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Sample records for amorphous carbon substrates

  1. Amorphous carbon film growth on Si: Correlation between stress and generation of defects into the substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous carbon films of several thicknesses were prepared by graphite sputtering on crystalline silicon substrate. The samples were depth profiled with positron annihilation spectroscopy for open-volume measurements and characterized for their residual internal stress. It was found that after film growth the substrate presents vacancy-like defects decorated by oxygen in a layer extending in the substrate by several tens of nanometers beyond the film/Si interface. The width of the defected layer and the decoration of vacancy-like defects are directly and inversely proportional to the measured intensity of the residual stress, respectively. These findings indicate the existence of a relaxation mechanism of the stress in the films that involves deeply the substrate. The decorated vacancy-like defects are suggested to be bounded to dislocations induced in the substrate by the stress relaxation

  2. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano-Osorio, D. S.; Vargas, S.; López-Córdoba, L. M.; Ospina, R.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P. J.

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature ( Troom), 100 °C, 150 °C and 200 °C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 °C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 ± 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the ID/ IG or sp 3/sp 2 ratio and not by the absolute sp 3 or sp 2 concentration.

  3. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature (Troom), 100 deg. C, 150 deg. C and 200 deg. C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 deg. C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 ± 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the ID/IG or sp3/sp2 ratio and not by the absolute sp3 or sp2 concentration.

  4. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeano-Osorio, D.S.; Vargas, S.; Lopez-Cordoba, L.M.; Ospina, R. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature (T{sub room}), 100 deg. C, 150 deg. C and 200 deg. C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 deg. C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 {+-} 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the I{sub D}/I{sub G} or sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio and not by the absolute sp{sup 3} or sp{sup 2} concentration.

  5. Mechanical and tribological properties of amorphous carbon films deposited on implanted steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited using unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique from graphite targets on AISI 440C steel substrates implanted with (1) carbon (C), (2) titanium (Ti), and (3) titanium followed by carbon (Ti+C), respectively. After deposition, the adhesion strength of the films was examined by scratch test and Rockwell-C indentation test. The tribological performance of the films was evaluated by a typical ball-on-disk tribometer and a reciprocating wear tester. A dynamic impact tester was also carried out to study the fatigue strength of the films. In order to study the effect of the pre-treatment of steel substrates by means of ion implantation on the actual performance of a-C films, the implanted substrates were investigated by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation, from which the composition depth profile as well as the hardness (H) and elastic modulus (E) depth profiles could be accurately obtained. As a result, due to higher contents of carbide bonds appeared at the outmost surface of the C and Ti+C implanted substrates, a critical load over 65 N was obtained, indicating good scratch resistance of the films. The combination of high interfacial strength and high plastic deformation resistance (H3/E2) of the Ti+C implanted substrates led to a higher load-carrying capacity and longer duration lifetime in the sliding wear test. In the dynamic impact test, the good adhesion strength and high toughness of C and Ti+C implanted substrates improved the impact resistance of the films

  6. Dependence of Structure and Haemocompatibility of Amorphous Carbon Films on Substrate Bias Voltage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yang-Ming; MO Dang; LI Zhe-Yi; LIU Yi; HE Zhen-Hui; CHEN Di-Hu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Tetrahedral amorphous hydrogenated carbon (ta-C:H) films on Si(100) substrates were prepared by using a magnetic-field-filter plasma stream deposition system. Samples with different ratios of spa-bond to sp2-bond were obtained by changing the bias voltage applied to the substrates. The ellipsometric spectra of various carbon films in the photon energy range of 1.9-5.4eV were measured. The refractive index n and the relative sp3 C ratio of these films were obtained by simulating their ellipsometric spectra using the Forouhi-Bloomer model and by using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation, respectively. The haemocompatibility of these ta-C:H films was analysed by observation of platelet adhesion and measurement of kinetic clotting time. The results show that the sp3 C fraction is dependent on the substrate bias voltage, and the haemocompatibility is dependent on the ratio of sp3-bond to sp2-bond. A good haemocompatibility material of ta-C:H films with a suitable sp3 C fraction can be prepared by changing the substrate bias voltage.

  7. The effect of substrate bias on titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films have been deposited on silicon substrate by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology, the effects of substrate bias on composition, structures and mechanical properties of the films are studied by scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation. The results show that the Ti content, deposition rate and hardness at first increase and then decrease with increasing the substrate bias. Maximum hardness of the titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite film is 51 Gpa prepared at −400 V. The hardness enhancement may be attributed to the compressive stress and the fraction of crystalline TiC phase due to ion bombardment

  8. Evolution of sp2 networks with substrate temperature in amorphous carbon films: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of sp2 hybrids in amorphous carbon (a-C) films deposited at different substrate temperatures was studied experimentally and theoretically. The bonding structure of a-C films prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc was assessed by the combination of visible Raman spectroscopy, x-ray absorption, and spectroscopic ellipsometry, while a-C structures were generated by molecular-dynamics deposition simulations with the Brenner interatomic potential to determine theoretical sp2 site distributions. The experimental results show a transition from tetrahedral a-C (ta-C) to sp2-rich structures at ∼500 K. The sp2 hybrids are mainly arranged in chains or pairs whereas graphitic structures are only promoted for sp2 fractions above 80%. The theoretical analysis confirms the preferred pairing of isolated sp2 sites in ta-C, the coalescence of sp2 clusters for medium sp2 fractions, and the pronounced formation of rings for sp2 fractions >80%. However, the dominance of sixfold rings is not reproduced theoretically, probably related to the functional form of the interatomic potential used

  9. Analysis on multiple ring-like cracks in thin amorphous carbon film on soft substrate under nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, the fracture toughness of thin amorphous carbon films was quantitatively characterized by nanoindentation using a conical indenter. The amorphous carbon films with different thickness, i.e. 140 and 400 nm, were obtained by plasma vapour deposition on a poly-ether-ether-ketone substrate. During indentation, it was noticed that multiple ring-like, through-thickness cracks occurred in the films. Correspondingly, ‘sliding pop-ins’ were observed in the load–depth curves. Using an energy method, the fracture toughness of the films could be therefore determined. The results showed that the fracture toughness of the amorphous carbon films was in the range of 0.99–2.87 MPa m0.5, which agreed well with the published data. Further, finite element analysis was also performed to evaluate the stress distribution in a thin film/soft substrate system, which showed that the ring-like cracks were caused by the tensile radial stress on the film surface. (paper)

  10. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  11. Drawing Circuits with Carbon Nanotubes: Scratch-Induced Graphoepitaxial Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Amorphous Silicon Oxide Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Jin; Chung, Yoon Jang; Kim, Yun Ho; Han, Jeongho; Lee, Young-Kook; Kong, Ki-jeong; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Young Kuk; Kim, Byoung Gak; Lee, Jeong-O

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the orientations of nanomaterials on arbitrary substrates is crucial for the development of practical applications based on such materials. The aligned epitaxial growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on specific crystallographic planes in single crystalline sapphire or quartz has been demonstrated; however, these substrates are unsuitable for large scale electronic device applications and tend to be quite expensive. Here, we report a scalable method based on graphoepitaxy for the aligned growth of SWNTs on conventional SiO2/Si substrates. The “scratches” generated by polishing were found to feature altered atomic organizations that are similar to the atomic alignments found in vicinal crystalline substrates. The linear and circular scratch lines could promote the oriented growth of SWNTs through the chemical interactions between the C atoms in SWNT and the Si adatoms in the scratches. The method presented has the potential to be used to prepare complex geometrical patterns of SWNTs by ‘drawing' circuits using SWNTs without the need for state-of-the-art equipment or complicated lithographic processes. PMID:24924480

  12. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  13. Rapid Annealing Of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes experiments to determine effects of rapid annealing on films of amorphous hydrogenated carbon. Study represents first efforts to provide information for applications of a-C:H films where rapid thermal processing required. Major finding, annealing causes abrupt increase in absorption and concomitant decrease in optical band gap. Most of change occurs during first 20 s, continues during longer annealing times. Extend of change increases with annealing temperature. Researchers hypothesize abrupt initial change caused by loss of hydrogen, while gradual subsequent change due to polymerization of remaining carbon into crystallites or sheets of graphite. Optical band gaps of unannealed specimens on silicon substrates lower than those of specimens on quartz substrates.

  14. Investigations on silicon/amorphous-carbon and silicon/nanocrystalline palladium/ amorphous-carbon interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M; Sengupta, P; Tyagi, A K; Kale, G B

    2008-08-01

    Our previous work revealed that significant enhancement in sp3-carbon content of amorphous carbon films could be achieved when grown on nanocrystalline palladium interlayer as compared to those grown on bare silicon substrates. To find out why, the nature of interface formed in both the cases has been investigated using Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) technique. It has been found that a reactive interface in the form of silicon carbide and/silicon oxy-carbide is formed at the interface of silicon/amorphous-carbon films, while palladium remains primarily in its native form at the interface of nanocrystalline palladium/amorphous-carbon films. However, there can be traces of dissolved oxygen within the metallic layer as well. The study has been corroborated further from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. PMID:19049221

  15. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Vishwakarma; V Prasad; S V Subramanyam; V Ganesan

    2005-10-01

    Amorphous conducting carbon films deposited over quartz substrates were analysed using X-ray diffraction and AFM technique. X-ray diffraction data reveal disorder and roughness in the plane of graphene sheet as compared to that of graphite. This roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. The AFM data shows surface roughness of carbon films depending on preparation temperatures. The surface roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. Also some nucleating islands were seen on the samples prepared at 900°C, which are not present on the films prepared at 700°C. Detailed analysis of these islands reveals distorted graphitic lattice arrangement. So we believe these islands to be nucleating graphitic. Power spectrum density (PSD) analysis of the carbon surface indicates a transition from the nonlinear growth mode to linear surface-diffusion dominated growth mode resulting in a relatively smoother surface as one moves from low preparation temperature to high preparation temperature. The amorphous carbon films deposited over a rough quartz substrate reveal nucleating diamond like structures. The density of these nucleating diamond like structures was found to be independent of substrate temperature (700–900°C).

  16. Impact wear resistance of silicon, oxygen and nitrogen containing amorphous carbon films deposited on steel substrates using PECVD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fořt, Tomáš; Sobota, Jaroslav; Grossman, Jan; Bursíková, V.; Dupák, Libor; Peřina, Vratislav; Klapetek, P.; Buršík, Jiří

    Cancún : ICPIG2009 Local Organizing Committee, 2009 - (de Urquijo, J.), PB13-13:1-4 ISBN 978-1-61567-694-1. [International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases (ICPIG) /29./. Cancun (MX), 12.07.2009-17.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/1669; GA AV ČR KAN311610701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511; CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : PECVD * diamond-like carbon coatings Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.icpig2009.unam.mx/pdf/PB13-13.pdf

  17. Amorphous Silicon Display Backplanes on Plastic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striakhilev, Denis; Nathan, Arokia; Vygranenko, Yuri; Servati, Peyman; Lee, Czang-Ho; Sazonov, Andrei

    2006-12-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin-film transistor (TFT) backplanes are very promising for active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays (AMOLEDs) on plastic. The technology benefits from a large manufacturing base, simple fabrication process, and low production cost. The concern lies in the instability of the TFTs threshold voltage (VT) and its low device mobility. Although VT-instability can be compensated by means of advanced multi-transistor pixel circuits, the lifetime of the display is still dependent on the TFT process quality and bias conditions. A-Si TFTs with field-effect mobility of 1.1 cm2/V · s and pixel driver circuits have been fabricated on plastic substrates at 150 °C. The circuits are characterized in terms of current drive capability and long-term stability of operation. The results demonstrate sufficient and stable current delivery and the ability of the backplane on plastic to meet AMOLED requirements.

  18. ENHANCING ADHESION OF TETRAHEDRAL AMORPHOUS CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yuqing; Lin Yi; Wang Xiaoyan; Wang Yanwu; Wei Xinyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective The high energy ion bombardment technique is applied to enhancing the adhesion of the tetrahedral amorphous carbon (TAC) films deposited by the filtered cathode vacuum arc (FCVA). Methods The abrasion method, scratch method, heating and shaking method as well as boiling salt solution method is used to test the adhesion of the TAC films on various material substrates. Results The test results show that the adhesion is increased as the ion bombardment energy increases. However, if the bombardment energy were over the corresponding optimum value, the adhesion would be enhanced very slowly for the harder material substrates and drops quickly, for the softer ones. Conclusion The optimum values of the ion bombardment energy are larger for the harder materials than that for the softer ones.

  19. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented

  20. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  1. Amorphous carbon and its surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Some examples of 2.0 g/cm3 surfaces. The cell contained 64 atoms. The top figure shows some tube-like formation, the central figure is an example of a wave-like surface, and the bottom figure is an example of the bending over of the carbons at the surface to form a surface sheet when the sheets in the bulk are not parallel to the surface. - Abstract: We have investigated bulk amorphous carbon at three densities (3.2, 2.6, and 2.0 g/cm3) using density functional theory (DFT). The variation in the structure with density is discussed. The bulk structures are used to create surface structures. If the surfaces are relaxed at 700 K, the surface structures, as a function of density, are more similar than the analogous bulk structures. The relaxed surfaces appear to be graphene sheets with defects, sizable distortions, and have covalently bonded carbon chains holding the sheets together.

  2. Study on the substrate-induced crystallisation of amorphous SiC-precursor ceramics. TIB/A; Untersuchungen zur substratinduzierten Kristallisation amorpher SiC-Precursorkeramiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, C.

    2000-12-01

    In the present thesis the crystallization behaviour of amorphous silicon-carbon materials (SiC{sub x}) was studied. The main topic of the experimental studies formed thereby the epitactical crystallization of thin silicon carbide layers on monocrystalline substrates of silicon carbides or silicon. Furthermore by thermolysis of the polymer amorphous SiC{sub x}-powder was obtained.

  3. Substrate induced crystallization of amorphous solid water at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that N2 monolayer desorption from ice surfaces is a quantitative, highly sensitive method for following the surface crystallization kinetics at low temperatures. Vapor deposited water films on a crystalline ice substrate exhibit amorphous growth at temperatures below ∼110 K. The rate of crystallization for these amorphous films is dramatically accelerated compared to the rate of crystallization observed for the amorphous films deposited directly on Pt(111). We find that the crystalline ice substrate acts as a two-dimensional nucleus for the growth of the crystalline phase, thereby accelerating the crystallization kinetics. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  4. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  5. Filtered pulsed carbon cathodic arc: Plasma and amorphous carbon properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongping; Benstetter, Günther; Lodermeier, Edgar; Zhang, Jialiang; Liu, Yanhong; Vancea, Johann

    2004-06-01

    The carbon plasma ion energies produced by the filtered pulsed cathodic arc discharge method were measured as a function of filter inductance. The energy determination is based on the electro-optical time-of-flight method. The average ion energies of the pulsed ion beams were found to depend upon the rise time and duration of pulsed arc currents, which suggests that a gain of ion kinetic energy mainly arises from the electric plasma field from the ambipolar expansion of both electrons and ions, and an electron drag force because of the high expansion velocity of the electrons. The tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films with a sp3 fraction of ˜70% were deposited on silicon substrates at the average ion energies of >6 eV in the highly ionized plasmas. The ta-C films were found to be covered with a few graphitelike atomic layers. The surface properties of ultrathin carbon films, such as nanoscale friction coefficients, surface layer thickness, and silicon contents were strongly dependent on the ion energies. The growth of amorphous carbon films was explained in terms of the thermal spike migration of surface carbon atoms. In terms of this model, the thermal spike provides the energy required to release surface atoms from their metastable positions and leads to the formation of the sp3 bonded carbon on a sp3 bonded matrix. The experimental results indicate that the low-energy (<3 eV) carbon ions have insufficient energies to cause the rearrangement reaction within the film and they form graphitelike structures at film surface.

  6. Filtered pulsed carbon cathodic arc: Plasma and amorphous carbon properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon plasma ion energies produced by the filtered pulsed cathodic arc discharge method were measured as a function of filter inductance. The energy determination is based on the electro-optical time-of-flight method. The average ion energies of the pulsed ion beams were found to depend upon the rise time and duration of pulsed arc currents, which suggests that a gain of ion kinetic energy mainly arises from the electric plasma field from the ambipolar expansion of both electrons and ions, and an electron drag force because of the high expansion velocity of the electrons. The tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films with a sp3 fraction of ∼70% were deposited on silicon substrates at the average ion energies of >6 eV in the highly ionized plasmas. The ta-C films were found to be covered with a few graphitelike atomic layers. The surface properties of ultrathin carbon films, such as nanoscale friction coefficients, surface layer thickness, and silicon contents were strongly dependent on the ion energies. The growth of amorphous carbon films was explained in terms of the thermal spike migration of surface carbon atoms. In terms of this model, the thermal spike provides the energy required to release surface atoms from their metastable positions and leads to the formation of the sp3 bonded carbon on a sp3 bonded matrix. The experimental results indicate that the low-energy (<3 eV) carbon ions have insufficient energies to cause the rearrangement reaction within the film and they form graphitelike structures at film surface

  7. Field Emission Properties of Nitrogen-doped Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon thin films are deposited on the ceramic substrates coated with Ti film by using direct current magnetron sputtering technique at N2 and Ar gas mixture atmosphere during deposition. The field emission properties of the deposited films have been investigated. The threshold field as low as 5.93V/μm is obtained and the maximum current density increases from 4μA/cm2 to 20.67μA/cm2 at 10.67V/μm comparing with undoped amorphous film. The results show that nitrogen doping plays an important role in field emission of amorphous carbon thin films.

  8. Laser annealing of amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous (a-C) Carbon thin films were deposited, using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 7 ns), from a pyrolytic graphite target, on silicon and refractory metal (Mo) substrates to a film thickness of 55, 400 and 500 nm. Samples were grown at RT and then annealed by a laser annealing technique, to reduce residual stress and induce a locally confined 'graphitization' process. The films were exposed to irradiation, in vacuum, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, operating at different wavelengths (VIS, N-UV) and increasing values of energy from 6-100 mJ/pulse. The thinner films were completely destroyed by N-UV laser treatment also at lower energies, owing to the almost direct propagation of heat to the Si substrate with melting and ruinous blistering effects. For thicker films the Raman micro-analysis evidenced the influence of laser treatments on the sp3/sp2 content evolution, and established the formation of aromatic nano-structures of average dimension 4.1-4.7 nm (derived from the ID/IG peak ratio), at fluence values round 50 mJ/cm2 for N-UV and 165 mJ/cm2 for VIS laser irradiation. Higher fluences were not suitable for a-Carbon 'graphitization', since a strong ablation process was the prominent effect of irradiation. Grazing incidence XRD (GI-XRD) used to evaluate the dimension and texturing of nano-particles confirmed the findings of Raman analysis. The effects of irradiation on surface morphology were studied by SEM analysis

  9. Effect of pre-treatment of the substrate surface by energetic C+ ion bombardment on structure and nano-tribological characteristics of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismani, E.; Sinha, S. K.; Tripathy, S.; Yang, H.; Bhatia, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Depositing an ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coating on the surface of the recording heads in magnetic tape drives can improve the tribological problems at the head/tape interface. In this work the effect of pre-treatment of the surface of AlTiC substrate (main bearing surface of head in contact with tape) by C+ ions of moderate energy (smaller than 400 eV) on the structural and tribo-mechanical behaviours of the coated surfaces is studied. Sample preparation consisted of two separate stages of surface pre-treatment and deposition of the protective film, and was done by means of filtered cathodic vacuum arc. Structure of the ta-C film and its interface with the substrate were studied by transmission electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. The results revealed the formation of a broader, dense atomically mixed layer at the ta-C film-substrate interface of the pre-treated samples comparing with that of the samples without pre-treatment. Chemical characterization of thin diamond-like carbon coatings was conducted by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface pre-treatment was found to have a remarkable effect on increasing the sp3 hybridization fraction in the ta-C overcoat. Nano-tribological properties of the treated surfaces were examined using ball-on-flat wear test at very low load (20 mN). There was a good correlation between the surface and structure characteristics of the film, and the tribological results and the pre-treated surfaces presented a very low coefficient of friction and higher wear life. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of bombardment of the surface with C+ ions of moderate ion energy to improve the structural and tribo-mechanical properties of the protective ta-C films on the magnetic head substrate material.

  10. Effect of pre-treatment of the substrate surface by energetic C+ ion bombardment on structure and nano-tribological characteristics of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depositing an ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coating on the surface of the recording heads in magnetic tape drives can improve the tribological problems at the head/tape interface. In this work the effect of pre-treatment of the surface of AlTiC substrate (main bearing surface of head in contact with tape) by C+ ions of moderate energy (smaller than 400 eV) on the structural and tribo-mechanical behaviours of the coated surfaces is studied. Sample preparation consisted of two separate stages of surface pre-treatment and deposition of the protective film, and was done by means of filtered cathodic vacuum arc. Structure of the ta-C film and its interface with the substrate were studied by transmission electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. The results revealed the formation of a broader, dense atomically mixed layer at the ta-C film-substrate interface of the pre-treated samples comparing with that of the samples without pre-treatment. Chemical characterization of thin diamond-like carbon coatings was conducted by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface pre-treatment was found to have a remarkable effect on increasing the sp3 hybridization fraction in the ta-C overcoat. Nano-tribological properties of the treated surfaces were examined using ball-on-flat wear test at very low load (20 mN). There was a good correlation between the surface and structure characteristics of the film, and the tribological results and the pre-treated surfaces presented a very low coefficient of friction and higher wear life. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of bombardment of the surface with C+ ions of moderate ion energy to improve the structural and tribo-mechanical properties of the protective ta-C films on the magnetic head substrate material.

  11. Effect of pre-treatment of the substrate surface by energetic C{sup +} ion bombardment on structure and nano-tribological characteristics of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rismani, E; Sinha, S K [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Block EA, 07-08, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Tripathy, S [Institute of Material Research and Engineering (IMRE), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Yang, H; Bhatia, C S, E-mail: elebcs@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Block E4, Level 5, Room 45, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2011-03-23

    Depositing an ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coating on the surface of the recording heads in magnetic tape drives can improve the tribological problems at the head/tape interface. In this work the effect of pre-treatment of the surface of AlTiC substrate (main bearing surface of head in contact with tape) by C{sup +} ions of moderate energy (smaller than 400 eV) on the structural and tribo-mechanical behaviours of the coated surfaces is studied. Sample preparation consisted of two separate stages of surface pre-treatment and deposition of the protective film, and was done by means of filtered cathodic vacuum arc. Structure of the ta-C film and its interface with the substrate were studied by transmission electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. The results revealed the formation of a broader, dense atomically mixed layer at the ta-C film-substrate interface of the pre-treated samples comparing with that of the samples without pre-treatment. Chemical characterization of thin diamond-like carbon coatings was conducted by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface pre-treatment was found to have a remarkable effect on increasing the sp{sup 3} hybridization fraction in the ta-C overcoat. Nano-tribological properties of the treated surfaces were examined using ball-on-flat wear test at very low load (20 mN). There was a good correlation between the surface and structure characteristics of the film, and the tribological results and the pre-treated surfaces presented a very low coefficient of friction and higher wear life. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of bombardment of the surface with C{sup +} ions of moderate ion energy to improve the structural and tribo-mechanical properties of the protective ta-C films on the magnetic head substrate material.

  12. Nanomechanical characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thin films deposited on a silicon substrate under various mixtures of methane-hydrogen gas by electron cyclotron resonance microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-MPCVD) was investigated. Microstructure, surface morphology and mechanical characterizations of the a-C:H films were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoindentation technique, respectively. The results indicated there was an increase of the hydrogen content, the ratio of the D-peak to the G-peak (I D/I G) increased but the surface roughness of the films was reduced. Both hardness and Young's modulus increased as the hydrogen content was increased. In addition, the contact stress-strain analysis is reported. The results confirmed that the mechanical properties of the amorphous hydrogenated carbon thin films improved using a higher H2 content in the source gas

  13. Room temperature photoluminescence from nanostructured amorphous carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Henley, SJ; Carey, JD; Silva, SRP

    2004-01-01

    Visible room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) was observed from hydrogen-free nanostructured amorphous carbon films deposited by pulsed laser ablation in different background pressures of argon (PAr). By varying PAr from 5 to 340 mTorr, the film morphology changed from smooth to rough and at the highest pressures, low-density filamentary growth was observed. Over the same pressure regime an increase in the ordering of sp2 bonded C content was observed using visible Raman spectroscopy. Th...

  14. Polymeric amorphous carbon as p-type window within amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, R.U.A.; Silva, S.R.P.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) has been shown to be intrinsically p-type, and polymeric a-C (PAC) possesses a wide Tauc band gap of 2.6 eV. We have replaced the p-type amorphous silicon carbide layer of a standard amorphous silicon solar cell with an intrinsic ultrathin layer of PAC. The thickness of the p

  15. Ion beam deposition of amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, John C.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon films were deposited on silicon, quartz, and potassium bromide substrates from an ion beam. Growth rates were approximately 0.3 micron/hour. The films were featureless and amorphous and contained only carbon and hydrogen in significant amounts. The density and carbon/hydrogen ratio indicate the film is a hydrogen deficient polymer. One possible structure, consistent with the data, is a random network of methylene linkages and tetrahedrally coordinated carbon atoms.

  16. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic study of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon films embedded with nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of substrate bias on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C:N) films embedded with nanoparticles deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique is discussed. High resolution transmission electron microscope exhibited initially the amorphous structure but on closer examination the film was constituted of amorphous phase with the nanoparticle embedded in the amorphous matrix. X-ray diffraction study reveals dominantly an amorphous nature of the film. A straight forward method of deconvolution of XPS spectra has been used to evaluate the sp3 and sp2 contents present in these a-C:N films. The carbon (C 1s) peaks have been deconvoluted into four different peaks and nitrogen (N 1s) peaks have been deconvoluted into three different peaks which attribute to different bonding state between C, N and O. The full width at half maxima (FWHM) of C 1s peak, sp3 content and sp3/sp2 ratio of a-C:N films increase up to -150 V substrate bias and beyond -150 V substrate bias these parameters are found to decrease. Thus, the parameters evaluated are found to be dependent on the substrate bias which peaks at -150 V substrate bias.

  17. Amorphous Silicon-Carbon Nanostructure Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriver, Maria; Regan, Will; Loster, Matthias; Zettl, Alex

    2011-03-01

    Taking advantage of the ability to fabricate large area graphene and carbon nanotube networks (buckypaper), we produce Schottky junction solar cells using undoped hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films and nanostructured carbon films. These films are useful as solar cell materials due their combination of optical transparency and conductance. In our cells, they behave both as a transparent conductor and as an active charge separating layer. We demonstrate a reliable photovoltaic effect in these devices with a high open circuit voltage of 390mV in buckypaper devices. We investigate the unique interface properties which result in an unusual J-V curve shape and optimize fabrication processes for improved solar conversion efficiency. These devices hold promise as a scalable solar cell made from earth abundant materials and without toxic and expensive doping processes.

  18. Microstructural analyses of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, C. B.; Davanloo, F.; Jander, D.R.;

    1992-01-01

    comparative examinations of the microstructures of samples of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon. Four distinct morphologies were found that correlated closely with the energy densities used in preparing the different materials. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of...... Physics....

  19. Interfacial electrical properties of ion-beam sputter deposited amorphous carbon on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Chung, Y.; Banks, B.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous, 'diamond-like' carbon films have been deposited on Si substrates, using ion-beam sputtering. The interfacial properties are studied using capacitance and conductance measurements. Data are analyzed using existing theories for interfacial electrical properties. The density of electronic states at the interface, along with corresponding time constants are determined.

  20. Recombination of atomic oxygen and hydrogen on amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposit buildup and fuel entrapment due to amorphous carbon are relevant issues in fusion devices with carbon based plasma facing components. Neutral atomic species play a significant role – atomic hydrogen facilitates the formation of amorphous carbon while atomic oxygen could be used to remove carbon deposits. The kinetics of either reaction depends on the density of neutral species, which in turn is influenced by recombination on the vessel walls. In this work, we measured the probability of heterogeneous recombination of atomic hydrogen and oxygen on amorphous carbon deposits. The recombination coefficients were determined by observing density profiles of atomic species in a closed side-arm of a plasma vessel with amorphous carbon deposit-lined walls. Density profiles were measured with fiber optics catalytic probes. The source of atomic species was inductively coupled radiofrequency plasma. The measured recombination coefficient values were of the order of 10−3 for both species

  1. 13C NMR spectroscopy of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the 13C NMR spectrum of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and boron carbide. The amorphous hydrogenated carbon spectra consist primarily of an sp3 line at 40 ppm and an sp2 line at 140 ppm and are in reasonable agreement with the recent theoretical calculations of Mauri, Pfrommer, and Louie, but there are some notable discrepancies. The amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide spectra are very different from those of amorphous hydrogenated carbon, being dominated by one line at 15 ppm. We interpret this line as due to carbon bound in boron carbide icosahedra, because polycrystalline boron carbide with boron carbide icosahedra as the unit cell gives very similar NMR spectra. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  2. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Widlow, I

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes our most recent findings in the structure and properties of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings, synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering. By careful control of the plasma conditions via proper choice of process parameters such as substrate bias, target power and gas pressure, one can precisely control film structure and properties. With this approach, we were able to produce amorphous carbon nitride films with controlled hardness and surface roughness. In particular, we can synthesize ultrathin (1 nm thick) amorphous carbon nitride films to be sufficiently dense and uniform that they provide adequate corrosion protection for hard disk applications. We demonstrated the strong correlation between ZrN (111) texture and hardness in CN sub x /ZrN superlattice coatings. Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption show the predominance of sp sup 3 -bonded carbon in these superlattice coatings.

  3. Thermal shock and thermal cycling behaviour of amorphous a-C:H films on molybdenum substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal behaviour of a-C:H films (a stands for amorphous) deposited by the TEXTOR carbonization technique on molybdenum substrates was investigated in high power electron beam testing device for single and multiple shot sequences. The stationary thermal behaviour was also measured. The results for single shot testing are presented in a threshold damage diagram and show that the stability of a-C:H films on molybdenum is superior to that on steel. At higher or repeated loadings the films are converted gradually to molybdenum carbide. AES and SIMS depth profiling was used to investigate the concentration profiles and interface compositions of the films after various heat treatments. Their 1-h thermal stability on molybdenum extends to approximately 7000C in a stationary test. Results show that a-C:H films on molybdenum should be effective in shielding the molybdenum substrate from the plasma in a fusion device as long as the stated loading limits are not exceeded. (orig.)

  4. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EijiIwamura; MasanoriYamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process, graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  5. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eiji Iwamura; Masanori Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process,graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  6. Source Molecular Effect on Amorphous Carbon Film Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kawazoe, Hiroki; Inayoshi, Takanori; Shinohara, Masanori; Matsuda, Yoshinobu; Fujiyama, Hiroshi; Nitta, Yuki; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigated deposition process of amorphous carbon films using acetylene and methane as a source molecule, by using infrared spectroscopy in multiple internal reflection geometry (MIR-IRAS). We found that deposited film structures were different due to source molecules.

  7. Solution growth of microcrystalline silicon on amorphous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heimburger, Robert

    2010-07-05

    This work deals with low-temperature solution growth of micro-crystalline silicon on glass. The task is motivated by the application in low-cost solar cells. As glass is an amorphous material, conventional epitaxy is not applicable. Therefore, growth is conducted in a two-step process. The first step aims at the spatial arrangement of silicon seed crystals on conductive coated glass substrates, which is realized by means of vapor-liquid-solid processing using indium as the solvent. Seed crystals are afterwards enlarged by applying a specially developed steady-state solution growth apparatus. This laboratory prototype mainly consists of a vertical stack of a silicon feeding source and the solvent (indium). The growth substrate can be dipped into the solution from the top. The system can be heated to a temperature below the softening point of the utilized glass substrate. A temperature gradient between feeding source and growth substrate promotes both, supersaturation and material transport by solvent convection. This setup offers advantages over conventional liquid phase epitaxy at low temperatures in terms of achievable layer thickness and required growth times. The need for convective solute transport to gain the desired thickness of at least 50 {mu}m is emphasized by equilibrium calculations in the binary system indium-silicon. Material transport and supersaturation conditions inside the utilized solution growth crucible are analyzed. It results that the solute can be transported from the lower feeding source to the growth substrate by applying an appropriate heating regime. These findings are interpreted by means of a hydrodynamic analysis of fluid flow and supporting FEM simulation. To ensure thermodynamic stability of all materials involved during steady-state solution growth, the ternary phase equilibrium between molybdenum, indium and silicon at 600 C was considered. Based on the obtained results, the use of molybdenum disilicide as conductive coating

  8. Electrical properties of pulsed UV laser irradiated amorphous carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Miyajima; Adikaari, AADT; Henley, SJ; Shannon, JM; Silva, SRP

    2008-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films containing no hydrogen were irradiated with a pulsed UV laser in vacuum. Raman spectroscopy indicates an increase in the quantity of sp(2) clustering with the highest laser energy density and a commensurate reduction in resistivity. The reduction of resistivity is explained to be associated with thermally induced graphitization of amorphous carbon films. The high field transport is consistent with a Poole-Frenkel type transport mechanism via neutral trapping centers rel...

  9. Intrinsic graphene field effect transistor on amorphous carbon films

    OpenAIRE

    Tinchev, Savcho

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of graphene field effect transistor is described which uses an intrinsic graphene on the surface of as deposited hydrogenated amorphous carbon films. Ambipolar characteristic has been demonstrated typical for graphene devices, which changes to unipolar characteristic if the surface graphene was etched in oxygen plasma. Because amorphous carbon films can be growth easily, with unlimited dimensions and no transfer of graphene is necessary, this can open new perspective for graphene ...

  10. Fabrication of C60/amorphous carbon superlattice structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrogen doping effects in C60 films by RF plasma source was investigated, and it was found that the nitrogen ion bombardment broke up C60 molecules and changed them into amorphous carbon. Based on these results, formation of C60/amorphous carbon superlattice structure was proposed. The periodic structure of the resulted films was confirmed by XRD measurements, as the preliminary results of fabrication of the superlattice structure

  11. The effect of the underlying substrate on the crystallization kinetics of dense amorphous solid water films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization kinetics of thin, dense amorphous solid water films deposited on crystalline ice and Pt(111) substrates are investigated. A dramatic acceleration of the crystallization rate is observed for amorphous films on crystalline ice substrates. The acceleration originates from the absence of the nucleation process on the crystalline ice substrate which serves as a two-dimensional nucleus for the growth of the crystalline phase. This contrasts with the crystallization on a Pt(111) substrate which proceeds via bulk nucleation and three-dimensional growth. Activation energies for growth and nucleation are determined to be 56 and 140 kJ/mol, respectively, using the apparent activation energies measured on crystalline ice and Pt(111) substrates. For amorphous films deposited on crystalline ice substrates, the crystallization rate decreases rapidly with increasing distance from the crystalline ice substrate most probably due to crystallization-induced cracking of the films. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  12. Field emission from amorphous-carbon nanotips on copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous-carbon (a-C) nanotips were directly grown on copper substrates by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. The length of a typical a-C nanotip is ∼250 nm and its tip diameter is ∼25 nm. The in-plane correlation length La, equivalent to the size of the sp2 clusters, is determined to be 1.2 nm through the intensity ratio of the D and G peaks in the Raman spectrum, which is about in the optimum range for field emission. A low turn-on field of 1.6 V/μm at 10 μA/cm2, a threshold field of 3.8 V/μm at 10 mA/cm2, and a high current density of 32.42 mA/cm2 at 4.0 V/μm are achieved. The field emission characteristics of a-C nanotips are close to those of carbon nanotubes, and much better than what has been reported for flat diamond-like carbon or a-C:H coated cathodes. The roles of the sp2 cluster size, electron confinement and conductivity in the field emission of a-C nanotips are discussed

  13. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution. PMID:26692360

  14. Polymeric amorphous carbon as p-type window within amorphous silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, R U A; Silva, S. R. P.; Van Swaaij, R.A.C.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) has been shown to be intrinsically p-type, and polymeric a-C (PAC) possesses a wide Tauc band gap of 2.6 eV. We have replaced the p-type amorphous silicon carbide layer of a standard amorphous silicon solar cell with an intrinsic ultrathin layer of PAC. The thickness of the p layer had to be reduced from 9 to 2.5 nm in order to ensure sufficient conduction through the PAC film. Although the resulting external parameters suggest a decrease in the device efficiency from 9...

