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Sample records for amorphous ice transition

  1. Molecular Dynamical Simulation of Ice Phase Transition: Ice Ih to High-Density Amorphous

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Shun-Le; WANG Yan

    2005-01-01

    @@ We put 5kbar and 12kbar on perfect ice Ih lattice at 77K and 180K. After 30000 simulation steps (in units of 10-15 s), high-density amorphous ice is formed. Four-site simple-pair potential TIP4P is used for molecular interactions and the rigid molecular model is employed. Phase transition processes are fitted by an exponential function, and different phase transition times τ are obtained from O-O radial distribution functions (366 and 359fs for 77K and 180K) and O-O-O angle distribution functions (126 and 116fs for 77K and 180K).

  2. Amorphization of Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline ice by irradiation in the 10-50 K temperature range with 5 keV electrons at a dose of ~140 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. Our experiments showed that some of the 1.65-micrometer band survived the irradiation, to a degree that depends on the temperature, demonstrating that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. At 50 K, recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most known objects in the solar system, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites, and Kuiper belt objects, are equal to or above 50 K, this might explain why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline.

  3. Potential energy landscape of the apparent first-order phase transition between low-density and high-density amorphous ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Sciortino, Francesco; Starr, Francis W.; Poole, Peter H.

    2016-12-01

    The potential energy landscape (PEL) formalism is a valuable approach within statistical mechanics to describe supercooled liquids and glasses. Here we use the PEL formalism and computer simulations to study the pressure-induced transformations between low-density amorphous ice (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA) at different temperatures. We employ the ST2 water model for which the LDA-HDA transformations are remarkably sharp, similar to what is observed in experiments, and reminiscent of a first-order phase transition. Our results are consistent with the view that LDA and HDA configurations are associated with two distinct regions (megabasins) of the PEL that are separated by a potential energy barrier. At higher temperature, we find that low-density liquid (LDL) configurations are located in the same megabasin as LDA, and that high-density liquid (HDL) configurations are located in the same megabasin as HDA. We show that the pressure-induced LDL-HDL and LDA-HDA transformations occur along paths that interconnect these two megabasins, but that the path followed by the liquid is different from the path followed by the amorphous solid. At higher pressure, we also study the liquid-to-ice-VII first-order phase transition, and find that the behavior of the PEL properties across this transition is qualitatively similar to the changes found during the LDA-HDA transformation. This similarity supports the interpretation that the LDA-HDA transformation is a first-order phase transition between out-of-equilibrium states. Finally, we compare the PEL properties explored during the LDA-HDA transformations in ST2 water with those reported previously for SPC/E water, for which the LDA-HDA transformations are rather smooth. This comparison illuminates the previous work showing that, at accessible computer times scales, a liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in the case of ST2 water, but not for SPC/E water.

  4. Potential energy landscape of the apparent first-order phase transition between low-density and high-density amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovambattista, Nicolas; Sciortino, Francesco; Starr, Francis W; Poole, Peter H

    2016-12-14

    The potential energy landscape (PEL) formalism is a valuable approach within statistical mechanics to describe supercooled liquids and glasses. Here we use the PEL formalism and computer simulations to study the pressure-induced transformations between low-density amorphous ice (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA) at different temperatures. We employ the ST2 water model for which the LDA-HDA transformations are remarkably sharp, similar to what is observed in experiments, and reminiscent of a first-order phase transition. Our results are consistent with the view that LDA and HDA configurations are associated with two distinct regions (megabasins) of the PEL that are separated by a potential energy barrier. At higher temperature, we find that low-density liquid (LDL) configurations are located in the same megabasin as LDA, and that high-density liquid (HDL) configurations are located in the same megabasin as HDA. We show that the pressure-induced LDL-HDL and LDA-HDA transformations occur along paths that interconnect these two megabasins, but that the path followed by the liquid is different from the path followed by the amorphous solid. At higher pressure, we also study the liquid-to-ice-VII first-order phase transition, and find that the behavior of the PEL properties across this transition is qualitatively similar to the changes found during the LDA-HDA transformation. This similarity supports the interpretation that the LDA-HDA transformation is a first-order phase transition between out-of-equilibrium states. Finally, we compare the PEL properties explored during the LDA-HDA transformations in ST2 water with those reported previously for SPC/E water, for which the LDA-HDA transformations are rather smooth. This comparison illuminates the previous work showing that, at accessible computer times scales, a liquid-liquid phase transition occurs in the case of ST2 water, but not for SPC/E water.

  5. Structural Evolution of Compressing Amorphous Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; DONG Shun-Le

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to study structural evolution during compressing low density amorphous ice from one atmosphere to 2.5 GPa.The calculated results show that high density amorphous ice is formed under intermediate pressure of about 1.0 GPa and O-O-O angle ranges from about 83°to 113°and O-H……O is bent from 112°to 160°.The very high density amorphous ice is also formed under the pressure larger than 1.4 GPa and interstitial molecules are found in 0.3-0.4 (A) just beyond the nearest O-O distance.Low angle O-H……O disappears and it is believed that these hydrogen bonds are broken or re-bonded under high pressures.

  6. Polyamorphism in Water: Amorphous Ices and their Glassy States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann-Winkel, K.; Boehmer, R.; Fujara, F.; Gainaru, C.; Geil, B.; Loerting, T.

    2015-12-01

    Water is ubiquitous and of general importance for our environment. But it is also known as the most anomalous liquid. The fundamental origin of the numerous anomalies of water is still under debate. An understanding of these anomalous properties of water is closely linked to an understanding of the phase diagram of the metastable non-crystalline states of ice. The process of pressure induced amorphization of ice was first observed by Mishima et al. [1]. The authors pressurized hexagonal ice at 77 K up to a pressure of 1.6 GPa to form high density amorphous ice (HDA). So far three distinct structural states of amorphous water are known [2], they are called low- (LDA), high- (HDA) and very high density amorphous ice (VHDA). Since the discovery of multiple distinct amorphous states it is controversy discussed whether this phenomenon of polyamorphism at high pressures is connected to the occurrence of more than one supercooled liquid phase [3]. Alternatively, amorphous ices have been suggested to be of nanocrystalline nature, unrelated to liquids. Indeed inelastic X-ray scattering measurements indicate sharp crystal-like phonons in the amorphous ices [4]. In case of LDA the connection to the low-density liquid (LDL) was inferred from several experiments including the observation of a calorimetric glass-to-liquid transition at 136 K and ambient pressure [5]. Recently also the glass transition in HDA was observed at 116 K at ambient pressure [6] and at 140 K at elevated pressure of 1 GPa [7], using calorimetric measurements as well as dielectric spectroscopy. We discuss here the general importance of amorphous ices and their liquid counterparts and present calorimetric and dielectric measurements on LDA and HDA. The good agreement between dielectric and calorimetric results convey for a clearer picture of water's vitrification phenomenon. [1] O. Mishima, L. D. Calvert, and E. Whalley, Nature 314, 76, 1985 [2] D.T. Bowron, J. L. Finney, A. Hallbrucker, et al., J. Chem

  7. The Metastable Persistence of Vapor-Deposited Amorphous Ice at Anomalously High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    in each pattern are determined by subtracting a percentage of crystalline component relative to amorphous and pure crystalline endmembers. Vapor-deposited water ice undergoes two amorphous to amorphous structural transformations in the temperature range 15-130 K with important astrophysical implications. The onset of cubic crystallization occurs at 142-160 K (at 1K per minute heating rates) during which the 220 and 311 diffraction maxima appear and 0.1 micrometer crystallites can be seen in bright field images. This transition is time dependent.

  8. Structural studies of several distinct metastable forms of amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulk, C A; Benmore, C J; Urquidi, J; Klug, D D; Neuefeind, J; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2002-08-23

    Structural changes during annealing of high-density amorphous ice were studied with both neutron and x-ray diffraction. The first diffraction peak was followed from the high- to the low-density amorphous form. Changes were observed to occur through a series of intermediate forms that appear to be metastable at each anneal temperature. Five distinct amorphous forms were studied with neutron scattering, and many more forms may be possible. Radial distribution functions indicate that the structure evolves systematically between 4 and 8 angstroms. The phase transformations in low-temperature liquid water may be much more complex than currently understood.

  9. Distinct Properties of Nanofibrous Amorphous Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanyi Cai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We make glassy water in the form of nanofibers by electrospraying liquid water into a hyperquenching chamber. It is measured with means of differential scanning calorimetry, wide angle X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It is found that two apparent glass transitions at Tg1 = 136 K and Tg2 = 228 K are detected and non-crystallized water is observed at temperatures up to 228 K. This finding may expand the research objects for liquid water at low temperatures.

  10. Dynamics of CO in Amorphous Water Ice Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Karssemeijer, L J; van Hemert, M C; van der Avoird, A; Allodi, M A; Blake, G A; Cuppen, H M

    2013-01-01

    The long-timescale behavior of adsorbed carbon monoxide on the surface of amorphous water ice is studied under dense cloud conditions by means of off-lattice, on-the-fly, kinetic Monte Carlo simula- tions. It is found that the CO mobility is strongly influenced by the morphology of the ice substrate. Nanopores on the surface provide strong binding sites which can effectively immobilize the adsorbates at low coverage. As the coverage increases, these strong binding sites are gradually occupied leav- ing a number of admolecules with the ability to diffuse over the surface. Binding energies, and the energy barrier for diffusion are extracted for various coverages. Additionally, the mobility of CO is determined from isothermal desorption experiments. Reasonable agreement on the diffusivity of CO is found with the simulations. Analysis of the 2152 cm$^{-1}$, polar CO band supports the computational findings that the pores in the water ice provide the strongest binding sites and dominate diffusion at low temperatur...

  11. The Infrared Spectra and Absorption Intensities of Amorphous Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Our research group is carrying out new IR measurements of icy solids relevant to the outer solar system and to the interstellar medium, with an emphasis on amorphous and crystalline ices below ~ 120 K. Our goal is to update and add to the relatively meager literature on this subject and to provide electronic versions of state-of-the-art data, since the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate reference spectra and IR band strengths. In the past year, we have focused on three of the simplest and most abundant components of interstellar and solar-system ices: methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methanol (CH3OH). Infrared spectra from ˜ 4500 to 500 cm-1 have been measured for each of these molecules in μm-thick films at temperatures from 10 to 120 K. All known amorphous and crystalline phases have been reproduced and, for some, presented for the first time. We also report measurements of the index of refraction at 670 nm and the mass densities for each ice phase. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible. Electronic versions of our new results are available at http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/691/cosmicice/ constants.html.

  12. The structure and dynamics of amorphous and crystalline phases of ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klug, D. D.; Tse, J. S.; Tulk, C. A.; Svensson, E. C.; Swainson, I.; Loong, C.-K.

    2000-07-14

    The structures of the high and low-density amorphous phases of ice are studied using several techniques. The diffraction patterns of high and low density amorphous ice are analyzed using reverse Monte Carlo methods and compared with molecular dynamics simulations of these phases. The spectra of crystalline and amorphous phases of ice obtained by Raman and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering are analyzed to yield structural features for comparison with the results of molecular dynamics and Reverse Monte Carlo analysis. The structural details obtained indicate that there are significant differences between the structure of liquid water and the amorphous phases of ice.

  13. Atypical water lattices and their possible relevance to the amorphous ices: A density functional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Anick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Of the fifteen known crystalline forms of ice, eleven consist of a single topologically connected hydrogen bond network with four H-bonds at every O. The other four, Ices VI–VIII and XV, consist of two topologically connected networks, each with four H-bonds at every O. The networks interpenetrate but do not share H-bonds. This article presents two new periodic water lattice families whose topological connectivity is “atypical”: they consist of many two-dimensional layers that share no H-bonds. Layers are held together only by dispersion forces. Within each layer there are still four H-bonds at each O. Called “Hexagonal Bilayer Water” (HBW and “Pleated Sheet Water” (PSW, they have computed densities of about 1.1 g/mL and 1.3 g/mL respectively, and nearest neighbor O-coordination is 4.5 to 5.5 and 6 to 8 respectively. Using density functional theory (BLYP-D/TZVP, various proton ordered forms of HBW and PSW are optimized and categorized. There are simple pathways connecting Ice-Ih to HBW and HBW to PSW. Their computed properties suggest similarities to the high density and very high density amorphous ices (HDA and VHDA respectively. It is unknown whether HDA, VHDA, and Low Density Amorphous Ice (LDA are fully disordered glasses down to the molecular level, or whether there is some short-range local order. Based on estimated radial distribution functions (RDFs, one proton ordered form of HBW matches HDA best. The idea is explored that HDA could contain islands with this underlying structure, and likewise, that VHDA could contain regions of PSW. A “microlattice model version 1” (MLM1 is presented as a device to compare key experimental data on the amorphous ices with these atypical structures and with a microlattice form of Ice-XI for LDA. Resemblances are found with the amorphs’ RDFs, densities, Raman spectra, and transition behaviors. There is not enough information in the static models to assign either a microlattice structure

  14. Amorphous and polycrystalline water ices in space environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Diana; Pilling, Sergio; Da Silveira, Enio; Barros, Ana

    2016-07-01

    Ices are an important reservoir of more complex molecular species in several space environments, containing information about the composition and formation of these regions. Water ice is the dominant constituent of interstellar ices in most lines of sight and is about 70 % of the composition in comets, being a key molecule in astrochemical models. It is believed that one of the reactive species possibly evaporated from the water ices is the hydronium ion, H_{3}O^{+}, which plays an important role in the oxygen chemistry network. This ion has been detected in the lunar surface of Enceladus and Titan, and toward the Sagittarius B2 molecular Clouds, where H_{2}O and OH were also identified. In this work, the ion desorption due to radiolysis in ices constituted by water at three different temperatures (40, 70 and 125 K) is studied, to investigate the different allotropic water ices. A discussion on the rate of H_{3}O^{+} and water delivered to gas phase, as well as the half-life of water ice grains, inside dense molecular clouds considering a constants cosmic ray flux is given. The ions desorbed from water ice have been mass/charge analyzed by a time-of-flight spectrometer. Among the results, it is seen that in the positive ion spectrum of high density amorphous water ice at 40 K the highest desorption yields (ejected ions/impact) correspond to H^{+}, H_{3}O^{+} and clusters formed by (H_{2}O)_{n}R^{+}, where R^{+} is H_{3}O^{+} and 1 ≤ n ≤ 25. At T = 125 K, the ice is in its low density polycrystalline form and new clusters are present, such as (H_{2}O)_{n}R^{+}, where R^{+} is H_{2}^{+} and H_{3}^{+} (for low n), beyond H_{3}O^{+}. Therefore, it is seen that (H_{2}O)_{n}H_{3}O^{+} series (with n between 1 and 25) is dominant in all cases. The H_{3}O^{+} desorption yield at 40 K is about 5times10^{-3} ions/impact. This value is 4-5 times higher than the one obtained at T > 125 K. This behavior is also seen to all series member and consequently to the sum (Yn).

  15. State transformations and ice nucleation in glassy or (semi-solid amorphous organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Baustian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glassy or amorphous (semi-solid organic aerosol particles have the potential to serve as surfaces for heterogeneous ice nucleation in cirrus clouds. Raman spectroscopy and optical microscopy have been used in conjunction with a cold stage to examine water uptake and ice nucleation on individual aqueous organic glass particles at atmospherically relevant temperatures (200–273 K. Three organic compounds considered proxies for atmospheric secondary organic aerosol (SOA were used in this investigation: sucrose, citric acid and glucose. Internally mixed particles consisting of each organic species and ammonium sulfate were also investigated.

    Results from water uptake experiments were used to construct glass transition curves and state diagrams for each organic and corresponding mixture. A unique glass transition point on each state diagram, Tg', was used to quantify and compare results from this study to previous works. Values of Tg' determined for aqueous sucrose, glucose and citric acid glasses were 236 K, 230 K and 220 K, respectively. Values of Tg' for internally mixed organic/sulfate particles were always significantly lower; 210 K, 207 K and 215 K for sucrose/sulfate, glucose/sulfate and citric acid/sulfate, respectively.

    All investigated organic species were observed to serve as heterogeneous ice nuclei at tropospheric temperatures. Heterogeneous ice nucleation on pure organic particles occurred at Sice=1.1–1.4 for temperatures between 235 K and 200 K. Particles consisting of 1:1 organic-sulfate mixtures remained liquid over a greater range of conditions but were in some cases also observed to depositionally nucleate ice at temperatures below 202 K (Sice=1.25–1.38.

    Glass transition curves constructed from experimental data were incorporated into the Community Aerosol Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA along with the

  16. Glass transition phenomena applied to powdered amorphous food carbohydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ronkart, Sebastien N; Blecker, Christophe; Deroanne, Claude; Paquot, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Glass transition phenomena applied to powdered amorphous food carbohydrates. During these last fifteen years, some food technologists and scientists have become aware of the importance of the glass transition, a thermal property of glassy or amorphous material, in food preparation processes. Recent studies have successfully correlated this fundamental notion to technofunctional changes within the powder. The aim of this paper is to present in a non exhaustive manner the relationship between g...

  17. The yielding transition in amorphous solids under oscillatory shear deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishangthem, Premkumar; Parmar, Anshul D. S.; Sastry, Srikanth

    2017-01-01

    Amorphous solids are ubiquitous among natural and man-made materials. Often used as structural materials for their attractive mechanical properties, their utility depends critically on their response to applied stresses. Processes underlying such mechanical response, and in particular the yielding behaviour of amorphous solids, are not satisfactorily understood. Although studied extensively, observed yielding behaviour can be gradual and depend significantly on conditions of study, making it difficult to convincingly validate existing theoretical descriptions of a sharp yielding transition. Here we employ oscillatory deformation as a reliable probe of the yielding transition. Through extensive computer simulations for a wide range of system sizes, we demonstrate that cyclically deformed model glasses exhibit a sharply defined yielding transition with characteristics that are independent of preparation history. In contrast to prevailing expectations, the statistics of avalanches reveals no signature of the impending transition, but exhibit dramatic, qualitative, changes in character across the transition. PMID:28248289

  18. Stepwise morphological change of porous amorphous ice films observed through adsorption of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Noriko; Kato, Hiroyuki S.; Kawai, Maki

    2002-03-01

    Morphological change of amorphous ice films of D2O has been studied through adsorption of methane using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy under ultrahigh vacuum. The investigated ice films were prepared under several different conditions; first, water (D2O) molecules are evaporated onto a Ru substrate at 25 K, and then subjected to an annealing process at various temperatures prior to methane deposition. On ice annealed at low temperatures, two desorption species of methane were observed in TDS: one was derived from methane adsorbed near the ice surface and the other was attributed to the desorption of methane encapsulated in ice during heating. Only the former species was observed when the annealing temperature exceeded 60 K. This indicates that reconstruction of ice occurs below 60 K, which inhibits the encapsulation of methane molecules from the amorphous ice. On the other hand, infrared spectra of ice covered with methane show that the micropores in ice start to collapse at ˜80 K, and ice becomes pore free at 120 K. We have found that the morphological change of amorphous ice induced by thermal relaxation takes place in a stepwise manner.

  19. Thermal transitions of the amorphous polymers in wheat straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stelte, Wolfgang; Clemons, Craig; Holm, Jens K.;

    2011-01-01

    The thermal transitions of the amorphous polymers in wheat straw were investigated using dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The study included both natural and solvent extracted wheat straw, in moist (8–9% water content) and dry conditions, and was compared to spruce samples. Under...... these conditions two transitions arising from the glass transition of lignin and hemicelluloses have been identified. Key transitions attributed to softening of lignin were found at 53, 63 and 91 °C for moist samples of wheat straw, extracted straw and spruce, respectively. Transitions for hemicelluloses were...... determined at 2, −1 and 5 °C, respectively. Differences are likely due to different compositions of lignin and hemicelluloses from straw and spruce and structural differences between the raw materials. The high wax content in wheat straw resulted in a transition at about 40 °C which was absent in solvent...

  20. Atomistic and infrared study of CO-water amorphous ice onto olivine dust grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Roa, Elizabeth; Moreno, Fernando; López-Moreno, J. Juan; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    This work is a study of CO and H2O molecules as adsorbates that interact on the surface of olivine dust grains. Olivine (forsterite) is present on the Earth, planetary dust, in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in particular in comets. The composition of amorphous ice is very important for the interpretation of processes that occur in the solar system and the ISM. Dust particles in ISM are composed of a heterogeneous mixture of amorphous or crystalline silicates (e.g. olivine) organic material, carbon, and other minor constituents. These dust grains are embedded in a matrix of ices, such as H2O, CO, CO2, NH3, and CH4. We consider that any amorphous ice will interact and grow faster on dust grain surfaces. In this work we explore the adsorption of CO-H2O amorphous ice onto several (100) forsterite surfaces (dipolar and non-dipolar), by using first principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). These models are applied to two possible situations: i) adsorption of CO molecules mixed into an amorphous ice matrix (gas mixture) and adsorbed directly onto the forsterite surface. This interaction has lower adsorption energy than polar molecules (H2O and NH3) adsorbed on this surface; ii) adsorption of CO when the surface has previously been covered by amorphous water ice (onion model). In this case the calculations show that adsorption energy is low, indicating that this interaction is weak and therefore the CO can be desorbed with a small increase of temperature. Vibration spectroscopy for the most stable complex was also studied and the frequencies were in good agreement with experimental frequency values.

  1. Extracellular ice phase transitions in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, T C

    2014-01-01

    At temperatures below their temperature of crystallization (Tc), the extracellular body fluids of insects undergo a phase transition from liquid to solid. Insects that survive the transition to equilibrium (complete freezing of the body fluids) are designated as freeze tolerant. Although this phenomenon has been reported and described in many Insecta, current nomenclature and theory does not clearly delineate between the process of transition (freezing) and the final solid phase itself (the frozen state). Thus freeze tolerant insects are currently, by convention, described in terms of the temperature at which the crystallization of their body fluids is initiated, Tc. In fact, the correct descriptor for insects that tolerate freezing is the temperature of equilibrium freezing, Tef. The process of freezing is itself a separate physical event with unique physiological stresses that are associated with ice growth. Correspondingly there are a number of insects whose physiological cryo-limits are very specifically delineated by this transitional envelope. The distinction also has considerable significance for our understanding of insect cryobiology: firstly, because the ability to manage endogenous ice growth is a fundamental segregator of cryotype; and secondly, because our understanding of internal ice management is still largely nascent.

  2. CO diffusion into amorphous H2O ices

    CERN Document Server

    Lauck, Trish; Shulenberger, Katherine; Rajappan, Mahesh; Oberg, Karin I; Cuppen, Herma M

    2015-01-01

    The mobility of atoms, molecules and radicals in icy grain mantles regulate ice restructuring, desorption, and chemistry in astrophysical environments. Interstellar ices are dominated by H2O, and diffusion on external and internal (pore) surfaces of H2O-rich ices is therefore a key process to constrain. This study aims to quantify the diffusion kinetics and barrier of the abundant ice constituent CO into H2O dominated ices at low temperatures (15-23 K), by measuring the mixing rate of initially layered H2O(:CO2)/CO ices. The mixed fraction of CO as a function of time is determined by monitoring the shape of the infrared CO stretching band. Mixing is observed at all investigated temperatures on minute time scales, and can be ascribed to CO diffusion in H2O ice pores. The diffusion coefficient and final mixed fraction depend on ice temperature, porosity, thickness and composition. The experiments are analyzed by applying Fick's diffusion equation under the assumption that mixing is due to CO diffusion into an i...

  3. Investigation of the atypical glass transition and recrystallization behavior of amorphous prazosin salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lokesh; Popat, Dharmesh; Bansal, Arvind K

    2011-08-25

    This manuscript studied the effect of counterion on the glass transition and recrystallization behavior of amorphous salts of prazosin. Three amorphous salts of prazosin, namely, prazosin hydrochloride, prazosin mesylate and prazosin tosylate were prepared by spray drying, and characterized by optical-polarized microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry was used to determine the glass transition and recrystallization temperature of amorphous salts. Glass transition of amorphous salts followed the order: prazosin mesylate > prazosin tosylate ~ prazosin hydrochloride. Amorphous prazosin mesylate and prazosin tosylate showed glass transition, followed by recrystallization. In contrast, amorphous prazosin hydrochloride showed glass transition and recrystallization simultaneously. Density Functional Theory, however, suggested the expected order of glass transition as prazosin hydrochloride > prazosin mesylate > prazosin tosylate. The counterintuitive observation of amorphous prazosin hydrochloride having lower glass transition was explained in terms of its lower activation energy (206.1 kJ/mol) for molecular mobility at Tg, compared to that for amorphous prazosin mesylate (448.5 kJ/mol) and prazosin tosylate (490.7 kJ/mol), and was further correlated to a difference in hydrogen bonding strength of the amorphous and the corresponding recrystallized salts. This study has implications in selection of an optimal amorphous salt form for pharmaceutical development.

  4. Ion implantation damage and crystalline-amorphous transition in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Impellizzeri, G.; Mirabella, S.; Grimaldi, M.G. [Universita di Catania, MATIS IMM-CNR (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Catania (Italy)

    2011-05-15

    Experimental studies on the damage produced in (100) Ge substrates by implantation of Ge{sup +} ions at different energies (from 25 to 600 keV), fluences (from 2 x 10{sup 13} to 4 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}) and temperature (room temperature, RT, or liquid-nitrogen temperature, LN{sub 2}T) have been performed by using the Rutherford backscattering spectrometry technique. We demonstrated that the higher damage rate of Ge with respect to Si is due to both the high stopping power of germanium atoms and the low mobility of point defects within the collision cascades. The amorphization of Ge has been modeled by employing the critical damage energy density model in a large range of implantation energies and fluences both at RT and LN{sub 2}T. The experimental results for implantation at LN{sub 2}T were fitted using a critical damage energy density of {proportional_to}1 eV/atom. A fictitious value of {proportional_to}5 eV/atom was obtained for the samples implanted at RT, essentially because at RT the damage annihilation plays a non-negligible role against the crystalline-amorphous transition phase. The critical damage energy density model was found to stand also for other ions implanted in crystalline Ge (Ar{sup +} and Ga{sup +}). (orig.)

  5. Sticking of molecules on non-porous amorphous water ice

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modeling of physical and chemical processes in the interstellar medium requires detailed knowledge of how atoms and molecule adsorb on dust grains. However, the sticking coefficient, a number between 0 and 1 that measures the first step in the interaction of a particle with a surface, is usually assumed in simulations of ISM environments to be either 0.5 or 1. Here we report on the determination of the sticking coefficient of H$_2$, D$_2$, N$_2$, O$_2$, CO, CH$_4$, and CO$_2$ on non-porous amorphous solid water (np-ASW). The sticking coefficient was measured over a wide range of surface temperatures using a highly collimated molecular beam. We showed that the standard way of measuring the sticking coefficient --- the King-Wells method --- leads to the underestimation of trapping events in which there is incomplete energy accommodation of the molecule on the surface. Surface scattering experiments with the use of a pulsed molecular beam are used instead to measure the sticking coefficient. Based on th...

  6. Possible existence of two amorphous phases of D-mannitol related by a first-order transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Men; Yu, Lian, E-mail: lian.yu@wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry and School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Wang, Jun-Qiang; Perepezko, John H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-06-28

    We report that the common polyalcohol D-mannitol may have two amorphous phases related by a first-order transition. Slightly above its glass transition temperature T{sub g} (284 K), the supercooled liquid (SCL) of D-mannitol transforms to a low-energy, apparently amorphous phase with stronger hydrogen bonds. The enthalpy of this so-called Phase X is approximately halfway between those of the known amorphous and crystalline phases, a position low for glass aging and high for crystal polymorphs. Similar to the SCL, Phase X is transparent with broad X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering; upon temperature cycling, it exhibits a glass-transition-like change of heat capacity. On fast heating, Phase X transforms back to the SCL near T{sub g} + 50 K, enabling a determination of their equilibrium temperature. The presence of D-sorbitol as a plasticizer enables observation of a first-order transition from the SCL to Phase X entirely in the liquid state (liquid-liquid transition). The transition from D-mannitol’s SCL to Phase X has intriguing similarities with the formation of the glacial phase of triphenyl phosphite (TPP) and the conversion from high-density to low-density amorphous ice, both studied intensely in the context of polyamorphism. All three processes occur near T{sub g} with substantial enthalpy decrease toward the crystalline phases; the processes in water and D-mannitol both strengthen the hydrogen bonds. In contrast to TPP, D-mannitol’s Phase X forms more rapidly and can transform back to the SCL. These features make D-mannitol a valuable new model for understanding polyamorphism.

  7. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice

    CERN Document Server

    Urquidi, J; Neuefeind, J; Tomberli, B; Tulk, C A; Guthrie, M; Egelstaff, P A; Klug, D D

    2003-01-01

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully 'annealed' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is approx 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 A sup - sup 1. This compares to a maximum effect of approx 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 A sup - sup 1 in the isotopi...

  8. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi, J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Benmore, C J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Neuefeind, J [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Tomberli, B [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Tulk, C A [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Guthrie, M [Intense Pulsed Neutron Source Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Egelstaff, P A [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1 (Canada); Klug, D D [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON, K0A 0R6 (Canada)

    2003-06-11

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully 'annealed' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is {approx} 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 A{sup -1}. This compares to a maximum effect of {approx} 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 A{sup -1} in the isotopic difference function is not reproduced in the temperature difference and suggests that additional longer-range correlations are present in the more ordered deuterated form.

  9. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi, J.; Benmore, C. J.; Neuefeind, J.; Tomberli, B.; Tulk, C. A.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Klug, D.D.; CHM; IPNS; APS-USR

    2003-06-11

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully ''annealed'' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is {approx} 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 {angstrom}{sup -1}. This compares to a maximum effect of {approx} 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 {angstrom}{sup -1} in the isotopic difference function is not reproduced in the temperature difference and suggests that additional longer-range correlations are present in the more ordered deuterated form.

  10. Creep of FINEMET alloy at amorphous to nanocrystalline transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Csach, K.; Miškuf, J.; Juríková, A.; Ocelík, V.

    2009-01-01

    The application of FINEMET-type materials with specific magnetic properties prepared by the crystallization of amorphous alloys is often limited by their brittleness. The structure of these materials consists of nanosized Fe-based grains surrounded with amorphous phase. Then the final macroscopic me

  11. Transitions of amorphous- crystalline-amorphous in bulk metallic glass under HP and HT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In-situ SR-XRD measurements revealed that the crystallization process in Zr41.2Ti13.sCu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass is significantly different from that in traditional glasses. Subsequent heating at 10 GPa converts the sample from amorphous phase into the metastable fcc phase and then leads to the fcc phase back to the amorphous phase,nomena in the material under high pressure and high temperature.``

  12. Amorphous and crystalline phase interaction during the Brill transition in nylon 66

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A prominent α' process in specifically treated nylon 66 and microcomposite samples is identified by dynamic mechanical analysis and proposed to be an amorphous phase counterpart of the Brill transition identified by synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD. It is suggested that this α' process, which marks a critical free volume change and an onset of segmental chain movement in the amorphous phase, precedes and prompts the Brill transition in the crystalline phase.

  13. Crystalline to amorphous transition in solids upon high-pressure torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundeev, R.V., E-mail: apricisvir@gmail.com [I.P. Bardin Central Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, 2-ya Baumanskaya 9/23, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Moscow State University of Instrument Engineering and Computer Science, Stromynka 20, Moscow 107996 (Russian Federation); Glezer, A.M. [I.P. Bardin Central Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, 2-ya Baumanskaya 9/23, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Moscow State University of Instrument Engineering and Computer Science, Stromynka 20, Moscow 107996 (Russian Federation); National University of Science and Technology “MISIS”, Leninsky avenue 4, Moscow 119049 (Russian Federation); Shalimova, A.V. [I.P. Bardin Central Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, 2-ya Baumanskaya 9/23, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-25

    Highlights: • Ti–Ni, Zr and Fe-based alloys were deformed using HTP processing. • Ability to deformation-induced amorphization (DIA) of these alloys was studied. • Amorphization is determined by mechanical, thermodynamic and concentration factors. • The smaller stability of phases the higher their ability to deformation amorphization. • There is the difference between of DIA and to thermal amorphization in the nature. - Abstract: The amorphization behavior of the crystalline multicomponent Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 30}Hf{sub 20}, Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 25}Cu{sub 25,} Zr{sub 50}Ni{sub 18}Ti{sub 17}Cu{sub 15}, and Fe{sub 78}B{sub 8.5}Si{sub 9}P{sub 4.5} alloys upon severe plastic deformation (SPD) has been studied. It is shown that the crystalline to amorphous transition is determined by the ability of the crystals to accumulation of deformation defects under mechanical action, by the thermodynamic stability of the crystalline phases contained in the alloy, and by the possibility of the diffusion processes necessary for the change in the chemical composition of the crystalline and amorphous phases upon deformation. It is found that the susceptibility to amorphization upon SPD does not coincide with the tendency of the alloys to amorphization upon melt quenching.

  14. Rate of thermal transitions in kagome spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liashko, S. Y.; Uzdin, V. M.; Jónsson, H.

    2016-08-01

    The rate of thermal transitions in a kagome spin ice element is calculated using harmonic transition state theory for magnetic systems. Each element consists of six prolate magnetic islands. Minimum energy paths on the multidimensional energy surface are found to estimate activation energy. Vibrational frequencies are also calculated to estimate the rate of the various transitions. An overall transition rate between equivalent ground states is calculated by using the stationary state approximation including all possible transition paths. The resulting transition rate is in a good agreement with experimentally measured lifetime.

  15. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and phase transition of viscous α-pinene secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Virtanen, Annele; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate deposition ice nucleation and thus influence cirrus cloud properties. Global model simulations of monoterpene SOA particles suggest that viscous biogenic SOA are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle (INP) budget. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) experiment at CERN (Ignatius et al., 2015, Järvinen et al., 2015). In the CLOUD chamber, the SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10° C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water (RHw) to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. We found that particles formed and grown in the chamber developed an asymmetric shape through coagulation. As the RHw was increased to between 35 % at -10° C and 80 % at -38° C, a transition to spherical shape was observed with a new in-situ optical method. This transition confirms previous modelling of the viscosity transition conditions. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber SPIN (Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei) for different SOA particle sizes. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA in the deposition mode for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4, significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -36.5 and -38.3° C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. References Ignatius, K. et al., Heterogeneous ice

  16. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Astronomical Ices: I. Amorphous and Crystalline Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. L.; Ferrante, R. F.; Moore, M. H.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report recent measurements on acetylene (C2H2) ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System and the interstellar medium. New near- and mid-infrared data, including optical constants (n, k), absorption coefficients (alpha), and absolute band strengths (A), are presented for both amorphous and crystalline phases of C2H2 that exist below 70 K. Comparisons are made to earlier work. Electronic versions of the data are made available, as is a computer routine to use our reported n and k values to simulate the observed IR spectra. Suggestions are given for the use of the data and a comparison to a spectrum of Makemake is made.

  17. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, G; Vinothkumar, K R; Henderson, R

    2015-11-01

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å(2) for every incident 300 keV e(-)/Å(2). The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e(-)/Å(2) per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination.

  18. A Comprehensive Study of Hydrogen Adsorbing to Amorphous Water ice: Defining Adsorption in Classical Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, John L.; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C.

    2016-11-01

    Gas-grain and gas-phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas-grain reactions require a substrate (e.g., a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas-grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking probabilities and coefficients. Here, using our new definition of a sticking event, we report sticking probabilities and sticking coefficients for nine different incident kinetic energies of hydrogen atoms [5-400 K] across seven different temperatures of dust grains [10-70 K]. We find that probabilities and coefficients vary both as a function of grain temperature and incident kinetic energy over the range of 0.99-0.22.

  19. Polaron transitions in charge intercalated amorphous tungsten oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenger, M.F.; Hofmann, T.; Schubert, M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln (United States); Hoeing, T. [Flabeg GmbH and Co. KG, Furth im Wald (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    We present a parametric dielectric function model in dependence of the intercalated charge per tungsten ion ratio x, which excellently describes the ellipsometric experimental data, and allows the identification of two polaron modes corresponding to transitions between W{sup 4+} and W{sup 5+} and between W{sup 5+} and W{sup 6+} tungsten ion sites. A competitive relation between the two polaron transitions is found. An empirical relation for the amplitude of the polaron transitions is found useful to provide a good description of the polaron transition dependence on x. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles interacting with water vapor – Part 1: Microstructure, phase transitions, hygroscopic growth and kinetic limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Koop

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions with water are crucial for the properties, transformation and climate effects of atmospheric aerosols. Here we outline characteristic features and differences in the interaction of amorphous and crystalline aerosol particles with water vapor. Using a hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (H-TDMA, we performed hydration, dehydration and cyclic hydration&dehydration experiments with aerosol particles composed of levoglucosan, oxalic acid and ammonium sulfate (diameters ~100–200 nm, relative uncertainties <0.4%, relative humidities <5% to 95% at 298 K. The measurements and accompanying Köhler model calculations provide new insights into particle microstructure, surface adsorption, bulk absorption, phase transitions and hygroscopic growth. The results of these and related investigations lead to the following main conclusions: 1. Many organic substances (including carboxylic acids, carbohydrates and proteins tend to form amorphous rather than crystalline phases upon drying of aqueous solution droplets. Depending on viscosity and microstructure, the amorphous phases can be classified as glasses, rubbers, gels or viscous liquids. 2. Amorphous organic substances tend to absorb water vapor and undergo gradual deliquescence and hygroscopic growth at much lower relative humidity than their crystalline counterparts. 3. In the course of hydration and dehydration, certain organic substances can form rubber- or gel-like structures (supra-molecular networks and undergo stepwise transitions between swollen and collapsed network structures. 4. Organic gels or (semi-solid amorphous shells (glassy, rubbery, ultra-viscous with low molecular diffusivity can kinetically limit the uptake and release of water by submicron aerosol particles on (multi-second time scales, which may influence the hygroscopic growth and activation of aerosol particles as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and ice nuclei (IN. 5. The shape and porosity of amorphous

  1. Kinetics of glass transition and crystallization in multicomponent bulk amorphous alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄艳歆[1; 赵德乾[2; 张勇[3; 汪卫华[4; 潘明祥[5

    2000-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) is used to investigate apparent activation energy of glass transition and crystallization of Zr-based bulk amorphous alloys by Kissinger equation under non-isothermal condition. It is shown that the glass transition behavior as well as crystallization reaction depends on the heating rate and has a characteristic of kinetic effects. After being isothermally annealed near glass transition temperature, the apparent activation energy of glass transition increases and the apparent activation energy of crystallization reaction decreases. However, the kinetic effects are independent of the pre-annealing.

  2. A fast method to diagnose phase transition from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU; GuoFu

    2007-01-01

    A series of hydrogenated silicon thin films were prepared by the radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method (RF-PECVD) with various silane concentrations. The influence of silane concentration on structural and electrical characteristics of these films was investigated to study the phase transition region from amorphous to microcrystalline phase. At the same time, optical emission spectra (OES) from the plasma during the deposition process were monitored to get information about the plasma properties, Raman spectra were measured to study the structural characteristics of the deposited films. The combinatorial analysis of OES and Raman spectra results demonstrated that the OES can be used as a fast method to diagnose phase transition from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon. At last the physical mechanism, why both OES and Raman can be used to diagnose the phase transition, was analyzed theoretically.……

  3. Disorder-assisted melting and the glass transition in amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Alessio; Terentjev, Eugene

    2013-03-01

    The mechanical response of solids depends on temperature because the way atoms and molecules respond collectively to deformation is affected at various levels by thermal motion. This is a fundamental problem of solid state science and plays a crucial role in metallurgy, aerospace engineering, energy. In disordered solids (glass, amorphous semiconductors, ceramics, metallic glass, polymers) the vanishing of rigidity as a function of temperature is not well understood because continuum elasticity is inapplicable due to the disorder leading to nontrivial (nonaffine) components in the atomic displacements. Our theory explains the basic mechanism of the melting transition of amorphous solids in terms of the lattice energy lost to nonaffine motion, compared to which thermal vibrations turn out to play a negligible role. The theory is in good agreement with data on melting of amorphous polymers (where no alternative theory can be found in the literature) and offers new opportunities in materials science.

  4. Molecular relaxation behavior and isothermal crystallization above glass transition temperature of amorphous hesperetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shete, Ganesh; Khomane, Kailas S; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the relaxation behavior of amorphous hesperetin (HRN), using dielectric spectroscopy, and assessment of its crystallization kinetics above glass transition temperature (Tg ). Amorphous HRN exhibited both local (β-) and global (α-) relaxations. β-Relaxation was observed below Tg , whereas α-relaxation prominently emerged above Tg . β-Relaxation was found to be of Johari-Goldstein type and was correlated with α-process by coupling model. Secondly, isothermal crystallization experiments were performed at 363 K (Tg + 16.5 K), 373 K (Tg + 26.5 K), and 383 K (Tg + 36.5 K). The kinetics of crystallization, obtained from the normalized dielectric strength, was modeled using the Avrami model. Havriliak-Negami (HN) shape parameters, αHN and αHN .βHN , were analyzed during the course of crystallization to understand the dynamics of amorphous phase during the emergence of crystallites. HN shape parameters indicated that long range (α-like) were motions affected to a greater extent than short range (β-like) motions during isothermal crystallization studies at all temperature conditions. The variable behavior of α-like motions at different isothermal crystallization temperatures was attributed to evolving crystallites with time and increase in electrical conductivity with temperature.

  5. Upper critical fields and superconducting transition temperatures of some zirconium-base amorphous transition-metal alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkut, M. G.; Hake, R. R.

    1983-08-01

    Superconducting upper critical fields Hc2(T), transition temperatures Tc and normal-state electrical resistivities ρn have been measured in the amorphous transition-metal alloy series Zr1-xCox, Zr1-xNix, (Zr1-xTix)0.78Ni0.22, and (Zr1-xNbx)0.78Ni0.22. Structural integrity of these melt-spun alloys is indicated by x-ray, density, bend-ductility, normal-state electrical resistivity, superconducting transition width, and mixed-state flux-pinning measurements. The specimens display Tc=2.1-3.8 K, ρn=159-190 μΩ cm, and |(dHc2dT)Tc|=28-36 kG/K. These imply electron mean free paths l~2-6 Å, zero-temperature Ginzburg-Landau coherence distances ξG0~50-70 Å, penetration depths λG0~(7-10)×103 Å, and extremely high dirtiness parameters ξ0l~300-1300. All alloys display Hc2(T) curves with negative curvature and (with two exceptions) fair agreement with the standard dirty-limit theory of Werthamer, Helfand, Hohenberg, and Maki (WHHM) for physically reasonable values of spin-orbit-coupling induced, electron-spin-flip scattering time τso. This is in contrast to the anomalously elevated Hc2(T) behavior which is nearly linear in T that is observed by some, and the unphysically low-τso fits to WHHM theory obtained by others, for various amorphous alloys. Current ideas that such anomalies may be due to alloy inhomogeneity are supported by present results on two specimens for which relatively low-τso fits of Hc2(T) to WHHM theory are coupled with superconductive evidence for inhomogeneity: relatively broad transitions at Tc and Hc2 current-density-dependent transitions at Hc2 and (in one specimen) a J-dependent, high-H (>Hc2), resistive "beak effect." In the Zr1-xCox and Zr1-xNix series, Tc decreases linearly with x (and with unfilled-shell average electron-to-atom ratio in the range 5.05previous results for these systems and contrary to the Tc vs behavior of both amorphous and crystalline transition-metal alloys formed between near neighbors in the Periodic Table. Upper

  6. Microcrystalline B-doped window layers prepared near amorphous to microcrystalline transition by HWCVD and its application in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany)]. E-mail: kumarp@rhrk.uni-kl.de; Kupich, M. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany); Grunsky, D. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany); Schroeder, B. [Department of Physics/Center of Optical Technologies and Laser Controlled Processes, University of Kaiserslautern, P.O. Box 3049, Kaiserslautern D-67653 (Germany)

    2006-04-20

    The electronic and structural properties of p-type microcrystalline silicon films prepared near the microcrystalline to amorphous ({mu}c-amorphous) transition by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition are studied. Silane is used as a source gas while H{sub 2} as diluent and trimethylboron (TMB) and boron trifluoride (BF{sub 3}) as doping gases. Increasing TMB concentration from 0.01% to 5% favors the amorphous growth whereas for BF{sub 3} the crystalline fraction remains constant. The dark conductivity ({sigma} {sub d}) of {mu}c-Si:H p-layers remains approximately constant for TMB 1-5% at constant crystalline fraction X {sub c}. This dark conductivity behavior is attributed to the decrease in doping efficiency with increasing TMB concentration. The best initial efficiency obtained for a 400 nm amorphous pin solar cell with optimized {mu}c-Si:H p-layer is 7.7% (V {sub oc} = 874 mV, J {sub sc} = 12.91 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 68%)

  7. Impact of polymers on the crystallization and phase transition kinetics of amorphous nifedipine during dissolution in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shweta A; Alonzo, David E; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Gao, Yi; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-10-06

    The commercial and clinical success of amorphous solid dispersions (ASD) in overcoming the low bioavailability of poorly soluble molecules has generated momentum among pharmaceutical scientists to advance the fundamental understanding of these complex systems. A major limitation of these formulations stems from the propensity of amorphous solids to crystallize upon exposure to aqueous media. This study was specifically focused on developing analytical techniques to evaluate the impact of polymers on the crystallization behavior during dissolution, which is critical in designing effective amorphous formulations. In the study, the crystallization and polymorphic conversions of a model compound, nifedipine, were explored in the absence and presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose (HPMC), and HPMC-acetate succinate (HPMC-AS). A combination of analytical approaches including Raman spectroscopy, polarized light microscopy, and chemometric techniques such as multivariate curve resolution (MCR) were used to evaluate the kinetics of crystallization and polymorphic transitions as well as to identify the primary route of crystallization, i.e., whether crystallization took place in the dissolving solid matrix or from the supersaturated solutions generated during dissolution. Pure amorphous nifedipine, when exposed to aqueous media, was found to crystallize rapidly from the amorphous matrix, even when polymers were present in the dissolution medium. Matrix crystallization was avoided when amorphous solid dispersions were prepared, however, crystallization from the solution phase was rapid. MCR was found to be an excellent data processing technique to deconvolute the complex phase transition behavior of nifedipine.

  8. Influence of compression on water sorption, glass transition, and enthalpy relaxation behavior of freeze-dried amorphous sugar matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Koreyoshi; Kagotani, Ryo; Nomura, Mayo; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Kinugawa, Kohshi; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2011-04-15

    An amorphous matrix comprised of sugar molecules are frequently used in the pharmaceutical industry. The compression of the amorphous sugar matrix improves the handling. Herein, the influence of compression on the water sorption of an amorphous sugar matrix was investigated. Amorphous sugar samples were prepared by freeze-drying, using several types of sugars, and compressed at 0-443 MPa. The compressed amorphous sugar samples as well as uncompressed samples were rehumidified at given RHs, and the equilibrium water content and glass transition temperature (T(g)) were then measured. Compression resulted in a decrease in the equilibrium water content of the matrix, the magnitude of which was more significant for smaller sized sugars. Diffusivity of water vapor in the sample was also decreased to one-hundredth by the compression. The T(g) value for a given RH remained unchanged, irrespective of the compression. Accordingly, the decrease in T(g) with increasing water content increased as the result of compression. The structural relaxation of the amorphous sugar matrices were also examined and found to be accelerated to the level of a non-porous amorphous sugar matrix as the result of the compression. The findings indicate that pores contained in freeze-dried sugar samples interfere with the propagation of structural relaxation.

  9. Phase transition of an ice-proton system into a Bernal-Fowler state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkin, Ivan A.; Petrenko, Victor F.

    2000-11-01

    We present a microscopic model of an ice-proton system. A mean-field approximation was used to study the disorder-partial order transition in the proton subsystem of ice. This analysis revealed that ice rules arise as a result of the second-order phase transition. From the theoretical point of view, above the phase-transition temperature the protons should be distributed over all possible positions without any restrictions. However, in real ice under zero pressure the disordering of the proton lattice apparently leads to ice melting. We also derived the Landau-Ginzburg equation suitable for the model under consideration and showed that the theories based on ice rules must be modified when one is working in the region of the critical temperature.

  10. Amorphous state in the mixed phase of quark-hadron phase transition in protoneutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Yasutake, Nobutoshi; Tatsumi, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    We study the quark-hadron mixed phase in protoneutron stars, where neutrinos are trapped and lepton number becomes a conserved quantity besides the baryon number and electric charge. Considering protoneutron star matter as a ternary system, the Gibbs conditions are applied together with the Coulomb interaction. We find there appears no crystalline ("pasta") structure in the regime of high lepton-number fraction; the size of pasta becomes very large and the geometrical structure becomes mechanically unstable due to the charge screening effect. Consequently the whole system is separated into two bulk regions like an amorphous state, where the surface effect is safely neglected. The local charge neutrality is approximately attained there. After neutrinos are ejected, the matter becomes a binary system. Charge neutrality is globally ensured and the pasta structures appear there. These features are important to consider the quark-hadron phase transition during the evolution of protoneutron stars.

  11. A Comprehensive Study of Hydrogen Adsorbing to Amorphous Water-Ice: Defining Adsorption in Classical Molecular Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Dupuy, John L; Stancil, P C

    2016-01-01

    Gas-grain and gas-phase reactions dominate the formation of molecules in the interstellar medium (ISM). Gas-grain reactions require a substrate (e.g. a dust or ice grain) on which the reaction is able to occur. The formation of molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) in the ISM is the prototypical example of a gas-grain reaction. In these reactions, an atom of hydrogen will strike a surface, stick to it, and diffuse across it. When it encounters another adsorbed hydrogen atom, the two can react to form molecular hydrogen and then be ejected from the surface by the energy released in the reaction. We perform in-depth classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of hydrogen atoms interacting with an amorphous water-ice surface. This study focuses on the first step in the formation process; the sticking of the hydrogen atom to the substrate. We find that careful attention must be paid in dealing with the ambiguities in defining a sticking event. The technical definition of a sticking event will affect the computed sticking ...

  12. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: exploring the transition from stochastic to singular freezing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Niedermeier

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice nucleation, a primary pathway for ice formation in the atmosphere, has been described alternately as being stochastic, in direct analogy with homogeneous nucleation, or singular, with ice nuclei initiating freezing at deterministic temperatures. We present an idealized, conceptual model to explore the transition between stochastic and singular ice nucleation. This "soccer ball" model treats particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in our research groups. Even with ice nucleation treated fundamentally as a stochastic process this process can be masked by the heterogeneity of surface properties, as might be typical for realistic atmospheric particle populations. Full evaluation of the model findings will require experiments with well characterized ice nucleating particles and the ability to vary both temperature and waiting time for freezing.

  13. RECOVERY OF AMORPHOUS POLY(ETHYLENE TEREPHTHALATE) FILM UNIAXIALLY DRAWN JUST BELOW THE GLASS TRANSITION TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-jian Sun; Juan Yang; De-yan Shen; Ren-yuan Qian

    2000-01-01

    Isothermal recovery in the macroscopic length of homogeneously deformed specimens of amorphous poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film sample uniaxially drawn at 69℃ to the draw ratios λ0 = 1.26~2.20 were studied at temperatures around the glass transition temperature (Tg = 73 ℃). Experimental results indicate that the length recovery took place in two distinct steps: a fast first step (fast relaxation) followed by a slow second step (slow relaxation). The relaxation processes were accompanied by the reversion of trans-conformers (1340 cm-1) to gauche, and the dichroic function of the 1340 cm-1 band characterizing the segmental orientation along the chain direction decreased to a very low value at the end of the fast relaxation. This fact led us to assign the fast relaxation as the segmental orientation while the slow relaxation as relaxation of the global chain orientation. It was found that the slow relaxation follows a single exponential function, with relaxation times strongly dependent on the temperature resembling the glass transition process. The fast relaxation does not follow a single exponential decay, presumably a distribution of relaxation times is involved.

  14. Superionic-Superionic Phase Transitions in Body-Centered Cubic H2O Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jean-Alexis; Caracas, Razvan

    2016-09-01

    From first-principles molecular dynamics, we investigate the relation between the superionic proton conduction and the behavior of the O - H ⋯O bond (ice VII' to ice X transition) in body-centered-cubic (bcc) H2O ice between 1300 and 2000 K and up to 300 GPa. We bring evidence that there are three distinct phases in the superionic bcc stability field. A first superionic phase characterized by extremely fast diffusion of highly delocalized protons (denoted VII'' hereinafter) is stable at low pressures. A first-order transition separates this phase from a superionic VII' , characterized by a finite degree of localization of protons along the nonsymmetric O - H ⋯O bonds. The transition is identified in structural, energetic, and elastic analysis. Upon further compression a second-order phase transition leads to the superionic ice X with symmetric O - H - O bonds.

  15. Superionic-Superionic Phase Transitions in Body-Centered Cubic H_{2}O Ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jean-Alexis; Caracas, Razvan

    2016-09-23

    From first-principles molecular dynamics, we investigate the relation between the superionic proton conduction and the behavior of the O─H⋯O bond (ice VII^{'} to ice X transition) in body-centered-cubic (bcc) H_{2}O ice between 1300 and 2000 K and up to 300 GPa. We bring evidence that there are three distinct phases in the superionic bcc stability field. A first superionic phase characterized by extremely fast diffusion of highly delocalized protons (denoted VII^{''}  hereinafter) is stable at low pressures. A first-order transition separates this phase from a superionic VII^{'}, characterized by a finite degree of localization of protons along the nonsymmetric O─H⋯O bonds. The transition is identified in structural, energetic, and elastic analysis. Upon further compression a second-order phase transition leads to the superionic ice X with symmetric O─H─O bonds.

