levels in the patients with AIT were 98.0 ± 15.6 μg/l. A significant difference to the matched group of normal persons, whose selenium serum levels were 103.2 ± 12.4 μg/l, could not be detected by the t-test (p>0.05). We considered the serum selenium levels to be indicators of selenium supply (by alimentation). A serum level of 120-160 μg/l of selenium represents the normal range. According to this, most patients and control persons showed mild to moderate selenium deficiency (80-120 μg/l selenium). Although our data present slightly higher selenium levels in normal persons than in patients with AIT, this weak and statistically insignificant trend is not sufficient to support the conclusion of a link between inadequate selenium supply and autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:24977659

  13. Protective role of biogenic selenium nanoparticles in immunological and oxidative stress generated by enrofloxacin in broiler chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsat, Shubhangi; Kadam, Ambadas; Mane, Rajaram S; Jadhav, Vijaykumar V; Zate, Manohar K; Naushad, Mu; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2016-06-01

    Presently most bacteria are becoming antibiotic resistant. Due to this there is a deficiency of potent antibiotics, therefore we have to preserve and improve the efficiency of existing antibiotics by mitigating the side effects. Enrofloxacin (EFX) is an important antimicrobial used in veterinary practice but it is known to exert immune suppression antioxidant stress. In the present study, we report on: (a) the biosynthesis of selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs), and (b) their protective effect in reducing adverse effects of EFX on broiler chicken. A potent bacterial strain, isolated from farm soil, has been identified as Pantoea agglomerans (GenBank: KU500622). It tolerates a high concentration of selenium dioxide (9 mM) and produces Se NPs under aerobic conditions. The obtained Se NPs are amorphous in structure and spherical in shape with sizes of less than 100 nm. The activity of cellular, humoral immune response and enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, has significantly been decreased as a result of EFX treatment. We investigated that Se NP supplementation greatly restores these values towards the control, and to even higher than those of the control. Adverse effects of EFX are prevented by simultaneous exposure to Se NPs (0.6 mg per kg of feed) in the diet of poultry chicken. PMID:27147084

  14. Relationships between the selenium content in flue-cured tobacco leaves and the selenium content in soil in Enshi, China tobacco-growing area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relationships between the selenium content in flue-cured tobacco leaves and the selenium content in soil in Enshi tobacco-growing area were analyzed. The results indicated that: The selenium content in flue-cured tobacco leaves in Enshi was high, ranging from 0.30 to 29.30 mg kg/sup -1/ with the mean of (8.37+- 5.83) mg kg/sup -1/. The content of selenium in flue-cured tobacco among different positions was X2F>C3F>B2F, among different altitudes was medium altitude(800 m -- 1200 m)>high altitude(=1200 m)>low altitude (<800 m). The selenium content in soil in Enshi tobacco-growing area was high, ranging from 0.28 to 7.03 mg kg/sup -1/ with the mean of (2.56 +- 1.64) mg kg/sup -1/. Most of the soil was selenium-rich and high-selenium soil, and 34.44% of soil was excessive-selenium soil. As the soil thickness deepened, the selenium contents in soil became lower and lower, and the same trend was observed in the selenium content of flue-cured tobacco leaves at different altitudes. There was significantly positive-correlation between the selenium content in soil and the selenium content of flue-cured tobacco leaves (correlation coefficient was 0.949). Based on the correlation analysis, the regression equation, was established between soil available selenium and the selenium content in flue-cured tobacco leaves for 72 samples. Regression equation reached a significant level by F-test. (author)

  15. Bioavailable nanoparticles obtained in laser ablation of a selenium target in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of producing colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles in water using the laser ablation method is described. The prospects of using nanoparticles of elementary selenium as a nutrition source of this microelement are discussed. (nanoparticles)

  16. Polymer-support Selenium-induced Electrophilic Cyclization: Solid-phase Synthesis of Flavonoids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian CAO; E TANG; Xuan HUANG; Lu Ling WU; Xian HUANG

    2006-01-01

    The Lewis acid mediated polystyrene supported selenium induced intramolecular cyclization of chalcones and oxidative cleavage of selenium resins gave the corresponding flavonoids in good yields and purities have been reported.

  17. Final report on biogeochemical cycling of selenium in Benton Lake, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The biogeochemical cycling of selenium in Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, west-central Montana was very complicated. Selenium accumulation in sediment was a...

  18. Hazard assessment of selenium contamination at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study done to assess selenium levels on Benton Lake NWR. Because selenium is not evenly distributed across wetland units, sampling in 2006...

  19. Update to hazard assessment of selenium contamination at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study done to assess selenium levels on Benton Lake NWR. Water was sampled for dissolved selenium in Lake Creek at the point where it...

  20. Update to hazard assessment of selenium contamination at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The levels of selenium in all trophic levels in Unit 1 on the refuge continue to be a concern. The mean concentration of selenium in water, sediment,...