  15. Opto-electrical properties of amorphous carbon thin film deposited from natural precursor camphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, Debabrata [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India)]. E-mail: dpradhan@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca; Sharon, Maheshwar [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

    2007-06-30

    A simple thermal chemical vapor deposition technique is employed for the pyrolysis of a natural precursor 'camphor' and deposition of carbon films on alumina substrate at higher temperatures (600-900 deg. C). X-ray diffraction measurement reveals the amorphous structure of these films. The carbon films properties are found to significantly vary with the deposition temperatures. At higher deposition temperature, films have shown predominately sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and therefore, higher conductivity and lower optical band gap (Tauc gap). These amorphous carbon (a-C) films are also characterized with Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, electrical and optical properties are measured. The thermoelectric measurement shows these as-grown a-C films are p-type in nature.

  16. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  17. Plasma deposition of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films on III-V semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.; Liu, David C.; Alterovitz, Samuel A.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films were grown on GaAs, InP and fused silica substrates using plasmas generated from hydrocarbon gases. Methane and n-butane sources were utilized. The effects of flow rate and power density on film growth were investigated. Carbon was the major constituent in the films. The degree of asymmetry at the carbon-semiconductor interface was approximately independent of the power density. Different H-C bonding configurations were detected by the technique of secondary-ion mass spectrometry. Band gaps up to 3 eV were obtained from optical absorption studies. Breakdown strengths as high as 600 MV/m were measured.

  18. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Jaqueline S.; Ado Jorio

    2012-01-01

    Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the ...

  19. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  20. Thermal shock and thermal cycling behaviour of amorphous a-C:H films on molybdenum substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal behaviour of a-C:H films (a stands for amorphous) deposited by the TEXTOR carbonization technique on molybdenum substrates was investigated in high power electron beam testing device for single and multiple shot sequences. The stationary thermal behaviour was also measured. The results for single shot testing are presented in a threshold damage diagram and show that the stability of a-C:H films on molybdenum is superior to that on steel. At higher or repeated loadings the films are converted gradually to molybdenum carbide. AES and SIMS depth profiling was used to investigate the concentration profiles and interface compositions of the films after various heat treatments. Their 1-h thermal stability on molybdenum extends to approximately 700 degree C in a stationary test. Results show that a-C:H films on molybdenum should be effective in shielding the molybdenum substrate from the plasma in a fusion device as long as the stated loading limits are not exceeded. (author)

  1. Amorphous carbon contamination monitoring and process optimization for single-walled carbon nanotube integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We detail the monitoring of amorphous carbon deposition during thermal chemical vapour deposition of carbon nanotubes and propose a contamination-less process to integrate high-quality single-walled carbon nanotubes into micro-electromechanical systems. The amorphous content is evaluated by confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy and by scanning/transmission electron microscopy. We show how properly chosen process parameters can lead to successful integration of single-walled nanotubes, enabling nano-electromechanical system synthesis

  2. Growth of Well-Aligned InN Nanorods on Amorphous Glass Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijie; Zhao, Guijuan; Wei, Hongyuan; Wang, Lianshan; Chen, Zhen; Yang, Shaoyan

    2016-12-01

    The growth of well-aligned nanorods on amorphous substrates can pave the way to fabricate large-scale and low-cost devices. In this work, we successfully prepared vertically well-aligned c-axis InN nanorods on amorphous glass substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The products formed directly on bare glass are randomly oriented without preferential growth direction. By inserting a GaN/Ti interlayer, the nanowire alignment can be greatly improved as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. PMID:27229517

  3. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Risplendi, Francesca; Bernardi, Marco; Cicero, Giancarlo; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles mol...

  4. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Marrs

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm2 and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate.

  5. Substrate and Passivation Techniques for Flexible Amorphous Silicon-Based X-ray Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, Michael A; Raupp, Gregory B

    2016-01-01

    Flexible active matrix display technology has been adapted to create new flexible photo-sensing electronic devices, including flexible X-ray detectors. Monolithic integration of amorphous silicon (a-Si) PIN photodiodes on a flexible substrate poses significant challenges associated with the intrinsic film stress of amorphous silicon. This paper examines how altering device structuring and diode passivation layers can greatly improve the electrical performance and the mechanical reliability of the device, thereby eliminating one of the major weaknesses of a-Si PIN diodes in comparison to alternative photodetector technology, such as organic bulk heterojunction photodiodes and amorphous selenium. A dark current of 0.5 pA/mm² and photodiode quantum efficiency of 74% are possible with a pixelated diode structure with a silicon nitride/SU-8 bilayer passivation structure on a 20 µm-thick polyimide substrate. PMID:27472329

  6. Amorphous selenium photodetector on a flexible substrate for indirect conversion medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Majid, Shaikh H.; Allec, Nicholas; Karim, Karim S.

    2012-03-01

    Amorphous selenium photodetectors, in both lateral and vertical structures, have been investigated for indirect conversion medical imaging applications. The low dark current, high responsivity for blue light, and possibility for gain are all among the attractive features of these devices. Typically these devices are deposited on a solid glass substrate and are read out using thin-film-transistors (TFTs). With the advent of flexible TFTs, flexible electronics have become a viable technology. This technology may be leveraged for flexible imaging, however the detection and conversion materials that serve to convert the incident x-rays to collectable charge will also need to be flexible. In this paper, we investigate the use of amorphous selenium photodetectors on flexible substrates and compare their performance with amorphous selenium photodetectors deposited on glass.

  7. Inprovement of Field Emission Properties of PBS Thin Films by Amorphous Carbon Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead sulfide (PbS nanocrystalline thin films were synthesized at room temperature via chemical bath deposition on both silicon and glass substrates and coated with amorphous carbon of different thickness by varying deposition time in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The as prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and atomic force microscope (AFM. XRD study reveals that coating of amorphous carbon does not change the crystal structure of PbS. From FESEM images it is seen that the average size of PbS nanoparticle does not exceed 100 nm, though sometomes small cubic particles agglomerated to form bigger particles. The coating of amorphous carbon can be clearly visible by the FESEM as well as from AFM micrographs. Field emission study show a significant betterment for the carbon coated sample as compared to the pure PbS. The effect of inter-electrode distance on the field emission characteristics of best field emitting sample has been studied for three different inter-electrode distances.

  8. Bivalves build their shells from amorphous calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Soldati, A. L.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most common shell structures in the bivalve class is the prism and nacre structure. It is widely distributed amongst both freshwater and marine species and gives cultured pearls their sought-after lustre. In freshwater bivalves, both shell structures (prism and nacre) consist of aragonite. Formation of the shell form an amorphous precursor phase is a wide-spread strategy in biomineralization and presents a number of advantages for the organisms in the handling of the CaCO3 material. While there is already evidence that larval shells of some mollusk species use amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) as a transient precursor phase for aragonite, the use of this strategy by adult animals was only speculated upon. We present results from in-situ geochemistry, Raman spectroscopy and focused-ion beam assisted TEM on three species from two different bivalve families that show that remnants of ACC can be found in shells from adult species. We show that the amorphous phase is not randomly distributed, but is systematically found in a narrow zone at the interface between periostracum and prism layer. This zone is the area where spherulitic CaCO3- structures protrude from the inner periostracum to form the initial prisms. These observations are in accordance with our earlier results on equivalent structures in freshwater cultured pearls (Jacob et al., 2008) and show that the original building material for the prisms is amorphous calcium carbonate, secreted in vesicles at the inner periostracum layer. Quantitative temperature calibrations for paleoclimate applications using bivalve shells are based on the Mg-Ca exchange between inorganic aragonite (or calcite) and water. These calibrations, thus, do not take into account the biomineral crystallization path via an amorphous calcium carbonate precursor and are therefore likely to introduce a bias (a so-called vital effect) which currently is not accounted for. Jacob et al. (2008) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72, 5401-5415

  9. Growth, characterisation and electronic applications of amorphous hydrogenated carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, S

    2000-01-01

    temperature on GaAs, has been studied and concluded to be satisfactory on the basis of good adherence and low leakage currents. Such a structure was motivated by the applicability in Metal Insulator Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MISFET). My thesis proposes solutions to a number of riddles associated with the material, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, (a-C:H). This material has lately generated interest in the electronic engineering community, owing to some remarkable properties. The characterisation of amorphous carbon films, grown by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition has been reported. The coexistence of multiple phases in the same a-C:H film manifests itself in the inconsistent electrical behaviour of different parts of the film, thus rendering it difficult to predict the nature of films. For the first time, in this thesis, a reliable prediction of Schottky contact formation on a-C:H films is reported. A novel and simple development on a Scanning Electron Microscope, configu...

  10. Presence of Amorphous Carbon Nanoparticles in Food Caramels

    OpenAIRE

    Md Palashuddin Sk; Amit Jaiswal; Anumita Paul; Siddhartha Sankar Ghosh; Arun Chattopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    We report the finding of the presence of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) in different carbohydrate based food caramels, viz. bread, jaggery, sugar caramel, corn flakes and biscuits, where the preparation involves heating of the starting material. The CNPs were amorphous in nature; the particles were spherical having sizes in the range of 4–30 nm, depending upon the source of extraction. The results also indicated that particles formed at higher temperature were smaller than those formed at lower ...

  11. Simulation of swift boron clusters traversing amorphous carbon foils

    OpenAIRE

    Heredia Ávalos, Santiago; Abril Sánchez, Isabel; Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; García Molina, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    We use a simulation code to study the interaction of swift boron clusters (Bn+, n=2–6, 14) with amorphous carbon foils. We analyze different aspects of this interaction, such as the evolution of the cluster structure inside the target, the energy and angle distributions at the detector or the stopping power ratio. Our simulation code follows in detail the motion of the cluster fragments through the target and in the vacuum until reaching a detector, taking into account the following interacti...

  12. Photoelectron spectroscopy study of metallic nanocluster arrangement at the surface of reactively sputtered amorphous hydrogenated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the results of the arrangement of isolated surface metallic nanoclusters embedded in amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) thin films, studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. As a model system we used gold-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Au), due to the lack of reactivity between carbon and gold. The a-C:H/Au samples are obtained by simultaneous magnetron sputtering of Au target by argon and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of methane. Photoelectron spectroscopy with x-ray and ultraviolet excitation has been employed for surface studies that comprise as-deposited sample spectra recordings, measurements at off-normal takeoff angle, in situ in-depth profiling by Ar+ ion etching, and thiophene adsorption at the sample surface. The results of these extended studies firmly support previously drawn conclusions [I. R. Videnovic, V. Thommen, P. Oelhafen, D. Mathys, M. Dueggelin, and R. Guggenheim, Appl. Phys. Lett 80, 2863 (2002)] that by deposition on electrically grounded substrates one obtains samples with topmost Au clusters covered with a thin layer of a-C:H. Introducing a dc substrate bias voltage results in bald Au clusters on the surface and increased sp2/sp3 coordinated carbon ratio in the a-C:H matrix

  13. Defects study of hydrogenated amorphous silicon samples and their relation with the substrate and deposition conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work is to study the properties of the defects aiming to explore the types of defects and the effect of various deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, the kind of the substrate, gas pressure and deposition rate. Two kinds of samples have been used; The first one was a series of Schottky diodes, and the second one a series of solar cells (p-i-n junction) deposited on crystalline silicon or on corning glass substrates with different deposition parameters. The deposition parameters were chosen to obtain materials whose their structures varying from amorphous to microcrystalline silicon including polymorphous silicon. Our results show that the polymorphous silicon samples deposited at high deposition rates present the best photovoltaic properties in comparison with those deposited at low rates. Also we found that the defects concentration in high deposition rate samples is less at least by two orders than that obtained in low deposition rate polymorphous, microcrystalline and amorphous samples. This study shows also that there is no effect of the substrate, or the thin films of highly doped amorphous silicon deposited on the substrate, on the creation and properties of these defects. Finally, different experimental methods have been used; a comparison between their results has been presented. (author)

  14. Electromechanical properties of amorphous In-Zn-Sn-O transparent conducting film deposited at various substrate temperatures on polyimide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Sung; Lee, Eun Kyung; Eun, Kyoungtae; Choa, Sung-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    The electromechanical properties of the amorphous In-Zn-Sn-O (IZTO) film deposited at various substrate temperatures were investigated by bending, stretching, twisting, and cyclic bending fatigue tests. Amorphous IZTO films were grown on a transparent polyimide substrate using a pulsed DC magnetron sputtering system at different substrate temperatures ranging from room temperature to 200 °C. A single oxide alloyed ceramic target (In2O3: 80 wt %, ZnO: 10 wt %, SnO2: 10 wt % composition) was used. The amorphous IZTO film deposited at 150 °C exhibited an optimized electrical resistivity of 5.8 × 10-4 Ω cm, optical transmittance of 87%, and figure of merit of 8.3 × 10-3 Ω-1. The outer bending tests showed that the critical bending radius decreased as substrate temperature increased. On the other hand, in the inner bending tests, the critical bending radius increased with an increase in substrate temperature. The differences in the bendability of IZTO films for the outer and inner bending tests could be attributed to the internal residual stress of the films. The uniaxial stretching tests also showed the effects of the internal stress on the mechanical flexibility of the film. The bending and stretching test results demonstrated that the IZTO film had higher bendability and stretchability than the conventional ITO film. The IZTO film could withstand 10,000 bending cycles at a bending radius of 10 mm. The effect of the surface roughness on the mechanical durability of all IZTO films was very small due to their very smooth surfaces.

  15. HRTEM study of Popigai impact diamond: heterogeneous diamond nanostructures in native amorphous carbon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Viktoria K.; Shumilova, Tatyana; Masaitis, Victor

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied for the detailed nanostructural investigation of Popigai impact diamonds with the aim of revealing the nature of the amorphous carbon of the matrix. The successful application of two complementary specimen preparation methods, focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical cleavage, allowed direct imaging of nanotwinned nanodiamond crystals embedded in a native amorphous carbon matrix for the first time. Based on its stability under the electron beam, native amorphous carbon can be easily distinguished from the amorphous carbon layer produced by FIB milling during specimen preparation. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the native amorphous carbon revealed the dominance of sp 2-bonded carbon and the presence of a small amount of oxygen. The heterogeneous size distribution and twin density of the nanodiamond crystals and the structural properties of the native amorphous carbon are presumably related to non-graphitic (organic) carbon precursor material.

  16. Combined HRTEM and PEELS analysis of nanoporous and amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the mass density (1.37 kgm/m3) and sp2+sp3 bonding fraction (0.15) were determined for an unusual nanoporous amorphous carbon consisting of curved single graphitic sheets. A combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy (PEELS) was used. The values of these two parameters provide important constraints for the determination of the structure of this relatively low density variety of nanoporous carbon. The results are relevant also in the search for negatively-curved Schwarzite-related carbon structures. New date are also presented for highly-oriented pyrollytic graphite (HOPG), chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond, C60, glassy carbon (GC) and evaporated amorphous carbon (EAC); these are compared with the results for NAC. Kramers-Kronig analysis (KKA) of the low-loss PEELS data shows that the band gaps of both NAC and EAC are collapsed relative to that of CVD diamond. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  17. Properties and local structure of plasma-deposited amorphous silicon-carbon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon-carbon alloy films were plasma-deposited from methane and silane, varying gas ratio, R.F. power and substrate temperature. Carbon addition increases the optical gap, but also raises the dangling bond density while decreasing conductivity. Low C alloys can be gas-phase doped both p and n type. In the IR spectra the various Si-C stretching modes observed between 650 and 780 cm/sup -1/ are explained by back bonding variations. A tentative method of assigning this shift to back bonding of C to the Si is given. A distribution of modes is observed for all alloys, with each mode appearing even at 2% C. The distribution is sensitive to substrate temperature, but is stable after vacuum annealing to 4000C

  18. Influence of dc bias on amorphous carbon deposited by pulse laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films were deposited on single-crystalline silicon and K9 glass by pulse laser ablation using different negative substrate bias. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the surface. Thickness and refractive index of the film deposited on K9 glass were measured by ellipsometry. Micro-hardness of films was measured relatively to single crystal silicon. All films deposited on silicon were analyzed by Raman spectra. All spectra were deconvoluted to three peaks. Line-width ratios varied similarly with bias voltage when the laser energy was kept invariant.

  19. Reduction of Photoluminescence Quenching by Deuteration of Ytterbium-Doped Amorphous Carbon-Based Photonic Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Lin Hsu; Keith R. Leong; I-Ju Teng; Michael Halamicek; Jenh-Yih Juang; Sheng-Rui Jian; Li Qian; Nazir P. Kherani

    2014-01-01

    In situ Yb-doped amorphous carbon thin films were grown on Si substrates at low temperatures (<200 °C) by a simple one-step RF-PEMOCVD system as a potential photonic material for direct integration with Si CMOS back end-of-line processing. Room temperature photoluminescence around 1 µm was observed via direct incorporation of optically active Yb3+ ions from the selected Yb(fod)3 metal-organic compound. The partially fluorinated Yb(fod)3 compound assists the suppression of photoluminescence...

  20. Electron transport in W-containing amorphous carbon-silicon diamond-like nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron transport in amorphous hydrogenated carbon-silicon diamond-like nanocomposite films containing tungsten over the concentration range 12-40 at.% was studied in the temperature range 80-400 K. The films were deposited onto polycrystalline substrates, placed on the RF-biased substrate holder, by the combination of two methods: PECVD of siloxane vapours in the stimulated dc discharge and dc magnetron sputtering of tungsten target. The experimental dependences of the conductivity on the temperature are well fitted by the power-law dependences over the entire temperature range. The results obtained are discussed in terms of the model of inelastic tunnelling of the electrons in amorphous dielectrics. The average number of localized states (n) in the conducting channels between metal clusters calculated in the framework of this model is characterized by the non-monotonic dependence on the tungsten concentration in the films. The qualitative explanation of the results on the basis of host carbon-silicon matrix structural modifications is proposed. The evolution of the carbon-silicon matrix microstructure by the increase in the tungsten concentration is confirmed by the Raman spectroscopy data

  1. Strain-induced photoconductivity in thin films of Co doped amorphous carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y C; Gao, J

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, strain effect was mainly considered in the materials with periodic lattice structure, and was thought to be very weak in amorphous semiconductors. Here, we investigate the effects of strain in films of cobalt-doped amorphous carbon (Co-C) grown on 0.7PbMg(1/3)Nb(2/3)O3-0.3PbTiO3 (PMN-PT) substrates. The electric transport properties of the Co-C films were effectively modulated by the piezoelectric substrates. Moreover, we observed, for the first time, strain-induced photoconductivity in such an amorphous semiconductor. Without strain, no photoconductivity was observed. When subjected to strain, the Co-C films exhibited significant photoconductivity under illumination by a 532-nm monochromatic light. A strain-modified photoconductivity theory was developed to elucidate the possible mechanism of this remarkable phenomenon. The good agreement between the theoretical and experimental results indicates that strain-induced photoconductivity may derive from modulation of the band structure via the strain effect. PMID:25338641

  2. Interpretation of quantitative crystallographic texture in copper electrodeposits on amorphous substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Jensen, Jens Arne Dahl; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Crystallographic texture and morphology in Cu electrodeposits was studied in relation to the current density and the content of the organic levelling additive 3-mercapto-1-propanesulfonate. The substrate onto which Cu was electrodeposited consisted of amorphous Ni-P in order to allow substrate......-unbiased texture development in the electrodeposit. Comprehensive X-ray diffraction studies of the crystallographic texture, including calculations of the three-dimensional orientation distribution function, were performed and accompanied by investigations of the deposit morphology by means of light optical......-annealing effects (recrystallization) of the as-deposited layers were considered. (C) 2003 The Electrochemical Society....

  3. Characterization of defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on different substrates by capacitance techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwich, R., E-mail: rdarwich@aec.org.sy [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P. O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de physique des interfaces et des couches minces, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau France (France)

    2011-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrate were analyzed using different capacitance techniques. The distribution of localized states and some electronic properties were studied using the temperature, frequency and bias dependence of the Schottky barrier capacitance and deep level transient spectroscopy. Our results show that the distribution of the gap states depends on the type of substrate. We have found that the films deposited on c-Si substrate represent only one positively charged or prerelaxed neutral deep state and one interface state, while the films deposited on glass substrate have one interface state and three types of deep defect states, positively or prerelaxed neutral, neutral and negatively charged.

  4. Characterization of defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on different substrates by capacitance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrate were analyzed using different capacitance techniques. The distribution of localized states and some electronic properties were studied using the temperature, frequency and bias dependence of the Schottky barrier capacitance and deep level transient spectroscopy. Our results show that the distribution of the gap states depends on the type of substrate. We have found that the films deposited on c-Si substrate represent only one positively charged or pre relaxed neutral deep state and one interface state, while the films deposited on glass substrate have one interface state and three types of deep defect states, positively or pre relaxed neutral, neutral and negatively charged. (author)

  5. Characterization of defects in hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited on different substrates by capacitance techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrate were analyzed using different capacitance techniques. The distribution of localized states and some electronic properties were studied using the temperature, frequency and bias dependence of the Schottky barrier capacitance and deep level transient spectroscopy. Our results show that the distribution of the gap states depends on the type of substrate. We have found that the films deposited on c-Si substrate represent only one positively charged or prerelaxed neutral deep state and one interface state, while the films deposited on glass substrate have one interface state and three types of deep defect states, positively or prerelaxed neutral, neutral and negatively charged.

  6. Superconductivity in Sulfur-Doped Amorphous Carbon Films

    OpenAIRE

    Felner, I.; Wolf, O; Millo, O.

    2013-01-01

    Following our previous investigations on superconductivity in amorphous carbon (aC) based systems; we have prepared thin composite aC-W films using electron-beam induced deposition. The films did not show any sign for superconductivity above 5 K. However, local, non-percolative, superconductivity emerged at Tc = 34.4 K after treatment with sulfur at 250 C for 24 hours. The superconducting features in the magnetization curves were by far sharper compared to our previous results, and the shield...

  7. Superconductivity and unusual magnetic behavior in amorphous carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Felner, Israel

    2013-01-01

    Traces of superconductivity (SC) at elevated temperatures (up to 65 K) were observed by magnetic measurements in three different inhomogeneous sulfur doped amorphous carbon (a-C) systems: (a) in commercial and (b) synthesized powders and (c) in a-C thin films. (a) Studies performed on commercial (a-C) powder which contains 0.21% of sulfur, revealed traces of non-percolated superconducting phases below Tc = 65 K. The SC volume fraction is enhanced by the sulfur doping. (b) a-C powder obtained ...

  8. A percolation theory approach to the implantation induced diamond to amorphous-carbon transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical fact that diamond is electrically insulating while amorphous carbon and graphite are conducting is used in the present work to study the local damage that each implanted ion creates around its track and to conclude about the processes through which implanted diamond turns amorphous. Experimental data for the conductivity of Sb implanted diamond for various geometries, energies and doses are analyzed by the use of percolation theory. It seems that the amorphization of implanted diamond proceeds gradually with no well defined amorphous regions formed around the ion track. Amorphization in implanted diamond seems to occur in a way different than is believed to be the case for implanted silicon, where some direct amorphization around an ion track is suggested. This major difference can be attributed to the abnormally large change in densities between diamond and amorphous carbon or graphite which suppresses the growth of local amorphous regions in diamond. (author)

  9. Controlled fluoridation of amorphous carbon films deposited at reactive plasma conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoffe Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the correlations between plasma parameters, gas ratios, and deposited amorphous carbon film properties is presented. The injection of a C4F8/Ar/N2 mixture of gases was successfully used in an inductively coupled plasma system for the preparation of amorphous carbon films with different fluoride doping at room-temperature, using silicon as a substrate. This coating was formed at low-pressure and low-energy using an inductively coupled plasma process. A strong dependence between the ratios of gases during deposition and the composition of the substrate compounds was shown. The values of ratios between Ar (or Ar+N2 and C4F8 - 1:1 and between N2 and Ar - 1:2 in the N2/Ar/C4F8 mixture were found as the best for low fluoridated coatings. In addition, an example of improving the etch-passivation in the Bosch procedure was described. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy options, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectivity were used for quantitative analysis of the deposited films.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp2 and sp3 bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  11. Chemical bonding modifications of tetrahedral amorphous carbon and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films induced by rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, R. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Roy, S.S. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.sinha-roy@ulster.ac.uk; Papakonstantinou, P. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Bain, M.F. [Queens University of Belfast, School of Elect and Elect Engineering, Belfast, Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Gamble, H.S. [Queens University of Belfast, School of Elect and Elect Engineering, Belfast, Antrim, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, J.A. [NIBEC, School of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, University of Ulster at Jordanstown, Newtownabbey, Co. Antrim, BT37 OQB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-22

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) and nitrogenated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films (ta-CN {sub x}), deposited by double bend off plane Filtered Vacuum Cathodic Arc were annealed up to 1000 deg. C in flowing argon for 2 min. Modifications on the chemical bonding structure of the rapidly annealed films, as a function of temperature, were investigated by NEXAFS, X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The interpretation of these spectra is discussed. The results demonstrate that the structure of undoped ta-C films prepared at floating potential with an arc current of 80 A remains stable up to 900 deg. C, whereas that of ta-CN {sub x} containing 12 at.% nitrogen is stable up to 700 deg. C. At higher temperatures, all the spectra indicated the predominant formation of graphitic carbon. Through NEXAFS studies, we clearly observed three {pi}* resonance peaks at the {sup '}N K edge structure. The origin of these three peaks is not well established in the literature. However our temperature-dependant study ascertained that the first peak originates from C=N bonds and the third peak originates from the incorporation of nitrogen into the graphite like domains.

  12. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Caniello; Espedito Vassallo; Anna Cremona; Giovanni Grosso; David Dellasega; Maurizio Canetti; Enrico Miorin

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coatin...

  13. Direct growth of single-crystalline III-V semiconductors on amorphous substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager Iii, Joel W; Chrzan, Daryl C; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III-V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III-V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III-V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III-V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III-V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth. PMID:26813257

  14. Direct growth of single-crystalline III-V semiconductors on amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kevin; Kapadia, Rehan; Harker, Audrey; Desai, Sujay; Seuk Kang, Jeong; Chuang, Steven; Tosun, Mahmut; Sutter-Fella, Carolin M.; Tsang, Michael; Zeng, Yuping; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hazra, Jubin; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Hettick, Mark; Chen, Yu-Ze; Mastandrea, James; Amani, Matin; Cabrini, Stefano; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ager, Joel W., III; Chrzan, Daryl C.; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The III-V compound semiconductors exhibit superb electronic and optoelectronic properties. Traditionally, closely lattice-matched epitaxial substrates have been required for the growth of high-quality single-crystal III-V thin films and patterned microstructures. To remove this materials constraint, here we introduce a growth mode that enables direct writing of single-crystalline III-V's on amorphous substrates, thus further expanding their utility for various applications. The process utilizes templated liquid-phase crystal growth that results in user-tunable, patterned micro and nanostructures of single-crystalline III-V's of up to tens of micrometres in lateral dimensions. InP is chosen as a model material system owing to its technological importance. The patterned InP single crystals are configured as high-performance transistors and photodetectors directly on amorphous SiO2 growth substrates, with performance matching state-of-the-art epitaxially grown devices. The work presents an important advance towards universal integration of III-V's on application-specific substrates by direct growth.

  15. Regrowth of Carbon Nanotubes Array on Al Layer Coated Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chao Chiu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotube (CNT arrays have been synthesized by a repeated growth method using a custom-fabricated plasma-enhanced thermal chemical vapor deposition (PE-thermal CVD apparatus. The initial catalyst is a layered structure prepared by depositing 10 nm of Al followed by 3 nm of Fe on an oxidized silicon substrate. Following CNT growth, the CNT arrays are removed using an ultrasonic cleaner, and another CNT array is grown on the remaining Fe-Al bimetalic nanoparticles without the addition of more catalyst. Annealing the catalytic substrate in air between growth cycles results in the removal of residual amorphous carbon along with the CNTs, and oxidation of the Fe-Al nanoparticles. The diameter of CNTs is reduced with repeated growth-annealing cycles, an effect of which is attributed to the diminishing size of the catalytically active nanoparticles with each cycle. After two growth cycles, SWNTs with the extraordinarily narrow diameter of 0.86 nm are synthesized. The ID/IG ratio derived from the Raman spectrum of these of the SWNT arrays shows the remarkably low value of 0.22.

  16. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  17. Amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells deposited on flexible substrates using different zinc oxide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alpuim, P.; Samantilleke, A.; Marins, E.; Rebouta, L. [Centro de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Oliveira, F.; Cerqueira, M.F. [Centro de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Centro de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Stefanov, S.; Chiussi, S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidade de Vigo, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Serra, C. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidade de Vigo, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); C.A.C.T.I., Universidade de Vigo, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Bouree, J.E. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS UMR 7647, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2010-04-15

    In order to improve the transparent contact layer in amorphous silicon solar cells fabricated on low-temperature plastic substrates, Al and Ga doped ZnO films were deposited at room temperature on plastic and glass and their optical, electronic and structural properties were correlated and optimized. Aiming to explore light trapping effects, plastic substrates were laser textured and their haze and total transmittance and reflectance were compared with those of untextured substrates. Although the haze increased dramatically, from 1.7 to 78.9%, the total transmittance of PET coated with ZnO:Ga decreased from 83.9%, in the untextured substrate, to 58.5% in the textured PET. The haze in reflected light of PET coated with Al increased from 4.3% to 66.2% after texturing but the total reflectance decreased from 70.1% to 36.8%. Therefore the untextured substrates were used in the solar cells. a-Si:H solar cells were deposited at a substrate temperature of 150 C on plastic, in the superstrate p-i-n configuration, and on stainless steel, in the substrate n-i-p configuration. The efficiency is {proportional_to}5% in both types of devices, limited by low J{sub sc} and low fill factor. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Selective Oxidation of Amorphous Carbon Layers without Damaging Embedded Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Chul; Lim, Seong Chu

    2013-11-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were synthesized by arc discharge, and then purified by selective oxidation of amorphous carbon layers that were found to encase SWCNT bundles and catalyst metal particles. In order to remove selectively the amorphous carbon layers with SWCNTs being intact, we have systematically investigated the thermal treatment conditions; firstly, setting the temperature by measuring the activation energies of SWCNTs and amorphous carbon layers, and then, secondly, finding the optimal process time. As a consequence, the optimal temperature and time for the thermal treatment was found to be 460 °C and 20 min, respectively. The complete elimination of surrounding amorphous carbon layers makes it possible to efficiently disperse the SWCNT bundles, resulting in high absorbance of SWCNT-ink. The SWCNTs which were thermal-treated at optimized temperature (460 °C) and duration (20 min) showed much better crystallinity, dispersibility, and transparent conducting properties, compared with as-synthesized and the nanotubes thermal-treated at different experimental conditions.

  19. Substrate-induced strain in carbon nanodisks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphitic nanodisks of typically 20–50 nm in thickness, produced by the so-called Kvaerner Carbon Black and Hydrogen Process were dispersed on gold substrate and investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and confocal Raman spectroscopy. The roughness of the gold surface was drastically changed by annealing at 400 °C. AFM measurements show that this change in the surface roughness induces changes also in the topography of the nanodisks, as they closely follow the corrugation of the gold substrate. This leads to strained nanodisks, which is confirmed also by confocal Raman microscopy. We found that the FE-SEM contrast obtained from the disks depends on the working distance used during the image acquisition by In-lens detection, a phenomenon which we explain by the decrease in the amount of electrons reaching the detector due to diffraction. This process may affect the image contrast in the case of other layered materials, like hexagonal boron nitride, and other planar hybrid nanostructures, too. - Highlights: • Bending of carbon nanodisks is induced by the roughness of the gold substrate. • Confocal Raman microscopy shows a compressive strain induced in the nanodisks. • The electron microscopy contrast of nanodisks depends on the working distance

  20. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Bernardi, Marco; Cicero, Giancarlo; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-07-01

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  1. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  2. Solid-phase Crystallization of Hydrogenated Amorphous Silicon on Glass Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Amorphous silicon films prepared by PECVD on glass substrate have been crystallized by conventional furnace annealing and rapid thermal annealing(RTA), respectively. From the Raman spectra, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope, it is found that the grain size is crystallized at 850℃ in both techniques. The thin film made by RTA is smooth and of perfect structure, the thin film annealed by FA has a highly structural disorder. An average grain size of about 30nm is obtained by both techniques.

  3. Time-Resolved Observation of Deposition Process of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Kunihito Nagayama; Tsuyoshi Yoshitake; Takashi Nishiyama; Kenji Hanada

    2009-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere wherein ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films were grown on heated substrates. Time-resolved photographs of a plume that expanded from a laser-irradiation spot toward a substrate were taken using a high-speed ICCD camera equipped with narrow-bandpass filters. While the emissions from C atoms and C2 dimers lasted above the laser-irradi...

  4. Pulsed laser deposition of amorphous carbon/silver nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metal/amorphous carbon (a-C:M) composite films are emerging as a category of very important engineering materials for surface protection. We implement pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to grow pure a-C and a-C:Ag nanocomposites. Our PLD process is assisted by a static electric field. We investigate the structural features of the a-C:Ag nanocomposites and the bonding configuration of the a-C matrix with respect to the electric field and the composition of the PLD target. For this study we use Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We show that the Ag mean grain size and the sp2 content of the a-C matrix are increasing with increasing Ag content in the films

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of amorphous carbon/silver nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matenoglou, G.; Evangelakis, G. A.; Kosmidis, C.; Foulias, S.; Papadimitriou, D.; Patsalas, P.

    2007-07-01

    Metal/amorphous carbon (a-C:M) composite films are emerging as a category of very important engineering materials for surface protection. We implement pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to grow pure a-C and a-C:Ag nanocomposites. Our PLD process is assisted by a static electric field. We investigate the structural features of the a-C:Ag nanocomposites and the bonding configuration of the a-C matrix with respect to the electric field and the composition of the PLD target. For this study we use Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We show that the Ag mean grain size and the sp 2 content of the a-C matrix are increasing with increasing Ag content in the films.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of amorphous carbon/silver nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matenoglou, G. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Evangelakis, G.A. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Kosmidis, C. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Foulias, S. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Papadimitriou, D. [University of Ioannina, Department of Physics, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Patsalas, P. [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece)]. E-mail: ppats@cc.uoi.gr

    2007-07-31

    Metal/amorphous carbon (a-C:M) composite films are emerging as a category of very important engineering materials for surface protection. We implement pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to grow pure a-C and a-C:Ag nanocomposites. Our PLD process is assisted by a static electric field. We investigate the structural features of the a-C:Ag nanocomposites and the bonding configuration of the a-C matrix with respect to the electric field and the composition of the PLD target. For this study we use Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). We show that the Ag mean grain size and the sp{sup 2} content of the a-C matrix are increasing with increasing Ag content in the films.

  7. Presence of Amorphous Carbon Nanoparticles in Food Caramels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palashuddin, Sk; Jaiswal, Amit; Paul, Anumita; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2012-04-01

    We report the finding of the presence of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) in different carbohydrate based food caramels, viz. bread, jaggery, sugar caramel, corn flakes and biscuits, where the preparation involves heating of the starting material. The CNPs were amorphous in nature; the particles were spherical having sizes in the range of 4-30 nm, depending upon the source of extraction. The results also indicated that particles formed at higher temperature were smaller than those formed at lower temperature. Excitation tuneable photoluminescence was observed for all the samples with quantum yield (QY) 1.2, 0.55 and 0.63%, for CNPs from bread, jaggery and sugar caramels respectively. The present discovery suggests potential usefulness of CNPs for various biological applications, as the sources of extraction are regular food items, some of which have been consumed by humans for centuries, and thus they can be considered as safe.

  8. Resistance switching at the nanometre scale in amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrical transport and resistance switching mechanism in amorphous carbon (a-C) is investigated at the nanoscale. The electrical conduction in a-C thin films is shown to be captured well by a Poole-Frenkel transport model that involves nonisolated traps. Moreover, at high electric fields a field-induced threshold switching phenomenon is observed. The following resistance change is attributed to Joule heating and subsequent localized thermal annealing. We demonstrate that the mechanism is mostly due to clustering of the existing sp2 sites within the sp3 matrix. The electrical conduction behaviour, field-induced switching and Joule-heating-induced rearrangement of atomic order resulting in a resistance change are all reminiscent of conventional phase-change memory materials. This suggests the potential of a-C as a similar nonvolatile memory candidate material.