  16. Effects of heating conditions on the glass transition parameters of amorphous sucrose produced by melt-quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Won; Thomas, Leonard C; Schmidt, Shelly J

    2011-04-13

    This research investigates the effects of heating conditions used to produce amorphous sucrose on its glass transition (T(g)) parameters, because the loss of crystalline structure in sucrose is caused by the kinetic process of thermal decomposition. Amorphous sucrose samples were prepared by heating at three different scan rates (1, 10, and 25 °C/min) using a standard differential scanning calorimetry (SDSC) method and by holding at three different isothermal temperatures (120, 132, and 138 °C) using a quasi-isothermal modulated DSC (MDSC) method. In general, the quasi-isothermal MDSC method (lower temperatures for longer times) exhibited lower T(g) values, larger ΔC(p) values, and broader glass transition ranges (i.e., T(g end) minus T(g onset)) than the SDSC method (higher temperatures for shorter times), except at a heating rate of 1 °C/min, which exhibited the lowest T(g) values, the highest ΔC(p), and the broadest glass transition range. This research showed that, depending on the heating conditions employed, a different amount and variety of sucrose thermal decomposition components may be formed, giving rise to wide variation in the amorphous sucrose T(g) values. Thus, the variation observed in the literature T(g) values for amorphous sucrose produced by thermal methods is, in part, due to differences in the heating conditions employed.

  17. Influence of pulsing current on the glass transition and crystallizing kinetics of a Zr base bulk amorphous alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Wenfei; YAO Kefu; ZHAO Zhankui

    2004-01-01

    Based on the thermal analysis, the influence of pulsing current on the glass transition and crystallizing kinetics of Zr41.3Ti14.2Cu12.8Ni10.3Be21.4 bulk amorphous alloy has been studied. The obtained results show that after the Zr41.3Ti14.2Cu12.8Ni10.3Be21.4 bulk amorphous alloy was pretreated by high-density pulsing current at low temperature, its glass transition temperature Tg, the initial crystallizing temperature Tx and the corresponding exothermic peak of crystallization Tpi were reduced. But the temperature range of supercooled liquid ΔT=Tx-Tg is almost the same. The calculated results with Kissinger equation show that the activation energy of glass transition of the alloy pretreated is reduced significantly, while the activation energy of crystallization is basically unchanged. The influence of pulsing current on the glass transition and crystallization of the Zr41.3Ti14.2Cu12.8Ni10.3Be21.4 bulk amorphous alloy is believed to be related with the structure relaxation of the glass caused by the current.

  18. IceCube simulation production and the transition to IceProd2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David

    2016-04-01

    IceCube's simulation production relies largely on dynamic, heterogeneous resources spread around the world. Datasets consist of many thousands of job workflow subsets running in parallel as directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) and using varying resources. IceProd is a set of Python daemons which process job workflow and maintain configuration and status information on jobs before, during, and after processing. IceProd manages a complex workflow of DAGs to distribute jobs across all computing grids and optimize resource usage. IceProd2 is a new version of IceProd with substantial increases in security, reliability, scalability, and ease of use. It is undergoing testing and will be deployed this fall.

  19. IceCube simulation production and the transition to IceProd2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz David

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IceCube's simulation production relies largely on dynamic, heterogeneous resources spread around the world. Datasets consist of many thousands of job workflow subsets running in parallel as directed acyclic graphs (DAGs and using varying resources. IceProd is a set of Python daemons which process job workflow and maintain configuration and status information on jobs before, during, and after processing. IceProd manages a complex workflow of DAGs to distribute jobs across all computing grids and optimize resource usage. IceProd2 is a new version of IceProd with substantial increases in security, reliability, scalability, and ease of use. It is undergoing testing and will be deployed this fall.

  20. Reversible crystal-to-amorphous-to-crystal phase transition and a large magnetocaloric effect in a spongelike metal organic framework material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chong-Bin; Chen, Rui-Ping; He, Chao; Li, Wei-Jin; Wei, Qi; Zhang, Xu-Dong; Du, Shao-Wu

    2014-02-21

    Reversible crystal-to-amorphous-to-crystal phase transition accompanied by changes in magnetic and NLO properties was first observed in a rigid non-porous spongelike MOF material. The crystal phase exhibits a high magnetocaloric effect, while the amorphous phase has potential application as a magnetic DMF sensor.

  1. Bonding at Compatible and Incompatible Amorphous Interfaces of Polystyrene and Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Below the Glass Transition Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiko, Yuri M.; Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Films of high-molecular-weight amorphous polystyrene (PS, M-w = 225 kg/mol, M-w/M-n = 3, T-g-bulk = 97degreesC, where T-g-bulk is the glass transition temperature of the bulk sample) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA, M-w = 87 kg/mol, M-w/M-n = 2, Tg-bulk = 109degreesC) were brought into contact...

  2. Explaining the Noble Gas Content of the Planets: Theoretical Models for Argon-Trapping by Amorphous Ices in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, C. B.; Ciesla, F.

    2014-12-01

    The composition of planets in the modern solar system can be traced to the chemistry and physics of the solar nebula, the diffuse disk of gas and dust that surrounded the young sun immediately after its formation. Materials such as the noble gases were too volatile to be chemically incorporated by planetary embryos. Instead, it is likely that they were trapped physically and transported to the inner planets by migrating comets and planetesimals. One trapping mechanism under consideration is the capture of noble gas atoms in amorphous ices on the surface of cold grains. We created a simple numerical model to explore this mechanism, using argon as a representative volatile gas. We have demonstrated that our model reproduces experimental trapping efficiencies (ratio of the volatile atoms to water molecules in the deposited ice) when we constrain the binding energy of our representative volatile to 3500-5500K and the sticking efficiency of volatile atoms to 0.004x gas phase water pressure. Binding energy and sticking efficiency are poorly understood for most volatile substances, but this study finds that they are among the most critical when predicting the trapping of volatiles in the physical world. Constraining these parameters under nebular conditions will allow us to evaluate how much argon could have been trapped in nebular ices and ultimately assess the role of amorphous ice trapping in the origin of planetary volatiles.

  3. Percolation transition, stipulated by the generation of ice in the sugar-beet tissue. (in Ukrainian)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulavin, L. A.; Zabashta, Yu. F.; Fridman, A. Ya.; Kostyuk, A. I.

    The temperature dependence of sugar-beet parenchyma tissue dynamic shear modulus has been studied. The dynamic shear modulus investigation was performed employing low frequency reverse torsional pendulum at the temperature ranging from 200 to 280 K. Percolation transition (T_0 = 251 K), stipulated by the generation of ice in the sugar-beet tissue, is discovered. The quantity of ice in the sugar-beet at the temperatures lower than the percolation transition temperature was calculated on the dynamic shear modulus temperature dependence in terms of the percolation theory. It is concluded that this transition corresponds to the appearance of an infinite ice cluster. One can maintain that the sugar-beet survives above the percolation transition temperature.

  4. Anisotropic phase separation through the metal-insulator transition in amorphous Mo-Ge and Fe-Ge alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regan, M.J.

    1993-12-01

    Since an amorphous solid is often defined as that which lacks long-range order, the atomic structure is typically characterized in terms of the high-degree of short-range order. Most descriptions of vapor-deposited amorphous alloys focus on characterizing this order, while assuming that the material is chemically homogeneous beyond a few near neighbors. By coupling traditional small-angle x-ray scattering which probes spatial variations of the electron density with anomalous dispersion which creates a species-specific contrast, one can discern cracks and voids from chemical inhomogeneity. In particular, one finds that the chemical inhomogeneities which have been previously reported in amorphous Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} and Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} are quite anisotropic, depending significantly on the direction of film growth. With the addition of small amounts of metal atoms (x<0.2), no films appear isotropic nor homogeneous through the metal/insulator transition. The results indicate that fluctuations in the growth direction play a pivotal role in preventing simple growth models of a columnar structure or one that evolves systematically as it grows. The anomalous scattering measurements identify the metal atoms (Fe or Mo) as the source of the anisotropy, with the Ge atoms distributed homogeneously. The author has developed a method for using these measurements to determine the compositions of the phase-separating species. The results indicate phase separation into an amorphous Ge and an intermetallic phase of stoichiometry close to FeGe{sub 2} or MoGe{sub 3}. Finally, by manipulating the deposited power flux and rates of growth, Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 1-x} films which have the same Fe composition x can be grown to different states of phase separation. These results may help explain the difficulty workers have had in isolating the metal/insulator transition for these and other vapor-deposited amorphous alloys.

  5. Dynamics enhanced by HCl doping triggers full Pauling entropy release at the ice XII-XIV transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köster, K. W.; Fuentes-Landete, V.; Raidt, A.; Seidl, M.; Gainaru, C.; Loerting, T.; Böhmer, R.

    2015-06-01

    The pressure-temperature phase diagram of ice displays a perplexing variety of structurally distinct phases. In the century-long history of scientific research on ice, the proton-ordered ice phases numbered XIII through XV were discovered only recently. Despite considerable effort, none of the transitions leading from the low-temperature ordered ices VIII, IX, XI, XIII, XIV and XV to their high-temperature disordered counterparts were experimentally found to display the full Pauling entropy. Here we report calorimetric measurements on suitably high-pressure-treated, hydrogen chloride-doped ice XIV that demonstrate just this at the transition to ice XII. Dielectric spectroscopy on undoped and on variously doped ice XII crystals reveals that addition of hydrogen chloride, the agent triggering complete proton order in ice XIV, enhances the precursor dynamics strongest. These discoveries provide new insights into the puzzling observation that different dopants trigger the formation of different proton-ordered ice phases.

  6. Surface transition on ice induced by the formation of a grain boundary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Pedersen

    Full Text Available Interfaces between individual ice crystals, usually referred to as grain boundaries, play an important part in many processes in nature. Grain boundary properties are, for example, governing the sintering processes in snow and ice which transform a snowpack into a glacier. In the case of snow sintering, it has been assumed that there are no variations in surface roughness and surface melting, when considering the ice-air interface of an individual crystal. In contrast to that assumption, the present work suggests that there is an increased probability of molecular surface disorder in the vicinity of a grain boundary. The conclusion is based on the first detailed visualization of the formation of an ice grain boundary. The visualization is enabled by studying ice crystals growing into contact, at temperatures between -20°C and -15°C and pressures of 1-2 Torr, using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy. It is observed that the formation of a grain boundary induces a surface transition on the facets in contact. The transition does not propagate across facet edges. The surface transition is interpreted as the spreading of crystal dislocations away from the grain boundary. The observation constitutes a qualitatively new finding, and can potentially increase the understanding of specific processes in nature where ice grain boundaries are involved.

  7. Amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition in a-Si:H under hydrogen plasma: Optical and electrical detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadjadj, Aomar; Larbi, Fadila [Groupe de Recherche en Sciences pour l' Ingenieur (GRESPI), Universite de Reims, 51687 Reims cedex 2 (France); Pham, Nans [Groupe de Recherche en Sciences pour l' Ingenieur (GRESPI), Universite de Reims, 51687 Reims cedex 2 (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces (LPICM), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces (LPICM), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2012-06-15

    The exact role of hydrogen in the crystallization process is still a subject of broad controversies due to the complexity of the overall plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. We have investigated by ellipsometry the amorphous-to-microcrystalline the phase transition in intrinsic and doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films during their exposure to a hydrogen plasma in conditions of chemical transport. The whole ellipsometry diagnostics reveal that, while intrinsic and phosphorus-doped a-Si:H present a similar trend during the plasma treatment, boron-doped a-Si:H differs by special features such as a rapid formation of the hydrogen-rich subsurface layer and an early amorphous-to-microcrystalline phase transition. The particular behavior of boron-doped material is also pointed out through the time-evolution of the self-bias voltage on the radio-frequency electrode during the hydrogen plasma treatment (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Freeze-Drying Above the Glass Transition Temperature in Amorphous Protein Formulations While Maintaining Product Quality and Improving Process Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaz, Roberto A; Pansare, Swapnil; Patel, Sajal Manubhai

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the ability to conduct primary drying during lyophilization at product temperatures above the glass transition temperature of the maximally freeze-concentrated solution (Tg′) in amorphous formulations for four proteins from three different classes. Drying above Tg′ resulted in significant reductions in lyophilization cycle time. At higher protein concentrations, formulations freeze dried above Tg′ but below the collapse temperature yielded pharmaceutically acceptable cakes. However, using an immunoglobulin G type 4 monoclonal antibody as an example, we found that as protein concentration decreased, minor extents of collapse were observed in formulations dried at higher temperatures. No other impacts to product quality, physical stability, or chemical stability were observed in this study among the different drying conditions for the different proteins. Drying amorphous formulations above Tg′, particularly high protein concentration formulations, is a viable means to achieve significant time and cost savings in freeze-drying processes.

  9. Mechanisms for pressure-induced crystal-crystal transition, amorphization, and devitrification of SnI{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.; Tse, J. S., E-mail: john.tse@usask.ca [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5B2 (Canada); Hu, M. Y.; Bi, W.; Zhao, J.; Alp, E. E. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Pasternak, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv (Israel); Taylor, R. D.; Lashley, J. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663 Bikini Atoll Road, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The pressure-induced amorphization and subsequent recrystallization of SnI{sub 4} have been investigated using first principles molecular dynamics calculations together with high-pressure {sup 119}Sn nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering measurements. Above ∼8 GPa, we observe a transformation from an ambient crystalline phase to an intermediate crystal structure and a subsequent recrystallization into a cubic phase at ∼64 GPa. The crystalline-to-amorphous transition was identified on the basis of elastic compatibility criteria. The measured tin vibrational density of states shows large amplitude librations of SnI{sub 4} under ambient conditions. Although high pressure structures of SnI{sub 4} were thought to be determined by random packing of equal-sized spheres, we detected electron charge transfer in each phase. This charge transfer results in a crystal structure packing determined by larger than expected iodine atoms.

  10. Long-Term Stability of New Co-Amorphous Drug Binary Systems: Study of Glass Transitions as a Function of Composition and Shelf Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Martínez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The amorphous state is of particular interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to the higher solubility that amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients show compared to their respective crystalline forms. Due to their thermodynamic instability, drugs in the amorphous state tend to recrystallize; in order to avoid crystallization, it has been a common strategy to add a second component to hinder the crystalline state and form a thermally stable co-amorphous system, that is to say, an amorphous binary system which retains its amorphous structure. The second component can be a small molecule excipient (such as a sugar or an aminoacid or a second drug, with the advantage that a second active pharmaceutical ingredient could be used for complementary or combined therapeutic purposes. In most cases, the compositions studied are limited to 1:1, 2:1 and 1:2 molar ratios, leaving a gap of information about phase transitions and stability on the amorphous state in a wider range of compositions. In the present work, a study of novel co–amorphous formulations in which the selection of the active pharmaceutical ingredients was made according to the therapeutic effect is presented. Resistance against crystallization and behavior of glass transition temperature ( T g were studied through calorimetric measurements as a function of composition and shelf time. It was found that binary formulations with T g temperatures higher than those of pure components presented long-term thermal stability. In addition, significant increments of T g values, of as much as 15 ∘ C, were detected as a result of glass relaxation at room temperature during storage time; this behavior of glass transition has not been previously reported for co-amorphous drugs. Based on these results, it can be concluded that monitoring behavior of T g and relaxation processes during the first weeks of storage leads to a more objective evaluation of the thermomechanical stability of an amorphous

  11. Long-Term Stability of New Co-Amorphous Drug Binary Systems: Study of Glass Transitions as a Function of Composition and Shelf Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luz María; Videa, Marcelo; Sosa, Nahida González; Ramírez, José Héctor; Castro, Samuel

    2016-12-14

    The amorphous state is of particular interest in the pharmaceutical industry due to the higher solubility that amorphous active pharmaceutical ingredients show compared to their respective crystalline forms. Due to their thermodynamic instability, drugs in the amorphous state tend to recrystallize; in order to avoid crystallization, it has been a common strategy to add a second component to hinder the crystalline state and form a thermally stable co-amorphous system, that is to say, an amorphous binary system which retains its amorphous structure. The second component can be a small molecule excipient (such as a sugar or an aminoacid) or a second drug, with the advantage that a second active pharmaceutical ingredient could be used for complementary or combined therapeutic purposes. In most cases, the compositions studied are limited to 1:1, 2:1 and 1:2 molar ratios, leaving a gap of information about phase transitions and stability on the amorphous state in a wider range of compositions. In the present work, a study of novel co-amorphous formulations in which the selection of the active pharmaceutical ingredients was made according to the therapeutic effect is presented. Resistance against crystallization and behavior of glass transition temperature ( T g were studied through calorimetric measurements as a function of composition and shelf time. It was found that binary formulations with T g temperatures higher than those of pure components presented long-term thermal stability. In addition, significant increments of T g values, of as much as 15 ∘ C, were detected as a result of glass relaxation at room temperature during storage time; this behavior of glass transition has not been previously reported for co-amorphous drugs. Based on these results, it can be concluded that monitoring behavior of T g and relaxation processes during the first weeks of storage leads to a more objective evaluation of the thermomechanical stability of an amorphous formulation.

  12. Phénomène de la transition vitreuse appliquée aux glucides alimentaires amorphes à l'état de poudre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deroanne C.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass transition phenomena applied to powdered amorphous food carbohydrates. During these last fifteen years, some food technologists and scientists have become aware of the importance of the glass transition, a thermal property of glassy or amorphous material, in food preparation processes. Recent studies have successfully correlated this fundamental notion to technofunctional changes within the powder. The aim of this paper is to present in a non exhaustive manner the relationship between glass transition characteristics and applications in food technology (caking, alterations, etc..

  13. Self-bonding in an amorphous polymer below the glass transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boiko, Yuri M.; Bach, Anders; Lyngaae-Jørgensen, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Films of amorphous polystyrene (PS) with a weight-average molecular weight (Mw) of 225 × 103 g/mol were bonded in a T-peel test geometry, and the fracture energy (G) of a PS/PS interface was measured at the ambient temperature as a function of the healing time (th) and healing temperature (Th). G...

  14. Phase transitions of amorphous solid acetone in confined geometry investigated by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sunghwan; Kang, Hani; Kim, Jun Soo; Kang, Heon

    2014-11-26

    We investigated the phase transformations of amorphous solid acetone under confined geometry by preparing acetone films trapped in amorphous solid water (ASW) or CCl4. Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) were used to monitor the phase changes of the acetone sample with increasing temperature. An acetone film trapped in ASW shows an abrupt change in the RAIRS features of the acetone vibrational bands during heating from 80 to 100 K, which indicates the transformation of amorphous solid acetone to a molecularly aligned crystalline phase. Further heating of the sample to 140 K produces an isotropic solid phase, and eventually a fluid phase near 157 K, at which the acetone sample is probably trapped in a pressurized, superheated condition inside the ASW matrix. Inside a CCl4 matrix, amorphous solid acetone crystallizes into a different, isotropic structure at ca. 90 K. We propose that the molecularly aligned crystalline phase formed in ASW is created by heterogeneous nucleation at the acetone-water interface, with resultant crystal growth, whereas the isotropic crystalline phase in CCl4 is formed by homogeneous crystal growth starting from the bulk region of the acetone sample.

  15. Modelled ocean changes at the Plio-Pleistocene transition driven by Antarctic ice advance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Daniel J.; Bolton, Kevin P.; Haywood, Alan M.

    2017-01-01

    The Earth underwent a major transition from the warm climates of the Pliocene to the Pleistocene ice ages between 3.2 and 2.6 million years ago. The intensification of Northern Hemisphere Glaciation is the most obvious result of the Plio-Pleistocene transition. However, recent data show that the ocean also underwent a significant change, with the convergence of deep water mass properties in the North Pacific and North Atlantic Ocean. Here we show that the lack of coastal ice in the Pacific sector of Antarctica leads to major reductions in Pacific Ocean overturning and the loss of the modern North Pacific Deep Water (NPDW) mass in climate models of the warmest periods of the Pliocene. These results potentially explain the convergence of global deep water mass properties at the Plio-Pleistocene transition, as Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) became the common source. PMID:28252023

  16. Physical and biological controls on DMS,P dynamics in ice shelf-influenced fast ice during a winter-spring and a spring-summer transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carnat, G.; Zhou, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Delille, B.; Goossens, T.; Haskell, T.; Schoemann, V.; Fripiat, F.; Rintala, J.-M.; Tison, J.-L.

    2014-01-01

    We report the seasonal and vertical variations of dimethylsulfide (DMS) and its precursor dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) in fast ice at Cape Evans, McMurdo Sound (Antarctica) during the spring-summer transition in 2011 and winter-spring transition in 2012. We compare the variations of DMS,P obser

  17. Excitability, mixed-mode oscillations and transition to chaos in a stochastic ice ages model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, D. V.; Bashkirtseva, I. A.; Ryashko, L. B.

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by an important geophysical significance, we consider the influence of stochastic forcing on a simple three-dimensional climate model previously derived by Saltzman and Sutera. A nonlinear dynamical system governing three physical variables, the bulk ocean temperature, continental and marine ice masses, is analyzed in deterministic and stochastic cases. It is shown that the attractor of deterministic model is either a stable equilibrium or a limit cycle. We demonstrate that the process of continental ice melting occurs with a noise-dependent time delay as compared with marine ice melting. The paleoclimate cyclicity which is near 100 ky in a wide range of model parameters abruptly increases in the vicinity of a bifurcation point and depends on the noise intensity. In a zone of stable equilibria, the 3D climate model under consideration is extremely excitable. Even for a weak random noise, the stochastic trajectories demonstrate a transition from small- to large-amplitude stochastic oscillations (SLASO). In a zone of stable cycles, SLASO transitions are analyzed too. We show that such stochastic transitions play an important role in the formation of a mixed-mode paleoclimate scenario. This mixed-mode dynamics with the intermittency of large- and small-amplitude stochastic oscillations and coherence resonance are investigated via analysis of interspike intervals. A tendency of dynamic paleoclimate to abrupt and rapid glaciations and deglaciations as well as its transition from order to chaos with increasing noise are shown.

  18. Thermal phase transition in artificial spin ice systems induces the formation and migration of monopole-like magnetic excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Artificial spin ice systems exhibit monopole-like magnetic excitations. We develop here a theoretical study of the thermal phase transition of an artificial spin ice system, and we elucidate the role of the monopole excitations in the transition temperature. The dynamics of the spin ice is described by an efficient model based on cellular automata, which considers both thermal effects and dipolar interactions. We have established the critical temperature of the phase transition as function of the magnetic moment and the energy barrier of reversion. In addition, we predict that thermal gradients in the system induce the motion of elementary excitations, which could permit to manipulate monopole-like states.

  19. Amorphous-crystalline transition studied in hydrated MoO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho-Lopez, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Colon y Tollocan, Toluca Edo. de Mexico 50110 (Mexico); Haro-Poniatowski, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Laboratorio de Optica Cuantica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apdo. Postal 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Lartundo-Rojas, L. [Laboratorio de Microscopia, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Apdo. Postal 55-534, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Livage, J. [Chimie de la Matiere Condensee, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Julien, C.M. [Institut des Nano-Sciences de Paris, UMR 7588, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Campus Boucicaut, 140 rue de Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)]. E-mail: Christian.Julien@insp.jussieu.fr

    2006-11-25

    In this work we study the thermal behavior of hydrated MoO{sub 3} synthesized via acidification of sodium molybdate. MoO{sub 3}.nH{sub 2}O (n = 1.4) amorphous compound was heated in air at increasing temperatures in order to obtain the crystalline MoO{sub 3} phase. We have studied the structural changes as a function of annealing temperature by Raman spectroscopy. A statistical study to determine the average size of the crystallites at each annealing step has been realized by scanning electron microscopy. Results show that the hydrated MoO{sub 3}.1.4H{sub 2}O glass transforms in an amorphous MoO{sub 3}.0.7H{sub 2}O phase prior to its crystallization, while the sample heated at 500 deg. C crystallizes into the orthorhombic {alpha}-MoO{sub 3} phase with micro-crystallites having an average size of 6.8 {mu}m.

  20. Amorphous to nanocrystalline transition in HWCVD Si:H films by substrate temperature variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, Purabi; Jha, Himanshu S.; Agarwal, Pratima [Department of Physics, IIT Guwahati, Guwahati (India); Deva, Dinesh [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Kanpur, Kanpur (India)

    2010-04-15

    Thin films of hydrogenated silicon with band gap ranging from 2.0-2.34 eV are prepared at deposition rate 8-14A/sec in an indigenously fabricated HWCVD system keeping all parameters except substrate temperature fixed. The films grown at T{sub s}{<=}150 C are found to be pure amorphous, whereas the formation of nanocrystalline phase starts at T{sub s} {>=} 200 C. With increase in T{sub s}, crystalline fraction increases along with the increase in the band gap whereas the hydrogen content in the films and the deposition rate decreases. The variation of microstructure by varying substrate temperature without a significant decrease in deposition rate is useful for various device applications. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Deep Ocean Circulation Changes During the Transition to the Last Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, D. R.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Goldstein, S. L.; Hemming, S. R.

    2003-12-01

    The transition between marine isotope stages (MIS) 5a and 4 appears in the stacked benthic foraminferal δ 18O SPECMAP record as a gradual increase in ice volume. In contrast, the transition occurs in the Greenland ice core δ 18O records with two well-developed interstadial events (I19 and I20), which are the first Dansgaard-Oescheger events of the last ice age. The MIS 5b/5a transition appears as a much more rapid warming in both the Greenland ice and benthic δ 18O records. Recent work (Lehmann et al. 2002, Chapman et al. 1999) indicates that climate variability in MIS 5 as indicated in the Greenland ice record was closely interconnected with iceberg discharges, surface temperature changes, and deep ocean circulation in the North Atlantic. In order to determine the response of deep ocean circulation to climate changes from late in MIS 5 to full glacial MIS 4, we have measured Nd isotope ratios from the Fe-Mn portion of core TNO57-21 from the Cape Basin in the South Atlantic. Nd isotopes, unlike nutrient water mass proxies, are not affected by biological fractionation, and reflect the strength of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) signal in the seawater above the core site. Results from cores TNO57-21 and RC11-83 (also from the Cape Basin) indicate that the NADW export to the Southern Ocean has varied on time scales reflecting glacial-interglacial cycles through MIS 4 (Rutberg et al. 2000) and during interstadial events through MIS 3 (Piotrowski et al. Fall AGU), and was stronger and weaker during warmer and colder Northern Hemisphere climate intervals, respectively. The extension of the Nd isotope record to MIS 5a and 5b indicates an increased NADW signal during MIS 5, therefore the long-term pattern of strong and weak NADW export during warm and cold periods persists beyond the last ice age. The Nd isotope pattern during MIS 4 through 5b generally corresponds to the benthic foraminferal δ 13C record from Cape Basin cores (Ninnemann et al. 1999), indicating

  2. Nanocrystals in compression: unexpected structural phase transition and amorphization due to surface impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Kong, Lingping; Yan, Jinyuan; Liu, Zhenxian; Zhang, Hengzhong; Lei, Pei; Xu, Tao; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Chen, Bin

    2016-06-01

    We report an unprecedented surface doping-driven anomaly in the compression behaviors of nanocrystals demonstrating that the change of surface chemistry can lead to an interior bulk structure change in nanoparticles. In the synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction experiments, titania nanocrystals with low concentration yttrium dopants at the surface are found to be less compressible than undoped titania nanocrystals. More surprisingly, an unexpected TiO2(ii) phase (α-PbO2 type) is induced and obvious anisotropy is observed in the compression of yttrium-doped TiO2, in sharp contrast to the compression behavior of undoped TiO2. In addition, the undoped brookite nanocrystals remain with the same structure up to 30 GPa, whereas the yttrium-doped brookite amorphizes above 20 GPa. The abnormal structural evolution observed in yttrium-doped TiO2 does not agree with the reported phase stability of nano titania polymorphs, thus suggesting that the physical properties of the interior of nanocrystals can be controlled by the surface, providing an unconventional and new degree of freedom in search for nanocrystals with novel tunable properties that can trigger applications in multiple areas of industry and provoke more related basic science research.We report an unprecedented surface doping-driven anomaly in the compression behaviors of nanocrystals demonstrating that the change of surface chemistry can lead to an interior bulk structure change in nanoparticles. In the synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction experiments, titania nanocrystals with low concentration yttrium dopants at the surface are found to be less compressible than undoped titania nanocrystals. More surprisingly, an unexpected TiO2(ii) phase (α-PbO2 type) is induced and obvious anisotropy is observed in the compression of yttrium-doped TiO2, in sharp contrast to the compression behavior of undoped TiO2. In addition, the undoped brookite nanocrystals remain with the same structure up to 30 GPa, whereas the yttrium

  3. Effect of Alkali Ions on the Amorphous to Crystalline Phase Transition of Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venezia, A. M.; La Parola, V.; Longo, A.; Martorana, A.

    2001-11-01

    The effect of the addition of alkali ions to commercial amorphous silica, generally used as support for heterogeneous catalysts, has been investigated from the point of view of morphological and structural changes. Samples of alkali-doped silica were prepared by impregnation and subsequent calcination at various temperatures. The structural effect of Li, Na, K, and Cs was determined by use of techniques such as wide-angle (WAXS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The WAXS diffractograms, analyzed with the Rietveld method using the GSAS program, allowed qualitative and quantitative identification of the fraction of the different silica polymorphs like quartz, tridymite, and cristobalite. SAXS measurements, using the classical method based on Porod's law, yielded the total surface area of the systems. The calculated areas were compared with the surface areas determined by the nitrogen adsorption technique using the analytical method of Brunauer-Emmett-Teller. The results are explained in terms of sizes of the alkali ions and cell volume of the different crystalline phases.

  4. Structural mechanisms of the Ih–II and II → Ic transitions between the crystalline phases of aqueous ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheligovskaya, E. A., E-mail: lmm@phyche.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Structural mechanisms are proposed for experimentally observed phase transitions between crystalline modifications of aqueous ice, Ih and II, as well as II and Ic. It is known that the Ih–II transition occurs with the conservation of large structural units (hexagonal channels) common for these ices. It is shown that the Ih → II transition may occur with the conservation of 5/6 of all hydrogen bonds in crystal, including all hydrogen bonds in the retained channels (3/4 of the total number of bonds in crystal) and 1/3 of the bonds between these channels (1/12 of the total number). The transformation of other hydrogen bonds between the retained channels leads to the occurrence of proton order in ice II. A structural mechanism is proposed to explain the transformation of single crystals of ice Ih either into single crystals of ice II or into crystalline twins of ice II with c axes rotated by 180° with respect to each other, which is often observed at the Ih → II transition. It is established that up to 7/12 of all hydrogen bonds are retained at the irreversible cooperative II → Ic transition.

  5. Sea ice melt onset associated with lead opening during the spring/summer transition near the North Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivier, Frédéric; Hutchings, Jennifer K.; Kawaguchi, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Takashi; Morison, James H.; Lourenço, Antonio; Noguchi, Tomohide

    2016-04-01

    In the central Arctic Ocean, autonomous observations of the ocean mixed layer and ice documented the transition from cold spring to early summer in 2011. Ice-motion measurements using GPS drifters captured three events of lead opening and ice ridge formation in May and June. Satellite sea ice concentration observations suggest that locally observed lead openings were part of a larger-scale pattern. We clarify how these ice deformation events are linked with the onset of basal sea ice melt, which preceded surface melt by 20 days. Observed basal melt and ocean warming are consistent with the available input of solar radiation into leads, once the advent of mild atmospheric conditions prevents lead refreezing. We use a one-dimensional numerical simulation incorporating a Local Turbulence Closure scheme to investigate the mechanisms controlling basal melt and upper ocean warming. According to the simulation, a combination of rapid ice motion and increased solar energy input at leads promotes basal ice melt, through enhanced mixing in the upper mixed layer, while slow ice motion during a large lead opening in mid-June produced a thin, low-density surface layer. This enhanced stratification near the surface facilitates storage of solar radiation within the thin layer, instead of exchange with deeper layers, leading to further basal ice melt preceding the upper surface melt.

  6. Post-coring entrapment of modern air in some shallow ice cores collected near the firn-ice transition: evidence from CFC-12 measurements in Antarctic firn air and ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aydin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report measurements of CFC-12 (CCl2F2 in firn air and in air extracted from shallow ice cores from three Antarctic sites. The firn air data are consistent with the known atmospheric history of CFC-12. In contrast, some of the ice core samples collected near the firn-ice transition exhibit anomalously high CFC-12 levels. Together, the ice core and firn air data provide evidence for the presence of modern air entrapped in the shallow ice core samples that likely contained open pores at the time of collection. We propose that this is due to closure of the open pores after drilling, entrapping modern air and resulting in elevated CFC-12 mixing ratios. Our results reveal that open porosity can exist below the maximum depth at which firn air samples can be collected, particularly at sites with lower accumulation rates. CFC-12 measurements demonstrate that post-drilling closure of open pores can lead to a change in the composition of bubble air in shallow ice cores through purely physical processes. The results have implications for investigations involving trace gas composition of bubbles in shallow ice cores collected near the firn-ice transition.

  7. Superconducting transitions in amorphous molybdenum-germanium ultrathin films and multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missert, N.

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal of this work was to clarify the role of enhanced Coulomb interactions in the destruction of superconductivity in disordered systems of reduced dimensions. Through a systematic study of the critical temperatures in single film sandwich and multilayer structures, the author has examined the role of dimensionality in the reduction of {Tc} in disordered superconductors. The author has observed a continuous crossover from two to three dimensional behavior as electron diffusion between individual superconducting layers in the multilayer becomes possible. This demonstrates unambiguously that the reduction in {Tc} is an artistic 2D effect and is not simply due to interface or proximity effects, as has often been assumed in the past. Multilayers were fabricated by sequential cosputtering of alternate layers of superconducting and nonsuperconducting amorphous Mo-Ge alloys. The effects of screening at short length scales in these films are probed via a systematic variation of both the distance between superconducting layers and the conductivity of the nonsuperconducting layers in a multilayer structure. As the conductivity of the nonsuperconducting layer increases, electron diffusion becomes more three dimensional. However this increased conductivity also introduces a reduction in {Tc} due to the proximity effect. This has been accounted for by comparing the T, of the multilayers with a corresponding NISIN single layer sandwich structure, designed to have an identical proximity effect reduction of {Tc}, in addition to compensating for any effect of the SIN interface itself. X-ray diffraction measurements and cross-sectional TEM micrographs confirm that the layers are structurally well defined, uniform, and continuous.

  8. Problems in obtaining perfect images by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy of biological structures in amorphous ice

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, Richard; McMullan, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical considerations together with simulations of single-particle electron cryomicroscopy images of biological assemblies in ice demonstrate that atomic structures should be obtainable from images of a few thousand asymmetric units, provided the molecular weight of the whole assembly being studied is greater than the minimum needed for accurate position and orientation determination. However, with present methods of specimen preparation and current microscope and detector...

  9. High-throughput exploration of thermoelectric and mechanical properties of amorphous NbO2 with transition metal additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Denis; Geyer, Richard W.; Hans, Marcus

    2016-07-01

    To increase the thermoelectric efficiency and reduce the thermal fatigue upon cyclic heat loading, alloying of amorphous NbO2 with all 3d and 5d transition metals has systematically been investigated using density functional theory. It was found that Ta fulfills the key design criteria, namely, enhancement of the Seebeck coefficient and positive Cauchy pressure (ductility gauge). These quantum mechanical predictions were validated by assessing the thermoelectric and elastic properties on combinatorial thin films, which is a high-throughput approach. The maximum power factor is 2813 μW m-1 K-2 for the Ta/Nb ratio of 0.25, which is a hundredfold increment compared to pure NbO2 and exceeds many oxide thermoelectrics. Based on the elasticity measurements, the consistency between theory and experiment for the Cauchy pressure was attained within 2%. On the basis of the electronic structure analysis, these configurations can be perceived as metallic, which is consistent with low electrical resistivity and ductile behavior. Furthermore, a pronounced quantum confinement effect occurs, which is identified as the physical origin for the Seebeck coefficient enhancement.

  10. Variable-range hopping conduction and metal-insulator transition in amorphous RexSi1-x thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisunov, K. G.; Vinzelberg, H.; Arushanov, E.; Schumann, J.

    2011-09-01

    Resistivity, ρ(T), of the amorphous RexSi1-x thin films with x = 0.285-0.351 is investigated in the interval of T ~ 300-0.03 K. At x = 0.285-0.324 the activated behavior of ρ(T) is governed by the Mott and the Shklovskii-Efros variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction mechanisms in different temperature intervals and the three-dimensional regime of the hopping. Between x = 0.328 and 0.351 the activationless dependence of ρ(T) takes place. The critical behavior of the characteristic VRH temperatures and of the Coulomb gap, Δ, pertinent to proximity to the metal-insulator transition at the critical value of xc ≈ 0.327, is observed. The analysis of the critical behavior of Δ yields directly the critical exponent of the dielectric permittivity, η = 2.1 ± 0.2, in agreement with the theoretical prediction, η = 2. On the other hand, the values of the critical exponent of the correlation length ν ~ 0.8-1.1 close to the expected value of unity can be obtained from the analysis of the critical behavior of the VRH characteristic temperatures under an additional assumption of a strong underbarrier scattering of hopping charge carriers in conditions, when the concentration of scattering centers considerably exceeds the concentration of sites involved in the hopping.

  11. Analytic model for low energy excitation states and phase transitions in spin-ice systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bara, F. I.; López-Aguilar, F.

    2017-04-01

    Low energy excitation states in magnetic structures of the so-called spin-ices are produced via spin flips among contiguous tetrahedra of their crystal structure. These spin flips generate entities which mimic magnetic dipoles in every two tetrahedra according to the dumbbell model. When the temperature increases, the spin-flip processes are transmitted in the lattice, generating so-called Dirac strings, which constitute structural entities that can present mimetic behavior similar to that of magnetic monopoles. In recent studies of both specific heat and ac magnetic susceptibility, two (even possibly three) phases have been shown to vary the temperature. The first of these phases presents a sharp peak in the specific heat and another phase transition occurs for increasing temperature whose peak is broader than that of the former phase. The sharp peak occurs when there are no free individual magnetic charges and temperature of the second phase transition coincides with the maximum proliferation of free deconfined magnetic charges. In the present paper, we propose a model for analyzing the low energy excitation many-body states of these spin-ice systems. We give analytical formulas for the internal energy, specific heat, entropy and their temperature evolution. We study the description of the possible global states via the nature and structure of their one-body components by means of the thermodynamic functions. Below 0.37 K, the Coulomb-like magnetic charge interaction can generate a phase transition to a condensation of pole–antipole pairs, possibly having Bose–Einstein structure which is responsible for the sharp peak of the first phase transition. When there are sufficient free positive and negative charges, the system tends to behave as a magnetic plasma, which implies the broader peak in the specific heat appearing at higher temperature than the sharper experimental peak.

  12. Observed microphysical changes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds when transitioning from sea ice to open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gillian; Jones, Hazel M.; Choularton, Thomas W.; Crosier, Jonathan; Bower, Keith N.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Davies, Rhiannon S.; Renfrew, Ian A.; Elvidge, Andrew D.; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Marenco, Franco; Brown, Philip R. A.; Ricketts, Hugo M. A.; Connolly, Paul J.; Lloyd, Gary; Williams, Paul I.; Allan, James D.; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Liu, Dantong; Flynn, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    In situ airborne observations of cloud microphysics, aerosol properties, and thermodynamic structure over the transition from sea ice to ocean are presented from the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling And Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign. A case study from 23 March 2013 provides a unique view of the cloud microphysical changes over this transition under cold-air outbreak conditions. Cloud base lifted and cloud depth increased over the transition from sea ice to ocean. Mean droplet number concentrations, Ndrop, also increased from 110 ± 36 cm-3 over the sea ice to 145 ± 54 cm-3 over the marginal ice zone (MIZ). Downstream over the ocean, Ndrop decreased to 63 ± 30 cm-3. This reduction was attributed to enhanced collision-coalescence of droplets within the deep ocean cloud layer. The liquid water content increased almost four fold over the transition and this, in conjunction with the deeper cloud layer, allowed rimed snowflakes to develop and precipitate out of cloud base downstream over the ocean. The ice properties of the cloud remained approximately constant over the transition. Observed ice crystal number concentrations averaged approximately 0.5-1.5 L-1, suggesting only primary ice nucleation was active; however, there was evidence of crystal fragmentation at cloud base over the ocean. Little variation in aerosol particle number concentrations was observed between the different surface conditions; however, some variability with altitude was observed, with notably greater concentrations measured at higher altitudes ( > 800 m) over the sea ice. Near-surface boundary layer temperatures increased by 13 °C from sea ice to ocean, with corresponding increases in surface heat fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy. These significant thermodynamic changes were concluded to be the primary driver of the microphysical evolution of the cloud. This study represents the first investigation, using in situ airborne observations, of cloud microphysical changes with

  13. Glass transition of aqueous solutions involving annealing-induced ice recrystallization resolves liquid-liquid transition puzzle of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Shan; Cao, Ze-Xian; Wang, Qiang

    2015-10-27

    Liquid-liquid transition of water is an important concept in condensed-matter physics. Recently, it was claimed to have been confirmed in aqueous solutions based on annealing-induced upshift of glass-liquid transition temperature, T(g) . Here we report a universal water-content, X(aqu) , dependence of T(g) for aqueous solutions. Solutions with X(aqu)>X(cr)(aqu)vitrify/devitrify at a constant temperature, ~T(g) , referring to freeze-concentrated phase with X(aqu)left behind ice crystallization. Those solutions with X(aqu)recrystallization is stabilized at . Experiments on aqueous glycerol and 1,2,4-butanetriol solutions in literature were repeated, and the same samples subject to other annealing treatments equally reproduce the result. The upshift of T(g) by annealing is attributable to freeze-concentrated phase of solutions instead of 'liquid II phase of water'. Our work also provides a reliable method to determine hydration formula and to scrutinize solute-solvent interaction in solution.

  14. Simulating the last glacial-interglacial transition with a coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice sheet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Ziemen, Florian

    2015-04-01

    One of the major challenges in climate modeling is the simulation of glacial-interglacial transitions. A few models of intermediate complexity have been successful in simulating the last termination. Complex atmosphere-ocean general circulation models have been shown to be able to yield realistic climate changes with prescribed ice sheets. Here we presents results from a first attempt to simulate a substantial part of the last glacial cycle with an AOGCM coupled interactively with a state-of-the-art ice sheet model. The ECHAM5/MPIOM AOGCM has been interactively coupled to the dynamical ice sheet model PISM. The latter is run for most of the northern hemisphere with a horizontal resolution of 20 km. An earlier version of this model ( Ziemen et al. 2014) has been applied to a steady state simulation of the last glacial maximum (LGM). The model was integrated from the late Glacial into the Holocene using insolation and greenhouse gas concentrations as transient forcing. Land sea mask and ocean topography are fixed at LGM conditions, river routing and surface elevation for the atmospheric model component are calculated interactively depending on the simulated ice sheets. To make these long simulations feasible, the atmosphere is accelerated by a factor of 10 relative to the other model components using a periodically-synchronous coupling technique. A mini-ensemble with different initial conditions has been run. In all simulation the northern hemispheric deglaciation starts between 18 and 17 kyr BP, consistent with the onset of global warming. The model produces Heinrich event like variability as part of its internal variability. These rapid ice discharge events have a strong impact on the North Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (NAMOC). During the peak deglaciation the NAMOC is collapsed (with a few short interruptions) for several thousand years, which is longer than the estimates from reconstructions. This seems to be an artifact due to keeping ocean

  15. Post-coring entrapment of modern air in polar ice cores collected near the firn-ice transition: evidence from CFC-12 measurements in Antarctic firn air and shallow ice cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aydin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report the first measurements of CFC-12 (CCl2F2 in air extracted from shallow ice cores along with firn air CFC-12 measurements from three Antarctic sites. The firn air data are consistent with the known atmospheric history of CFC-12. In contrast, the ice core samples collected near the firn-ice transition exhibit anomalously high CFC-12 levels. Together, the ice core and firn air data provide evidence for presence of modern air entrapped in shallow ice core samples. We propose that this is due to closure of open pores after drilling, entrapping modern air and resulting in elevated CFC-12 mixing ratios. Our measurements reveal the presence of open porosity below the depth at which firn air samples can be collected and demonstrate how the composition of bubble air in shallow ice cores can be altered during the post-drilling period through purely physical processes. These results have implications for investigations involving trace gas composition of bubbles in shallow ice cores.

  16. Effects of dopants on the amorphous-to-fcc transition in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Privitera, S. [R and D Department, Micro, Power, Analog (MPA) Group, STMicroelectronics, MP8, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy)]. E-mail: stefania.privitera@st.com; Rimini, E. [Istituto di Microelettronica e Microsistemi (IMM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy); Bongiorno, C. [Istituto di Microelettronica e Microsistemi (IMM), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy); Pirovano, A. [FTM, Advanced R and D, NVMTD, STMicroelectronics, Via Olivetti 2, 20041, Agrate Brianza (Italy); Bez, R. [FTM, Advanced R and D, NVMTD, STMicroelectronics, Via Olivetti 2, 20041, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    The amorphous-to-crystal transition has been studied through in situ resistance measurements in Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films doped by ion implantation with nitrogen, oxygen or fluorine at different concentrations. Enhancement of the thermal stability has been observed in O and N amorphous doped Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. Larger effects have been found in the case of nitrogen doping. On the contrary, doping with Fluorine produced a decrease in the crystallization temperature. The electrical properties have been related to the structural phase change through in situ transmission electron microscopy analysis. The comparison between undoped and doped Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} shows that the introduction of oxygen or nitrogen modifies in a different way the kinetics of the amorphous-to-fcc transition and gives new insight on the effects of doping with light elements in GeSbTe alloys.

  17. Effect of Si additions on thermal stability and the phase transition sequence of sputtered amorphous alumina thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolvardi, H.; Baben, M. to; Nahif, F.; Music, D., E-mail: music@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Schnabel, V.; Shaha, K. P.; Mráz, S.; Schneider, J. M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Bednarcik, J.; Michalikova, J. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, FS-PE group, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-01-14

    Si-alloyed amorphous alumina coatings having a silicon concentration of 0 to 2.7 at. % were deposited by combinatorial reactive pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of Al and Al-Si (90-10 at. %) split segments in Ar/O{sub 2} atmosphere. The effect of Si alloying on thermal stability of the as-deposited amorphous alumina thin films and the phase formation sequence was evaluated by using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The thermal stability window of the amorphous phase containing 2.7 at. % of Si was increased by more than 100 °C compared to that of the unalloyed phase. A similar retarding effect of Si alloying was also observed for the α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} formation temperature, which increased by more than 120 °C. While for the latter retardation, the evidence for the presence of SiO{sub 2} at the grain boundaries was presented previously, this obviously cannot explain the stability enhancement reported here for the amorphous phase. Based on density functional theory molecular dynamics simulations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments for amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with and without Si incorporation, we suggest that the experimentally identified enhanced thermal stability of amorphous alumina with addition of Si is due to the formation of shorter and stronger Si–O bonds as compared to Al–O bonds.

  18. Observed microphysical changes in Arctic mixed-phase clouds when transitioning from sea-ice to open ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gillian; Jones, Hazel M.; Crosier, Jonathan; Bower, Keith N.; Darbyshire, Eoghan; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Liu, Dantong; Allan, James D.; Williams, Paul I.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Choularton, Thomas W.

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic sea-ice is intricately coupled to the atmosphere[1]. The decreasing sea-ice extent with the changing climate raises questions about how Arctic cloud structure will respond. Any effort to answer these questions is hindered by the scarcity of atmospheric observations in this region. Comprehensive cloud and aerosol measurements could allow for an improved understanding of the relationship between surface conditions and cloud structure; knowledge which could be key in validating weather model forecasts. Previous studies[2] have shown via remote sensing that cloudiness increases over the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and ocean with comparison to the sea-ice; however, to our knowledge, detailed in-situ data of this transition have not been previously presented. In 2013, the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign was carried out in the vicinity of Svalbard, Norway to collect in-situ observations of the Arctic atmosphere and investigate this issue. Fitted with a suite of remote sensing, cloud and aerosol instrumentation, the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft was used during the spring segment of the campaign (Mar-Apr 2013). One case study (23rd Mar 2013) produced excellent coverage of the atmospheric changes when transitioning from sea-ice, through the MIZ, to the open ocean. Clear microphysical changes were observed, with the cloud liquid-water content increasing by almost four times over the transition. Cloud base, depth and droplet number also increased, whilst ice number concentrations decreased slightly. The surface warmed by ~13 K from sea-ice to ocean, with minor differences in aerosol particle number (of sizes corresponding to Cloud Condensation Nuclei or Ice Nucleating Particles) observed, suggesting that the primary driver of these microphysical changes was the increased heat fluxes and induced turbulence from the warm ocean surface as expected. References: [1] Kapsch, M.L., Graversen, R.G. and Tjernström, M. Springtime

  19. DMSP and DMS cycling within Antarctic sea ice during the winter-spring transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E.; Nomura, D.; Martin, A.; Dieckmann, G. S.; Meiners, K. M.

    2016-09-01

    This study describes within-ice concentrations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), its degradation product dimethylsulphide (DMS), as well as nutrients and chlorophyll a, that were sampled during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment-2 (SIPEX-2) in 2012. DMSP is a methylated substrate produced in large amounts annually by ice-associated microalgae, while DMS plays a significant role in carbon and sulphur cycling in the Southern Ocean. In the East Antarctic study area between 115-125°E and 64-66°S, ice and slush cores, brine, under-ice seawater and zooplankton (Antarctic krill) samples were collected at 6 ice stations. The pack-ice was characterised by high snow loading which initiated flooding events and triggered nutrient supply to the sea-ice surface, while variation in ice conditions influenced sea-ice permeability. This ranged from impermeable surface and middle sections of the sea ice, to completely permeable ice cores at some stations. Chlorophyll a maxima shifted from the sea-ice surface horizon at the first station to the sea ice bottom layer at the last station. Highest DMSP concentrations were detected in brine samples at the sea-ice surface, reflecting a mismatch with respect to the distribution of chlorophyll a. Our data suggest enhanced DMSP production by sea-ice surface algal communities and its release into brine during freezing and melting, which in turn is coupled to flooding events early in the season. A time-cycle of DMS production by DMSP degradation and DMS efflux is evident at the sea ice-snow interface when slush is formed during melt. Seawater under the ice contained only low concentrations of DMSP and DMS, even when brine drainage was evident and the sea ice became permeable. We postulate that in situ grazing by zooplankton may act as sink for the DMSP produced early in the season.

  20. Chronology and dynamics of the Amundsen Gulf Ice Stream in Arctic Canada during the last glacial-interglacial transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeman, T. R.; MacLean, B.; Blasco, S.; Bennett, R.; Hughes Clarke, J. E.

    2012-04-01

    influence of the Mackenzie and other fluvial sediment discharge on the seabed over the last 13,000 cal yr BP. The deglacial history of Amundsen Gulf under ameliorating climate conditions of the last ~19,000 cal yr BP provides important constraints on the variables that occasioned the demise of the northwest Laurentide Ice Sheet, such as sea level change, paleoclimate, and regional ice sheet dynamics. Understanding the complex interplay among these variables during the last deglaciation will bear on current model projections of the dynamics of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. In addition, quantifying past iceberg fluxes to the Arctic Ocean has implications for assessing the origin of deep ice scours in the Arctic Ocean Basin and the nature of rapid climate changes at the last glacial-interglacial transition.

  1. Study of the pressure-time-temperature transformation of amorphous La6Ni5Al89 by the energy dispersive method for phase transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paci, B.; Rossi-Albertini, V.; Sikorski, M.

    2005-01-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray diffraction method to observe phase transitions is applied to follow the crystallization of an amorphous alloy (La6Ni5Al89) in isothermal conditions. In this way, the diffraction-based configurational entropy (DCE) of the system undergoing the phase transformations...... was measured and the curves describing the transitions, qualitatively equivalent to a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermogram, could be drawn. Finally, the analysis of such curves allowed calculation of some points of the alloy pressure-time-temperature transformation (PTTT) diagram. More...... importantly, the present work shows that the DCE method can be successfully applied even when DSC can no longer be used. As a consequence, regions of the phase diagram that could not be reached up to now become accessible, opening the way to the study of transition phenomena under extreme conditions....

  2. Automatic Detection of the Holocene Transition in Radio-Echo Sounding Data from the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, N. B.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Gogineni, S. P.; Paden, J.; Hvidberg, C. S.

    2012-04-01

    Radio-echo sounding has provided important insights into the subsurface properties of the Greenland Ice-Sheet. Recent years have seen increasing interest in englacial radio reflectors (or internal layers) because their stratigraphy reflects both mass balance rates and flow dynamics. Thus patterns of internal layers contain information about the past behaviour of an ice mass. Unfortunately retrieving this information often relies on a large amount of user interaction and can be very time consuming. As the amount of radio-echo sounding data increases, the development of quantitative techniques for digitising internal layers in radar data is a logical step forward. In this study we present an automated method for estimating the elevation of the Holocene transition in radio-echo sounding data from Greenland. The data was collected by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), University of Kansas. The automated method is based on the observation that the CReSIS radio-echo data often display a characteristic appearance: the upper half of the radio-echo data contains numerous internal layering and appears much darker than the lower, older part, where only a few visible layers can be seen. Compared to the depth-age relationship from the NorthGRIP ice core this change in the radar-echo data coincides with the transition to the Holocene period. The method obtains a good match with manually traced data and also returns an estimate of the confidence in its output. The depth of the Holocene transition will provide insight into the large-scale variation of mass balance and basal melt rate over the Greenland Ice Sheet and will assist in efforts to model the past evolution of the ice sheet.