  9. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jeffery Alexander; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plume ion condensation formation mechanism. By fine-tuning the laser plume temperature and ion interaction mechanisms within the plume, we are able to precisely program the relative proportion of crystalline Si to amorphous Si content in the nanospheroids as well as the size distribution of individual nanospheroids and the size of Raman hotspot nanogaps. With the use of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) and Crystal Violet (CV) chemical dyes, we have been able to observe a maximum enhancement factor of 5.38 × 106 and 3.72 × 106 respectively, for the hybrid nanomaterial compared to a bulk Si wafer substrate. With the creation of a silicon-based nanomaterial capable of SERS detection of analytes, this work demonstrates a redefinition of the role of nanostructured Si from an inactive to SERS active role in nano-Raman sensing applications.

  10. Low-temperature graphitization of amorphous carbon nanospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katia Barbera; Leone Frusteri; Giuseppe Italiano; Lorenzo Spadaro; Francesco Frusteri; Siglinda Perathoner; Gabriele Centi

    2014-01-01

    The investigation by SEM/TEM, porosity, and X-ray diffraction measurements of the graphitization process starting from amorphous carbon nanospheres, prepared by glucose carbonization, is re-ported. Aspects studied are the annealing temperature in the 750-1000 °C range, the type of inert carrier gas, and time of treatment in the 2-6 h range. It is investigated how these parameters influ-ence the structural and morphological characteristics of the carbon materials obtained as well as their nanostructure. It is shown that it is possible to maintain after graphitization the round-shaped macro morphology, a high surface area and porosity, and especially a large structural disorder in the graphitic layers stacking, with the presence of rather small ordered domains. These are charac-teristics interesting for various catalytic applications. The key in obtaining these characteristics is the thermal treatment in a flow of N2. It was demonstrated that the use of He rather than N2 does not allow obtaining the same results. The effect is attributed to the presence of traces of oxygen, enough to create the presence of oxygen functional groups on the surface temperatures higher than 750 °C, when graphitization occurs. These oxygen functional groups favor the graphitization pro-cess.

  11. Research Update: Direct conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond at ambient pressures and temperatures in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on fundamental discovery of conversion of amorphous carbon into diamond by irradiating amorphous carbon films with nanosecond lasers at room-temperature in air at atmospheric pressure. We can create diamond in the form of nanodiamond (size range <100 nm) and microdiamond (>100 nm). Nanosecond laser pulses are used to melt amorphous diamondlike carbon and create a highly undercooled state, from which various forms of diamond can be formed upon cooling. The quenching from the super undercooled state results in nucleation of nanodiamond. It is found that microdiamonds grow out of highly undercooled state of carbon, with nanodiamond acting as seed crystals

  12. Amorphous silicon carbide heterojunction solar cells on p-type substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells is discussed in this paper in regard to their dependence on the applied amorphous silicon layers, their thicknesses and surface morphology. The emitter system investigated in this work consists of an n-doped, hydrogenized, amorphous silicon carbide a-SiC:H(n) layer with or without a pure, hydrogenized, intrinsic, amorphous silicon a-Si:H(i) intermediate layer. All solar cells were fabricated on p-type FZ-silicon and feature a high-efficiency backside consisting of a SiO2 passivation layer and a diffused local boron back surface field, allowing us to focus only on the effects of the front side emitter system. The highest solar cell efficiency achieved within this work is 18.5%, which is one of the highest values for SHJ-solar cells using p-type substrates. A dependence of the passivation quality on the surface morphology was only observed for solar cells including an a-Si:H(i) layer. It could be shown that the fill factor suffers from a reduction due to a reduced pseudo fill factor for emitter thicknesses below 11 nm due to a lower passivation quality and/or a higher potential for shunting thorough the a-Si emitter to the crystalline wafer with the conductive indium tin oxide layer. Furthermore, the influence of a variation of the doping gas flow (PH3) during the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of the doped amorphous silicon carbide a-SiC:H(n) on the solar cell current-voltage characteristic-parameter has been investigated. We could demonstrate that a-SiC:H(n) shows in principle the same dependence on PH3-flow as pure a-Si:H(n).

  13. Nanocomposite metal amorphous-carbon thin films deposited by hybrid PVD and PECVD technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, V; Soares, P; Martins, A J; Carneiro, J; Cerqueira, F

    2009-07-01

    Carbon based films can combine the properties of solid lubricating graphite structure and hard diamond crystal structure, i.e., high hardness, chemical inertness, high thermal conductivity and optical transparency without the crystalline structure of diamond. Issues of fundamental importance associated with nanocarbon coatings are reducing stress, improving adhesion and compatibility with substrates. In this work new nanocomposite coatings with improved toughness based in nanocrystalline phases of metals and ceramics embedded in amorphous carbon matrix are being developed within the frame of a research project: nc-MeNxCy/a-C(Me) with Me = Mo, Si, Al, Ti, etc. Carbide forming metal/carbon (Me/C) composite films with Me = Mo, W or Ti possess appropriate properties to overcome the limitation of pure DLC films. These novel coating architectures will be adopted with the objective to decrease residual stress, improve adherence and fracture toughness, obtain low friction coefficient and high wear-resistance. Nanocomposite DLC's films were deposited by hybrid technique using a PVD-Physically Vapor Deposition (magnetron sputtering) and Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD), by the use of CH4 gas. The parameters varied were: deposition time, substrate temperature (180 degrees C) and dopant (Si + Mo) of the amorphous carbon matrix. All the depositions were made on silicon wafers and steel substrates precoated with a silicon inter-layer. The characterisation of the film's physico-mechanical properties will be presented in order to understand the influence of the deposition parameters and metal content used within the a-C matrix in the thin film properties. Film microstructure and film hybridization state was characterized by Raman Spectroscopy. In order to characterize morphology SEM and AFM will be used. Film composition was measured by Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS) and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The contact angle for the produced DLC's on

  14. Microtribology of Nitrogen-doped Amorphous Carbon Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong F. Wang

    2004-01-01

    The friction, wear and lubrication of carbon nitride coatings on silicon substrates are studied using a spherical diamond counter-face with nano-scale asperities. The first part of this paper clarifies the coating thickness effect on frictional behavior of carbon nitride coatings. The second part of this paper reports empirical data on wear properties in repeated sliding contacts through in situ examination and post-sliding observation. The third part will concentrate on wear mechanisms for the transition from "No observable wear particles" to "Wear particle generation." In light of the above tribological study, the application of carbon nitride coatings to MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) is therefore discussed from view points of both microtribology and micromachining.

  15. The Ammount of Interstellar Carbon Locked in Solid Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Furton, D. G.; Laiho, J. W.; Witt, A. N.

    1999-01-01

    We review the literature and present new experimental data to determine the amount of carbon likely to be locked in form of solid hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) grains. We conclude on the basis of a thorough analysis of the intrinsic strength of the C-H stretching band at 3.4 micron that between 10 and 80 ppM H of carbon is in the form of HAC grains. We show that it is necessary to know the level of hydrogenation (H/C) of the interstellar HAC to determine more precisely the amount of car...

  16. Production of thin carbon stripper foils using heated-substrates in a cathodic arc deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lifetime of carbon stripper foil can have a marked impact on the successful running of a beam line. Standard techniques for production of carbon stripper foils include evaporation of carbon (ec) and laser-pulsed ablation (Ipa). Recent work by a using Ipa has been successful in substantially increasing the lifetime of a very thin foil. The suspected mechanism for the increased lifetime of the foil is that the amorphous carbon foil is density-matched to that of graphite (around 2.26g/cc). In this work, we attempt to reproduce this result by producing carbon stripper foils with a mass-density similar to graphite using a cathodic arc deposition system. The cathodic arc is well known for the production of tetrahedral amorphous carbon: a high density, high stress form of carbon with over 90% sp3-like bonds; to reduce the density of the carbon and promote more graphitic structure, a high bias was initially attempted but this proved unsuccessful. Another method is to use a heated-substrate holder to reduce compressive stress within the deposited film. The performance of the density-matched carbon stripper foils and the implications for future production of high-quality carbon stripper foils in our laboratory will be discussed. (authors)

  17. Growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) on patterned substrates for increased mechanical stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Residual stress in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film, which causes substrate bending and delamination, is studied. The internal stress can be reduced by controlling deposition parameters, but it is known to produce a trade-off between stress and electronic quality. Selective area deposition, in which the deposition area is reduced by making islands, reduced the stress when the lateral dimension of the islands becomes comparable to the film thickness. The overall stress is reduced by approximately 40% when the lateral dimension is decreased to 40 μm, but the adhesion was not improved much. However, substrates having a 2-dimensional array of inversed pyramids of 200 μm in lateral dimension produced overall stress 3 ∼ 4 times lower than that on the normal substrates. Such substrates were prepared by anisotropic etching of silicon wafers. The inversed pyramid structure also has other advantages including minimized delamination and increased effective thickness. Computer simulation confirmed that the overall stress can be reduced by deposition on the pyramidal structure

  18. Field Emission and Radial Distribution Function Studies of Fractal-like Amorphous Carbon Nanotips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lebrón-Colón M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The short-range order of individual fractal-like amorphous carbon nanotips was investigated by means of energy-filtered electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope (TEM. The nanostructures were grown in porous silicon substrates in situ within the TEM by the electron beam-induced deposition method. The structure factorS(k and the reduced radial distribution functionG(r were calculated. From these calculations a bond angle of 124° was obtained which suggests a distorted graphitic structure. Field emission was obtained from individual nanostructures using two micromanipulators with sub-nanometer positioning resolution. A theoretical three-stage model that accounts for the geometry of the nanostructures provides a value for the field enhancement factor close to the one obtained experimentally from the Fowler-Nordheim law.

  19. Rapid thermal annealing of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon (a-C:H) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Pouch, John J.; Warner, Joseph D.

    1987-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were deposited on silicon and quartz substrates by a 30 kHz plasma discharge technique using methane. Rapid thermal processing of the films was accomplished in nitrogen gas using tungsten halogen light. The rapid thermal processing was done at several fixed temperatures (up to 600 C), as a function of time (up to 1800 sec). The films were characterized by optical absorption and by ellipsometry in the near UV and the visible. The bandgap, estimated from extrapolation of the linear part of a Tauc plot, decreases both with the annealing temperature and the annealing time, with the temperature dependence being the dominating factor. The density of states parameter increases up to 25 percent and the refractive index changes up to 20 percent with temperature increase. Possible explanations of the mechanisms involved in these processes are discussed.

  20. Gas and pressure effects on the synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tingkai; LIU Yongning; ZHU Jiewu

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gas, pressure and temperature on the production of amorphous carbon nanotubes were investigated using an arc discharging furnace at controlled temperature. Co/Ni alloy powder was used as catalyst.The discharge current was 80 A and voltage was 32 V. The optimal parameters were obtained: 600℃ temperature, hydrogen gas and 500 torr pressure. The productivity and purity of amorphous carbon nanotubes are 6.5 gram per hour and 80%, respectively. The diameter of the amorphous carbon nanotubes is about 7-20 nm.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of amorphous silica gel adsorbed on gold substrates for optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degioanni, S.; Jurdyc, A. M.; Cheap, A.; Champagnon, B.; Bessueille, F.; Coulm, J.; Bois, L.; Vouagner, D.

    2015-10-01

    Two kinds of gold substrates are used to produce surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of amorphous silica obtained via the sol-gel route using tetraethoxysilane Si(OC2H5)4 (TEOS) solution. The first substrate consists of a gold nanometric film elaborated on a glass slide by sputter deposition, controlling the desired gold thickness and sputtering current intensity. The second substrate consists of an array of micrometer-sized gold inverted pyramidal pits able to confine surface plasmon (SP) enhancing electric field, which results in a distribution of electromagnetic energy inside the cavities. These substrates are optically characterized to observe SPR with, respectively, extinction and reflectance spectrometries. Once coated with thin layers of amorphous silica (SiO2) gel, these samples show Raman amplification of amorphous SiO2 bands. This enhancement can occur in SERS sensors using amorphous SiO2 gel as shells, spacers, protective coatings, or waveguides, and represents particularly a potential interest in the field of Raman distributed sensors, which use the amorphous SiO2 core of optical fibers as a transducer to make temperature measurements.

  2. Gas desorption during friction of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, A.; Fontaine, J.; Martin, J.-M.; Mogne, T. L.; Nevshupa, R.

    2008-03-01

    Gas desorption induced by friction of solids, i.e. tribodesorption, is one of the numerous physical and chemical phenomena, which arise during friction as result of thermal and structural activation of material in a friction zone. Tribodesorption of carbon oxides, hydrocarbons, and water vapours may lead to significant deterioration of ultra high vacuum conditions in modern technological equipment in electronic, optoelectronic industries. Therefore, knowledge of tribodesorption is crucial for the performance and lifetime of vacuum tribosystems. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are interesting materials for vacuum tribological systems due to their high wear resistance and low friction. Highly hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films are known to exhibit extremely low friction coefficient under high vacuum or inert environment, known as 'superlubricity' or 'superlow friction'. However, the superlow friction period is not always stable and then tends to spontaneous transition to high friction. It is supposed that hydrogen supply from the bulk to the surface is crucial for establishing and maintaining superlow friction. Thus, tribodesorption can serve also as a new technique to determine the role of gases in superlow friction mechanisms. Desorption of various a-C:H films, deposited by PECVD, ion-beam deposition and deposition using diode system, has been studied by means of ultra-high vacuum tribometer equipped with a mass spectrometer. It was found that in superlow friction period desorption rate was below the detection limit in the 0-85 mass range. However, transition from superlow friction to high friction was accompanied by desorption of various gases, mainly of H2 and CH4. During friction transition, surfaces were heavily damaged. In experiments with DLC films with low hydrogen content tribodesorption was significant during the whole experiment, while low friction was not observed. From estimation of maximum surface temperature during sliding contact it was

  3. Electrical characteristics of nitrogen incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen incorporation into hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films has recently attracted a wide range of interest due to its contribution in reducing film stress and improving field emission properties. In this work we characterize the electrical properties of nitrogen containing a-C:H films. The a-C:H films were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition in an acetylene (C2H2) environment with a range of bias voltages. Nitrogen incorporation was achieved by exposing the films to an atomic nitrogen flux from a rf plasma with up to 40% dissociation and atomic nitrogen fluxes of up to 0.85x1018 atoms s-1. Raman results indicate that the doping process is accompanied by some structural changes seen by the G-band peak shifts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra suggest that the dopant levels exceed those previously reported. Capacitance probe and I-V techniques showed a decrease in contact potential difference and density of states for doped films, indicating a rise in the Fermi level

  4. Studies of nanostructured copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon multilayer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Multilayer coatings have been grown by RF-PECVD and RF-sputtering techniques under varied bilayers from one to four. → After deposition these coatings were characterized for stress, hardness, elastic modulus, SEM, AFM, XPS, EDAX, SIMS, PL, transmission, and conductivity. → Observed results were correlated fairly with each other. - Abstract: Nanostructured copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) multilayer grown in a low base vacuum (1 x 10-3 Torr) system combining plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering techniques. These nanostructured multilayer were found to exhibit improved electrical, optical, surface and structural properties, compared to that of monolayer a-C:H films. The residual stresses of such multilayer structure were found well below 1 GPa. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy results revealed a nanostructured surface morphology and low surface roughnesses values. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed a very small amount of copper in these films. These structures exhibited very high optical transparency in the near infrared region (∼90%) and the optical band gap varied from 1.35 to 1.7 eV. It was noticed that the temperature dependent conductivity improved due to the presence of both copper and the nano-structured morphology.

  5. Controlled epitaxial graphene growth within removable amorphous carbon corrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, James; Kunc, Jan; Hu, Yike; Hankinson, John; Guo, Zelei; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.

    2014-07-01

    We address the question of control of the silicon carbide (SiC) steps and terraces under epitaxial graphene on SiC and demonstrate amorphous carbon (aC) corrals as an ideal method to pin SiC surface steps. aC is compatible with graphene growth, structurally stable at high temperatures, and can be removed after graphene growth. For this, aC is first evaporated and patterned on SiC, then annealed in the graphene growth furnace. There at temperatures above 1200 °C, mobile SiC steps accumulate at the aC corral that provide effective step flow barriers. Aligned step free regions are thereby formed for subsequent graphene growth at temperatures above 1330 °C. Atomic force microscopy imaging supports the formation of step-free terraces on SiC with the step morphology aligned to the aC corrals. Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of good graphene sheets on the step-free terraces.

  6. Near single-crystalline, high-carrier-mobility silicon thin film on a polycrystalline/amorphous substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findikoglu, Alp T. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Arendt, Paul N. (Los Alamos, NM); Matias, Vladimir (Santa Fe, NM); Choi, Woong (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-10-27

    A template article including a base substrate including: (i) a base material selected from the group consisting of polycrystalline substrates and amorphous substrates, and (ii) at least one layer of a differing material upon the surface of the base material; and, a buffer material layer upon the base substrate, the buffer material layer characterized by: (a) low chemical reactivity with the base substrate, (b) stability at temperatures up to at least about 800.degree. C. under low vacuum conditions, and (c) a lattice crystal structure adapted for subsequent deposition of a semiconductor material; is provided, together with a semiconductor article including a base substrate including: (i) a base material selected from the group consisting of polycrystalline substrates and amorphous substrates, and (ii) at least one layer of a differing material upon the surface of the base material; and, a buffer material layer upon the base substrate, the buffer material layer characterized by: (a) low chemical reactivity with the base substrate, (b) stability at temperatures up to at least about 800.degree. C. under low vacuum conditions, and (c) a lattice crystal structure adapted for subsequent deposition of a semiconductor material, and, a top-layer of semiconductor material upon the buffer material layer.

  7. Influence of the incident angle of energetic carbon ions on the properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongping; Benstetter, Günther; Lodermeier, Edgar; Vancea, Johann

    2003-09-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films have been grown on Ar+-beam-cleaned silicon substrates by changing the incident angle of energetic carbon ions produced in the plasma of pulsed cathodic vacuum arc discharge. Their surface roughness, deposition rate, composition, and mechanical and frictional properties as a function of the incident angle of energetic carbon ions were reported. The substrate holder can be rotated, and so an angle of deposition was defined as the angle of ion flux with respect to the substrate surface. While the deposition angle is varied from 20° to 59°, the root-mean-square (rms) roughness decreases from 0.5 to 0.1 nm, then it turns to increase at a slow rate when the deposition angle is over 77°. The variation correlates well with the one of hardness with the deposition angle and the films with lower rms roughness exhibit the higher hardness. The soft graphite-like surface layers existing at the surfaces of these films were revealed by atomic force microscopy-based nanowear tests and their thickness increases from 0.35 to 2.9 nm with the deposition angle decreasing from 90° to 30°. The soft surface layer thickness can have a great effect on the sp3 contents measured by x-ray photoelectron spectra. Nanoscale friction coefficient measurements were performed from lateral force microscopy by using a V-shaped Si3N4 cantilever. The low friction coefficients (0.076-0.093) of ta-C films can be attributed to their graphite-like surface structure. The implications of these results on the mechanisms proposed for the film formation were discussed.

  8. Reduction of Photoluminescence Quenching by Deuteration of Ytterbium-Doped Amorphous Carbon-Based Photonic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Lin Hsu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In situ Yb-doped amorphous carbon thin films were grown on Si substrates at low temperatures (<200 °C by a simple one-step RF-PEMOCVD system as a potential photonic material for direct integration with Si CMOS back end-of-line processing. Room temperature photoluminescence around 1 µm was observed via direct incorporation of optically active Yb3+ ions from the selected Yb(fod3 metal-organic compound. The partially fluorinated Yb(fod3 compound assists the suppression of photoluminescence quenching by substitution of C–H with C–F bonds. A four-fold enhancement of Yb photoluminescence was demonstrated via deuteration of the a-C host. The substrate temperature greatly influences the relative deposition rate of the plasma dissociated metal-organic species, and hence the concentration of the various elements. Yb and F incorporation are promoted at lower substrate temperatures, and suppressed at higher substrate temperatures. O concentration is slightly elevated at higher substrate temperatures. Photoluminescence was limited by the concentration of Yb within the film, the concentration of Yb ions in the +3 state, and the relative amount of quenching due to the various de-excitation pathways associated with the vibrational modes of the host a-C network. The observed wide full-width-at-half-maximum photoluminescence signal is a result of the variety of local bonding environments due to the a-C matrix, and the bonding of the Yb3+ ions to O and/or F ions as observed in the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses.

  9. Tribological studies of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films in a vacuum, spacelike environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the adhesion and friction properties of plasma-deposited amorphous hydrogenated carbon films and their dependence on preparation conditions are reviewed. The results of the study indicate that plasma deposition enables one to deposit a variety of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) exhibiting diamondlike friction behavior. The plasma-deposited a-C:H films can be effectively used as hard lubricating films on ceramic materials such as silicon nitride in vacuum.

  10. The Ammount of Interstellar Carbon Locked in Solid Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Furton, D G; Witt, A N

    1999-01-01

    We review the literature and present new experimental data to determine the amount of carbon likely to be locked in form of solid hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) grains. We conclude on the basis of a thorough analysis of the intrinsic strength of the C-H stretching band at 3.4 micron that between 10 and 80 ppM H of carbon is in the form of HAC grains. We show that it is necessary to know the level of hydrogenation (H/C) of the interstellar HAC to determine more precisely the amount of carbon it ties up. We present optical constants, photoluminescence spectroscopy, and IR absorption spectroscopy for a particular HAC sample that is shown to have a 3.4 micron absorption feature that is quantatively consistent with that observed in the diffuse interstellar medium.

  11. Micromachining of large area amorphous carbon membranes prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liujiang, Yu; Tay, B. K.; Sheeja, D.; Fu, Y. Q.; Miao, J. M.

    2004-02-01

    Currently, there is a strong drive to make micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) devices from higher performance materials such as diamond-like carbon or amorphous carbon (a-C) films, due to their excellent tribological properties, low-stiction (hydrophobic) surfaces, chemical inertness and high elastic modulus, compared to that of Si. The hydrogen free a-C films prepared, by Nanyang Technological University's (NTUs) patented filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique, at 100 eV exhibits high fraction of tetrahedral (sp 3 bonded) carbon atoms. These films exhibit relatively high hardness, stiffness and wear resistance in addition to low friction and stiction behaviour. However, the primary problem lies in the large intrinsic compressive stress induced during the deposition process. By making use of high substrate pulse bias, we have successfully produced low stress, thick a-C films. The films were then characterised using different equipments to evaluate the stress, microstructure and morphological roughness. Large area a-C membranes, of 2 mm×2 mm in size, have also been fabricated using the low stress, thick film deposited by the above method.

  12. Micromachining of large area amorphous carbon membranes prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liujiang, Yu; Tay, B.K.; Sheeja, D.; Fu, Y.Q.; Miao, J.M

    2004-02-29

    Currently, there is a strong drive to make micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) devices from higher performance materials such as diamond-like carbon or amorphous carbon (a-C) films, due to their excellent tribological properties, low-stiction (hydrophobic) surfaces, chemical inertness and high elastic modulus, compared to that of Si. The hydrogen free a-C films prepared, by Nanyang Technological University's (NTUs) patented filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique, at 100 eV exhibits high fraction of tetrahedral (sp{sup 3} bonded) carbon atoms. These films exhibit relatively high hardness, stiffness and wear resistance in addition to low friction and stiction behaviour. However, the primary problem lies in the large intrinsic compressive stress induced during the deposition process. By making use of high substrate pulse bias, we have successfully produced low stress, thick a-C films. The films were then characterised using different equipments to evaluate the stress, microstructure and morphological roughness. Large area a-C membranes, of 2 mmx2 mm in size, have also been fabricated using the low stress, thick film deposited by the above method.

  13. An Effective Method for Improvement of Field Electron Emission Site Density and Uniformity of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Ping; WANG Li-Jun; ZHANG Bing-Lin; YAO Ning; ZANG Qi-Ren; CHEN Jun; DUAN Xin-Chao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Amorphous carbon films are deposited on the Mo film/ceramic substrates, which are pretreated by a laser spat-tering chiselling technique (2 line/mm), by using the microwave chemical vapour deposition technique. The films are characterized by x-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy.The experimental result indicates that the laser spattering chiselling pretreated techniques can essentially improve the field emission uniformity and the emission site density of the amorphous carbon thin film devices so that its emission site density can reach the level of actual application (undistinguishable by naked eye) from a broad well-proportioned emission area of 50mm × 50mm. This kind of device can show various digits and words clearly. The lowest turn-on field below 1 V/m, the emission current density over 5.0 ±0.1 mA/cm2, and the highest luminance 1.0 × 103 cd/m2 are obtained. Meanwhile, the role of the laser spattering chiselling techniques in improving the field emission properties of the amorphous carbon film are explained.

  14. Amorphous Silica- and Carbon- rich nano-templated surfaces as model interstellar dust surfaces for laboratory astrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Natalia; Dawes, Anita; González-Posada, Fernando; Thompson, Neil; Chakarov, Dinko; Mason, Nigel J.; Fraser, Helen Jane

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies on surface astrochemistry are vital to our understanding of chemical evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). Laboratory surface-astrochemists have recently begun to study chemical reactions on interstellar dust-grain mimics, ranging from graphite, HOPG and graphene (representative of PAHs or large C-grains in the ISM) to amorphous olivine (representative of silicate dust) and ablated meteoritic samples (representative of interplanetary dust). These pioneering experiments show that the nature of the surface fundamentally affects processes at the substrate surface, substrate-ice interface, and ice over-layer. What these experiments are still lacking is the ability to account for effects arising from the discrete nano-scale of ISM grains, which might include changes to electronic structure, optical properties and surface-kinetics in comparison to bulk materials. The question arises: to what extent are the chemical and optical properties of interstellar ices affected by the size, morphology and material of the underlying ISM dust?We have designed, fabricated and characterised a set of nano-structured surfaces, where nanoparticles, representative of ISM grains, are adhered to an underlying support substrate. Here we will show the nanoparticles that have been manufactured from fused-silica (FS), glassy carbon (GC) and amorphous-C (aC). Our optical characterisation data shows that the nanostructured surfaces have different absorption cross-sections and significant scattering in comparison to the support substrates, which has implications for the energetic processing of icy ISM dust. We have been able to study how water-ice growth differs on the nanoparticles in comparison to the “flat” substrates, indicating increased ice amorphicity when nanoparticles are present, and on C-rich surfaces, compared to Si-rich particles. These data will be discussed in the context of interstellar water-ice features.

  15. Superconductivity and unusual magnetic behavior in amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felner, Israel

    2014-03-01

    Traces of superconductivity (SC) at elevated temperatures (up to 65 K) were observed by magnetic measurements in three different inhomogeneous sulfur doped amorphous carbon (a-C) systems: (a) in commercial and (b) synthesized powders and (c) in a-C thin films. (a) Studies performed on a commercial (a-C) powder, which contains 0.21% sulfur, revealed traces of non-percolated superconducting phases below T c = 65 K. The SC volume fraction is enhanced by the sulfur doping. (b) The a-C powder obtained by pyrolytic decomposition of sucrose did not show any sign of SC above 5 K. This powder was mixed with sulfur and synthesized at 400 °C (a-CS). The inhomogeneous products obtained show traces of SC phases at T c = 17 and 42 K. (c) Non-superconducting composite a-C-W thin films were grown by electron-beam induced deposition. SC emerged at T c = 34.4 K only after heat treatment with sulfur. Other parts of the pyrolytic a-CS powder show unusual magnetic features. (i) Pronounced irreversible peaks around 55-75 K appear in the first zero-field-cooled (ZFC) sweep only. Their origin is not known. (ii) Unexpectedly, these peaks are totally suppressed in the second ZFC runs measured a few minutes later. (iii) Around the peak position the field-cooled (FC) curves cross the ZFC plots (ZFC > FC). These peculiar magnetic observations are also ascribed to an a-CS powder prepared from the commercial a-C powder and are connected to each other. All SC and magnetic phenomena observed are intrinsic properties of the sulfur doped a-C materials. It is proposed that the a-CS systems behave similarly to well-known high T c curates and/or pnictides in which SC emerges from magnetic states.

  16. Superconductivity and unusual magnetic behavior in amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traces of superconductivity (SC) at elevated temperatures (up to 65 K) were observed by magnetic measurements in three different inhomogeneous sulfur doped amorphous carbon (a-C) systems: (a) in commercial and (b) synthesized powders and (c) in a-C thin films. (a) Studies performed on a commercial (a-C) powder, which contains 0.21% sulfur, revealed traces of non-percolated superconducting phases below T c = 65 K. The SC volume fraction is enhanced by the sulfur doping. (b) The a-C powder obtained by pyrolytic decomposition of sucrose did not show any sign of SC above 5 K. This powder was mixed with sulfur and synthesized at 400 °C (a-CS). The inhomogeneous products obtained show traces of SC phases at T c = 17 and 42 K. (c) Non-superconducting composite a-C-W thin films were grown by electron-beam induced deposition. SC emerged at T c = 34.4 K only after heat treatment with sulfur. Other parts of the pyrolytic a-CS powder show unusual magnetic features. (i) Pronounced irreversible peaks around 55–75 K appear in the first zero-field-cooled (ZFC) sweep only. Their origin is not known. (ii) Unexpectedly, these peaks are totally suppressed in the second ZFC runs measured a few minutes later. (iii) Around the peak position the field-cooled (FC) curves cross the ZFC plots (ZFC > FC). These peculiar magnetic observations are also ascribed to an a-CS powder prepared from the commercial a-C powder and are connected to each other. All SC and magnetic phenomena observed are intrinsic properties of the sulfur doped a-C materials. It is proposed that the a-CS systems behave similarly to well-known high T c curates and/or pnictides in which SC emerges from magnetic states. (papers)

  17. Carbon Nanotube Patterning on a Metal Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A CNT electron source, a method of manufacturing a CNT electron source, and a solar cell utilizing a CNT patterned sculptured substrate are disclosed. Embodiments utilize a metal substrate which enables CNTs to be grown directly from the substrate. An inhibitor may be applied to the metal substrate to inhibit growth of CNTs from the metal substrate. The inhibitor may be precisely applied to the metal substrate in any pattern, thereby enabling the positioning of the CNT groupings to be more precisely controlled. The surface roughness of the metal substrate may be varied to control the density of the CNTs within each CNT grouping. Further, an absorber layer and an acceptor layer may be applied to the CNT electron source to form a solar cell, where a voltage potential may be generated between the acceptor layer and the metal substrate in response to sunlight exposure.

  18. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp3 bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN

  19. Single walled carbon nanotube network—Tetrahedral amorphous carbon composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Ajai, E-mail: ajai.iyer@aalto.fi; Liu, Xuwen; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Aalto University, POB 15100, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Johansson, Leena-Sisko [Department of Forest Products Technology, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, POB 16400, 00076 Espoo (Finland)

    2015-06-14

    Single walled carbon nanotube network (SWCNTN) was coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) using a pulsed Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc system to form a SWCNTN—ta-C composite film. The effects of SWCNTN areal coverage density and ta-C coating thickness on the composite film properties were investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements prove the presence of high quality sp{sup 3} bonded ta-C coating on the SWCNTN. Raman spectroscopy suggests that the single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) forming the network survived encapsulation in the ta-C coating. Nano-mechanical testing suggests that the ta-C coated SWCNTN has superior wear performance compared to uncoated SWCNTN.

  20. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na

    2013-08-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of the plasmon excitation energy shift and through-thickness elemental concentration show a multilayered a-C film structure comprising an interface layer consisting of C, Si, and, possibly, SiC, a buffer layer with continuously increasing sp 3 fraction, a relatively thicker layer (bulk film) of constant sp 3 content, and an ultrathin surface layer rich in sp 2 hybridization. A detailed study of the C K-edge spectrum indicates that the buffer layer between the interface layer and the bulk film is due to the partial backscattering of C+ ions interacting with the heavy atoms of the silicon substrate. The results of this study provide insight into the minimum thickness of a-C films deposited by FCVA under optimum substrate bias conditions. Copyright © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  1. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Caniello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coating became three time stronger than in the case of a bare silicon substrate. Physical structure and microstructural proprieties of the coatings were investigated by means of a scan electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the films was measured by a scratch tester.

  2. Structural evolutions in polymer-derived carbon-rich amorphous silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kewei; Ma, Baisheng; Li, Xuqin; Wang, Yiguang; An, Linan

    2015-01-29

    The detailed structural evolutions in polycarbosilane-derived carbon-rich amorphous SiC were investigated semiquantitatively by combining experimental and analytical methods. It is revealed that the material is comprised of a Si-containing matrix phase and a free-carbon phase. The matrix phase is amorphous, comprised of SiC4 tetrahedra, SiCxOx-4 tetrahedra, and Si-C-C-Si/Si-C-H defects. With increasing pyrolysis temperature, the amorphous matrix becomes more ordered, accompanied by a transition from SiC2O2 to SiCO3. The transition was completed at 1250 °C, where the matrix phase started to crystallize by forming a small amount of β-SiC. The free-carbon phase was comprised of carbon nanoclusters and C-dangling bonds. Increasing pyrolysis temperature led to the transition of the free carbon from amorphous carbon to nanocrystalline graphite. The size of the carbon clusters decreased first and then increased, while the C-dangling bond content decreased continuously. The growth of carbon clusters was attributed to Ostwald ripening and described using a two-dimensional grain growth model. The calculated activation energy suggested that the decrease in C-dangling bonds is directly related to the lateral growth of the carbon clusters. PMID:25490064

  3. The effect of empirical potential functions on modeling of amorphous carbon using molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Empirical potentials have a strong effect on the hybridization and structure of amorphous carbon and are of great importance in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, amorphous carbon at densities ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 g/cm3 was modeled by a liquid quenching method using Tersoff, 2nd REBO, and ReaxFF empirical potentials. The hybridization, structure and radial distribution function G(r) of carbon atoms were analyzed as a function of the three potentials mentioned above. The ReaxFF potential is capable to model the change of the structure of amorphous carbon and MD results are in a good agreement with experimental results and density function theory (DFT) at low density of 2.6 g/cm3 and below. The 2nd REBO potential can be used when amorphous carbon has a very low density of 2.4 g/cm3 and below. Considering the computational efficiency, the Tersoff potential is recommended to model amorphous carbon at a high density of 2.6 g/cm3 and above. In addition, the influence of the quenching time on the hybridization content obtained with the three potentials is discussed.

  4. Amorphous flower-like molybdenum-sulfide-@-nitrogen-doped-carbon-nanofiber film for use in the hydrogen-evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Libo; Guo, Yaxiao; Liu, Dong; You, Tianyan

    2016-06-15

    A novel amorphous flower-like molybdenum sulfides@nitrogen doped carbon nanofibers (MoSx@NCNFs) films are successfully synthesized by combining electrospinning, carbonization and a mild hydrothermal process. NCNFs, as a conductive substrate, can accelerate the electron transfer rate and depress the aggregation of MoSx nanoparticles. The resultant amorphous flower-like MoSx on NCNFs exposes abundant S(2-)/S2(2-) active edge sites which is of great importance for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalytic performance. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate the superior electrocatalytic activity of MoSx@NCNFs toward HER deriving from the synergistic effect between NCNFs and amorphous MoSx. The overpotential is only 137mV to reach the current density of 10mAcm(-2) with a Tafel slope of 41mVdecade(-1) at MoSx@NCNFs. Meanwhile, MoSx@NCNFs exhibits satisfactory long-time stability for HER. Noteworthy, the obtained composites show a free-standing structure which can be directly used as electrode materials. This work provides a feasible way to design promising noble-metal free electrocatalysts in the aspect of energy conversion. PMID:27015391

  5. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    OpenAIRE

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma...

  6. Crystalline and amorphous carbon nitride films produced by high-energy shock plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-energy shock plasma deposition techniques are used to produce carbon-nitride films containing both crystalline and amorphous components. The structures are examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, parallel-electron-energy loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The crystalline phase appears to be face-centered cubic with unit cell parameter approx. a=0.63nm and it may be stabilized by calcium and oxygen at about 1-2 at % levels. The carbon atoms appear to have both trigonal and tetrahedral bonding for the crystalline phase. There is PEELS evidence that a significant fraction of the nitrogen atoms have sp2 trigonal bonds in the crystalline phase. The amorphous carbon-nitride film component varies from essentially graphite, containing virtually no nitrogen, to amorphous carbon-nitride containing up to 10 at % N, where the fraction of sp3 bonds is significant. 15 refs., 5 figs

  7. Substrate and material transfer effects on the surface chemistry and texture of diamond-like carbon deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Benjamin; Ojeda, J. J.

    2012-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC), a thin amorphous carbon film, has many uses in tribological systems. Exploiting alternative substrates and interlayers can enable the control of the hardness and modulus of the multilayer system and improve wear or friction properties. We used XPS and atomic force microscopy to examine DLC that had been concurrently coated on an epoxy interlayer and a steel substrate by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition. sp2/sp3 ratios were calculated both by the deconvolut...

  8. Properties of Amorphous Carbon Microspheres Synthesised by Palm Oil-CVD Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous carbon microspheres were synthesized using a dual-furnace chemical vapour deposition method at 800-1000 deg. C. Palm oil-based cooking oil (PO) and zinc nitrate solution was used as a carbon source and catalyst precursor, respectively with PO to zinc nitrate ratio of 30:20 (v/v) and a silicon wafer as the sample target. Regular microsphere shape of the amorphous carbons was obtained and a uniform microsphere structure improved as the carbonization temperature increased from 800 to 1000 deg. C. At 800 deg. C, no regular microspheres were formed but more uniform structure is observed at 900 deg. C. Generally the microspheres size is uniform when the heating temperature was increased to 1000 deg. C, but the presence of mixed sizes can still be observed. X-ray diffraction patterns show the presence of oxide of carbon, ZnO phase together with Zn oxalate phase. Raman spectra show two broad peaks characteristic to amorphous carbon at 1344 and 1582 cm-1 for the D and G bands, respectively. These bands become more prominent as the preparation temperature increased from 800 to 1000 deg. C. This is in agreement with the formation of amorphous carbon microspheres as shown by the FESEM study and other Zn-based phases as a result of the oxidation process of the palm oil as the carbon source and the zinc nitrate as the catalyst precursor, respectively.

  9. Large-deformation and high-strength amorphous porous carbon nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weizhu; Mao, Shimin; Yang, Jia; Shang, Tao; Song, Hongguang; Mabon, James; Swiech, Wacek; Vance, John R.; Yue, Zhufeng; Dillon, Shen J.; Xu, Hangxun; Xu, Baoxing

    2016-04-01

    Carbon is one of the most important materials extensively used in industry and our daily life. Crystalline carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and graphene possess ultrahigh strength and toughness. In contrast, amorphous carbon is known to be very brittle and can sustain little compressive deformation. Inspired by biological shells and honeycomb-like cellular structures in nature, we introduce a class of hybrid structural designs and demonstrate that amorphous porous carbon nanospheres with a thin outer shell can simultaneously achieve high strength and sustain large deformation. The amorphous carbon nanospheres were synthesized via a low-cost, scalable and structure-controllable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis approach using energetic carbon precursors. In situ compression experiments on individual nanospheres show that the amorphous carbon nanospheres with an optimized structure can sustain beyond 50% compressive strain. Both experiments and finite element analyses reveal that the buckling deformation of the outer spherical shell dominates the improvement of strength while the collapse of inner nanoscale pores driven by twisting, rotation, buckling and bending of pore walls contributes to the large deformation.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Microarrays Grown on Nanoflake Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Howard K.; Hauge, Robert H.; Pint, Cary; Pheasant, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This innovation consists of a new composition of matter where single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are grown in aligned arrays from nanostructured flakes that are coated in Fe catalyst. This method of growth of aligned SWNTs, which can yield well over 400 percent SWNT mass per unit substrate mass, exceeds current yields for entangled SWNT growth. In addition, processing can be performed with minimal wet etching treatments, leaving aligned SWNTs with superior properties over those that exist in entangled mats. The alignment of the nanotubes is similar to that achieved in vertically aligned nanotubes, which are called "carpets. " Because these flakes are grown in a state where they are airborne in a reactor, these flakes, after growing SWNTs, are termed "flying carpets. " These flakes are created in a roll-to-roll evaporator system, where three subsequent evaporations are performed on a 100-ft (approx. =30-m) roll of Mylar. The first layer is composed of a water-soluble "release layer, " which can be a material such as NaCl. After depositing NaCl, the second layer involves 40 nm of supporting layer material . either Al2O3 or MgO. The thickness of the layer can be tuned to synthesize flakes that are larger or smaller than those obtained with a 40-nm deposition. Finally, the third layer consists of a thin Fe catalyst layer with a thickness of 0.5 nm. The thickness of this layer ultimately determines the diameter of SWNT growth, and a layer that is too thick will result in the growth of multiwalled carbon nanotubes instead of single-wall nanotubes. However, between a thickness of 0.5 nm to 1 nm, single-walled carbon nanotubes are known to be the primary constituent. After this three-layer deposition process, the Mylar is rolled through a bath of water, which allows catalyst-coated flakes to detach from the Mylar. The flakes are then collected and dried. The method described here for making such flakes is analogous to that which is used to make birefringent ink that is

  11. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp3 content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms

  12. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  13. A study of the chemical, mechanical, and surface properties of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandentop, G.J.

    1990-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were studied with the objective of elucidating the nucleation and growth mechanisms, and the origin of their unique physical properties. The films were deposited onto Si(100) substrates both on the powered (negatively self-biased) and on the grounded electrodes from methane in an rf plasma (13.56 MHz) at 65 mTorr and 300 to 370 K. The films produced at the powered electrode exhibited superior mechanical properties, such as high hardness. A mass spectrometer was used to identify neutral species and positive ions incident on the electrodes from the plasma, and also to measure ion energies. The effect of varying ion energy flux on the properties of a-C:H films was investigated using a novel pulsed biasing technique. It was demonstrated that ions were not the dominant deposition species as the total ion flux measured was insufficient to account for the observed deposition rate. The interface between thin films of a-C:H and silicon substrates was investigated using angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A silicon carbide layer was detected at the interface of a hard a-C:H film formed at the powered electrode. At the grounded electrode, where the kinetic energy is low, no interfacial carbide layer was observed. Scanning tunneling microscopy and high energy electron energy loss spectroscopy was used to investigate the initial stages of growth of a-C:H films. On graphite substrates, films formed at the powered electrode were observed to nucleate in clusters approximately 50 {Angstrom} in diameter, while at the grounded electrode no cluster formation was observed. 58 figs.

  14. Reaction of amorphous Ni-W and Ni-N-W films with substrate silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, M. F.; Suni, I.; Nicolet, M.-A.; Sands, T.

    1984-01-01

    Wiley et al. (1982) have studied sputtered amorphous films of Nb-Ni, Mo-Ni, Si-W, and Si-Mo. Kung et al. (1984) have found that amorphous Ni-Mo films as diffusion barriers between multilayer metallizations on silicon demonstrate good electrical and thermal stability. In the present investigation, the Ni-W system was selected because it is similar to the Ni-Mo system. However, W has a higher silicide formation temperature than Mo. Attention is given to aspects of sample preparation, sample characterization, the interaction between amorphous Ni-W films and Si, the crystallization of amorphous Ni(36)W(64) films on SiO2, amorphous Ni-N-W films, silicide formation and phase separation, and the crystallization of amorphous Ni(36)W(64) and Ni(30)N(21)W(49) layers.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Areas - Printed on Textile and Paper Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Hubler, Arved C.; Lothar Kroll; Holg Elsner; Nora Wetzold; Thomas Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Mass printing processes are the key technology to produce mass products to the point of one-disposable. Carbon nanotube (CNT) based structures were prepared by flexographic printing using multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) dispersions in water. The carbon nanotubes were applied to a textile substrate made of polyester and polyamide microfilaments and to both-side coated paper to produce electrically conductive layers that can be used, for example, as heating elements. Carbon nanotube layers...

  16. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Jeongwoon Hwang; Jisoon Ihm; Kwang-Ryeol Lee; Seungchul Kim

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV). As the incident energy decrease...

  17. Carbon nanotube substrates and catalyzed hot stamp for polishing and patterning the substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhuang; Hauge, Robert H.; Schmidt, Howard K.; Kim, Myung Jong; Kittrell, W. Carter

    2009-09-08

    The present invention is generally directed to catalyzed hot stamp methods for polishing and/or patterning carbon nanotube-containing substrates. In some embodiments, the substrate, as a carbon nanotube fiber end, is brought into contact with a hot stamp (typically at 200-800.degree. C.), and is kept in contact with the hot stamp until the morphology/patterns on the hot stamp have been transferred to the substrate. In some embodiments, the hot stamp is made of material comprising one or more transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Pt, Ag, Au, etc.), which can catalyze the etching reaction of carbon with H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O, and/or O.sub.2. Such methods can (1) polish the carbon nanotube-containing substrate with a microscopically smooth finish, and/or (2) transfer pre-defined patterns from the hot stamp to the substrate. Such polished or patterned carbon nanotube substrates can find application as carbon nanotube electrodes, field emitters, and field emitter arrays for displays and electron sources.

  18. Amorphous carbon for structured step bunching during graphene growth on SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, James; Kunc, Jan; Hu, Yike; Hankinson, John; Guo, Zelei; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt

    2014-03-01

    Structured growth of high quality graphene is necessary for technological development of carbon based materials. Specifically, control of the bunching and placement of surface steps under epitaxial graphene on SiC is an important consideration for graphene device production. We demonstrate lithographically patterned evaporated amorphous carbon as a method to pin SiC surface steps. Evaporated amorphous carbon is an ideal step-flow barrier on SiC due to its chemical compatibility with graphene growth and its structural stability at high temperatures, as well as its patternability. The amorphous carbon is deposited in vacuum on SiC prior to graphene growth. In the graphene furnace at temperatures above 1200°C, mobile SiC steps accumulate at these amorphous carbon barriers, forming an aligned step free region for graphene growth at temperatures above 1330°C. AFM imaging and Raman spectroscopy support the formation of quality step-free graphene sheets grown on SiC with the step morphology aligned to the carbon grid.

  19. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl4-C3H6-H2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm3 by Archimedes' principle.

  20. Synthesis of Core-Shell SiOx/Carbon Nano fibers on Silicon Substrates by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We synthesized the core-shell SiOx/carbon nano fibers with diameters of 200-300 nm using ultrasonic spray pyrolysis with a phosphorus/ethanol mixture. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) investigations confirmed the core-shell structure, which consisted of a core of SiOx and a shell of amorphous carbon. The phosphorus atoms corroded the entire silicon substrate surface, and the Si-P liquid-catalyzed the solid-liquid-solid mechanism is proposed to explain the growth of the core-shell SiOx/carbon nano fibers.

  1. Energy loss of electrons impinging upon glassy carbon, amorphous carbon, and diamond: Comparison between two different dispersion laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we compare and discuss calculated inelastic mean free path, stopping power, range, and reflection electron energy loss spectra obtained using two different and popular dispersion laws. We will present and discuss the results we obtained investigating the interaction of electron beams impinging upon three allotropic forms of carbon, i.e. solid glassy carbon, amorphous carbon, and diamond. We will compare numerical results with experimental reflection electron energy loss spectra

  2. Amorphous Interface Layer in Thin Graphite Films Grown on the Carbon Face of SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colby, R.; Stach, E.; Bolen, M.L.; Capano, M.A.

    2011-09-05

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to characterize an amorphous layer observed at the interface in graphite and graphene films grown via thermal decomposition of C-face 4H-SiC. The amorphous layer does not cover the entire interface, but uniform contiguous regions span microns of cross-sectional interface. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) demonstrate that the amorphous layer is a carbon-rich composition of Si/C. The amorphous layer is clearly observed in samples grown at 1600 C for a range of growth pressures in argon, but not at 1500 C, suggesting a temperature-dependent formation mechanism.

  3. Superior tribological properties of an amorphous carbon film with a graphite-like structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yong-Jun; Li Hong-Xuan; Ji Li; Liu Xiao-Hong; Wu Yan-Xia; Zhou Hui-Di; Chen Jian-Min

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films with high sp2 concentrations are deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering with a narrow range of substrate bias voltage. Field emission scanning electron microscopes (FESEMs),high resolution transmission electron microscopes (HRTEMs),atomic force microscopes (AFMs),the Raman spectrometers,nanoindentation,and tribometers are subsequently used to characterize the microstructures and the properties of the resulting films.It is found that the present films are dominated by the sp2 sites.However,the films demonstrate a moderate hardness together with a low internal stress.The high hardness of the deposited film originates from the crosslinking of the sp2 clusters by the sp3 sites.The presence of the graphite-like clusters in the film structure may be responsible for the low internal stress.What is more important is that the resulting films show excellent tribological properties with high load capacity and excellent wear resistance in humid atmospheres.The relationship between the microstructure determined by the deposition condition and the film characteristic is discussed in detail.

  4. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings on implants drastically reduce biofilm formation and water permeation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammations and crystalline bacterial biofilms (encrustations) remain a major complication in long-term artificial urinary tract drainage. To solve this problem we present urological implants with coatings made of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) that show excellent protection from encrustation in-vitro as well as in-vivo. Part of the success of a-C:H coatings is attributed to their ability to act as a diffusion barrier between an implant and the body, which prevents leaching of solvents from polymeric implants. To further enhance their barrier properties a-C:H coatings are combined with parylene coatings to develop diffusion-barrier multilayer coatings with a total thickness between 0.2 μm and 0.8 μm. The combination of the two types of coatings leads to a reduction of water diffusion by a factor of up to ten with respect to uncoated 25 μm thick polyimide sub-strates. The diffusion of water vapour from a controlled atmospheric pressure chamber through coated foils to a vacuum chamber is measured in a custom-built device

  5. Magnetron sputtered transparent conductive zinc-oxide stabilized amorphous indium oxide thin films on polyethylene terephthalate substrates at ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous transparent conducting zinc-oxide stabilized indium oxide thin films, named amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO), were deposited by direct current magnetron sputtering at ambient temperature on flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrates. It has been demonstrated that the electrical resistivity could attain as low as ∼ 5 × 10−4 Ω cm, which was noticeably lower than amorphous indium tin oxide films prepared at the same condition, while the visible transmittance exceeded 84% with the refractive index of 1.85–2.00. In our experiments, introduction of oxygen gas appeared to be beneficial to the improvement of the transparency and electrical conductivity. Both free carrier absorption and indirect transition were observed and Burstein–Moss effect proved a-IZO to be a degenerated amorphous semiconductor. However, the linear relation between the optical band gap and the band tail width which usually observed in covalent amorphous semiconductor such as a-Si:H was not conserved. Besides, porosity could greatly determine the resistivity and optical constants for the thickness variation at this deposition condition. Furthermore, a broad photoluminescence peak around 510 nm was identified when more than 1.5 sccm oxygen was introduced. - Highlights: ► Highly conducting amorphous zinc-oxide stabilized indium oxide thin films were prepared. ► The films were fabricated on polyethylene terephthalate at ambient temperature. ► Introduction of oxygen can improve the transparency and electrical conductivity. ► The linear relation between optical band gap and band tail width was not conserved

  6. Strong Metal-Support Interaction: Growth of Individual Carbon Nanofibers from Amorphous Carbon Interacting with an Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO/Ni nanopar......The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO....../Ni nanoparticles, devoid of any gaseous carbon source and external heating and stimulated by an electron beam in a 300 kilo volt transmission electron microscope....

  7. Surface structure and optical property of amorphous carbon nanotubes hybridized with cadmium selenide quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Kim Han, E-mail: kimhan8419@gmail.com; Johan, Mohd Rafie [University of Malaya, Nanomaterials Engineering Research Group, Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering (Malaysia)

    2013-09-15

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes ({alpha}-CNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at low temperature. The as-synthesized {alpha}-CNTs were then hybridized with cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs) through a simple chemical process. Raman spectra reveal the amorphous nature of the {alpha}-CNTs surface. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed the amorphous phase of carbon and the formation of CdSe QDs crystalline phase. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM) indicate that the successfully formed hybridized {alpha}-CNTs-CdSe QDs possess an average outer diameter in the range of 110-130 nm. The CdSe QDs fall in the size range of 15-40 nm. UV-visible spectroscopy showed quantum confinement effect due to the attachment of CdSe QDs on the surface of {alpha}-CNTs.

  8. Oxygen effect of transparent conducting amorphous Indium Zinc Tin Oxide films on Polyimide substrate for flexible electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the effect of oxygen on the transparent conducting properties and mechanical durability of the amorphous indium zinc tin oxide (IZTO) films. IZTO films deposited on flexible clear polyimide (PI) substrate using pulsed direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering at room temperature under various oxygen partial pressures. All IZTO films deposited at room temperature exhibit an amorphous structure. The electrical and optical properties of the IZTO films were sensitively influenced by oxygen partial pressures. At optimized deposition condition of 3.0% oxygen partial pressure, the IZTO film shows the lowest resistivity of 6.4 × 10−4 Ωcm, high transmittance of over 80% in the visible range, and figure of merit value of 3.6 × 10−3 Ω−1 without any heat controls. In addition, high work function and good mechanical flexibility of amorphous IZTO films are beneficial to flexible applications. It is proven that the proper oxygen partial pressure is important parameter to enhance the transparent conducting properties of IZTO films on PI substrate deposited at room temperature. - Highlights: • Indium zinc tin oxide (IZTO) films were deposited on polyimide at room temperature. • Transparent conducting properties of IZTO were influenced with oxygen partial pressure. • The smooth surface and high work function of IZTO were beneficial to anode layer. • The mechanical reliability of IZTO shows better performance to indium tin oxide film

  9. Programmable SERS active substrates for chemical and biosensing applications using amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon nanomaterial

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffery Alexander Powell; Krishnan Venkatakrishnan; Bo Tan

    2016-01-01

    We present the creation of a unique nanostructured amorphous/crystalline hybrid silicon material that exhibits surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. This nanomaterial is an interconnected network of amorphous/crystalline nanospheroids which form a nanoweb structure; to our knowledge this material has not been previously observed nor has it been applied for use as a SERS sensing material. This material is formed using a femtosecond synthesis technique which facilitates a laser plu...

  10. Silicon and aluminum doping effects on the microstructure and properties of polymeric amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang; Hao, Junying; Xie, Yuntao

    2016-08-01

    Polymeric amorphous carbon films were prepared by radio frequency (R.F. 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering deposition. The microstructure evolution of the deposited polymeric films induced by silicon (Si) and aluminum(Al) doping were scrutinized through infrared spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparative results show that Si doping can enhance polymerization and Al doping results in an increase in the ordered carbon clusters. Si and Al co-doping into polymeric films leads to the formation of an unusual dual nanostructure consisting of cross-linked polymer-like hydrocarbon chains and fullerene-like carbon clusters. The super-high elasticity and super-low friction coefficients (amorphous carbon films with different elements doping are also discussed in detail.

  11. A solvothermal method for synthesizing monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengtong; Gebauer, Denis; Cölfen, Helmut

    2016-05-19

    A solvothermal method was developed for synthesizing organic monolayer protected amorphous calcium carbonate clusters using 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid as ligand, ethanol as solvent and NaHCO3 decomposition as CO2 source, which can be extended to synthesize other monolayer protected mineral clusters. PMID:27161807

  12. A transparent hybrid of nanocrystalline cellulose and amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Denis; Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Salajkova, Michaela; Sort, Jordi; Zhou, Qi; Bergström, Lennart; Salazar-Alvarez, German

    2011-01-01

    Nanocellulose hybrids are promising candidates for biodegradable multifunctional materials. Hybrids of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles were obtained through a facile chemical approach over a wide range of compositions. Controlling the interactions between NCC and ACC results in hard, transparent structures with tunable composition, homogeneity and anisotropy.

  13. Citrate effects on amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) structure, stability, and crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobler, Dominique Jeanette; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of citrate in the crystallization kinetics of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is essential to explain the formation mechanisms, stabilities, surface properties, and morphologies of CaCO3 biominerals. It also contributes to deeper insight into fluid-mineral inte...

  14. Electrochemical Tuning of Amorphous Carbon Amount and Surface Oxidation Degree of Graphitic Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo-Ping; Ma, Ning; Ge, Juan; Li, Ling; Li, Ting; Liu, Qian-Qian

    2016-04-01

    Graphitic quantum dots (GQDs) have attracted much interesting of researchers because of its amazing optical properties and its ability to be used for many applications. Now, there are various methods have been reported for preparation of GQDs. Among them electrochemical method is simple technology, while it can afford various conditions to realize controllable prepared of GQDs. In this study, we tuned the PH values of electrolyte to probe the relationship of electrolyte environment and GQDs' optical properties as well as to seek the effective controllable condition for GQDs' preparation. It is found that the density of oxygen-related functional groups and the amount of amorphous carbon of GQDs were related to the PH values of electrolyte. The amount of amorphous carbon decreased as the PH values increased in the region of 6.6 to 7.1. Although, the positions of photoluminescence (PL) peak almost no changed of GQDs with different density of oxygen-related functional groups, GQDs with the lowest amount of amorphous carbon achieved the maximum PL intensity. Therefore, controlling amorphous carbon's amount by electrochemical method may afford a new direction to improve the fluorescence (FL) emission of GQDs. PMID:27451661

  15. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  16. Residual stresses and mechanical properties of amorphous carbon films on 40 CAD 6-12 plasma nitrided steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text.An investigation has been carried out to study the effect of deposition time and benzene flow rate on residual stresses level, morphological, hardness, adhesion strength and friction coefficient of carbon films. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon a-c:H films were deposited on plasma nitrided layers (ε+γ') of 40 CAD 6-12 steel substrate using Microwave Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition nethod with benzene/Argon gas as precursor. The coatings have been deposited at different temperatures 350 and 520 degree celsius for times 3,5,60 and 120 minutes under different pressures ranging from 10-3 to 10-5 mbar. A wide range of thickness values of the amorphous carbon layers (0.4 up 15 μm) was formed as function of the deposition conditions and precursors, when the bias voltage (-200V) and microwave power (300 W) were kept constant. Stress behavior in carbon films has been investigated by x-ray diffraction measurement using the sin2Ψ technique. The type and the value of stress have shown a strong dependence of film thickness and the benzene flow rate (σ= -259 ÷ 5 MPa). Scratch tests revealed that they possess excellent adhesion strength and exhibit both low values of friction coefficient and roughness. The has been concluded than the micro hardness measurements results are not influenced by the coating thickness. The hardness of the coatings is normally below 30 GPa for coatings with 7 sccm of benzene flow rate. The carbon films were characterized by SEM and Raman spectroscopy

  17. Chemical bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon-nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Wesley Jason

    In this study, the chemical bonding in hard and elastic amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films is investigated with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and 15N, 13C, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The films were deposited by DC Magnetron sputtering in a pure nitrogen discharge on Si(001) substrates at 300--400°C. Nanoindentation measurements reveal an elastic modulus of ˜50 GPa and a hardness of ˜5 GPa, thus confirming our films are highly elastic but resist plastic deformation. Our 13C NMR study demonstrates the absence of sp 3-bonded carbon in this material. Collectively, our N(1s) XPS, 13C NMR, and 15N NMR data suggest a film-bonding model that has an aromatic carbon structure with sp2-hybridized nitrogen incorporated in heterocyclic rings. We demonstrate that the nitrogen bonding is predominantly in configurations similar to those in pyridine and pyrrole. In addition, the data indicate that the a-CNx films prepared for this study have low hydrogen content, but are hydrophilic. Specifically, results from 15N and 13C cross polarization (CP) and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR experiments suggest that nitrogen sites are susceptible to protonation from water absorbed during sample preparation for the NMR experiments. The sensitivity of the surface of a-CNx to water absorption may impact tribological applications for this material. In accord with our XPS and NMR spectroscopic studies on a-CN x films, we propose a film-structure model consisting of buckled graphitic planes that are cross-linked together by sp2 hybridized carbons. The curvature and cross-linking is attributed to a type of compound defect, which is formed by placing a pentagon next to single-atom vacancy in a graphite layer. Our proposed film structure is called the pentagon-with-vacancy-defect (5VD) model. Using Hartree-Fock calculations, we show that the 5VD, film-structure model is compatible with our XPS, NMR, and nanoindentation measurements and with previous

  18. TEM-simulation of amorphous carbon films: influence of supercell packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultrich, H; Schultrich, B

    2001-07-01

    Recent developments in thin film technology allow to prepare deliberately amorphous carbon films with structures widely varying between graphite-like (sp2) and diamond-like (sp3) atomic bonds. This leads to amorphous structures with correspondingly varying densities. By periodically changing deposition conditions, nanometer multilayers may be prepared consisting of carbon layers of different density. Simulation of the electron microscopic imaging allows to differentiate between such real structural details (on the nanometer scale) and artefacts induced by the imaging procedure. But it must be assured that the modeled structure reflects the real one with sufficient accuracy. Thorough comparison of different simulation strategies shows that for the adequate simulation of TEM imaging of amorphous materials, the thickness of the layer with independently distributed atoms has to exceed a certain limit. Then, the statistical scattering of the randomly distributed atoms will be averaged. Otherwise, if the model of the transmission electron microscopy sample is constructed as iteration of thin identical supercells, the superposition of scattering waves with constant phase differences results in enhanced local fluctuations burying the multilayer structure. For thicker packages of supercells with independent random distributions, the effect of statistical atomic arrangements is more and more leveled off. Hence, nanometer structures based on regions with different density will be visible more distinctively in the random background. For carbon, this critical thickness amounts to about 4 nm. This is of special importance for the visualization of nanoscaled heterogeneities like multilayers or nanotube-like inclusions in amorphous matrices. PMID:11419873

  19. Substrate quality alters microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadamma, S.; Mayes, M. A.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.

    2014-03-01

    The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is dependent on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial processing of carbon (C), and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly-labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol). The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils, despite an initial delay in respiration. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days was sufficient to model decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch) with three pools, but was insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid) and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality imparts considerable control on microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and added substrates.

  20. Substrate quality alters the microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadamma, S.; Mayes, M. A.; Steinweg, J. M.; Schaeffer, S. M.

    2014-09-01

    The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) is dependent, among other factors, on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial decomposition of carbon (C), and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol). The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days were sufficient to model the decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch) with three pools, but were insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid) and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality exerts considerable control on the microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and complex substrates.

  1. Substrate quality alters microbial mineralization of added substrate and soil organic carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jagadamma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The rate and extent of decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC is dependent on substrate chemistry and microbial dynamics. Our objectives were to understand the influence of substrate chemistry on microbial processing of carbon (C, and to use model fitting to quantify differences in pool sizes and mineralization rates. We conducted an incubation experiment for 270 days using four uniformly-labeled 14C substrates (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid on four different soils (a temperate Mollisol, a tropical Ultisol, a sub-arctic Andisol, and an arctic Gelisol. The 14C labeling enabled us to separate CO2 respired from added substrates and from native SOC. Microbial gene copy numbers were quantified at days 4, 30 and 270 using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Substrate C respiration was always higher for glucose than other substrates. Soils with cinnamic and stearic acid lost more native SOC than glucose- and starch-amended soils, despite an initial delay in respiration. Cinnamic and stearic acid amendments also exhibited higher fungal gene copy numbers at the end of incubation compared to unamended soils. We found that 270 days was sufficient to model decomposition of simple substrates (glucose and starch with three pools, but was insufficient for more complex substrates (cinnamic and stearic acid and native SOC. This study reveals that substrate quality imparts considerable control on microbial decomposition of newly added and native SOC, and demonstrates the need for multi-year incubation experiments to constrain decomposition parameters for the most recalcitrant fractions of SOC and added substrates.

  2. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, voltage-current measurement, microphotography and numerical simulation. On the basis of observed plasma parameters, the kinetics of the film deposition process is discussed.

  3. Selective growth of carbon nanotube on silicon substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao-ping; H. ABE; T. SHIMIZU; A. ANDO; H. TOKUMOT; ZHU Shen-ming; ZHOU Hao-shen

    2006-01-01

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) growth of iron oxide-deposited trench-patterns and the locally-ordered CNT arrays on silicon substrate were achieved by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition(STCVD) of ethanol vapor. The CNTs were uniformly synthesized with good selectivity on trench-patterned silicon substrates. This fabrication process is compatible with currently used semiconductor-processing technologies,and the carbon-nanotube fabrication process can be widely applied for the development of electronic devices using carbon-nanotube field emitters as cold cathodes and can revolutionize the area of field-emitting electronic devices. The site-selective growth of CNT from an iron oxide nanoparticle catalyst patterned were also achieved by drying-mediated self-assembly technique. The present method offers a simple and cost-effective method to grow carbon nanotubes with self-assembled patterns.

  4. Stress relief patterns of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nature of the deposited films was characterized by Raman spectra and the stress relief patterns were observed by scanning electron microscope. Besides the well-known sinusoidal type and flower type patterns, etc., two different stress relief patterns, ring type and peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top, were observed. The ring type in this paper was a clear ridge-cracked buckle and unusual. Two competing buckle delamination morphologies ring and sinusoidal buckling coexist. The ridge-cracked buckle in ring type was narrower than the sinusoidal buckling. Meanwhile peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top in this paper was unusual. These different patterns supported the approach in which the stress relief forms have been analyzed using the theory of plate buckling.

  5. Influence of Increasing Deposition Temperature on Electrical Properties of Amorphous Carbon Thin Film Prepared by Aerosol-Assisted Thermal CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the successful deposition of p-type semiconducting amorphous carbon (paC) films fabricated onto the glass substrate by Aerosol-Assisted Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using natural source of camphor oil as the precursor material. The analyze reveal that conductivity and resistivity shows some changes at different deposition temperature, that is the conductivity increase as temperature increase from 350 to 550 degree Celsius, but drop slightly at 550 degree Celsius. Other than that, optical and structural properties were also characterized by using UV-VIS-NIR system and Atomic Force Microscopy. The same trend of optical and electrical can be seen when the measurement from the Taucs plot expose a decreasing value of optical band gap as temperature increase, but slightly increase when temperature increase to 550 degree Celsius. (author)

  6. Production and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films deposited in methane plasmas diluted by noble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dilution effects of the precursor methane atmosphere by three noble gases (Ar, Ne and He) on the mechanical properties and the microstructure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited by rf-PECVD were studied. The chemical composition and atomic density of the films were determined by ion beam analysis. The film microstructure was probed by means of Raman spectroscopy. The internal stress was determined through the measurement of the changing of the substrate curvature by a profilometer, while nanoindentation experiments provided the film hardness. The results show that the precursor atmosphere dilution by different noble gases did not induce substantial modifications in the microstructure or in the mechanical properties of the films. On the other hand, the composition, the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the films are strongly dependent on the self-bias voltage. The results confirm the importance of the ion bombardment during film growth on the mechanical properties of the films

  7. Chemical vapor deposition of pyrolytic carbon on polished substrates

    OpenAIRE

    DesprÉs, J.-F.; Vahlas, C.; Oberlin, A.

    1993-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon thin (4-100 nm) films were obtained from méthane in a hot wall reactor on optically polished inert substrates by varying the déposition time and temperature. They were characterized by all modes of TEM. They are composed in majority of lamellar pyrocarbon whose thickness and disorder increases with increasing temperature. Isotropic carbon islands are also observed at the upper surface of the film.

  8. Reactive Infiltration of Silicon Melt Through Microporous Amorphous Carbon Preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsuwan, P.; Tewari, S. N.; Gatica, J. E.; Singh, M.; Dickerson, R.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of unidirectional capillary infiltration of silicon melt into microporous carbon preforms have been investigated as a function of the pore morphology and melt temperature. The infiltrated specimens showed alternating bands of dark and bright regions, which corresponded to the unreacted free carbon and free silicon regions, respectively. The decrease in the infiltration front velocity for increasing infiltration distances, is in qualitative agreement with the closed-form solution of capillarity driven fluid flow through constant cross section cylindrical pores. However, drastic changes in the thermal response and infiltration front morphologies were observed for minute differences in the preforms microstructure. This suggests the need for a dynamic percolation model that would account for the exothermic nature of the silicon-carbon chemical reaction and the associated pore closing phenomenon.

  9. Amorphous silicon thin film transistor active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays fabricated on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jonathan A.

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays are of immense interest because they have several advantages over liquid crystal displays, the current dominant flat panel display technology. OLED displays are emissive and therefore are brighter, have a larger viewing angle, and do not require backlights and filters, allowing thinner, lighter, and more power efficient displays. The goal of this work was to advance the state-of-the-art in active-matrix OLED display technology. First, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistor (TFT) active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were designed and fabricated on glass substrates. The devices operated at low voltages and demonstrated that lower performance TFTs could be utilized in active-matrix OLED displays, possibly allowing lower cost processing and the use of polymeric substrates. Attempts at designing more control into the display at the pixel level were also made. Bistable (one bit gray scale) active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were designed and fabricated. Such pixels could be used in novel applications and eventually help reduce the bandwidth requirements in high-resolution and large-area displays. Finally, a-Si:H TFT active-matrix OLED pixels and arrays were fabricated on a polymeric substrate. Displays fabricated on a polymeric substrates would be lightweight; flexible, more rugged, and potentially less expensive to fabricate. Many of the difficulties associated with fabricating active-matrix backplanes on flexible substrates were studied and addressed.

  10. Amorphous Carbon Gold Nanocomposite Thin Films: Structural and Spectro-ellipsometric Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spectroscopic Ellipsometry was used to determine the optical and structural properties of amorphous carbon:gold nanocomposite thin films deposited by dc magnetron co-sputtering at different deposition power. The incorporation of gold as small particles distributed in the amorphous carbon matrix was confirmed by X-ray Diffraction, Rutherford Backscattering measurements and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Based on these results, an optical model for the films was developed using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium with the Drude-Lorentz model representing the optical response of gold and the Tauc-Lorentz model for the amorphous carbon. The gold volume fraction and particle size obtained from the fitting processes were comparable to those from the physical characterization. The analysis of the ellipsometric spectra for all the samples showed strong changes in the optical properties of the carbon films as a consequence of the gold incorporation. These changes were correlated to the structural modification observed by Raman Spectroscopy, which indicated a clustering of the sp2 phase with a subsequent decrease in the optical gap. Finally, measurements of Reflection and Transmission Spectroscopy were carried out and Transmission Electron Microscopy images were obtained in order to support the ellipsometric model results.

  11. Optical properties of amorphous carbons and their applications and perspectives in photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@cc.uoi.g

    2011-04-01

    Amorphous carbon exhibits a wide variety of optical properties and, thus, offers substantial opportunities for various applications in photonics. The main optical properties, which should be taken into account for the design of new photonic devices, are the refractive index n, the fundamental gap E{sub g} and the E{sub 04} gap. In this work, the optical properties of the various forms of amorphous carbon films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, pulsed laser deposition, sputtering and vacuum cathodic arc deposition and the crucial structural and chemical factors that determine n, E{sub g}, and E{sub 04} are reviewed. The knowledge of the optical properties of such films is exploited in order to design and implement various photonic devices such as: 1) anti-reflection (AR) coatings for various uses including photovoltaic modules, 2) interferometric sensors and indicators based on carbon-based AR layers, and 3) laser patterning of amorphous carbons and study of its photosensitivity for holographic applications.

  12. Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ohmagari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H films prepared by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere was examined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The measured spectra were decomposed with simple component spectra, and they were analyzed in detail. As compared to the a-C:H films deposited at room substrate-temperature, the UNCD/a-C:H and nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C films deposited at a substrate-temperature of 550∘C exhibited enhanced π∗ and σ∗C≡C peaks. At the elevated substrate-temperature, the π∗ and σ∗C≡C bonds formation is enhanced while the σ∗C–H and σ∗C–C bonds formation is suppressed. The UNCD/a-C:H film showed a larger σ∗C–C peak than the a-C film deposited at the same elevated substrate-temperature in vacuum. We believe that the intense σ∗C–C peak is evidently responsible for UNCD crystallites existence in the film.