  3. Structural and electronic properties of binary amorphous aluminum alloys with transition metals and rare earth metals; Strukturelle und elektronische Eigenschaften binaerer amorpher Aluminiumlegierungen mit Uebergangsmetallen und Metallen der Seltenen Erden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stiehler, Martin

    2012-02-03

    The influence of the d-states of the transition metals on the structure formation in amorphous alloys has so far only been inadequately understood. The present work aims to elaborate additional contributions to the understanding of binary amorphous aluminum alloys with transition metals. Special emphasis was placed on alloys with a subgroup of the transition metals, the rare earth metals. Within the scope of the present work, layers of Al-Ce in the region of 15at% Ce-80at% Ce were produced by sequential flash evaporation at 4.2K in the high vacuum, and characterized electronically by electrical resistance and Hall effect measurements as well as structurally by transmission electron diffraction. In addition, studies of plasma resonance were carried out by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy. In the range of 25at% Ce-60at% Ce, homogeneous amorphous samples were obtained. Especially the structural investigations were made difficult by oxidation of the material. The influence of the Ce-4f electrons manifests itself mainly in the low-temperature and magnetoresistance, both of which are dominated by the Kondo effect. The Hall effect in Al-Ce is dominated by anomalous components over the entire temperature range (2K-320K), which are attributed to skew-scattering effects, also due to Ce-4f electrons. Down to 2K there was no macroscopic magnetic order. In the region 2K-20K, the existence of clusters of ordered magnetic moments is concluded. For T> 20K, paramagnetic behavior occurs. With regard to the structural and electronic properties, a-Al-Ce can be classified as a group with a-Al- (Sc, Y, La). In the sense of plasma resonance, a-Al-Ce is excellently arranged in a system known from other Al transition metal alloys. Furthermore, by increasing the results of binary amorphous Al transition metal alloys from the literature, it has been found that the structure formation in these systems is closely linked to a known but still unexplained structure-forming effect that

  4. Plankton assembly in an ultra-oligotrophic Antarctic lake over the summer transition from the ice-cover to ice-free period: A size spectra approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochera, Carlos; Quesada, Antonio; Toro, Manuel; Rico, Eugenio; Camacho, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Lakes from the Antarctic maritime region experience climate change as a main stressor capable of modifying their plankton community structure and function, essentially because summer temperatures are commonly over the freezing point and the lake's ice cap thaws. This study was conducted in such seasonally ice-covered lake (Lake Limnopolar, Byers Peninsula, Livingston Is., Antarctica), which exhibits a microbial dominated pelagic food web. An important feature is also the occurrence of benthic mosses (Drepanocladus longifolius) covering the lake bottom. Plankton dynamics were investigated during the ice-thawing transition to the summer maximum. Both bacterioplankton and viral-like particles were higher near the lake's bottom, suggesting a benthic support. When the lake was under dim conditions because of the snow-and-ice cover, autotrophic picoplankters dominated at deep layers. The taxa-specific photopigments indicated dominance of picocyanobacteria among them when the light availability was lower. By contrast, larger and less edible phytoplankton dominated at the onset of the ice melting. The plankton size spectra were fitted to the continuous model of Pareto distribution. Spectra evolved similarly at two sampled depths, in surface and near the bottom, with slopes increasing until mid-January. However, slopes were less steep (i.e., size classes more uniformly distributed) at the bottom, thus denoting a more efficient utilization of resources. These findings suggest that microbial loop pathways in the lake are efficiently channelized during some periods to the metazoan production (mainly the copepod Boeckella poppei). Our results point to that trophic interactions may still occur in these lakes despite environmental harshness. This results of interest in a framework of increasing temperatures that may reduce the climatic restrictions and therefore stimulate biotic interactions.

  5. Surface energy budget of landfast sea ice during the transitions from winter to snowmelt and melt pond onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Else, B.G.T.; Papakyriakou, T.N.; Raddatz, R.

    2014-01-01

    Relatively few sea ice energy balance studies have successfully captured the transition season of warming, snowmelt, and melt pond formation. In this paper, we report a surface energy budget for landfast sea ice that captures this important period. The study was conducted in the Canadian Arctic......, but it delivered enough energy to significantly hasten melt onset had it occurred earlier in the season. Changes in the frequency, duration, and timing of synoptic-scale weather events that deliver clouds and/or strong turbulent heat fluxes may be important in explaining observed changes in sea ice melt onset......) combined with the seasonal increase in incoming shortwave radiation then triggered snowmelt onset. Melt progressed with a rapid reduction in albedo and attendant increases in shortwave energy absorption, resulting in melt pond formation 8 days later. The key role of longwave radiation in initiating melt...

  6. Heterogeneous ice nucleation controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms controlling heterogeneous ice nucleation are complex and remain poorly understood. Although good ice nucleators are generally believed to match ice lattice and to bind water, counter examples are often identified. Here we show, by advanced molecular simulations, that the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on graphitic surface is controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity. Molecular level analysis reveals that the crystalline graphitic lattice with an appropriate hydrophilicity may indeed template ice basal plane by forming a strained ice layer, thus significantly enhancing its ice nucleation efficiency. Remarkably, the templating effect is found to transit from within the first contact layer of water to the second as the hydrophilicity increases, yielding an oscillating distinction between the crystalline and amorphous graphitic surfaces in their ice nucleation efficiencies. Our study sheds new light on the long-standing question of what constitutes ...

  7. Little Ice Age to modern climate transition of Meso-American climate derived from speleothems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, A.; Miller, T.; Kushnir, Y.; Black, D. E.; Estrella, J.; Burnett, A.; Haug, G. H.; Breitenbach, S.; Beaufort, L.; Edwards, R.

    2011-12-01

    We present a high-resolution (annual) reconstruction of hydrological variability from a speleothem located in a cave under the Guatemala/Belize (G/B) border. Our age model is highly constrained by annual layering in the speleothem and nine U/Th MC ICPMS dates. Our δ18O record from 1640 to 2005 A.D. shows two large, abrupt decreases in inferred precipitation rates that appear to coincide with historical, large volcanic eruptions, superimposed on a general drying trend. The first abrupt increase in aridity occurred synchronously with the Tambora eruption in 1815, followed by another sharp decrease in Meso-American precipitation coincident with the eruption of Krakatau in 1883. Both drying events extend for thirty to forty years after the initial eruption, in good agreement with the 19th century drying and the "volcanic dust veil index" from Lamb (1970). Preliminary analysis indicates that the Meso-Americas may be highly sensitive to volcanic forcing because they receive considerable climate input from both Atlantic (primary) and Pacific (secondary) influences. Past volcanic aerosol model loading patterns from the Mt. Pinatubo eruption produced global and in particular, North Atlatic cooling. This could have moved the Atlantic ITCZ southwards and caused drying in Meso-America. Wavelet analysis of the speleothem data also shows ENSO scale variability. Our results highlight the need for better understanding of the consequences of volcanic eruptions and their patterns of climate variability, in particular during the transition from the Little Ice Age to the modern industrial era.

  8. Transition from amorphous Fe to polycrystalline body-centred-cubic Fe in Gd/Fe and Dy/Fe multilayered thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Engl, K; Zweck, J

    2002-01-01

    Rare-earth/iron multilayered thin films were magnetron sputtered to investigate the thickness-dependent transition from amorphous iron to polycrystalline body-centred-cubic iron. To characterize this transition it is necessary to get information about the average short-range order (SRO) in the multilayers. A unique technique for measuring this SRO is calculating pair distribution functions (PDFs) from reduced intensity functions by using high-energy electron diffraction in a 300 kV transmission electron microscope. With a maximum resolution in the PDFs of 0.024 nm, this method offers a high sensitivity for the investigation of the SRO. Due to the planar probing characteristics of the experiment, one gets structure information on interfaces rather than from the bulk structure. A further advantage of this method is that no specimen preparation is necessary. Therefore preparation artefacts can be excluded.

  9. The 3D Kasteleyn transition in dipolar spin ice: a numerical study with the conserved monopoles algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, M. L.; Borzi, R. A.

    2017-02-01

    We study the three-dimensional Kasteleyn transition in both nearest neighbours and dipolar spin ice models using an algorithm that conserves the number of excitations. We first limit the interactions range to nearest neighbours to test the method in the presence of a field applied along ≤ft[1 0 0\\right] , and then focus on the dipolar spin ice model. The effect of dipolar interactions, which is known to be greatly self screened at zero field, is particularly strong near full polarization. It shifts the Kasteleyn transition to lower temperatures, which decreases  ≈0.4 K for the parameters corresponding to the best known spin ice materials, \\text{D}{{\\text{y}}2}\\text{T}{{\\text{i}}2}{{\\text{O}}7} and \\text{H}{{\\text{o}}2}\\text{T}{{\\text{i}}2}{{\\text{O}}7} . This shift implies effective dipolar fields as big as 0.05 T opposing the applied field, and thus favouring the creation of ‘strings’ of reversed spins. We compare the reduction in the transition temperature with results in previous experiments, and study the phenomenon quantitatively using a simple molecular field approach. Finally, we relate the presence of the effective residual field to the appearance of string-ordered phases at low fields and temperatures, and we check numerically that for fields applied along ≤ft[1 0 0\\right] there are only three different stable phases at zero temperature.

  10. Characteristics and primary productivity of East Antarctic pack ice during the winter-spring transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugalde, Sarah C.; Westwood, Karen J.; van den Enden, Rick; McMinn, Andrew; Meiners, Klaus M.

    2016-09-01

    Microbial communities have evolved mechanisms to allow them to survive within the challenging and changing pack ice environment. One such mechanism may be the exudation of photosynthetically-derived organic carbon into various extracellular pools. During the 2nd Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystems eXperiment (SIPEX-2), East Antarctic pack ice productivity and subsequent carbon allocation were quantified, together with physico-biogeochemical characteristics (29 September-28 October, 2012). Mean ice thickness ranged between 0.80 and 2.16 m, and typically exhibited a warm ice interior with weak temperature gradients. All stations, with one exception, were layered with granular (mean: 78%), columnar (mean: 15%), and mixed granular/columnar (mean: 4%) ice. Highest ice brine-volume fractions were at the ice-water interface, but all ice had high brine-volume fractions conducive for brine percolation (mean: 15%). Dissolved inorganic nutrient concentrations in the brine were scattered around theoretical dilution lines (TDLs), with some values of nitrate and nitrite, ammonium and silicic acid falling below TDLs, indicating nutrient depletion. Bulk ice dissolved organic carbon was low (mean: 64 μmol kg-1), but most samples showed enrichment in relation to TDLs. Microbial biomass (bacterial and algal) was low, and generally showed maxima in the sea-ice interior. Bottom ice algal communities were dominated by pennate diatom species (mean: 86% of total cell abundance). 14C-total primary productivity (14C-TPP) ranged from mean: 61%), with the remaining proportion allocated to 14C-colloidal organic carbon. Production of 14C-extracellular polymeric substances was not detected at any station.

  11. Ice Age Reboot: Thermohaline Circulation Crisis during the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, L.; Goldstein, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    The mid-Pleistocene transition (MPT) marked a fundamental change in glacial-interglacial periodicity, when it increased from ~41- to 100-kyr cycles and developed higher amplitude climate variability. Because it took place without significant changes in the Milankovitch forcing, this fundamental change must reflect either non-linear responses of the climate system to these external forcings, or internal changes in the ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere system that led to longer periodicities and more intense glacial periods. We document using Nd isotopes a major disruption of the ocean thermohaline circulation (THC) system during the MPT between MIS 25-21 at ~950-860 ka, which effectively marks the first 100-kyr cycle, including an exceptional weakening through critical interglacial MIS 23 at ~900 ka. The data are from ODP Sites 1088 (41°8.163'S, 13°33.77'E, 2082m) and 1090 (42°54.82'S, 8°53.98E', 3702m) in the SE Atlantic Subantarctic Zone, near the upper and lower boundaries of NADW and Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). Given evidence for nearly stable NADW and North Pacific Water (NPW) ɛNd-values over the last 2 Ma, we interpret the ɛNd variations to reflect changes in the NADW:NPW mixing fractions. During the studied pre-MPT 41-kyr world (MIS 31-25, 1,100-950 ka), at both sites the differences in glacial and interglacial ɛNd-values are small, indicating strong glacial as well as interglacial export of NADW. A major weakening of NADW export occurred during MIS 24-22, including MIS 23, which is unique as the only known interglacial in which the THC did not strengthen, and thus can be considered as a 'trans-glacial' period. The recovery into the post-MPT 100-kyr world is characterized by continued weak glacial THC. We conclude that the MPT ocean circulation crisis 'rebooted' the pacing and intensity of ice ages and facilitated the coeval drawdown of atmospheric CO2 and high latitude ice sheet growth, generating the conditions that stabilized 100-kyr cycles.

  12. Trehalose amorphization and recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussich, Fabiana; Cesàro, Attilio

    2008-10-13

    The stability of the amorphous trehalose prepared by using several procedures is presented and discussed. Amorphization is shown to occur by melting (T(m)=215 degrees C) or milling (room temperature) the crystalline anhydrous form TRE-beta. Fast dehydration of the di-hydrate crystalline polymorph, TRE-h, also produces an amorphous phase. Other dehydration procedures of TRE-h, such as microwave treatment, supercritical extraction or gentle heating at low scan rates, give variable fractions of the polymorph TRE-alpha, that undergo amorphization upon melting (at lower temperature, T(m)=130 degrees C). Additional procedures for amorphization, such as freeze-drying, spray-drying or evaporation of trehalose solutions, are discussed. All these procedures are classified depending on the capability of the undercooled liquid phase to undergo cold crystallization upon heating the glassy state at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (T(g)=120 degrees C). The recrystallizable amorphous phase is invariably obtained by the melt of the polymorph TRE-alpha, while other procedures always give an amorphous phase that is unable to crystallize above T(g). The existence of two different categories is analyzed in terms of the transformation paths and the hypothesis that the systems may exhibit different molecular mobilities.

  13. Amorphous pharmaceutical solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranić, Edina

    2004-07-01

    Amorphous forms are, by definition, non-crystalline materials which possess no long-range order. Their structure can be thought of as being similar to that of a frozen liquid with the thermal fluctuations present in a liquid frozen out, leaving only "static" structural disorder. The amorphous solids have always been an essential part of pharmaceutical research, but the current interest has been raised by two developments: a growing attention to pharmaceutical solids in general, especially polymorphs and solvates and a revived interest in the science of glasses and the glass transition. Amorphous substances may be formed both intentionally and unintentionally during normal pharmaceutical manufacturing operations. The properties of amorphous materials can be exploited to improve the performance of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but these properties can also give rise to unwanted effects that need to be understood and managed in order for the systems to perform as required.

  14. Amorphous-crystalline transition layers formation during quenching of Fe61 Co7 Zr10 Mo5 W2B15 melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    New Fe-based multicomponent amorphous alloys have been developed recently based on empirical rulesfor large glass forming ability(GFA). In the present investigation, the master alloy ingot with the nominal composi-tion of Fe61 Co7 Zr10 Mo5 W2 B15 (mole fraction, %) was prepared by arc-melting under Ti-gettered Ar atmosphere.The Fe-based buttons with different transverse cross sections were fabricated by arc-melting method, and the d 2.5mm Fe-based rods were manufactured by injection technique. Characterization of the ingots and the parameters asso-ciated with the thermal stability were carried out by X-ray diffractometry(XRD) and high temperature differential scan-ning calorimeter(DSC), respectively. The interval of the supercooled liquid region is 39 K for the Fe-based alloy. The GFAof Fe-based alloys is relatively lower, to the buttons obtained are all crystallized. The Fe-based rod exhibites a high Vickershardness up to HV 1 329. In addition, an amorphous-crystalline transition layers are observed in the rod. This transitionzone is caused by unhomogeneous temperature distribution and relatively lower GFA for Fe-based alloys.

  15. On the origin of Gaussian network theory in the thermo/chemo-responsive shape memory effect of amorphous polymers undergoing photo-elastic transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haibao; Huang, Wei Min; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous polymers are normally isotropic in their physical properties, however, upon stress their structural randomness is disturbed and they become anisotropic. There is a close connection between the optical anisotropy and the elastic (or mechanical) anisotropy, since both are related to the type of symmetry exhibited by the molecular structure. On the origin of Gaussian network theory, a phenomenological constitutive framework was proposed to study the photo-elastic transition and working mechanism of the thermo-/chemo-responsive shape-memory effect (SME) in amorphous shape memory polymers (SMPs). Optically refractive index was initially employed to couple the stress, strain and the anisotropy of the random link in macromolecule chain. Based on the Arrhenius law, a constitutive framework was then applied for the temperature dependence of optical (or elastic or mechanical) anisotropy according to the fictive temperature parameter. Finally, the phenomenological photo-elastic model was proposed to quantitatively identify the influential factors behind the thermo-/chemo-responsive SME in SMPs, of which the shape recovery behavior is predicted and verified by the available experimental data reported in the literature.

  16. Data on energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles obtained by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of transition metal salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Zimnyakov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the data on the energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles produced by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of different transition metal salts. Band gap characteristics are investigated using diffuse reflection spectra of the obtained powders. Calculated logarithmic derivative quantity of the Kubelka–Munk function reveals a presence of local maxima in the regions 0.5–1.5 eV and 1.6–3.0 eV which correspond to band gap values of the investigated materials. The values might be related to the constituents of the composite nanoparticles and intermediate products of their chemical interaction.

  17. THz Time-Domain Spectroscopy of Mixed CO2-CH3OH Interstellar Ice Analogs

    CERN Document Server

    McGuire, Brett A; Allodi, Marco A; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2016-01-01

    The icy mantles of interstellar dust grains are the birthplaces of the primordial prebiotic molecular inventory that may eventually seed nascent solar systems and the planets and planetesimals that form therein. Here, we present a study of two of the most abundant species in these ices after water: carbon dioxide (CO2) and methanol (CH3OH) using TeraHertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy and mid-infrared spectroscopy. We study pure and mixed-ices of these species, and demonstrate the power of the THz region of the spectrum to elucidate the long-range structure (i.e. crystalline versus amorphous) of the ice, the degree of segregation of these species within the ice, and the thermal history of the species within the ice. Finally, we comment on the utility of the THz transitions arising from these ices for use in astronomical observations of interstellar ices.

  18. A stochastic nonlinear oscillator model for glacial millennial-scale climate transitions derived from ice-core data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Kwasniok

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic Duffing-type oscillator model, i.e noise-driven motion with inertia in a potential landscape, is considered for glacial millennial-scale climate transitions. The potential and noise parameters are estimated from a Greenland ice-core record using a nonlinear Kalman filter. For the period from 60 to 20 ky before present, a bistable potential with a deep well corresponding to a cold stadial state and a shallow well corresponding to a warm interstadial state is found. The system is in the strongly dissipative regime and can be very well approximated by an effective one-dimensional Langevin equation.

  19. Bader's topological analysis of the electron density in the pressure-induced phase transitions/amorphization in α-quartz from the catastrophe theory viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Marcello; Sciascia, Luciana

    2013-06-01

    In this work, the Bader's topological analysis of the electron density, coupled with Thom's catastrophe theory, was used to characterize the pressure-induced transformations in α-quartz. In particular, ab initio calculations of the α-quartz structures in the range 0-105 Gpa have been performed at the HF/DFT exchange-correlation terms level, using Hamiltonians based on a WC1LYP hybrid scheme. The electron densities calculated throughout the ab initio wave functions have been analysed by means of the Bader's theory, seeking for some catastrophic mechanism in the sense of Thom's theory. The analysis mainly showed that there is a typical fold catastrophe feature involving an O-O interaction at the quartz-coesite transition pressure, while the amorphization of α-quartz is coincident with an average distribution of the gradient field of the electron density around the oxygen atom which is typically observed in the free atoms. This approach is addressed to depict a phase transition from a novel viewpoint, particularly useful in predicting the stability of a compound at extreme conditions, especially in the absence of experimental data.

  20. Heterogeneous ice nucleation: Exploring the transition from stochastic to singular freezing behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, F.; Niedermeier, D.; Hartmann, S.; Shaw, R. A.; Clauss, T.; Wex, H.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation directly influences cloud physical processes, precipitation formation, global radiation balances, and therefore Earth's climate (Cantrell and Heymsfield, 2005 and references therein). It is important to understand the heterogeneous freezing process at a fundamental level in order to describe this process in a physically-based way that will behave robustly in weather and climate models. There is longstanding debate as to whether heterogeneous ice nucleation is a stochastic process (e.g., Carte, 1956) or whether it exhibits singular behaviour (e.g., Langham and Mason, 1958). Fundamentally, the stochastic ice nucleation behavior implies ice nucleation being time dependent, while singular behavior is characterized by ice nucleation taking place on specific particle surface sites at a certain temperature and being time independent (Vali and Stansbury, 1966). We addressed this issue using both experimental and theoretical methods. Experiments focused on immersion freezing of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) were carried out using the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS), a seven meter long laminar flow diffusion chamber. Both, temperature and time dependencies of ATD-particle induced immersion freezing were investigated. It was found, that ATD-particle induced immersion freezing took place over a wide temperature range and exhibited no detectable time dependence within the range investigated. The theoretical investigations were carried out using a Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) based, i.e., purely stochastic, numerical model. This idealized model treats statistically similar particles as being covered with surface sites (patches of finite area) characterized by different nucleation barriers, but with each surface site following the stochastic nature of ice embryo formation. The model provides a phenomenological explanation for seemingly contradictory experimental results obtained in the past. Based on CNT alone, a population of

  1. Amorphous nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, Toralf

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the first comprehensive overview over amorphous nano-optical and nano-photonic systems. Nanophotonics is a burgeoning branch of optics that enables many applications by steering the mould of light on length scales smaller than the wavelength with devoted nanostructures. Amorphous nanophotonics exploits self-organization mechanisms based on bottom-up approaches to fabricate nanooptical systems. The resulting structures presented in the book are characterized by a deterministic unit cell with tailored geometries; but their spatial arrangement is not controlled. Instead of periodic, the structures appear either amorphous or random. The aim of this book is to discuss all aspects related to observable effects in amorphous nanophotonic material and aspects related to their design, fabrication, characterization and integration into applications. The book has an interdisciplinary nature with contributions from scientists in physics, chemistry and materials sciences and sheds light on the topic fr...

  2. Subsurface Thermal Erosion Of Ice-Wedge Polygon Terrains: Implications For Arctic Geosystem In Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, D.; Godin, E.; Lévesque, E.; Veillette, A.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface thermal erosion is triggered by convective heat transfers between flowing water and permafrost. For inland ice-wedge polygon terrains, heat advection due to infiltration of run-off in the massive ice wedges and the ice-rich upper portion of permafrost creates sink holes and networks of interconnected tunnels in the permafrost. Mass movements such as collapse of tunnel's roof, retrogressive thaw-slumping along exposed permafrost and active layer detachment slides lead to the development of extensive gully networks in the landscape. These gullies drastically change the hydrology of ice-wedge polygon terrains and the fluxes of heat, water, sediment and carbon within the permafrost geosystem. Exportation of sediments by fluvial processes within gullies are positive mechanical feed-back effects that keep gully channels active over decades. Along gully margins, drainage of disturbed polygons and ponds, slope drainage, soil consolidation, plant colonization of disturbed gully slopes and wet to mesic plant succession of drained polygons change the thermal properties of the active layer and create negative feedback effects that stabilize active erosion processes and promote permafrost recovery in gully slopes and adjacent disturbed polygons. On Bylot Island (Nunavut), over 40 gullies were mapped and monitored to characterize gully geomorphology, thermal and mechanical processes of gully erosion, rates of gully erosion over time within different sedimentary deposits, total volume of eroded permafrost at the landscape scale and gully hydrology. We conducted field and laboratory experiments to quantify heat convection processes and speed of ice wedge ablation in order to derive empirical equations to develop a numerical, fully-coupled, heat and mass (water) transfer model of ice-wedge thermal erosion. We used data collected over 10 years of geomorphological gully monitoring, regional climate scenarios, our physics-based numerical thermal erosion model and our field

  3. Liquid-liquid transition in supercooled aqueous solution involving a low-temperature phase similar to low-density amorphous water

    CERN Document Server

    Woutersen, Sander; Zhao, Zuofeng; Angell, C Austen

    2016-01-01

    The striking anomalies in physical properties of supercooled water that were discovered in the 1960-70s, remain incompletely understood and so provide both a source of controversy amongst theoreticians, and a stimulus to experimentalists and simulators to find new ways of penetrating the "crystallization curtain" that effectively shields the problem from solution. Recently a new door on the problem was opened by showing that, in ideal solutions, made using ionic liquid solutes, water anomalies are not destroyed as earlier found for common salt and most molecular solutes, but instead are enhanced to the point of precipitating an apparently first order liquid-liquid transition. The evidence was a spike in apparent heat capacity during cooling that could be fully reversed during reheating before any sign of ice crystallization appeared. Here, we use decoupled-oscillator infrared spectroscopy to define the structural character of this phenomenon using similar down and upscan rates as in the calorimetric study. Th...

  4. Bottom Fixed Platform Dynamics Models Assessing Surface Ice Interactions for Transitional Depth Structures in the Great Lakes: FAST8 – IceDyn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karr, Dale G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Yu, Bingbin [Principle Power, Inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Sirnivas, Senu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-04-01

    To create long-term solutions for offshore wind turbines in a variety of environmental conditions, CAE tools are needed to model the design-driving loads that interact with an offshore wind turbine system during operation. This report describes our efforts in augmenting existing CAE tools used for offshore wind turbine analysis with a new module that can provide simulation capabilities for ice loading on the system. This augmentation was accomplished by creating an ice-loading module coupled to FAST8, the CAE tool maintained by the NREL for simulating land-based and offshore wind turbine dynamics. The new module includes both static and dynamic ice loading that can be applied during a dynamic simulation of the response of an offshore wind turbine. The ice forces can be prescribed, or influenced by the structure’s compliant response, or by the dynamics of both the structure and the ice floe. The new module covers ice failure modes of spalling, buckling, crushing, splitting, and bending. The supporting structure of wind turbines can be modeled as a vertical or sloping form at the waterline. The Inward Battered Guide Structure (IBGS) foundation designed by Keystone Engineering for the Great Lakes was used to study the ice models coupled to FAST8. The IBGS foundation ice loading simulations in FAST8 were compared to the baseline simulation case without ice loading. The ice conditions reflecting those from Lake Huron at Port Huron and Lake Michigan at North Manitou were studied under near rated wind speed of 12 m/s for the NREL 5-MW reference turbine. Simulations were performed on ice loading models 1 through 4 and ice model 6 with their respective sub-models. The purpose of ice model 5 is to investigate ice loading on sloping structures such as ice-cones on a monopile and is not suitable for multi-membered jacketed structures like the IBGS foundation. The key response parameters from the simulations, shear forces and moments from the tower base and IBGS foundation

  5. Permafrost landscapes in transition - towards modeling interactions, thresholds and feedbacks related to ice-rich ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Sebastian; Langer, Moritz; Lee, Hanna; Berntsen, Terje; Boike, Julia; Krinner, Gerhard; Aalstad, Kristoffer; Schanke Aas, Kjetil; Peter, Maria; Heikenfeld, Max; Etzelmüller, Bernd

    2016-04-01

    Thawing of permafrost is governed by a complex interplay of different processes, of which only conductive heat transfer is taken into account in most model studies. However, heat conduction alone can not account for the dynamical evolution of many permafrost landscapes, e.g. in areas rich in ground ice shaped by thermokarst ponds and lakes. Novel process parameterizations are required to include such phenomena in future projections of permafrost thaw and hereby triggered climatic feedbacks. Recently, we have demonstrated a physically-based parameterization for thaw process in ice-rich ground in the permafrost model CryoGrid 3, which can reproduce the formation of thermokarst ponds and subsidence of the ground following thawing of ice-rich subsurface layers. Long-term simulations for different subsurface stratigraphies in the Lena River Delta, Siberia, demonstrate that the hydrological regime can both accelerate and delay permafrost thawing. If meltwater from thawed ice-rich layers can drain, the ground subsides while at the same time the formation of a talik is delayed. If the meltwater pools at the surface, a pond is formed which enhances heat transfer in the ground and leads to the formation of a talik. The PERMANOR project funded by the Norwegian Research Council until 2019 will extend this work by integrating such small-scale processes in larger-scale Earth System Models (ESMs). For this purpose, the project will explore and develop statistical approaches, in particular tiling, to represent permafrost landscape dynamics on subgrid scale. Ultimately, PERMANOR will conceptualize process understanding from in-situ studies to develop new model algorithms and pursue their implementation in a coupled ESM framework.

  6. Photometric Measurements of H2O Ice Crystallinity on Trans-Neptunian Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Yoichi; Oasa, Yumiko; Furusho, Reiko; Watanabe, Junichi

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of H2O ice crystallinity on the surface of trans-neptunian objects with near-infrared narrow-band imaging. The newly developed photometric technique allows us to efficiently determine the strength of a 1.65 μm absorption feature in crystalline H2O ice. Our data for three large objects—Haumea, Quaoar, and Orcus—which are known to contain crystalline H2O ice on the surfaces, show a reasonable result with high fractions of the crystalline phase. It can also be pointed out that if the grain size of H2O ice is larger than ˜20 μm, the crystallinities of these objects are obviously below 1.0, which suggests the presence of the amorphous phase. In particular, Orcus exhibits a high abundance of amorphous H2O ice compared to Haumea and Quaoar, possibly indicating a correlation between the bulk density of the bodies and the degree of surface crystallization. We also found the presence of crystalline H2O ice on Typhon and 2008 AP129, both of which are smaller than the minimum size limit for inducing cryovolcanism as well as a transition from amorphous to crystalline phase through thermal evolution due to the decay of long-lived isotopes. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ).

  7. Seasonally asymmetric transition of the Asian monsoon in response to ice age boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Hiroaki; Kuroki, Harumitsu; Kamae, Youichi [University of Tsukuba, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohba, Masamichi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Environmental Science Research Laboratory, Abiko (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    Modulation of a monsoon under glacial forcing is examined using an atmosphere-ocean coupled general circulation model (AOGCM) following the specifications established by Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project phase 2 (PMIP2) to understand the air-sea-land interaction under different climate forcing. Several sensitivity experiments are performed in response to individual changes in the continental ice sheet, orbital parameters, and sea surface temperature (SST) in the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM: 21 ka) to evaluate the driving mechanisms for the anomalous seasonal evolution of the monsoon. Comparison of the model results in the LGM with the pre-industrial (PI) simulation shows that the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal are characterized by enhancement of pre-monsoon convection despite a drop in the SST encompassing the globe, while the rainfall is considerably suppressed in the subsequent monsoon period. In the LGM winter relative to the PI, anomalies in the meridional temperature gradient (MTG) between the Asian continents minus the tropical oceans become positive and are consistent with the intensified pre-monsoon circulation. The enhanced MTG anomalies can be explained by a decrease in the condensation heating relevant to the suppressed tropical convection as well as positive insolation anomalies in the higher latitude, showing an opposing view to a warmer future climate. It is also evident that a latitudinal gradient in the SST across the equator plays an important role in the enhancement of pre-monsoon rainfall. As for the summer, the sensitivity experiments imply that two ice sheets over the northern hemisphere cools the air temperature over the Asian continent, which is consistent with the reduction of MTG involved in the attenuated monsoon. The surplus pre-monsoon convection causes a decrease in the SST through increased heat loss from the ocean surface; in other words, negative ocean feedback is also responsible for the subsequent weakening of summer

  8. A new modeling tool for the diffusion of gases in ice or amorphous binary mixture in the polar stratosphere and the upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Varotsos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available To elaborate stratospheric ozone depletion processes, measurements of diffusion coefficients of selected gas phase molecules (i.e. HCl, CH3OH, HCOOH and CH3COOH in ice in the temperature range 170–195 K have been analyzed with respect to the mechanisms and rates of diffusion. It is argued that the diffusion in ice of these compounds is governed by a vacancy – mediated mechanism, i.e. H2O vacancies are required to diffuse to lattice sites adjacent to these compounds prior to the diffusion of the corresponding molecule into the vacancy sites. In addition, we show that the diffusion coefficients of these compounds exhibit a specific interconnection, i.e. a linear relationship holds between the logarithm of the pre-exponential factor, Do, and the activation energy E. The physical meaning of this interconnection is discussed.

  9. Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  10. An ice core record of near-synchronous global climate changes at the Bølling transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Julia L.; Brook, Edward J.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Blunier, Thomas; Mitchell, Logan E.; Lee, James E.; Edwards, Jon S.; Gkinis, Vasileios

    2014-06-01

    The abrupt warming that initiated the Bølling-Allerød interstadial was the penultimate warming in a series of climate variations known as Dansgaard-Oeschger events. Despite the clear expression of this transition in numerous palaeoclimate records, the relative timing of climate shifts in different regions of the world and their causes are subject to debate. Here we explore the phasing of global climate change at the onset of the Bølling-Allerød using air preserved in bubbles in the North Greenland Eemian ice core. Specifically, we measured methane concentrations, which act as a proxy for low-latitude climate, and the 15N/14N ratio of N2, which reflects Greenland surface temperature, over the same interval of time. We use an atmospheric box model and a firn air model to account for potential uncertainties in the data, and find that changes in Greenland temperature and atmospheric methane emissions at the Bølling onset occurred essentially synchronously, with temperature leading by 4.5 years. We cannot exclude the possibility that tropical climate could lag changing methane concentrations by up to several decades, if the initial methane rise came from boreal sources alone. However, because even boreal methane-producing regions lie far from Greenland, we conclude that the mechanism that drove abrupt change at this time must be capable of rapidly transmitting climate changes across the globe.

  11. Radiation damage and associated phase change effect on photodesorption rates from ices—Lyα studies of the surface behavior of CO{sub 2}(ice)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Yates, John T. Jr., E-mail: jty2n@virginia.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Photodesorption from a crystalline film of CO{sub 2}(ice) at 75 K has been studied using Lyα (10.2 eV) radiation. We combine quantitative mass spectrometric studies of gases evolved and transmission IR studies of species trapped in the ice. Direct CO desorption is observed from the primary CO{sub 2} photodissociation process, which occurs promptly for CO{sub 2} molecules located on the outermost surface of the ice (Process I). As the fluence of Lyα radiation increases to ∼5.5 × 10{sup 17} photons cm{sup –2}, extensive damage to the crystalline ice occurs and photo-produced CO molecules from deeper regions (Process II) are found to desorb at a rapidly increasing rate, which becomes two orders of magnitude greater than Process I. It is postulated that deep radiation damage to produce an extensive amorphous phase of CO{sub 2} occurs in the 50 nm ice film and that CO (and CO{sub 2}) diffusive transport is strongly enhanced in the amorphous phase. Photodesorption in Process II is a combination of electronic and thermally activated processes. Radiation damage in crystalline CO{sub 2} ice has been monitored by its effects on the vibrational line shapes of CO{sub 2}(ice). Here the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition has been correlated with the occurrence of efficient molecular transport over long distances through the amorphous phase of CO{sub 2}(ice). Future studies of the composition of the interstellar region, generated by photodesorption from ice layers on grains, will have to consider the significant effects of radiation damage on photodesorption rates.

  12. Evidence of Complex Ice-Volcano Interactions in the Transition Zone Between Elysium Rise and Utopia Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, G. B. M.; Head, J. W.

    2012-03-01

    We report on morphologic evidence of a complex succession of ice-volcano interactions in the Galaxias region, Mars, and reconsider the emplacement properties of volcanoclastic outflow deposit under martian conditions.

  13. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  14. Crystallization inhibition of an amorphous sucrose system using raffinose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEINEN K.M.; LABUZA T.P.

    2006-01-01

    The shelf life of pure amorphous sucrose systems, such as cotton candy, can be very short. Previous studies have shown that amorphous sucrose systems held above the glass transition temperature will collapse and crystallize. One study,however, showed that adding a small percent of another type of sugar, such as trehalose, to sucrose can extend the shelf life of the amorphous system by slowing crystallization. This study explores the hypothesis that raffinose increases the stability of an amorphous sucrose system. Cotton candy at 5 wt% raffinose and 95 wt% sucrose was made and stored at room temperature and three different relative humidities (%RH) 11%RH, 33%RH, and 43%RH. XRD patterns, and glass transition temperatures were obtained to determine the stability as a function of %RH. The data collected showed that raffinose slows sucrose crystallization in a low moisture amorphous state above the glass transition temperature and therefore improves the stability of amorphous sucrose systems.

  15. An ice lithography instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Anpan; Chervinsky, John; Branton, Daniel; Golovchenko, J. A.

    2011-06-01

    We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

  16. Glass-to-cryogenic-liquid transitions in aqueous solutions suggested by crack healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un; Tate, Mark W; Gruner, Sol M

    2015-09-22

    Observation of theorized glass-to-liquid transitions between low-density amorphous (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) water states had been stymied by rapid crystallization below the homogeneous water nucleation temperature (∼235 K at 0.1 MPa). We report optical and X-ray observations suggestive of glass-to-liquid transitions in these states. Crack healing, indicative of liquid, occurs when LDA ice transforms to cubic ice at 160 K, and when HDA ice transforms to the LDA state at temperatures as low as 120 K. X-ray diffraction study of the HDA to LDA transition clearly shows the characteristics of a first-order transition. Study of the glass-to-liquid transitions in nanoconfined aqueous solutions shows them to be independent of the solute concentrations, suggesting that they represent an intrinsic property of water. These findings support theories that LDA and HDA ice are thermodynamically distinct and that they are continuously connected to two different liquid states of water.

  17. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    the velocities of ultrasonic longitudinal and shear waves were measured to 1820 m/sec and 930 m/sec, respectively. Based on these results the two line systems in the transition zone can be interpreted as ``Wallner lines'' with sources within the zone. ©1966 The American Institute of Physics......Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...

  18. Cell viability, pigments and photosynthetic performance of Arctic phytoplankton in contrasting ice-covered and open-water conditions during the spring-summer transition

    KAUST Repository

    Alou-Font, E

    2015-12-02

    © Inter-Research 2016. We examined phytoplankton biomass and community composition (mostly based on pigments) as well as cell viability with the cell digestion assay in surface waters of the Canadian Beaufort Sea during the spring-summer transition. Our aim was to understand phytoplankton responses to the large environmental changes (irradiance, temperature and nutrients) occurring during this period. Two categories of stations were visited in May and June 2008: ice-covered (IC), exposed to low irradiances, and open-water (OW), exposed to higher irradiances. We observed a large variation in the percentage of living cells (%LC) relative to the total community. No relationship was found between %LC and nitrate concentration (the nutrient potentially limiting in this environment). The in situ irradiance influenced the status of the cells at OW stations. Mean surface mixed layer irradiances >600 μmol photons m-2 s-1 were associated with low cell viability and a decline in photosynthetic performance (Fv/Fm). For IC stations, %LC declined at temperatures above 0°C, whereas for OW stations, it increased, suggesting that ice melting resulted in the release into surface waters of unhealthy cells from the bottom ice in one case, and that seasonal warming favored the communities present in open waters. A chlorophyll degradation pigment tentatively identified as pyropheophorbide a-\\'like\\' showed a significant negative relationship between its concentration (relative to chlorophyll a) and the %LC and Fv/Fm. Our results suggest that the melting conditions influence the distribution of this pigment and that it may be useful as a marker for low cell viability of ice algae being released into surface waters.

  19. A study on the properties of C-doped Ge8Sb2Te11 thin films during an amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol-Jin; Kong, Heon; Lee, Hyun-Yong; Yeo, Jong-Bin

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we evaluated the structural, electrical and optical properties of carbon-doped Ge8Sb2Te11 thin films. In a previous work, GeSbTe alloys were doped with different materials in an attempt to improve the thermal stability. Ge8Sb2Te11 and carbon-doped Ge8Sb2Te11 films of 250 nm in thickness were deposited on p-type Si (100) and glass substrates by using a RF magnetron reactive co-sputtering system at room temperature. The fabricated films were annealed in a furnance in the 0 ~ 400°C temperature range. The structural properties were analyzed by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the result showed that the carbon-doped Ge8Sb2Te11 had a face-centeredcubic (fcc) crystalline structure and an increased crystallization temperature ( T c ). An increase in the T c leads to thermal stability in the amorphous state. The optical properties were analyzed by using an UV-Vis-IR spectrophotometer, and the result showed an increase in the optical-energy band gap ( E op ) in the crystalline materials and an increase in the E op difference (Δ E op ), which is a good effect for reducing the noise in the memory device. The electrical properties were analyzed by using a 4-point probe, which showed an increase in the sheet resistance ( R s ) in the amorphous state and the crystalline state, which means a reduced programming current in the memory device.

  20. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  1. Embrittlement and conditions of the optimization of magnetic properties in the amorphous alloy Co69Fe3.7Cr3.8Si12.5B11 in the absence of a viscous-brittle transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil'nikov, P. S.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the holding time upon annealing on the temperature of the viscous-brittle transition (temperature of embrittlement) T f in a cobalt-based amorphous alloy of the composition Co69Fe3.7Cr3.8Si12.5B11 with a very low saturation magnetostriction λs (<10-7) has been studied. It has been established that the dependence of the embrittlement temperature T f on the of time of holding t a can be described by an Arrhenius equation and that the embrittlement at the annealing temperatures above and below 300°C is described by different kinetic parameters. In the alloy under study, irrespective of the holding time, embrittlement occurs in a very narrow range of annealing temperatures, which does not exceed 5 K. Based on the experimental data on the evolution of the hysteresis magnetic properties upon the isochronous annealings and upon the isothermal holding, the regime of heat treatment that ensures a very high (about 50000) magnitude of the permeability µ5 ( H = 5 mOe, f = 1 kHz) without the transition of the alloy into a brittle state has been determined.

  2. Amorphous Solid Water (ASW): Macroscale Environmentally-Neutral Application for Remediation of Hazardous Pollutants using Condensed-Phase Cryogenic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Strulle, Ronald; Rheinhart, Maximilian

    2012-03-01

    We report macroscale environmentally-neutral use of cryogenic fluids to induce phase transitions from crystalline water-ices to amorphous solid water (ASW). New IP and uses in remediation of oil-spills and hazardous immiscibles from aquatic environments. We display high-resolution images of the transitions from hexagonal to cubic crystalline water-ice, then to hydrophobic ASW. Accretion and encapsulation of viscous pollutants within crystalline water-ice, and sequestration of condensed volatiles (PAH, methane) and low viscosity fluids within the interstitial cavities of ASW are shown and differentiated for: crude oils, diesel (heating) and blended oils, petroleum byproducts, vegetable and mineral oils, lipids, and light immiscible fluids. The effects of PdV work and thermal energy transfers during phase changes are shown, along with the sequestration efficiencies for hexagonal and cubic ice lattices vs. non-crystalline ASW, for a range of pollutant substances. The viability of ASW as a medium for study of quantum criticality phases is also proposed. The process is environmentally-neutral in that only substantially condensed-phase air liquefaction products, e.g. nitrogen in >90% liquid phase are employed as an active agent. The applications are also presented in terms of the scale-up of experiments performed at the nanoscale.

  3. [Amorphization in pharmaceutical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, Piroska; Laczkovich, Orsolya; Eros, István

    2004-01-01

    The amorphization of crystalline active ingredients may be necessary because of the polymorphism of the active substance, the poor water-solubility of the drug material, difficult processing in the crystalline form and the taking out of a patent for a new (amorphous) form. This article introduces protocols for amorphization, which use methods traditionally applied in pharmaceutical technology. The protocols involve three possible routes: solvent methods, hot-melt technologies and milling procedures. With this presentation, the authors suggest help for practising experts to find the correct amorphization method.

  4. Molecular dynamics study of ice structural evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Dong Shun-Le

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to study the structural evolution of low density amorphous ice during its compression from one atmosphere to 2.5 GPa. Calculated results show that high density amorphous ice is formed at an intermediate pressure of~1.0GPa; the O-O-O bond angle ranges from 83° to 113°, and the O-H...O bond is bent from 112° to 160°. Very high density amorphous ice is obtained by quenching to 80K and decompressing the ice to ambient pressure from 160 K/1.3 GPa or 160 K/1.7 GPa; and the next-nearest O-O length is found to be 0.310 nm, just 0.035 nm beyond the nearest O-O distance of 0.275 nm.

  5. Excessively High Vapor Pressure of Al-based Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Im Jeong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-based amorphous alloys exhibited an abnormally high vapor pressure at their approximate glass transition temperatures. The vapor pressure was confirmed by the formation of Al nanocrystallites from condensation, which was attributed to weight loss of the amorphous alloys. The amount of weight loss varied with the amorphous alloy compositions and was inversely proportional to their glass-forming ability. The vapor pressure of the amorphous alloys around 573 K was close to the vapor pressure of crystalline Al near its melting temperature, 873 K. Our results strongly suggest the possibility of fabricating nanocrystallites or thin films by evaporation at low temperatures.

  6. Canted spin structure and the first order magnetic transition in CoFe2O4 nanoparticles coated by amorphous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubutin, I. S.; Starchikov, S. S.; Gervits, N. E.; Korotkov, N. Yu.; Dmitrieva, T. V.; Lin, Chun-Rong; Tseng, Yaw-Teng; Shih, Kun-Yauh; Lee, Jiann-Shing; Wang, Cheng-Chien

    2016-10-01

    The functional polymer (PMA-co-MAA) latex microspheres were used as a core template to prepare magnetic hollow spheres consisting of CoFe2O4/SiO2 composites. The spinel type crystal structure of CoFe2O4 ferrite is formed under annealing, whereas the polymer cores are completely removed after annealing at 450 °C. Magnetic and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements reveal very interesting magnetic properties of the CoFe2O4/SiO2 hollow spheres strongly dependent on the particle size which can be tuned by the annealing temperature. In the ground state of low temperatures, the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles are in antiferromagnetic state due to the canted magnetic structure. Under heating in the applied field, the magnetic structure gradually transforms from canted to collinear, which increases the magnetization. The Mössbauer data revealed that the small size CoFe2O4/SiO2 particles (2.2-4.3 nm) do not show superparamagnetic behavior but transit from the magnetic to the paramagnetic state by a jump-like magnetic transition of the first order This effect is a specific property of the magnetic nanoparticles isolated by inert material, and can be initiated by internal pressure creating at the particle surface. The suggested method of synthesis can be modified with various bio-ligands on the silane surface, and such materials can find many applications in diagnostics and bio-separation.

  7. Analysis of water sorption isotherms of amorphous food materials by solution thermodynamics with relevance to glass transition: evaluation of plasticizing effect of water by the thermodynamic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Eriko; Tashiro, Akiko; Kumagai, Hitomi; Kumagai, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Relation between the thermodynamic parameters obtained from water sorption isotherms and the degree of reduction in the glass transition temperature (Tg), accompanied by water sorption, was quantitatively studied. Two well-known glassy food materials namely, wheat gluten and maltodextrin were used as samples. The difference between the chemical potential of water in a solution and that of pure water ([Formula: see text]), the difference between the chemical potential of solid in a solution and that of a pure solid ([Formula: see text]), and the change in the integral Gibbs free energy ([Formula: see text]) were obtained by analyzing the water sorption isotherms using solution thermodynamics. The parameter [Formula: see text] correlated well with ΔTg (≡Tg - Tg0; where Tg0 is the glass transition temperature of dry material), which had been taken to be an index of plasticizing effect. This indicates that plasticizing effect of water on foods can be evaluated through the parameter [Formula: see text].

  8. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt;

    1997-01-01

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials...... are superparamagnetic at finite temperatures. The temperature dependence of the superparamagnetic relaxation time and the influence of inter-particle interactions is discussed. Finally, some examples of studies of surface magnetization of alpha-Fe particles are presented....

  9. [The development of co-amorphous drug systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jing; Shi, Nian-Qiu; Wang, Xing-Lin

    2013-05-01

    Converting two poorly water-soluble crystalline drugs to co-amorphous drug systems by ball milling, quench-cooling, or cryo-milling method can improve stability of the drug, enhance dissolution rates, and reduce adverse reactions of the single drug. Co-amorphous system has been used to solve problems of co-administration of medicines. Formation and intermolecular interactions of co-amorphous drug systems may be verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Raman spectroscopy (RS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Stability of co-amorphous drug systems is influenced by their glass transition temperature (Tg) and intermolecular interactions. The theoretical Tg values and the interaction parameter x are calculated by Gordon-Taylor equation and the Flory-Huggins equation, respectively. Thus, co-amorphous drug systems are analyzed theoretically at molecular level. Co-amorphous drug systems provide a new sight for the co-administration of medicines.

  10. Hydrogen-induced crystallization of an amorphous metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Pil-Ryung [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: cprdream@kookmin.ac.kr; Kim, Yu Chan [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Bae [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Hyun-Kwang [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Fleury, Eric [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung-Hee [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The influence of hydrogen on the structural stability of an amorphous nickel has been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. We find that the volume of the amorphous metal increases nonlinearly with the hydrogen concentration and that it crystallizes at a certain critical concentration. The crystallization is shown to be caused by hydrogen-induced transition from the amorphous to the supercooled liquid state, and the change of diffusion mechanism from atomic hopping to string-like collective motion is also observed at the transition.

  11. Numerical simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition – Part 2: Impact of initial ice crystal number, radiation, stratification, secondary nucleation and layer depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Unterstrasser

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of contrail-to-cirrus transition were performed with an LES model. In Part 1 the impact of relative humidity, temperature and vertical wind shear was explored in a detailed parametric study. Here, we study atmospheric parameters like stratification and depth of the supersaturated layer and processes which may affect the contrail evolution. We consider contrails in various radiation scenarios herein defined by the season, time of day and the presence of lower-level cloudiness which controls the radiance incident on the contrail layer. Under suitable conditions, controlled by the radiation scenario and stratification, radiative heating lifts the contrail-cirrus and prolongs its lifetime. The potential of contrail-driven secondary nucleation is investigated. We consider homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores released from sublimated contrail ice crystals. In our model the contrail dynamics triggered by radiative heating does not suffice to force homogeneous freezing of ambient liquid aerosol particles. Furthermore, our model results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation of preactivated soot cores is unimportant. Contrail evolution is not controlled by the depth of the supersaturated layer as long as it exceeds roughly 500 m. Deep fallstreaks however need thicker layers. A variation of the initial ice crystal number is effective during the whole evolution of a contrail. A cut of the soot particle emission by two orders of magnitude can reduce the contrail timescale by one hour and the optical thickness by a factor of 5. Hence future engines with lower soot particle emissions could potentially lead to a reduction of the climate impact of aviation.

  12. Nuclear Quantum Effects in Ice Phases and Water from First Principles Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamuk, Betul

    Despite the simplicity of the molecule, condensed phases of water show many physical anomalies, some of which are still unexplained to date. This thesis focuses on one striking anomaly that has been largely neglected and never explained. When hydrogen (1H) is replaced by deuterium (2 D), zero point fluctuations of the heavy isotope causes ice to expand, whereas in normal isotope effect, heavy isotope causes volume contraction. Furthermore, in a normal isotope effect, the shift in volume should decrease with increasing temperature, while, in ice, the volume shift increases with increasing temperature and persists up to the melting temperature and also exists in liquid water. In this dissertation, nuclear quantum effects on structural and cohesive properties of different ice polymorphs are investigated. We show that the anomalous isotope effect is well described by first principles density functional theory with van der Waals (vdW-DF) functionals within the quasi-harmonic approximation. Our theoretical modeling explains how the competition between the intra- and inter-molecular bonding of ice leads to an anomalous isotope effect in the volume and bulk modulus of ice. In addition, we predict a normal isotope effect when 16O is replaced by 18O, which is experimentally confirmed. Furthermore, the transition from proton disordered hexagonal phase, ice Ih to proton ordered hexagonal phase, ice XI occurs with a temperature difference between 1H and 2D of 6K, in good agreement with experimental value of 4K. We explain, for first time for that this temperature difference is entirely due to the zero point energy. In the second half of this thesis, we expand our study to the other ice phases: ice Ic, ice IX, ice II, ice VIII, clathrate hydrates, and low and high density amorphous ices. We employ the methodology that we have developed to investigate the isotope effect in structures with different configurations. We show that there is a transition from anomalous isotope effect

  13. Breakdown of elasticity in amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biroli, Giulio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco

    2016-12-01

    What characterizes a solid is the way that it responds to external stresses. Ordered solids, such as crystals, exhibit an elastic regime followed by a plastic regime, both understood microscopically in terms of lattice distortion and dislocations. For amorphous solids the situation is instead less clear, and the microscopic understanding of the response to deformation and stress is a very active research topic. Several studies have revealed that even in the elastic regime the response is very jerky at low temperature, resembling very much the response of disordered magnetic materials. Here we show that in a very large class of amorphous solids this behaviour emerges upon decreasing temperature, as a phase transition, where standard elastic behaviour breaks down. At the transition all nonlinear elastic moduli diverge and standard elasticity theory no longer holds. Below the transition, the response to deformation becomes history- and time-dependent.