  13. Enhanced off-resonance magnetoelectric response in laser annealed PZT thick film grown on magnetostrictive amorphous metal substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A highly dense, 4 μm-thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) film is deposited on amorphous magnetostrictive Metglas foil (FeBSi) by granule spray in vacuum process at room temperature, followed by its localized annealing with a continuous-wave 560 nm ytterbium fiber laser radiation. This longer-wavelength laser radiation is able to anneal the whole of thick PZT film layer without any deteriorative effects, such as chemical reaction and/or atomic diffusion, at the interface and crystallization of amorphous Metglas substrate. Greatly enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties of the annealed PZT are attributed to its better crystallinity and grain growth induced by laser irradiation. As a result, a colossal off-resonance magnetoelectric (ME) voltage coefficient that is two orders of magnitude larger than previously reported output from PZT/Metglas film-composites is achieved. The present work addresses the problems involved in the fabrication of PZT/Metglas film-composites and opens up emerging possibilities in employing piezoelectric materials with low thermal budget substrates (suitable for integrated electronics) and designing laminate composites for ME based devices

  14. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm2 aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiNx/a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiNx/a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiNx/a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance

  15. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Da; Kunz, Thomas [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wolf, Nadine [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Energy Efficiency, Am Galgenberg 87, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Liebig, Jan Philipp [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wittmann, Stephan; Ahmad, Taimoor; Hessmann, Maik T.; Auer, Richard [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Göken, Mathias [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-29

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm{sup 2} aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance.

  16. Enhanced off-resonance magnetoelectric response in laser annealed PZT thick film grown on magnetostrictive amorphous metal substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palneedi, Haribabu [Materials Interface Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Functional Ceramics Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon 641-831 (Korea, Republic of); Maurya, Deepam; Priya, Shashank [Bio-inspired Materials and Devices Laboratory (BMDL), Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Kim, Gi-Yeop; Choi, Si-Young, E-mail: youngchoi@kims.re.kr [Materials Modeling and Characterization Department, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon 641-831 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Suk-Joong L. [Materials Interface Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Ho [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jungho, E-mail: jhryu@kims.re.kr [Functional Ceramics Group, Korea Institute of Materials Science (KIMS), Changwon 641-831 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-06

    A highly dense, 4 μm-thick Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} (PZT) film is deposited on amorphous magnetostrictive Metglas foil (FeBSi) by granule spray in vacuum process at room temperature, followed by its localized annealing with a continuous-wave 560 nm ytterbium fiber laser radiation. This longer-wavelength laser radiation is able to anneal the whole of thick PZT film layer without any deteriorative effects, such as chemical reaction and/or atomic diffusion, at the interface and crystallization of amorphous Metglas substrate. Greatly enhanced dielectric and ferroelectric properties of the annealed PZT are attributed to its better crystallinity and grain growth induced by laser irradiation. As a result, a colossal off-resonance magnetoelectric (ME) voltage coefficient that is two orders of magnitude larger than previously reported output from PZT/Metglas film-composites is achieved. The present work addresses the problems involved in the fabrication of PZT/Metglas film-composites and opens up emerging possibilities in employing piezoelectric materials with low thermal budget substrates (suitable for integrated electronics) and designing laminate composites for ME based devices.

  17. Amorphous carbon thin films deposited on Si and PET: Study of interface states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin carbon films with various thickness, deposited on different substrates (Si and poly-ethylene-terephthalate) at the same operating conditions in a ratio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system were characterized by Doppler broadening spectroscopy. The films and the substrates were depth profiled by a slow positron beam. The aim od these measurements was to study the open volume structure and the interface of the films. It was found that, independently from the substrate, the films were homogeneous and exhibited to some open volume distribution. On the contrary, the effective positron diffusion length in the Si substrate was found to change with the thickness of the carbon films. This behaviour was found to change with the thickness of the carbon films. This behaviour was interpreted as a change in the electric field at the carbon/silicon interface. (author)

  18. Study of SEY degradation of amorphous carbon coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Bundaleski, N; Santos, A; Teodoro, O M N D; Silva, A G

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of low secondary electron yield (SEY) carbon coatings by magnetron sputtering onto the inner walls of the accelerator seems to be the most promising solution for suppressing the electron cloud problem. However, these coatings change their electron emission properties during long term exposure to air. The ageing process of carbon coated samples with initial SEY of about 0.9 received from CERN is studied as a function of exposure to different environments. It is shown that samples having the same initial SEY may age with different rates. The SEY increase can be correlated with the surface concentration of oxygen. Annealing of samples in air at 100-200 {\\deg}C reduces the ageing rate and even recovers previously degraded samples. The result of annealing is reduction of the hydrogen content in the coatings by triggering its surface segregation followed by desorption.

  19. Very high frequency plasma deposited amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon tandem solar cells on flexible substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y

    2010-01-01

    The work in this thesis is to develop high quality intrinsic layers (especially nc-Si:H) for micromorph silicon tandem solar cells/modules on plastic substrates following the substrate transfer method or knows as the Helianthos procedure. Two objectives are covered in this thesis: (1) preliminary work on trial and optimization of single junction and tandem cells on glass substrate, (2) silicon film depositions on Al foil, and afterwards the characterization and development of these cells/modu...

  20. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in tetrahedral amorphous carbon: carrier trapping versus electron-hole recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the investigation of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon films by means of femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity. We estimated the electron-phonon relaxation time of a few hundred femtoseconds and we observed that under low optical excitation photo-generated carriers decay according to two distinct mechanisms attributed to trapping by defect states and direct electron-hole recombination. With high excitation, when photo-carrier and trap densities are comparable, a unique temporal evolution develops, as the time dependence of the trapping process becomes degenerate with the electron-hole recombination. This experimental evidence highlights the role of defects in the ultrafast electronic dynamics and is not specific to this particular form of carbon, but has general validity for amorphous and disordered semiconductors

  1. Wettability and biocompatibility of nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon films: Effect of nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous carbon films have been applied in biomedical fields as potential biocompatible materials with wettability that can be adjusted by doping with other elements, including F, Si, Ti, O and N. In this study, nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H:N) films were deposited by PIII-D using C2H2 + N2 gas mixtures. The biocompatibility and anti-thrombotic properties of the films were assessed in vitro. The surface morphology and surface wettability of the films were characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a contact angle method. The results show no cytotoxicity for all films, and films with appropriate nitrogen doping possess much better endothelial cell growth and anti-thrombotic properties

  2. Carbon nanotube-amorphous silicon hybrid solar cell with improved conversion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funde, Adinath M.; Nasibulin, Albert G.; Gufran Syed, Hashmi; Anisimov, Anton S.; Tsapenko, Alexey; Lund, Peter; Santos, J. D.; Torres, I.; Gandía, J. J.; Cárabe, J.; Rozenberg, A. D.; Levitsky, Igor A.

    2016-05-01

    We report a hybrid solar cell based on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) interfaced with amorphous silicon (a-Si). The high quality carbon nanotube network was dry transferred onto intrinsic a-Si forming Schottky junction for metallic SWNT bundles and heterojunctions for semiconducting SWNT bundles. The nanotube chemical doping and a-Si surface treatment minimized the hysteresis effect in current-voltage characteristics allowing an increase in the conversion efficiency to 1.5% under an air mass 1.5 solar spectrum simulator. We demonstrated that the thin SWNT film is able to replace a simultaneously p-doped a-Si layer and transparent conductive electrode in conventional amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaics.

  3. Carbon nanotube-amorphous silicon hybrid solar cell with improved conversion efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funde, Adinath M; Nasibulin, Albert G; Syed, Hashmi Gufran; Anisimov, Anton S; Tsapenko, Alexey; Lund, Peter; Santos, J D; Torres, I; Gandía, J J; Cárabe, J; Rozenberg, A D; Levitsky, Igor A

    2016-05-01

    We report a hybrid solar cell based on single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) interfaced with amorphous silicon (a-Si). The high quality carbon nanotube network was dry transferred onto intrinsic a-Si forming Schottky junction for metallic SWNT bundles and heterojunctions for semiconducting SWNT bundles. The nanotube chemical doping and a-Si surface treatment minimized the hysteresis effect in current-voltage characteristics allowing an increase in the conversion efficiency to 1.5% under an air mass 1.5 solar spectrum simulator. We demonstrated that the thin SWNT film is able to replace a simultaneously p-doped a-Si layer and transparent conductive electrode in conventional amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaics. PMID:27005494

  4. A transparent hybrid of nanocrystalline cellulose and amorphous calcium carbonate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Denis; Oliynyk, Vitaliy; Salajkova, Michaela; Sort, Jordi; Zhou, Qi; Bergström, Lennart; Salazar-Alvarez, German

    2011-09-01

    Nanocellulose hybrids are promising candidates for biodegradable multifunctional materials. Hybrids of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles were obtained through a facile chemical approach over a wide range of compositions. Controlling the interactions between NCC and ACC results in hard, transparent structures with tunable composition, homogeneity and anisotropy.Nanocellulose hybrids are promising candidates for biodegradable multifunctional materials. Hybrids of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) nanoparticles were obtained through a facile chemical approach over a wide range of compositions. Controlling the interactions between NCC and ACC results in hard, transparent structures with tunable composition, homogeneity and anisotropy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental procedures and results. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10681c

  5. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  6. In situ mechanical property measurements of amorphous carbon-boron nitride nanotube nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Carpena Núñez, Jennifer; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  7. Electronic state modification in laser deposited amorphous carbon films by the inclusion of nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Miyajima; Adamopoulos, G; Henley, SJ; V.Stolojan; Tison, Y; Garcia-Caurel, E; Drevillon, B.; Shannon, JM; Silva, SRP

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of the inclusion of nitrogen in amorphous carbon thin films deposited by pulsed laser deposition, which results in stress induced modifications to the band structure and the concomitant changes to the electronic transport properties. The microstructural changes due to nitrogen incorporation were examined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and Raman scattering. The band structure was investigated using spectroscopic ellipsometry data in the range o...

  8. Synergistic etch rates during low-energetic plasma etching of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etch mechanisms of hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films in low-energetic (2 and pure H2 plasmas, although a contribution of swift chemical sputtering to the total etch rate is not excluded. Furthermore, ions determine to a large extent the surface morphology during plasma etching. A high influx of ions enhances the etch rate and limits the surface roughness, whereas a low ion flux promotes graphitization and leads to a large surface roughness (up to 60 nm).

  9. Inelastic Neutron-Scattering Of Molecular-Hydrogen In Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon.

    OpenAIRE

    Honeybone, P.J.R.; Newport, Robert J; Howells, W. S.; Tomkinson, John; Bennington, S.M.; Revell, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have, by use of inelastic neutron scattering, detected the presence of molecular hydrogen in amorphous hydrogenated car-bon. We have found the hydrogen to be in a high-pressure, asymmetric environment formed by the compressive stresses in the a-C: H films. On comparing two samples, we have also found that the sample with higher molecular hydrogen concentration has a lower total hydrogen composition. This is caused by a higher network density, trapping the molecular hydrogen during network ...

  10. 3D micro- and nano-machining of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films on SiO2/Si and glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani-Amiri, S.; Zanganeh, S.; Ramzani, R.; Talei, R.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Azimi, S.; Sanaee, Z.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the hydrogen-assisted deep reactive ion etching of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films deposited using radio-frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD). High aspect-ratio vertical and 3D amorphous silicon features, with the desired control over the shaping of the sidewalls, in micro and nano scales, were fabricated in ordered arrays. The suitable adhesion of amorphous Si film to the underlayer allows one to apply deep micro- and nano-machining to these layers. By means of a second deposition of amorphous silicon on highly curved 3D structures and subsequent etching, the fabrication of amorphous silicon rings is feasible. In addition to photolithography, nanosphere colloidal lithography and electron beam lithography were exploited to realize ultra-small features of amorphous silicon. We have also investigated the optical properties of fabricated hexagonally patterned a-Si nanowire arrays on glass substrates and demonstrated their high potential as active layers for solar cells. This etching process presents an inexpensive method for the formation of highly featured arrays of vertical and 3D amorphous silicon rods on both glass and silicon substrates, suitable for large-area applications.

  11. Diamond-like carbon films deposited on three-dimensional shape substrate model by liquid electrochemical technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Y.Y. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Zhang, G.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, 116024, Dalian China (China); Zhao, Y.; Liu, D.D. [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Cong, Y., E-mail: congyan@ciomp.ac.cn [Institute of Nano-photonics, School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, 116600 Dalian (China); Buck, V. [Thin Film Technology Group, Faculty of Physics, University Duisburg-Essen and CeNIDE, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited on three-dimensional (3D) shape substrate model by electrolysis of 2-propanol solution at low temperature (60 °C). This 3D shape model was composed of a horizontally aligned stainless steel wafer and vertically aligned stainless steel rods. Morphology and microstructure of the films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The results suggested there were only differences in film uniformity and thickness for two kinds of samples. The hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited on horizontally aligned substrate were smooth and homogeneous. And the film thickness of DLC films gained on the vertical substrates decreased along vertical direction. It is believed that bubble formation could enhance nucleation on the wetted capillary area. This experiment shows that deposition of DLC films by liquid phase deposition on 3D shape conductive substrates is possible. - Highlights: • DLC film is expected to be deposited on complex surface/shape substrate. • DLC film is deposited on 3D shape substrate by liquid electrochemical method. • Horizontal substrate is covered by smooth and homogeneous DLC films. • Film thickness decreases along vertical direction due to boiling effect.

  12. Incorporation of nitrogen into amorphous carbon films produced by surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the influence of nitrogen incorporated into amorphous carbon films, nitrogenated amorphous carbon films have been deposited by using surface wave plasma chemical vapor deposition under various ratios of N2/CH4 gas flow. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used to monitor plasma features near the deposition zone. After deposition, the samples are checked by Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photo spectroscopy (XPS). Optical emission intensities of CH and N atom in the plasma are found to be enhanced with the increase in the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio, and then reach their maximums when the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio is 5%. A contrary variation is found in Raman spectra of deposited films. The intensity ratio of the D band to the G band (ID/IG) and the peak positions of the G and D bands all reach their minimums when the N2/CH4 gas flow ratio is 5%. These show that the structure of amorphous carbon films has been significantly modified by introduction of nitrogen

  13. Very high frequency plasma deposited amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon tandem solar cells on flexible substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The work in this thesis is to develop high quality intrinsic layers (especially nc-Si:H) for micromorph silicon tandem solar cells/modules on plastic substrates following the substrate transfer method or knows as the Helianthos procedure. Two objectives are covered in this thesis: (1) preliminary wo

  14. Fungal Taxa Target Different Carbon Substrates in Harvard Forest Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, C. A.; Allison, S. D.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Mellilo, J. M.; Treseder, K. K.

    2006-12-01

    The mineralization of soil organic carbon is a major component of the global carbon cycle and is largely controlled by soil microbial communities. However, little is known about the functional roles of soil microbes or whether different microbial taxa target different carbon substrates under natural conditions. To examine this possibility, we assessed the community composition of active fungi by using a novel nucleotide analog technique in soils from the Harvard Forest. We hypothesized that fungal community composition would shift in response to the addition of different substrates and that specific fungal taxa would respond differentially to particular carbon sources. To test this hypothesis, we added a nucleotide analog probe directly to soils in conjunction with one of five carbon compounds of increasing recalcitrance: glycine, sucrose, cellulose, tannin-protein complex, and lignin. During 48 hour incubations, the nucleotide analog was incorporated into newly replicated DNA of soil organisms that proliferated following the addition of the substrates. In this way, we labeled the DNA of microbes that respond to a particular carbon source. Labeled DNA was isolated and fungal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) were sequenced and analyzed to identify active fungi to near-species resolution. Diversity analyses at the ≥97% sequence similarity level indicated that taxonomic richness was greater under cellulose (Shannon Index: 3.23 ± 0.11 with ± 95% CI) and lignin (2.87 ± 0.15) additions than the other treatments (2.34 ± 0.16 to 2.64 ± 0.13). In addition, community composition of active fungi shifted under glycine, sucrose, and cellulose additions. Specifically, the community under glycine was significantly different from communities under control, cellulose, and tannin-protein (Ptannin-protein and slightly increased in response to lignin and sucrose. This confirms our hypothesis that particular taxa respond differently to specific

  15. Epitaxial Relationships between Calcium Carbonate and Inorganic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taewook Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The polymorph-selective crystallization of calcium carbonate has been studied in terms of epitaxial relationship between the inorganic substrates and the aragonite/calcite polymorphs with implication in bioinspired mineralization. EpiCalc software was employed to assess the previously published experimental results on two different groups of inorganic substrates: aragonitic carbonate crystals (SrCO3, PbCO3, and BaCO3 and a hexagonal crystal family (α-Al2O3, α-SiO2, and LiNbO3. The maximum size of the overlayer (aragonite or calcite was calculated for each substrate based on a threshold value of the dimensionless potential to estimate the relative nucleation preference of the polymorphs of calcium carbonate. The results were in good agreement with previous experimental observations, although stereochemical effects between the overlayer and substrate should be separately considered when existed. In assessing the polymorph-selective nucleation, the current method appeared to provide a better tool than the oversimplified mismatch parameters without invoking time-consuming molecular simulation.

  16. Control of carbon content in amorphous GeTe films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) for phase-change random access memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous and smooth GeTe thin films are deposited on 200 mm silicon substrates by plasma enhanced—metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PE–MOCVD) using the commercial organometallic precursors TDMAGe and DIPTe as Ge and Te precursors, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show a stoichiometric composition of the deposited GeTe films but with high carbon contamination. Using information collected by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) and XPS, the origin of carbon contamination is determined and the dissociation mechanisms of Ge and Te precursors in H2 + Ar plasma are proposed. As a result, carbon level is properly controlled by varying operating parameters such as plasma radio frequency power, pressure and H2 rate. Finally, GeTe films with carbon level as low as 5 at. % are obtained. (paper)

  17. Control of carbon content in amorphous GeTe films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) for phase-change random access memory applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoukar, M.; Szkutnik, P. D.; Jourde, D.; Pelissier, B.; Michallon, P.; Noé, P.; Vallée, C.

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous and smooth GeTe thin films are deposited on 200 mm silicon substrates by plasma enhanced—metal organic chemical vapor deposition (PE-MOCVD) using the commercial organometallic precursors TDMAGe and DIPTe as Ge and Te precursors, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements show a stoichiometric composition of the deposited GeTe films but with high carbon contamination. Using information collected by Optical Emission Spectroscopy (OES) and XPS, the origin of carbon contamination is determined and the dissociation mechanisms of Ge and Te precursors in H2 + Ar plasma are proposed. As a result, carbon level is properly controlled by varying operating parameters such as plasma radio frequency power, pressure and H2 rate. Finally, GeTe films with carbon level as low as 5 at. % are obtained.

  18. Electron field emission from 2-induced insulating to metallic behaviour of amorphous carbon (-C) films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pitamber Mahanandia; P N Viswakarma; Prasad Vishnu Bhotla; S V Subramanyam; Karuna Kar Nanda

    2010-06-01

    The influence of concentration and size of 2 cluster on the transport properties and electron field emissions of amorphous carbon films have been investigated. The observed insulating to metallic behaviour from reduced activation energy derived from transport measurement and threshold field for electron emission of -C films can be explained in terms of improvements in the connectivity between 2 clusters. The connectivity is resulted by the cluster concentration and size. The concentration and size of 2 content cluster is regulated by the coalescence of carbon globules into clusters, which evolves with deposition conditions.

  19. Ni-YSZ Substrate Degradation during Carbon Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinsek, M.

    2011-07-01

    Carbon deposition on various Ni-YSZ catalytic composites with average Ni particle size from 0.44 {mu}m to 0.98 mm was studied under dry CH{sub 4}-Ar and humidified CH{sub 4}-Ar conditions. The change in the catalytic activity was monitored both as a mass gain due to carbon deposition and hydrogen evolution due to CH{sub 4} dehydrogenation on Ni-YSZ. Regarding the start of methane decomposition and subsequent catalyst deactivation rate, composites with smaller Ni-grains were much more active in comparison to those with relatively large grains. Dry methane conditions always caused coking of the catalyst substrate with substantial activity loss. In contrast, under humidified methane atmosphere conditions with a steam to carbon (S/C) ratio of 0.82, catalytic activity of the Ni-YSZ composites remained nearly undiminished after 2,000 minutes at chosen deposition temperatures (600-800 degree centigrade). On the catalyst surface, some encapsulation of Ni with the deposited carbon was noticed while carbon filaments grew inside the treated samples. The dimensions of C-filaments were influenced by treatment conditions and Ni-YSZ substrate morphology. (Author) 42 refs.

  20. Measurement of the magnetostriction constants of amorphous thin films on kapton substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, C.; Kim, T. W.; Gambino, R. J.; Jahnes, C.

    1998-06-01

    The saturation magnetostriction constants of thin films of amorphous Co39Ni31Fe8Si8B14 and CoZrTb have been measured either by the small angle magnetization rotation (SAMR) method or by the initial susceptibility method. The SAMR method is used for the soft materials. When the material is magnetically hard or has a strong perpendicular anisotropy, the initial susceptibility method is used. It is found that the amorphous Co39Ni31Fe8Si8B14 prepared by ion beam deposition from an alloy target shows very soft magnetic properties and has a very small negative saturation magnetostriction, λs, of -1×10-7. Sputtered films of CoZrTb show a strong perpendicular anisotropy when the concentration of Tb is high. We have found that the SAMR method can be applied to CoZrTb films when the Tb content is low. The saturation magnetostricition constant of a sputtered film of Co78.4Zr20.8Tb0.8 is 2×106. When the Tb content is high, however, the initial susceptibility method is used to measure magnetostriction.

  1. Field Emission from Amorphous carbon Nitride Films Deposited on silicon Tip Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊杰; 郑伟涛; 孙龙; 卞海蛟; 金曾孙; 赵海峰; 宋航; 孟松鹤; 赫晓东; 韩杰才

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride films (a-CNx) were deposited on silicon tip arrays by rf magnetron sputtering in pure nitrogen atmosphere. The field emission property of carbon nitride films on Si tips was compared with that of carbon nitride on silicon wafer. The results show that field emission property of carbon nitride films deposited on silicon tips can be improved significantly in contrast with that on wafer. It can be explained that field emission is sensitive to the local curvature and geometry, thus silicon tips can effectively promote field emission property of a-CNx films. In addition, the films deposited on silicon tips have a smaller effective work function ( F = 0.024 eV)of electron field emission than that on silicon wafer ( F = 0.060 e V), which indicates a significant enhancement of the ability of electron field emission from a-CNx films.

  2. Deposition of carbon nanostructures on metal substrates at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Zh; Nikovski, M.; Kiss'ovski, Zh

    2016-03-01

    The microwave-plasma-enhanced CVD of carbon nanostructures at atmospheric pressure allows shorter deposition times and reduces the complexity of the experimental set-up. In our study, the substrate temperature was varied in a wide range (300 – 700 C) using microwave plasma heating, as well as an additional heater. The distance between the substrate and the plasma flame was also varied in order to establish the conditions for an efficient deposition process, the latter being carried out at specific argon/hydrogen/methane gas mixtures. Optical measurements of the plasma flame spectrum were conducted to obtain the gas temperature and the plasma density and to analyze the existence of reactive species. The carbon nanostructures deposited on the metal samples were investigated by SEM. The relation between the morphology and the gas-discharge conditions is discussed.

  3. Spatially-Resolved Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon Films on the Glass Substrate by Multi-beam Laser Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Laser interference induced crystallization of amorphous silicon (a-Si) on the glass substrate was performed using a Q-switched Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser. White light interferometer (WLI) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were used to characterize the morphology of the structured films, while X-ray diffraction (XRD), combined with the AFM, was used to analyse the crystalline structure of the film. The experimental results show that the laser energy density above a certain threshold, in the range of 400-500 mJ/cm2,triggers the patterned crystallizations which take the form similar to the laser intensity distribution. For the patterned crystallization under multipulse exposure, a definite polycrystalline structure with individual phases was observed by XRD. The difference in feature form, e.g., deepened craters or heightened lines, is related to the laser energy density relative to the threshold of evaporation of the material.

  4. Surface roughening during plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon on crystal silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphology of a series of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) grown by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. The substrates were atomically flat, oxide-free, single-crystal silicon. Films were grown in a PECVD chamber directly connected to a surface analysis chamber with no air exposure between growth and measurement. The homogeneous roughness of the films increases with film thickness. The quantification of this roughening is achieved by calculation of both rms roughness and lateral correlation lengths of the a-Si:H film surface from the height difference correlation functions of the measured topographs. Homogeneous roughening occurs over the film surface due to the collective behavior of the flux of depositing radical species and their interactions with the growth surface. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  5. Hydrogenation assisted nickel-induced lateral nano-crystallization of amorphous silicon on flexible plastic substrates at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report ultra low temperature lateral crystallization of amorphous silicon films on flexible plastic substrates suitable for the realization of thin-film transistors. A sequential hydrogenation and annealing is necessary to crystallize silicon films aided with an external mechanical stress at a temperature of 170 deg. C. Ni is used as the seed for the crystallization using a metal induced crystallization method. For the formation of polycrystalline-silicon thin-film transistors, a lateral crystallization is tried where the seed is placed on the source and drain regions and crystallization progresses from the seed regions towards the central parts of the channel of the thin-film transistor. Scanning electron and transmission electron microscopies were used to investigate the morphology and crystallinity of the layers. The fabricated lateral transistors show an on/off ratio of 2000 and an effective mobility of about 25 cm2/V s

  6. Template synthesis, characterization and magnetic property of Fe nanowires-filled amorphous carbon nanotubes array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Fe nanowires-filled amorphous carbon nanotubes (FeNW-filled a-CNTs) array was synthesized by sequential growth of electrodeposited Fe nanowires and subsequent chemical vapour deposition of amorphous CNTs in the nanochannels of alumina template. Structural characterizations of as-prepared FeNW-filled a-CNTs were carried out via field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), elemental mapping, high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and Raman scattering. The formation mechanism of such Fe/C nanoheterostructure was proposed according to the detailed HRTEM analyses. Furthermore, the room temperature magnetic property of the as-prepared FeNW-filled a-CNTs array was also investigated, and obvious anisotropic behaviour in magnetization was observed

  7. The ir emission features: Emission from PAH [Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons] molecules and amorphous carbon particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PAHs can have several forms in the interstellar medium. To assess the importance of each requires the availability of a collection of high quality, complete mid-ir interstellar emission spectra, a collection of laboratory spectra of PAH samples prepared under realistic conditions and a firm understanding of the microscopic emission mechanism. Given what we currently know about PAHs, the spectroscopic data suggests that there are at least two components which contribute to the interstellar emission spectrum: free molecule sized PAHs producing the narrow features and amorphous carbon particles (which are primarily made up of an irregular ''lattice'' of PAHs) contributing to the broad underlying components. An exact treatment of the ir fluorescence from highly vibrationally excited large molecules shows that species containing between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the narrow features, although the spectra match more closely with the spectra of amorphous carbon particles. Since little is known about the spectroscopic properties of free PAHs and PAH clusters, much laboratory work is called for in conjunction with an observational program which focuses on the spatial characteristics of the spectra. In this way the distribution and evolution of carbon from molecule to particle can be traced. 38 refs., 9 figs

  8. Crystalline and Amorphous Phosphorus – Carbon Nanotube Composites as Promising Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Smajic, Jasmin

    2016-05-04

    Battery research has been going full steam and with that the search for alternative anodes. Among many proposed electrode materials, little attention has been given to phosphorus. Phosphorus boasts the third highest gravimetric charge capacity and the highest volumetric charge capacity of all elements. Because of that, it would be an attractive battery anode material were it not for its poor cyclability with significant capacity loss immediately after the first cycle. This is known to be the consequence of considerable volume changes of phosphorus during charge/discharge cycles. In this work, we propose circumventing this issue by mixing amorphous red phosphorus with carbon nanotubes. By employing a non-destructive sublimation-deposition method, we have synthesized composites where the synergetic effect between phosphorus and carbon nanotubes allow for an improvement in the electrochemical performance of battery anodes. In fact, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes can act as an effective buffer to phosphorus volumetric expansions and contractions during charging and discharging of the half-cells [1]. By modifying the synthesis parameters, we have also been able to change the degree of crystallinity of the phosphorus matrix in the composites. In fact, the less common phase of red phosphorus, named fibrous phosphorus, was obtained, and that explains some of the varying electrochemical performances observed in the composites. Overall, it is found that a higher surface area of amorphous phosphorus allows for a better anode material when using single-walled carbon nanotubes as fillers.

  9. Studies of pure and nitrogen-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films and their possible application for amorphous silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) and nitrogen-incorporated a-C:H (a-C:N:H) thin films were deposited using radio frequency-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique and studied for their electrical, optical, and nano-mechanical properties. Introduction of nitrogen and increase of self bias enhanced the conductivity of a-C:H and a-C:N:H films, whereas current-voltage measurement reveals heterojunction formation due to their rectifying behavior. The bandgap of these films was changed over wide range from 1.9 eV to 3.45 eV by varying self bias and the nitrogen incorporation. Further, activation energy was correlated with the electronic structure of a-C:H and a-C:N:H films, and conductivity was discussed as a function of bandgap. Moreover, a-C:N:H films exhibited high hardness and elastic modulus, with maximum values as 42 GPa and 430 GPa, respectively, at -100 V. Observed fascinating electrical, optical, and nano-mechanical properties made it a material of great utility in the development of optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells. In addition, we also performed simulation study for an a-Si:H solar cell, considering a-C:H and C:N:H as window layers, and compared their performance with the a-Si:H solar cell having a-SiC:H as window layer. We also proposed several structures for the development of a near full-spectrum solar cell. Moreover, due to high hardness, a-C:N:H films can be used as a protective and encapsulate layer on solar cells, especially in n-i-p configuration on metal substrate. Nevertheless, a-C:H and a-C:N:H as a window layer can avoid the use of additional hard and protective coating and, hence, minimize the cost of the product.

  10. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  11. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 -4 Torr until 7.5 x 10 -2 Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  12. Very high frequency plasma deposited amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon tandem solar cells on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The work in this thesis is to develop high quality intrinsic layers (especially nc-Si:H) for micromorph silicon tandem solar cells/modules on plastic substrates following the substrate transfer method or knows as the Helianthos procedure. Two objectives are covered in this thesis: (1) preliminary work on trial and optimization of single junction and tandem cells on glass substrate, (2) silicon film depositions on Al foil, and afterwards the characterization and development of these cells/modules on a plastic substrate. The first objective includes the development of suitable ZnO:Al TCO for nc Si:H single junction solar cells, fabrication of the aimed micromorph tandem solar cells on glass, and finally the optimization of the nc-Si:H i-layer for the depositions afterwards on Al foil. Chapter 3 addresses the improvement of texture etching of ZnO:Al by studying the HCl etching effect on ZnO:Al films sputter-deposited in a set substrate heater temperature series. With the texture-etched ZnO:Al front TCO, a single junction nc-Si:H solar cell was deposited with an initial efficiency of 8.33%. Chapter 4 starts with studying the light soaking and annealing effects on micromorph tandem solar cell. In the end, a highly stabilized bottom cell current limited tandem cell was made. The tandem shows an initial efficiency of 10.2%, and degraded only 6.9% after 1600 h of light soaking. In Chapter 5, the nc-Si:H i-layers were studied in 3 pressure and inter-electrode distance series. The correlations between plasma physics and the consequent i-layers’ properties are investigated. We show that the Raman crystalline ratio and porosity of the nc-Si:H layer have an interesting relation with the p•d product. By varying p and d, device quality nc-Si:H layer can be deposited at a high rate of 0.6 nm/s. These results in fact are a very important step for the second objective. The second objective is covered by the entire Chapter 6. All silicon layers are deposited on special aluminum

  13. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells deposited under well controlled ion bombardment using pulse-shaped substrate biasing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wank, M. A.; van Swaaij, R.; R. van de Sanden,; Zeman, M.

    2012-01-01

    We applied pulse-shaped biasing (PSB) to the expanding thermal plasma deposition of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers at substrate temperatures of 200 degrees C and growth rates of about 1?nm/s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of intrinsic films showed a densification with incr

  14. X-ray diffraction study of atomic structure features of amorphous carbon containing materials of nature and synthetic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure of amorphous carbon-containing materials such as carbon glass, spectroscopically pure carbon, schungite and anthracite is investigated using X ray diffraction analysis and computerized simulation. In computerized simulation of model gratings packing into packets an interlayer distance and a number of layer in a packet varied and a gratings turn is predetermined randomly. The quantity of gratings in a packet is shown to vary between four for anthracite and six for spectroscopically pure coal. The interlayer distance for all amorphous carbonaceous materials is above 3.35 A which is typical for graphite

  15. Growth of crystalline silicon nanowires on nickel-coated silicon wafer beneath sputtered amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth of crystalline silicon nanowire of controllable diameter directly from Si wafer opens up another avenue for its application in solar cells and optical sensing. Crystalline Si nanowire can be directly grown from Si wafer upon rapid thermal annealing in the presence of the catalyst such as nickel (Ni). However, the accompanying oxidation immediately changes the crystalline Si nanowire to amorphous SiOx. In this study, amorphous carbon layer was sputtered to on top of the catalyst Ni layer to retard the oxidation. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the wires and oxidation process. A model was developed to explain the growth and oxidation process of the crystalline Si nanowire. - Highlights: ► Carbon was sputtered on nickel to retard the oxidation of silicon nanowires. ► Silicon core was controlled by carbon layer thickness and annealing duration. ► An oxidation-accompanying solid–liquid–solid growth mechanism was developed

  16. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings for friction reduction of the valve train in internal combustion engines

    OpenAIRE

    Götze, Andreas; Makowski, Stefan; Kunze, Tim; Hübner, Matthias; Zellbeck, Hans; Weihnacht, Volker; Leson, Andreas; Beyer, Eckhard; Joswig, Jan-Ole; Seifert, Gotthard; Abrasonis, Gintautas; Posselt, Matthias; Fassbender, Jürgen; Möller, Wolfhard; Gemming, Sibylle

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) is studied as a tribological coating for the valve train's exhaust camshaft of a combustion engine. The coated camshafts were installed in a non-fired engine, tested in a computerized component test bench under practice-relevant conditions and analyzed for their frictional behavior. A notable reduction of the valve train's drive torque on the test bench is demonstrated. Namely, on a roller cam system with ta-C-coated camshaft the reduction is about 15% in a...

  17. Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon-Nitrogen Alloy Thin Films for Solar Cell Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-Bin; DING Zheng-Ming; PANG Qian-Jun; CUI Rong-Qiang

    2001-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon-nitrogen alloy (a-CNx :H) thin films have been deposited on silicon substratesby improved dc magnetron sputtering from a graphite target in nitrogen and hydrogen gas discharging. Thefilms are investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectral ellipsometer and electron spin resonance techniques. The optimized process condition for solar cell application is discussed. Thephotovoltaic property of a-CNx:H/silicon heterojunctions can be improved by the adjustment of the pressureratio of hydrogen to nitrogen and unbalanced magnetic field intensity. Open-circuit voltage and short-circuitcurrent reach 300mV and 5.52 Ma/cm2, respectively.

  18. Phonon transport in amorphous carbon using Green-Kubo modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wei; Henry, Asegun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) is an important material often used in microelectronics. Using a recently developed approach, termed Green-Kubo modal analysis, we were able to calculate the thermal conductivity of a-C, which yielded excellent agreement with experiments, by employing a simple correction to the specific heat. The results show that the heat capacity substantially limits the thermal conductivity of a-C at room temperature and it is dominated by contributions from diffusons between 10 and 40 THz. Furthermore, the phonon relaxation times in a-C do not vary significantly with increasing temperature, which is quite unusual by comparison with the behavior observed for other materials.

  19. Soft x-ray reflectivity measurements of amorphous carbon thin films using Indus-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using Indus-I synchrotron radiation source, the soft x-ray reflectivity measurements have been performed on electron beam deposited amorphous carbon thin films. The study shows that soft x-ray reflectivity is an extremely effective, accurate and non-destructive technique for measuring thickness, density and microscopic roughness. High q- space resolution at larger wavelength permits to investigate thicker films in the range of 100 to 3000 A. Our simulation study for hard x-ray region reveals that the instrumental resolution factor limits the probing thickness range. (author)

  20. Strength and tribology of bulk and electroformed nickel amorphized by implantation of titanium and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual ion implantation of titanium and carbon was shown to produce an amorphous layer of exceptional strength within annealed bulk Ni and electroformed Ni and Ni80Fe20 materials used in micro-electromechanical systems. The intrinsic elastic and plastic mechanical properties of the implanted region were quantified using nanoindentation testing in conjunction with finite-element modeling, and the results were interpreted in the light of microstructures observed by electron microscopy. The implantation treatment was found to produce substantial reductions in unlubricated friction and wear

  1. Photoluminescence of amorphous carbon films fabricated by layer-by-layer hydrogen plasma chemical annealing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐骏; 黄晓辉; 李伟; 王立; 陈坤基

    2002-01-01

    A method in which nanometre-thick film deposition was alternated with hydrogen plasma annealing (layer-by-layermethod) was applied to fabricate hydrogenated amorphous carbon films in a conventional plasma-enhanced chemicalvapour deposition system. It was found that the hydrogen plasma treatment could decrease the hydrogen concentrationin the films and change the sp2/sp3 ratio to some extent by chemical etching. Blue photoluminescence was observed atroom temperature, as a result of the reduction of sp2 clusters in the films.

  2. Cell survival in carbon beams - comparison of amorphous track model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, L.; Greilich, S.; Korcyl, M.;

    Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under i....... Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams. 4.Tsuruoka C, Suzuki M, Kanai T, et al. LET and ion species dependence for cell killing in normal human skin fibroblasts. Radiat Res. 2005;163:494-500.......Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under ion...... factors is the normalization of the energy distribution around the particle tracks to the actual LET value. Later on we check what is the effect of radial dose distribution choice on kappa parameter for different types and energy of ions. Outline References 1.Katz R, Sharma SC.Response of cells to fast...

  3. Erbium-Doped Amorphous Carbon-Based Thin Films: A Photonic Material Prepared by Low-Temperature RF-PEMOCVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Lin Hsu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The integration of photonic materials into CMOS processing involves the use of new materials. A simple one-step metal-organic radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (RF-PEMOCVD was deployed to grow erbium-doped amorphous carbon thin films (a-C:(Er on Si substrates at low temperatures (<200 °C. A partially fluorinated metal-organic compound, tris(6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluoro-2,2-dimethyl-3,5- octanedionate Erbium(+III or abbreviated Er(fod3, was incorporated in situ into a-C based host. Six-fold enhancement of Er room-temperature photoluminescence at 1.54 µm was demonstrated by deuteration of the a-C host. Furthermore, the effect of RF power and substrate temperature on the photoluminescence of a-C:D(Er films was investigated and analyzed in terms of the film structure. Photoluminescence signal increases with increasing RF power, which is the result of an increase in [O]/[Er] ratio and the respective erbium-oxygen coordination number. Moreover, photoluminescence intensity decreases with increasing substrate temperature, which is attributed to an increased desorption rate or a lower sticking coefficient of the fluorinated fragments during film growth and hence [Er] decreases. In addition, it is observed that Er concentration quenching begins at ~2.2 at% and continues to increase until 5.5 at% in the studied a-C:D(Er matrix. This technique provides the capability of doping Er in a vertically uniform profile.

  4. Properties of amorphous SiC coatings deposited on WC-Co substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Costa A.K.; Camargo Jr S.S.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, silicon carbide films were deposited onto tungsten carbide from a sintered SiC target on a r.f. magnetron sputtering system. Based on previous results about the influence of r.f. power and argon pressure upon the properties of films deposited on silicon substrates, suitable conditions were chosen to produce high quality films on WC-Co pieces. Deposition parameters were chosen in order to obtain high deposition rates (about 30 nm/min at 400 W rf power) and acceptable residual str...

  5. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation; Sintesis y caracterizacion de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado, depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo P, B

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  6. X-ray and neutron scattering from amorphous diamondlike carbon and hydrocarbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report amorphous, diamondlike, carbon and hydrocarbon films are investigated by two different methods, namely, X-ray scattering and a combination of X-ray and neutron reflectivity. As specular reflectivity probes the scattering length density profile of a sample perpendicular to its surface, the combination of X-ray and neutron reflectivity reveals the nuclei density of both carbon and hydrogen separately. This allows to calculate the concentration of hydrogen in the films, which varies in the presented experiments between 0 and 36 atomic %. This method is a new and nondestructive technique to determine the concentration of hydrogen within an error of about ±1 at. % in samples with sharp interfaces. It is well suited for thin diamondlike carbon films. X-ray scattering is used to obtain structural information on the atomic scale, especially the average carbon-carbon distance and the average coordination number of the carbon atoms. As grazing incidence diffraction experiments were not successful, free-standing films are used for the scattering experiments with synchrotron light. However, the scattered intensity for large scattering vectors is, in spite of the intense primary beam, very weak, and therefore the accuracy of the obtained structural parameter is not sufficient to prove the diamondlike properties also on the atomic scale. (au) (10 tabs., 76 ills., 102 refs.)

  7. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoon Hwang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV. As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries.

  8. Effects of energetic species during the growth of nitrogenated amorphous carbon thin films on their nanomechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous carbon nitride (CN x) films are promising materials either as wear-resistant or as solid-lubricant coatings, depending on their mechanical and tribological behavior. In this work, we produced amorphous CN x films by reactive magnetron sputtering, and we varied independently the film density, sp3/sp2 content and [N] concentration. The morphology, density and hybridization state of the CN x films were studied ex situ by X-ray reflectivity (XRR). Also, the effects of energetic species (mainly N+ or Ar+) on their microstructure and composition were investigated. Using the assumptions of the subplantation model and the results of SRIM simulations, we correlated the density of the films and [N] with the N+ ion energy. The nanomechanical and tribological properties of CN x films were studied by nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests. While both adhesion and ploughing mechanisms contribute to the friction behavior in the intermediate and high load ranges, the dominant friction mechanism in the low-load range was attributed to adhesion of the film to the substrate. CN x films grown without ion bombardment (IBD), depending on the normal load, will deform either elastically or elastically-plastically, and may even delaminate. For loads below 5 mN, nanoscratching showed mainly elastic behavior of the film, while above 5 mN, a mixed elastic-plastic behavior was identified. However, the scratch and friction response of the films grown under high-energy ion bombardment (IBD) during ion beam assisted deposition showed a load-dependent transition. The results will be discussed in detail

  9. The implications of microbial and substrate limitation for the fates of carbon in different organic soil horizon types: a mechanistically based model analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. He

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The large magnitudes of soil carbon stocks provide potentially large feedbacks to climate changes, highlighting the need to better understand and represent the environmental sensitivity of soil carbon decomposition. Most soil carbon decomposition models rely on empirical relationships omitting key biogeochemical mechanisms and their response to climate change is highly uncertain. In this study, we developed a multi-layer mechanistically based soil decomposition model framework for boreal forest ecosystems. A global sensitivity analysis was conducted to identify dominating biogeochemical processes and to highlight structural limitations. Our results indicate that substrate availability (limited by soil water diffusion and substrate quality is likely to be a major constraint on soil decomposition in the fibrous horizon (40–60% of SOC pool size variation, while energy limited microbial activity in the amorphous horizon exerts a predominant control on soil decomposition (>70% of SOC pool size variation. Elevated temperature alleviated the energy constraint of microbial activity most notably in amorphous soils; whereas moisture only exhibited a marginal effect on dissolved substrate supply and microbial activity. Our study highlights the different decomposition properties and underlying mechanisms of soil dynamics between fibrous and amorphous soil horizons. Soil decomposition models should consider explicitly representing different boreal soil horizons and soil-microbial interactions to better characterize biogeochemical processes in boreal ecosystems. A more comprehensive representation of critical biogeochemical mechanisms of soil moisture effects may be required to improve the performance of the soil model we analyzed in this study.

  10. Effects of carbon substrate lability on carbon mineralization dynamics of tropical peat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, Jyrki; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Könönen, Mari; Limin, Suwido; Vasander, Harri

    2016-04-01

    Extensive draining at tropical ombrotrophic peatlands in Southeast Asia has made them global 'hot spots' for greenhouse gas emissions. Management practises and fires have led to changed substrate status, which affects microbial processes. Here, we present the first data on how management practises affect carbon (C) mineralization processes at these soils. We compared the carbon mineralization potentials of pristine forest soils to those of drained fire affected soils at various depths, with and without additional labile substrates (glucose, glutamate and NO3-N) and in oxic and anoxic conditions by dedicated ex situ experiments. Carbon mineralization (CO2 and CH4 production) rates were higher in the pristine site peat, which contains more labile carbon due to higher input via vegetation. Production rates decreased with depth together with decreasing availability of labile carbon. Consequently, the increase in production rates after labile substrate addition was relatively modest from pristine site as compared to the managed site and from the top layers as compared to deeper layers. Methanogenesis had little importance in total carbon mineralization. Adding labile C and N enhanced heterotrophic CO2 production more than the sole addition of N. Surprisingly, oxygen availability was not an ultimate requirement for substantial CO2 production rates, but anoxic respiration yielded comparable rates, especially at the pristine soils. Flooding of these sites will therefore reduce, but not completely cease, peat carbon loss. Reintroduced substantial vegetation and fertilization in degraded peatlands can enrich recalcitrant peat with simple C and N compounds and thus increase microbiological activity.

  11. K-intercalated carbon systems: Effects of dimensionality and substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2012-06-01

    Density functional theory is employed to investigate the electronic properties of K-intercalated carbon systems. Young\\'s modulus indicates that the intercalation increases the intrinsic stiffness. For K-intercalated bilayer graphene on SiC(0001) the Dirac cone is maintained, whereas a trilayer configuration exhibits a small splitting at the Dirac point. Interestingly, in contrast to many other intercalated carbon systems, the presence of the SiC(0001) substrate does not suppress but rather enhances the charge carrier density. Reasonably high values are found for all systems, the highest carrier density for the bilayer. The band structure and electron-phonon coupling of free-standing K-intercalated bilayer graphene points to a high probability for superconductivity in this system. © 2012 Europhysics Letters Association.

  12. Electronic Sputtering of Nanodimensional Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon and Copper Oxide Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ghosh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Electronic sputtering of carbon from hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H/Si film and oxygen from copper oxide (CuO/Si film at different electronic energy loss (Se value is reported. The sputtering is monitored by online elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA technique and the yield (sputtered atoms/incident ion is determined. Two important results emerging out from this study are: (i much higher yield of C and O from a-C:H and CuO films as compared to conventional kinetic sputtering and (ii sputtering yield increases with increase in Se in both the cases. These observations are understood on the basis of thermal spike model of ion-solid interaction.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(4, pp.370-376, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1536

  13. Structure evolution from nanocolumns to nanoporous of nitrogen doped amorphous carbon films deposited by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different nitrogen doped amorphous carbon (CNx) films were obtained by magnetron sputtering of carbon target in argon and nitrogen atmosphere at the increasing negative bias voltages from 0 to 150 V. The films structures have experienced great change, from the novel column to nanoporous structure at the bias voltage of 0 V to the porous structure at 150 V. The proposed growth process was that the CNx nuclei grew at 0 V acted as the 'seeds' for the growth of the nanocolumns, and ion etching effects at 150 V induced the formation of nanoporous structures. Furthermore, a comparison study showed that the field emission properties of the CNx films were related with the introduction of the nitrogen atoms, the size and concentration of sp2 C clusters and the surface roughness. The films with rougher surface have lower threshold field.

  14. Amorphous Carbon Coatings for Mitigation of Electron Cloud in the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Christina; Bauche, Jeremie; Calatroni, Sergio; Chiggiato, Paolo; Cornelis, Karel; Costa Pinto, Pedro; Metral, Elias; Rumolo, Giovanni; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Taborelli, Mauro; Vandoni, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbon thin films have been applied to the liners in the electron cloud monitors and to vacuum chambers of three dipole magnets in the SPS. The electron cloud is completely suppressed for LHC type beams in the liners even after 3 months of air venting and no performance deterioration is observed after more than one year of SPS operation. In stainless steel (StSt) liners upon variation of the magnetic field in the monitors the electron cloud current maintains its intensity down to weak fields of some 40 Gauss. This is in agreement with previous findings and also with dark traces observed on the RF shields made of StSt, which are located between dipoles and quadrupoles. The dynamic pressure rise has been used to monitor the behavior of the dipole magnets. It is about the same for coated and uncoated magnets, apart from a weak improvement in the carbon coated ones under conditions of intense electron cloud

  15. Stabilization of amorphous calcium carbonate by phosphate rich organic matrix proteins and by single phosphoamino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentov, Shmuel; Weil, Simy; Glazer, Lilah; Sagi, Amir; Berman, Amir

    2010-08-01

    Stable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a unique material produced naturally exclusively as a biomineral. It was demonstrated that proteins extracted from biogenic stable ACC induce and stabilize synthetic ACC in vitro. Polyphosphate molecules were similarly shown to induce amorphous calcium carbonate formation in vitro. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that biogenic ACC induction and stabilization is mediated by the phosphorylated residues of phosphoproteins. We show that extracellular organic matrix extracted from gastroliths of the red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus induce stable ACC formation in vitro. The proteinaceous fraction of this organic matrix is highly phosphorylated and is incorporated into the ACC mineral phase during precipitation. We have identified the major phosphoproteins of the organic matrix and showed that they have high calcium binding capacity. Based on the above, in vitro precipitation experiments with single phosphoamino acids were performed, indicating that phosphoserine or phosphothreonine alone can induce the formation of highly stable ACC. The results indicate that phosphoproteins may play a major role in the control of ACC formation and stabilization and that their phosphoamino acid moieties are key components in this process. PMID:20416381

  16. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  17. Carbon nitride deposition onto steel substrates by radio frequency plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition with substrate heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films are promising candidates for tribological application due to its low friction coefficient. However, the adhesion strength of the film on steel substrate was poor at elevated temperature during deposition. In this study, CNx film was fabricated on bearing steel (SUJ2) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304) substrates with radio frequency (RF) plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Adhesion strength of the film on the steel substrates was improved by blasting or polishing of the substrate surface before deposition. Thick CNx film was deposited on the steel substrates by substrate heating and substrate pretreatment. The atomic composition ratio of N/C and the bonding ratio of sp3 / (sp2 + sp3) increased with substrate temperature. Maximum atomic composition ratio of N/C was 0.155 on SUJ2 substrate and 0.171 on AISI304 substrate at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature. The maximum adhesion strength of 14.8 MPa was obtained at blasted SUJ2 substrate. The maximum knoop hardness of 8.94 GPa and the lowest friction coefficient of 0.072 were obtained on SUJ2 substrate with polished no. 150 at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature.

  18. Carbon nitride deposition onto steel substrates by radio frequency plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition with substrate heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasui, Toshiaki, E-mail: yasui@me.tut.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Kimura, Shingo [Department of Production Systems Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Nishikawa, Ryutaro; Fukumoto, Masahiro [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tempaku, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    Carbon nitride (CNx) films are promising candidates for tribological application due to its low friction coefficient. However, the adhesion strength of the film on steel substrate was poor at elevated temperature during deposition. In this study, CNx film was fabricated on bearing steel (SUJ2) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI304) substrates with radio frequency (RF) plasma assisted pulsed laser deposition in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Adhesion strength of the film on the steel substrates was improved by blasting or polishing of the substrate surface before deposition. Thick CNx film was deposited on the steel substrates by substrate heating and substrate pretreatment. The atomic composition ratio of N/C and the bonding ratio of sp{sup 3} / (sp{sup 2} + sp{sup 3}) increased with substrate temperature. Maximum atomic composition ratio of N/C was 0.155 on SUJ2 substrate and 0.171 on AISI304 substrate at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature. The maximum adhesion strength of 14.8 MPa was obtained at blasted SUJ2 substrate. The maximum knoop hardness of 8.94 GPa and the lowest friction coefficient of 0.072 were obtained on SUJ2 substrate with polished no. 150 at 40 W of RF power and 673 K of substrate temperature.

  19. Biological Characteristics of the MG-63 Human Osteosarcoma Cells on Composite Tantalum Carbide/Amorphous Carbon Films

    OpenAIRE

    Yin-Yu Chang; Heng-Li Huang; Ya-Chi Chen; Jui-Ting Hsu; Tzong-Ming Shieh; Ming-Tzu Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC) and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon...

  20. Transformation of Mg-bearing amorphous calcium carbonate to Mg-calcite - In situ monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The formation of Mg-bearing calcite via an amorphous precursor is a poorly understood process that is of relevance for biogenic and abiogenic carbonate precipitation. In order to gain an improved insight on the controls of Mg incorporation in calcite formed via an Mg-rich amorphous calcium carbonate (Mg-ACC) precursor, the precipitation of Mg-ACC and its transformation to Mg-calcite was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy. The experiments were performed at 25.0 ± 0.03 °C and pH 8.3 ± 0.1 and revealed two distinct pathways of Mg-calcite formation: (i) At initial aqueous Mg/Ca molar ratios ⩽ 1:6, Mg-calcite formation occurs via direct precipitation from solution. (ii) Conversely, at higher initial Mg/Ca molar ratios, Mg-calcite forms via an intermediate Mg-rich ACC phase. In the latter case, the final product is a calcite with up to 20 mol% Mg. This Mg content is significant higher than that of the Mg-rich ACC precursor phase. Thus, a strong net uptake of Mg ions from the solution into the crystalline precipitate throughout and also subsequent to ACC transformation is postulated. Moreover, the temporal evolution of the geochemical composition of the reactive solution and the Mg-ACC has no significant effect on the obtained "solubility product" of Mg-ACC. The enrichment of Mg in calcite throughout and subsequent to Mg-ACC transformation is likely affected by the high aqueous Mg/Ca ratio and carbonate alkalinity concentrations in the reactive solution. The experimental results have a bearing on the formation mechanism of Mg-rich calcites in marine early diagenetic environments, where high carbonate alkalinity concentrations are the rule rather than the exception, and on the insufficiently investigated inorganic component of biomineralisation pathways in many calcite secreting organisms.

  1. Characterization of amorphous carbon films as total-reflection mirrors for XUV free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Sandra; Steeg, Barbara; Wiesmann, Jorg; Stormer, Michael; Feldhaus, Josef; Bormann, R.'diger; Michaelsen, Carsten

    2002-12-01

    As part of the TESLA (TeV-Energy Superconducting Linear Accelerator) project a free electron laser (FEL) in the XUV (Extreme Ultra-Violet, (6-200 eV)) and X-ray (0.5-15 keV) range is being developed at DESY (Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron, Hamburg). At the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) a prototype FEL has recently demonstrated maximum light amplification in the range of 80 nm to 120 nm. It is expected that the FEL will provide intense, sub-picosecond radiation pulses with photon energies up to 200 eV in the next development stage. In a joint project between DESY and GKSS, thin film optical elements with very high radiation stability, as required for FEL applications, are currently being developed. Sputter-deposited amorphous carbon coatings have been prepared for use as total reflection X-ray mirrors. The optical characterization of the mirrors has been carried out using the soft X-ray reflectometer at HASYLAB (Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor) beamline G1. The reflectivity of the carbon films at 2 deg incidence angle is close to the theoretical reflectivity of 95.6 %, demonstrating the high quality of the coatings. For comparison, layers produced by different methods (e.g. Chemical vapor deposition, Pulsed laser deposition) have been characterized as well. Annealing experiments have been performed to evaluate the thermal stability of the amorphous carbon films. Further investigations concerning the radiation stability of the X-ray mirrors have also been conducted. The mirrors were irradiated in the FELIS (Free Electron Laser-Interaction with Solids) experiment at the TTF-FEL. Microscopic investigations demonstrate that the carbon mirrors are fairly stable.

  2. Structural changes of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films deposited on steel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junho; Hatta, Tetsuya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were deposited on steel rods of various radii by using bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation and deposition, and the film structure and mechanical properties have been investigated. Furthermore, the behavior of plasma surrounding the steel rods (i.e., flux and energy of incident ions and electrons) was investigated using the particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision (PIC-MCC) method to examine the mechanism behind the structural changes of the a-C:H films. Three kinds of amorphous carbon films with different microstructures were prepared by changing the negative pulse voltages from -1 kV to -5 kV: one polymer-like carbon film and two diamond-like carbon films that possess the maximum FWHM(G) (full width at half maximum of Raman G-peak) and maximum hardness. The structure of the a-C:H films was evaluated through Raman spectroscopy, and the hardness of the films was measured using nanoindentation. It was found that the structures of a-C:H films deposited on the steel-rod surfaces are quite different from those on flat surfaces, and the film structures are directly affected by the curvature of the rod. It was also determined from the plasma simulation that the incident electron flux and ion flux become more intense as the curvature increases, resulting in the structural changes of the a-C:H films due to hydrogen evolution and thermal relaxation in the films.

  3. Determination of carbon in amorphous carbon and uranium monocarbide by oxidation with lead(IV) oxide, copper(II) oxide or barium sulfate in an inert atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxidation behavior was studied on amorphous carbon and carbon in uranium monocarbide when lead(IV) oxide, copper(II) oxide and barium sulfate were used as the oxidizing fluxes in helium. The amorphous carbon and the carbon in the carbide were completely extracted with lead oxide in 5 min at 10000C and in 8 min at 700 and 5000C, respectively. Carbon in two samples was quantitatively extracted at 10000C with copper oxide in 8 and 5 min, and with barium sulfate in 7 and 5 min, respectively. The rate of extraction of carbon with copper oxide decreased with decreasing temperature. It was found that the mixing ratio of the oxidizing flux to the amorphous carbon or carbide gave effect on the recovery of carbon. The conventional capillary-trap method which is used for the determination of carbon has a disadvantage that, when carbon dioxide is caught in a cold trap (liquid nitrogen), oxygen is also trapped. This disadvantage was eliminated when a stream of helium was used in place of oxygen. Carbon in the sample can be determined with lead oxide, copper oxide or barium sulfate by extracting carbon dioxide at 10000C for 10 min. (auth.)

  4. Robust topological surface states of Bi2Se3 thin films on amorphous SiO2/Si substrate and a large ambipolar gating effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Namrata; Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew; Han, Myung-Geun; Zhu, Yimei; Cao, Yue; Waugh, Justin; Dessau, Daniel S.; Oh, Seongshik

    2014-06-01

    The recent emergence of topological insulators (TI) has spurred intensive efforts to grow TI thin films on various substrates. However, little is known about how robust the topological surface states (TSS) are against disorders and other detrimental effects originating from the substrates. Here, we report the observation of a well-defined TSS on Bi2Se3 films grown on amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) substrates and a large gating effect on these films using the underneath doped-Si substrate as the back gate. The films on a-SiO2 were composed of c-axis ordered but random in-plane domains. However, despite the in-plane randomness induced by the amorphous substrate, the transport properties of these films were superior to those of similar films grown on single-crystalline Si(111) substrates, which are structurally better matched but chemically reactive with the films. This work sheds light on the importance of chemical compatibility, compared to lattice matching, for the growth of TI thin films, and also demonstrates that the technologically important and gatable a-SiO2/Si substrate is a promising platform for TI films.

  5. Properties of amorphous SiC coatings deposited on WC-Co substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, silicon carbide films were deposited onto tungsten carbide from a sintered SiC target on a r.f. magnetron sputtering system. Based on previous results about the influence of r.f. power and argon pressure upon the properties of films deposited on silicon substrates, suitable conditions were chosen to produce high quality films on WC-Co pieces. Deposition parameters were chosen in order to obtain high deposition rates (about 30 nm/min at 400 W rf power and acceptable residual stresses (1.5 GPa. Argon pressure affects the energy of particles so that films with higher hardness (30 GPa were obtained at low pressures (0.05 Pa. Wear rates of the coated pieces against a chromium steel ball in a diamond suspension medium were found to be about half of the uncoated ones. Hardness and wear resistance measurements were done also in thermally annealed (200-800 °C samples revealing the effectiveness of SiC coatings to protect tool material against severe mechanical degradation resulting of high temperature (above 500 °C oxidation.

  6. Controlled growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhaoli

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a fascinating material with extraordinary electrical thermal and mechanical properties. Growing vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays on metal substrates is an important step in bringing CNT into practical applications such as thermal interface materials (TIMs) and microelectrodes. However, the growth process is challenging due to the difficulties in preventing catalyst diffusion and controlling catalyst dewetting on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity. In this work, the catalyst diffusion mechanism and catalyst dewetting theory were studied for the controlled growth of VACNTs on metal substrates. The diffusion time of the catalyst, the diffusion coefficients for the catalyst in the substrate materials and the number density of catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting are identified as the key parameters, based on which three strategies are developed. Firstly, a fast-heating catalyst pretreatment strategy was used, aiming at preserving the amount of catalyst prior to CNT growth by reducing the catalyst diffusion time. The catalyst lifetime is extended from half an hour to one hour on a patterned Al thin film and a VACNT height of 106 mum, about twenty fold of that reported in the literature, was attained. Secondly, a diffusion barrier layer strategy is employed for a reduction of catalyst diffusion into the substrate materials. Enhancement of VACNT growth on Cu substrates was achieved by adopting a conformal Al2O 3 diffusion barrier layer fabricated by a specially designed atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Lastly, a novel catalyst glancing angle deposition (GLAD) strategy is performed to manipulate the morphology of a relatively thick catalyst on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity, aiming to obtain uniform and dense catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting in the pretreatment process for enhanced VACNT growth. We are able to control the VACNT growth conditions on metal substrates in terms of their

  7. Properties of boron and phosphorous incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films grown using filtered cathodic vacuum arc process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the electrical, mechanical, structural and field emission properties of as grown and also boron and phosphorous incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films, deposited using a filtered cathodic vacuum arc process. The effect of varying boron and phosphorous content (up to 2.0 at.% in to ta-C) on the conductivity (σD), activation energy (ΔE1), hardness, microstructure, emission threshold (Eturn-ON) and emission current density (J) at 12.5 V/μm of ta-C: B and ta-C: P films deposited at a high negative substrate bias of -300 V are reported. It is observed that both boron and phosphorous incorporation leads to a nearly an order increase in σD and corresponding decrease in ΔE1 and a slight increase in hardness as compared to as grown ta-C films. In the case of field assisted electron emission, it is observed that Eturn-ON increases and J decreases. The changes are attributed to the changes in the sp3/sp2 ratio of the films due to boron and phosphorous incorporation. The effect of boron on ta-C is to give a p-type effect whereas the effect of phosphorous gives n-type doping effect.

  8. Optimized pulsed laser deposition by wavelength and static electric field control: The case of tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsalas, P.; Kaziannis, S.; Kosmidis, C.; Papadimitriou, D.; Abadias, G.; Evangelakis, G. A.

    2007-06-01

    We report on the application of a static (dc) electric field in the plume region during the pulsed Nd doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser deposition (PLD) of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films in vacuum ambient (pressure=10-4-10-3Pa), where the working pressure is exclusively due to ablation vapor. This approach is strikingly different from the plasma- or ion-beam-assisted PLD because the mean free path at this pressure is by far longer than the target to substrate distance. Thus, the electric field interacts with individual ionized species invoking ion acceleration and gas-phase reactions among different ionized species. These phenomena are clearly dependent on the laser wavelength (first, second, or third harmonic, λ =1064, 532, and 355nm, respectively) used for the ablation. We found that the application of the electric field causes surface smoothing (the roughness decreases from about 1to0.4nm) and faster deposition rate (from about 2to7nm/min) for the second and third harmonics. In addition, the phenomena are less intense in the case of the first harmonic due to the low concentration of ionized species in the plume. In addition, in the case of PLD using λ =532nm, the electric field improves the film's density (from 2.60to2.95g/cm3). The correlations found are discussed in terms of the ablated species and the deposition mechanisms of the ta-C.

  9. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  10. Study on effects of carbon impurities and oxygen vacancies in amorphous alumina phosphor prepared via a solution method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amorphous alumina phosphors without containing expensive or toxic elements were prepared via a solution method. The obtained sample indicates bluish-white emission centered at 390–430 nm by UV excitation. According to the measurement results of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and organic microanalysis, it is found that the carbon impurities exist in the sample and they are essential for luminescence. On the other hand, 27Al NMR measurements indicate the presence of Al of 5-coordination. Moreover, there is good correspondence among the excitation spectra of the emission samples, the experimental optical properties of amorphous alumina, and the calculated oxygen vacancies levels in amorphous alumina model. Therefore, the new luminescence mechanism can be proposed as follows; the electrons in valence band are excited to oxygen vacancies bands by UV light and return to ground state through the carbon impurities band, being accompanied by the bluish-white emission. - Highlights: • The amorphous alumina prepared via solution method shows bluish-white emission. • According to the ESR results, carbon impurities are necessary for luminescence. • FT-IR, NMR and UV–vis measurements of the samples were conducted. • Our results indicated that oxygen vacancies play an important role. • We proposed the new luminescence mechanism for amorphous alumina phosphor

  11. Study on effects of carbon impurities and oxygen vacancies in amorphous alumina phosphor prepared via a solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakui, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Kanako [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Shan, Yue Jin, E-mail: shan@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Tezuka, Keitaro; Imoto, Hideo [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Hosokawa, Shogo; Shinozaki, Norifumi [Tatsumori Ltd., 50 Minami-Kawada, Kami-Yukiai, Tamura-cho, Koriyama-shi, Fukushima 963-0724 (Japan); Ando, Mariko; Maekawa, Hideki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-04 Aramaki Aoba, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    The amorphous alumina phosphors without containing expensive or toxic elements were prepared via a solution method. The obtained sample indicates bluish-white emission centered at 390–430 nm by UV excitation. According to the measurement results of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and organic microanalysis, it is found that the carbon impurities exist in the sample and they are essential for luminescence. On the other hand, {sup 27}Al NMR measurements indicate the presence of Al of 5-coordination. Moreover, there is good correspondence among the excitation spectra of the emission samples, the experimental optical properties of amorphous alumina, and the calculated oxygen vacancies levels in amorphous alumina model. Therefore, the new luminescence mechanism can be proposed as follows; the electrons in valence band are excited to oxygen vacancies bands by UV light and return to ground state through the carbon impurities band, being accompanied by the bluish-white emission. - Highlights: • The amorphous alumina prepared via solution method shows bluish-white emission. • According to the ESR results, carbon impurities are necessary for luminescence. • FT-IR, NMR and UV–vis measurements of the samples were conducted. • Our results indicated that oxygen vacancies play an important role. • We proposed the new luminescence mechanism for amorphous alumina phosphor.

  12. Computational investigation of the mechanical and tribological responses of amorphous carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucholz, Eric W.; Sinnott, Susan B.

    2013-02-01

    Nanoparticles are a class of materials that have seen increasing use as friction and wear reducers in tribological applications. Amorphous carbon (a-C) films have been the subject of significant scientific and industrial interest for use as solid-state lubricants. Here, we present classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the mechanical and tribological responses of a-C nanoparticles that are subjected to external forces between hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. Over the range of a-C nanoparticle diameters (2-5 nm) and hydrogenation (0%-50%) considered, the simulations predict a consistent mechanical response where each nanoparticle is highly elastic. The simulations predict that the transition from elastic to plastic response is directly related to an increase in the percentage of carbon-carbon crosslinking within the individual nanoparticles. Contrarily, the simulations also predict that the tribological response is noticeably impacted by changes in diameter and hydrogenation. This is because during friction, hydrogen passivates the unsaturated carbon atoms near the nanoparticle's surface, which prevents interfacial bond formation and allows the nanoparticle to roll within the interface. From these findings, it is demonstrated that a-C nanoparticles are able to provide good tribological performance only when sufficient chemical passivation of the nanoparticles is maintained.

  13. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Emmerling, Franziska; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed.During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: (S1 and S5) TEM at higher magnifications and of crystallizations conducted at pH = 6.0, 9.0 and 11.3; (S2) sketch of a spreading liquid particle on a TEM grid; (S3) wide-angle scattering of BaCO3 and CdCO3; (S4 and S6-S9) ESI-MS spectra of a solution of carbon dioxide and of bicarbonates of Sr, Ba, Pb, Mn and Cd. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00761g

  14. 非晶碳氮纳米尖端的微结构和发光机理%Microstructure and Photoluminescence Mechanism of Amorphous Carbon Nitride Nanotips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王必本; 谢焕玲; 陈玉安; 董国波

    2012-01-01

    利用等离子体增强热丝化学气相沉积系统,用CH4、H2和N2为反应气体,在Si衬底上制备了碳氮纳米尖端.用扫描电子显微镜和显微Raman光谱仪对其进行了表征.在室温下测试了它的发光性能,发光谱由中心约为406 nm和506 nm的两条发光带组成.根据Raman散射谱,对其微结构进行了分析.结合非晶碳氮薄膜的结构和发光机理,分析了它的发光性能.%Carbon nitride nanotips were prepared on silicon substrate in plasma-enhanced hot fila ment chemical vapor deposition system, in which methane, hydrogen and nitrogen were used as the reaction gases. The carbon nitride nanotips were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The photoluminescence of the carbon nitride nanotips was measured at room temperature and the photoluminescence spectrum shows two emission bands at 406 and 506 nm. Combined with the Raman spectrum, the microstructure of the carbon nitride was analyzed. Ac cording to the structure and photoluminescence mechanism of amorphous carbon nitride films, the photoluminescence of carbon nitride nanotips was studied.

  15. Highly ordered amorphous silicon-carbon alloys obtained by RF PECVD

    CERN Document Server

    Pereyra, I; Carreno, M N P; Prado, R J; Fantini, M C A

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that close to stoichiometry RF PECVD amorphous silicon carbon alloys deposited under silane starving plasma conditions exhibit a tendency towards c-Si C chemical order. Motivated by this trend, we further explore the effect of increasing RF power and H sub 2 dilution of the gaseous mixtures, aiming to obtain the amorphous counterpart of c-Si C by the RF-PECVD technique. Doping experiments were also performed on ordered material using phosphorus and nitrogen as donor impurities and boron and aluminum as acceptor ones. For nitrogen a doping efficiency close to device quality a-Si:H was obtained, the lower activation energy being 0,12 eV with room temperature dark conductivity of 2.10 sup - sup 3 (OMEGA.cm). Nitrogen doping efficiency was higher than phosphorous for all studied samples. For p-type doping, results indicate that, even though the attained conductivity values are not device levels, aluminum doping conducted to a promising shift in the Fermi level. Also, aluminum resulted a more efficie...

  16. Carbon-assisted growth and high visible-light optical reflectivity of amorphous silicon oxynitride nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Zirong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Large amounts of amorphous silicon oxynitride nanowires have been synthesized on silicon wafer through carbon-assisted vapor-solid growth avoiding the contamination from metallic catalysts. These nanowires have the length of up to 100 μm, with a diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. Around 3-nm-sized nanostructures are observed to be homogeneously distributed within a nanowire cross-section matrix. The unique configuration might determine the growth of ternary amorphous structure and its special splitting behavior. Optical properties of the nanowires have also been investigated. The obtained nanowires were attractive for their exceptional whiteness, perceived brightness, and optical brilliance. These nanowires display greatly enhanced reflection over the whole visible wavelength, with more than 80% of light reflected on most of the wavelength ranging from 400 to 700 nm and the lowest reflectivity exceeding 70%, exhibiting performance superior to that of the reported white beetle. Intense visible photoluminescence is also observed over a broad spectrum ranging from 320 to 500 nm with two shoulders centered at around 444 and 468 nm, respectively.

  17. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Novikov, Serguei; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-05-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40-60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  18. CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

    2009-01-01

    The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT “forests” have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel® foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 °C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel® electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of

  19. Adhesive slip process between a carbon nanotube and a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Chiao; McGruer, Nicol E.; Adams, George G.

    2013-05-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attractive components for nanoelectromechanical (NEM) devices because of their excellent mechanical and electrical properties. Several CNT-based NEM devices have been reported. Experimental investigations have discovered that the force required for a CNT to slip on a SiO2 substrate is almost constant in the range of contact lengths from 140 to 246 nm and increases with the contact length for greater lengths. This study develops a theory based on the continuum mechanics to explain this observed phenomenon. The critical force needed to cause the CNT to slip over the whole substrate is determined by applying a beam theory which includes the bending, shear, and axial deformations of the CNT. At the stick-slip transition, the work of adhesion contributes a concentrated force and a concentrated moment to produce discontinuities in the internal forces and moments of the CNT. The modelling results obtained here provide the external force required for complete slip versus a dimensionless parameter related to the shear stress and the contact length. A comparison of the modelling result and the experimental data from the literature shows good agreement.