  14. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    exothermic than that of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). This suggests that enthalpy of crystallization in carbonate systems is ionic-size controlled, which may have significant implications in a wide variety of conditions, including geological sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide.......Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  15. Warm Ice Giant GJ 3470b. II Revised Planetary and Stellar Parameters from Optical to Near-infrared Transit Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Biddle, Lauren I; Crossfield, Ian J M; Fulton, Benjamin J; Ciceri, Simona; Eastman, Jason; Barman, Travis; Mann, Andrew W; Henry, Gregory W; Howard, Andrew W; Williamson, Michael H; Sinukoff, Evan; Dragomir, Diana; Vican, Laura; Mancini, Luigi; Southworth, John; Greenberg, Adam; Turner, Jake D; Thompson, Robert; Taylor, Brian W; Levine, Stephen E; Webber, Matthew W

    2014-01-01

    It is important to explore the diversity of characteristics of low-mass, low-density planets to understand the nature and evolution of this class of planets. We present a homogeneous analysis of 12 new and 9 previously published broadband photometric observations of the Uranus-sized extrasolar planet GJ 3470b, which belongs to the growing sample of sub-Jovian bodies orbiting M dwarfs. The consistency of our analysis explains some of the discrepancies between previously published results and provides updated constraints on the planetary parameters. Our data are also consistent with previous transit observations of this system. We also provide new spectroscopic measurements of GJ~3470 from 0.33 to 2.42 $\\mu$$m$ to aid our analysis. We find $R_{\\star}$ = 0.48$\\pm$0.04 $R_{\\odot}$, $M_{\\star}$ = 0.51$\\pm$0.06 $M_{\\odot}$, and $T_{\\rm eff}$ = 3652$\\pm$50 K for GJ 3470, along with a rotation period of $20.70\\pm{0.15}$ d and an R-band amplitude of 0.01 mag, which is small enough that current transit measurements sho...

  16. Amorphous Solid Water:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Jack; Linderstrøm-Lang, C. U.; Rice, Stuart A.

    1975-01-01

    The structure factor of amorphous solid D2O deposited from the vapor at 10°K has been obtained by measuring the neutron diffraction spectrum in the wave vector transfer from 0.8 to 12.3 reciprocal angstroms. The results indicate that the phase investigated is amorphous and has a liquiid-like stru......The structure factor of amorphous solid D2O deposited from the vapor at 10°K has been obtained by measuring the neutron diffraction spectrum in the wave vector transfer from 0.8 to 12.3 reciprocal angstroms. The results indicate that the phase investigated is amorphous and has a liquiid...

  17. Layered kagome spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamp, James; Dutton, Sian; Mourigal, Martin; Mukherjee, Paromita; Paddison, Joseph; Ong, Harapan; Castelnovo, Claudio

    Spin ice materials provide a rare instance of emergent gauge symmetry and fractionalisation in three dimensions: the effective degrees of freedom of the system are emergent magnetic monopoles, and the extensively many `ice rule' ground states are those devoid of monopole excitations. Two-dimensional (kagome) analogues of spin ice have also been shown to display a similarly rich behaviour. In kagome ice however the ground-state `ice rule' condition implies the presence everywhere of magnetic charges. As temperature is lowered, an Ising transition occurs to a charge-ordered state, which can be mapped to a dimer covering of the dual honeycomb lattice. A second transition, of Kosterlitz-Thouless or three-state Potts type, occurs to a spin-ordered state at yet lower temperatures, due to small residual energy differences between charge-ordered states. Inspired by recent experimental capabilities in growing spin ice samples with selective (layered) substitution of non-magnetic ions, in this work we investigate the fate of the two ordering transitions when individual kagome layers are brought together to form a three-dimensional pyrochlore structure coupled by long range dipolar interactions. We also consider the response to substitutional disorder and applied magnetic fields.

  18. Epitaxial growth of amorphous Ge films deposited on single-crystal Ge

    OpenAIRE

    M. G. Grimaldi; Mäenpää, M. (Markus); Paine, B. M.; Nicolet, M-A.; Lau, S. S.; Tseng, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    The epitaxial growth of amorphous Ge films deposited onto 110 Ge substrate is demonstrated. Substrate cleaning prior to deposition involves only conventional chemical procedures. The growth appears to be a strong function of the interface cleanliness. Two different growth mechanisms are observed: (a) a direct transition from amorphous to single-crystalline layer and (b) the growth involving the transition of amorphous to polycrystals to single crystal.

  19. Investigation of the amorphous to crystalline phase transition of chemical solution deposited Pb(Zr30Ti70)O3 thin films by soft x-ray absorption and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneller, T.; Schneller, T.; Kohlstedt, H.; Petraru, A.; Waser, R.; Guo, J.; Denlinger, J.; Learmonth, T.; Glans, Per-Andres; Smith, K. E.

    2008-08-01

    Chemical solution deposited (CSD) complex oxide thin films attract considerable interest in various emerging fields as for example, fuel cells, ferroelectric random access memories or coated conductors. In the present paper the results of soft-x-ray spectroscopy between 100 eV and 500 eV on the amorphous to crystalline phase transition of ferroelectric PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films are presented. Five CSD samples derived from the same wafer coated with a PZT film pyrolyzed at 350 C were heat treated at different temperatures between 400 C and 700 C. At first the sample were morphologically and electrically characterized. Subsequently the soft-x-ray absorption and emission experiments were performed at the undulator beamline 8.0 of the Advanced Light Source of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Soft-x-ray absorption spectra were acquired for the Ti L{sub 2,3-}, O K-, and C K-edge thresholds by using simultaneously the total electron yield (TEY) and total fluorescence yield (TFY) detection methods. For two samples, annealed at 400 C and 700 C, respectively, the resonant inelastic soft-x-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) was applied for various excitation energies near the Ti L-, O K-edges. We observed clear evidence of a rutile phase at untypically low temperatures. This rutile phase transforms into the perovskite phase upon increasing annealing temperature. These results are discussed in the framework of current microscopic models of the PZT (111) texture selection.

  20. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bosworth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using WxSi1−x, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (MoxSi1−x offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo83Si17. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz, there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of the ice temperature dependence of water ice photodesorption

    CERN Document Server

    Arasa, C; Cuppen, H M; van Dishoweck, E F; Kroes, G -J; 10.1063/1.3422213

    2010-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) photodissociation of amorphous water ice at different ice temperatures is investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analytical potentials. Previous MD calculations of UV photodissociation of amorphous and crystalline water ice at 10 K [S. Andersson et al., J. Chem. Phys. 124, 064715 (2006)] revealed -for both types of ice- that H atom, OH, and H2O desorption are the most important processes after photoexcitation in the uppermost layers of the ice. Water desorption takes place either by direct desorption of recombined water, or when, after dissociation, an H atom transfers part of its kinetic energy to one of the surrounding water molecules which is thereby kicked out from the ice. We present results of MD simulations of UV photodissociation of amorphous ice at 10, 20, 30, and 90 K in order to analyze the effect of ice temperature on UV photodissociation processes. Desorption and trapping probabilities are calculated for photoexcitation of H2O in the top four monolayers an...

  2. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Elusive Amorphous Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2015-01-01

    New and accurate laboratory results are reported for amorphous methane (CH4) ice near 10 K for the study of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the outer Solar System. Near- and mid-infrared (IR) data, including spectra, band strengths, absorption coefficients, and optical constants, are presented for the first time for this seldom-studied amorphous solid. The apparent IR band strength near 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) for amorphous CH4 is found to be about 33% higher than the value long used by IR astronomers to convert spectral observations of interstellar CH4 into CH4 abundances. Although CH4 is most likely to be found in an amorphous phase in the ISM, a comparison of results from various laboratory groups shows that the earlier CH4 band strength at 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) was derived from IR spectra of ices that were either partially or entirely crystalline CH4 Applications of the new amorphous-CH4 results are discussed, and all optical constants are made available in electronic form.

  3. Predicting Crystallization of Amorphous Drugs with Terahertz Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibik, Juraj; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Zeitler, J Axel

    2015-08-03

    There is a controversy about the extent to which the primary and secondary dielectric relaxations influence the crystallization of amorphous organic compounds below the glass transition temperature. Recent studies also point to the importance of fast molecular dynamics on picosecond-to-nanosecond time scales with respect to the glass stability. In the present study we provide terahertz spectroscopy evidence on the crystallization of amorphous naproxen well below its glass transition temperature and confirm the direct role of Johari-Goldstein (JG) secondary relaxation as a facilitator of the crystallization. We determine the onset temperature Tβ above which the JG relaxation contributes to the fast molecular dynamics and analytically quantify the level of this contribution. We then show there is a strong correlation between the increase in the fast molecular dynamics and onset of crystallization in several chosen amorphous drugs. We believe that this technique has immediate applications to quantify the stability of amorphous drug materials.

  4. Observed degradation stages of ring-mold craters (RMC): Geomorphic evidence for modification of ice-rich deposits in the transitions zone between Elysium and Utopia Basin, Mars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gro Birkefeldt Møller

    Deposits with pits, depressions and RMCs observed north of Elysium rise are interpreted as degraded mixtures of ice and clastic material (CCF, LVF and LDA). Degradation stages of RMCs are an important tool for mapping dusty, deflated ice-rich units....

  5. Preparation of Ti-based amorphous brazing alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Jia-sheng; JIANG Zhi-guo; XU Zhi-rong; CHEN Guang

    2006-01-01

    A new kind of amorphous active brazing alloy foil with the composition of Ti40Zr25Ni15Cu20 was successfully synthesized using melt spinning in roll forging machine in argon atmosphere. The amorphous structure and composition were examined by X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and energy dispersive X-ray detector. The results show that the Ti40Zr25Ni15Cu20 amorphous alloy foil has excellent wettability on Si3N4 ceramic and demonstrate a strong glass forming ability. The reduced glass transition temperature (Trg) and the temperature interval of supercooled liquid region before crystallization are 0.76 and 78 K, respectively.

  6. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices.

  7. Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Frances

    1998-10-03

    OAK B204 Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films. The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and hTi-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials.

  8. Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten-bearing Alloys and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS-6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-14-73 Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten ...Technology, Boise State University, Army Research Laboratory Project Title: Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten -bearing Alloys and Composites...strength, we made them better suited to study the mechanical alloying of tungsten -transition metal couples in which interdiffusion during mechanical

  9. On the origin of the ice ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ice sheet dynamics provide a possible explanation for the 100 kyr power in climatic records. Some numerical experiments presented here show that even the transition from an essentially ice-free earth to a glacial can be produced by a northern hemisphere ice-sheet model, provided that a slow general

  10. Only Amorphous Ethanethiol Exists in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Mason, Nigel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Rajan, Rabin; Pradeep, T.; Sundararajan, Pavithraa; Cheng, Bing-Ming

    2016-07-01

    In the ISM, it is now recognised that many molecular species are synthesised on the surface of dust grains which remain within the icy mantles on these grains until desorbed or sputtered (e.g., during star or planetary formation processes). Spitzer has revealed the presence of molecular ices in the dense clouds of the ISM but it is the advent of ALMA and then JWST that is expected to reveal the chemical complexity of such ices. Since the detection of methanol (CH_3OH) in Sgr A and Sgr B2 and hydrogen sulphide (H_2S) in Sgr B2, and other sources, it was long expected that a molecule containing thiol group could the synthesized in the complex chemical regions of the ISM. In 1979, first detection of methanethiol in Sgr B2 was reported. However, the first report on the detection of the higher order thiol, ethanethiol, has only been made recently in Orion KL, 30 years after the first observations of methanethiol, although the necessary precursors were detected earlier, ethylene in IRC +10216, ethanol in Sgr B2 and hydrogen sulfide. In the laboratory for experimental astrochemistry facility in PRL, thiol ices on cold dust grains are simulated and are probed by the FTIR for the first time. Ethanethiol ices were formed on zinc selenide substrate cooled to 10 K in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. An infrared spectrum recorded after forming the ethanethiol ice at 10K revealed the ice formed to be amorphous in nature. Ices thus formed are then gradually warmed to higher temperatures with subsequent recording of infrared spectra. From the spectrum recorded at 180K, ethanethiol molecules from the ice phase were found to sublime. Until sublimation, which is typical indication for molecules turning from amorphous to crystalline phase, significant change in the infrared spectra, was not observed. Therefore we conclude that ethanethiol exists only in amorphous phase in the icy mantles of the cold dust grains. It is also the first known largest molecule to be present only in the

  11. Ice sheets as a missing source of silica to the polar oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkings, Jon R.; Wadham, Jemma L.; Benning, Liane G.; Hendry, Katharine R.; Tranter, Martyn; Tedstone, Andrew; Nienow, Peter; Raiswell, Rob

    2017-01-01

    Ice sheets play a more important role in the global silicon cycle than previously appreciated. Input of dissolved and amorphous particulate silica into natural waters stimulates the growth of diatoms. Here we measure dissolved and amorphous silica in Greenland Ice Sheet meltwaters and icebergs, demonstrating the potential for high ice sheet export. Our dissolved and amorphous silica flux is 0.20 (0.06-0.79) Tmol year-1, ~50% of the input from Arctic rivers. Amorphous silica comprises >95% of this flux and is highly soluble in sea water, as indicated by a significant increase in dissolved silica across a fjord salinity gradient. Retreating palaeo ice sheets were therefore likely responsible for high dissolved and amorphous silica fluxes into the ocean during the last deglaciation, reaching values of ~5.5 Tmol year-1, similar to the estimated export from palaeo rivers. These elevated silica fluxes may explain high diatom productivity observed during the last glacial-interglacial period.

  12. Ices in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J. Mayo; van de Bult, C. E. P. M.; Allamandola, Louis J.

    The chemical and physical properties of ice grains in interstellar space have been studied in the laboratory and theoretically modeled to compare with astronomical spectra between 2700 and 3700/cm. The observed polarization of starlight in this region clearly indicates that elongated particles are involved. Absorption characteristics for various shaped grains whose radii vary from approximately 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer, containing either pure amorphous H20 or amorphous mixtures of H20 with NH3, have been calculated with the aim of narrowing the range of acceptable grain parameters. By comparing the band shapes for spherical, spheroidal, and cylindrical grains with astronomical spectra we show that elongated particles whose radii are approximately equal to 0.15 micrometer produce an acceptable match and that both spherical and elongated particles whose radii are greater than or equal to 0.5 micrometer are definitely not consistent with observations. Details of the band shape are shown to depend on particle size, shape, and composition. Similar profiles can be produced by using different combinations of particle shape and composition. For example, the NH3 signature at 2.97 micrometer, which is prominent in a spherical grain, is greatly suppressed when in an elongated grain. This is exactly equivalent to reducing the concentration of NH3 in a spherical grain. A morphological grain model is used to explain the large variations in the observed strength of the 3.07 micrometer ice band from one region of space to another.

  13. Current use pesticide and legacy organochlorine pesticide dynamics at the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere interface in resolute passage, Canadian Arctic, during winter-summer transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pućko, Monika; Stern, Gary A; Burt, Alexis E; Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F; Macdonald, Robie W; Barber, David G; Geilfus, Nicolas-X; Rysgaard, Søren

    2017-02-15

    Here, we present the first detailed analysis of processes by which various current use pesticides (CUPs) and legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) are concentrated in melt ponds that form on Arctic sea ice in the summer, when surface snow is melting and ice eventually breaks up. Four current use pesticides (dacthal, chlorpyrifos, trifluralin, and pentachloronitrobenzene) and one legacy organochlorine pesticide (α-hexachlorocyclohexane) were detected in ponds in Resolute Passage, Canadian Arctic, in 2012. Melt-pond concentrations changed over time as a function of gas exchange, precipitation, and dilution with melting sea ice. Observed increases in melt-pond concentrations for all detected pesticides were associated with precipitation events. Dacthal reached the highest concentration of all current use pesticides in ponds (95±71pgL(-1)), a value exceeding measured concentrations in the under-ice (0m) and 5m seawater by >10 and >16 times, respectively. Drainage of dacthal-enriched pond water to the ocean during ice break-up provides an important ice-mediated annual delivery route, adding ~30% of inventory in the summer Mixed Layer (ML; 10m) in the Resolute Passage, and a concentrating mechanism with potential implications for exposures to organisms such as ice algae, and phytoplankton.

  14. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  15. Synchronizing ice cores from the Renland and Agassiz ice caps to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Bo Møllesøe; Clausen, Henrik Brink; Fischer, D. A.;

    2008-01-01

    Four ice cores from the Agassiz ice cap in the Canadian high arctic and one ice core from the Renland ice cap in eastern Greenland have been synchronized to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) which is based on annual layer counts in the DYE-3, GRIP and NGRIP ice cores. Volcanic...... reference horizons, seen in electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) have been used to carry out the synchronization throughout the Holocene. The Agassiz ice cores have been matched to the NGRIP ice core ECM signal, while the Renland core has been matched to the GRIP ice core ECM signal, thus tying...... the cores to GICC05. Furthermore, it has been possible to synchronize the Renland ice core to NGRIP-GICC05 in the glacial period back to 60,000 years b2k (years before A.D. 2000), on the basis of a matching of transitions between stadials and interstadials. This work brings the total number of ice core...

  16. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  17. Ice Cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ice cream is a popular dessert, which owes its sensorial properties (mouth feel) to its complex microstructure. The microstructure is a result of the combination of the ingredients and the production process. Ice cream is produced by simultaneous freezing and shearing of the ice cream mix, which res

  18. Interaction of ice sheets and climate on geological time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stap, L.B.

    2017-01-01

    Since the inception of the Antarctic ice sheet at the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (~34 Myr ago), land ice plays a crucial role in Earth’s climate. Through the ice-albedo and surface-height-temperature feedbacks, land ice variability strengthens atmospheric temperature changes induced by orbital and

  19. The role of ice stream dynamics in deglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robel, Alexander A.; Tziperman, Eli

    2016-08-01

    Since the mid-Pleistocene transition, deglaciation has occurred only after ice sheets have grown large while experiencing several precession and obliquity cycles, indicating that large ice sheets are more sensitive to Milankovitch forcing than small ice sheets are. Observations and model simulations suggest that the development of ice streams in the Laurentide Ice Sheet played an as yet unknown role in deglaciations. In this study, we propose a mechanism by which ice streams may enhance deglaciation and render large ice sheets more sensitive to Milankovitch forcing. We use an idealized configuration of the Parallel Ice Sheet Model that permits the formation of ice streams. When the ice sheet is large and ice streams are sufficiently developed, an upward shift in equilibrium line altitude, commensurate with Milankovitch forcing, results in rapid deglaciation, while the same shift applied to an ice sheet without fully formed ice streams results in continued ice sheet growth or slower deglaciation. Rapid deglaciation in ice sheets with significant streaming behavior is caused by ice stream acceleration and the attendant enhancement of calving and surface melting at low elevations. Ice stream acceleration is ultimately the result of steepening of the ice surface and increased driving stresses in ice stream onset zones, which come about due to the dependence of surface mass balance on elevation. These ice sheet simulations match the broad features of geomorphological observations and add ice stream dynamics that are missing from previous model studies of deglaciation.

  20. Properties of amorphous carbon

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon has a wide range of properties that are primarily controlled by the different bond hydridisations possible in such materials. This allows for the growth of an extensive range of thin films that can be tailored for specific applications. Films can range from those with high transparency and are hard diamond-like, through to those which are opaque, soft and graphitic-like. Films with a high degree of sp3 bonding giving the diamond-like properties are used widely by industry for hard coatings. Application areas including field emission cathodes, MEMS, electronic devices, medical and optical coatings are now close to market. Experts in amorphous carbon have been drawn together to produce this comprehensive commentary on the current state and future prospects of this highly functional material.

  1. Variable-amplitude oscillatory shear response of amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchikov, Nathan; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2014-06-01

    Variable-amplitude oscillatory shear tests are emerging as powerful tools to investigate and quantify the nonlinear rheology of amorphous solids, complex fluids, and biological materials. Quite a few recent experimental and atomistic simulation studies demonstrated that at low shear amplitudes, an amorphous solid settles into an amplitude- and initial-conditions-dependent dissipative limit cycle, in which back-and-forth localized particle rearrangements periodically bring the system to the same state. At sufficiently large shear amplitudes, the amorphous system loses memory of the initial conditions, exhibits chaotic particle motions accompanied by diffusive behavior, and settles into a stochastic steady state. The two regimes are separated by a transition amplitude, possibly characterized by some critical-like features. Here we argue that these observations support some of the physical assumptions embodied in the nonequilibrium thermodynamic, internal-variables based, shear-transformation-zone model of amorphous viscoplasticity; most notably that "flow defects" in amorphous solids are characterized by internal states between which they can make transitions, and that structural evolution is driven by dissipation associated with plastic deformation. We present a rather extensive theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic shear-transformation-zone model for a variable-amplitude oscillatory shear protocol, highlighting its success in accounting for various experimental and simulational observations, as well as its limitations. Our results offer a continuum-level theoretical framework for interpreting the variable-amplitude oscillatory shear response of amorphous solids and may promote additional developments.

  2. Magnetostrictive amorphous bimetal sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Mehnen, L; Kaniusas, E

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the application of a magnetostrictive amorphous ribbon (AR) for the detection of bending. In order to increase sensitivity, a bimetal structure is used which consists of AR and a nonmagnetic carrier ribbon. Several methods for the preparation of the bimetal are discussed. Results of the bending sensitivities are given for various combinations of the material types indicating crucial problems of bimetal preparation.

  3. Dissolved iron and iron(II) distributions beneath the pack ice in the East Antarctic (120°E) during the winter/spring transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallenberg, Christina; van der Merwe, Pier; Chever, Fanny; Cullen, Jay T.; Lannuzel, Delphine; Bowie, Andrew R.

    2016-09-01

    Distributions of dissolved iron (dFe) and its reduced form, Fe(II), to a depth of 1000 m were investigated under the seasonal pack ice off East Antarctica during the Sea Ice Physics and Ecosystem experiment (SIPEX-2) sea-ice voyage in September-October 2012. Concentrations of dFe were elevated up to five-fold relative to Southern Ocean background concentrations and were spatially variable. The mean dFe concentration was 0.44±0.4 nM, with a range from 0.09 to 3.05 nM. Profiles of dFe were more variable within and among stations than were macronutrients, suggesting that coupling between these biologically-essential elements was weak at the time of the study. Brine rejection and drainage from sea ice are estimated to be the dominant contributors to elevated dFe concentrations in the mixed layer, but mass budget considerations indicate that estimated dFe fluxes from brine input alone are insufficient to account for all observed dFe. Melting icebergs and shelf sediments are suspected to provide the additional dFe. Fe(II) was mostly below the detection limit but elevated at depth near the continental shelf, implying that benthic processes are a source of reduced Fe in bottom waters. The data indicate that dFe builds up under the seasonal sea-ice cover during winter and that reduction of Fe may be hampered in early spring by several factors such as lack of electron donors, low biological productivity and inadequate light below the sea ice. The accumulated dFe pool in the mixed layer is expected to contribute to the formation of the spring bloom as the ice retreats.

  4. Structure and Properties of an Amorphous Metal-Organic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Thomas D.; Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Barney, Emma R.; Soper, Alan K.; Bithell, Erica G.; Tan, Jin-Chong; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2010-03-01

    ZIF-4, a metal-organic framework (MOF) with a zeolitic structure, undergoes a crystal-amorphous transition on heating to 300°C. The amorphous form, which we term a-ZIF, is recoverable to ambient conditions or may be converted to a dense crystalline phase of the same composition by heating to 400°C. Neutron and x-ray total scattering data collected during the amorphization process are used as a basis for reverse Monte Carlo refinement of an atomistic model of the structure of a-ZIF. The structure is best understood in terms of a continuous random network analogous to that of a-SiO2. Optical microscopy, electron diffraction and nanoindentation measurements reveal a-ZIF to be an isotropic glasslike phase capable of plastic flow on its formation. Our results suggest an avenue for designing broad new families of amorphous and glasslike materials that exploit the chemical and structural diversity of MOFs.

  5. Legal Ice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandsbjerg, Jeppe

    The idealised land|water dichotomy is most obviously challenged by ice when ‘land practice’ takes place on ice or when ‘maritime practice’ is obstructed by ice. Both instances represent disparity between the legal codification of space and its social practice. Logically, then, both instances call...... for alternative legal thought and practice; in the following I will emphasise the former and reflect upon the relationship between ice, law and politics. Prior to this workshop I had worked more on the relationship between cartography, geography and boundaries than specifically on ice. Listening to all...... the interesting conversations during the workshop, however, made me think that much of the concern with the Polar Regions in general, and the presence of ice in particular, reverberates around the question of how to accommodate various geographical presences and practices within the regulatory framework that we...

  6. Observation of viscosity transition in α-pinene secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Järvinen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Under certain conditions, secondary organic aerosol (SOA particles can exist in the atmosphere in an amorphous solid or semi-solid state. To determine their relevance to processes such as ice nucleation or chemistry occurring within particles requires knowledge of the temperature and relative humidity (RH range for SOA to exist in these states. In the CLOUD experiment at CERN, we deployed a new in-situ optical method to detect the viscosity of α-pinene SOA particles and measured their transition from the amorphous viscous to liquid state. The method is based on the depolarising properties of laboratory-produced non-spherical SOA particles and their transformation to non-depolarising spherical liquid particles during deliquescence. We found that particles formed and grown in the chamber developed an asymmetric shape through coagulation. A transition to spherical shape was observed as the RH was increased to between 35 % at −10 °C and 80 % at −38 °C, confirming previous calculations of the viscosity transition conditions. Consequently, α-pinene SOA particles exist in a viscous state over a wide range of ambient conditions, including the cirrus region of the free troposphere. This has implications for the physical, chemical and ice-nucleation properties of SOA and SOA-coated particles in the atmosphere.

  7. Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  8. Conductor rail anti-icing sche me of monorail transit based on the Joule heat%基于焦耳热分析的单轨交通导电轨防覆冰方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高晓杰; 郭蕾; 王旭光; 李群湛

    2014-01-01

    According to the characteristics of the urban monorail transit system,a melting ice plan of large current was proposed in this paper.Based on the joule heating effect,the heat balance equation of T-shaped special conductive rail in monorail transit system was established.Then the critical anti -icing current was calculated and the impact of environmental factors,such as temperature,wind speed,on the anti-icing current was inves-tigated.In order to validate its feasibility,T-shaped conductor rail model was generated in ANSYS and the thermal analysis was carried out.The results show that the critical melting current obtained in this study can meet the practical needs.%针对跨座式单轨交通系统的特点,提出一种大电流防融冰方案。基于焦耳热效应建立了单轨交通系统的T型专用导电轨的热平衡方程,计算其临界防冰电流,并分析温度、风速等环境因素对防冰电流的影响。为验证其可行性,在ANSYS中建立T型导电轨模型并对其进行热分析,结果显示计算得到的临界防冰电流满足实际所需。

  9. A rapid transition from ice covered CO2–rich waters to a biologically mediated CO2 sink in the eastern Weddell Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Geibert

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, locally called Warm Deep Water (WDW, enters the Weddell Gyre in the southeast, roughly at 25° E to 30° E. In December 2002 and January 2003 we studied the effect of entrainment of WDW on the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in Weddell Sea surface waters. Ultimately the fCO2 difference across the sea surface drives air-sea fluxes of CO2. Deep CTD sections and surface transects of fCO2 were made along the Prime Meridian, a northwest-southeast section, and along 17° E to 23° E during cruise ANT XX/2 on FS Polarstern. Upward movement and entrainment of WDW into the winter mixed layer had significantly increased DIC and fCO2 below the sea ice along 0° W and 17° E to 23° E, notably in the southern Weddell Gyre. Nonetheless, the ice cover largely prevented outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. During and upon melting of the ice, biological activity rapidly reduced surface water fCO2 by up to 100 μatm, thus creating a sink for atmospheric CO2. Despite the tendency of the surfacing WDW to cause CO2 supersaturation, the Weddell Gyre may well be a CO2 sink on an annual basis due to this effective mechanism involving ice cover and ensuing biological fCO2 reduction. Dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 in melting sea ice may play a minor role in this rapid reduction of surface water fCO2.

  10. A rapid transition from ice covered CO2-rich waters to a biologically mediated CO2 sink in the eastern Weddell Gyre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Geibert

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, locally called Warm Deep Water (WDW, enters the Weddell Gyre in the southeast, roughly at 25° E to 30° E. In December~2002 and January 2003} we studied the effect of entrainment of WDW on the fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2 and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in Weddell Sea surface waters. Ultimately the fCO2 difference across the sea surface drives CO2 air-sea fluxes. Deep CTD sections and surface transects of fCO2 were made along the Prime Meridian, a northwest-southeast section, and along 17° E to 23° E during cruise ANT XX/2 on FS Polarstern. Upward movement and entrainment of WDW into the winter mixed layer had significantly increased DIC and fCO2 below the sea ice along 0° W and 17° E to 23° E, notably in the southern Weddell Gyre. Nonetheless, the ice cover largely prevented outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. During and upon melting of the ice, biological activity rapidly reduced surface water fCO2 by up to 100 μatm, thus creating a sink for atmospheric CO2. Despite the tendency of the surfacing WDW to cause CO2 supersaturation, the Weddell Gyre may well be a CO2 sink on an annual basis due to this effective mechanism involving ice cover and ensuing biological fCO2 reduction. Dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 in melting sea ice may also play a role in this rapid reduction of surface water fCO2. The CO2 source tendency deriving from the upward movement of "pre-industrial" CDW is declining, as atmospheric CO2 levels continue to increase, and thus the CO2 sink of the Weddell Gyre will continue to increase as well (provided the upward movement of WDW does not change significantly.

  11. DETECTIONS OF TRANS-NEPTUNIAN ICE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClure, M. K.; Calvet, N.; Bergin, E.; Cleeves, L. I. [Department of Astronomy, The University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, 830 Dennison Bldg., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Espaillat, C. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); D' Alessio, P. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad NacionalAUtónoma de México, 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Manoj, P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Sargent, B., E-mail: melisma@umich.edu, E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu, E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu, E-mail: cleeves@umich.edu, E-mail: cce@bu.edu, E-mail: p.dalessio@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: dmw@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: manoj.puravankara@tifr.res.in, E-mail: baspci@rit.edu [Center for Imaging Science and Laboratory for Multiwavelength Astrophysics, Rochester Institute of Technology, 54 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We present Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of T Tauri stars, in which we detect amorphous and crystalline water ice features. Using irradiated accretion disk models, we determine the disk structure and ice abundance in each of the systems. Combining a model-independent comparison of the ice feature strength and disk size with a detailed analysis of the model ice location, we estimate that the ice emitting region is at disk radii >30 AU, consistent with a proto-Kuiper belt. Vertically, the ice emits most below the photodesorption zone, consistent with Herschel observations of cold water vapor. The presence of crystallized water ice at a disk location (1) colder than its crystallization temperature and (2) where it should have been re-amorphized in ∼1 Myr suggests that localized generation is occurring; the most likely cause appears to be micrometeorite impact or planetesimal collisions. Based on simple tests with UV models and different ice distributions, we suggest that the SED shape from 20 to 50 μm may probe the location of the water ice snowline in the disk upper layers. This project represents one of the first extra-solar probes of the spatial structure of the cometary ice reservoir thought to deliver water to terrestrial planets.

  12. Growth induced magnetic anisotropy in crystalline and amorphous thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, F.

    1998-07-20

    The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and Ni-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials. A brief summary of work done in each area is given.

  13. Properties of amorphous FeCoB alloy particles (abstract)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, S. W.; Wells, S.; Meagher, A.

    1988-01-01

    -ray diffraction. Magnetic measurements of the saturation magnetization, coercivity, and remanence of the particles have been measured. The transition from the amorphous-to-crystalline state has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermomagnetometry up to a temperature of 450 °C (see Fig...

  14. Water migration mechanisms in amorphous powder material and related agglomeration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renzetti, S.; Voogt, J.A.; Oliver, L.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    The agglomeration phenomenon of amorphous particulate material is a major problem in the food industry. Currently, the glass transition temperature (Tg) is used as a fundamental parameter to describe and control agglomeration. Models are available that describe the kinetics of the agglomeration proc

  15. Vibration properties of low-fraction hydrogen in deuterium ices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ya; Dong Shun-Le

    2005-01-01

    Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectra of D2O high-density amorphous (hda) ice, ice-Ⅷ and ice-Ⅱ mixed with small amount of H2O (<5%) have been measured recently on high-energy transfer spectrometer at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). The hydrogen atom on D2O ice lattices has three distinguished vibrational modes, two bending at low frequencies and one stretching at high frequencies, and their frequencies are slightly different for different phases of ice. It was found that the lower one of the bending modes is located at ~95 meV for hda-ice, at ~95 meV for ice-Ⅷ and at ~96 meV for ice-Ⅱ and they are all lower than the value of 104 meV for ice-Ih. It was also measured that the O-D and O-H covalent bond stretching modes of ice-Ⅷ are at ~315 and ~425 meV, ice-Ⅱ at 307 and ~415 meV, hda-ice at 312 and ~418 meV, respectively. They are significantly higher than the values of ice-Ih at ~299 and ~406 meV,respectively.

  16. Multidisciplinary study of sediments deposited in the Ross Sea (Antarctica) during the last 50 ka: information on changes of ice extent during the glacial-interglacial transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carlo, Paola; Baneschi, Ilaria; Bertagnini, Antonella; Boschi, Chiara; Cascella, Antonio; Colizza, Ester; Di Roberto, Alessio; Di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Finocchiaro, Furio; Landi, Patrizia; Lirer, Fabrizio; Pompilio, Massimo; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Sprovieri, Mario; Wrinkler, Aldo

    2013-04-01

    In the Ross Sea (Antarctica), sedimentation is controlled by the dynamics of the ice shelves, fluctuations of the ice sheets extensions (Eastern and Western) and volcanic activity from several volcanic complex of the Victoria Land. Marine sediments consisting of alternated glacigenic, biogenic and volcanic deposits can be interpreted in terms of changes in paleoclimate and paleoenvironment conditions. In this project we present a multidisciplinary study (comprising tephrostratigraphy, petrology, paleomagnetism, rock magnetism, TIC/TOC geochemistry, Ar/Ar dating, palinology and integrated biostratigraphy of forams and calcareous nannoplankton) of the sediments recovered in selected cores from Ross Sea during 1999 and 2000 cruises and stored in the Italian archive at Museo Nazionale dell'Antartide (Trieste). Results provide new data on local and/or global changes of paleoclimate and paleoenvironmental conditions over the past 50 Ka. Furthermore, the study of the recovered volcanic deposits adds new information about the poorly known, recent volcanic activity in the Victoria Land area.

  17. Structure and Properties of Amorphous Transparent Conducting Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, Julia

    Driven by technological appeal, the research area of amorphous oxide semiconductors has grown tremendously since the first demonstration of the unique properties of amorphous indium oxide more than a decade ago. Today, amorphous oxides, such as a-ITO, a-IZO, a-IGZO, or a-ZITO, exhibit the optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties that are comparable or even superior to those possessed by their crystalline counterparts, pushing the latter out of the market. Large-area uniformity, low-cost low-temperature deposition, high carrier mobility, optical transparency, and mechanical flexibility make these materials appealing for next-generation thin-film electronics. Yet, the structural variations associated with crystalline-to-amorphous transition as well as their role in carrier generation and transport properties of these oxides are far from being understood. Although amorphous oxides lack grain boundaries, factors like (i) size and distribution of nanocrystalline inclusions; (ii) spatial distribution and clustering of incorporated cations in multicomponent oxides; (iii) formation of trap defects; and (iv) piezoelectric effects associated with internal strains, will contribute to electron scattering. In this work, ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) and accurate density-functional approaches are employed to understand how the properties of amorphous ternary and quaternary oxides depend on quench rates, cation compositions, and oxygen stoichiometries. The MD results, combined with thorough experimental characterization, reveal that interplay between the local and long-range structural preferences of the constituent oxides gives rise to a complex composition-dependent structural behavior in the amorphous oxides. The proposed network models of metal-oxygen polyhedra help explain the observed intriguing electrical and optical properties in In-based oxides and suggest ways to broaden the phase space of amorphous oxide semiconductors with tunable properties. The

  18. Search for the First-Order Liquid-to-Liquid Phase Transition in Low-Temperature Confined Water by Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Sow-Hsin [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Wang, Zhe [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Liu, Kao-Hsiang [National Taiwan University

    2013-01-01

    It has been conjectured that a 1st order liquid-to-liquid (L-L) phase transition (LLPT) between high density liquid (HDL) and low density liquid (LDL) in supercooled water may exist, as a thermodynamic extension to the liquid phase of the 1st order transition established between the two bulk solid phases of amorphous ice, the high density amorphous ice (HDA) and the low density amorphous ice (LDA). In this paper, we first recall our previous attempts to establish the existence of the 1st order L-L phase transition through the use of two neutron scattering techniques: a constant Q elastic diffraction study of isobaric temperature scan of the D2O density, namely, the equation of state (EOS) measurements. A pronounced density hysteresis phenomenon in the temperature scan of the density above P = 1500 bar is observed which gives a plausible evidence of crossing the 1st order L-L phase transition line above this pressure; an incoherent quasi-elastic scattering measurements of temperature-dependence of the alpha-relaxation time of H2O at a series of pressures, namely, the study of the Fragile-to-Strong dynamic crossover (FSC) phenomenon as a function of pressure which we interpreted as the results of crossing the Widom line in the one-phase region. In this new experiment, we used incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (INS) to measure the density of states (DOS) of H atoms in H2O molecules in confined water as function of temperature and pressure, through which we may be able to follow the emergence of the LDL and HDL phases at supercooled temperature and high pressures. We here report for the first time the differences of librational and translational DOSs between the hypothetical HDL and LDL phases, which are similar to the corresponding differences between the well-established HDA and LDA ices. This is plausible evidence that the HDL and LDL phases are the thermodynamic extensions of the corresponding amorphous solid water HDA and LDA ices.

  19. Beyond amorphous organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Jun-ichi

    2003-07-01

    Recently it has been discovered that some types of liquid crystals, which believed to be governed by ionic conduction, exhibit a very fast electronic conduction. Their charge carrier transport is characterized by high mobility over 10-2 cm2/Vs independent of electric field and temperature. Now, the liquid crystals are being recognized as a new class of organic semiconductors. In this article, a new aspect of liquid crystals as a self-organizing molecular semiconductor are reviewed, focused on their basic charge carrier transport properties and discussed in comparison with those of molecular crystals and amorphous materials. And it is concluded that the liquid crystal is promising as a quality organic semiconductor for the devices that require a high mobility.

  20. Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of amorphous Y3Fe5O12 compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, E. P.; Costa, S. S.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Alho, B. P.; Caldas, A.; Ribeiro, P. O.; de Sousa, V. S. R.; de Oliveira, N. A.; von Ranke, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    We report a theoretical model formed by two coupled magnetic sublattices of localized spins in the presence of an applied magnetic field to investigate the magnetic characteristics and magnetocaloric properties of amorphous yttrium iron garnet. The magnetic state equation is based on Handrich-Kobe´s theory, where the amorphization is taken into account by introducing fluctuations in the exchange parameters. Experimental results report that Y3Fe5O12 presents a structural phase transition from crystalline to amorphous caused by a variation of external pressure. This phase transition on Y3Fe5O12 leads to interesting results in the magnetic properties and magnetocaloric quantities.

  1. Analysis and Application of the Amorphous Properties in Freeze-Dried Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Kiyoshi

    The dynamic properties of amorphous materials drastically change by the phase transition between glassy state and rubber state. Furthermore, the dynamic properties of amorphous materials in glassy state are affected by the thermal history such as processing and/or storage conditions. In this paper, effect of the glass transition of freeze-dried food systems on the storage stability was summarized. Moreover, analytical approaches of the amorphous properties for glassy products with enthalpy relaxation measurements by using differential scanning calorimetry were presented and its application to food industry was proposed.

  2. Archimedean Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Eloranta, Kari

    2009-01-01

    The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

  3. Interstellar ice analogs: band strengths of H$_2$O, CO$_2$, CH$_3$OH, and NH$_3$ in the far-infrared region

    CERN Document Server

    Giuliano, B M; Martín-Doménech, R; Dartois, E; Caro, G M Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    We measure the band strengths in the far-infrared region of interstellar ice analogs of astrophysically relevant species, such as H$_2$O, CO$_2$, CH$_3$OH, and NH$_3$, deposited at low temperature (8-10 $\\mathrm{K}$), followed by warm-up, to induce amorphous-crystalline phase transitions when relevant. The spectra of pure H$_2$O, NH$_3$, and CH$_3$OH ices have been measured in the near-, mid- and far-infrared spectroscopic regions using the Interstellar Astrochemistry Chamber (ISAC) ultra-high-vacuum setup. In addition, far-infrared spectra of NH$_3$ and CO$_2$ were measured using a different set-up equipped with a bolometer detector. Band strengths in the far-infrared region were estimated using the corresponding near- and mid-infrared values as a reference. We also performed theoretical calculations of the amorphous and crystalline structures of these molecules using solid state computational programs at density functional theory (DFT) level. Vibrational assignment and mode intensities for these ices were p...

  4. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  5. Ancient ice streams and their megalineated beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Nick; Ross, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Ice streams are corridors of fast-flowing (~ 800 m yr- 1) ice inset within otherwise sluggish-moving ice sheets. According to reported estimates, as much as 90% of the total discharge of the Antarctic Ice Sheet, for example, occurs through such corridors. Recognition of ice stream records in paleo-ice sheet research has profoundly changed the discipline of glacial geology. The key has been identification of the distinctive corrugated or 'megalineated' geomorphology of their beds, consisting of elongate ridges that are parallel to ice flow direction and often transitional to drumlins. Access to new satellite imagery has enabled mapping of megascale glacial lineations (MSGLs) over large swaths of terrain and the recognition of regional-scale ice stream flow paths and origins. At the peak of the last ice age, just after 20,000 years ago, there were more than 100 ice streams within the Laurentide Ice Sheet. Only now are we beginning to fully appreciate the fundamental role that such streams (which have been called the 'arteries' of ice sheets) have had on glaciated landscapes, by moving enormous volumes of sediment and releasing armadas of floating ice to the Arctic and Atlantic oceans. There is also a growing awareness of the erosional role of ice streams in overdeepening of lakes, fiords and other troughs along coastlines. Much remains to be learnt and new discoveries surely await. The picture of past ice sheets, like the Laurentide and Fennoscandian Ice Sheets, that is emerging today is very different from that of 20 years ago.

  6. Relating C-band Microwave and Optical Satellite Observations as A Function of Snow Thickness on First-Year Sea Ice during the Winter to Summer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Yackel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice and its snow cover have a direct impact on both the Arctic and global climate system through their ability to moderate heat exchange across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface. Snow cover plays a key role in the OSA interface radiation and energy exchange, as it controls the growth and decay of first-year sea ice (FYI). However, meteoric accumulation and redistribution of snow on FYI is highly stochastic over space and time, which makes it poorly understood. Previous studies have estimated local-scale snow thickness distributions using in-situ technique and modelling but it is spatially limited and challenging due to logistic difficulties. Moreover, snow albedo is also critical for determining the surface energy balance of the OSA during the critical summer ablation season. Even then, due to persistent and widespread cloud cover in the Arctic at various spatio-temporal scales, it is difficult and unreliable to remotely measure albedo of snow cover on FYI in the optical spectrum. Previous studies demonstrate that only large-scale sea ice albedo was successfully estimated using optical-satellite sensors. However, space-borne microwave sensors, with their capability of all-weather and 24-hour imaging, can provide enhanced information about snow cover on FYI. Daily spaceborne C-band scatterometer data (ASCAT) and MODIS data are used to investigate the the seasonal co-evolution of the microwave backscatter coefficient and optical albedo as a function of snow thickness on smooth FYI. The research focuses on snow-covered FYI near Cambridge Bay, Nunavut (Fig.1) during the winter to advanced-melt period (April-June, 2014). The ACSAT time series (Fig.2) show distinct increase in scattering at melt onset indicating the first occurrence of melt water in the snow cover. The corresponding albedo exhibits no decrease at this stage. We show how the standard deviation of ASCAT backscatter on FYI during winter can be used as a proxy for surface roughness

  7. Melting ice, growing trade?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Bensassi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large reductions in Arctic sea ice, most notably in summer, coupled with growing interest in Arctic shipping and resource exploitation have renewed interest in the economic potential of the Northern Sea Route (NSR. Two key constraints on the future viability of the NSR pertain to bathymetry and the future evolution of the sea ice cover. Climate model projections of future sea ice conditions throughout the rest of the century suggest that even under the most “aggressive” emission scenario, increases in international trade between Europe and Asia will be very low. The large inter-annual variability of weather and sea ice conditions in the route, the Russian toll imposed for transiting the NSR, together with high insurance costs and scarce loading/unloading opportunities, limit the use of the NSR. We show that even if these obstacles are removed, the duration of the opening of the NSR over the course of the century is not long enough to offer a consequent boost to international trade at the macroeconomic level.

  8. Evidence for middle Eocene Arctic sea ice from diatoms and ice-rafted debris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickley, Catherine E; St John, Kristen; Koç, Nalân; Jordan, Richard W; Passchier, Sandra; Pearce, Richard B; Kearns, Lance E

    2009-07-16

    Oceanic sediments from long cores drilled on the Lomonosov ridge, in the central Arctic, contain ice-rafted debris (IRD) back to the middle Eocene epoch, prompting recent suggestions that ice appeared in the Arctic about 46 million years (Myr) ago. However, because IRD can be transported by icebergs (derived from land-based ice) and also by sea ice, IRD records are restricted to providing a history of general ice-rafting only. It is critical to differentiate sea ice from glacial (land-based) ice as climate feedback mechanisms vary and global impacts differ between these systems: sea ice directly affects ocean-atmosphere exchanges, whereas land-based ice affects sea level and consequently ocean acidity. An earlier report assumed that sea ice was prevalent in the middle Eocene Arctic on the basis of IRD, and although somewhat preliminary supportive evidence exists, these data are neither comprehensive nor quantified. Here we show the presence of middle Eocene Arctic sea ice from an extraordinary abundance of a group of sea-ice-dependent fossil diatoms (Synedropsis spp.). Analysis of quartz grain textural characteristics further supports sea ice as the dominant transporter of IRD at this time. Together with new information on cosmopolitan diatoms and existing IRD records, our data strongly suggest a two-phase establishment of sea ice: initial episodic formation in marginal shelf areas approximately 47.5 Myr ago, followed approximately 0.5 Myr later by the onset of seasonally paced sea-ice formation in offshore areas of the central Arctic. Our data establish a 2-Myr record of sea ice, documenting the transition from a warm, ice-free environment to one dominated by winter sea ice at the start of the middle Eocene climatic cooling phase.

  9. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization.

  10. ICE AND DUST IN THE PRESTELLAR DARK CLOUD LYNDS 183: PREPLANETARY MATTER AT THE LOWEST TEMPERATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittet, D. C. B.; Poteet, C. A.; Bajaj, V. M.; Horne, D. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy and New York Center for Astrobiology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Chiar, J. E. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Pagani, L. [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 61 Av. de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Shenoy, S. S. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Adamson, A. J. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile)

    2013-09-10

    Dust grains are nucleation centers and catalysts for the growth of icy mantles in quiescent interstellar clouds, the products of which may accumulate into preplanetary matter when new stars and solar systems form within the clouds. In this paper, we present the first spectroscopic detections of silicate dust and the molecular ices H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} in the vicinity of the prestellar core L183 (L134N). An infrared photometric survey of the cloud was used to identify reddened background stars, and we present spectra covering solid-state absorption features in the wavelength range 2-20 {mu}m for nine of them. The mean composition of the ices in the best-studied line of sight (toward J15542044-0254073) is H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2} Almost-Equal-To 100:40:24. The ices are amorphous in structure, indicating that they have been maintained at low temperature ({approx}< 15 K) since formation. The ice column density N(H{sub 2}O) correlates with reddening by dust, exhibiting a threshold effect that corresponds to the transition from unmantled grains in the outer layers of the cloud to ice-mantled grains within, analogous to that observed in other dark clouds. A comparison of results for L183 and the Taurus and IC 5146 dark clouds suggests common behavior, with mantles first appearing in each case at a dust column corresponding to a peak optical depth {tau}{sub 9.7} = 0.15 {+-} 0.03 in the silicate feature. Our results support a previous conclusion that the color excess E{sub J-K} does not obey a simple linear correlation with the total dust column in lines of sight that intercept dense clouds. The most likely explanation is a systematic change in the optical properties of the dust as the density increases.

  11. Amorphous drugs and dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, K.; Priemel, P.;

    2013-01-01

    formulation principles are needed to ensure the stability of amorphous drug forms. The formation of solid dispersions is still the most investigated approach, but additional approaches are desirable to overcome the shortcomings of solid dispersions. Spatial separation by either coating or the use of micro......The transformation to an amorphous form is one of the most promising approaches to address the low solubility of drug compounds, the latter being an increasing challenge in the development of new drug candidates. However, amorphous forms are high energy solids and tend to recry stallize. New......-containers has shown potential to prevent or delay recrystallization. Another recent approach is the formation of co-amorphous mixtures between either two drugs or one drug and one low molecular weight excipient. Molecular interactions between the two molecules provide an energy barrier that has to be overcome...

  12. Comprehensive modeling of ion-implant amorphization in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, K.R.C. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain) and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: g0202446@nus.edu.sg; Jaraiz, M. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Synopsys, Karl-Hammerschmidt Strasse 34, D-85609 Aschheim/Dornach (Germany); Rubio, J.E. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Castrillo, P. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pinacho, R. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Srinivasan, M.P. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Benistant, F. [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing. 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2005-12-05

    A physically based model has been developed to simulate the ion-implant induced damage accumulation up to amorphization in silicon. Based on damage structures known as amorphous pockets (AP), which are three-dimensional, irregularly shaped agglomerates of interstitials (I) and vacancies (V) surrounded by crystalline silicon, the model is able to reproduce a wide range of experimental observations of damage accumulation and amorphization with interdependent implantation parameters. Instead of recrystallizing the I's and V's instantaneously, the recrystallization rate of an AP containing nI and mV is a function of its effective size, defined as min(n, m), irrespective of its internal spatial configuration. The parameters used in the model were calibrated using the experimental silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature as a function of dose rate for C, Si, and Ge. The model is able to show the superlinear damage build-up with dose, the extent of amorphous layer and the superadditivity effect of polyatomic ions.

  13. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xin; Bai Junqiang; Hua Jun; Wang Kun; Zhang Yang

    2014-01-01

    Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when enter-ing clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes:rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  14. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when entering clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes: rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  15. 2H-SiC Dendritic Nanocrystals In Situ Formation from Amorphous Silicon Carbide under Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Under electron beam irradiation, the in-situ formation of 2H-SiC dentritic nanocrystals from amorphous silicon carbide at room temperature was observed. The homogenous transition mainly occurs at the thin edge and on the surface of specimen where the energy obtained from electron beam irradiation is high enough to cause the amorphous crystallizing into 2H-SiC.

  16. Influence of variation in molar ratio on co-amorphous drug-amino acid systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann; Löbmann, Korbinian;

    2016-01-01

    Molecular interactions were investigated within four different co-amorphous drug-amino acid systems, namely indomethacin-tryptophan (Ind-Trp), furosemide-tryptophan (Fur-Trp), indomethacin-arginine (Ind-Arg) and furosemide-arginine (Fur-Arg). The co-amorphous systems were prepared by ball milling...... for 90min at different molar ratios and analyzed by XRPD and DSC. Interactions within the co-amorphous samples were evaluated based on the deviation between the actual glass transition temperature (Tg) and the theoretical Tg calculated by the Gordon-Taylor equation. The strongest interactions were...... observed in the 50mol% drug (1:1M ratio) mixtures, with the exception of co-amorphous Ind-Arg where the interactions within the 40mol% drug samples appear equally strong. A particularly large deviation between the theoretical and actual Tgs was observed within co-amorphous Ind-Arg and Fur-Arg systems...

  17. The pressure-amorphized state in zirconium tungstate: a precursor to decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Akhilesh K [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sastry, V S [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Sahu, P Ch [Materials Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mary, T A [Department of Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2004-02-25

    In contrast to widely accepted view that pressure-induced amorphization arises due to kinetic hindrance of equilibrium phase transitions, here we provide evidence that the metastable pressure-amorphized state in zirconium tungstate is a precursor to decomposition of the compound into a mixture of simple oxides. This is from the volume collapse {delta}V across amorphization, which is obtained for the first time by measuring linear dimensions of irreversibly amorphized samples during their recovery to the original cubic phase upon isochronal annealing up to 1000 K. The anomalously large {delta}V of 25.7 {+-} 1.2% being the same as that expected for the decomposition indicates that this amorphous state is probably a precursor to kinetically hindered decomposition. A P-T diagram of the compound is also proposed.

  18. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Vishwakarma; V Prasad; S V Subramanyam; V Ganesan

    2005-10-01

    Amorphous conducting carbon films deposited over quartz substrates were analysed using X-ray diffraction and AFM technique. X-ray diffraction data reveal disorder and roughness in the plane of graphene sheet as compared to that of graphite. This roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. The AFM data shows surface roughness of carbon films depending on preparation temperatures. The surface roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. Also some nucleating islands were seen on the samples prepared at 900°C, which are not present on the films prepared at 700°C. Detailed analysis of these islands reveals distorted graphitic lattice arrangement. So we believe these islands to be nucleating graphitic. Power spectrum density (PSD) analysis of the carbon surface indicates a transition from the nonlinear growth mode to linear surface-diffusion dominated growth mode resulting in a relatively smoother surface as one moves from low preparation temperature to high preparation temperature. The amorphous carbon films deposited over a rough quartz substrate reveal nucleating diamond like structures. The density of these nucleating diamond like structures was found to be independent of substrate temperature (700–900°C).