  20. Low-emissivity coating of amorphous diamond-like carbon/Ag-alloy multilayer on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent low-emissivity (low-e) coatings comprising dielectrics of amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) and Ag-alloy films are investigated. All films have been prepared by dc magnetron sputtering. An index of refraction of the DLC film deposited in a gas mixture of Ar/H2 (4%) shows n = 1.80 + 0.047i at 500 nm wavelength. A multilayer stack of DLC (70 nm thick)/Ag87.5Cu12.5-alloy (10 nm)/DLC (140 nm)/Ag87.5Cu12.5-alloy (10 nm)/DLC (70 nm) has revealed clear interference spectra with spectra selectivity. This coating performs low emittance less than 0.1 for black body radiation at 297 K, exhibiting a transparent heat mirror property embedded in DLC films

  1. Far-infrared absorption measurements of graphite, amorphous carbon, and silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T.; Nakada, Y.; Kamijo, F.; Sakata, A.

    The mass absorption coefficients of graphite (G), amorphous-carbon (AC), and SiC grains at 25-250 microns are determined experimentally at room temperature and applied to the interpretation of published IR observations of IRC+10216. Absorption measurements are obtained using a single-beam grating spectrometer with a Goley-cell detector by a polyethylene-powder-tablet technique. The results are presented in a table and graphs. The mass absorption constants (in sq cm/g) are calculated as 642 for G, 281 for AC produced in Ar, 93.9 for AC produced in H2, and 19.6 for SiC; power-law relationships to wavelength, with indices of -2.18, 0.60, -0.59, and -1.37 (respectively) are established. AC is found to be the most likely constituent of the IRC+10216 dust cloud, permitting the dust mass to be estimated as 0.0001 solar mass.

  2. Nanoelectromechanical digital logic circuits using curved cantilever switches with amorphous-carbon-coated contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Christopher L.; Grogg, Daniel; Bazigos, Antonios; Bleiker, Simon J.; Fernandez-Bolaños, Montserrat; Niklaus, Frank; Hagleitner, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches have the potential to complement or replace traditional CMOS transistors in the area of ultra-low-power digital electronics. This paper reports the demonstration of prototype circuits including the first 3-stage ring oscillator built using cell-level digital logic elements based on curved NEM switches. The ring oscillator core occupies an area of 30 μm × 10 μm using 6 NEM switches. Each NEM switch device has a footprint of 5 μm × 3 μm, an air gap of 60 μm and is coated with amorphous carbon (a-C) for reliable operation. The ring oscillator operates at a frequency of 6.7 MHz, and confirms the simulated inverter propagation delay of 25 ns. The successful fabrication and measurement of this demonstrator are key milestones on the way towards an optimized, scaled technology with sub-nanosecond switching times, lower operating voltages and VLSI implementation.

  3. Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon (ta-C) Ultra Thin Films for Slider Overcoat Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, X.; Hu, Y. H.; Hu, L.

    Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon (ta-C) thin film by using Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc (FCVA) technique has proven to be wear-resistive and corrosion resistant for a wide range of electrical, optical, and mechanical applications. Many investigations have shown that the ta-C film prepared by the FCVA technique can provide a superior ultra thin overcoat for the sliders and media compared to ECR-CVD and IBD coating technology. The ta-C film excels in terms of the film density, hardness, surface roughness and corrosion resistance. Nanofilm Technology International (NTI) has successfully developed and commercialized the FCVA coating system (FS series) for the slider overcoat application, which provides a good quality film with a high hardness (~50 GPa), low stress (2~3 GPa), low macro-particle density (~1/cm2 for particles > 0.3 μm), good uniformity (production repeatability (< 5%).

  4. A Selective Metasurface Absorber with An Amorphous Carbon Interlayer for Solar Thermal Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Chenglong; Nunez-Sanchez, S; Chen, Lifeng; Lopez-Garcia, M; Pugh, J; Zhu, Bofeng; Selvaraj, P; Mallick, T; Senthilarasu, S; Cryan, M J

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents fabrication, measurement and modelling results for a metal-dielectric-metal metasurface absorber for solar thermal applications. The structure uses amorphous carbon as an inter-layer between thin gold films with the upper film patterned with a 2D periodic array using focused ion beam etching. The patterned has been optimised to give high absorptance from 400-1200nm and low absorptance above this wavelength range to minimise thermal radiation and hence obtain higher temperature performance. Wide angle absorptance results are shown and detailed modelling of a realistic nanostructured upper layer results in excellent agreement between measured and modelled results. The use of gold in this paper is a first step towards a high temperature metasurface where gold can be replaced by other refractory metals such as tungsten or chrome.

  5. Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Bassler, Niels;

    be seriously hampered by variations in detector efficiency (light output per energy imparted) due to high-LET effects and gradients along the physical size (~mm) of the detector crystals. Amorphous track models (ATMs) such as the Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach by Katz and co-workers or the ECLaT code by Geiß et...... assumptions in a variety of detectors. The library also includes simple particle transportation or can be interfaced to external transport codes. We applied our code to RL and OSL data from fiber-coupled Al2O3:C-detectors in a proton (nominal energies 10 MeV to 60 MeV) and a carbon beam (270 MeV/u). Results...

  6. Electromagnetic wave absorption properties of iron/rare earth oxide composites dispersed by amorphous carbon powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sludge powders of Nd-Fe-B sintered magnets were oxidized at 250-325 deg. C for 2 h and then the α-Fe/Fe2B/Nd2O3/amorphous carbon (a-C) nanocomposite powders were prepared by ball-milling the sludge with the a-C powder for 12-40 h. The resin composites of 75 mass% of these nanocomposite powders showed excellent electromagnetic wave absorption properties in GHz range. The effective absorption of RL <-20 dB were observed in a range of 7.6-18.0 GHz and the minimum absorption peaks around -58.5 dB appeared at 12.0 GHz with matching thickness of 1.9 mm for the samples heated at 300 deg. C for 2 h and then ball-milled with 4.8 mass% a-C for 30 h

  7. Platinum containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films as selective solar absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated a double-cermet structured thin film in which an a-C:H thin film was used as an anti-reflective (AR) layer and two platinum-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films were used as the double cermet layers. A reactive co-sputter deposition method was used to prepare both the anti-reflective and cermet layers. Effects of the target power and heat treatment were studied. The obtained films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorptance and emittance of the as deposited and annealed films were determined using UV–vis-NIR spectroscopy. We show that the optical absorptance of the resulting double-cermet structured thin film is as high as 96% and remains to be 91% after heat treatment at 400 °C, indicating the thermal stability of the film

  8. Electrical transport and resistance switching in amorphous carbon at the nanometer scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: There is a strong recent interest in the use of amorphous carbon (a-C) for non-volatile memory applications. We have conducted a thorough investigation of the unipolar resistance switching mechanism in a-C at the nanoscale. The electrical conduction in a-C thin films is shown to be well captured by a Poole-Frenkel transport model that involves non isolated traps. Moreover, at high electric fields, a field-induced threshold switching phenomenon is observed. The following resistance change is attributed to Joule heating and subsequent localized thermal annealing. We demonstrate that the mechanism is mostly due to clustering of the existing sp2 sites within the sp3 matrix. The electrical conduction behavior, field-induced switching and Joule-heating-induced re-arrangement of atomic order resulting in a resistance change are all reminiscent of conventional phase-change memory materials. (author)

  9. Platinum containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films as selective solar absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Yung-Hsiang; Brahma, Sanjaya [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Y.H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Ting, Jyh-Ming, E-mail: jting@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    We have investigated a double-cermet structured thin film in which an a-C:H thin film was used as an anti-reflective (AR) layer and two platinum-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films were used as the double cermet layers. A reactive co-sputter deposition method was used to prepare both the anti-reflective and cermet layers. Effects of the target power and heat treatment were studied. The obtained films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorptance and emittance of the as deposited and annealed films were determined using UV–vis-NIR spectroscopy. We show that the optical absorptance of the resulting double-cermet structured thin film is as high as 96% and remains to be 91% after heat treatment at 400 °C, indicating the thermal stability of the film.

  10. Structural and Electrical Properties of Amorphous Hydrogen Carbon-Nitrogen Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUO Da-Cheng; LIU Yi-Chun; LIU Yan; QI Xiu-Ying; ZHONG Dian-Qiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Amorphous hydrogenated carbon-nitrogen (a-C:H:(N)) films with different nitrogen contents have been deposited by using rf-sputtering of a high purity graphite target in an Ar-H2-N2 atmosphere. Transmittance and reflectance spectra are used to characterize the Tauc gap and absorption coefficients in the wavelength range 0.185-3.2μm.The temperature dependence of conductivity demonstrates a hopping mechanism of the Fermi level in the temperature range of 77-300K. The density of state at the Fermi level is derived from the direct current conductivity.The photoluminescence properties of a-C:H:N films were investigated. The photoluminescence peak has a blue shift with increasing excitation energy. These results are discussed on the basis of a model in which the different sp2 clusters dispersed in sp3 matrices.

  11. Cathodic arc deposition of nitrogen doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon for computer memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much interest has been shown in the use of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) deposited by filtered cathodic arc as an inexpensive, easily produced, wide band-gap semiconductor in the fabrication of electronic devices. Around the world much of this interest has been in its potential use as a low electron-affinity field emitter for flat-screen displays. Recent observations of a nonvolatile memory effect in nitrogen doped ta-C at the University of Sydney suggest that new possibilities may exist for its use as a means of non-volatile digital information storage. Devices with switching times of 100 μs, read times of 100 ns, and effective memory retention times of the order of months have been fabricated. Nonvolatile memory phenomena observed in the electrical characteristics of nitrogen doped ta-C thin films suggests such traps may be useful as a means of digital information storage

  12. Facile Synthesis of Hollow MoS2 Microspheres/Amorphous Carbon Composites and Their Lithium Storage Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hollow MoS2 MACCs have been successfully synthesized. • Initial discharge capacity of 1545 mAhg−1 is obtained at 100 mAg−1. • Hollow MoS2 MACCs show enhanced cycling stability and rate capability. • Amorphous carbon can improve electrochemical performance. - Abstract: In this paper, we report a facile process to synthesize hollow MoS2 microspheres/amorphous carbon composites (MACCs) by hydrothermal method and their improved electrochemical performance in Lithium ion batteries (LIBs). The composites prepared are characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and EDS. MoS2 nanosheets are uniformly grow on the surface of amorphous carbon. The interlayer-distance of the adjacent MoS2 nanosheets in the composites is about 0.64 nm. As an electrode material for the LIBs, hollow MoS2 MACCs exhibit excellent cyclic stability with 1147 mAhg−1 at 100 mAg−1 after 100 cycles, which displays more prominent performance than that of the hollow MoS2 microspheres. Moreover, the reversible capacity for the hollow MoS2 MACCs can be still maintain at 876 mAhg−1 at 1000 mAg−1. The enhanced electrochemical performance of hollow MoS2 MACCs could be attributed to their unique hollow structure, large specific surface area, the increased interlayer-distance and the synergistic effects between hollow MoS2 microspheres and amorphous carbon

  13. Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cobourne, G.; Mountjoy, G.; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego;

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in biomineralisation processes in sea organisms. Neutron and X-ray diffraction have been performed for a sample of magnesium-stabilised ACC, which was prepared with a Mg:Ca ratio of 0.05:1 and 0.25 H2O molecules per molecule of CO3. The empirical...

  14. Improved adhesion and tribological properties of fast-deposited hard graphite-like hydrogenated amorphous carbon films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaharia, T.; Kudlacek, P.; Creatore, M.; Groenen, R.; Persoone, P.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2011-01-01

    Graphite-like hard hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) was deposited using an Ar-C(2)H(2) expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD) process. The relatively high hardness of the fast deposited a-C:H material leads to high compressive stress resulting in poor adhesion between the

  15. Multiscale simulation of thermal disruption in resistance switching process in amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A. M.; Shumkin, G. N.; Nikishin, N. G.

    2015-09-01

    The switching of material atomic structure and electric conductivity is used in novel technologies of making memory on the base of phase change. The possibility of making memory on the base of amorphous carbon is shown in experiment [1]. Present work is directed to simulation of experimentally observed effects. Ab initio quantum calculations were used for simulation of atomic structure changes in amorphous carbon [2]. These simulations showed that the resistance change is connected with thermally induced effects. The temperature was supposed to be the function of time. In present paper we propose a new multiscale, self-consistent model which combines three levels of simulation scales and takes into account the space and time dependencies of the temperature. On the first level of quantum molecular dynamic we provide the calculations of phase change in atomic structure with space and time dependence of the temperature. Nose-Hover thermostats are used for MD simulations to reproduce space dependency of the temperature. It is shown that atomic structure is localized near graphitic layers in conducting dot. Structure parameter is used then on the next levels of the modeling. Modified Ehrenfest Molecular Dynamics is used on the second level. Switching evolution of electronic subsystem is obtained. In macroscopic scale level the heat conductivity equation for continuous media is used for calculation space-time dependence of the temperature. Joule heat source depends on structure parameter and electric conductivity profiles obtained on previous levels of modeling. Iterative procedure is self-consistently repeated combining three levels of simulation. Space localization of Joule heat source leads to the thermal disruption. Obtained results allow us to explain S-form of the Volt-Ampere characteristic observed in experiment. Simulations were performed on IBM Blue Gene/P supercomputer at Moscow State University.

  16. Amorphous Molybdenum Sulfide on Graphene-Carbon Nanotube Hybrids as Highly Active Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Kien-Cuong; Chang, Yung-Huang; McPhail, David S; Mattevi, Cecilia; Wee, Andrew T S; Chua, Daniel H C

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we report on the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulfide (MoSx, with x ≈ 3) on a high specific surface area conductive support of Graphene-Carbon Nanotube hybrids (GCNT) as the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) catalysts. We found that the high surface area GCNT electrode could support the deposition of MoSx at much higher loadings compared with simple porous carbon paper or flat graphite paper. The morphological study showed that MoSx was successfully deposited on and was in good contact with the GCNT support. Other physical characterization techniques suggested the amorphous nature of the deposited MoSx. With a typical catalyst loading of 3 mg cm(-2), an overpotential of 141 mV was required to obtain a current density of 10 mA cm(-2). A Tafel slope of 41 mV decade(-1) was demonstrated. Both measures placed the MoSx-deposited GCNT electrode among the best performing molybdenum sulfide-based HER catalysts reported to date. The electrode showed a good stability with only a 25 mV increase in overpotential required for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), after undergoing 500 potential sweeps with vigorous bubbling present. The current density obtained at -0.5 V vs SHE (Standard Hydrogen Electrode potential) decreased less than 10% after the stability test. The deposition of MoSx on high specific surface area conductive electrodes demonstrated to be an efficient method to maximize the catalytic performance toward HER. PMID:26864503

  17. Surface morphology, cohesive and adhesive properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon nanocomposite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), SiOx containing a-C:H (a-C:H/SiOx) and nitrogen-doped a-C:H/SiOx (a-C:H:N/SiOx) thin films were deposited on chromium thin film coated glass using a closed drift ion beam source. Acetylene gas, hexamethyldisiloxane and hydrogen or 20% nitrogen/hydrogen mixture were used as precursors. Resulting hydrogenated carbon thin film surface morphology as well as their cohesive and adhesive properties were studied using progressive loading scratch tests followed by optical microscopy analysis. Surface analysis was also performed using atomic force microscopy via topography, surface morphology parameter, height distribution histogram and bearing ratio curve based hybrid parameter measurements. The a-C:H/SiOx and a-C:H:N/SiOx thin films showed better mechanical strength as compared to the conventional a-C:H films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of these films. It showed increased amounts of silicon and absence of terminal oxygenated carbon bonds in a-C:H:N/SiOx thin film which was attributed to its improved mechanical properties.

  18. Effect of ambient gaseous environment on the properties of amorphous carbon thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous carbon films have been deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique under different gaseous environments. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope studies have been performed on the deposited films for the surface morphological studies. The morphology of the deposited film changes with the change in gas environment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and Raman studies have been carried out on the deposited samples for the evaluation of the chemical bonding of carbon atoms with the ambient gas atoms. The sp3 and sp2 contents have been evaluated from the XPS studies and found to be dependent on the gaseous environment. The film deposited under hydrogen environment has the highest value of the sp3 content (54.6 at.%) whereas the film deposited under helium environment has the lowest value of sp3 content (37 at.%). For the evaluation of the electrical and mechanical properties of the deposited films, the electrical conductivity and nanoindentation measurements have been performed on the deposited films. It has been observed that the film deposited under helium environment has the highest electrical conductivity and the lowest hardness (∼15 GPa) value whereas film deposited under hydrogen environment has the highest hardness (∼21 GPa) and the lowest conductivity.

  19. Reactivity of lithium containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon films towards oxygen: an in situ photoelectron spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon coatings (a-C : H) containing different amounts of lithium have been prepared by a modified radio frequency-plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition (rf-PACVD) technique. They have been characterized in situ by X-ray (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The samples have been exposed to molecular oxygen as well as an oxygen plasma in order to obtain information about the reactivity of the coatings. The effect of the oxygen plasma on pure a-C : H is found to be a mere etching, the structure of the surface itself remaining essentially unchanged. In contrast, a transition from the carbidic carbon-lithium phase to a metal-carbonate like configuration, i.e. Li2CO3 or LiHCO3, occurs in the lithium containing samples. These differences result in a much larger oxygen uptake at the surface of the lithium containing samples as compared to the pure a-C : H. Furthermore the rate of etching by the oxygen plasma is substantially lower for the lithium containing films. ((orig.))

  20. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N2) and C2H2 activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  1. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chih-Ho [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, 404 Taiwan (China); Chang, Yin-Yu, E-mail: yinyu@mail2000.com.tw [Department of Mechanical and Computer-Aided Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Huang, Heng-Li [School of Dentistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Ho-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mingdao University, Changhua, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-30

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N{sub 2}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  2. Synthesis of acid-functionalized composite via surface deposition of acid-containing amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Zhang, Xuan; Lou, Lan-Lan; Dong, Yanling; Liu, Gaixia; Liu, Shuangxi

    2012-07-01

    A synthetic procedure, including two steps: a hydrothermal treatment using H2SO4 solution and a thermal treatment with concentrated H2SO4 in Teflon-lined stainless autoclaves was developed to synthesize acid-functionalized composite. In this process, the carbonization of glucose which contributed to the formation of carbon species with acid functional groups occurred on the silica surface. The resultant composite, investigated by powder XRD, low temperature N2 sorption and TEM, possessed well-defined mesostructure. And it was determined by XPS that amorphous carbon was deposited at the silica surface of SBA-15. The presence of multi-functional groups in the composite was confirmed by FT-IR results. Furthermore, carboxylic and sulfonic groups could be incorporated into the composite material via the covalent bond. The composite was employed as the catalyst for the acetalization of carbonyl compounds. It was suggested that acid sites were well dispersed, which was responsible for the good performance in the catalytic test. According to these facts, a synthesis route for mesostructured composite with acid functional groups has been proposed.

  3. Reciprocating sliding behaviour of self-mated amorphous diamond-like carbon coatings on Si3N4 ceramics under tribological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering have been deposited on silicon nitride based substrates for tribological purposes. A conductive Si3N4/30% vol.TiN composite was produced for bias substrate application. Friction and wear properties of carbon coated self-mated pairs were assessed using a reciprocal motion ball-on-flat setup in unlubricated conditions with applied normal loads of 3 N and 5 N. The worn surfaces were studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to identify the prevalent wear mechanism. Unbiased and biased substrates behaved differently, the former undergoing premature delamination while the latter endured the tribological test conditions (3 N, ∼ 43 m). Very low friction coefficient values of ∼ 0.015 were sustained assuring remarkable wear behaviour. Surface grooving and wear debris accumulation in the sliding track lead to a roughness increase from the nominal rms value of ∼ 12 nm to ∼ 97 nm, although no weight loss and surface profile modification was quantifiable

  4. Carbon Nanotubes on Titanium Substrates for Stray Light Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John; Getty, Stephanie; Quijada, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for growing carbon nanotubes on a titanium substrate, which makes the nano tubes ten times blacker than the current state-of-the-art paints in the visible to near infrared. This will allow for significant improvement of stray light performance in scientific instruments, or any other optical system. Because baffles, stops, and tubes used in scientific observations often undergo loads such as vibration, it is critical to develop this surface treatment on structural materials. This innovation optimizes the carbon nano - tube growth for titanium, which is a strong, lightweight structural material suitable for spaceflight use. The steps required to grow the nanotubes require the preparation of the surface by lapping, and the deposition of an iron catalyst over an alumina stiction layer by e-beam evaporation. In operation, the stray light controls are fabricated, and nanotubes (multi-walled 100 microns in length) are grown on the surface. They are then installed in the instruments or other optical devices.

  5. Synthesis of Poly-Silicon Thin Films on Glass Substrate Using Laser Initiated Metal Induced Crystallization of Amorphous Silicon for Space Power Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Safe, Husam H.; Naseem, Hameed A.; Brown, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Poly-silicon thin films on glass substrates are synthesized using laser initiated metal induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. These films can be used to fabricate solar cells on low cost glass and flexible substrates. The process starts by depositing 200 nm amorphous silicon films on the glass substrates. Following this, 200 nm of sputtered aluminum films were deposited on top of the silicon layers. The samples are irradiated with an argon ion cw laser beam for annealing. Laser power densities ranging from 4 to 9 W/cm2 were used in the annealing process. Each area on the sample is irradiated for a different exposure time. Optical microscopy was used to examine any cracks in the films and loss of adhesion to the substrates. X-Ray diffraction patterns from the initial results indicated the crystallization in the films. Scanning electron microscopy shows dendritic growth. The composition analysis of the crystallized films was conducted using Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy. The results of poly-silicon films synthesis on space qualified flexible substrates such as Kapton are also presented.

  6. Fractal analysis and atomic force microscopy measurements of surface roughness for Hastelloy C276 substrates and amorphous alumina buffer layers in coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, F.; Shi, K.; Xiao, S.-Z.; Zhang, Y.-Y. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhao, Z.-J. [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangzhi@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wei, J.-J.; Han, Z. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-02-01

    In coated conductors, surface roughness of metallic substrates and buffer layers could significantly affect the texture of subsequently deposited buffer layers and the critical current density of superconductor layer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is usually utilized to measure surface roughness. However, the roughness values are actually relevant to scan scale. Fractal geometry could be exerted to analyze the scaling performance of surface roughness. In this study, four samples were prepared, which were electro polished Hastelloy C276 substrate, mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 substrate and the amorphous alumina buffer layers deposited on both the substrates by ion beam deposition. The surface roughness, described by root mean squared (RMS) and arithmetic average (R{sub a}) values, was analyzed considering the scan scale of AFM measurements. The surfaces of amorphous alumina layers were found to be fractal in nature because of the scaling performance of roughness, while the surfaces of Hastelloy substrates were not. The flatten modification of AFM images was discussed. And the calculation of surface roughness in smaller parts divided from the whole AFM images was studied, compared with the results of actual AFM measurements of the same scan scales.

  7. Fractal analysis and atomic force microscopy measurements of surface roughness for Hastelloy C276 substrates and amorphous alumina buffer layers in coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, F.; Shi, K.; Xiao, S.-Z.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Zhao, Z.-J.; Wang, Z.; Wei, J.-J.; Han, Z.

    2012-02-01

    In coated conductors, surface roughness of metallic substrates and buffer layers could significantly affect the texture of subsequently deposited buffer layers and the critical current density of superconductor layer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is usually utilized to measure surface roughness. However, the roughness values are actually relevant to scan scale. Fractal geometry could be exerted to analyze the scaling performance of surface roughness. In this study, four samples were prepared, which were electro polished Hastelloy C276 substrate, mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 substrate and the amorphous alumina buffer layers deposited on both the substrates by ion beam deposition. The surface roughness, described by root mean squared (RMS) and arithmetic average (Ra) values, was analyzed considering the scan scale of AFM measurements. The surfaces of amorphous alumina layers were found to be fractal in nature because of the scaling performance of roughness, while the surfaces of Hastelloy substrates were not. The flatten modification of AFM images was discussed. And the calculation of surface roughness in smaller parts divided from the whole AFM images was studied, compared with the results of actual AFM measurements of the same scan scales.

  8. Fractal analysis and atomic force microscopy measurements of surface roughness for Hastelloy C276 substrates and amorphous alumina buffer layers in coated conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In coated conductors, surface roughness of metallic substrates and buffer layers could significantly affect the texture of subsequently deposited buffer layers and the critical current density of superconductor layer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is usually utilized to measure surface roughness. However, the roughness values are actually relevant to scan scale. Fractal geometry could be exerted to analyze the scaling performance of surface roughness. In this study, four samples were prepared, which were electro polished Hastelloy C276 substrate, mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 substrate and the amorphous alumina buffer layers deposited on both the substrates by ion beam deposition. The surface roughness, described by root mean squared (RMS) and arithmetic average (Ra) values, was analyzed considering the scan scale of AFM measurements. The surfaces of amorphous alumina layers were found to be fractal in nature because of the scaling performance of roughness, while the surfaces of Hastelloy substrates were not. The flatten modification of AFM images was discussed. And the calculation of surface roughness in smaller parts divided from the whole AFM images was studied, compared with the results of actual AFM measurements of the same scan scales.

  9. Controlled synthesis of crystalline calcium carbonate aggregates with unusual morphologies involving the phase transformation from amorphous calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peanut-shaped CaCO3 aggregates, featured of two dandelion-like heads built up from rod-like subunits, have been synthesized via a facile precipitation reaction between Na2CO3 and CaCl2 at ambient temperature in the presence of magnesium ions and ethanol solvent. The as-prepared products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The results show that a high magnesium concentration and ethanol solvent are necessary for the formation of the unusual peanut-like aggregates. In addition, a multistep phase transformation process from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) to a mixture of ACC and calcite and ultimately to calcite and aragonite was observed in the formation process of the unusual structures. A possible mechanism for the formation of the unusual peanut-shape aggregates has been proposed and discussed

  10. Development of spin-on carbon hardmasks with comparable etch resistance to Amorphous Carbon Layer (ACL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Hwan-Sung; Yoon, Kyong-Ho; Kim, Min-Soo; Oh, Seung Bae; Song, Jee-Yun; Tokareva, Nataliya; Kim, Jong-Seob; Chang, Tuwon

    2008-11-01

    In recent microlithography of semiconductor fabrication, spin-on hardmask (SOH) process continue to gain popularity as it replaces the traditional SiON/ACL hardmask scheme which suffers from high CoO, low productivity, particle contamination, and layer alignment issues. In the SOH process, organic polymer with high carbon content is spin-cast to form a carbon hardmask film. In the previous papers, we reported the development of organic SOH materials and their application in sub-70 nm lithography. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of organic polymers with very high carbon contents (>92 wt.%) and the evaluation of the spin-coated films for the hardmask application. The high carbon content of the polymer ensures improved etch resistance which amounts to >90% of ACL's resistance. However, as the carbon content of the polymers increases, the solubility in common organic solvents becomes lower. Here we report the strategies to improve the solubility of the high carbon content resins and optimization of the film properties for the SOH application.

  11. Surface morphology of amorphous germanium thin films following thermal outgassing of SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valladares, L. de los Santos, E-mail: ld301@cam.ac.uk [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dominguez, A. Bustamante [Laboratorio de Cerámicos y Nanomateriales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Apartado Postal 14-0149, Lima (Peru); Llandro, J.; Holmes, S. [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Quispe, O. Avalos [Laboratorio de Cerámicos y Nanomateriales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Apartado Postal 14-0149, Lima (Peru); Langford, R. [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Aguiar, J. Albino [Laboratório de Supercondutividade e Materiais Avançados, Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50670-901, Recife (Brazil); Barnes, C.H.W. [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, J.J. Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Annealing promotes outgassing of SiO{sub 2}/Si wafers. • Outgassing species embed in the a-Ge film forming bubbles. • The density of bubbles obtained by slow annealing is smaller than by rapid annealing. • The bubbles explode after annealing the samples at 800 °C. • Surface migration at higher temperatures forms polycrystalline GeO{sub 2} islands. - Abstract: In this work we report the surface morphology of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) thin films (140 nm thickness) following thermal outgassing of SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. The thermal outgassing was performed by annealing the samples in air at different temperatures from 400 to 900 °C. Annealing at 400 °C in slow (2 °C/min) and fast (10 °C/min) modes promotes the formation of bubbles on the surface. A cross sectional view by transmission electron microscope taken of the sample slow annealed at 400 °C reveals traces of gas species embedded in the a-Ge film, allowing us to propose a possible mechanism for the formation of the bubbles. The calculated internal pressure and number of gas molecules for this sample are 30 MPa and 38 × 10{sup 8}, respectively. Over an area of 22 × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2} the density of bubbles obtained at slow annealing (9 × 10{sup 3} cm{sup −2}) is smaller than that at rapid annealing (6.4 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −2}), indicating that the amount of liberated gas in both cases is only a fraction of the total gas contained in the substrate. After increasing the annealing temperature in the slow mode, bubbles of different diameters (from tens of nanometers up to tens of micrometers) randomly distribute over the Ge film and they grow with temperature. Vertical diffusion of the outgas species through the film dominates the annealing temperature interval 400–600 °C, whereas coalescence of bubbles caused by lateral diffusion is detected after annealing at 700 °C. The bubbles explode after annealing the samples at 800 °C. Annealing at higher temperatures, such as

  12. Surface morphology of amorphous germanium thin films following thermal outgassing of SiO2/Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Annealing promotes outgassing of SiO2/Si wafers. • Outgassing species embed in the a-Ge film forming bubbles. • The density of bubbles obtained by slow annealing is smaller than by rapid annealing. • The bubbles explode after annealing the samples at 800 °C. • Surface migration at higher temperatures forms polycrystalline GeO2 islands. - Abstract: In this work we report the surface morphology of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) thin films (140 nm thickness) following thermal outgassing of SiO2/Si substrates. The thermal outgassing was performed by annealing the samples in air at different temperatures from 400 to 900 °C. Annealing at 400 °C in slow (2 °C/min) and fast (10 °C/min) modes promotes the formation of bubbles on the surface. A cross sectional view by transmission electron microscope taken of the sample slow annealed at 400 °C reveals traces of gas species embedded in the a-Ge film, allowing us to propose a possible mechanism for the formation of the bubbles. The calculated internal pressure and number of gas molecules for this sample are 30 MPa and 38 × 108, respectively. Over an area of 22 × 10−3 cm2 the density of bubbles obtained at slow annealing (9 × 103 cm−2) is smaller than that at rapid annealing (6.4 × 104 cm−2), indicating that the amount of liberated gas in both cases is only a fraction of the total gas contained in the substrate. After increasing the annealing temperature in the slow mode, bubbles of different diameters (from tens of nanometers up to tens of micrometers) randomly distribute over the Ge film and they grow with temperature. Vertical diffusion of the outgas species through the film dominates the annealing temperature interval 400–600 °C, whereas coalescence of bubbles caused by lateral diffusion is detected after annealing at 700 °C. The bubbles explode after annealing the samples at 800 °C. Annealing at higher temperatures, such as 900 °C, leads to surface migration of the film to the

  13. Swift heavy ion irradiation of metal containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaseov, P. A.; Protopopova, V. S.; Karabeshkin, K. V.; Shubina, E. N.; Mishin, M. V.; Koskinen, J.; Mohapatra, S.; Tripathi, A.; Avasthi, D. K.; Titov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Thin carbon films were grown at room temperature on (0 0 1) n-Si substrate using dual cathode filtered vacuum arc deposition system. Graphite was used as a source of carbon atoms and separate metallic electrode was simultaneously utilized to introduce Ni or Cu atoms. Films were irradiated by 100 MeV Ag7+ ions to fluences in the range 1 × 1010-3 × 1011 cm-2. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Raman scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in conductive mode were used to investigate film properties and structure change under irradiation. Some conductive channels having metallic conductivity type were found in the films. Number of such channels is less than number of impinged ions. Presence of Ni and Cu atoms increases conductivity of those conductive channels. Fluence dependence of all properties studied suggests different mechanisms of swift heavy ion irradiation-induced transformation of carbon matrix due to different chemical effect of nickel and copper atoms.

  14. Carbide formation in tungsten coatings on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten coatings with molybdenum interlayer deposited on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) substrates were selected as the first wall material for the divertor in the Wall Project at Joint European Torus (similar to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). For such a layered structure, diffusion of carbon from the CFC substrate towards the Mo and W deposits is expected during the operation of the reactor. As both molybdenum and tungsten form stable carbides, brittle compounds may form at the interface, thus strongly affecting the thermomechanical performance of the coated tiles. For the purpose of prediction of the operation time of such coated tiles, carbon diffusion and carbide formation kinetics need to be determined. In the present study, W/Mo/CFC samples were subjected to heat treatment at 1470 K for various annealing times. The Focused Ion Beam technique was used for sample preparation for electron microscopy examinations. Transmission electron microscopy observations supported with diffraction pattern analyses revealed the both W2C and WC carbides in the W coating, as well as that of Mo2C carbide in the Mo layer. The results were used to estimate the kinetics of coatings degradation. - Highlights: ► Thin Mo/W layers system on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon divertor tile ► Heat treatment at 1470 K results in two tungsten carbide creation — W2C and WC ► The total tungsten carbide creation is limited by carbon diffusion ► WC carbide creation is limited by W2C–WC reaction rate

  15. Synthesis and characterization of amorphous poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(trimethylene carbonate) polymer blend electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) have been proposed as substitutes for conventional non-aqueous electrolytes in various electrochemical devices. These promising materials may be of interest in various practical devices including batteries, sensors and electrochromic displays as they can offer high performance in terms of specific energy and specific power (batteries), safe operation, form flexibility in device arquitecture and low manufacturing costs. Many different host polymers have been characterized over the last 30 years, however a relatively un-explored strategy involves the use of interpenetrating blends incorporating two or more polymers. Electrolyte systems based on interpenetrating blends of known host polymers, poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(trimethylene carbonate), doped with lithium perchlorate, were prepared by co-dissolution in acetonitrile. This combination of polymer components results in the formation of a material that may be applicable in batteries and electrochromic devices. The results of characterization of polymer electrolyte systems based on interpenetrating blends of amorphous poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(trimethylene carbonate) host matrices, with lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) as guest salt, are described in this study. Electrolytes with compositions of n between 5 and 15 (where n represents the total number of cation-coordinating units per lithium ion) were obtained as flexible, transparent and free-standing films that were characterized by measurements of conductivity, cyclic voltammetry, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry.

  16. Electronic structure and conductivity of nanocomposite metal (Au,Ag,Cu,Mo)-containing amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrino, Jose L.; Horwat, David; Gago, Raul; Andersson, Joakim; Liu, Y.S.; Guo, Jinghua; Anders, Andre

    2008-05-14

    In this work, we study the influence of the incorporation of different metals (Me = Au, Ag, Cu, Mo) on the electronic structure of amorphous carbon (a-C:Me) films. The films were produced at room temperature using a novel pulsed dual-cathode arc deposition technique. Compositional analysis was performed with secondary neutral mass spectroscopy whereas X-ray diffraction was used to identify the formation of metal nanoclusters in the carbon matrix. The metal content incorporated in the nanocomposite films induces a drastic increase in the conductivity, in parallel with a decrease in the band gap corrected from Urbach energy. The electronic structure as a function of the Me content has been monitored by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the C K-edge. XANES showed that the C host matrix has a dominant graphitic character and that it is not affected significantly by the incorporation of metal impurities, except for the case of Mo, where the modifications in the lineshape spectra indicated the formation of a carbide phase. Subtle modifications of the spectral lineshape are discussed in terms of nanocomposite formation.

  17. Optical and structural properties of microcrystalline GaN on an amorphous substrate prepared by a combination of molecular beam epitaxy and metal–organic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Kang, Eun-Kyu; Park, Kwangwook; Kim, Ci-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Seon; Jho, Young-Dahl; Bae, Si-Young; Lee, Yong-Tak

    2016-05-01

    Microscale platelet-shaped GaN grains were grown on amorphous substrates by a combined epitaxial growth method of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal–organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). First, MBE GaN was grown on an amorphous substrate as a pre-orienting layer and its structural properties were investigated. Second, MOCVD grown GaN samples using the different growth techniques of planar and selective area growth (SAG) were comparatively investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and photoluminescence (PL). In MOCVD planar GaN, strong bound exciton peaks dominated despite the high density of the threading dislocations (TDs). In MOCVD SAG GaN, on the other hand, TDs were clearly reduced with bending, but basal stacking fault (BSF) PL peaks were observed at 3.42 eV. The combined epitaxial method not only provides a deep understanding of the growth behavior but also suggests an alternative approach for the growth of GaN on amorphous substances.