  19. Anisotropic mechanical amorphization drives wear in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastewka, Lars; Moser, Stefan; Gumbsch, Peter; Moseler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is the hardest material on Earth. Nevertheless, polishing diamond is possible with a process that has remained unaltered for centuries and is still used for jewellery and coatings: the diamond is pressed against a rotating disc with embedded diamond grit. When polishing polycrystalline diamond, surface topographies become non-uniform because wear rates depend on crystal orientations. This anisotropy is not fully understood and impedes diamond's widespread use in applications that require planar polycrystalline films, ranging from cutting tools to confinement fusion. Here, we use molecular dynamics to show that polished diamond undergoes an sp(3)-sp(2) order-disorder transition resulting in an amorphous adlayer with a growth rate that strongly depends on surface orientation and sliding direction, in excellent correlation with experimental wear rates. This anisotropy originates in mechanically steered dissociation of individual crystal bonds. Similarly to other planarization processes, the diamond surface is chemically activated by mechanical means. Final removal of the amorphous interlayer proceeds either mechanically or through etching by ambient oxygen.

  20. Signatures of Quantum-Tunneling Diffusion of Hydrogen Atoms on Water Ice at 10 K

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Reported here is the first observation of the tunneling surface diffusion of a hydrogen (H) atom on water ice. Photostimulated desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization methods were used to determine the diffusion rates at 10 Kon amorphous solid water and polycrystalline ice. H-atom diffusion on polycrystalline ice was 2 orders of magnitude faster than that of deuterium atoms, indicating the occurrence of tunneling diffusion. Whether diffusion is by tunneling or thermal hopping...

  1. Acoustic Communications and Navigation for Mobile Under-Ice Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    urethane-filled hose with spiral conductors for the through- ice transition where a cable would be vulnerable. The buoy is designed to float after melting ...project is that it allows a drifting, ice -tethered navigation and communications system to be employed in the Arctic during times when it is not possible...performing tactical missions under Arctic ice . Potential programs for transition include LD-UUV if an Arctic version is fielded in the future. RELATED

  2. Large-Scale Surveys of Snow Depth on Arctic Sea Ice from Operation IceBridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, Nathan T.; Farrell, Sinead L.

    2011-01-01

    We show the first results of a large ]scale survey of snow depth on Arctic sea ice from NASA fs Operation IceBridge snow radar system for the 2009 season and compare the data to climatological snow depth values established over the 1954.1991 time period. For multiyear ice, the mean radar derived snow depth is 33.1 cm and the corresponding mean climatological snow depth is 33.4 cm. The small mean difference suggests consistency between contemporary estimates of snow depth with the historical climatology for the multiyear ice region of the Arctic. A 16.5 cm mean difference (climatology minus radar) is observed for first year ice areas suggesting that the increasingly seasonal sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean has led to an overall loss of snow as the region has transitioned away from a dominantly multiyear ice cover.

  3. Transmission and Trapping of Cold Electrons in Water Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Cicman, Peter; Field, David;

    2011-01-01

    Experiments are reported that show currents of low energy (“cold”) electrons pass unattenuated through crystalline ice at 135 K for energies between zero and 650 meV, up to the maximum studied film thickness of 430 bilayers, showing negligible apparent trapping. By contrast, both porous amorphous...

  4. Ethane Ices in the Outer Solar System: Spectroscopy and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Raines, L. L.

    2009-01-01

    We report recent experiments on ethane ices made at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System. New near- and mid-infrared data for crystalline and amorphous ethane, including new spectra for a seldom-studied solid phase that exists at 35-55 K, are presented along with radiation-chemical experiments showing the formation of more-complex hydrocarbons

  5. Porosity effects on crystallization kinetics of Amorphous Solid Water: Implications for cold icy objects in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Emily H.; Raut, Ujjwal; Baragiola, Raul A.

    2015-11-01

    Crystalline ice has been identified on the cold surfaces of most icy satellites and TNOs [1]. This is surprising since accretion of water vapor at temperatures (T isothermal transition from amorphous to fully crystalline phase was characterized by analyzing the time-dependent evolution of the OH-stretch absorption band using transmission infrared spectroscopy. Our initial results show that τc decreases with increasing porosity; for instance, a film deposited at 45° was observed to crystallize ~6 times faster than a film deposited at 0°. The preliminary estimate of the porosity of the 45° film is ~50% higher than that of the film deposited at normal incidence. Our findings can explain the reported variation in temperature-dependent τc [2] and contribute to the understanding of crystalline ice on cold bodies in the Outer Solar System.1. Mastrapa, R.M.E. et al. In: Gudipati, M.S. & Castillo-Rogez, J., Eds, The Science of Solar System Ices, Springer, New York, 2013.2. Baragiola, R.A. In: Devlin & Buch, Eds, Water in Confining Geometries, Springer-Verlag, 2003.3. Jewitt, D.C. & Luu, J., Nature 432, 731, 2004.4. Porter, S.B. et al. Icarus 208, 492, 2010.5. Stevenson, K.P., et al. Science 283, 1505, 1999.6. Francis, R.J. & O’Hare, D., J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans., 3133, 1998.7. Kirsch, B.L. et al., J. Phys. Chem. B., 108, 12698, 2004.

  6. Predicting Crystallization of Amorphous Drugs with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibik, Juraj; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    -to-nanosecond time scales with respect to the glass stability. In the present study we provide terahertz spectroscopy evidence on the crystallization of amorphous naproxen well below its glass transition temperature and confirm the direct role of Johari–Goldstein (JG) secondary relaxation as a facilitator......There is a controversy about the extent to which the primary and secondary dielectric relaxations influence the crystallization of amorphous organic compounds below the glass transition temperature. Recent studies also point to the importance of fast molecular dynamics on picosecond...... of the crystallization. We determine the onset temperature Tβ above which the JG relaxation contributes to the fast molecular dynamics and analytically quantify the level of this contribution. We then show there is a strong correlation between the increase in the fast molecular dynamics and onset of crystallization...

  7. A tissue-inspired amorphous photonic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by how cells pack in dense biological tissues, we design an amorphous material which possesses a complete photonic band gap. A physical parameter inspired by how cells adhere with one another and regulate their shapes can continuously tune the photonic band gap size as well as the bulk mechanical property of the material. The material can be further tuned to undergo a solid-fluid phase transition during which the shear modulus vanishes yet the photonic band gap persists, hence giving rise to a photonic fluid that is robust to flow and rearrangements. Experimentally this design should lead to the engineering of self-assembled non-rigid photonic structures with photonic band gaps that can be controlled in real time.

  8. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-11-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions.

  9. Strain localization and percolation of stable structure in amorphous solids

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yunfeng; Falk, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous strain localization occurs during mechanical tests of a model amorphous solid simulated using molecular dynamics. The degree of localization depends upon the extent of structural relaxation prior to mechanical testing. In the most rapidly quenched samples higher strain rates lead to increased localization, while the more gradually quenched samples exhibit the opposite strain rate dependence. This transition coincides with the k-core percolation of atoms with quasi-crystal-like sho...

  10. Fundamentals of amorphous solids structure and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2014-01-01

    Long awaited, this textbook fills the gap for convincing concepts to describe amorphous solids. Adopting a unique approach, the author develops a framework that lays the foundations for a theory of amorphousness. He unravels the scientific mysteries surrounding the topic, replacing rather vague notions of amorphous materials as disordered crystalline solids with the well-founded concept of ideal amorphous solids. A classification of amorphous materials into inorganic glasses, organic glasses, glassy metallic alloys, and thin films sets the scene for the development of the model of ideal amorph

  11. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  12. Calorimetric and neutron diffraction studies on transitions of water confined in nanoporous copper rubeanate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Yonamine, Ryo; Yamada, Teppei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2010-07-01

    Copper rubeanate (H(2)C(2)N(2)S(2)Cu) has a nanoporous structure and exhibits high proton conductivity with adsorbing water inside the pores. We have studied the phase behavior and structure of the water confined in copper rubeanate hydrates (H(2)C(2)N(2)S(2)Cu.nH(2)O, n = 0, 2.1, 3.7) by adiabatic calorimetry and neutron powder diffraction. In the hydrate samples, a glass transition and a first-order transition appeared around 150 and 260 K, respectively. The transition entropy was similar to the entropy of fusion of bulk water, indicating that the adsorbed water is disordered above the transition temperature, like bulk water, and ordered below 150 K, like bulk ice. The neutron diffraction data demonstrated that both dry and hydrated copper rubeanates have amorphous structures over the temperature range 100-340 K. The analyses on the diffraction peak owing to the adsorbed water revealed that the transition at 260 K is a liquid-liquid transition due to the condensation of water on the surface of the pores, and the condensed water molecules are gradually ordered below 260 K and frozen-in at the glass transition around 150 K.

  13. Process induced disorder in crystalline materials: differentiating defective crystals from the amorphous form of griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Tao; Pinal, Rodolfo; Carvajal, M Teresa

    2008-08-01

    This research investigates milling induced disorder in crystalline griseofulvin. Griseofulvin was subjected to cryogenic milling for various lengths of time. For comparison, the amorphous form of griseofulvin was also prepared by the quench melt method. Different analytical techniques were used to study the differences between the cryomilled, amorphous and crystalline forms of the drug. Cryogenic milling of griseofulvin progressively reduces the crystallinity of the drug by inducing crystal defects, rather than amorphous materials. Raman analysis provides evidence of structural differences between the two. The differences between the defective crystals produced by milling and the amorphous form are significant enough as to be measurable in their bulk thermal properties. Defective crystals show significant decrease in the heat of fusion as a function of milling time but do not exhibit a glass transition nor recrystallization from the amorphous form. Crystal defects undergo recrystallization upon heating at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T(g)) in a process that is separate and completely independent from the crystallization of the amorphous griseofulvin, observed above T(g). Physical mixtures of defective crystals and amorphous drug demonstrate that the thermal events associated with each form persist in the mixtures, unaffected by the presence of the other form.

  14. High hydrogen dilution and low substrate temperature cause columnar growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronsveld, Paula C.P.; Rath, Jatindra K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Mates, Tomas; Fejfar, Antonin; Kocka, Jan [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 53 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2010-03-15

    Columnar growth was observed in the amorphous part of mixed phase layers deposited at very low substrate temperatures. The width of the columns and the layer thickness at which they are first distinguishable in a cross-sectional transmission electron microscope (X-TEM) image, about 120 nm, is similar for the substrate temperature range of 40-100 C, but the columns are less well developed when either the substrate temperature is increased or the dilution ratio is lowered. This growth behaviour and the incubation layer are attributed to hydrogen-induced surface diffusion of growth precursors resulting in an amorphous-amorphous roughness transition. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Property change during nanosecond pulse laser annealing of amorphous NiTi thin film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Sadrnezhaad; Noushin Yasavol; Mansoureh Ganjali; Sohrab Sanjabi

    2012-06-01

    Nanosecond lasers of different intensities were pulsed into sputter-deposited amorphous thin films of near equiatomic Ni/Ti composition to produce partially crystallized highly sensitive -phase spots surrounded by amorphous regions. Scanning electron microscopy having secondary and back-scattered electrons, field emission scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction patterns were used to characterize the laser treated spots. Effect of nanosecond pulse lasering on microstructure, morphology, thermal diffusion and inclusion formation was investigated. Increasing beam intensity and laser pulse-number promoted amorphous to -phase transition. Lowering duration of the pulse incidence reduced local film oxidation and film/substrate interference.

  16. Stochastic approach to plasticity and yield in amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, H. G. E.; Jaiswal, Prabhat K.; Procaccia, Itamar; Sastry, Srikanth

    2015-12-01

    We focus on the probability distribution function (PDF) P (Δ γ ;γ ) where Δ γ are the measured strain intervals between plastic events in a athermal strained amorphous solids, and γ measures the accumulated strain. The tail of this distribution as Δ γ →0 (in the thermodynamic limit) scales like Δ γη . The exponent η is related via scaling relations to the tail of the PDF of the eigenvalues of the plastic modes of the Hessian matrix P (λ ) which scales like λθ, η =(θ -1 )/2 . The numerical values of η or θ can be determined easily in the unstrained material and in the yielded state of plastic flow. Special care is called for in the determination of these exponents between these states as γ increases. Determining the γ dependence of the PDF P (Δ γ ;γ ) can shed important light on plasticity and yield. We conclude that the PDF's of both Δ γ and λ are not continuous functions of γ . In slowly quenched amorphous solids they undergo two discontinuous transitions, first at γ =0+ and then at the yield point γ =γ Y to plastic flow. In quickly quenched amorphous solids the second transition is smeared out due to the nonexisting stress peak before yield. The nature of these transitions and scaling relations with the system size dependence of are discussed.

  17. Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, K

    2013-09-30

    At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 °C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys

  18. Molecular simulation of freestanding amorphous nickel thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, T.Q. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée, Cedex 2 (France); Hoang, V.V., E-mail: vvhoang2002@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Institute of Technology, National University of Ho Chi Minh City, 268 Ly Thuong Kiet Street, District 10, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Lauriat, G. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 Boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée, Cedex 2 (France)

    2013-10-31

    Size effects on glass formation in freestanding Ni thin films have been studied via molecular dynamics simulation with the n-body Gupta interatomic potential. Atomic mechanism of glass formation in the films is determined via analysis of the spatio-temporal arrangements of solid-like atoms occurred upon cooling from the melt. Solid-like atoms are detected via the Lindemann ratio. We find that solid-like atoms initiate and grow mainly in the interior of the film and grow outward. Their number increases with decreasing temperature and at a glass transition temperature they dominate in the system to form a relatively rigid glassy state of a thin film shape. We find the existence of a mobile surface layer in both liquid and glassy states which can play an important role in various surface properties of amorphous Ni thin films. We find that glass formation is size independent for models containing 4000 to 108,000 atoms. Moreover, structure of amorphous Ni thin films has been studied in details via coordination number, Honeycutt–Andersen analysis, and density profile which reveal that amorphous thin films exhibit two different parts: interior and surface layer. The former exhibits almost the same structure like that found for the bulk while the latter behaves a more porous structure containing a large amount of undercoordinated sites which are the origin of various surface behaviors of the amorphous Ni or Ni-based thin films found in practice. - Highlights: • Glass formation is analyzed via spatio-temporal arrangements of solid-like atoms. • Amorphous Ni thin film exhibits two different parts: surface and interior. • Mobile surface layer enhances various surface properties of the amorphous Ni thin films. • Undercoordinated sites play an important role in various surface activities.

  19. On amorphization and nanocomposite formation in Al–Ni–Ti system by mechanical alloying

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Das; G K Dey; B S Murty; S K Pabi

    2005-11-01

    Amorphous structure generated by mechanical alloying (MA) is often used as a precursor for generating nanocomposites through controlled devitrification. The amorphous forming composition range of ternary Al–Ni–Ti system was calculated using the extended Miedema's semi-empirical model. Eleven compositions of this system showing a wide range of negative enthalpy of mixing (− mix) and amorphization (− amor) of the constituent elements were selected for synthesis by MA. The Al88Ni6Ti6 alloy with relatively small negative mix (−0.4 kJ/mol) and amor (−14.8 kJ/mol) became completely amorphous after 120 h of milling, which is possibly the first report of complete amorphization of an Al-based rare earth element free Al–TM–TM system (TM = transition metal) by MA. The alloys of other compositions selected had much more negative mix and amor; but they yielded either nanocomposites of partial amorphous and crystalline structure or no amorphous phase at all in the as-milled condition, evidencing a high degree of stability of the intermetallic phases under the MA environment. Hence, the negative mix and amor are not so reliable for predicting the amorphization in the present system by MA.

  20. River Ice Data Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    edge in the field of ice engineering expands. For example, ice concentration and freezeup stage are not considered by the survey respondents to...im- pacts both freezeup and breakup jam formation Table 2. Ice parameters currently monitored, by Divisions (as of 1995). Ice parameters currently...V V V V Date of ice in V V V V Ice concentration V V V V Freezeup stage V V V V V Note: Southwestern Division does not currently monitor ice

  1. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  2. Nonlinear threshold behavior during the loss of Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, I; Wettlaufer, J S

    2009-01-06

    In light of the rapid recent retreat of Arctic sea ice, a number of studies have discussed the possibility of a critical threshold (or "tipping point") beyond which the ice-albedo feedback causes the ice cover to melt away in an irreversible process. The focus has typically been centered on the annual minimum (September) ice cover, which is often seen as particularly susceptible to destabilization by the ice-albedo feedback. Here, we examine the central physical processes associated with the transition from ice-covered to ice-free Arctic Ocean conditions. We show that although the ice-albedo feedback promotes the existence of multiple ice-cover states, the stabilizing thermodynamic effects of sea ice mitigate this when the Arctic Ocean is ice covered during a sufficiently large fraction of the year. These results suggest that critical threshold behavior is unlikely during the approach from current perennial sea-ice conditions to seasonally ice-free conditions. In a further warmed climate, however, we find that a critical threshold associated with the sudden loss of the remaining wintertime-only sea ice cover may be likely.

  3. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA, levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosol particles that have re

  4. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Skrotzki, J.; Leisner, T.; Wilson, T. W.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2012-09-01

    The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA), levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition) before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosol particles that have re-vitrified in contact

  5. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. Murray

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA, levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosols that have re-vitrified in

  6. Radiation-induced amorphization of rare-earth titanate pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jie; Chen, Jian; Wang, L. M.; Ewing, Rodney C.; Farmer, J. Matt; Boatner, Lynn A.; Helean, K. B.

    2003-10-01

    Single crystals of the entire series of A2Ti2O7 (A=Sm to Lu, and Y) pyrochlore compounds were irradiated by 1-MeV Kr+ ions at temperatures from 293 to 1073 K, and the microstructure evolution, as a function of increasing radiation fluence, was characterized using in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The critical amorphization temperature, Tc, generally increases from ˜480 to ˜1120 K with increasing A-site cation size (e.g., 0.977 Å for Lu3+ to 1.079 Å for Sm3+). An abnormally high susceptibility to ion beam damage was found for Gd2Ti2O7 (with the highest Tc of ˜1120 K). Factors influencing the response of titanate pyrochlores to ion irradiation-induced amorphization are discussed in terms of cation radius ratio, defect formation, and the tendency to undergo an order-disorder transition to the defect-fluorite structure. The resistance of the pyrochlore structure to ion beam-induced amorphization is not only affected by the relative sizes of the A- and B-site cations, but also the cation electronic configuration and the structural disorder. Pyrochlore compositions that have larger structural deviations from the ideal fluorite structure, as evidenced by the smaller 48f oxygen positional parameter, x, are more sensitive to ion beam-induced amorphization.

  7. Great Lakes Ice Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Charts show ice extent and concentration three times weekly during the ice season, for all lakes except Ontario, from the 1973/74 ice season through the 2001/2002...

  8. Flexible amorphous metal films with high stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Cao, C. R.; Lu, Y. M.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report the formation of amorphous Cu50Zr50 films with a large-area of more than 100 cm2. The films were fabricated by ion beam assisted deposition with a slow deposition rate at moderate temperature. The amorphous films have markedly enhanced thermal stability, excellent flexibility, and high reflectivity with atomic level smoothness. The multifunctional properties of the amorphous films are favorites in the promising applications of smart skin or wearable devices. The method of preparing highly stable amorphous metal films by tuning the deposition rate instead of deposition temperature could pave a way for exploring amorphous metal films with unique properties.

  9. Effect of ion irradiation on the stability of amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bastiani, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania and MATIS CNR-INFM, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)], E-mail: riccardo.debastiani@ct.infn.it; Piro, A.M.; Crupi, I.; Grimaldi, M.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania and MATIS CNR-INFM, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Rimini, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per la Microelettronica e Microsistemi (CNR-IMM), Stradale Primosole 50, I-95121 Catania (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    The archival life of phase-change memories (PCM) is determined by the thermal stability of amorphous phase in a crystalline matrix. In this paper, we report the effect of ion beam irradiation on the crystallization kinetics of amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} alloy (GST). The transition rate of amorphous GST films was measured by in situ time resolved reflectivity (TRR). The amorphous to crystal transformation time decreases considerably in irradiated amorphous GST samples when ion fluence increases. The stability of amorphous Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} thin films subjected to ion irradiation is discussed in terms of the free energy variation of the amorphous state because of damage accumulation.

  10. Amorphous metal based nanoelectromechanical switch

    KAUST Repository

    Mayet, Abdulilah M.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch is an interesting ultra-low power option which can operate in the harsh environment and can be a complementary element in complex digital circuitry. Although significant advancement is happening in this field, report on ultra-low voltage (pull-in) switch which offers high switching speed and area efficiency is yet to be made. One key challenge to achieve such characteristics is to fabricate nano-scale switches with amorphous metal so the shape and dimensional integrity are maintained to achieve the desired performance. Therefore, we report a tungsten alloy based amorphous metal with fabrication process development of laterally actuated dual gated NEM switches with 100 nm width and 200 nm air-gap to result in <5 volts of actuation voltage (Vpull-in). © 2013 IEEE.

  11. Nonlinear threshold behavior during the loss of Arctic sea ice

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, I; 10.1073/pnas.0806887106

    2008-01-01

    In light of the rapid recent retreat of Arctic sea ice, a number of studies have discussed the possibility of a critical threshold (or "tipping point") beyond which the ice-albedo feedback causes the ice cover to melt away in an irreversible process. The focus has typically been centered on the annual minimum (September) ice cover, which is often seen as particularly susceptible to destabilization by the ice-albedo feedback. Here we examine the central physical processes associated with the transition from ice-covered to ice-free Arctic Ocean conditions. We show that while the ice-albedo feedback promotes the existence of multiple ice cover states, the stabilizing thermodynamic effects of sea ice mitigate this when the Arctic Ocean is ice-covered during a sufficiently large fraction of the year. These results suggest that critical threshold behavior is unlikely during the approach from current perennial sea ice conditions to seasonally ice-free conditions. In a further warmed climate, however, we find that a ...

  12. Amorphous/crystal and polymer/filler interphases in biocomposites from poly(butylene succinate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signori, Francesca [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Pelagaggi, Martina [Universita di Pisa - Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Via Risorgimento 35, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Bronco, Simona [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy); Righetti, Maria Cristina, E-mail: righetti@ipcf.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche - Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici (CNR-IPCF), Via G. Moruzzi 1, I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-09-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The existence of intermolecular interactions between poly(butylene succinate) and hemp fibres was proved from specific heat capacities data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different degrees of mobility of the poly(butylene succinate) amorphous segments were evidenced at the amorphous/crystal interphase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Devitrification of the rigid amorphous fraction in poly(butylene succinate) was found to occur before and simultaneously with the fusion. - Abstract: Poly(butylene succinate)-hemp composites (PBS-hemp), with hemp content in the range 0-40 wt.%, were prepared in the melt and characterized. This paper focuses on the detailed analysis of the thermal behaviour of the PBS-hemp composites, investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), to enlighten the polymer/fibre interphase features. The occurrence of specific intermolecular interactions between PBS and hemp was assessed from specific heat capacity data. Different degrees of mobility of the PBS amorphous segments were found at the amorphous/crystal interphases. A broadening of the bulk glass transition was observed, and attributed to the presence of polymer segments slightly constrained. Moreover, a rigid amorphous fraction that devitrifies at temperatures higher than the bulk glass transition, partly before the melting region and partly simultaneously with the fusion, was observed and quantified, and attributed to the presence of major constraints probably occurring in geometrically restricted areas.

  13. The effect of surfactants on the dissolution behavior of amorphous formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Pei T; Peltonen, Leena; Novakovic, Dunja; Rades, Thomas; Strachan, Clare J; Laaksonen, Timo

    2016-06-01

    The optimal design of oral amorphous formulations benefits from the use of excipients to maintain drug supersaturation and thus ensures adequate absorption during intestinal transit. The use of surfactants for the maintenance of supersaturation in amorphous formulations has not been investigated in detail. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of surfactant on the dissolution behavior of neat amorphous drug and binary polymer based solid dispersion. Indomethacin was used as the model drug and the surfactants studied were polysorbate 80 and poloxamer 407. The presence of surfactants (alone or in combination with polymers) in the buffer was detrimental to the dissolution of neat amorphous indomethacin, suggesting that the surfactants promoted the crystallization of neat amorphous indomethacin. In contrast, the presence of surfactants (0.01% w/v) in the buffer resulted in a significant improvement on the dissolution behavior of binary polymer based solid dispersion. Incorporating the surfactant to the formulation to form ternary solid dispersion adversely affected the dissolution behavior. In conclusion, the use of surfactants (as wetting or solubilization agents) in dissolution studies of neat amorphous drugs requires prudent consideration. The design of amorphous formulations with optimal dissolution performance requires the appropriate selection of a combination of excipients and consideration of the method of introducing the excipients.

  14. Infrared electroabsorption spectra in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyou, J.H.; Schiff, E.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    1999-07-01

    The authors report measurements of the infrared spectrum detected by modulating the reverse-bias voltage across amorphous silicon pin solar cells and Schottky barrier diodes. They find a band with a peak energy of 0.8 eV. The existence of this band has not, to their knowledge, been reported previously. The strength of the infrared band depends linearly upon applied bias, as opposed to the quadratic dependence for interband electroabsorption in amorphous silicon. The band's peak energy agrees fairly well with the known optical transition energies for dangling bond defects, but the linear dependence on bias and the magnitude of the signal are surprising if interpreted using an analogy to interband electroabsorption. A model based on absorption by defects near the n/i interface of the diodes accounts well for the infrared spectrum.

  15. Polymeric Amorphous Solid Dispersions: A Review of Amorphization, Crystallization, Stabilization, Solid-State Characterization, and Aqueous Solubilization of Biopharmaceutical Classification System Class II Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Shrawan; Cathcart, Helen; O'Reilly, Niall J

    2016-09-01

    Poor water solubility of many drugs has emerged as one of the major challenges in the pharmaceutical world. Polymer-based amorphous solid dispersions have been considered as the major advancement in overcoming limited aqueous solubility and oral absorption issues. The principle drawback of this approach is that they can lack necessary stability and revert to the crystalline form on storage. Significant upfront development is, therefore, required to generate stable amorphous formulations. A thorough understanding of the processes occurring at a molecular level is imperative for the rational design of amorphous solid dispersion products. This review attempts to address the critical molecular and thermodynamic aspects governing the physicochemical properties of such systems. A brief introduction to Biopharmaceutical Classification System, solid dispersions, glass transition, and solubility advantage of amorphous drugs is provided. The objective of this review is to weigh the current understanding of solid dispersion chemistry and to critically review the theoretical, technical, and molecular aspects of solid dispersions (amorphization and crystallization) and potential advantage of polymers (stabilization and solubilization) as inert, hydrophilic, pharmaceutical carrier matrices. In addition, different preformulation tools for the rational selection of polymers, state-of-the-art techniques for preparation and characterization of polymeric amorphous solid dispersions, and drug supersaturation in gastric media are also discussed.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of D2O ice photodesorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasa, C.; Andersson, S.; Cuppen, H.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kroes, G. J.

    2011-05-01

    We present results of MD calculations performed to study the photodissociation of D2O in an amorphous ice at different ice temperatures in order to investigate isotope effects on the photodesorption processes. In dense interstellar clouds, small dust particles of micrometer silicates are covered by ice mantles, mainly consisting of H2O and also of CO, CO2. Previous MD calculations of H2O ice at Tice=10-90 K show that the photodesorption of H while OH remains trapped is the main outcome in the first three monolayers (MLs). On the other hand, the H and OH photofragments released recombine or are trapped at separate positions in the deeper MLs and can react with other species in the ice. Desorption and trapping probabilities have been calculated following photoexcitation of D2O amorphous ice at 10, 20, 60 and 90 K, and the main conclusions agree with previous calculations of H2O ice. But, the average D photodesorption probability is smaller than that of the H atom, whereas the average OD radical photodesorption probability is larger than that of OH, and the average D2O photodesorption probability is larger than that for H2O due to the D2O kick-out mechanism. The total (OD + D2O) yield has been compared with experiments and the total (OH + H2O) yield from previous simulations. We find better agreement when we compare experimental yields with calculated yields for D2O ice than when we compare with calculated yields for H2O ice.

  17. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... mesoscale model, allowing for both climatological estimates of icing and short term icing forecasts. The current model was able to detect periods of icing reasonably well at the warmer site. However at the cold climate site, the model was not able to remove ice quickly enough leading to large ice...... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine...

  18. Classification of new-ice in the Greenland Sea using Satellite SSM/I radiometer and SeaWinds scatterometer data and comparison with ice model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonboe, Rasmus; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2005-01-01

    In the ice covered waters of the Greenland Sea the polarisation ratio of QuikSCAT SeaWinds Ku-band (13.4 GHz) scatterometer measurements and the polarisation ratio of DMSP-SSM/I 19 GHz radiometer measurements are used in combination to classify new-ice and mature ice. In particular, the formation...... and radiative properties as reflected in the polarisation ratio. Our results based on these comparisons show that the transformation into older mature (sheet) ice occurs within 5 - 10 days. During one day the new-ice cover increased by 33 000 km(2). The new-ice appears in March 2001 as a peninsula (maximum...... to the physical transition of the ice cover from pancake ice to a consolidated young-ice sheet. The classification of each pixel into ice or water is done using two scatterometer parameters, namely the polarisation ratio and the daily standard deviation of the backscatter. (C) 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights...

  19. Ice shedding from overhead electrical lines by mechanical breaking : a ductile model for viscoplastic behaviour of atmospheric ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskandarian, M.

    2005-07-01

    The mechanical characteristics of power line components need improvement in order to avoid power failures during severe ice storms. Atmospheric icing of overhead power lines creates electrical and mechanical problems in the transmission network. The successful development of anti-icing and de-icing techniques requires good knowledge of the adherence and bulk strength characteristics of atmospheric ice. This study presented a model for viscoplastic behaviour of porous atmospheric ice in the ductile region. The model was then modified to consider the effects of cracking activities to predict the material behaviour in transition and brittle regions. The following general methodologies were followed in this research for describing the ductile behaviour of porous atmospheric ice: instantaneous elastic strain; delayed viscoelastic strain; and, permanent plastic strain. The scientific contributions of this study include a classification of atmospheric ice structure on power lines on the basis of its grain shape and c-axis orientation. This thesis also presented 3 computer codes in Maple Mathematical Program for determining the elastic moduli of various types of freshwater ice; a poroelastic model for modifying the elastic moduli of porous atmospheric ice; a cap-model plasticity for various types of porous atmospheric ice; new freshwater ice yield envelopes in ductile regions that take porosity into account by means of an elliptical moving cap; and a newly developed user-defined material subroutine for viscoplastic behaviour of atmospheric ice in ductile region including the poroelastic, viscoelastic, and cap-model plasticity.

  20. Formation and crystallization of bulk Pd82Si18 amorphous alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲建; 王敬丰; 肖建中; 崔昆

    2003-01-01

    Bulk amorphous Pd82Si18 alloy with the largest diameter of 8 mm was prepared by water quenching the molten alloy with flux medium in a quartz tube. The calculation result indicates that the bulk Pd82Si18 amorphous alloys have a low critical cooling rate (Rc) of 4.589 K/s or less. The experimental results show that purifying melt may improve glass forming ability(GFA) of undercooled melt, while liquid phase separation (LPS) of undercooled melt will decrease its GFA. There are some differences in crystallization experiments between bulk metallic glass and amorphous ribbons of Pd82Si18 alloys. These include the numbers of exothermic peak, glass transition temperature Tg, crystallization temperature Tx, region of undercooling liquid (ΔT=Tx-Tg) respectively. The links of cooling rates of melt and crystallization of Pd82Si18 amorphous alloys are explored.

  1. Constraining projections of summer Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Massonnet

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the recent (1979–2010 and future (2011–2100 characteristics of the summer Arctic sea ice cover as simulated by 29 Earth system and general circulation models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5 (CMIP5. As was the case with CMIP3, a large intermodel spread persists in the simulated summer sea ice losses over the 21st century for a given forcing scenario. The 1979–2010 sea ice extent, thickness distribution and volume characteristics of each CMIP5 model are discussed as potential constraints on the September sea ice extent (SSIE projections. Our results suggest first that the future changes in SSIE with respect to the 1979–2010 model SSIE are related in a complicated manner to the initial 1979–2010 sea ice model characteristics, due to the large diversity of the CMIP5 population: at a given time, some models are in an ice-free state while others are still on the track of ice loss. However, in phase plane plots (that do not consider the time as an independent variable, we show that the transition towards ice-free conditions is actually occurring in a very similar manner for all models. We also find that the year at which SSIE drops below a certain threshold is likely to be constrained by the present-day sea ice properties. In a second step, using several adequate 1979–2010 sea ice metrics, we effectively reduce the uncertainty as to when the Arctic could become nearly ice-free in summertime, the interval [2041, 2060] being our best estimate for a high climate forcing scenario.

  2. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  3. Ice Lithography for Nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Kuan, A.; Wang, J.;

    Water vapor is condensed onto a cold sample, coating it with a thin-film of ice. The ice is sensitive to electron beam lithography exposure. 10 nm ice patterns are transferred into metals by “melt-off”. Non-planar samples are coated with ice, and we pattern on cantilevers, AFM tips, and suspended...

  4. Dead-ice environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Johannes; Kjær, Kurt H.; Schomacker, Anders

    2010-01-01

    glacier environment. The scientific challenges are to answer the key questions. What are the conditions for dead-ice formation? From which sources does the sediment cover originate? Which melting and reworking processes act in the ice-cored moraines? What is the rate of de-icing in the ice-cored moraines...

  5. The Composition of Interstellar Grains Toward Zeta Ophiuchi: Constraining the Elemental Budget Near the Diffuse-Dense Cloud Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Poteet, Charles A; Draine, Bruce T

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the composition of interstellar grains along the line of sight toward Zeta Ophiuchi, a well-studied environment near the diffuse-dense cloud transition. A spectral decomposition analysis of the solid-state absorbers is performed using archival spectroscopic observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Infrared Space Observatory. We find strong evidence for the presence of sub-micron-sized amorphous silicate grains, principally comprised of olivine-like composition, with no convincing evidence of H2O ice mantles. However, tentative evidence for thick H2O ice mantles on large (a ~ 2.8 microns) grains is presented. Solid-state abundances of elemental Mg, Si, Fe, and O are inferred from our analysis and compared to standard reference abundances. We find that nearly all of elemental Mg and Si along the line of sight are present in amorphous silicate grains, while a substantial fraction of elemental Fe resides in compounds other than silicates. Moreover, we find that the total abundance of eleme...

  6. THE COMPOSITION OF INTERSTELLAR GRAINS TOWARD ζ OPHIUCHI: CONSTRAINING THE ELEMENTAL BUDGET NEAR THE DIFFUSE-DENSE CLOUD TRANSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteet, Charles A.; Whittet, Douglas C. B. [New York Center for Astrobiology, Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Draine, Bruce T., E-mail: charles.poteet@gmail.com [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    We investigate the composition of interstellar grains along the line of sight toward ζ Ophiuchi, a well-studied environment near the diffuse-dense cloud transition. A spectral decomposition analysis of the solid-state absorbers is performed using archival spectroscopic observations from the Spitzer Space Telescope and Infrared Space Observatory. We find strong evidence for the presence of sub-micron-sized amorphous silicate grains, principally comprised of olivine-like composition, with no convincing evidence of H{sub 2}O ice mantles. However, tentative evidence for thick H{sub 2}O ice mantles on large (a ≈ 2.8 μm) grains is presented. Solid-state abundances of elemental Mg, Si, Fe, and O are inferred from our analysis and compared to standard reference abundances. We find that nearly all of the Mg and Si atoms along the line of sight reside in amorphous silicate grains, while a substantial fraction of the elemental Fe resides in compounds other than silicates. Moreover, we find that the total abundance of elemental O is largely inconsistent with the adopted reference abundances, indicating that as much as ∼156 ppm of interstellar O is missing along the line of sight. After taking into account additional limits on the abundance of elemental O in other O-bearing solids, we conclude that any missing reservoir of elemental O must reside on large grains that are nearly opaque to infrared radiation.

  7. Thermal aspects of ice abrasive water jet technology

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Jerman; Henri Orbanić; Mihael Junkar; Andrej Lebar

    2015-01-01

    During the last few years, different research groups have been developing systems for the transition of abrasive water jet into ice abrasive water jet. The aim of this new technology is to make the technology cleaner from both practical and ecological points of view. Mineral abrasive is replaced with ice grains that melt away after the machining process, leaving the workpiece uncontaminated. Several different approaches to this technology were studied. Thermal aspects of integrating the ice a...

  8. Thermal aspects of ice abrasive water jet technology

    OpenAIRE

    Orbanić, Henri; Lebar, Andrej; Junkar, Mihael; Jerman, Marko

    2016-01-01

    During the last few years, different research groups have been developing systems for the transition of abrasive water jet into ice abrasive water jet. The aim of this new technology is to make the technology cleaner from both practical and ecological points of view. Mineral abrasive is replaced with ice grains that melt away after the machining process, leaving the workpiece uncontaminated. Several different approaches to this technology were studied. Thermal aspects of integrating the ice a...

  9. On Structure and Properties of Amorphous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew H. Stachurski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical, optical, magnetic and electronic properties of amorphous materials hold great promise towards current and emergent technologies. We distinguish at least four categories of amorphous (glassy materials: (i metallic; (ii thin films; (iii organic and inorganic thermoplastics; and (iv amorphous permanent networks. Some fundamental questions about the atomic arrangements remain unresolved. This paper focuses on the models of atomic arrangements in amorphous materials. The earliest ideas of Bernal on the structure of liquids were followed by experiments and computer models for the packing of spheres. Modern approach is to carry out computer simulations with prediction that can be tested by experiments. A geometrical concept of an ideal amorphous solid is presented as a novel contribution to the understanding of atomic arrangements in amorphous solids.

  10. Neutron diffraction and thermal studies of amorphous CS{sub 2} realised by low-temperature vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamuro, O.; Matsuo, T. [Osaka Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Graduate School of Sciences (Japan); Onoda-Yamamuro, N. [Tokyo Denki Univ., College of Sciences and Technology (Japan); Takeda, K. [Naruto Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Tokushima (Japan); Munemura, H.; Tanaka, S.; Misawa, M. [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    2003-08-01

    We have succeeded in preparing amorphous carbon disulphide (CS{sub 2}) by depositing its vapour on a cold substrate at 10 K. Complete formation of the amorphous state has been confirmed by neutron diffraction and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The amorphous sample crystallized at ca. 70 K, which is lower than the hypothetical glass transition temperature (92 K) estimated from the DTA data of the (CS{sub 2}){sub x}(S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}){sub 1-x} binary mixture. CS{sub 2}, a symmetric linear tri-atomic molecule, is the simplest of the amorphized molecular substances whose structural and thermal information has been reported so far. Comparison of the static structure factors S(Q) has shown that the orientational correlation of CS{sub 2} molecules may be much stronger in the amorphous state than in the liquid state at higher temperature. (authors)

  11. Thermomechanical Analysis on the Phase Stability of Nitrogen-Doped Amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il-Mok; Cho, Ju-Young; Yang, Tae-Youl; Park, Eun Soo; Joo, Young-Chang

    2011-06-01

    The phase stability of amorphous Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) films affects the performance and reliability of phase change memory (PRAM) devices. The viscosity and the glass forming ability of nitrogen (N)-doped amorphous GST films were investigated in terms of thermomechanical behavior using wafer curvature measurements. The viscosity which increased by two orders of magnitude was observed in the N-doped amorphous GST film by measuring the stress relaxation accompanied by bimolecular structural relaxation. The glass forming ability (ΔTx), difference between the glass transition temperature (Tg) and the crystallization temperature (Tc), of GST increased as the nitrogen contents increased. These increases in the viscosity and ΔTx indicate the retardation of atomic diffusion in amorphous GST and the stabilization of the amorphous phase.

  12. A recent bifurcation in Arctic sea-ice cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Livina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There is ongoing debate over whether Arctic sea-ice has already passed a "tipping point", or whether it will do so in future, with several recent studies arguing that the loss of summer sea ice does not involve a bifurcation because it is highly reversible in models. Recently developed methods can detect and sometimes forewarn of bifurcations in time-series data, hence we applied them to satellite data for Arctic sea-ice cover. Here we show that a new low ice cover state has appeared from 2007 onwards, which is distinct from the normal state of seasonal sea ice variation, suggesting a bifurcation has occurred from one attractor to two. There was no robust early warning signal of critical slowing down prior to this bifurcation, consistent with it representing the appearance of a new ice cover state rather than the loss of stability of the existing state. The new low ice cover state has been sampled predominantly in summer-autumn and seasonal forcing combined with internal climate variability are likely responsible for triggering recent transitions between the two ice cover states. However, all early warning indicators show destabilization of the summer-autumn sea-ice since 2007. This suggests the new low ice cover state may be a transient feature and further abrupt changes in summer-autumn Arctic sea-ice cover could lie ahead; either reversion to the normal state or a yet larger ice loss.

  13. Wave-Ice interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈奚海莉

    2001-01-01

    The growth and movement of sea ice cover are influenced by the presence of wave field. Inturn, the wave field is influenced by the presence of ice cover. Their interaction is not fully understood.In this paper, we discuss some current understanding on wave attenuation when it propagates through frag-mented ice cover, ice drift due to the wave motion, and the growth characteristics of ice cover in wave field.

  14. The physics and applications of amorphous semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Madan, Arun

    1988-01-01

    This comprehensive, detailed treatise on the physics and applications of the new emerging technology of amorphous semiconductors focuses on specific device research problems such as the optimization of device performance. The first part of the book presents hydrogenated amorphous silicon type alloys, whose applications include inexpensive solar cells, thin film transistors, image scanners, electrophotography, optical recording and gas sensors. The second part of the book discusses amorphous chalcogenides, whose applications include electrophotography, switching, and memory elements. This boo

  15. Structural study of amorphous polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laridjani, M.; Pouget, J. P.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Epstein, A. J.

    1992-06-01

    Many materials, especially polymers, have a substantial volume fraction with no long range crystalline order. Through these regions are often termed amorphous, they frequently have a specific local order. We describe and use here a method, base on a non-energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique, to obtain good quality interference functions and, by Fourier transform, radial distribution functions of the amorphous structure of polymers. We apply this approach to members of a family of electronic polymers of current interest : polyaniline emeraldine bases. We show that the local order exhibits significant differences in type I and type II materials, precipitated as salt and base respectively. These studies demonstrate the importance of sample preparation in evaluating the physical properties of polyaniline, and provide a structural origin for memory effects observed in the doping-dedoping processes. Beaucoup de matériaux, spécialement les polymères, ont une importante fraction de leur volume sans ordre cristallin à longue portée. Bien que ces régions soient souvent appelées amorphes, elles présentent fréquemment un ordre local caractéristique. Nous décrivons et utilisons dans ce papier une méthode, basée sur une technique de diffraction de rayons X non dispersive en énergie, pour obtenir des fonctions d'interférence de bonne qualité et, par transformée de Fourier, la fonction de distribution radiale des polymères amorphes. Nous appliquons cette technique à plusieurs éléments d'une même famille de polymères électroniques d'intérêt actuel : les polyanilines éméraldine bases. Nous montrons que l'ordre local présente d'appréciables différences dans les matériaux de type I et II, préparés respectivement sous forme de sel et de base. Cette étude démontre l'importance des conditions de préparation sur les propriétés physiques du polyaniline et donne une base structurale aux effets observés dans les processus de dopage-dédopage de

  16. Crystallographic analysis of amorphization caused by ion irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakagawa, S T; Ono, T; Hada, Y; Betz, G

    2003-01-01

    Ion irradiation often causes amorphization in a crystal. We have presented a new crystallographic analysis that defines a new type of order parameter, which we call pixel mapping (PM). PM can describe algebraically to what extent and how the crystallinity has changed under ion bombardment. In other words, PM describes the long-range-order (LRO) interactions, based on the crystallography. PM can be effectively used, when it is incorporated in a classical molecular dynamics (MD) calculation. In the case of B ions implanted into a Si crystal, we observed crystal to amorphous (CA) transitions under energetic ion bombardment at low temperature. The PM profiling was more effective to reveal the CA transition than other atomistic methods of analyses as radial distribution function g(r) or vacancy mapping N sub v. PM could distinguish between perfect crystalline states, transition states, and random states. Moreover, PM revealed that the lattice reaction was cooperative even in a mesoscopic volume, e.g. in a cube of ...

  17. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1998-08-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by {alpha}-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  18. Arctic ice islands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  19. Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Clayton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear continuum phase field theory is developed to describe amorphization of crystalline elastic solids under shear and/or pressure loading. An order parameter describes the local degree of crystallinity. Elastic coefficients can depend on the order parameter, inelastic volume change may accompany the transition from crystal to amorphous phase, and transitional regions parallel to bands of amorphous material are penalized by interfacial surface energy. Analytical and simple numerical solutions are obtained for an idealized isotropic version of the general theory, for an element of material subjected to compressive and/or shear loading. Solutions compare favorably with experimental evidence and atomic simulations of amorphization in boron carbide, demonstrating the tendency for structural collapse and strength loss with increasing shear deformation and superposed pressure.

  20. Modeling the competing phase transition pathways in nanoscale olivine electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Ming, E-mail: tang25@llnl.go [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Carter, W. Craig [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Belak, James F. [Condensed Matter and Materials Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Chiang, Yet-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2010-12-30

    Recent experimental developments reveal that nanoscale lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}) olivine particles exhibit very different phase transition behavior from the bulk olivine phase. A crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition has been observed in nanosized particles in competition with the equilibrium phase transition between the lithium-rich and lithium-poor olivine phases. Here we apply a diffuse-interface (phase-field) model to study the kinetics of the different phase transition pathways in nanosized LiFePO{sub 4} particles upon delithiation. We find that the nucleation and growth kinetics of the crystalline-to-crystalline and crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformations are sensitive to the applied electrical overpotential and particle size, which collectively determine the preferred phase transition pathway. While the crystalline-to-crystalline phase transition is favored by either faster nucleation or growth kinetics at low or high overpotentials, particle amorphization dominates at intermediate overpotentials. Decreasing particle size expands the overpotential region in which amorphization is preferred. The asymmetry in the nucleation energy barriers for amorphization and recrystallization results in a phase transition hysteresis that should promote the accumulation of the amorphous phase in electrodes after repeated electrochemical cycling. The predicted overpotential- and size-dependent phase transition behavior of nanoscale LiFePO{sub 4} particles is consistent with experimental observations.

  1. Bulk amorphous metallic alloys: Synthesis by fluxing techniques and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi; Shen, Tongde; Schwarz, R.B.

    1997-05-01

    Bulk amorphous alloys having dimensions of at least 1 cm diameter have been prepared in the Pd-Ni-P, Pd-Cu-P, Pd-Cu-Ni-P, and Pd-Ni-Fe-P systems using a fluxing and water quenching technique. The compositions for bulk glass formation have been determined in these systems. For these bulk metallic glasses, the difference between the crystallization temperature T{sub x}, and the glass transition temperature T{sub g}, {Delta}T = T{sub x} - T{sub g}, ranges from 60 to 1 10 K. These large values of {Delta}T open the possibility for the fabrication of amorphous near net-shape components using techniques such as injection molding. The thermal, elastic, and magnetic properties of these alloys have been studied, and we have found that bulk amorphous Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 22.5}Fe{sub 17.5}P{sub 20} has spin glass behavior for temperatures below 30 K. 65 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Creep strain recovery of Fe-Ni-B amorphous metallic ribbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurikova, Alena; Csach, Kornel; Miskuf, Jozef; Ocelik, Vaclav

    2007-01-01

    Creep strain recovery and structural relaxation of the amorphous metallic glass Fe40Ni41B19 after longtime loading at different annealing temperatures below the glass transition temperature have been studied using anisothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dilatometry (TMA). It has bee

  3. A New Physical Metallurgy Phenomenon-the Shock Wave Nanocrystallization of Amorphous Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Some results of amorphous alloy nanocrystallization by shock wave are presented. Compared with the well knownannealing crystallization, these results seem novel and are very difficult to be explained by the diffusion theory, such asnucleation and growth mechanism in the solid state phase transitions. The shock wave crystallization of amorphousalloy is a new metallurgical phenomenon with possibilities for improving the crystallization theory in physics.

  4. Sensitivity of micromechanical actuation on amorphous to crystalline phase transformations under the influence of Casimir forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi Ghozotkhar, Mehdi; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.; Kooi, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous to crystalline phase transitions in phase change materials (PCM) can have strong influence on the actuation of microelectromechanical systems under the influence of Casimir forces. Indeed, the bifurcation curves of the stationary equilibrium points and the corresponding phase portraits of

  5. Water migration mechanisms in amorphous powder material and related agglomeration propensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renzetti, S.; Voogt, J.A.; Oliver, L.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    The agglomeration phenomenon of amorphous particulate material is a major problem in the food industry. Currently, the glass transition temperature (Tg) is used as a fundamental parameter to describe and control agglomeration. Models are available that describe the kinetics of the agglomeration proc

  6. Packing of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: An analytical approach and application to amorphization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The geometrical stability of the three lattices of the cubic crystal system, viz. face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and simple cubic (sc), consisting of bimodal discrete hard spheres, and the transition to amorphous packing is studied. First, the random close packing (rcp) fracti

  7. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  8. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  9. On the potential for abrupt Arctic winter sea-ice loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bathiany, S.; Notz, Dirk; Mauritsen, T.; Raedel, G.; Brovkin, V.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine the transition from a seasonally ice-covered Arctic to an Arctic Ocean that is sea ice free all year round under increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. It is shown that in comprehensive climate models, such loss of Arctic winter sea ice area is faster than the preceding loss of summe

  10. Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctic Ice and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In this view of Antarctic ice and clouds, (56.5S, 152.0W), the Ross Ice Shelf of Antarctica is almost totally clear, showing stress cracks in the ice surface caused by wind and tidal drift. Clouds on the eastern edge of the picture are associated with an Antarctic cyclone. Winds stirred up these storms have been known to reach hurricane force.

  11. In situ observation of shear-driven amorphization in silicon crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yang; Zhong, Li; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Chongmin; Zhu, Ting; Mao, Scott X.

    2016-09-19

    Amorphous materials have attracted great interest in the scientific and technological fields. An amorphous solid usually forms under the externally driven conditions of melt-quenching, irradiation and severe mechanical deformation. However, its dynamic formation process remains elusive. Here we report the in situ atomic-scale observation of dynamic amorphization processes during mechanical straining of nanoscale silicon crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We observe the shear-driven amorphization (SDA) occurring in a dominant shear band. The SDA involves a sequence of processes starting with the shear-induced diamond-cubic to diamond-hexagonal phase transition that is followed by dislocation nucleation and accumulation in the newly formed phase, leading to the formation of amorphous silicon. The SDA formation through diamond-hexagonal phase is rationalized by its structural conformity with the order in the paracrystalline amorphous silicon, which maybe widely applied to diamond-cubic materials. Besides, the activation of SDA is orientation-dependent through the competition between full dislocation nucleation and partial gliding.

  12. Electronic transport in disordered n-alkanes: From fluid methane to amorphous polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero, David; Quirke, Nicholas; Coker, David F.

    2003-08-01

    We use a fast Fourier transform block Lanczos diagonalization algorithm to study the electronic states of excess electrons in fluid alkanes (methane, ethane, and propane) and in a molecular model of amorphous polyethylene (PE) relevant to studies of space charge in insulating polymers. We obtain a new pseudopotential for electron-PE interactions by fitting to the electronic properties of fluid alkanes and use this to obtain new results for electron transport in amorphous PE. From our simulations, while the electronic states in fluid methane are extended throughout the whole sample, in amorphous PE there is a transition between localized and delocalized states slightly above the vacuum level (˜+0.06 eV). The localized states in our amorphous PE model extend to -0.33 eV below this level. Using the Kubo-Greenwood equation we compute the zero-field electron mobility in pure amorphous PE to be μ≈2×10-3 cm2/V s. Our results highlight the importance of electron transport through extended states in amorphous regions to an understanding of electron transport in PE.

  13. Heterogeneity of the state and functionality of water molecules sorbed in an amorphous sugar matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Koreyoshi; Kagotani, Ryo; Nomura, Mayo; Kinugawa, Kohshi; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2012-04-01

    An amorphous matrix, comprised of sugar molecules, is frequently used in the pharmaceutical industry. An amorphous sugar matrix exhibits high hygroscopicity, and it has been established that the sorbed water lowers the glass transition temperature T(g) of the amorphous sugar matrix. It is naturally expected that the random allocation and configuration of sugar molecules would result in heterogeneity of states for sorbed water. However, most analyses of the behavior of water, when sorbed to an amorphous sugar matrix, have implicitly assumed that all of the sorbed water molecules are in a single state. In this study, the states of water molecules sorbed in an amorphous sugar matrix were analyzed by Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy and a Fourier self-deconvolution technique. When sorbed water molecules were classified into five states, according to the extent to which they are restricted, three of the states resulted in a lowering of T(g) of an amorphous sugar matrix, while the other two were independent of the plasticization of the matrix. This finding provides an explanation for the paradoxical fact that compression at several hundreds of MPa significantly decreases the equilibrium water content at a given RH, while the T(g) remains unchanged.

  14. Predictability of Critical Transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socio-economic changes and climate transitions between ice-ages and warm-ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However especially in the presence of noise it is not clear, whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model, under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictabil...

  15. Reversability of arctic sea ice retreat - A conceptual multi-scale modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Stoffels, Marc

    The ice-albedo feedback has been identified as an important factor in the decay of the Arctic sea ice cover in a warming climate. Mechanisms of transition from perennial ice cover to seasonal ice cover are discussed in the literature; the existence of a tipping point is disputed. A newly developed regular network model for energy exchange and phase transition of an ice covered ocean mixed layer is introduced. The existence of bistability, a key ingredient for irreversibility, on local and regional scales is explored. It is shown in a spatially confined model that the asymptotic behavior and the existence of a parameter region of bistability strongly depend on the albedo parametrization. The spatial dynamics of sea ice retreat are studied for a high resolution latitudinal model of the ocean mixed layer. This regional model suggests that sea ice retreat is reversible. It is shown that laterally driven melt of thick multi-year sea ice, and thus, ice-albedo feedback, is an important mechanism in the transition from perennial to seasonal ice cover at the pole. Results are used to interpret observed changes in the recent ice extent and ice volume record. It is shown that the effectiveness of ice-albedo feedback strongly depends on the existence of lateral heat transfer mechanisms in the ocean.

  16. A Comparison of Photo-Induced Hysteresis Between Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous IGZO Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Jun; Cho, Won-Ju; Chung, Hong-Bay; Koo, Sang-Mo

    2015-09-01

    We investigate photo-induced instability in thin-film transistors (TFTs) consisting of amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) as active semiconducting layers by comparing with hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). An a-IGZO TFT exhibits a large hysteresis window in the illuminated measuring condition but no hysteresis window in the dark condition. On the contrary, a large hysteresis window measured in the dark condition in a-Si:H was not observed in the illuminated condition. Even though such materials possess the structure of amorphous phase, optical responses or photo instability in TFTs looks different from each other. Photo-induced hysteresis results from initially trapped charges at the interface between semiconductor and dielectric films or in the gate dielectric which possess absorption energy to interact with deep trap-states and affect the movement of Fermi energy level. In order to support our claim, we also perform CV characteristics in photo-induced hysteresis and demonstrate thermal-activated hysteresis. We believe that this work can provide important information to understand different material systems for optical engineering which includes charge transport and band transition.

  17. Microstructural analyses of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, C. B.; Davanloo, F.; Jander, D.R.;

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments have identified the microstructure of amorphic diamond with a model of packed nodules of amorphous diamond expected theoretically. However, this success has left in doubt the relationship of amorphic diamond to other noncrystalline forms of carbon. This work reports...... the comparative examinations of the microstructures of samples of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon. Four distinct morphologies were found that correlated closely with the energy densities used in preparing the different materials. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute...

  18. Amorphization of silicon induced by nanodroplet impact: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, Fernan; Gamero-Castaño, Manuel

    2012-09-01

    The hypervelocity impact of electrosprayed nanodroplets on crystalline silicon produces an amorphous layer with a thickness comparable to the droplet diameters. The phase transition is puzzling considering that amorphization has not been observed in macroscopic shock compression of silicon, the only apparent difference being the several orders of magnitude disparity between the sizes of the macroscopic and nanodroplet projectiles. This article investigates the physics of the amorphization by modeling the impact of a nanodrop on single-crystal silicon via molecular dynamics. The simulation shows that the amorphization results from the heating and subsequent melting of a thin layer of silicon surrounding the impact area, followed by an ultrafast quenching with cooling rates surpassing 1013 K/s. These conditions impede crystalline growth in the supercooled liquid phase, which finally undergoes a glass transition to render a disordered solid phase. The high temperature field near the impact interface is a localized effect. The significantly different temperatures and cooling rates near the surface and in the bulk explain why amorphization occurs in nanodroplet impact, while it is absent in macroscopic shock compression. Since these high temperatures and ultrafast quenching rates are likely to occur in other materials, nanodroplet impact may become a general amorphatization technique for treating the surfaces of most crystalline substrates.

  19. Thermal conductivity of the cryoprotective cocktail DP6 in cryogenic temperatures, in the presence and absence of synthetic ice modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lili E; Malen, Jonathan A; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    The thermal conductivity of the cryoprotective agent (CPA) cocktail DP6 in combination with synthetic ice modulators (SIMs) is measured in this study, using a transient hot-wire method. DP6 is a mixture of 3 M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 3 M propylene glycol, which received significant attention in the cryobiology community in recent years. Tested SIMs include 6% 1,3Cyclohexanediol, 6% 2,3Butanediol, and 12% PEG400 (percentage by volume). This study integrates the scanning cryomacroscope for visual verification of crystallization and vitrification events. It is demonstrated that the thermal conductivity of the vitrifying CPA cocktail decreases monotonically with the decreasing temperature down to -180 °C. By contrast, the thermal conductivity of the crystalline material increases with decreasing temperature in the same temperature range. Results of this study demonstrate that the thermal conductivity may vary by three fold between the amorphous and crystalline phases of DP6 below the glass transition temperature of DP6 (Tg = -119 °C). The selected SIMs demonstrate the ability to inhibit crystallization in DP6, even at subcritical cooling rates. An additional ice suppression capability is observed by the Euro-Collins as a vehicle solution, disproportionate to its volume ratio in the cocktail. The implication of the observed thermal conductivity differences between the amorphous and crystalline phases of the same cocktail on cryopreservation simulations is significant in some cases and must be taken into account in thermal analyses of cryopreservation protocols.

  20. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation and properties of bulk amorphous quarternary Mg-based alloys and the influence of additional elements on the ability of the alloy to form bulk amorphous. The main goal is to find a Mg-based alloy system which shows both high strength to weight ratio and...

  1. Photoexcitation-induced processes in amorphous semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and Logistics, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)]. E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au

    2005-07-30

    Theories for the mechanism of photo-induced processes of photodarkening (PD), volume expansion (VE) in amorphous chalcogenides are presented. Rates of spontaneous emission of photons by radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors are also calculated and applied to study the excitonic photoluminescence in a-Si:H. Results are compared with previous theories.

  2. Band Gaps of an Amorphous Photonic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-Quan; FENG Zhi-Fang; HU Xiao-Yong; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new kind of amorphous photonic materials is presented. Both the simulated and experimental results show that although the disorder of the whole dielectric structure is strong, the amorphous photonic materials have two photonic gaps. This confirms that the short-range order is an essential factor for the formation of the photonic gaps.

  3. Co amorphous systems: A product development perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Rahul B; Thipparaboina, Rajesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Shastri, Nalini R

    2016-12-30

    Solubility is one of the major problems associated with most of the new chemical entities that can be reasonably addressed by drug amorphization. However, being a high-energy form, it usually tends to re-crystallize, necessitating new formulation strategies to stabilize amorphous drugs. Polymeric amorphous solid dispersion (PASD) is one of the widely investigated strategies to stabilize amorphous drug, with major limitations like limited polymer solubility and hygroscopicity. Co amorphous system (CAM), a new entrant in amorphous arena is a promising alternative to PASD. CAMs are multi component single phase amorphous solid systems made up of two or more small molecules that may be a combination of drugs or drug and excipients. Excipients explored for CAM preparation include amino acids, carboxylic acids, nicotinamide and saccharine. Advantages offered by CAM include improved aqueous solubility and physical stability of amorphous drug, with a potential to improve therapeutic efficacy. This review attempts to address different aspects in the development of CAM as drug products. Criterion for co-former selection, various methods involved in CAM preparation, characterization tools, stability, scale up and regulatory requirements for the CAM product development are discussed.

  4. Electron beam recrystallization of amorphous semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystalline films of silicon, germanium, and cadmium sulfide on substrates of plastic and glass were investigated. Amorphous films of germanium, silicon, and cadmium sulfide on amorphous substrates of glass and plastic were converted to the crystalline condition by electron bombardment.

  5. On the Arctic Ocean ice thickness response to changes in the external forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stranne, Christian; Bjoerk, Goeran [University of Gothenburg, Department of Earth Sciences, Box 460, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2012-12-15

    Submarine and satellite observations show that the Arctic Ocean ice cover has undergone a large thickness reduction and a decrease in the areal extent during the last decades. Here the response of the Arctic Ocean ice cover to changes in the poleward atmospheric energy transport, F{sub wall}, is investigated using coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean column models. Two models with highly different complexity are used in order to illustrate the importance of different internal processes and the results highlight the dramatic effects of the negative ice thickness - ice volume export feedback and the positive surface albedo feedback. The steady state ice thickness as a function of F{sub wall} is determined for various model setups and defines what we call ice thickness response curves. When a variable surface albedo and snow precipitation is included, a complex response curve appears with two distinct regimes: a perennial ice cover regime with a fairly linear response and a less responsive seasonal ice cover regime. The two regimes are separated by a steep transition associated with surface albedo feedback. The associated hysteresis is however small, indicating that the Arctic climate system does not have an irreversible tipping point behaviour related to the surface albedo feedback. The results are discussed in the context of the recent reduction of the Arctic sea ice cover. A new mechanism related to regional and temporal variations of the ice divergence within the Arctic Ocean is presented as an explanation for the observed regional variation of the ice thickness reduction. Our results further suggest that the recent reduction in areal ice extent and loss of multiyear ice is related to the albedo dependent transition between seasonal and perennial ice i.e. large areas of the Arctic Ocean that has previously been dominated by multiyear ice might have been pushed below a critical mean ice thickness, corresponding to the above mentioned transition, and into a state dominated

  6. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  7. Tritiated amorphous silicon for micropower applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kherani, N.P. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kosteski, T.; Zukotynski, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Shmayda, W.T. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-10-01

    The application of tritiated amorphous silicon as an intrinsic energy conversion semiconductor for radioluminescent structures and betavoltaic devices is presented. Theoretical analysis of the betavoltaic application shows an overall efficiency of 18% for tritiated amorphous silicon. This is equivalent to a 330 Ci intrinsic betavoltaic device producing 1 mW of power for 12 years. Photoluminescence studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a-Si:H, show emission in the infra-red with a maximum quantum efficiency of 7.2% at 50 K; this value drops by 3 orders of magnitude at a temperature of 300 K. Similar studies of hydrogenated amorphous carbon show emission in the visible with an estimated quantum efficiency of 1% at 300 K. These results suggest that tritiated amorphous carbon may be the more promising candidate for room temperature radioluminescence in the visible. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Amorphous metals for radial airgap electric machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Ning; Kokernak, J.M. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Dept. of Electric Poer Engineering, Troy, NY (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Amorphous steel teas been in use for some time in the transformer industry. The difficulty associated with handling such a hard material paired with the extremely thin nature of the casting has prevented amorphous steel from being seriously considered for radial airgap electric motors. In light of recent advances in manufacturing and handling of the amorphous materials, this paper presents an investigation into the performance advantages of an amorphous brushless dc motor. A two-dimensional, time-stepped, finite element model is used to analyze the electromagnetic field and motor performance for an amorphous brushless dc (BLDC) motor and a M-l9 BLDC motor. Each is modeled with identical structure geometries. Magnetic core losses are also estimated for the two motors operating over a frequency range of 50 to 200 Hz. (orig.)

  9. EXAFS characterization of amorphous GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgway, M.C.; Glover, C.J. [Australia National Univ., Canberra (Australia); Foran, G.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia); Yu, K.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1998-12-31

    The structural parameters of stoichiometric, amorphous GaAs have been determined with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements performed in transmission mode at 10 K. Amorphous GaAs samples were fabricated with a combination of epitaxial growth, ion implantation and selective chemical etching. Relative to a crystalline sample, the nearest-neighbor bond length and Debye-Waller factor both increased for amorphous material. In contrast, the coordination numbers about both Ga and As atoms in the amorphous phase decreased to {approximately} 3.85 atoms from the crystalline value of four. All structural parameters were independent of implantation conditions and as a consequence, were considered representative of intrinsic, amorphous GaAs as opposed to an implantation-induced extrinsic structure.

  10. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Zarkadoula, E. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6138 (United States); Todorov, I. T. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 1EP (United Kingdom); Geisler, T. [Steinmann-Institut für Geologie, Mineralogie und Paläontologie, University of Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Brazhkin, V. V. [Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, 142190 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also find that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.

  11. Drug-excipient behavior in polymeric amorphous solid dispersions.

    OpenAIRE

    Surikutchi Bhanu Teja; Shashank Pralhad Patil; Ganesh Shete; Sarsvatkumar Patel; Arvind Kumar Bansal

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous drug delivery systems are increasingly utilized to enhance aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability. However, they lack physical and/or chemical stability. One of the most common ways of stabilizing an amorphous form is by formulating it as an amorphous solid dispersion. This review focuses on polymeric amorphous solid dispersions wherein polymers are used as excipients to stabilize the amorphous form. A brief introduction to the basic concepts of amorphous systems such as glass ...

  12. Drug excipient behavior in polymeric amorphous solid dispersions

    OpenAIRE

    Bhanu Teja Surikutchi; Shashank Pralhad Patil; Ganesh Shete; Sarsvatkumar Patel; Arvind Kumar Bansal

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous drug delivery system is being increasingly utilized for enhancing aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability. However it suffers from lack of physical/chemical stability. One of the most common ways of stabilizing an amorphous form is by formulating it as amorphous solid dispersion. This review focuses on the polymeric amorphous solid dispersion wherein polymers are used as excipients to stabilize the amorphous form. We present a brief introduction of basic concepts of amorphous sy...

  13. Thermal aspects of ice abrasive water jet technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Jerman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, different research groups have been developing systems for the transition of abrasive water jet into ice abrasive water jet. The aim of this new technology is to make the technology cleaner from both practical and ecological points of view. Mineral abrasive is replaced with ice grains that melt away after the machining process, leaving the workpiece uncontaminated. Several different approaches to this technology were studied. Thermal aspects of integrating the ice abrasive water jet technology into commercially available machines were considered. The results and analyses of water temperature measurements on the ice abrasive water jet machine are presented in this article.

  14. Abrupt climatic changes on the Tibetan Plateau during the Last Ice Age——Comparative study of the Guliya ice core with the Greenland GRIP ice core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚檀栋

    1999-01-01

    Based on a comparative study of the Gtdiya ice core with the Greenland GRIP ice core, the abrupt climatic changes on the Tibetan Plateau during the Last Ice Age have been examined. The major stadial-interstadial events and 7 warm events (BrΦrump, Odderade, Oerel, Glinde, Hengelo, Denekamp, BΦlling) are consistent in the two ice cores. However, there are some unique features in the Guliya ice core records. The transition from warm to cold periods in the Guliya ice core is faster than that in the Greenland GRIP ice core. The magnitude of the climatic changes in the Guliya ice core is also larger than that in the Greenland GRIP ice core. Another significant feature of the Guliya ice core records is that there is a series of cycles of about 200 a from 18 to 35 kaBP. 22 warm events and 20 cold events with a fluctuation magnitude of 7℃ have been distinguished. The warm and cold events with a fluctuation magnitude within 3℃ are as high as 100. It is speculated that the abrupt climatic changes in different

  15. Amplification of European Little Ice Age by sea ice-ocean-atmosphere feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Flavio; Born, Andreas; Raible, Christoph C.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2013-04-01

    The transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly (~950-1250 AD) to the Little Ice Age (~1400-1700 AD) is believed to have been driven by an interplay of external forcing and climate system-internal variability. While the hemispheric signal seems to have been dominated by solar irradiance and volcanic eruptions, the understanding of mechanisms shaping the climate on continental scale is less robust. Examining an ensemble of transient model simulations as well as a new type of sensitivity experiments with artificial sea ice growth, we identify a sea ice-ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism that amplifies the Little Ice Age cooling in the North Atlantic-European region and produces the temperature pattern expected from reconstructions. Initiated by increasing negative forcing, the Arctic sea ice substantially expands at the beginning of the Little Ice Age. The excess of sea ice is exported to the subpolar North Atlantic, where it melts, thereby weakening convection of the ocean. As a consequence, northward ocean heat transport is reduced, reinforcing the expansion of the sea ice and the cooling of the Northern Hemisphere. In the Nordic Seas, sea surface height anomalies cause the oceanic recirculation to strengthen at the expense of the warm Barents Sea inflow, thereby further reinforcing sea ice growth in the Barents Sea. The absent ocean-atmosphere heat flux in the Barents Sea results in an amplified cooling over Northern Europe. The positive nature of this feedback mechanism enables sea ice to remain in an expanded state for decades to centuries and explain sustained cold periods over Europe such as the Little Ice Age. Support for the feedback mechanism comes from recent proxy reconstructions around the Nordic Seas.

  16. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  17. Forecast Icing Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Forecast Icing Product (FIP) is an automatically-generated index suitable for depicting areas of potentially hazardous airframe icing. The FIP algorithm uses...

  18. Ice Adhesion Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Uses Evaluate and compare the relative performance of materials and surfcae coating based on their ability to aid in ice removal Test the effectiveness of de-icing...

  19. Boundary condition of grounding lines prior to collapse, Larsen-B Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Rebesco, M.; Domack, E.; Zgur, F.; Lavoie, C.; Leventer, A.; Brachfeld, S.; Willmott, V.; Halverson, G.; M. Truffer; Scambos, T; Smith, J.; E. Pettit

    2014-01-01

    Grounding zones, where ice sheets transition between resting on bedrock to full floatation, help regulate ice flow. Exposure of the sea floor by the 2002 Larsen-B Ice Shelf collapse allowed detailed morphologic mapping and sampling of the embayment sea floor. Marine geophysical data collected in 2006 reveal a large, arcuate, complex grounding zone sediment system at the front of Crane Fjord. Radiocarbon-constrained chronologies from marine sediment cores indicate loss of ice contact with the ...

  20. Amorphous TM1−xBx alloy particles prepared by chemical reduction (invited)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Mørup, Steen

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous transition-metal boron (TM-B) alloy particles can be prepared by chemical reduction of TM ions by borohydride in aqueous solutions. ln the last few years systematic studies of the parameters which control the composition, and, in turn, many of the properties of the alloy particles, have...... been performed and are reviewed in the present paper. The most important preparation parameters which influence the composition are the concentration of the borohydride solution and the pH of the TM salt solution. By controlling these parameters it is possible to prepare amorphous alloy samples...

  1. Spectroscopic and mechanical studies on the Fe-based amorphous alloy 2605SA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral P, A.; Garcia S, I. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Contreras V, J. A.; Garcia S, F. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, El Cerrillo Piedras Blancas, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Nava, N., E-mail: agustin.cabral@inin.gob.m [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The Vickers micro-hardness of this alloy was unusually dependent on the heat treatment from 300 to 634 K, inferring important micro-structural changes and the presence of amorphous grains before its phase transition. Once the alloy is crystallized, the micro-hardness is characteristic of a brittle alloy, the main problem of these alloys. Within the amorphous state, other properties like free-volume, magnetic states and Fe-Fe distances were followed by Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy, respectively, to analyze those micro-structural changes, thermally induced, which are of paramount interest to understand their brittleness problem. (Author)

  2. Ice Cream Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Ice cream headaches By Mayo Clinic Staff Ice cream headaches are brief, stabbing headaches that can happen when you eat, drink or inhale something cold. Digging into an ice cream cone is a common trigger, but eating or ...

  3. Aircraft Icing Handbook. (Update)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    pp. 68-69, 1947. Speranza, F., OThe Formation of Ice,a Rivista di Meteorologia Aeronautics, 1(2), pp. 19-30, 1937. Steiner, R. 0., "The Icing of...Deposits of Ice on Airplane Carburetors,8 (Translation) Rivista di Meteorologia Aeronautica, 4(2), pp. 38-47, 1940. Von Glahn, U. H.; Renner, C. E

  4. Islands in the ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tina; Kjær, Kurt H.; Haile, James Seymour

    2012-01-01

    Nunataks are isolated bedrocks protruding through ice sheets. They vary in age, but represent island environments in 'oceans' of ice through which organism dispersals and replacements can be studied over time. The J.A.D. Jensen's Nunataks at the southern Greenland ice sheet are the most isolated ...

  5. Superconductivity in the amorphous phase of topological insulator Bi x Sb100-x alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzola-Quiquia, J.; Lauinger, C.; Zoraghi, M.; Stiller, M.; Sharma, S.; Häussler, P.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we investigated the electrical properties of rapidly quenched amorphous Bi x Sb{}100-x alloys in the temperature range of 1.2 K to 345 K. The resistance reveals that for a broad range of different compositions, including that for the topological insulator (TI), a superconducting state in the amorphous phase is present. After crystallization and annealing at an intermediate temperature, we found that in pure Bi and Bi x Sb{}100-x alloys with composition corresponding to the TI, the superconductivity persists, but the transition shifts to a lower temperature. The highest superconducting transition temperature {T}{{C}0} was found for pure Bi and those TI’s, with a shift to low temperatures when the Sb content is increased. After annealing at a maximum temperature of T = 345 K, the samples are non-superconducting within the experimental range and the behavior changes from semiconducting-like for pure Bi, to metallic-like for pure Sb. Transition temperature {T}{{C}0} of the amorphous Bi x Sb{}100-x alloys have been calculated in the BCS-Eliashberg-McMillan framework, modified for binary alloys. The results can explain the experimental results and show that amorphous Bi x Sb{}100-x exhibits a strong to intermediate electron-phonon coupling.

  6. High pressure synthesis of amorphous TiO{sub 2} nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Quanjun; Liu, Ran; Wang, Tianyi; Xu, Ke; Dong, Qing; Liu, Bo; Liu, Bingbing, E-mail: liubb@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Liu, Jing [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Amorphous TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with diameters of 8-10 nm and length of several nanometers were synthesized by high pressure treatment of anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. The structural phase transitions of anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were investigated by using in-situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The starting anatase structure is stable up to ∼20GPa, and transforms into a high-density amorphous (HDA) form at higher pressure. Pressure-modified high- to low-density transition was observed in the amorphous form upon decompression. The pressure-induced amorphization and polyamorphism are in good agreement with the previous results in ultrafine TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and nanoribbons. The relationship between the LDA form and α-PbO{sub 2} phase was revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study. In addition, the bulk modulus (B{sub 0} = 158 GPa) of the anatase TiO{sub 2} nanotubes is smaller than those of the corresponding bulks and nanoparticles (180-240 GPa). We suggest that the unique open-ended nanotube morphology and nanosize play important roles in the high pressure phase transition of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes.

  7. Broadband luminescence in liquid-solid transition

    CERN Document Server

    Achilov, M F; Trunilina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Broadband luminescence (BBL) intensity behavior in liquid-solid transition in polyethyleneglycol-600 has been established. Oscillation of BBL intensity observed in liquid-polycrystal transition are not found to observed in liquid-amorphous solid transition. It is shown that application of the theory of electron state tails to interpretation of BBL spectral properties in liquids demands restriction. BBL spectroscopy may be applied for optimization of preparation of polymers with determined properties. (author)

  8. Qualitative observation of reversible phase change in astrochemical ethanethiol ices using infrared spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pavithraa, S; Gorai, P; Lo, J -I; Das, A; Sekhar, B N Raja; Pradeep, T; Cheng, B -M; Mason, N J; Sivaraman, B

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the first evidence for a reversible phase change in an ethanethiol ice prepared under astrochemical conditions. InfraRed (IR) spectroscopy was used to monitor the morphology of the ice using the S-H stretching vibration, a characteristic vibration of thiol molecules. The deposited sample was able to switch between amorphous and crystalline phases repeatedly under temperature cycles between 10 K and 130 K with subsequent loss of molecules in every phase change. Such an effect is dependent upon the original thickness of the ice. Further work on quantitative analysis is to be carried out in due course whereas here we are reporting the first results obtained.

  9. Calculations of the magnetic entropy change in amorphous through a microscopic anisotropic model: Applications to Dy{sub 70}Zr{sub 30} and DyCo{sub 3.4} alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranke, P. J. von, E-mail: von.ranke@uol.com.br; Nóbrega, E. P.; Ribeiro, P. O.; Alvarenga, T. S. T.; Lopes, P. H. O.; Sousa, V. S. R. de; Oliveira, N. A. de [Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro—UERJ, Rua São Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-013 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Caldas, A. [Sociedade Unificada de Ensino Superior e Cultura, SUESC, 20211-351 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Alho, B. P. [Instituto de Aplicação Fernando Rodrigues da Silveira, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Santa Alexandrina, 288, 20260-232 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Carvalho, G. [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Sincroton—LNLS, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Magnus, A.

    2014-10-14

    We report theoretical investigations on the magnetocaloric effect, described by the magnetic entropy change in rare earth—transition metal amorphous systems. The model includes the local anisotropy on the rare earth ions in Harris-Plischke-Zuckermann assumptions. The transition metals ions are treated in terms of itinerant electron ferromagnetism and the magnetic moment of rare earth ions is coupled to the polarized d-band by a local exchange interaction. The magnetocaloric effect was calculated in DyCo{sub 3.4} system, which presents amorphous sperimagnetic configuration. The calculations predict higher refrigerant capacity in the amorphous DyCo{sub 3.4} than in DyCo{sub 2} crystal, highlighting the importance of amorphous magnetocaloric materials. Our calculation of the magnetocaloric effect in Dy{sub 70}Zr{sub 30}, which presents amorphous asperomagnetic configuration, is in good agreement with the experimental result. Furthermore, magnetic entropy changes associated with crystal-amorphous configurations change are estimated.

  10. Arctic ice management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Steven J.; Smith, Nathan; Groppi, Christopher; Vargas, Perry; Jackson, Rebecca; Kalyaan, Anusha; Nguyen, Peter; Probst, Luke; Rubin, Mark E.; Singleton, Heather; Spacek, Alexander; Truitt, Amanda; Zaw, Pye Pye; Hartnett, Hilairy E.

    2017-01-01

    As the Earth's climate has changed, Arctic sea ice extent has decreased drastically. It is likely that the late-summer Arctic will be ice-free as soon as the 2030s. This loss of sea ice represents one of the most severe positive feedbacks in the climate system, as sunlight that would otherwise be reflected by sea ice is absorbed by open ocean. It is unlikely that CO2 levels and mean temperatures can be decreased in time to prevent this loss, so restoring sea ice artificially is an imperative. Here we investigate a means for enhancing Arctic sea ice production by using wind power during the Arctic winter to pump water to the surface, where it will freeze more rapidly. We show that where appropriate devices are employed, it is possible to increase ice thickness above natural levels, by about 1 m over the course of the winter. We examine the effects this has in the Arctic climate, concluding that deployment over 10% of the Arctic, especially where ice survival is marginal, could more than reverse current trends of ice loss in the Arctic, using existing industrial capacity. We propose that winter ice thickening by wind-powered pumps be considered and assessed as part of a multipronged strategy for restoring sea ice and arresting the strongest feedbacks in the climate system.

  11. Considering thermal-viscous collapse of the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, William; Sommers, Aleah; Rajaram, Harihar; Abdalati, Waleed; Frahm, Joel

    2015-07-01

    We explore potential changes in Greenland ice sheet form and flow associated with increasing ice temperatures and relaxing effective ice viscosities. We define "thermal-viscous collapse" as a transition from the polythermal ice sheet temperature distribution characteristic of the Holocene to temperate ice at the pressure melting point and associated lower viscosities. The conceptual model of thermal-viscous collapse we present is dependent on: (1) sufficient energy available in future meltwater runoff, (2) routing of meltwater to the bed of the ice sheet interior, and (3) efficient energy transfer from meltwater to the ice. Although we do not attempt to constrain the probability of thermal-viscous collapse, it appears thermodynamically plausible to warm the deepest 15% of the ice sheet, where the majority of deformational shear occurs, to the pressure melting point within four centuries. First-order numerical modeling of an end-member scenario, in which prescribed ice temperatures are warmed at an imposed rate of 0.05 K/a, infers a decrease in ice sheet volume of 5 ± 2% within five centuries of initiating collapse. This is equivalent to a cumulative sea-level rise contribution of 33 ± 18 cm. The vast majority of the sea-level rise contribution associated with thermal-viscous collapse, however, would likely be realized over subsequent millennia.

  12. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik;

    2012-01-01

    is not shut down for its protection. We also found that there is a a large spread across the various turbines within a wind park, in the amount of icing. This is currently not taken into account by our model. Evaluating and adding these small scale differences to the model will be undertaken as future work....... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine......In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...

  13. ICE SLURRY APPLICATIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffeld, M; Wang, M J; Goldstein, V; Kasza, K E

    2010-12-01

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology.

  14. Arctic Sea Ice : Trends, Stability and Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    A stochastic Arctic sea-ice model is derived and analysed in detail to interpret the recent decay and associated variability of Arctic sea-ice under changes in radiative forcing. The approach begins from a deterministic model of the heat flux balance through the air/sea/ice system, which uses observed monthly-averaged heat fluxesto drive a time evolution of sea-ice thickness. This model reproduces the observed seasonal cycle of the ice cover and it is to this that stochastic noise--representing high frequency variability--is introduced.The model takes the form of a single periodic non-autonomous stochastic ordinary differential equation. The value of such a model is that it provides a relatively simple framework to examine the role of noise in the basic nonlinear interactions at play as transitions in the state of the ice cover (e.g., from perennial to seasonal) are approached. Moreover, the stability and the noise conspire to underlie the inter annual variability and how that variability changes as one approaches the deterministic bifurcations in the system.

  15. Ice sheets on plastically-yielding beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Ian

    2016-11-01

    Many fast flowing regions of ice sheets are underlain by a layer of water-saturated sediments, or till. The rheology of the till has been the subject of some controversy, with laboratory tests suggesting almost perfectly plastic behaviour (stress independent of strain rate), but many models adopting a pseudo-viscous description. In this work, we consider the behaviour of glaciers underlain by a plastic bed. The ice is treated as a viscous gravity current, on a bed that allows unconstrained slip above a critical yield stress. This simplified description allows rapid sliding, and aims to investigate 'worst-case' scenarios of possible ice-sheet disintegration. The plastic bed results in an approximate ice-sheet geometry that is primarily controlled by force balance, whilst ice velocity is determined from mass conservation (rather than the other way around, as standard models would hold). The stability of various states is considered, and particular attention is given to the pace at which transitions between unstable states can occur. Finally, we observe that the strength of basal tills depends strongly on pore pressure, and combine the model with a description of subglacial hydrology. Implications for the present-day ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica will be discussed. Funding: ERC Marie Curie FP7 Career Integration Grant.

  16. Icing Operations - De-Icing Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Procházka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of ice, frost and snow on aircraft surfaces can drastically reduce the climb and maneuvering capabilities of an aircraft. The removal of such contamination prior to take off MUST be strictly adhered to in accordance with regulations and standards. The policy with respect to aircraft icing contamination should be “MAKE IT CLEAN AND KEEP IT CLEAN”. All personnel associated with the dispatch and/or operation of aircraft share the responsibility for ensuring that no aircraft is dispatched unless it is clear of ice, snow or frost.

  17. Stabilisation of the amorphous state of a thin layer sandwiched between two crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyot, B.; Poupinet, L.; Desre, P.J

    2003-11-01

    It has been experimentally proven that thinning an amorphous layer, sandwiched between two crystals, up to the nanometer scale, leads to a higher crystallization temperature. The present work is an attempt to explain such behaviour on the basis of thermodynamical arguments. The approach assumes that a nanometric amorphous layer is submitted to the crystal field leading to a gradient of atomic density across the glassy layer. It is shown that the stabilisation of the glassy layer is expected when approaching a thickness of few nanometers. This study is closely related to the concerns of the phase change optical storage because such a technology involves both the use of very thin films and fast structural transitions between the two states (amorphous and crystalline) of the active material.

  18. Infrared Insight into the Network of Hydrogenated Amorphous and Polycrystalline Silicon thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Mullerova

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available IR measurements were carried out on both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon samples deposited by PECVDon glass substrate. The transition from amorphous to polycrystalline phase was achieved by increasing dilution of silaneplasma at the deposition process. The samples were found to be mixed phase materials. Commonly, infrared spectra ofhydrogenated silicon thin films yield information about microstructure, hydrogen content and hydrogen bonding to silicon. Inthis paper, additional understanding was retrieved from infrared response. Applying standard optical laws, effective mediatheory and Clausius-Mossoti approach concerning the Si-Si and Si-H bonds under IR irradiation as individual oscillators,refractive indices in the long wavelength limit, crystalline, amorphous and voids volume fractions and the mass density of thefilms were determined. The mass density was found to decrease with increasing crystalline volume fraction, which can beattributed to the void-dominated mechanism of network formation.

  19. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  20. Tracer Diffusion Mechanism in Amorphous Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Hung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracer diffusion in amorphous solid is studied by mean of nB-bubble statistic. The nB-bubble is defined as a group of atoms around a spherical void and large bubble that represents a structural defect which could be eliminated under thermal annealing. It was found that amorphous alloys such as CoxB100−x (x=90, 81.5 and 70 and Fe80P20 suffer from a large number of vacancy bubbles which function like diffusion vehicle. The concentration of vacancy bubble weakly depends on temperature, but essentially on the relaxation degree of considered sample. The diffusion coefficient estimated for proposed mechanism via vacancy bubbles is in a reasonable agreement with experiment for actual amorphous alloys. The relaxation effect for tracer diffusion in amorphous alloys is interpreted by the elimination of vacancy bubbles under thermal annealing.

  1. Theoretical Considerations in Developing Amorphous Solid Dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Surwase, Sachin;

    2014-01-01

    Before pursuing the laborious route of amorphous solid dispersion formulation and development, which is the topic of many of the subsequent chapters in this book, the formulation scientist would benefit from a priori knowledge whether the amorphous route is a viable one for a given drug and how...... to their glass-forming ability and glass stability. In the main parts of this chapter, we review theoretical approaches to determine amorphous drug polymer miscibility and crystalline drug polymer solubility, as a prerequisite to develop amorphous solid dispersions (glass solutions)....... much solubility improvement, and hence increase in bioavailability, can be expected, and what forms of solid dispersion have been developed in the past. In this chapter, we therefore initially define the various forms of solid dispersions, and then go on to discuss properties of pure drugs with respect...

  2. Surface Acidity of Amorphous Aluminum Hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. FUKUSHI; K. TSUKIMURA; H. YAMADA

    2006-01-01

    The surface acidity of synthetic amorphous Al hydroxide was determined by acid/base titration with several complementary methods including solution analyses of the reacted solutions and XRD characterization of the reacted solids. The synthetic specimen was characterized to be the amorphous material showing four broad peaks in XRD pattern. XRD analyses of reacted solids after the titration experiments showed that amorphous Al hydroxide rapidly transformed to crystalline bayerite at the alkaline condition (pH>10). The solution analyses after and during the titration experiments showed that the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide, Ksp =aAl3+/a3H+,was 1010.3,The amount of consumption of added acid or base during the titration experiment was attributed to both the protonation/deprotonation of dissolved Al species and surface hydroxyl group. The surface acidity constants, surface hydroxyl density and specific surface area were estimated by FITEQL 4.0.

  3. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfeng He

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/ÖHz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor.

  4. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  5. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    OpenAIRE

    Dongfeng He; Mitsuharu Shiwa

    2014-01-01

    Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/ÖHz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor.

  6. CO and N$_2$ desorption energies from water ice

    CERN Document Server

    Fayolle, Edith C; Loomis, Ryan; Bergner, Jennifer; Graninger, Dawn M; Rajappan, Mahesh; Öberg, Karin I

    2015-01-01

    The relative desorption energies of CO and N$_2$ are key to interpretations of observed interstellar CO and N$_2$ abundance patterns, including the well-documented CO and N$_2$H$^+$ anti-correlations in disks, protostars and molecular cloud cores. Based on laboratory experiments on pure CO and N$_2$ ice desorption, the difference between CO and N$_2$ desorption energies is small; the N$_2$-to-CO desorption energy ratio is 0.93$\\pm$0.03. Interstellar ices are not pure, however, and in this study we explore the effect of water ice on the desorption energy ratio of the two molecules. We present temperature programmed desorption experiments of different coverages of $^{13}$CO and $^{15}$N$_2$ on porous and compact amorphous water ices and, for reference, of pure ices. In all experiments, $^{15}$N$_2$ desorption begins a few degrees before the onset of $^{13}$CO desorption. The $^{15}$N$_2$ and $^{13}$CO energy barriers are 770 and 866 K for the pure ices, 1034-1143 K and 1155-1298 K for different sub-monolayer co...

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of CO2 formation in interstellar ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasa, C.; Andersson, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kroes, G. J.

    2011-05-01

    In dense interstellar clouds where new stars and planets are formed, small dust particles of micrometer silicates are covered by ice mantles, mainly consisting of H2O and also of CO, CO2, CH4 and other molecules. A high flux of UV photons can produce several photodissociative events. Previous MD calculations of H2O ice at Tice=10-90 K show that the photodesorption of H while OH remains trapped is the main outcome following photoexcitation in the first three monolayers (MLs). On the other hand, the H and OH photofragments released following photoexcitation deeper in the ice recombine or are trapped at separate positions, and can then react with other species in the ice. We hope to present results of MD calculations performed to study the photoinduced reaction of OH with CO through photodissociation of H2O in an amorphous COad - H2O ice at 10 K. This reaction pathway is supposed to be a principle route to form CO2 in interstellar ices.

  8. Emerging trends in the stabilization of amorphous drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Löbmann, Korbinian; Strachan, Clare J.;

    2013-01-01

    water-soluble drugs can be increased by the formation of stabilized amorphous forms. Currently, formulation as solid polymer dispersions is the preferred method to enhance drug dissolution and to stabilize the amorphous form of a drug. The purpose of this review is to highlight emerging alternative...... methods to amorphous polymer dispersions for stabilizing the amorphous form of drugs. First, an overview of the properties and stabilization mechanisms of amorphous forms is provided. Subsequently, formulation approaches such as the preparation of co-amorphous small-molecule mixtures and the use...... of mesoporous silicon and silica-based carriers are presented as potential means to increase the stability of amorphous pharmaceuticals....

  9. Land Ice: Greenland & Antarctic ice mass anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Data from NASA's Grace satellites show that the land ice sheets in both Antarctica and Greenland are losing mass. The continent of Antarctica (left chart) has been...

  10. Thermal transport in amorphous materials: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Matthew C.; Zheng, Jianlin; Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Renkun

    2016-11-01

    Thermal transport plays a crucial role in performance and reliability of semiconductor electronic devices, where heat is mainly carried by phonons. Phonon transport in crystalline semiconductor materials, such as Si, Ge, GaAs, GaN, etc, has been extensively studied over the past two decades. In fact, study of phonon physics in crystalline semiconductor materials in both bulk and nanostructure forms has been the cornerstone of the emerging field of ‘nanoscale heat transfer’. On the contrary, thermal properties of amorphous materials have been relatively less explored. Recently, however, a growing number of studies have re-examined the thermal properties of amorphous semiconductors, such as amorphous Si. These studies, which included both computational and experimental work, have revealed that phonon transport in amorphous materials is perhaps more complicated than previously thought. For instance, depending on the type of amorphous materials, thermal transport occurs via three types of vibrations: propagons, diffusons, and locons, corresponding to the propagating, diffusion, and localized modes, respectively. The relative contribution of each of these modes dictates the thermal conductivity of the material, including its magnitude and its dependence on sample size and temperature. In this article, we will review the fundamental principles and recent development regarding thermal transport in amorphous semiconductors.

  11. Fabric along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and its comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnat, M.; Azuma, N.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Eichler, J.; Fujita, S.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Samyn, D.; Svensson, A.; Weikusat, I.

    2014-07-01

    Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland was measured in the field by an automatic ice texture analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening rate is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin (HW) climatic transition. From a simple model we estimate that this depth is located at a transition from a state dominated by vertical compression to a state dominated by vertical shear. Comparisons are made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core, drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. This comparison tends to demonstrate that the ice viscosity change with the HW climatic transition must be associated with the shear-dominated state to induce the abrupt fabric strengthening observed at NEEM. This comparison therefore reflects the increasing role of shear deformation on the coring site when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NGRIP. Further along the core, centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the observed folding layers in Dahl-Jensen et al. (2013).

  12. Ice Jams in Alaska. Ice Engineering. Number 16, February 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-02-01

    An ice jam is an accumulation of ice in rivers that restricts flow and can cause destructive floods costly to riv- erine communities. Freezeup jams...and reliable data on past ice jam events. The CRREL Ice Jam Database is such a com- pilation of freezeup and breakup ice jam events in the United

  13. Electron impact ionization of H{sub 2}O molecule in crystalline ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinodkumar, Minaxi; Joshipura, K.N. E-mail: knjoshipura@yahoo.com; Limbachiya, C.G.; Antony, B.K

    2003-12-01

    The present work focuses on electron impact scattering in crystalline ice, which is an exotic solid. The major difference between crystalline form and amorphous form lies in its structure. Here we consider the H{sub 2}O molecule to possess properties consistent with the ice structure. Our basic calculation rests on the complex optical potential for the e-molecule system, with the molecular charge density as an input. To examine a single scattering event in condensed phases, we build up a model scattering potential to determine total inelastic cross-section Q{sub inel}. Finally an estimate of the total ionization cross-section, Q{sub ion} for H{sub 2}O (free), H{sub 2}O (amorphous) and H{sub 2}O (ice) in the energy range from threshold to 2000 eV, is obtained through semi-empirical arguments.

  14. Inhibition of Recrystallization of Amorphous Lactose in Nanocomposites Formed by Spray-Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellrup, Joel; Alderborn, Göran; Mahlin, Denny

    2015-11-01

    This study aims at investigating the recrystallization of amorphous lactose in nanocomposites. In particular, the focus is on the influence of the nano- to micrometer length scale nanofiller arrangement on the amorphous to crystalline transition. Further, the relative significance of formulation composition and manufacturing process parameters for the properties of the nanocomposite was investigated. Nanocomposites of amorphous lactose and fumed silica were produced by co-spray-drying. Solid-state transformation of the lactose was studied at 43%, 84%, and 94% relative humidity using X-ray powder diffraction and microcalorimetry. Design of experiments was used to analyze spray-drying process parameters and nanocomposite composition as factors influencing the time to 50% recrystallization. The spray-drying process parameters showed no significant influence. However, the recrystallization of the lactose in the nanocomposites was affected by the composition (fraction silica). The recrystallization rate constant decreased as a function of silica content. The lowered recrystallization rate of the lactose in the nanocomposites could be explained by three mechanisms: (1) separation of the amorphous lactose into discrete compartments on a micrometer length scale (compartmentalization), (2) lowered molecular mobility caused by molecular interactions between the lactose molecules and the surface of the silica (rigidification), and/or (3) intraparticle confinement of the amorphous lactose.

  15. Application of polyglycolized glycerides in protection of amorphous form of etoricoxib during compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimpi, Shamkant; Mahadik, Kakasaheb; Takada, Kanji; Paradkar, Anant

    2007-10-01

    Polymorphic transition and stability problems during amorphous drug formulation are the major limiting factors in pharmaceutical technology. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the ability of polyglycolized glycerides (Gelucire) in protection of amorphous form of drug during compression and shelf life with lower proportion. Amorphous etoricoxib (AET) was prepared by spray drying technique. Tablets of AET and melt granules of AET (MG-AET) with Gelucire 50/13 were prepared. Tablets parameters like hardness, disintegration and content uniformity were evaluated. Tablets were evaluated immediately after compression and on storage for 3 months at ambient conditions to determine degree of transformation using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dissolution profiles. Spray drying yielded the amorphous etoricoxib. Content uniformity in the tablet was in between 95 to 105%. Other parameters like disintegration and hardness were well within the limits. The results showed significant difference in the degree of crystallinity between AET tablet and MG-AET tablet. MG-AET tablet showed absence of crystallinity after 3 months storage. The reason could be formation of hydrogen bonding between the Gelucire and AET. Also Gelucire can be tableted very easily under low pressure and showed elastic recovery. Gelucire yielded a soft embedding during tableting, which prevented the polymorphic transformation. Polyglycolized glycerides (Gelucire 50/13) are able to protect amorphous etoricoxib during compression. As excipient required is low, it became possible to prepare tablet formulation as compared to other excipient like polyvinylpyrrolidon (PVP).

  16. Interfacial Free Energy as the Key to the Pressure-Induced Deceleration of Ice Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Jorge R.; Zaragoza, Alberto; Rosales-Pelaez, Pablo; Navarro, Caridad; Valeriani, Chantal; Vega, Carlos; Sanz, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    The avoidance of water freezing is the holy grail in the cryopreservation of biological samples, food, and organs. Fast cooling rates are used to beat ice nucleation and avoid cell damage. This strategy can be enhanced by applying high pressures to decrease the nucleation rate, but the physics behind this procedure has not been fully understood yet. We perform computer experiments to investigate ice nucleation at high pressures consisting in embedding ice seeds in supercooled water. We find that the slowing down of the nucleation rate is mainly due to an increase of the ice I -water interfacial free energy with pressure. Our work also clarifies the molecular mechanism of ice nucleation for a wide pressure range. This study is not only relevant to cryopreservation, but also to water amorphization and climate change modeling.

  17. Kagome spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Paula

    Spin ice in magnetic pyrochlore oxides is a peculiar magnetic state. Like ordinary water ice, these materials are in apparent violation with the third law of thermodynamics, which dictates that the entropy of a system in thermal equilibrium vanishes as its temperature approaches absolute zero. In ice, a "zero-point" entropy is retained down to low temperatures thanks to a high number of low-energy positions of hydrogen ions associated with the Bernal-Fowler ice-rules. Spins in pyrochlore oxides Ho2Ti 2O7 and Dy2Ti2O7 exhibit a similar degeneracy of ground states and thus also have a sizable zero-point entropy. A recent discovery of excitations carrying magnetic charges in pyrochlore spin ice adds another interesting dimension to these magnets. This thesis is devoted to a theoretical study of a two-dimensional version of spin ice whose spins reside on kagome, a lattice of corner-sharing triangles. It covers two aspects of this frustrated classical spin system: the dynamics of artificial spin ice in a network of magnetic nanowires and the thermodynamics of crystalline spin ice. Magnetization dynamics in artificial spin ice is mediated by the emission, propagation and absorption of domain walls in magnetic nanowires. The dynamics shows signs of self-organized behavior such as avalanches. The theoretical model compares favorably to recent experiments. The thermodynamics of the microscopic version of spin ice on kagome is examined through analytical calculations and numerical simulations. The results show that, in addition to the high-temperature paramagnetic phase and the low-temperature phase with magnetic order, spin ice on kagome may have an intermediate phase with fluctuating spins and ordered magnetic charges. This work is concluded with a calculation of the entropy of kagome spin ice at zero temperature when one of the sublattices is pinned by an applied magnetic field and the system breaks up into independent spin chains, a case of dimensional reduction.

  18. Theory of the sea ice thickness distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Toppaladoddi, Srikanth

    2015-01-01

    We use concepts from statistical physics to transform the original evolution equation for the sea ice thickness distribution $g(h)$ due to Thorndike et al., (1975) into a Fokker-Planck like conservation law. The steady solution is $g(h) = {\\cal N}(q) h^q \\mathrm{e}^{-~ h/H}$, where $q$ and $H$ are expressible in terms of moments over the transition probabilities between thickness categories. The solution exhibits the functional form used in observational fits and shows that for $h \\ll 1$, $g(h)$ is controlled by both thermodynamics and mechanics, whereas for $h \\gg 1$ only mechanics controls $g(h)$. Finally, we derive the underlying Langevin equation governing the dynamics of the ice thickness $h$, from which we predict the observed $g(h)$. The genericity of our approach provides a framework for studying the geophysical scale structure of the ice pack using methods of broad relevance in statistical mechanics.

  19. Hidden force resolving water ice densities

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Chang Q

    2013-01-01

    Inter-electron-pair Coulomb repulsion and the thermodynamic-disparity of the master-slave-segmented H bond are shown to originate the density anomalies of water ice. In the liquid and solid phases, the softer non-bond (of lower specific heat) serves as the master that contracts largely and meanwhile forces the stiffer real-bond as slave into Coulomb-repulsion-driven slight elongation, leading to the O-H:O cooling contraction and the seemingly normal cooling densification; at the transition phase, the master-slave swap roles, resulting in the O:-H-O freezing elongation and volume expansion. The O:H-O of ice is longer than that of water, and therefore, ice floats. In addition, angle relaxation also contributes to the volume change during the process of relaxation.

  20. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn-Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer-Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo-Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann-Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  1. Excimer laser crystallization of amorphous silicon on metallic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delachat, F.; Antoni, F.; Slaoui, A.; Cayron, C.; Ducros, C.; Lerat, J.-F.; Emeraud, T.; Negru, R.; Huet, K.; Reydet, P.-L.

    2013-06-01

    An attempt has been made to achieve the crystallization of silicon thin film on metallic foils by long pulse duration excimer laser processing. Amorphous silicon thin films (100 nm) were deposited by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on a commercial metallic alloy (N42-FeNi made of 41 % of Ni) coated by a tantalum nitride (TaN) layer. The TaN coating acts as a barrier layer, preventing the diffusion of metallic impurities in the silicon thin film during the laser annealing. An energy density threshold of 0.3 J cm-2, necessary for surface melting and crystallization of the amorphous silicon, was predicted by a numerical simulation of laser-induced phase transitions and witnessed by Raman analysis. Beyond this fluence, the melt depth increases with the intensification of energy density. A complete crystallization of the layer is achieved for an energy density of 0.9 J cm-2. Scanning electron microscopy unveils the nanostructuring of the silicon after laser irradiation, while cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy reveals the crystallites' columnar growth.

  2. Chromic mechanism in amorphous WO{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J G; Benson, D K; Tracy, C E; Deb, S K; Czanderna, A W [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bechinger, C [Universitaet Konstanz (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    The authors propose a new model for the chromic mechanism in amorphous tungsten oxide films (WO{sub 3{minus}y}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O). This model not only explains a variety of seemingly conflicting experimental results reported in the literature that cannot be explained by existing models, it also has practical implications with respect to improving the coloring efficiency and durability of electrochromic devices. According to this model, a typical as-deposited tungsten oxide film has tungsten mainly in W{sup 6+} and W{sup 4+} states and can be represented as W{sub 1{minus}y}{sup 6+} W{sub y}{sup 4+}O{sub 3{minus}y}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O. The proposed chromic mechanism is based on the small polaron transition between the charge-induced W{sup 5+} state and the original W{sup 4+} state instead of the W{sup 5+} and W{sup 6+} states as suggested in previous models. The correlation between the electrochromic and photochromic behavior in amorphous tungsten oxide films is also discussed.

  3. How Will Sea Ice Loss Affect the Greenland Ice Sheet? On the Puzzling Features of Greenland Ice-Core Isotopic Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Legrande, Allegra N.; Roberts, William H. G.

    2016-01-01

    The modern cryosphere, Earth's frozen water regime, is in fast transition. Greenland ice cores show how fast theses changes can be, presenting evidence of up to 15 C warming events over timescales of less than a decade. These events, called Dansgaard/Oeschger (D/O) events, are believed to be associated with rapid changes in Arctic sea ice, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The modern demise of Arctic sea ice may, in turn, instigate abrupt changes on the Greenland Ice Sheet. The Arctic Sea Ice and Greenland Ice Sheet Sensitivity (Ice2Ice Chttps://ice2ice.b.uib.noD) initiative, sponsored by the European Research Council, seeks to quantify these past rapid changes to improve our understanding of what the future may hold for the Arctic. Twenty scientists gathered in Copenhagen as part of this initiative to discuss the most recent observational, technological, and model developments toward quantifying the mechanisms behind past climate changes in Greenland. Much of the discussion focused on the causes behind the changes in stable water isotopes recorded in ice cores. The participants discussed sources of variability for stable water isotopes and framed ways that new studies could improve understanding of modern climate. The participants also discussed how climate models could provide insights into the relative roles of local and nonlocal processes in affecting stable water isotopes within the Greenland Ice Sheet. Presentations of modeling results showed how a change in the source or seasonality of precipitation could occur not only between glacial and modern climates but also between abrupt events. Recent fieldwork campaigns illustrate an important role of stable isotopes in atmospheric vapor and diffusion in the final stable isotope signal in ice. Further, indications from recent fieldwork campaigns illustrate an important role of stable isotopes in atmospheric vapor and diffusion in the final stable isotope signal in ice. This feature complicates

  4. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  5. Regular network model for the sea ice-albedo feedback in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Stoffels, Marc; Wackerbauer, Renate

    2011-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean and sea ice form a feedback system that plays an important role in the global climate. The complexity of highly parameterized global circulation (climate) models makes it very difficult to assess feedback processes in climate without the concurrent use of simple models where the physics is understood. We introduce a two-dimensional energy-based regular network model to investigate feedback processes in an Arctic ice-ocean layer. The model includes the nonlinear aspect of the ice-water phase transition, a nonlinear diffusive energy transport within a heterogeneous ice-ocean lattice, and spatiotemporal atmospheric and oceanic forcing at the surfaces. First results for a horizontally homogeneous ice-ocean layer show bistability and related hysteresis between perennial ice and perennial open water for varying atmospheric heat influx. Seasonal ice cover exists as a transient phenomenon. We also find that ocean heat fluxes are more efficient than atmospheric heat fluxes to melt Arctic sea ice.

  6. Amery ice shelf DEM and its marine ice distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The Amery Ice Shelf is the largest ice shelf in East Antarctica. A new DEM was generated for this ice shelf, using kriging to interpolate the data from ICESat altimetry and the AIS-DEM. The ice thickness distribution map is converted from the new DEM, assuming hydrostatic equilibrium. The Amery Ice Shelf marine ice, up to 230 m thick, is concentrated in the northwest of the ice shelf. The volume of the marine ice is 2.38×103 km3 and accounts for about 5.6% of the shelf volume.

  7. Ice Tank Experiments Highlight Changes in Sea Ice Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jeremy P.; DeCarolis, Giacomo; Ehlert, Iris; Notz, Dirk; Evers, Karl-Ulrich; Jochmann, Peter; Gerland, Sebastian; Nicolaus, Marcel; Hughes, Nick; Kern, Stefan; de la Rosa, Sara; Smedsrud, Lars; Sakai, Shigeki; Shen, Hayley; Wadhams, Peter

    2009-03-01

    With the current and likely continuing reduction of summer sea ice extent in the Arctic Ocean, the predominant mechanism of sea ice formation in the Arctic is likely to change in the future. Although substantial new ice formation occurred under preexisting ice in the past, the fraction of sea ice formation in open water likely will increase significantly. In open water, sea ice formation starts with the development of small ice crystals, called frazil ice, which are suspended in the water column [World Meteorological Organization, 1985]. Under quiescent conditions, these crystals accumulate at the surface to form an unbroken ice sheet known in its early stage as nilas. Under turbulent conditions, caused by wind and waves, frazil ice continues to grow and forms into a thick, soupy mixture called grease ice. Eventually the frazil ice will coalesce into small, rounded pieces known as pancake ice, which finally consolidate into an ice sheet with the return of calm conditions. This frazil/pancake/ice sheet cycle is currently frequently observed in the Antarctic [Lange et al., 1989]. The cycle normally occurs in regions that have a significant stretch of open water, because this allows for the formation of larger waves and hence increased turbulence. Given the increase of such open water in the Arctic Ocean caused by retreating summer sea ice, the frazil/pancake/ice sheet cycle may also become the dominant ice formation process during freezeup in the Arctic.

  8. Small Airframe Manufacturer's Icing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppins, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the icing effects, risk mitigation practices, and icing certifications for various Cessna small aircraft models. NASA's role in the development of simulation tools for icing certifications is also discussed.

  9. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet S. H. Lorv

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions.

  10. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater

  11. Ice-on-ice impact experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Manabu; Iijima, Yu-Ichi; Arakawa, Masahiko; Okimura, Yasuyuki; Fujimura, Akio; Maeno, Norikazu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1995-02-01

    Impact experiments, cratering and fragmentation, on water ice were performed in order to test the scaling laws previously constructed on rocks and sands for studying the collision process in the planetary history. The installation of a vertical gas gun in a cold room at -18°C (255 K) made it possible to use a projectile of water ice and to get the detailed mass distribution of ice fragments. Experimental results indicated the necessity for large modification of those scaling laws. Material dependence was investigated by using projectiles of ice, aluminum, and polycarbonate. Differences were observed in the morphology and efficiencies of cratering and in the energies required to initiate the fragmentation. Moreover, an abrupt increase of cratering efficiency, suggesting a change of excavation mechanism, was found at a critical diameter of spalled crater. The mass (size) distribution of small ice fragments obeyed a power law with an exponent significantly larger than that in rocks. The exponent was the same as that in Saturn's ring particles estimated from the data by the microwave occultation, which indicates a collisional disruption ring origin.

  12. The impact of ice layers on gas transport through firn at the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) site, Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, K.; Albert, M. R.; Baker, I.

    2014-10-01

    Typically, gas transport through firn is modeled in the context of an idealized firn column. However, in natural firn, imperfections are present, which can alter transport dynamics and therefore reduce the accuracy of reconstructed climate records. For example, ice layers have been found in several firn cores collected in the polar regions. Here, we examined the effects of two ice layers found in a NEEM, Greenland firn core on gas transport through the firn. These ice layers were found to have permeability values of 3.0 and 4.0 × 10-10 m2, and are therefore not impermeable layers. However, the shallower ice layer was found to be significantly less permeable than the surrounding firn, and can therefore retard gas transport. Large closed bubbles were found in the deeper ice layer, which will have an altered gas composition than that expected because they were closed near the surface after the water phase was present. The bubbles in this layer represent 12% of the expected closed porosity of this firn layer after the firn-ice transition depth is reached, and will therefore bias the future ice core gas record. The permeability and thickness of the ice layers at the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) site suggest that they do not disrupt the firn-air concentration profiles and that they do not need to be accounted for in gas transport models at NEEM.

  13. An Expanded Analysis of Nitrogen Ice Convection in Sputnik Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umurhan, Orkan M.; Lyra, Wladimir; Wong, Teresa; McKinnon, William B.; Nimmo, Francis; Howard, Alan D.; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Binzel, Richard; White, Oliver; Stern, S. Alan; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Catherine B.; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie; New Horizons Geology and Geophysics Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The New Horizons close-encounter flyby of Pluto revealed 20-35 km scale ovoid patterns on the informally named Sputnik Planum. These features have been recently interpreted and shown to arise from the action of solid-state convection of (predominantly) nitrogen ice driven by Pluto's geothermal gradient. One of the major uncertainties in the convection physics centers on the temperature and grain-size dependency of nitrogen ice rheology, which has strong implications for the overturn times of the convecting ice. Assuming nitrogen ice in Sputnik Planum rests on a passive water ice bedrock that conducts Pluto's interior heat flux, and, given the uncertainty of the grain-size distribution of the nitrogen ice in Sputnik Planum, we examine a suite of two-dimensional convection models that take into account the thermal contact between the nitrogen ice layer and the conducting water-ice bedrock for a given emergent geothermal flux. We find for nitrogen ice layers several km deep, the emerging convection efficiently cools the nitrogen-ice water-ice bedrock interface resulting in temperature differences across the convecting layer of 10-20 K (at most) regardless of layer depth. For grain sizes ranging from 0.01 mm to 5 mm the resulting horizontal size to depth ratios of the emerging convection patterns go from 4:1 up to 6:1, suggesting that the nitrogen ice layer in Sputnik Planum may be anywhere between 3.5 and 8 km deep. Such depths are consistent with Sputnik Planum being a large impact basin (in a relative sense) analogous to Hellas on Mars. In this grain-size range we also find, (i) the calculated cell overturn times are anywhere from 1e4 to 5e5 yrs and, (ii) there is a distinct transition from steady state to time dependent convection.

  14. Preparation of Plate Fe60Co8Zr10Mo5W2B15 Bulk Amorphous Alloy and Its Fracture Toughness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Huaxing; CHEN Guang

    2005-01-01

    With processes of arc melting, inductive melting and copper mold suction casting, a plate Fe-based bulk amorphous alloy Fe60Co8Zr10Mo5W2B15 with a thickness of 1mm was prepared. The surfaces and fractures of the cast bulk amorphous alloy were agleam and with typical metallic luster. The glass transition temperature(Tg), supercooled liquid region(△Tx)and reduced glass transition temperature(T rg)of the prepared Fe-based amorphous alloy are 884 K,63 K, and 0.611 respectively. The fracture toughness of the cast bulk amorphous alloy is at the level of 1.6 MPa·m1/2.

  15. Influence of gas environment on synthesis of silicon carbide and some carbides and carbonitrides of d-group transition metals through reaction between metal powders and amorphous carbon powders in a solar furnace at P.S.A. (plataforma solar de Almeria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, D.; Rodriguez, J. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria, PSA, Centro Europeo de Ensayos de Energia Solar, Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Tabernas (Spain); Guerra Rosa, L.; Cruz Fernandes, J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IST, Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais, Lisboa (Portugal); Shohoji, N. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, INETI, Instituto de Materiais e Tecnologias de Producao, Dept. de Tecnologias de Producao, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1999-03-01

    Refractory carbides and carbonitrides including silicon carbide SiC, tungsten carbide WC, titanium carbide TiC{sub x} (0.5amorphous carbon powders through heating in a solar furnace under controlled atmosphere (Ar or N{sub 2}). Under irradiation of the solar energy flux 1,350 kW/m{sup 2} (ca. 1650 deg C in terms of measured temperature) for 30 min in Ar atmosphere, Si, W and Ti were converted to SiC, WC and TiC{sub x}, respectively. By the similar reaction undertaken in N{sub 2} atmosphere, Si and W were converted to SiC and WC, respectively, but carbonitride TiC{sub x}N{sub y} formed from Ti. No special influence of atmosphere was detected on the WC formation, but conversion to SiC from Si was somewhat retarded in N{sub 2} atmosphere. In either Ar or N{sub 2} atmosphere, progress of graphitization of amorphous carbon was not detectable by X-ray diffraction analysis in the reaction with Si and Ti but graphitization of amorphous carbon appeared to be significantly accelerated in the reaction with W. (authors)

  16. Kinetic Characteristic of Hydrogenation Zr-Ti-Cu-Ni-Be Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Delin PENG; Jun SHEN; Jianfei SUN; Yuyong CHEN

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the hydrogen content and the microhardness and the charging period, the effect of hydrogen on the activation energy, the kinetics of glass transition and crystallization of Zr-Ti-Cu-Ni-Be bulk amorphous alloy were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the Kissinger equation. It shows that both of the hydrogen content and the microhardness are related to the charging period, and that the glass transition and crystallization behavior are associated with the heating rate, and possess the kinetic effect. Hydrogen increases the glass transition temperature and the crystallization temperature, decreasing the enthalpies in the different stages of crystallization.Hydrogen increases the activation energies of the glass transition and the crystallization and changes the kinetic effect. The dependent extent between the glass transition, the crystallization and heating rate decreases after hydrogen charging.

  17. Photometric Measurements of H2O Ice Crystallinity on Trans-Neptunian Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Terai, Tsuyoshi; Oasa, Yumiko; Furusho, Reiko; Watanabe, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of H2O ice crystallinity on the surface of trans-neptunian objects (TNOs) with near-infrared narrow-band imaging. The newly developed photometric technique allows us to efficiently determine the strength of an 1.65-um absorption feature in crystalline H2O ice. Our data for three large objects, Haumea, Quaoar, and Orcus, which are known to contain crystalline H2O ice on the surfaces, show a reasonable result with high fractions of the crystalline phase. It can also be pointed out that if the H2O-ice grain size is larger than ~20 um, the crystallinities of these objects are obviously below 1.0, which suggest the presence of the amorphous phase. Especially, Orcus exhibits a high abundance of amorphous H2O ice compared to Haumea and Quaoar, possibly indicating a correlation between bulk density of the bodies and surface crystallization degree. We also found the presence of crystalline H2O ice on Typhon and 2008 AP129, both of which are smaller than the minimum size limit for inducing cryo...

  18. Measurement of the accumulation of water ice on optical components in cryogenic vacuum environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Trevor M.; Montgomery Smith, L.; Collins, Frank G.; Labello, Jesse M.; Rogers, James P.; Lowry, Heard S.; Crider, Dustin H.

    2012-11-01

    Standard vacuum practices mitigate the presence of water vapor and contamination inside cryogenic vacuum chambers. However, anomalies can occur in the facility that can cause the accumulation of amorphous water ice on optics and test articles. Under certain conditions, the amorphous ice on optical components shatters, which leads to a reduction in signal or failure of the component. An experiment was performed to study and measure the deposition of water (H2O) ice on optical surfaces under high-vacuum cryogenic conditions. Water was introduced into a cryogenic vacuum chamber, via a hydrated molecular sieve zeolite, through an effusion cell and impinged upon a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and first-surface gold-plated mirror. A laser and photodiode setup, external to the vacuum chamber, monitored the multiple-beam interference reflectance of the ice-mirror configuration while the QCM measured the mass deposition. Data indicates that water ice, under these conditions, accumulates as a thin film on optical surfaces to thicknesses over 45 microns and can be detected and measured by nonintrusive optical methods which are based upon multiple-beam interference phenomena. The QCM validated the interference measurements. This experiment established proof-of-concept for a miniature system for monitoring ice accumulation within the chamber.

  19. Making an Ice Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  20. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  1. Testing The Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The country’s fourth scientific expedition tothe North Pole starts OBSERVATION STATIONS:Members of China’s fourth Arctic expedition set up polar bear-proof "apple houses" on the ice surface of the Arctic Ocean on August 8 The Chinese ice breaker Xuelong

  2. Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Listen Methamphetamine—meth for short—is a white, bitter powder. Sometimes ... clear or white shiny rock (called a crystal). Meth powder can be eaten or snorted up the ...

  3. Sputtering of water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Vidal, R.A.; Svendsen, W.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of a range of experiments of sputtering of water ice together with a guide to the literature. We studied how sputtering depends on the projectile energy and fluence, ice growth temperature, irradiation temperature and external electric fields. We observed luminescence from...

  4. Optical dephasing in organic amorphous systems. A photon echo and hole-burning study of pentacene in polymethylmethacrylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenkamp, Laurens W.; Wiersma, Douwe A.

    1985-01-01

    Picosecond photon echo experiments on pentacene in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) show that the homogeneous width exhibits a T1.3 temperature dependence. This behavior is ascribed to coupling of the pentacene transition to randomly distributed low-frequency excitations in the amorphous host. A calcul

  5. Glass solution formation in water - In situ amorphization of naproxen and ibuprofen with Eudragit® E PO

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doreth, Maria; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger;

    2016-01-01

    a glass solution with Eudragit® E when immersed into water. In XRPD, reflections of the respective drugs decreased or disappeared completely. All samples showed a single glass transition temperature in the DSC, suggesting the formation of single phase amorphous systems. Ionic interactions between drug...

  6. Towards upconversion for amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Wild, J.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijerink, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Condensed Matter and Interfaces, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Science, Technology and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    Upconversion of subbandgap light of thin film single junction amorphous silicon solar cells may enhance their performance in the near infrared (NIR). In this paper we report on the application of the NIR-vis upconverter {beta}-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}(18%) Er{sup 3+}(2%) at the back of an amorphous silicon solar cell in combination with a white back reflector and its response to infrared irradiation. Current-voltage measurements and spectral response measurements were done on experimental solar cells. An enhancement of 10 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} was measured under illumination with a 980 nm diode laser (10 mW). A part of this was due to defect absorption in localized states of the amorphous silicon. (author)

  7. The influence of a model subglacial lake on ice dynamics and internal layering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gudlaugsson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As ice flows over a subglacial lake, the drop in bed resistance leads to an increase in ice velocities and a subsequent draw-down of isochrones and cold ice from the surface. The ice surface flattens as it adjusts to the lack of resisting forces at the base. The rapid transition in velocity induces changes in temperature and ice viscosity, releasing deformation energy which raises the temperature locally. Recent studies of Antarctic subglacial lakes indicate that many lakes experience very fast and possibly episodic drainage, during which the lake size is rapidly reduced as water flows out. A question is what effect this would have on internal layers within the ice, and whether such past events could be inferred from isochrone structures downstream. Here, we study the effect of a subglacial lake on the dynamics of a model ice stream as well as the influence that such short timescale drainage would have on the internal layers of the ice. To this end, we use a Full–Stokes, polythermal ice flow model. An enthalpy gradient method is used to account for the evolution of temperature and water content within the ice. We find that the rapid transition between slow-moving ice outside the lake, and full sliding over the lake, releases large amounts of deformational energy, which has the potential to form a temperate layer at depth in the transition zone. In addition, we provide an explanation for a characteristic surface feature, commonly seen at the edges of subglacial lakes, a hummocky surface depression in the transition zone between little to full sliding. We also conclude that rapid changes in lake geometry or basal friction create a travelling wave at depth within the isochrone structure that transfers downstream with the advection of ice, thus indicating the possibility of detecting past events with ice penetrating radar.

  8. Mechanical milling of Fe3O4/SiO2: Formation of an amorphous Fe(II)-Si-O-containing phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, C.B.; Jiang, Jianzhong; Mørup, Steen

    1999-01-01

    The product of ball milling of magnetite and amorphous silica (40 mole% Fe3O4 in SiO2) for an extended period of time (800 h) in a closed vial, has been investigated by Mossbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. It is found that the milling induces extensive reduction...... of Fe(III). The material constitutes a mixture of ultrafine Fe-rich spinel particles (magnetite/maghemite) and ail amorphous Fe(II)-containing silicate with a magnetic transition temperature of approximately 25 K. The amorphous phase has a rather high Fe content and is distinctly differenct from...

  9. GLERL Radiation Transfer Through Freshwater Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation transmittance (ratio of transmitted to incident radiation) through clear ice, refrozen slush ice and brash ice, from ice surface to ice-water interface in...

  10. Raman Amplifier Based on Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ferrara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of stimulated Raman scattering in amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in Si-rich nitride/silicon superlattice structures (SRN/Si-SLs is reported. Using a 1427 nm continuous-wavelength pump laser, an amplification of Stokes signal up to 0.9 dB/cm at 1540.6 nm and a significant reduction in threshold power of about 40% with respect to silicon are experimentally demonstrated. Our results indicate that amorphous silicon nanoparticles are a great promise for Si-based Raman lasers.

  11. Effect of Temperature and Moisture on the Physical Stability of Binary and Ternary Amorphous Solid Dispersions of Celecoxib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tian; Taylor, Lynne S

    2017-01-01

    The effectiveness of different polymers, alone or in combination, in inhibiting the crystallization of celecoxib (CEX) from amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) exposed to different temperatures and relative humidities was evaluated. It was found that polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and PVP-vinyl acetate formed stronger or more extensive hydrogen bonding with CEX than cellulose-based polymers. This, combined with their better effectiveness in raising the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the dispersions, provided better physical stabilization of amorphous CEX against crystallization in the absence of moisture when compared with dispersions formed with cellulose derivatives. In ternary dispersions containing 2 polymers, the physical stability was minimally impaired by the presence of a cellulose-based polymer when the major polymer present was PVP. On exposure to moisture, stability of the CEX ASDs was strongly affected by both the dispersion hygroscopicity and the strength of the intermolecular interactions. Binary and ternary ASDs containing PVP appeared to undergo partial amorphous-amorphous phase separation when exposed 94% relative humidity, followed by crystallization, whereas other binary ASDs crystallized directly without amorphous-amorphous phase separation.

  12. Impact of water on molecular dynamics of amorphous α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrins studied by dielectric spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, K.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Kaminska, E.; Grzybowska, K.; Hawelek, L.; Paluch, M.; Tarnacka, M.; Gruszka, I.; Kasprzycka, A.

    2012-09-01

    Dielectric, calorimetric, and x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out on α-, β-, and γ-cyclodextrins, which are cyclic saccharides built by, respectively, six, seven, and eight glucose units connected via glycosidic linkage. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements indicated that each carbohydrate has a melting temperature located much above the temperature at which thermal decomposition begins. Moreover, calorimetric data revealed that it is possible to completely dehydrate each cyclodextrin by annealing them above 413 K. Unfortunately, it is impossible to obtain amorphous forms of cyclodextrin by simple cooling of the melt. Thus, a solid state amorphization method has been applied. X-ray diffraction studies demonstrated that by ball milling at room temperature we are able to obtain completely amorphous cyclodextrins. Finally, dielectric measurements were carried out to probe molecular dynamics in the amorphous state of cyclodextrins. It was found that there is only one relaxation process in amorphous hydrated cyclodextrins, while in dried samples two secondary relaxations are present. Moreover, we have shown that water has an enormous effect on the dynamics of both relaxation modes, i.e., with increasing content of water, the activation energy of the slow mode decreases, while that evaluated for the fast mode increases. We were not able to follow the dynamics of the structural relaxation process, because glass transition temperatures of amorphous cyclodextrins were found to lie above thermal degradation points.

  13. Thermal Expansion Behavior of Precursor-Derived Amorphous Si-C-N and Si-B-C-N Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal expansion behaviors of some precursor-derived amorphous Si-C-N and Si-B-C-N ceramics, which were shaped by plastic forming after crosslink, were studied. To complete the shrinkage and densification, after thermolysis specimens were heat treated at a temperature of 1400℃ for 10 h in nitrogen atmosphere. The thermal expansion coefficient of VT50-derived amorphous Si-C-N ceramic increases from 1.98×10-6/K at 400℃ to 3.09×10-6/K at 1000℃, of NCP200-derived amorphous Si-C-N ceramic increases from 2.35× 10-6/K at 400℃ to 3.45×10-6/K at1000℃, and of T2-1-derived amorphous Si-B-C-N ceramic increases from 2.08×10-6/K at 400℃ to 3.18×10-6/K at 1000℃. No glass transition for these amorphous ceramic materials was detected, indicating that as-thermolyzed precursor-derived Si-(B-)C-N ceramic materials are amorphous solids, but not glasses.

  14. Pore evolution in interstellar ice analogues: simulating the effects of temperature increase

    CERN Document Server

    Cazaux, S; Linnartz, H; Tielens, A G G M

    2014-01-01

    Context. The level of porosity of interstellar ices - largely comprised of amorphous solid water (ASW) - contains clues on the trapping capacity of other volatile species and determines the surface accessibility that is needed for solid state reactions to take place. Aims. Our goal is to simulate the growth of amorphous water ice at low temperature (10 K) and to characterize the evolution of the porosity (and the specific surface area) as a function of temperature (from 10 to 120 K). Methods. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations are used to mimic the formation and the thermal evolution of pores in amorphous water ice. We follow the accretion of gas-phase water molecules as well as their migration on surfaces with different grid sizes, both at the top growing layer and within the bulk. Results. We show that the porosity characteristics change substantially in water ice as the temperature increases. The total surface of the pores decreases strongly while the total volume decreases only slightly for higher temperatur...

  15. Surface abundance change in vacuum ultraviolet photodissociation of CO2 and H2O mixture ices.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinugawa, Takashi; Yabushita, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Hama, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Photodissociation of amorphous ice films of carbon dioxide and water co-adsorbed at 90 K was carried out at 157 nm using oxygen-16 and -18 isotopomers with a time-of-flight photofragment mass spectrometer. O((3)P(J)) atoms, OH (v = 0) radicals, and CO (v = 0, 1) molecules were detected as photofragments. CO is produced directly from the photodissociation of CO(2). Two different adsorption states of CO(2), i.e., physisorbed CO(2) on the surface of amorphous solid water and trapped CO(2) in the...

  16. Stacking disorder in ice I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Tamsin L; Murray, Benjamin J; Salzmann, Christoph G; Molinero, Valeria; Pickering, Steven J; Whale, Thomas F

    2015-01-07

    Traditionally, ice I was considered to exist in two well-defined crystalline forms at ambient pressure: stable hexagonal ice (ice Ih) and metastable cubic ice (ice Ic). However, it is becoming increasingly evident that what has been called cubic ice in the past does not have a structure consistent with the cubic crystal system. Instead, it is a stacking-disordered material containing cubic sequences interlaced with hexagonal sequences, which is termed stacking-disordered ice (ice Isd). In this article, we summarise previous work on ice with stacking disorder including ice that was called cubic ice in the past. We also present new experimental data which shows that ice which crystallises after heterogeneous nucleation in water droplets containing solid inclusions also contains stacking disorder even at freezing temperatures of around -15 °C. This supports the results from molecular simulations, that the structure of ice that crystallises initially from supercooled water is always stacking-disordered and that this metastable ice can transform to the stable hexagonal phase subject to the kinetics of recrystallization. We also show that stacking disorder in ice which forms from water droplets is quantitatively distinct from ice made via other routes. The emerging picture of ice I is that of a very complex material which frequently contains stacking disorder and this stacking disorder can vary in complexity depending on the route of formation and thermal history.

  17. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha [Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Edmund J. Safra Campus, Givat-Ram, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  18. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 μA) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 ± 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.

  19. Solvent-mediated amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of nitrendipine in amorphous particle suspensions containing polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Dengning; Wu, Jian-Xiong; Cui, Fude;

    2012-01-01

    quantitatively determined using image analysis based on polarized light microscopy. The findings from the image analysis revealed that the transformation process occurred through the dissolution of amorphous drug precipitate followed by the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase with the amorphous....... However, a further increase in drug concentration to 100mg/ml decelerated the growth of nitrendipine crystals. Combining image analysis of polarized light micrographs together with Raman spectroscopy and XRPD provided an in-depth insight into solid state transformations in amorphous nitrendipine...

  20. The improvement of hole transport property and optical band gap for amorphous Cu{sub 2}O films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qin; Li, Jin; Bi, Xiaofang

    2015-10-25

    This work presents an interesting observation that the suppression of crystallization for p-type Cu{sub 2}O facilitates the transition of transport behaviors from variable-range-hopping (VRH) to Arrhenius-like mechanism and further lead to a great reduction of thermal activation energy. Raman spectroscopy analysis shows a distortion of symmetrical O–Cu–O crosslink structure in the amorphous Cu{sub 2}O. The disruption of symmetry is revealed to increase dispersion of upper valence band and reduce Fermi as well, which results in possible intrusion of the Fermi level into a band tail state adjacent to the upper valence band level. Meanwhile, the amorphous Cu{sub 2}O film shows an optical band gap of 2.7 eV, much larger than 2.0 eV for the crystalline counterparts. The blue shift is consistent with the variation of energy band structure with the film changing from crystalline to amorphous state, suggesting that the O-mediated d–d interaction can be weakened with the nonsymmetrical structure in amorphous phase. - Graphical abstract: Suppression of crystallization for p-type Cu{sub 2}O is observed to facilitate the transition of transport behaviors from variable-range-hopping to the Arrhenius-like behavior based on the band tail transport mode. The amorphous Cu{sub 2}O film also shows a blue shift as compared to its crystalline counterpart. The effect of amorphous structure on the performances is discussed in combination with Raman spectroscopy and band structure calculation. - Highlights: • Amorphous Cu{sub 2}O films show Arrhenius-like p-type conductivity. • Raman spectroscopy is analyzed on the change of crystallization. • Physical origin of the transport behavior is clarified with electronic structure. • Optical band gap can be widened by suppressing crystallization of Cu{sub 2}O.

  1. Predictability of critical transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.

  2. Production, Properties and Applications of Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Zhang; Akihisa Inoue

    2000-01-01

    A review is given of recent work concerned with the production method, the characteristic properties(1) Bulk amorphous system; (2) Mechanical and magnetic properties of bulkamorphous alloys; (3)application of bulk amorphous alloys.

  3. Proton ordering in tetragonal and monoclinic H2O ice

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, Fei; Berlie, Adam; Liu, Xiaodi; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    H2O ice remains one of the most enigmatic materials as its phase diagram reveals up to sixteen solid phases. While the crystal structure of these phases has been determined, the phase boundaries and mechanisms of formation of the proton-ordered phases remain unclear. From high precision measurements of the complex dielectric constant, we probe directly the degree of ordering of the protons in H2O tetragonal ice III and monoclinic ice V down to 80 K. A broadened first-order phase transition is found to occur near 202 K we attribute to a quenched disorder of the protons which causes a continuous disordering of the protons during cooling and metastable behavior. At 126 K the protons in ice III become fully ordered, and for the case of ice V becoming fully ordered at 113 K forming ice XIII. Two triple points are proposed to exist: one at 0.35 GPa and 126 K where ices III, IX and V coexist; and another at 0.35 GPa and 113 K where ices V, IX and XIII coexist. Our findings unravel the underlying mechanism driving th...

  4. Thio residue from thermal processing of cometary ices containing carbon disulfide and ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methikkalam, R. R. J.; Pavithraa, S.; Murali Babu, S. P.; Hill, H.; Raja Sekhar, B. N.; Pradeep, T.; Sivaraman, B.

    2016-08-01

    We have carried out experimental investigation on binary ice mixture containing carbon disulfide (CS2) and ammonia (NH3) ices formed at 10 K. Icy films were formed in various combinations to investigate the reactivity of CS2 and NH3 molecules on cometary nucleus. In the case of NH3 ices, deposition carried out at 10 K was found to contain NH3 homo-dimers that was found to reorient upon annealing to 40 K. Phase transition was found to take place as the 10 K ice was warmed to higher temperatures and the phase transition temperature was found to be 5 K higher for the mixed ice in comparison to the layered deposits. Thermal processing of the mixed deposition of CS2sbnd NH3 ice was found to leave thio residue, which could be ammonium dithiocarbamate that was even found to be present at 340 K.

  5. Transition in the fractal geometry of Arctic melt ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a remarkable transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice-albedo feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a significant challenge to improving climate projections. By analyzing area-perimeter data from hundreds of thousands of melt ponds, we find here an unexpected separation of scales, where pond fractal dimension D transitions from 1 to 2 around a critical length scale of 100 m2 in area. Pond complexity increases rapidly through the transition as smaller ponds coalesce to form large connected regions, and reaches a maximum for ponds larger than 1000 m2 whose boundaries resemble space filling curves with D ≈ 2. These universal features of Arctic melt pond evolution are similar to phase transitions in statistical physics. The results impact sea ice albedo, the transmitted radiation fields under melting sea ice, the heat balance of sea ice and the upper ocean, and biological productivity such as under ice phytoplankton blooms.

  6. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  7. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place.

  8. Electrodeposition of amorphous gold alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masaru; Senda, Kazutaka [Central Research Laboratory, Kanto Chemical Co., Inc., Saitama 340-0003 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Musha, Yuta [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sasano, Junji [Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Okinaka, Yutaka [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Osaka, Tetsuya [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: osakatet@waseda.jp

    2007-11-20

    The process for electroplating amorphous gold-nickel-tungsten alloy that we developed previously based on the addition of a gold salt to a known amorphous Ni-W electroplating solution was investigated further using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method for the purpose of quickly surveying the effects of various experimental variables on the microstructure of the alloy. In this system the gold concentration in the plating bath was found to be critical; i.e., when it is either very low or very high, the deposit becomes crystalline to XRD. The deposit composition varies linearly with the mole ratio of Au to Ni in solution, and the alloy deposit is amorphous to XRD when the atomic ratio of Au/Ni in the deposit is between 0.5 and 1.5. At suitable concentrations of the metal ions, the deposit contains essentially no tungsten. By extending the work on the Au-Ni-W system, an amorphous Au-Co alloy plating process was also developed.

  9. Radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and Logistics, Faculty Technology, B-41, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)]. E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au

    2005-04-15

    A theory for calculating the radiative lifetime of excitons in amorphous semiconductors is presented. Four possibilities of excitonic radiative recombination are considered and the corresponding rates are derived at thermal equilibrium. The radiative lifetime is calculated from the inverse of the maximum rate for all the four possibilities. Results agree very well with experiments.

  10. Noise and degradation of amorphous silicon devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical noise measurements are reported on two devices of the disordered semiconductor hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The material is applied in sandwich structures and in thin-film transistors (TFTs). In a sandwich configuration of an intrinsic layer and two thin doped layers, the obse

  11. Amorphous Alloy and Magnetic Stabilization Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Sponsored by NSFC,a research team led by Prof.Enze Min (CAS Member) from Research Institute of Petroleum Processing,through 20 years' effort,settled the puzzled grave issue that amorphous alloy material has small specific surface area and low thermal stability.

  12. Compaction of amorphous iron–boron powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mørup, Steen; Koch, Christian;

    1993-01-01

    report on attempts to compact amorphous iron–boron particles prepared by chemical reduction of Fe(II) ions in aqueous solution by NaBH4 (Ref. 2). The particles prepared in this way are pyrophoric, but can be passivated. The small particle size (10–100 nm), characteristic of this preparation technique...

  13. Trap level spectroscopy in amorphous semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor V

    2010-01-01

    Although amorphous semiconductors have been studied for over four decades, many of their properties are not fully understood. This book discusses not only the most common spectroscopic techniques but also describes their advantages and disadvantages.Provides information on the most used spectroscopic techniquesDiscusses the advantages and disadvantages of each technique

  14. Amorphous silicon for thin-film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, Rudolf Emmanuel Isidore

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has considerable potential as a semiconducting material for large-area photoelectric and photovoltaic applications. Moreover, a-Si:H thin-film transistors (TFT’s) are very well suited as switching devices in addressable liquid crystal display panels and addres

  15. Amorphous track models: a numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Hahn, Ute;

    Amorphous track models such as Katz' Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach [1, 2] or the Local Effect Model (LEM) [3, 4] had reasonable success in predicting the response of solid state dosimeters and radiobiological systems. LEM is currently applied in radiotherapy for biological dose optimization in ca...

  16. Amorphous track models: A numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, L.; Bassler, N.;

    2010-01-01

    We present an open-source code library for amorphous track modelling which is suppose to faciliate the application and numerical comparability as well as serve as a frame-work for the implementation of new models. We show an example of using the library indicating the choice of submodels has a si...

  17. 趣话ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奉越

    2002-01-01

    在英语中,ice是一个很普通的词,它的基本含义是“冰,冰块”。如:The sportsman slipped on the ice and one of his legs was broken.(这个运动员在冰上滑倒了,一条腿摔断了。)它还可指“冰淇淋”,相当于ice cream。如.After having two ices I felt uncomfortable.

  18. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  19. Stripping with dry ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    Mechanical-type stripping using dry ice (solid CO2) consists in blasting particles of dry ice onto the painted surface. This surface can be used alone or in duplex according to type of substrate to be treated. According to operating conditions, three physical mechanisms may be involved when blasting dry ice particles onto a paint system: thermal shock, differential thermal contraction, and mechanical shock. The blast nozzle, nozzle travel speed, blast angle, stripping distance, and compressed air pressure and media flow rate influence the stripping quality and the uniformity and efficiency obtained.

  20. Ice nucleation terminology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  1. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co......-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed...... the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from...

  2. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  3. Towards Resolving the Paradox of Antarctic Sea Ice: A New Integrated Framework for Observing the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Antarctic sea ice distribution, a canary in the coal mine for climate change in the Southern Hemisphere, is controlled by the marginal ice zone (MIZ). The MIZ is the dynamic outer part of the sea-ice zone, where it interacts with the high-energy open ocean and is strongly affected by waves and storms. As an interface between ocean and atmosphere with extreme vertical and horizontal temperature gradients and large variations in mechanical properties, the MIZ is a complex system that evolves with, and impacts upon, the advancing/receding ice edge. More than a zone, it is a migratory transition in 'phase space' that biannually passes across the entire Antarctic SIZ. During the advance phase of sea-ice seasonality, and under freezing conditions, wave-induced pancake-ice formation can lead to rapid ice-edge advance. During the retreat phase, the dynamic break-up and modification of sea ice by passing storms, winds and waves greatly modifies the floe-size distribution within the MIZ, to create smaller floes that melt more rapidly and accelerate sea-ice retreat as spring progresses. Inspired by the current Arctic MIZ efforts, new fieldwork is proposed to resolve the key characteristics of the Antarctic MIZ and the processes controlling its extent. Combining new autonomous observation technology with ship-based techniques, integrated experiments are being designed to advance our understanding of the MIZ and its role in driving seasonal sea ice advance and retreat around Antarctica. The proposed project provides a unique opportunity to develop an observational, analytical, and science-policy framework for coordinated monitoring of sea ice in both the northern and southern hemispheres, with implications for forecasting, monitoring, and prediction that are essential with increasingly dynamic and variable polar climate systems.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin-poly(vinylpyrrolidone) glasses: solubility and hydrogen bonding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-03-01

    Amorphous drug dispersions are frequently employed to enhance solubility and dissolution of poorly water-soluble drugs and thereby increase their oral bioavailability. Because these systems are metastable, phase separation of the amorphous components and subsequent drug crystallization may occur during storage. Computational methods to determine the likelihood of these events would be very valuable, if their reliability could be validated. This study investigates amorphous systems of indomethacin (IMC) in poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and their molecular interactions by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. IMC and PVP molecules were constructed using X-ray diffraction data, and force-field parameters were assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03. Five assemblies varying in PVP and IMC composition were equilibrated in their molten states then cooled at a rate of 0.03 K/ps to generate amorphous glasses. Prolonged aging dynamic runs (100 ns) at 298 K and 1 bar were then carried out, from which solubility parameters, the Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, and associated hydrogen bonding properties were obtained. Calculated glass transition temperature (T(g)) values were higher than experimental results because of the faster cooling rates in MD simulations. Molecular mobility as characterized by atomic fluctuations was substantially reduced below the T(g) with IMC-PVP systems exhibiting lower mobilities than that found in amorphous IMC, consistent with the antiplasticizing effect of PVP. The number of IMC-IMC hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed per IMC molecule was substantially lower in IMC-PVP mixtures, particularly the fractions of IMC molecules involved in two or three HBs with other IMC molecules that may be potential precursors for crystal growth. The loss of HBs between IMC molecules in the presence of PVP was largely compensated for by the formation of IMC-PVP HBs. The difference (6.5 MPa(1/2)) between the solubility parameters in amorphous IMC

  5. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

  6. Nanocrystallization in Co67Cr7Fe4Si8B14 Amorphous Alloy Ribbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jamili-Shirvan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The nanocrystallization of Co67Fe4Cr7Si8B14 amorphous ribbons which prepared by planar flow melt spinning process (PFMS was investigated. Crystallization of the ribbons was studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA, X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The DTA result of amorphous ribbon at heating rate of 10˚C/min showedoccurrence of phase transitions in two stages. The ribbons were isothermally annealed for 30 minutes in argon atmosphere at different temperatures between 300 and 650ºC with 25ºC steps. The magnetic properties of annealed samples were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The VSM results revealed that optimum soft magnetic properties occurred at 400ºC. XRD patterns showed that the samples isothermally annealed up to 450ºC were amorphous, while TEM results at 400ºC indicated 7-8 nm mean size nanocrytallites in amorphous matrix and size of the nanocrystallites increased by increasing temperature. Also by X-ray diffraction pattern, precipitation of different phases at higher temperatures confirmed.

  7. Atomic mobility in the overheated amorphous GeTe compound for phase change memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosso, G.C. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via R. Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Thomas Young Centre and Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); London Centre for Nanotechnology, 17-19 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Behler, J. [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstrasse 150, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Bernasconi, M. [Dipartimento di Scienza dei Materiali, Universita di Milano-Bicocca, Via R. Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Abstractauthoren Phase change memories rest on the ability of some chalcogenide alloys to undergo a fast and reversible transition between the crystalline and amorphous phases upon Joule heating. The fast crystallization is due to a high nucleation rate and a large crystal growth velocity which are actually possible thanks to the fragility of the supercooled liquid that allows for the persistence of a high atomic mobility at high supercooling where the thermodynamical driving force for crystallization is also high. Since crystallization in the devices occurs by rapidly heating the amorphous phase, hysteretic effects might arise with a different diffusion coefficient and viscosity on heating than on cooling. In this work, we have quantified these hysteretic effects in the phase change compound GeTe by means of molecular dynamics simulations. The atomic mobility in the overheated amorphous phase is lower than in supercooled liquid at the same temperature and the viscosity is consequently higher. Still, the simulations of the overheated amorphous phase reveal a breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation between the diffusion coefficient and the viscosity, similarly to what we found previously in the supercooled liquid. Evidences are provided that the breakdown is due to the emergence of dynamical heterogeneities at high supercooling. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Origin of the second peak in the mechanical loss function of amorphous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billman, Chris R.; Trinastic, Jonathan P.; Davis, Dustin J.; Hamdan, Rashid; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2017-01-01

    The thermal noise in amorphous oxides is the limiting factor for gravitational wave detectors and other high-precision optical devices. Through the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the thermal noise is directly connected to the internal friction (Q-1). Computational calculations of Q-1 that use a two-level system (TLS) model have previously been performed for several coating materials, facilitating the search for coatings with lower thermal noise. However, they are based on a historical approximation made within the TLS model that treats the TLS distribution as uncorrelated, which has limited the predictive power of the model. In this paper, we demonstrate that this approximation limits the physical description of amorphous oxides using the TLS model and a fully correlated distribution must be used to calculate high-temperature behavior. Not only does using a correlated distribution improve the theoretical standing of the TLS model, calculations of Q-1 using a fully correlated distribution reproduce and uncover the physical mechanisms of a second peak observed in measurements of ion-beam sputtered amorphous silica. We also explore the details of the thermal activation of TLSs and analyze the atomic transitions that contribute to Q-1 in amorphous silica.

  9. Surface and basal sea ice melt from autonomous buoy arrays during the 2014 sea ice retreat in the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksym, T. L.; Wilkinson, J.; Hwang, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    As the Arctic continues its transition to a seasonal ice cover, the nature and role of the processes driving sea ice retreat are expected to change. Key questions revolve around how the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamic processes and potential changes in the role of melt ponds contribute to an accelerated seasonal ice retreat. To address these issues, 44 autonomous platforms were deployed in four arrays in the Beaufort Sea in March, 2014, with an additional array deployed in August in the Chukchi Sea to monitor the evolution of ice conditions during the seasonal sea ice retreat. Each "5-dice" array included four or five co-sited ice mass balance buoys (IMB) and wave buoys with digital cameras, and one automatic weather station (AWS) at the array center. The sensors on these buoys, combined with satellite imagery monitoring the large-scale evolution of the ice cover, provide a near-complete history of the processes involved in the seasonal melt of sea ice. We present a preliminary analysis of the contributions of several key processes to the seasonal ice decay. The evolution of surface ponding was observed at several sites with differing ice types and surface morphologies. The records of surface melt and ice thickness demonstrate a key role of ice type in driving the evolution of the ice cover. Analysis of the surface forcing and estimates of solar energy partitioning between the surface and upper ocean is compared to the surface and basal mass balance from the IMBs. The role of ice divergence and deformation in driving sea ice decay - in particular its role in accelerating thermodynamic melt processes - is discussed.

  10. Conversion of nuclear waste to molten glass: Formation of porous amorphous alumina in a high-Al melter feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel; Washton, Nancy; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-01-01

    The transition of Al phases in a simulated high-Al high-level nuclear waste melter feed heated at 5 K min-1 to 700 °C was investigated with transmission electron microscopy, 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, and X-ray diffraction. At temperatures between 300 and 500 °C, porous amorphous alumina formed from the dehydration of gibbsite, resulting in increased specific surface area of the feed (∼8 m2 g-1). The high-surface-area amorphous alumina formed in this manner could potentially stop salt migration in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification.

  11. Conversion of nuclear waste to molten glass: Formation of porous amorphous alumina in a high-Al melter feed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Kai; Hrma, Pavel R.; Washton, Nancy M.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Kruger, Albert A.

    2017-01-01

    The transition of Al phases in a simulated high-Al high-level nuclear waste melter feed heated at 5 K min-1 to 700°C was investigated with transmission electron microscopy, 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, and X-ray diffraction. At temperatures between 300 and 500°C, porous amorphous alumina formed from the dehydration of gibbsite, resulting in increased specific surface area of the feed (~8 m2 g-1). The high-surface-area amorphous alumina formed in this manner could potentially stop salt migration in the cold cap during nuclear waste vitrification.

  12. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  13. Ice Engineering Research Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Refrigerated Physical Modeling of Waterways in a Controlled EnvironmentThe Research Area in the Ice Engineering Facility at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering...

  14. Ice Cream Stick Math.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Cynthia

    1992-01-01

    Described is a teaching technique which uses the collection of ice cream sticks as a means of increasing awareness of quantity in a self-contained elementary special class for students with learning disabilities and mild mental retardation. (DB)

  15. Web life: Ice Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Computer and video gamers of a certain vintage will have fond memories of Lemmings, a game in which players must shepherd pixelated, suicidal rodents around a series of obstacles to reach safety. At first glance, Ice Flows is strikingly similar.

  16. Processes and imagery of first-year fast sea ice during the melt season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, B.; Digby, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    In June and July 1982, a field program was conducted in the Canadian Arctic on Prince Patrick Island to study sea ice during the melt season with in situ measurements and microwave instrumentation operated near the surface and from aircraft. The objective of the program was to measure physical characteristics together with microwave backscatter and emission coefficients of sea ice during this major period of transition. The present paper is concerned with a study of both surface measurements and imagery of first-year fast ice during the melt season. The melting process observed in first-year fast ice was found to begin with the gradual reduction of the snow cover. For a two- to three-day period in this melt stage, a layer of superimposed ice nodules formed at the snow/ice interface as meltwater froze around ice and snow grains.

  17. Boundary condition of grounding lines prior to collapse, Larsen-B Ice Shelf, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebesco, M; Domack, E; Zgur, F; Lavoie, C; Leventer, A; Brachfeld, S; Willmott, V; Halverson, G; Truffer, M; Scambos, T; Smith, J; Pettit, E

    2014-09-12

    Grounding zones, where ice sheets transition between resting on bedrock to full floatation, help regulate ice flow. Exposure of the sea floor by the 2002 Larsen-B Ice Shelf collapse allowed detailed morphologic mapping and sampling of the embayment sea floor. Marine geophysical data collected in 2006 reveal a large, arcuate, complex grounding zone sediment system at the front of Crane Fjord. Radiocarbon-constrained chronologies from marine sediment cores indicate loss of ice contact with the bed at this site about 12,000 years ago. Previous studies and morphologic mapping of the fjord suggest that the Crane Glacier grounding zone was well within the fjord before 2002 and did not retreat further until after the ice shelf collapse. This implies that the 2002 Larsen-B Ice Shelf collapse likely was a response to surface warming rather than to grounding zone instability, strengthening the idea that surface processes controlled the disintegration of the Larsen Ice Shelf.

  18. Amplified melt and flow of the Greenland ice sheet driven by late-summer cyclonic rainfall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, Samuel H.; Hubbard, Alun; van de Wal, Roderik S.W.

    2015-01-01

    Intense rainfall events significantly affect Alpine and Alaskan glaciers through enhanced melting, ice-flow acceleration and subglacial sediment erosion, yet their impact on the Greenland ice sheet has not been assessed. Here we present measurements of ice velocity, subglacial water pressure...... and meteorological variables from the western margin of the Greenland ice sheet during a week of warm, wet cyclonic weather in late August and early September 2011. We find that extreme surface runoff from melt and rainfall led to a widespread acceleration in ice flow that extended 140 km into the ice-sheet interior....... We suggest that the late-season timing was critical in promoting rapid runoff across an extensive bare ice surface that overwhelmed a subglacial hydrological system in transition to a less-efficient winter mode. Reanalysis data reveal that similar cyclonic weather conditions prevailed across southern...

  19. FIBER AND INTEGRATED OPTICS, LASER APPLICATIONS, AND OTHER PROBLEMS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Raman scattering spectra recorded in the course of the water-ice phase transition and laser diagnostics of heterophase water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkov, S. M.; Panchishin, I. M.; Fadeev, V. V.

    1989-04-01

    The method of laser Raman spectroscopy was used to study heterophase water systems. The apparatus included an argon laser, an optical multichannel analyzer, and a microcomputer. The temperature dependences of the profiles of the valence (stretching) band in the Raman spectrum of liquid water between + 50 °C and - 7 °C and of polycrystalline ice Ih (from 0 to - 62 °C) were determined, as well as the spectral polarization characteristics of the Raman valence band. A method was developed for the determination of the partial concentrations of the H2O molecules in liquid and solid phases present as a mixture. An analysis was made of the errors of the method and the sources of these errors. Applications of the method to multiparameter problems in more complex water systems (for example, solutions of potassium iodide in water) were considered. Other potential practical applications of the method were discussed.

  20. Innovative Control Effectors (ICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    including weight, maneuver performance, signa- ture, hydraulic requirements, demands on the flight control system (FCS) design, and car - rier (CV...applicable to the car - rier-based configurations. Figure 7-36 summarizes an assessment of the ICE series 101 configuration control allocation evaluation. ICE...plain leading edge flaps, all moving horizontal tails, rudder, two airbrakes under fuselage F-15C inner trailing edge plain flap, outer aileron, all

  1. Multi-temporal satellite analysis of Wilkins Ice Shelf, Antarctic Peninsula, and consequences for its stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankl, Melanie; Fürst, Johannes; Helm, Veit; Humbert, Angelika; Braun, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Antarctic Peninsula (AP) ice shelves have been affected by ice front retreat and surface lowering over the past decades. 12 major ice shelves have disintegrated or significantly retreated and have been affected by volume loss. Longterm ice shelf thinning is twice as high at western AP ice shelves than at eastern AP ice shelves. Wilkins Ice Shelf (WIS), located at the western AP, has undergone considerable ice front retreat since the 1990s. It lost ~ 5000 km² of its size since then. Surface lowering at WIS was found to be the largest at AP ice shelves between 1978 and 2008. Here, we analyze time-series of satellite data in order to assess dynamic changes of WIS following the ice front retreat between 1994 and 2010. We present multi-temporal changes in surface velocities and deduced products, such as strain rate and stress regimes. Surface flow was derived from SAR intensity offset tracking applied to ALOS PALSAR image pairs. In addition, we show variations in ice thickness between 2003 and 2012 derived from TanDEM-X satellite acquisitions and altimetry datasets (CryoSAT-2, ICESat). The bistatic TanDEM-X acquisitions are very suitable for interferometric processing due to highly coherent image pairs. The results showed surface velocity speed up during break-up of an ice bridge between two confining islands in 2006-2008, when an area of ~ 1800 km² broke off. A sharp transition between compressive and extensive in-flow strain rates evolved at the narrowest part of the ice bridge, which contributed to the formation of a crack and hence, failure of the ice bridge in April 2009. First principal stresses were estimated to amount to ~ 250 kPa in the vicinity of the crack formation. The imaging TanDEM-X radar geometry allowed for a comprehensive ice thickness mapping of the ice shelf in 2012 and resolved many details due to the high spatial resolution. The ice thickness at WIS was found to be very heterogeneous. Thickness changes between 2003 and 2012 revealed increased

  2. 14 CFR 135.345 - Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade ground training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Training § 135.345 Pilots: Initial, transition, and upgrade ground training... airplanes during ground icing conditions, (i.e., any time conditions are such that frost, ice, or snow may... responsibilities; (C) Communications; (D) Airplane surface contamination (i.e., adherence of frost, ice, or...

  3. Ice slurry accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, K.G.; Kauffeld, M.

    1998-06-01

    More and more refrigeration systems are designed with secondary loops, thus reducing the refrigerant charge of the primary refrigeration plant. In order not to increase energy consumption by introducing a secondary refrigerant, alternatives to the well established single phase coolants (brines) and different concepts of the cooling plant have to be evaluated. Combining the use of ice-slurry - mixture of water, a freezing point depressing agent (antifreeze) and ice particles - as melting secondary refrigerant and the use of a cool storage makes it possible to build plants with secondary loops without increasing the energy consumption and investment. At the same time the operating costs can be kept at a lower level. The accumulation of ice-slurry is compared with other and more traditional storage systems. The method is evaluated and the potential in different applications is estimated. Aspects of practically use of ice-slurry has been examined in the laboratory at the Danish Technological Institute (DTI). This paper will include the final conclusions from this work concerning tank construction, agitator system, inlet, outlet and control. The work at DTI indicates that in some applications systems with ice-slurry and accumulation tanks have a great future. These applications are described by a varying load profile and a process temperature suiting the temperature of ice-slurry (-3 - -8/deg. C). (au)

  4. Ice recrystallization inhibition in ice cream by propylene glycol monostearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleong, J M; Frochot, S; Goff, H D

    2008-11-01

    The effectiveness of propylene glycol monostearate (PGMS) to inhibit ice recrystallization was evaluated in ice cream and frozen sucrose solutions. PGMS (0.3%) dramatically reduced ice crystal sizes in ice cream and in sucrose solutions frozen in a scraped-surface freezer before and after heat shock, but had no effect in quiescently frozen solutions. PGMS showed limited emulsifier properties by promoting smaller fat globule size distributions and enhanced partial coalescence in the mix and ice cream, respectively, but at a much lower level compared to conventional ice cream emulsifier. Low temperature scanning electron microscopy revealed highly irregular crystal morphology in both ice cream and sucrose solutions frozen in a scraped-surface freezer. There was strong evidence to suggest that PGMS directly interacts with ice crystals and interferes with normal surface propagation. Shear during freezing may be required for its distribution around the ice and sufficient surface coverage.

  5. Providing Real-time Sea Ice Modeling Support to the U.S. Coast Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Richard; Dykes, James; Hebert, David; Posey, Pamela; Rogers, Erick; Wallcraft, Alan; Phelps, Michael; Smedstad, Ole Martin; Wang, Shouping; Geiszler, Dan

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) supported the U.S. Coast Guard Research Development Center (RDC) through a demonstration project during the summer and autumn of 2015. Specifically, a modeling system composed of a mesoscale atmospheric model, regional sea ice model, and regional wave model were loosely coupled to provide real-time 72-hr forecasts of environmental conditions for the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas. The system components included a 2-km regional Community Ice CodE (CICE) sea ice model, 15-km Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric model, and a 5-km regional WAVEWATCH III wave model. The wave model utilized modeled sea ice concentration fields to incorporate the effects of sea ice on waves. The other modeling components assimilated atmosphere, ocean, and ice observations available from satellite and in situ sources. The modeling system generated daily 72-hr forecasts of synoptic weather (including visibility), ice drift, ice thickness, ice concentration and ice strength for missions within the economic exclusion zone off the coast of Alaska and a transit to the North Pole in support of the National Science Foundation GEOTRACES cruise. Model forecasts graphics were shared on a common web page with selected graphical products made available via ftp for bandwidth limited users. Model ice thickness and ice drift show very good agreement compared with Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Ice Mass Balance buoys. This demonstration served as a precursor to a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave-ice modeling system under development. National Ice Center (NIC) analysts used these model data products (CICE and COAMPS) along with other existing model and satellite data to produce the predicted 48-hr position of the ice edge. The NIC served as a liaison with the RDC and NRL to provide feedback on the model predictions. This evaluation provides a baseline analysis of the current models for future comparison studies

  6. Using an Earth System Model to Better Understand Ice Sheet Variability Through the Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, C. R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Pollard, D.

    2015-12-01

    We use an Earth System model with a dynamic land-ice component to explore several inconsistencies between traditional Milankovitch theory and δ18O sediment records of the Pleistocene. Our model results show that a combination of albedo feedbacks, seasonal offset of precession forcing, and orbital cycle duration differences can explain much of the 41-kyr glacial cycles that characterize the early Pleistocene. The obliquity-controlled changes in annual average high-latitude insolation produce large variations in arctic vegetation-type and sea-ice cover, which amplify the land-ice response. In contrast, the seasonal nature of the precession insolation signal dampens net ice-melt. For instance, when precession enhances ice melt in the spring, it reduces ice melt in the fall, and vice versa. The lower frequency of obliquity cycles in combination with amplified climate sensitivity due to albedo feedbacks help produce a larger ice-volume response to cycles of obliquity compared to precession, despite precession contributing more to variations in high-latitude summer insolation. In addition, we can simulate the appearance of a 100-kyr ice-volume signal by reducing basal sliding in the ice sheet model. Model experiments with enhanced basal drag have greater ice sheet elevation because the ice sheets are not able to flow as quickly, leading to increased ice thickness at the expense of ice extent. These thicker ice sheets have colder surface temperatures, receive more snowfall, and do not readily advance past the ice equilibrium line. Greater high-latitude summer insolation from the combination of high obliquity and precession/eccentricity is then necessary to cause complete ice sheet retreat. This research lends support to the regolith hypothesis, which proposes gradual erosion of high-latitude northern hemisphere regolith by multiple cycles of glaciation helped cause the mid-Pleistocene transition.

  7. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Nitrile Ices Relevant to Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carrie; Ferrante, Robert F.; Moore, W. James; Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla H.

    2011-01-01

    Spectra and optical constants of nitrile ices known or suspected to be in Titan?s atmosphere have been determined from 2.0 to 333.3 microns (approx.5000 to 30/cm). These results are relevant to the ongoing modeling of Cassini CIRS observations of Titan?s winter pole. Ices studied were: HCN, hydrogen cyanide; C2N2, cyanogen; CH3CN, acetonitrile; C2H5CN, propionitrile; and HC3N, cyanoacetylene. Optical constants were calculated, using Kramers-Kronig analysis, for each nitrile ice?s spectrum measured at a variety of temperatures, in both the amorphous- and crystalline phases. Spectra were also measured for many of the nitriles after quenching at the annealing temperature and compared with those of annealed ices. For each of these molecules we also measured the real component, n, of the refractive index for amorphous and crystalline phases at 670 nm. Several examples of the information contained in these new data sets and their usefulness in modeling Titan?s observed features will be presented (e.g., the broad emission feature at 160/cm; Anderson and Samuelson, 2011).

  8. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a Changing Arctic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ice age, and iv) onset dates of melt and freezeup . 4. Assess the magnitude of the contribution from ice-albedo feedback to the observed decrease of...the impact on albedo evolution of ice concentration and melt and freezeup onset dates. This effort will expand on previous work by i) examining...radiation, ice concentration, ice type, and melt and freezeup onset dates on a 25 x 25 km equal area scalable grid. We have daily values of these parameters

  9. From Interstellar PAHs and Ices to the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Twenty years ago the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed at, the concept of ices in dense molecular clouds ignored, and the notion of large, abundant, gas phase, carbon rich molecules widespread throughout the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today the composition of dust in the diffuse ISM is reasonably well constrained to micron-sized cold refractory materials comprised of amorphous and crystalline silicates mixed with an amorphous carbonaceous material containing aromatic structural units and short, branched aliphatic chains. In dense molecular clouds, the birthplace of stars and planets, these cold dust particles are coated with mixed molecular ices whose composition is very well constrained. Lastly, the signature of carbon-rich polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by earlier interstellar chemistry standards, is widespread throughout the Universe. The first part of this lecture will describe how infrared studies of interstellar space, combined with laboratory simulations, have revealed the composition of interstellar ices (the building blocks of comets) and the high abundance and nature of interstellar PAHs. The laboratory database has now enabled us to gain insight into the identities, concentrations, and physical state of many interstellar materials. Within a dense molecular cloud, and especially in the solar nebula during the star and planet formation stage, the materials frozen into interstellar/precometary ices are photoprocessed by ultraviolet light, producing more complex molecules. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the photochemical evolution of these materials and the possible role of these compounds on the early Earth. As these materials are thought to be the building

  10. Metastable Nitric Acid Trihydrate in Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Fabian; Kubel, Frank; Gálvez, Oscar; Hölzel, Markus; Parker, Stewart F.; Baloh, Philipp; Iannarelli, Riccardo; Rossi, Michel J.; Grothe, Hinrich

    2016-04-01

    The composition of high altitude ice clouds is still a matter of intense discussion. The constituents in question are ice and nitric acid hydrates. The identification and formation mechanisms, however, are still unknown but are essential to understand atmospheric processing such as the seasonal ozone depletion in the lower polar stratosphere or the radiation balance of planet Earth. We found conclusive evidence for a long-predicted phase, which has been named alpha nitric acid trihydrate (alpha-NAT). This phase has been proven by combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction experiments allowing a convincing structure solution. Additionally, vibrational spectra (infrared and inelastic neutron scattering) were recorded and compared with theoretical calculations. A strong affinity between water ice and alpha-NAT has been found, which explains the experimental spectra and the phase transition kinetics essential for identification in the atmosphere. On the basis of our results, we propose a new three-step mechanism for NAT-formation in high altitude ice clouds. F. Weiss et al. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2016, accepted, DOI:10.1002/anie.201510841

  11. East Antarctic ice sheet stability recorded in a high-elevation ice-cored moraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Nicole A.; Licht, Kathy J.; Kaplan, Michael R.; Kassab, Christine; Winckler, Gisela

    2017-03-01

    Till in an extensive blue ice moraine in the central Transantarctic Mountains at Mt. Achernar shows relatively continuous deposition by East Antarctic derived ice throughout the last glacial cycle. The most recently exposed material along the active margin of the Law Glacier (Zone 1) has hummocky topography that transitions into to a relatively flat region (Zone 2), followed by a series of ∼2 m high continuous, parallel/sub-parallel ridges and troughs (Zones 3-5). The entire moraine is ice-cored. Past surface changes of data, the U-Pb zircon data from till across all zones show little variability and are consistent with a Beacon Supergroup source, as samples show significant populations from the Proterozoic, ∼550-600 Ma and ∼950-1270 Ma, as well as the late Archean ∼2700-2770 Ma. The Mackellar, Fairchild, and lower Buckley Formations are interpreted as dominant sources of the detrital zircons. The zircon data lack the spatio-temporal variability indicated by the pebble fraction because the local Ferrar dolerite is not zircon bearing, highlighting the broader importance of using multiple techniques when interpreting provenance changes over time. Rather than reflecting major changes in ice flow path over time, the provenance changes are interpreted to indicate relative stability of the East Antarctic ice sheet, as the Law Glacier tapped into and eroded successively lower stratigraphic units of the Beacon Supergroup. This has important implications for interpreting offshore provenance records.

  12. Arctic Summer Ice Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to estimate the flux of heat and freshwater resulting from sea ice melt in the polar seas. The approach taken is to examine the decay of sea ice in the summer months primarily through the use of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The improved understanding of the dynamics of the melt process can be usefully combined with ice thermodynamic and upper ocean models to form more complete models of ice melt. Models indicate that more heat is absorbed in the upper ocean when the ice cover is composed of smaller rather than larger floes and when there is more open water. Over the course of the summer, floes disintegrate by physical forcing and heating, melting into smaller and smaller sizes. By measuring the change in distribution of floes together with open water over a summer period, we can make estimates of the amount of heating by region and time. In a climatic sense, these studies are intended to improve the understanding of the Arctic heat budget which can then be eventually incorporated into improved global climate models. This work has two focus areas. The first is examining the detailed effect of storms on floe size and open water. A strong Arctic low pressure storm has been shown to loosen up the pack ice, increase the open water concentration well into the pack ice, and change the distribution of floes toward fewer and smaller floes. This suggests episodic melting and the increased importance of horizontal (lateral) melt during storms. The second focus area is related to an extensive ship-based experiment that recently took place in the Arctic called Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA). An icebreaker was placed purposely into the older pack ice north of Alaska in September 1997. The ship served as the base for experimenters who deployed extensive instrumentation to measure the atmosphere, ocean, and ice during a one-year period. My experiment will be to derive similar measurements (floe size, open

  13. Seasonal cycle of solar energy fluxes through Arctic sea ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arndt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arctic sea ice has not only decreased considerably during the last decades, but also changed its physical properties towards a thinner and more seasonal cover. These changes strongly impact the energy budget and might affect the ice-associated ecosystem of the Arctic. But until now, it is not possible to quantify shortwave energy fluxes through sea ice sufficiently well over large regions and during different seasons. Here, we present a new parameterization of light transmittance through sea ice for all seasons as a function of variable sea ice properties. The annual maximum solar heat flux of 30 × 105 J m−2 occurs in June, then also matching the under ice ocean heat flux. Furthermore, our results suggest that 96% of the total annual solar heat input occurs from May to August, during four months only. Applying the new parameterization on remote sensing and reanalysis data from 1979 to 2011, we find an increase in light transmission of 1.5% a−1 for all regions. Sensitivity studies reveal that the results strongly depend on the timing of melt onset and the correct classification of ice types. Hence, these parameters are of great importance for quantifying under-ice radiation fluxes and the uncertainty of this parameterization. Assuming a two weeks earlier melt onset, the annual budget increases by 20%. Continuing the observed transition from Arctic multi- to first year sea ice could increase light transmittance by another 18%. Furthermore, the increase in light transmission directly contributes to an increase in internal and bottom melt of sea ice, resulting in a positive transmittance-melt feedback process.

  14. Preparation and Cycling Performance of Iron or Iron Oxide Containing Amorphous Al-Li Alloys as Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Thoss

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline phase transitions cause volume changes, which entails a fast destroying of the electrode. Non-crystalline states may avoid this circumstance. Herein we present structural and electrochemical investigations of pre-lithiated, amorphous Al39Li43Fe13Si5-powders, to be used as electrode material for Li-ion batteries. Powders of master alloys with the compositions Al39Li43Fe13Si5 and Al39Li43Fe13Si5 + 5 mass-% FeO were prepared via ball milling and achieved amorphous/nanocrystalline states after 56 and 21.6 h, respectively. In contrast to their Li-free amorphous pendant Al78Fe13Si9, both powders showed specific capacities of about 400 and 700 Ah/kgAl, respectively, after the third cycle.

  15. Role of Amorphous Manganese Oxide in Nitrogen Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LILIANG-MO; WUQI-TU

    1991-01-01

    Studies have been made,by 15N-tracer technique on nitrogen loss resulting from adding amorphous manganese oxide to NH4+-N medium under anaerobic conditions.The fact that the total nitrogen recovery was decreased and that 15NO2,15N2O,15N14NO,15NO,15N2 and 15N14N were emitted has proved that,like amorphous iron oxide,amorphous manganese oxide can also act as an electron acceptor in the oxidation of NH4+-N under anaerobic conditions and give rise to nitrogen loss.This once again illustrates another mechanism by which the loss of ammonium nitrogen in paddy soils is brought about by amorphous iron and manganese oxides.The quantity of nitrogen loss by amorphous manganese oxide increased with an increase in the amount of amorphous manganese oxide added and lessened with time of its aging.The nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss by cooperation of amorphous manganese oxide and microorganisms (soil suspension) was larger than that by amorphous manganese oxide alone.In the system,nitrogen loss was associated with the specific surface ares and oxidation-reduction of amorphous manganese oxide.However,their quantitative relationship and the exact reaction processes of nitrogen loss induced by amorphous manganese oxide remain to be further studied.

  16. The structure and dynamics of carbon dioxide and water containing ices investigated via THz and mid-IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allodi, Marco A; Ioppolo, Sergio; Kelley, Matthew J; McGuire, Brett A; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2014-02-28

    Icy dust grains play a key role in the chemistry of the interstellar medium. The cumulative outcome of recent observations, laboratory studies, and astrochemical models indicates that solid-phase reaction mechanisms may dominate the formation of complex organic molecules such as amino acids and sugars in space. Consequently, the composition and structure of the icy grain mantle may significantly influence solid-phase reaction pathways. In this work, we present a new experimental setup capable of studying astrochemical ice analogs in both the TeraHertz (THz), or far-Infrared (far-IR), region (0.3-7.5 THz; 10-250 cm(-1)) and the mid-IR (400-4000 cm(-1)). The instruments are capable of performing a variety of spectroscopic studies that can provide especially relevant laboratory data to support astronomical observations from telescopes such as Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. Experimental spectra of astrochemical ice analogs of water and carbon dioxide in pure, mixed, and layered ices were collected at different temperatures under high vacuum conditions with the goal of investigating the structure of the ice. We tentatively observe a new feature in both amorphous solid water and crystalline water at 33 cm(-1) (1 THz). In addition, our studies of mixed and layered ices show how it is possible to identify the location of carbon dioxide as it segregates within the ice by observing its effect on the THz spectrum of water ice. The THz spectra of mixed and layered ices are further analyzed by fitting their spectral features to those of pure amorphous solid water and crystalline water ice to quantify the effects of temperature changes on structure. From the results of this work, it appears that THz spectroscopy is potentially well suited to study thermal transformations within the ice.

  17. Ionic conductivity measurements of H2O ice at high pressure and temperature and superionic ice in the mantle of ice giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimura, E.; Komabayashi, T.; Ohta, K.; Hirose, K.; Sata, N.; Ohishi, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Dubrovinsky, L. S.

    2011-12-01

    The experimental evidence for the superionic conduction in H2O ice at high pressure (P) and temperature (T) has been long-searched since its theoretical prediction. Melting experiments reported a steep rise of the melting curve at P-T range of 35-43 GP and 1000-1600 K, which could be due to a first-order phase transition in the solid phases, namely the presence of the triple point of water, ice VII, and a high-T phase which was assumed superionic. Nonetheless, there has still been no report on direct experimental evidence for superionic conduction (ca. 0.1 S/cm) in ice at high pressure. Here we examined ionic conductivity and isothermal molar volume of ice at high-P-T based on impedance spectroscopy (IS) and x-ray diffraction measurements in an externally-resistive heated diamond anvil cell. In situ IS measurements up to 62 GPa and 920 K demonstrated that ice exhibits superionic conduction (> 0.1 S/cm) above 580-720 K at 20-60 GPa. This suggests that superionic conduction occurs at sufficiently lower P-T than the triple point. Isothermal P-V data collected at P = 33-101 GPa and T = 873 K revealed that an anomalous volume reduction occurs at P = 50-53 GPa. This compression manner corresponds to the previously reported highly compressible regime at P = 40-60 GPa, T = 300 K, which were attributed to hydrogen bond symmetrization. There is no volume discontinuity in the isothermal compression, which contradicts the proposed first order P-T boundary between ice VII and superionic ice. Furthermore, all the conductivity data is expressed by a single Arrhenius equation so that the superionic conduction occurs regardless of the ongoing hydrogen bond symmetrization upon compression. We suggests that the previously reported steep rise of the melting temperature of ice above 35-43 GPa is independent of superionic transition, and is a consequence of the hydrogen bond symmetrization. Combining above results with the existing planetary isentropes, superionic conduction in H2O ice

  18. Fetus Amorphous Acardious – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Kamakeri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fetus amorphous acardious is a rare fetal malformation lacking a functional heart and bearing no resemblance to human embryos. The main differential diagnosis is with placental teratoma and is based on the degree of skeletal organization and umbilical cord formation. A 26 year old woman delivered a healthy newborn at 38 weeks of gestation by caesarian section. An amorphous mass covered with healthy looking skin was connected to the placenta with a short pedicle. Xray examination of the mass revealed the presence of vertebral column associated with ribs and pelvic bones and axial skeleton. Histopathological examination demonstrates the presence of cartilage, bone, adipose tissue, skin with adnexal structures and neural tissue.

  19. Microbial abundance in surface ice on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eStibal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Measuring microbial abundance in glacier ice and identifying its controls is essential for a better understanding and quantification of biogeochemical processes in glacial ecosystems. However, cell enumeration of glacier ice samples is challenging due to typically low cell numbers and the presence of interfering mineral particles. We quantified for the first time the abundance of microbial cells in surface ice from geographically distinct sites on the Greenland Ice Sheet, using three enumeration methods: epifluorescence microscopy (EFM, flow cytometry (FCM and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. In addition, we reviewed published data on microbial abundance in glacier ice and tested the three methods on artificial ice samples of realistic cell (10^2 – 10^7 cells ml-1 and mineral particle (0.1 – 100 mg/ml concentrations, simulating a range of glacial ice types, from clean subsurface ice to surface ice to sediment-laden basal ice. We then used multivariate statistical analysis to identify factors responsible for the variation in microbial abundance on the ice sheet. EFM gave the most accurate and reproducible results of the tested methodologies, and was therefore selected as the most suitable technique for cell enumeration of ice containing dust. Cell numbers in surface ice samples, determined by EFM, ranged from ca 2 x 10^3 to ca 2 x 10^6 cells/ml while dust concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 2 mg/ml. The lowest abundances were found in ice sampled from the accumulation area of the ice sheet and in samples affected by fresh snow; these samples may be considered as a reference point of the cell abundance of precipitants that are deposited on the ice sheet surface. Dust content was the most significant variable to explain the variation in the abundance data, which suggests a direct association between deposited dust particles and cells and/or by their provision of limited nutrients to microbial communities on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  20. Detailed stability investigation of amorphous solid dispersions prepared by single-needle and high speed electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démuth, B; Farkas, A; Pataki, H; Balogh, A; Szabó, B; Borbás, E; Sóti, P L; Vigh, T; Kiserdei, É; Farkas, B; Mensch, J; Verreck, G; Van Assche, I; Marosi, G; Nagy, Z K

    2016-02-10

    In this research the long-term stability (one year) of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) prepared by high speed electrospinning was investigated at 25 °C/60% relative humidity (RH) (closed conditions) and 40 °C/75% RH (open conditions). Single needle electrospinning and film casting were applied as reference technologies. Itraconazole (ITR) was used as the model API in 40% concentration and the ASDs consisted of either one of the following polymers as a comparison: polyvinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate 6:4 copolymer (no hydrogen bonds between API and polymer) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (possible hydrogen bonds between oxo or tertiary nitrogen function of API and hydroxyl moiety of polymer). DSC, XRPD and dissolution characteristics of samples at 0, 3 and 12 months were investigated. In addition, Raman maps of certain electrospun ASDs were assessed to investigate crystallinity. A new chemometric method, based on Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares algorithm, was developed to calculate the spectrum of amorphous ITR in the matrices and to determine the crystalline/amorphous ratio of aged samples. As it was expected ITR in single needle electrospun SDs was totally amorphous at the beginning, in addition hydroxypropyl methylcellulose could keep ITR in this form at 40 °C/75% RH up to one year due to the hydrogen bonds and high glass transition temperature of the SD. In polyvinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate matrix ITR remained amorphous at 25 °C/60% RH throughout one year. Materials prepared by scaled-up, high throughput version of electrospinning, which is compatible with pharmaceutical industry, also gained the same quality. Therefore these ASDs are industrially applicable and with an appropriate downstream process it would be possible to bring them to the market.

  1. Transition in the fractal geometry of Arctic melt ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the Arctic melt season, the sea ice surface undergoes a remarkable transformation from vast expanses of snow covered ice to complex mosaics of ice and melt ponds. Sea ice albedo, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by the complex evolution of melt pond configurations. In fact, ice–albedo feedback has played a major role in the recent declines of the summer Arctic sea ice pack. However, understanding melt pond evolution remains a significant challenge to improving climate projections. By analyzing area–perimeter data from hundreds of thousands of melt ponds, we find here an unexpected separation of scales, where pond fractal dimension D transitions from 1 to 2 around a critical length scale of 100 m2 in area. Pond complexity increases rapidly through the transition as smaller ponds coalesce to form large connected regions, and reaches a maximum for ponds larger than 1000 m2, whose boundaries resemble space-filling curves, with D ≈ 2. These universal features of Arctic melt pond evolution are similar to phase transitions in statistical physics. The results impact sea ice albedo, the transmitted radiation fields under melting sea ice, the heat balance of sea ice and the upper ocean, and biological productivity such as under ice phytoplankton blooms.

  2. A phase-space model for Pleistocene ice volume

    CERN Document Server

    Imbrie, John Z; Lisiecki, Lorraine E

    2011-01-01

    We present a phase-space model that simulates Pleistocene ice volume changes based on Earth's orbital parameters. Terminations in the model are triggered by a combination of ice volume and orbital forcing and agree well with age estimates for Late Pleistocene terminations. The average phase at which model terminations begin is approximately 90 +/- 90 degrees before the maxima in all three orbital cycles. The large variability in phase is likely caused by interactions between the three cycles and ice volume. Unlike previous ice volume models, this model produces an orbitally driven increase in 100-kyr power during the mid-Pleistocene transition without any change in model parameters. This supports the hypothesis that Pleistocene variations in the 100-kyr power of glacial cycles could be caused, at least in part, by changes in Earth's orbital parameters, such as amplitude modulation of the 100-kyr eccentricity cycle, rather than changes within the climate system.

  3. Metastable states in amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor I

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting and technologically important class of materials, the amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors. Experimental results on the structural and electronic metastable states in Se-rich chalcogenides are presented. Special attention is paid to the states in the mobility gap and their sensitivity to various factors such as irradiation, annealing and composition. Photoinduced changes of structure and physical properties are also considered and structural transformation at photocrystallization is studied in detail. Finally, the authors discuss potential applications of th

  4. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  5. A study of the morphology of photochromic and thermochromic MoO 3 amorphous films using an atomic force microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovskii, F. A.; Schaefer, D. M.; Gavrilyuk, A. I.; Reifenberger, R.

    The surface morphology of amorphous MoO 3 films enhanced by a coating of N.N-dimethylformamide was studied with an atomic force microscope. Images of the as-grown films revealed a surface structure consisting of ˜25 nm diameter clusters which had coalesced to form irregular-shaped grains with dimensions ranging between 100 and 190 nm. Similar structure was found in the films after a photochromic or thermochromic transition had occured. The relative surface areas of the films have been calculated and little change is observed after the photochromic transition while a ˜29 increase in surface area is observed after the thermochromic transition has taken place.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of the mechanical loss in amorphous pure and doped silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Trinastic, Jonathan P.; Cheng, H. P., E-mail: cheng@qtp.ufl.edu [Department of Physics and Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Gravitational wave detectors and other precision measurement devices are limited by the thermal noise in the oxide coatings on the mirrors of such devices. We have investigated the mechanical loss in amorphous oxides by calculating the internal friction using classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. We have implemented the trajectory bisection method and the non-local ridge method in the DL-POLY molecular dynamics simulation software to carry out those calculations. These methods have been used to locate the local potential energy minima that a system visits during a molecular dynamics trajectory and the transition state between any two consecutive minima. Using the numerically calculated barrier height distributions, barrier asymmetry distributions, relaxation times, and deformation potentials, we have calculated the internal friction of pure amorphous silica and silica mixed with other oxides. The results for silica compare well with experiment. Finally, we use the numerical calculations to comment on the validity of previously used theoretical assumptions.

  7. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  8. Concurrent multiscale modeling of amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    An approach to multiscale modeling of amorphous materials is presented whereby atomistic scale domains coexist with continuum-like domains. The atomistic domains faithfully predict severe deformation while the continuum domains allow the computation to scale up the size of the model without incurring excessive computational costs associated with fully atomistic models and without the introduction of spurious forces across the boundary of atomistic and continuum-like domains. The material domain is firstly constructed as a tessellation of Amorphous Cells (AC). For regions of small deformation, the number of degrees of freedom is then reduced by computing the displacements of only the vertices of the ACs instead of the atoms within. This is achieved by determining, a priori, the atomistic displacements within such Pseudo Amorphous Cells associated with orthogonal deformation modes of the cell. Simulations of nanoscale polymer tribology using full molecular mechanics computation and our multiscale approach give almost identical prediction of indentation force and the strain contours of the polymer. We further demonstrate the capability of performing adaptive simulations during which domains that were discretized into cells revert to full atomistic domains when their strain attain a predetermined threshold. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support given to this study by the Agency of Science, Technology and Research (ASTAR), Singapore (SERC Grant No. 092 137 0013).

  9. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  10. Computer model of tetrahedral amorphous diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, B. R.; Thorpe, M. F.; Wooten, F.

    1995-08-01

    We computer generate a model of amorphous diamond using the Wooten-Weaire method, with fourfold coordination everywhere. We investigate two models: one where four-membered rings are allowed and the other where the four-membered rings are forbidden; each model consisting of 4096 atoms. Starting from the perfect diamond crystalline structure, we first randomize the structure by introducing disorder through random bond switches at a sufficiently high temperature. Subsequently, the temperature is reduced in stages, and the topological and geometrical relaxation of the structure takes place using the Keating potential. After a long annealing process, a random network of comparatively low energy is obtained. We calculate the pair distribution function, mean bond angle, rms angular deviation, rms bond length, rms bond-length deviation, and ring statistics for the final relaxed structures. We minimize the total strain energy by adjusting the density of the sample. We compare our results with similar computer-generated models for amorphous silicon, and with experimental measurement of the structure factor for (predominantly tetrahedral) amorphous carbon.

  11. Interactions of hydrogen with amorphous hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas'ev, Valeri V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the interaction of hydrogen with amorphous hafnia (a -HfO2 ) using a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Injection of atomic hydrogen, its diffusion towards electrodes, and ionization can be seen as key processes underlying charge instability of high-permittivity amorphous hafnia layers in many applications. Hydrogen in many wide band gap crystalline oxides exhibits negative-U behavior (+1 and -1 charged states are thermodynamically more stable than the neutral state) . Our results show that in a -HfO2 hydrogen is also negative-U, with charged states being the most thermodynamically stable at all Fermi level positions. However, metastable atomic hydrogen can share an electron with intrinsic electron trapping precursor sites [Phys. Rev. B 94, 020103 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.020103] forming a [etr -+O -H ] center, which is lower in energy on average by about 0.2 eV. These electron trapping sites can affect both the dynamics and thermodynamics of the interaction of hydrogen with a -HfO2 and the electrical behavior of amorphous hafnia films in CMOS devices.

  12. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Laitinen, Riikka

    2015-12-03

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a "spring and parachute" effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS.

  13. Amino acids as co-amorphous stabilizers for poorly water soluble drugs--Part 1: preparation, stability and dissolution enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Laitinen, Riikka; Strachan, Clare; Rades, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Poor aqueous solubility of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is one of the most pressing problems in pharmaceutical research and development because up to 90% of new API candidates under development are poorly water soluble. These drugs usually have a low and variable oral bioavailability, and therefore an unsatisfactory therapeutic effect. One of the most promising approaches to increase dissolution rate and solubility of these drugs is the conversion of a crystalline form of the drug into its respective amorphous form, usually by incorporation into hydrophilic polymers, forming glass solutions. However, this strategy only led to a small number of marketed products usually because of inadequate physical stability of the drug (crystallization). In this study, we investigated a fundamentally different approach to stabilize the amorphous form of drugs, namely the use of amino acids as small molecular weight excipients that form specific molecular interactions with the drug resulting in co-amorphous forms. The two poorly water soluble drugs carbamazepine and indomethacin were combined with amino acids from the binding sites of the biological receptors of these drugs. Mixtures of drug and the amino acids arginine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and tyrosine were prepared by vibrational ball milling. Solid-state characterization with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) revealed that the various blends could be prepared as homogeneous, single phase co-amorphous formulations indicated by the appearance of an amorphous halo in the XRPD diffractograms and a single glass transition temperature (Tg) in the DSC measurements. In addition, the Tgs of the co-amorphous mixtures were significantly increased over those of the individual drugs. The drugs remained chemically stable during the milling process and the co-amorphous formulations were generally physically stable over at least 6 months at 40 °C under dry conditions. The

  14. An aerosol chamber investigation of the heterogeneous ice nucleating potential of refractory nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. C. Plane

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of iron oxide (crystalline and amorphous, silicon oxide and magnesium oxide were investigated for their propensity to nucleate ice over the temperature range 180–250 K, using the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe, Germany.

    All samples were observed to initiate ice formation via the deposition mode at threshold ice super-saturations (RHi thresh ranging from 105% to 140% for temperatures below 220 K. Approximately 10% of amorphous Fe2O3 particles (modal diameter = 30 nm generated in situ from a photochemical aerosol reactor, led to ice nucleation at RHi thresh = 140% at an initial chamber temperature of 182 K. Quantitative analysis using a singular hypothesis treatment provided a fitted function [ns (190 K = 10(3.33×sice+8.16] for the variation in ice-active surface site density (ns: m−2 with ice saturation (sice for Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This was implemented in an aerosol-cloud model to determine a predicted deposition (mass accommodation coefficient for water vapour on ice of 0.1 at temperatures appropriate for the upper atmosphere. Classical nucleation theory was used to determine representative contact angles (θ for the different particle compositions. For the in situ generated Fe2O3 particles, a slight inverse temperature dependence was observed with θ = 10.5° at 182 K, decreasing to 9.0° at 200 K (compared with 10.2° and 11.4°, respectively for the SiO2 and MgO particle samples at the higher temperature.

    These observations indicate that such refractory nanoparticles are relatively efficient materials for the nucleation of ice under the conditions studied in the chamber which correspond to cirrus cloud formation in the upper troposphere. The results also show that Fe2O3 particles do not act as ice nuclei

  15. An aerosol chamber investigation of the heterogeneous ice nucleating potential of refractory nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Saunders

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles of iron oxide (crystalline and amorphous, silicon oxide and magnesium oxide were investigated for their propensity to nucleate ice over the temperature range 180–250 K, using the AIDA chamber in Karlsruhe, Germany.

    All samples were observed to initiate ice formation via the deposition mode at threshold ice super-saturations (RHithresh ranging from 105% to 140% for temperatures below 220 K. Approximately 10% of amorphous Fe2O3 particles (modal diameter = 30 nm generated in situ from a photochemical aerosol reactor, led to ice nucleation at RHithresh = 140% at an initial chamber temperature of 182 K. Quantitative analysis using a singular hypothesis treatment provided a fitted function [ns(190 K=10(3.33×sice+8.16] for the variation in ice-active surface site density (ns:m−2 with ice saturation (sice for Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This was implemented in an aerosol-cloud model to determine a predicted deposition (mass accommodation coefficient for water vapour on ice of 0.1 at temperatures appropriate for the upper atmosphere. Classical nucleation theory was used to determine representative contact angles (θ for the different particle compositions. For the in situ generated Fe2O3 particles, a slight inverse temperature dependence was observed with θ = 10.5° at 182 K, decreasing to 9.0° at 200 K (compared with 10.2° and 11.4° respectively for the SiO2 and MgO particle samples at the higher temperature.

    These observations indicate that such refractory nanoparticles are relatively efficient materials for the nucleation of ice under the conditions studied in the chamber which correspond to cirrus cloud formation in the upper troposphere. The results also show that Fe2O3 particles do not act as ice

  16. Data archaeology at ICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Harry D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the function of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), both past and present, in particular in the context of its interest in compiling oceanographic data sets. Details are provided of the procedures it adopted to ensure adequate internationally collaborative marine investigations during the first part of the century, such as how it provided a forum for action by its member states, how it coordinated and published the results of scientific programs, and how it provided a foundation, through scientists employed in the ICES Office, for the establishment of the original oceanographic marine databases and associated products, and the scientific interpretation of the results. The growth and expansion of this area of ICES activity is then traced, taking into account the changing conditions for oceanographic data management resulting from the establishment of the National Data Centres, as well as the World Data Centres for Oceanography, which were created to meet the needs of the International Geophysical Year (IGY). Finally, there is a discussion of the way in which the very existence of ICES has proved to be a valuable source of old data, some of which have not yet been digitized, but which can be readily retrieved because they have been very carefully documented throughout the years. Lessons from this activity are noted, and suggestions are made on how the past experiences of ICES can be utilized to ensure the availability of marine data to present and future generations of scientists.

  17. IDEOLOGICALLY CHALLENGING ENTERTAINMENT (ICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Lori Chalmers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ideologically Challenging Entertainment (ICE is entertainment that challenges ‘us vs. them’ ideologies associated with radicalization, violent conflict and terrorism. ICE presents multiple perspectives on a conflict through mainstream entertainment. This article introduces the theoretical underpinnings of ICE, the first ICE production and the audience responses to it. The first ICE production was Two Merchants: The Merchant of Venice adapted to challenge ideologies of the Arab-Israeli Conflict. A mixed-methods study of audience responses explored whether this production inspired audiences to shift their ideological views. Each performance included two versions of the adaptation: a Jewish dominated society with an Arab Muslim minority, contrasted with an Arab Muslim dominated society and a Jewish minority. A mixed-methods study of audience responses explored whether this production inspired audiences to shift their ideological views to become more tolerant of differences away from ideological radicalization. Of audience members who did not initially agree with the premise of the production, 40% reconsidered their ideological views, indicating increased tolerance, greater awareness of and desire to change their own prejudices. In addition, 86% of the audience expressed their intention to discuss the production with others, thereby encouraging critical engagement with, and broader dissemination of the message. These outcomes suggest that high quality entertainment – as defined by audience responses to it - can become a powerful tool in the struggle against radicalised ideologies.

  18. Why could ice ages be unpredictable?

    CERN Document Server

    Crucifix, Michel

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that the variations of Earth's orbit and obliquity control the timing of Pleistocene glacial-interglacial cycles. Evidence comes from power spectrum analysis of palaeoclimate records and from inspection of the timing of glacial and deglacial transitions. However, we do not know how tight this control is. Is it, for example, conceivable that random climatic fluctuations could cause a delay in deglaciation, bad enough to skip a full precession or obliquity cycle and subsequently modify the sequence of ice ages? To address this question, seven previously published conceptual models of ice ages are analysed by reference to the notion of generalised synchronisation. Insight is being gained by comparing the effects of the astronomical forcing with idealised forcings composed of only one or two periodic components. In general, the richness of the astronomical forcing allows for synchronisation over a wider range of parameters, compared to periodic forcing. Hence, glacial cycles may conceivabl...

  19. Structure of and phase transformations in bulk amorphous (GaSb) sub 1 sub - sub x (Ge sub 2) sub x

    CERN Document Server

    Sapelkin, A V

    1997-01-01

    temperatures, under high pressures and at ambient conditions. Combined EXAFS and powder diffraction methods have been used to study the high pressure behavior of materials. The results revealed a complex picture of structural transformations in (GaSb) sub 1 sub - sub x (Ge sub 2) sub x owing to the meta-stable nature of samples. The semiconductor-to-metal transition observed previously is found to be due to percolation through the high pressure metallic phase GaSb II. It is showed that the combination of two structural techniques, powder diffraction and EXAFS, can provide quite detailed information on the structural behavior of amorphous materials under high pressures. The temperature-dependent EXAFS studies showed that semiconducting amorphous GaSb is likely to be chemically ordered. Issues concerning determination of the structure of amorphous materials and information theory are widely discussed. Amorphous materials are not new to scientists and mankind -- man has been using glass and glassy materials for ...

  20. Ice Cores of the National Ice Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. National Ice Core Laboratory (NICL) is a facility for storing, curating, and studying ice cores recovered from the polar regions of the world. It provides...

  1. Applications of KinetiSol dispersing for the production of plasticizer free amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNunzio, James C; Brough, Chris; Miller, Dave A; Williams, Robert O; McGinity, James W

    2010-06-14

    Thermal manufacturing methods for the production of solid dispersions frequently require the addition of a plasticizer in order to achieve requisite molten material flow properties when processed by unit operations such as hot melt extrusion. KinetiSol Dispersing, a rapid high energy thermal manufacturing process, was investigated for the ability to produce amorphous solid dispersions without the aid of a plasticizer. For this study itraconazole was used as a model active ingredient, while Eudragit L100-55 and Carbomer 974P were used as model solid dispersion carriers. Triethyl citrate (TEC) was used as necessary as a model plasticizer. Compositions prepared by KinetiSol Dispersing and hot melt extrusion were evaluated for solid state properties, supersaturated in vitro dissolution behavior under pH change conditions and accelerated stability performance. Results showed that both manufacturing processes were capable of producing amorphous solid dispersions, however compositions produced by hot melt extrusion required the presence of TEC and yielded a glass transition temperature (T(g)) of approximately 54 degrees C. Plasticized and unplasticized compositions were successfully produced by KinetiSol Dispersing, with plasticizer free solid dispersions exhibiting a T(g) of approximately 101 degrees C. Supersaturated in vitro dissolution testing revealed a significantly higher dissolution rate of plasticized material which was attributed to the pore forming behavior of TEC during the acidic phase of testing. A further contribution to release may also have been provided by the greater diffusivity in the plasticized polymer. X-ray diffraction testing revealed that under accelerated stability conditions, plasticized compositions exhibited partial recrystallization, while plasticizer free materials remained amorphous throughout the 6-month testing period. These results demonstrated that KinetiSol Dispersing could be used for the production of amorphous solid dispersions

  2. Electronic transport in mixed-phase hydrogenated amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienkes, Lee Raymond

    Interest in mixed-phase silicon thin film materials, composed of an amorphous semiconductor matrix in which nanocrystalline inclusions are embedded, stems in part from potential technological applications, including photovoltaic and thin film transistor technologies. Conventional mixed-phase silicon films are produced in a single plasma reactor, where the conditions of the plasma must be precisely tuned, limiting the ability to adjust the film and nanoparticle parameters independently. The films presented in this thesis are deposited using a novel dual-plasma co-deposition approach in which the nanoparticles are produced separately in an upstream reactor and then injected into a secondary reactor where an amorphous silicon film is being grown. The degree of crystallinity and grain sizes of the films are evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction respectively. I describe detailed electronic measurements which reveal three distinct conduction mechanisms in n-type doped mixed-phase amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films over a range of nanocrystallite concentrations and temperatures, covering the transition from fully amorphous to ~30% nanocrystalline. As the temperature is varied from 470 to 10 K, we observe activated conduction, multiphonon hopping (MPH) and Mott variable range hopping (VRH) as the nanocrystal content is increased. The transition from MPH to Mott-VRH hopping around 100K is ascribed to the freeze out of the phonon modes. A conduction model involving the parallel contributions of these three distinct conduction mechanisms is shown to describe both the conductivity and the reduced activation energy data to a high accuracy. Additional support is provided by measurements of thermal equilibration effects and noise spectroscopy, both done above room temperature (>300 K). This thesis provides a clear link between measurement and theory in these complex materials.

  3. Scaling aspects of the sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available A study of the sea-ice dynamics in the periods of time prior to and during the cycles of basin-wide fragmentation of the ice cover in the Arctic Ocean is presented. The fractal geometry of the ice-sheets limited by leads and ridges was assessed using the satellite images, while the data on the correlated sea-ice motion were obtained in the research stations "North Pole 32" and "North Pole 33" established on the ice pack. The revealed decrease of the fractal dimension as a result of large-scale fragmentation is consistent with the localization of the fracture process (leads propagation. At the same time, the scaling properties of the distribution of amplitudes of ice-fields accelerations were insensitive to the event of sea-ice fragmentation. The temporal distribution of the accelerations was scale-invariant during "quiet" periods of sea-ice drift but disordered in the period of mechanical perturbation. The period of decorrelated (in time ice-field motion during the important fracture event was interpreted as an inter-level transition in the hierarchic dynamical system. The mechanism of the long-range correlations in the sea-ice cover, including the fracture process, is suggested to be in relation with the self-organized oscillation dynamics inherent in the ice pack.

  4. Scaling aspects of the sea-ice-drift dynamics and pack fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chmel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of the sea-ice dynamics in the periods of time prior to and during the cycles of basin-wide fragmentation of the ice cover in the Arctic Ocean is presented. The fractal geometry of the ice-sheets limited by leads and ridges was assessed using the satellite images, while the data on the correlated sea-ice motion were obtained in the research stations "North Pole 32" and "North Pole 33" established on the ice pack. The revealed decrease of the fractal dimension as a result of large-scale fragmentation is consistent with the localization of the fracture process (leads propagation. At the same time, the scaling properties of the distribution of amplitudes of ice-fields accelerations were insensitive to the event of sea-ice fragmentation. The temporal distribution of the accelerations was scale-invariant during "quiet" periods of sea-ice drift but disordered in the period of mechanical perturbation. The period of decorrelated (in time ice-field motion during the important fracture event was interpreted as an inter-level transition in the hierarchic dynamical system. The mechanism of the long-range correlations in the sea-ice cover, including the fracture process, is suggested to be in relation with the self-organized oscillation dynamics inherent in the ice pack.

  5. Bimodal pattern of seismicity detected at the ocean margin of an Antarctic ice shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Denis; Benoit, Lionel; Camelbeeck, Thierry; Martin, Olivier; Meynard, Christophe; Thom, Christian

    2016-08-01

    In Antarctica, locally grounded ice, such as ice rises bordering floating ice shelves, plays a major role in the ice mass balance as it stabilizes the ice sheet flow from the hinterland. When in direct contact with the ocean, the ice rise buttressing effect may be altered in response of changing ocean forcing. To investigate this vulnerable zone, four sites near the boundary of an ice shelf with an ice rise promontory in Dronning Maud Land, East-Antarctica were monitored for a month in early 2014 with new instruments that include both seismic and GPS sensors. Our study indicated that this transition zone experiences periodic seismic activity resulting from surface crevassing during oceanic tide-induced flexure of the ice shelf. The most significant finding is the observation of apparent fortnightly tide-modulated low-frequency, long-duration seismic events at the seaward front of the ice rise promontory. A basal origin of these events is postulated with the ocean water surge at each new spring tide triggering basal crevassing or basal slip on a local bedrock asperity. Detection and monitoring of such seismicity may help identifying ice rise zones vulnerable to intensified ocean forcing.

  6. Amorphous Li-Al-Based Compounds: A Novel Approach for Designing High Performance Electrode Materials for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Thoss

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A new amorphous compound with the initial atomic composition Al43Li43Y6Ni8 applied as electrode material for Li-ion batteries is investigated. Unlike other amorphous compounds so-far investigated as anode materials, it already contains Li as a base element in the uncycled state. The amorphous compound powder is prepared by high energy ball milling of a master alloy. It shows a strongly enhanced specific capacity in contrast to amorphous alloys without Li in the initial state. Therewith, by enabling a reversible (delithiation of metallic electrodes without the phase transition caused volume changes it offers the possibility of much increased specific capacities than conventional graphite anodes. According to the charge rate (C-rate, the specific capacity is reversible over 20 cycles at minimum in contrast to conventional crystalline intermetallic phases failing by volume changes. The delithiation process occurs quasi-continuously over a voltage range of nearly 4 V, while the lithiation is mainly observed between 0.1 V and 1.5 V. That way, the electrode is applicable for different potential needs. The electrode stays amorphous during cycling, thus avoiding volume changes. The cycling performance is further enhanced by a significant amount of Fe introduced as wear debris from the milling tools, which acts as a promoting element.

  7. Paleo-ice flow directions of the Northern Antarctic Peninsula ice sheet based upon a new synthesis of seabed imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lavoie

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new seafloor map for the northern Antarctic Peninsula (AP, including swath multibeam data sets from five national programs. Our map allows for the examination and interpretation of Last Glacial Maximum (LGM paleo-ice sheet/stream flow directions developed upon the seafloor from the preservation of: mega-scale glacial lineations, drumlinized features, and selective linear erosion. We combine this with terrestrial observations of flow direction to place constraints on ice divides and accumulation centers (ice domes on the AP continental shelf. The results show a flow bifurcation as ice exits the Larsen-B embayment. Flow emanating off the Seal Nunataks (including Robertson Island is directed toward the southeast, then eastward as the flow transits toward the Robertson Trough. A second, stronger "streaming flow" is directed toward the southeast then southward, as ice overflowed the tip of the Jason Peninsula to reach the southern perimeter of the embayment. Our reconstruction also refines the extent of at least five other distinct paleo-ice stream systems which, in turn, serve to delineate seven broad regions where contemporaneous ice domes must have been centered on the continental shelf during the LGM time interval. Our reconstruction is more detailed than other recent compilations because we followed specific flow indicators and have kept tributary flow paths parallel.

  8. Alpine ice cores and ground penetrating radar: combined investigations for glaciological and climatic interpretations of a cold Alpine ice body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisen, Olaf; Nixdorf, Uwe [Alfred-Wegener-Inst. fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany); Keck, Lothar; Wagenbach, Dietmar [Univ. Heidelberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Umweltphysik

    2003-11-01

    Accurate interpretation of ice cores as climate archives requires detailed knowledge of their past and present geophysical environment. Different techniques facilitate the determination and reconstruction of glaciological settings surrounding the drilling location. During the ALPCLIM1 project, two ice cores containing long-term climate information were retrieved from Colle Gnifetti, Swiss-Italian Alps. Here, we investigate the potential of ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys, in conjunction with ice core data, to obtain information about the internal structure of the cold Alpine ice body to improve climatic interpretations. Three drill sites are connected by GPR profiles, running parallel and perpendicular to the flow line, thus yielding a three-dimensional picture of the subsurface and enabling the tracking of internal reflection horizons between the locations. As the observed reflections are of isochronic origin, they permit the transfer of age-depth relations between the ice cores. The accuracy of the GPR results is estimated by comparison of transferred timescales with original core datings, independent information from an older ice core, and, based on glaciological surface data, findings from flow modeling. Our study demonstrates that GPR is a mandatory tool for Alpine ice core studies, as it permits mapping of major transitions in physical-chemical properties, transfer of age-depth relations between sites, correlate signals in core records for interpretation, and establish a detailed picture of the flow regime surrounding the climate archive.

  9. The origins of ice crystals measured in mixed phase clouds at High-Alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lloyd

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the winter of 2013 and 2014 measurements of cloud microphysical properties over a five week period at the high Alpine site Jungfraujoch, Switzerland were carried out as part of the Cloud Aerosol Characterisation Experiments (CLACE and the Ice Nucleation Process Investigation and Quantification project (INUPIAQ Measurements of aerosol properties at a second, lower site, Schilthorn, Switzerland, were used as input for a primary ice nucleation scheme to predict ice nuclei concentrations at Jungfraujoch Frequent, rapid transitions in the ice and liquid properties of the clouds at Jungfraujoch were identified that led to large fluctuations in ice mass fractions over temporal scales of seconds to hours. During the measurement period we observed high concentrations of ice particles that exceeded 1000 L−1 at temperatures around −15 °C, verified by multiple instruments These concentrations could not be explained using the usual primary ice nucleation schemes, which predicted ice nucleus concentrations several orders of magnitude smaller than the peak ice crystal number concentrations. Secondary ice production through the Hallet–Mossop process as a possible explanation was ruled out, as the cloud was rarely within the active temperature range for this process It is shown that other mechanisms of secondary ice particle production cannot explain the highest ice particle concentrations. We describe 4 possible mechanisms that could lead to high cloud ice concentrations generated from the snow covered surfaces surrounding the measurement site. Of these we show that hoar frost crystals generated at the cloud enveloped snow surface could be the most important source of cloud ice concentrations Blowing snow was also observed to make significant contributions at higher wind speeds when ice crystal concentrations were −1.

  10. Seafloor Control on Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Rigor, I. G.; Hall, D. K.; Neumann, G.

    2011-01-01

    The seafloor has a profound role in Arctic sea ice formation and seasonal evolution. Ocean bathymetry controls the distribution and mixing of warm and cold waters, which may originate from different sources, thereby dictating the pattern of sea ice on the ocean surface. Sea ice dynamics, forced by surface winds, are also guided by seafloor features in preferential directions. Here, satellite mapping of sea ice together with buoy measurements are used to reveal the bathymetric control on sea ice growth and dynamics. Bathymetric effects on sea ice formation are clearly observed in the conformation between sea ice patterns and bathymetric characteristics in the peripheral seas. Beyond local features, bathymetric control appears over extensive ice-prone regions across the Arctic Ocean. The large-scale conformation between bathymetry and patterns of different synoptic sea ice classes, including seasonal and perennial sea ice, is identified. An implication of the bathymetric influence is that the maximum extent of the total sea ice cover is relatively stable, as observed by scatterometer data in the decade of the 2000s, while the minimum ice extent has decreased drastically. Because of the geologic control, the sea ice cover can expand only as far as it reaches the seashore, the continental shelf break, or other pronounced bathymetric features in the peripheral seas. Since the seafloor does not change significantly for decades or centuries, sea ice patterns can be recurrent around certain bathymetric features, which, once identified, may help improve short-term forecast and seasonal outlook of the sea ice cover. Moreover, the seafloor can indirectly influence cloud cover by its control on sea ice distribution, which differentially modulates the latent heat flux through ice covered and open water areas.

  11. Thresholds in the sliding resistance of simulated basal ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Emerson

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We report laboratory determinations of the shear resistance to sliding melting ice with entrained particles over a hard, impermeable surface. With higher particle concentrations and larger particle sizes, Coulomb friction at particle-bed contacts dominates and the shear stress increases linearly with normal load. We term this the sandy regime. When either particle concentration or particle size is reduced below a threshold, the dependence of shear resistance on normal load is no longer statistically significant. We term this regime slippery. We use force and mass balance considerations to examine the flow of melt water beneath the simulated basal ice. At high particle concentrations, the transition from sandy to slippery behavior occurs when the particle size is comparable to the thickness of the melt film that separates the sliding ice from its bed. For larger particle sizes, a transition from sandy to slippery behavior occurs when the particle concentration drops sufficiently that the normal load is no longer transferred completely to the particle-bed contacts. We estimate that the melt films separating the particles from the ice are approximately 0.1 µm thick at this transition. Our laboratory results suggest the potential for abrupt transitions in the shear resistance beneath hard-bedded glaciers with changes in either the thickness of melt layers or the particle loading.

  12. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  13. Atomically resolved images of I(h) ice single crystals in the solid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keita; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu

    2011-05-20

    The morphology and crystal structure of nanoparticles of ice were examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Two different crystal structures were found and unambiguously assigned to hexagonal (I(h)) and cubic (I(c)) ice crystals. Direct observation of oxygen columns clearly revealed the hexagonal packing of water molecules. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy was used to monitor the electronic excitation in ice, suggesting possible dissociation of water molecules. Dynamic process of phase transition between I(h) and I(c) phases of individual ice nanoparticles under electron beam irradiation was also monitored by in situ transmission electron diffractometry.

  14. EASE-Grid Sea Ice Age

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides weekly estimates of sea ice age for the Arctic Ocean from remotely sensed sea ice motion and sea ice extent. The ice age data are derived from...

  15. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Garimella, Sarvesh; Dias, Antonio; Frege, Carla; Höppel, Niko; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Robert; Yan, Chao; Amorim, Antonio; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Worsnop, Douglas; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-05-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation and thus influence cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10 °C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -39.0 and -37.2 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle budget.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of D2O ice photodesorption

    CERN Document Server

    Arasa, C; Cuppen, H M; van Dishoeck, E F; Kroes, G J; 10.1063/1.3582910

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations have been performed to study the ultraviolet photodissociation of D2O in an amorphous D2O ice surface at 10-90 K, in order to investigate the influence of isotope effects on the photodesorption processes. As for H2O, the main processes after UV photodissociation are trapping and desorption. There are three desorption processes: D atom, OD radical, and D2O molecule photodesorption. D2O desorption takes places either by direct desorption of a recombined D2O molecule, or when an energetic D atom produced by photodissociation kicks a surrounding D2O molecule out of the surface by transferring part of its momentum. Desorption probabilities are compared quantitatively with those for H2O obtained from previous MD simulations of UV photodissociation of amorphous water ice. The main conclusions are the same, but the average D atom photodesorption probability is smaller than that of the H atom (by about a factor of 0.9) because D has lower kinetic energy than H, whereas the average OD ra...

  17. ICE Online Detainee Locator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The Online Detainee Locator datasets provide the location of a detainee who is currently in ICE custody, or who was release from ICE custody for any reason with the...

  18. Vacancy Concentration in Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1977-01-01

    Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10.......Based on the diffusion constant for self-diffusion in ice, which is believed to take place by a vacancy mechanism, we estimate the relative vacancy concentration near the melting point to be at least ∼ 10−6, i.e. much higher than previous estimates of about 10−10....

  19. Antarctica - Ross Ice Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This color picture of Antarctica is one part of a mosaic of pictures covering the entire polar continent taken during the hours following Galileo's historic first encounter with its home planet. The view shows the Ross Ice Shelf to the right and its border with the sea. An occasional mountain can be seen poking through the ice near the McMurdo Station. It is late spring in Antarctica, so the sun never sets on the frigid, icy continent. This picture was taken about 6:20 p.m. PST on December 8, 1990. From top to bottom, the frame looks across about half of Antarctica.

  20. Marginal Ice Zone Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    In Russian.) Kryndin, A.N., 1971: Seasonal and yearly variations in the iciness and the position of ice edge in the Black and Azov Seas, which are...p.2057--2063. idreas, E.L., R.M. Williams, C.A. Paulson, 1981: Observatinis of conden- sate profiles over Arctic leads with a hot- film anemometer...A.N., 1971: Seasonal and yearly variations in the iciness and the position of ice edge in the Black and Azov Seas, which are associated with