  18. Optical and Structural Properties of Microcrystalline GaN on an Amorphous Substrate Prepared by a Combination of Molecular Beam Epitaxy and Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung-Wook; Hwang, Hyeong-Yong; Kang, Eun-Kyu; Park, Kwangwook; Kim, Ci-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Seon; Jho, Young-Dahl; Bae, Si-Young; Lee, Yong-Tak

    2016-05-01

    Microscale platelet-shaped GaN grains were grown on amorphous substrates by a combined epitaxial growth method of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). First, MBE GaN was grown on an amorphous substrate as a pre-orienting layer and its structural properties were investigated. Second, MOCVD grown GaN samples using the different growth techniques of planar and selective area growth (SAG) were comparatively investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cathodoluminescence (CL), and photoluminescence (PL). In MOCVD planar GaN, strong bound exciton peaks dominated despite the high density of the threading dislocations (TDs). In MOCVD SAG GaN, on the other hand, TDs were clearly reduced with bending, but basal stacking fault (BSF) PL peaks were observed at 3.42 eV. The combined epitaxial method not only provides a deep understanding of the growth behavior but also suggests an alternative approach for the growth of GaN on amorphous substances.

  19. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    More than 95% of silicate minerals and other oxides found in meteorites were melted, or vaporized and recondensed in the Solar Nebula prior to their incorporation into meteorite parent bodies. Gravitational accretion energy and heating via radioactive decay further transformed oxide minerals accreted into planetesimals. In such an oxygen-rich environment the carbonaceous dust that fell into the nebula as an intimate mixture with oxide grains should have been almost completely converted to CO. While some pre-collapse, molecular-cloud carbonaceous dust does survive, much in the same manner as do pre-solar oxide grains, such materials constitute only a few percent of meteoritic carbon and are clearly distinguished by elevated D/H, N-15/N-16, C-13/C-12 ratios or noble gas patterns. Carbonaceous Dust in Meteorites: We argue that nearly all of the carbon in meteorites was synthesized in the Solar Nebula from CO and that this CO was generated by the reaction of carbonaceous dust with solid oxides, water or OH. It is probable that some fraction of carbonaceous dust that is newly synthesized in the Solar Nebula is also converted back into CO by additional thermal processing. CO processing might occur on grains in the outer nebula through irradiation of CO-containing ice coatings or in the inner nebula via Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) reactions on grain surfaces. Large-scale transport of both gaseous reaction products and dust from the inner nebula out to regions where comets formed would spread newly formed carbonaceous materials throughout the solar nebula. Formation of Organic Carbon: Carbon dust in the ISM might easily be described as inorganic graphite or amorphous carbon, with relatively low structural abundances of H, N, O and S . Products of FTT reactions or organics produced via irradiation of icy grains contain abundant aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. aldehydes, keytones, acids, amines and amides.. The net result of the massive nebular carbon cycle is to convert

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical Vapor Deposition of Amorphous Carbon: Dependence on H/C Ratio of Source Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Atsushi M.; Takayama, Arimichi; Saito, Seiki; Ohno, Noriyasu; Kajita, Shin; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2010-01-01

    By molecular dynamics simulation, the chemical vapor deposition of amorphous carbon onto graphite and diamond surfaces was studied. In particular, we investigated the effect of source H/C ratio, which is the ratio of the number of hydrogen atoms to the number of carbon atoms in a source gas, on the deposition process. In the present simulation, the following two source gas conditions were tested: one was that the source gas was injected as isolated carbon and hydrogen atoms, and the other was...

  1. Structuring carbon forms by energetic species: Amorphous, nano tubes and crystalline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full Text: Energetic species in different. forms play a major role in current thin film technology. The evolution of such films via energetic particle bombardment is a shallow implantation (sub plantation) process. The stopping of the energetic species A the bombarded target advances through three stages: (i) collisional stage in which the species are stopped by the target via atomic displacements, ionization and phonon excitations, ii) the thermal relaxation stage i) which the excess energy is dissipated in the target; iii) the long term relaxation stage in which long term processes (diffusion, chemical reactions) take place. The final evolution of the structure is determined by the equilibrium between subsurface trapping at the final site and detrapping processes. Carbon is an excellent model system to study the structuring of materials by energetic species due to the host of possible configurations it forms. By properly altering the energy and temperature it is possible to form: (i) amorphous carbon films with a local configuration and properties ranging between those of graphite (sp2 hybridization) and diamond (sp3), (ii) ordered graphite Sims including carbon multi wall tubes, (iii) nanocrystalline diamond. The processes leading to the different carbon structures will be highlighted through experimental data and molecular dynamic situations. 1 Y. Lifshitz, S.R. Kasi and J.W. Rabalais, ''Subplantation Model for Film Growth From Hyperthermal Species: Application to Diamond'', Phys. Rev. Lett., 62, 1290, 1989. 2 Y. Lifshitz, G.D. Lempert, E. Grossman, ''Substantiation of Subplanta-tion Model for Diamondlike Film Growth from by Atomic Force Microscopy'', Phys. Rev. Lett., 72 (17), 2753, 1994. 3 S. Uhlmann, Th. Frauenheim, Y. Lifshitz, Molecular Dynamics Study of the Fundamental Processes Involved in Subplantation of Diamondlike Carbon, Phys. Rev. Lett., 81(3), 641, 1998. 4 H.Y. Peng, N. Wang, Y.F. Zheng, Y. LifshitB, J. Kulik, R.Q. Zhang C. S. Lee and S.T. Lee

  2. Cross-sectional STEM study of cathodic arc deposited amorphous carbon and carbon-nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The VG601 high resolution dedicated Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) located at the University of Sydney has the capability of providing structural information with a spatial resolution of less than one nanometre. Compositional information can be obtained using either Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) or Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy. Each characteristic absorption edge in EELS also exhibits structure which provides information on the atomic environment of the absorbing atom. The combination of EELS and STEM therefore provides a powerful tool for analysing structure at the nanometre scale. In this work we investigate the structure of cathodic arc deposited carbon and carbon-nitride films using this EELS/STEM combination. By preparing the films in cross-section and collecting a number of spectra in a line through the film thickness (line profile), it is possible to investigate the deposition process in great detail since variations in structure with depth in the film provide information on the 'history' of film growth. In the case of carbon based materials, this technique provides a direct measure of the variations in both density and proportion of diamond-like bonding. These measurements will be used to help understand the mechanisms of film growth by cathodic arc deposition

  3. Carbon nanotube network thin-film transistors on flexible/stretchable substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Kuniharu; Takahashi, Toshitake; Javey, Ali

    2016-03-29

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus for flexible thin-film transistors. In one aspect, a device includes a polymer substrate, a gate electrode disposed on the polymer substrate, a dielectric layer disposed on the gate electrode and on exposed portions of the polymer substrate, a carbon nanotube network disposed on the dielectric layer, and a source electrode and a drain electrode disposed on the carbon nanotube network.

  4. Electrochemical behavior of amorphous metal-silicon-carbon nanocomposites based on titanium or tungsten nanophase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrode behavior of nanocomposite films containing titanium- or tungsten-based conducting nanophase embedded in dielectric silicon-carbon matrix, deposited onto glassceramics substrate, is studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. As the films' resistivity decreases, their electrochemical behavior gradually changes from that of 'poor conductor' to the nearly metal-like behavior. In particular, the differential capacitance increases, the charge transfer in a model redox system [Fe(CN)6]3-/4- accelerates, which may be explained by the increasing number of metal-containing clusters at the film/electrolyte solution interface

  5. Amorphous red phosphorous embedded in carbon nanotubes scaffold as promising anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Demao; Cheng, Jianli; Qu, Guoxing; Li, Xiaodong; Ni, Wei; Wang, Bin; Liu, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous red phosphorus/carbon nanotubes (ARPC) composites are prepared by planetary ball-milling technique with the pre-milling red phosphorus processes, consisting of uniformly distributing amorphous red phosphorus embedding in a three-dimensional conductive scaffold of interconnected carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Combining the three-dimensional conductive network with the amorphous red phosphorus can not only alleviate the volumetric change in the charging/discharging processes, but also provide conductive network for electron transport and dramatically improve the specific capacity, cycling stability and rate capability of the composite electrode. The ARPC composites deliver a high initial charge capacity of 2133.4 mAh g-1 at a current density of 0.05 C and maintain a reversible capacity of 998.5 mAh g-1 with a high Coulombic efficiency of approximately 99% after 50 cycles. Meanwhile, the composite can maintain high specific capacities of 1993.8 mAh g-1, 1896.9 mAh g-1, 1546.8 mAh g-1 and 816.6 mAh g-1 at 0.01 C, 0.05 C, 0.1 C and 0.5 C, respectively. Compared with that of the ball-milled amorphous red phosphorus with or without CNTs, the pre-milled ARPC composites show much better electrochemical performances.

  6. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots as A New Substrate for Sensitive Glucose Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Hanxu Ji; Feng Zhou; Jiangjiang Gu; Chen Shu; Kai Xi; Xudong Jia

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are introduced as a novel substrate suitable for enzyme immobilization in electrochemical detection metods. Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are easily synthesised from polyacrylamide in just one step. With the help of the amino group on chitosan, glucose oxidase is immobilized on nitrogen-doped carbon dots-modified carbon glassy electrodes by amino-carboxyl reactions. The nitrogen-induced charge delocalization at nitrogen-doped carbon dots can enhance the electrocatalyti...

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers on impregnated powdered activated carbon as cheap substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The catalysis and characterization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs composite are reported in this work. Carbon nanofibers were produced on oil palm shell powdered activated carbon (PAC, which was impregnated with nickel. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD of C2H2 was used in the presence of hydrogen at ∼650 °C. The flow rates of carbon source and hydrogen were fixed. The CNFs formed directly on the surface of the impregnated PAC. Variable weight percentages (1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 9% of the catalyst salt (Ni+2 were used for the impregnation. However, the best catalysis was observed on the substrate with 3% Ni+2. The product displayed a relatively high surface area, essentially constituted by the external surface. New functional groups also appeared compared to those in the PAC. Field Emission Scanning Microscopy (FESEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, BET surface area analysis and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX were used for the characterization of the new carbon nano product, which was produced through a clean novel process.

  8. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited by MFPUMST at different ratios of mixed gases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haiyang Dai; Changyong Zhan; Hui Jiang; Ningkang Huang

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (-C:H) on -type (100) silicon wafers were prepared with a middle frequency pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (MFPUMST) at different ratios of methane–argon gases. The band characteristics, mechanical properties as well as refractive index were measured by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano-indentation tests and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It is found that the 3 fraction increases with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, and then decreases when Ar concentration exceeds 50%. The nano-indentation tests reveal that nano-hardness and elastic modulus of the films increase with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, while decreases with increasing Ar concentration from 50% to 86%. The variations in the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus could be interpreted due to different 3 fractions in the prepared -C:H films. The variation of refractive index with wavelength have the same tendency for the -C:H films prepared at different Ar concentrations, they decrease with increasing wavelength from 600 to 1700 nm. For certain wavelengths within 600–1700 nm, refractive index has the highest value at the Ar concentration of 50%, and it is smaller at the Ar concentration of 86% than at 17%. The results given above indicate that ratio of mixed gases has a strong influence on bonding configuration and properties of -C:H films during deposition. The related mechanism is discussed in this paper.

  9. Etching characteristics and application of physical-vapor-deposited amorphous carbon for multilevel resist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the fabrication of a multilevel resist (MLR) based on a very thin, physical-vapor-deposited (PVD) amorphous carbon (a-C) layer, the etching characteristics of the PVD a-C layer with a SiOx hard mask were investigated in a dual-frequency superimposed capacitively coupled plasma etcher by varying the following process parameters in O2/N2/Ar plasmas: high-frequency/low-frequency combination (fHF/fLF), HF/LF power ratio (PHF/PLF), and O2 and N2 flow rates. The very thin nature of the a-C layer helps to keep the aspect ratio of the etched features low. The etch rate of the PVD a-C layer increased with decreasing fHF/fLF combination and increasing PLF and was initially increased but then decreased with increasing N2 flow rate in O2/N2/Ar plasmas. The application of a 30 nm PVD a-C layer in the MLR structure of ArF PR/BARC/SiOx/PVD a-C/TEOS oxide supported the possibility of using a very thin PVD a-C layer as an etch-mask layer for the TEOS-oxide layer

  10. Characterisation of electrodeposited Co-W-P amorphous coatings on carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemistry and nucleation mechanism of induced co-deposition of cobalt, tungsten and phosphorus from a citrate bath was investigated using voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. It was found that the induced co-deposition of the species occurred under diffusion control and followed instantaneous nucleation mechanism. Co-W-P coatings were electrodeposited potentiostatically on plain carbon steels from a citrate bath containing CoSO4, Na2WO4 and NaH2PO2. X-ray diffraction studies of the coatings revealed that the as-deposited Co81W10P9 coatings had amorphous structure. The formation of some stoichiometric compounds like Co3W, Co2P and WP2, however, was observed upon annealing at 600 deg. C. The hardness of the Co-W-P coatings increased with annealing temperature which was possibly due to the formation of these inter-elemental compounds. The corrosion resistance of the Co-W-P coatings increased with increase in annealing temperature which might also be due to the formation of the stoichiometric compounds at elevated temperatures. A comparison between coating characteristics of Co-W-P and chromium showed that the Co-W-P coatings exhibited nobler corrosion potential than chromium coatings

  11. Inelastic and reactive scattering of hyperthermal atomic oxygen from amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Brinza, David E.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of hyperthermal oxygen atoms with an amorphous carbon-13 surface was studied using a modified universal crossed molecular beams apparatus. Time-of-flight distributions of inelastically scattered O-atoms and reactively scattered CO-13 and CO2-13 were measured with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Two inelastic scattering channels were observed, corresponding to a direct inelastic process in which the scattered O-atoms retain 20 to 30 percent of their initial kinetic energy and to a trapping desorption process whereby O-atoms emerge from the surface at thermal velocities. Reactive scattering data imply the formation of two kinds of CO products, slow products whose translational energies are determined by the surface temperature and hyperthermal (Approx. 3 eV) products with translational energies comprising roughly 30 percent of the total available energy (E sub avl), where E sub avl is the sum of the collision energy and the reaction exothermicity. Angular data show that the hyperthermal CO is scattered preferentially in the specular direction. CO2 product was also observed, but at much lower intensities than CO and with only thermal velocities.

  12. Evaluation on corrosion behavior and haemocompatibility of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Aiping [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3010, Yikuang Street 2, Harbin 150080 (China)], E-mail: liuaiping1979@gmail.com; Han Jiecai; Zhu Jiaqi; Meng Songhe; He Xiaodong [Center for Composite Materials, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3010, Yikuang Street 2, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2008-12-01

    Phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C:P) films are deposited on biomedical titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique. The structural properties of ta-C:P films are evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Potentiodynamic polarization tests are employed to assess the corrosion performances of ta-C:P coated and uncoated Ti alloys in 0.89 wt.% NaCl solution. In vitro platelet adhesion measurements are performed to investigate the blood compatibility of ta-C:P films. Results indicate that phosphorus incorporation increases the corrosion resistance of ta-C films. More positive breakdown potential and lower corrosion current density than those of Ti alloy are observed for ta-C:P films. Lower platelet adhesion and activation demonstrate the enhanced haemocompatibility of Ti alloy coated with ta-C:P films. The improved interaction between ta-C:P films and biological environments is attributed to structural changes of the films after phosphorus introduction.

  13. Evaluation on corrosion behavior and haemocompatibility of phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorus incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C:P) films are deposited on biomedical titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique. The structural properties of ta-C:P films are evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Potentiodynamic polarization tests are employed to assess the corrosion performances of ta-C:P coated and uncoated Ti alloys in 0.89 wt.% NaCl solution. In vitro platelet adhesion measurements are performed to investigate the blood compatibility of ta-C:P films. Results indicate that phosphorus incorporation increases the corrosion resistance of ta-C films. More positive breakdown potential and lower corrosion current density than those of Ti alloy are observed for ta-C:P films. Lower platelet adhesion and activation demonstrate the enhanced haemocompatibility of Ti alloy coated with ta-C:P films. The improved interaction between ta-C:P films and biological environments is attributed to structural changes of the films after phosphorus introduction

  14. Multiwavelength Raman analysis of SiOx and N containing amorphous diamond like carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current research SiOx and N containing amorphous diamond like carbon (a-C:H) films were deposited on crystalline silicon from hexamethyldisiloxane and hexamethyldisilazane compounds respectively, using closed drift ion beam source and different ion beam energy in a range 300–800 eV. Hydrogen was used as a carrier gas of the precursors. Composition of the films was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The structure of these films was studied employing multiwavelength (325 nm–785 nm) Raman analysis. From the Raman spectra analysis, the characteristic parameters such as the position of G peak, D/G peak intensity ratio as well as dispersion of G (Disp(G)) peak showing topological disorder of sp2 phase in doped a-C:H films were determined. Analysis of Disp (G) and D/G intensity ratio revealed that in both types of films increase of ion beam energy gives higher sp3/sp2 ratio in the films. - Highlights: • Siloxanes are used to incorporate Si, O and N into a-C:H films. • Closed drift ion beam source at varying ion beam energy was used. • Multiwavelength Raman spectroscopy analysis (325–785 nm) was performed. • Dispersion of G peak shows that sp3/sp2 ratio rises with increasing ion beam energy

  15. Thickness dependent electronic structure of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructural properties of ultrathin (1–10 nm) tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films are investigated by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The CK-edge NEXAFS spectra of 1 nm ta-C films provided evidence of surface defects (C―H bonds) which rapidly diminish with increasing film thickness. A critical thickness for stabilization of largely sp3 matrix structure distorted by sp2 sites is observed via the change of π*C=C peak behavior. Meanwhile, an increase in the film thickness promotes an enhancement in sp3 content, the film roughness remains nearly constant as probed by spectroscopic techniques and AFM, respectively. The effect of thickness on local bonding states of ultrathin ta-C films proves to be the limiting factor for their potential use in magnetic and optical storage devices. - Highlights: ► Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc deposited ultra-thin ta-C films (1–10 nm thick). ► CK-edge NEXAFS provides evidence of surface defects (C―H bonds). ► Concentration of C―H surface defects decreases with increasing thickness. ► π*C=C behavior suggestive of rise and fall of sp2 bonding configuration. ► Critical thickness required for stability of sp3 distorted sp2 structures.

  16. Breakthrough curves of oil adsorption on novel amorphous carbon thin film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, M; Ramzi, M; Hosny, R; Fathy, M; Abdel Moghny, Th

    2016-01-01

    A novel amorphous carbon thin film (ACTF) was prepared by hydrolyzing wood sawdust and delignificating the residue to obtain cellulose mass that was subjected to react with cobalt silicate nanoparticle as a catalyst under the influence of sudden concentrated sulfuric acid addition at 23 °C. The novel ACTF was obtained in the form of thin films like graphene sheets having winding surface. The prepared ACTF was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, transmission electron microscope (TEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The adsorption capacity of ACTF to remove oil from synthetic produced water was evaluated using the incorporation of Thomas and Yoon-Nelson models. The performance study is described through the breakthrough curves concept under relevant operating conditions such as column bed heights (3.8, 5 and 11 mm) and flow rate (0.5, 1 and 1.5 mL.min(-1)). It was found that the oil uptake mechanism is favoring higher bed height. Also, the highest bed capacity of 700 mg oil/g ACTF was achieved at 5 mm bed height, and 0.5 mL.min(-1) flow rate. The results of breakthrough curve for oil adsorption was best described using the Yoon-Nelson model. Finally, the results illustrate that ACTF could be utilized effectively for oil removal from synthetic produced water in a fixed-bed column system. PMID:27191556

  17. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  18. Surface plasmon resonance detection using amorphous carbon/Au multilayer structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) can be used to detect the change in reflective index on a metal surface. In this report, we propose detection of the SPR can easily be applied to estimate the thickness of the amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films. To detect changes in film thickness using SPR, devices with an a-C:H/Au structure were fabricated. The a-C:H films were deposited by electron cyclotron resonance plasma chemical vapor deposition (ECR-CVD) and sputtering, and the obtained film densities were 1.4 and 1.6 g/cm3, respectively. By the deposition of an 11-nm thick a-C:H film on a Au layer by sputtering, the SPR angle changed from 44.90 deg. to 47.05 deg. For a-C:H deposited by ECR-CVD, the SPR angle was shifted from 44.24 deg. for Au without the a-C:H layer to 58.44 deg. after deposition of 45 nm thick a-C:H film. In both systems of the SPR angle increased with increasing the film thickness. The rate at which the SPR angle shifted depended on the a-C:H film density. These results show that the thickness of an a-C:H film can be determined by the SPR angle shift on an a-C:H layer using a-C:H/Au device with an a-C:H film of the same density.

  19. Strength and Fracture Resistance of Amorphous Diamond-Like Carbon Films for MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Jonnalagadda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical strength and mixed mode I/II fracture toughness of hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-C films, grown by pulsed laser deposition, are discussed in connection to material flaws and its microstructure. The failure properties of ta-C were obtained from films with thicknesses 0.5–3 μm and specimen widths 10–20 μm. The smallest test samples with 10 μm gage section averaged a strength of 7.3 ± 1.2 GPa, while the strength of 20-μm specimens with thicknesses 0.5–3 μm varied between 2.2–5.7 GPa. The scaling of the mechanical strength with specimen thickness and dimensions was owed to deposition-induced surface flaws, and, only in the smallest specimens, RIE patterning generated specimen sidewall flaws. The mode I fracture toughness of ta-C films is KIc=4.4±0.4 MPam, while the results from mixed mode I/II fracture experiments with cracks arbitrarily oriented in the plane of the film compared very well with theoretical predictions.

  20. Surface passivation and boundary lubrication of self-mated tetrahedral amorphous carbon asperities under extreme tribological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, A. P.; Pastewka, L.; Lautz, J.; Moseler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings have the potential to significantly reduce friction and wear between sliding components. Here, we provide atomistic insights into the evolution of the sliding interface between naked and hydrogen-passivated ta-C sliding partners under dry and lubricated conditions. Using reactive classical atomistic simulations we show that sliding induces a sp3 to sp2 rehybridization and that the shear resistance is reduced by hydrogen-passivation and hexadecane-lubricat...

  1. Tailoring the Mechanical Properties of High-Aspect-Ratio Carbon Nanotube Arrays using Amorphous Silicon Carbide Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Poelma, R.H.; Morana, B.; Vollebregt, S.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Van Zeijl, H.W.; Fan, X.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2014-01-01

    The porous nature of carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays allows for the unique opportunity to tailor their mechanical response by the infiltration and deposition of nanoscale conformal coatings. Here, we fabricate novel photo-lithographically defined CNT pillars that are conformally coated with amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) to strengthen the interlocking of individual CNTs at junctions using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). We further quantify the mechanical response by performing...

  2. The influence of radio frequency power on the characteristics of carbon-rich hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of carbon-rich hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si1-xCx:H) films were prepared at different radio frequency (RF) powers from silane-ethylene-hydrogen plasma. The effect of the RF power on the bonding configurations and microstructures has been investigated. The grown films were characterized by a collection of techniques including Scanning Electron Microscope, Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The deposition rate increases upon RF power due to the enhancement of chemical reactivity of plasma. The carbon to silicon ratio increases, for more C2H4 molecules decompose with the enhancement of RF power and more carbon atoms are bonded into the films. Raman G peak position shifts to a higher wavenumber, which indicates that the size and concentration of sp2 carbon clusters increase as the RF power becomes stronger. Blue-green photoluminescence is detected at room temperature. The PL band can be attributed to the existence of the amorphous carbon clusters in films with high carbon concentrations.

  3. Amorphous Red Phosphorus Embedded in Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon with Superior Lithium and Sodium Storage Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihan; Yang, Zhenzhong; Li, Minsi; Jiang, Yu; Wei, Xiang; Zhong, Xiongwu; Gu, Lin; Yu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Red phosphorus (P) have been considered as one of the most promising anode material for both lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) and (NIBs), because of its high theoretical capacity. However, natural insulating property and the large volume expansion of red P during cycling lead to poor cyclability and low rate performance, which prevents its practical application. Here, we significantly improves both lithium storage and sodium storage performance of red P by confining nanosized amorphous red P into the mesoporous carbon matrix (P@CMK-3) using a vaporization-condensation-conversion process. The P@CMK-3 shows a high reversible specific capacity of ∼2250 mA h g(-1) based on the mass of red P at 0.25 C (∼971 mA h g(-1) based on the composite), excellent rate performance of 1598 and 624 mA h g(-1) based on the mass of red P at 6.1 and 12 C, respectively (562 and 228 mA h g(-1) based on the mass of the composite at 6.1 and 12 C, respectively) and significantly enhanced cycle life of 1150 mA h g(-1) based on the mass of red P at 5 C (500 mA h g(-1) based on the mass of the composite) after 1000 cycles for LIBs. For Na ions, it also displays a reversible capacity of 1020 mA h g(-1) based on the mass of red P (370 mA h g(-1) based on the mass of the composite) after 210 cycles at 5C. The significantly improved electrochemical performance could be attributed to the unique structure that combines a variety of advantages: easy access of electrolyte to the open channel structure, short transport path of ions through carbon toward the red P, and high ionic and electronic conductivity. PMID:26866666

  4. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell–core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell–core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost. (paper)

  5. Rational design of coaxial mesoporous birnessite manganese dioxide/amorphous-carbon nanotubes arrays for advanced asymmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Shijin

    2015-03-01

    Coaxial mesoporous MnO2/amorphous-carbon nanotubes have been synthesized via a facile and cost-effective strategy at room temperature. The coaxial double nanotubes of inner (outer) MnO2 and outer (inner) amorphous carbon can be obtained via fine tuning the preparative factors (e.g., deposition order and processing temperature). Furthermore, the electrochemical properties of the coaxial nanotubes were evaluated by cycle voltammetric (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GC) measurements. The as-prepared coaxial double nanotubes of outer MnO2 and inner amorphous carbon exhibit the optimized pseudocapacitance performance (362 F g-1) with good cycling stability, and ideal rate capability owning to the unique nanostructures. When assembled into two-electrode asymmetric supercapacitor, an energy density of 22.56 W h kg-1 at a power density of 224.9 W kg-1 is obtained. These findings provide a new and facile approach to fabricate high-performance electrode for supercapacitors.

  6. Amorphous polyphosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate implant material with enhanced bone healing efficacy in a critical-size defect in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Ackermann, Maximilian; Wang, Shunfeng; Tolba, Emad; Neufurth, Meik; Feng, Qingling; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2016-01-01

    In this study the effect of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) microparticles and amorphous calcium polyphosphate (polyP) microparticles (termed aCa-polyP-MP) on bone mineral forming cells/tissue was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The ACC particles (termed ACC-P10-MP) were prepared in the presence of Na-polyP. Only the combinations of polyP and ACC microparticles enhanced the proliferation rate of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Gene expression studies revealed that ACC causes an upregulation of the expression of the cell membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX; formation of ACC), while the transcript level of the alkaline phosphatase (ALP; liberation of orthophosphate from polyP) changes only relatively little. In contrast, aCa-polyP-MP primarily induces ALP expression. If both components are applied together a strong stimulation of expression of both marker genes is observed. In order to investigate whether ACC also enhances bone regeneration induced by polyP in vivo, the particles were encapsulated into PLGA (poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)) microspheres (diameter ~800 μm) and implanted into rat critical-size calvarial defects. The studies revealed that animals that received aCa-polyP-MP microspheres showed an increased rate of regeneration compared to β-tri-calcium phosphate (β-TCP) controls. This effect is even accelerated if microspheres with both aCa-polyP-MP and ACC-P10-MP (1 : 1 weight ratio) are applied, resulting in an almost complete restoration of the defect area after 12 weeks. qRT-PCR analyses of tissue sections through the regeneration zone with microspheres containing both aCa-polyP-MP and ACC-P10-MP revealed a significantly higher upregulation of expression of the marker genes compared to each of the components alone. The Young's moduli for microspheres containing aCa-polyP-MP (1.74 MPa) and aCa-polyP-MP/ACC-P10-MP (2.38 MPa) were markedly higher compared to β-TCP-controls (0.63 mPa). Our results show that the combined

  7. Endothelialization of TiO2 Nanorods Coated with Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongpeng; Tang, Nan; Chen, Min; Chen, Dihu

    2016-12-01

    Carbon plasma nanocoatings with controlled fraction of sp(3)-C bonding were deposited on TiO2 nanorod arrays (TNAs) by DC magnetic-filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD). The cytocompatibility of TNA/carbon nanocomposites was systematically investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured on the nanocomposites for 4, 24, and 72 h in vitro. It was found that plasma-treated TNAs exhibited excellent cell viability as compared to the untreated. Importantly, our results show that cellular responses positively correlate with the sp(3)-C content. The cells cultured on high sp(3)-C-contented substrates exhibit better attachment, shape configuration, and proliferation. These findings indicate that the nanocomposites with high sp(3)-C content possessed superior cytocompatibility. Notably, the nanocomposites drastically reduced platelet adhesion and activation in our previous studies. Taken together, these findings suggest the TNA/carbon scaffold may serve as a guide for the design of multi-functionality devices that promotes endothelialization and improves hemocompatibility. PMID:26979723

  8. Dispersing SnO2 nanocrystals in amorphous carbon as a cyclic durable anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renzong Hu; Wei Sun; Meiqin Zeng; Min Zhu

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a facile route for the massive production of SnO2/carbon nanocomposite used as high-capacity anode materials of next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The nanocomposite had a unique structure of ultrafine SnO2 nanocrystals (∼5 nm, 80 wt%) homogeneously dispersed in amorphous carbon matrix. This structure design can well accommodate the volume change of Li+insertion/desertion in SnO2, and prevent the aggregation of the nanosized active materials during cycling, leading to superior cycle performance with stable reversible capacity of 400 mAh/g at a high current rate of 3.3 A/g.

  9. Understanding the hydrogen and oxygen gas pressure dependence of the tribological properties of silicon oxide-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Koshigan, KD; Mangolini, F; McClimon, JB; Vacher, B.; Bec, S; Carpick, RW; Fontaine, J

    2015-01-01

    Silicon oxide-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a–C:H:Si:O) are amorphous thin films used as solid lubricants in a range of commercial applications, thanks to its increased stability in extreme environments, relative to amorphous hydrogenated carbons (a–C:H). This work aims to develop a fundamental understanding of the environmental impact on the tribology of a–C:H:Si:O. Upon sliding an a–C:H:Si:O film against a steel counterbody, two friction regimes develop: high friction in high vacuum...

  10. Characterization and comparison of lateral amorphous semiconductors with embedded Frisch grid detectors on 0.18μm CMOS processed substrate for medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristovski, Christos; Goldan, Amir; Majid, Shaikh Hasibul; Wang, Kai; Shafique, Umar; Karim, Karim

    2011-03-01

    An indirect digital x-ray detector is designed, fabricated, and tested. The detector integrates a high speed, low noise CMOS substrate with two types of amorphous semiconductors on the circuit surface. Using a laterally oriented layout a-Si:H or a-Se can be used to coat the CMOS circuit and provide high speed photoresponse to complement the high speed circuits possible on CMOS technology. The circuit also aims to reduce the effect of slow carriers by integrated a Frisch style grid on the photoconductive layer to screen for the slow carriers. Simulations show a uniform photoresponse for photons absorbed on the top layer and an enhanced response when using a Frisch grid. EQE and noise results are presented. Finally, possible applications and improvements to the area of indirect x-ray imaging that are capable of easily being implemented on the substrate are suggested.

  11. Stabilization and transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate: structural and kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Millicent Promise

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is a common transient precursor in the formation of more stable crystalline calcium carbonate minerals, most notably calcite, vaterite, and aragonite. Formation of ACC from calcium carbonate rich aqueous solution rather than direct crystallization of crystalline polymorphs by organisms provides several advantages: control of morphology, grain size, orientation, hardness, and other bulk properties as well as reduction of energy costs during growth cycles. Despite decades of study, stabilization and transformation mechanisms of synthetic and biogenic ACC remain unclear. In particular, the roles of H2O and inorganic phosphate in ACC structure and transformation, and the variables affecting transformation kinetics and polymorph selection are understudied. In this research, we addressed structure and kinetic behavior of ACC through four complementary investigations: two studies focus on synthetic ACC stabilization and two focus on synthetic and biogenic ACC transformation behavior in solution at ambient temperatures. We explored ACC stabilization via compositional and thermal analyses, X-ray scattering, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Transformation experiments used a novel method of in situ structural analysis that provided quantitative kinetic and structural data and allowed us to visualize the ACC transformation pathway. Results revealed the complexity of H2O structure in ACC samples synthesized from three methods, indicating that the distinct hydrous populations produced define ACC behavior. Transformation kinetics and polymorph selection were strongly affected by the hydration state and type of synthetic ACC reacted. In situ transformation experiments also showed differences in kinetic behavior due to reaction medium. The structural role of hydrous components was again evident in in situ transformation experiments for ACC from a biogenic lobster gastrolith (LG) reacted with water. LG

  12. Substrate effect on the enhanced biodegradation of carbon tetrachloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shian C.; Doong, Rueyan

    1993-03-01

    The effects of different substrates on the biotransformation of heavily chlorinated hydrocarbons under anaerobic conditions were investigated to evaluate the feasibility of in-situ bioremediation of the contaminated groundwaters by amending different substrates. The substrate-fed batches were anaerobically incubated with the addition of either acetate, glucose, methanol, or dissolved organic matter (DOM) with concentrations ranging from 10 to 30 mg/L. Experimental results demonstrated that the effect of the substrates on the dechlorination of the compounds varied. The removal efficiency was observed greatest for glucose- then methanol- and acetate-fed batches and least for DOM-fed batches. The sequence of the enhancement efficiency is consistent with the sequence of the reducing potentials of these substrates. Changing the substrate concentration could vary the dechlorination capability of the system. The viable counts of microorganisms determined by the direct epifluorescence counting technique showed that the batches with higher concentration of the supplemental substrate produced higher bacterial cell numbers. Moreover, from microscopic observations, different compositions of bacterial population were found. Small-sized bacteria with spheric shape were observed when culture bottles were amended with either acetate or DOM, whereas large-sized bacteria with rod-shape were predominant for bottles amended with glucose. Also, higher DNA contents were demonstrated for glucose-fed batches.

  13. Possible mediators for modification of carbon substrate based electodes for construction of biosensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotzian, P.; Brázdilová, P.; Bartoš, M.; Beyene, N. W.; Švancara, I.; Vlček, Milan; Kalcher, K.; Vytřas, K.

    Galway : National University of Ireland , 2004. s. 149. [International Conference on Electoanalysis /10./. 06.06.2004-10.06.2004, Galway] Keywords : carbon substrate Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  14. Impact of sodium polyacrylate on the amorphous calcium carbonate formation from supersaturated solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Pancera, S; Boyko, V; Gummel, J; Nayuk, R; Huber, K

    2012-02-21

    A detailed in situ scattering study has been carried out on the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles modulated by the presence of small amounts of sodium polyacrylate chains. The work is aiming at an insight into the modulation of ACC formation by means of two polyacrylate samples differing in their molecular weight by a factor of 50. The ACC formation process was initiated by an in situ generation of CO(3)(2-) ions via hydrolysis of 10 mM dimethylcarbonate in the presence of 10 mM CaCl(2). Analysis of the formation process by means of time-resolved small-angle X-ray and light scattering in the absence of any additives provided evidence for a monomer addition mechanism for the growth of ACC particles. ACC formation under these conditions sets in after a lag-period of some 350 s. In the presence of sodium polyacrylate chains, calcium polyacrylate aggregates are formed during the lag-period, succeeded by a modulated ACC growth in a second step. The presence of anionic polyacrylate chains changed the shape of the growing particles toward loose and less homogeneous entities. In the case of low amounts (1.5-7.5 mg/L) of the long chain additive with 97 kDa, the size of the aggregates is comparable to the size of the successively formed hybrid particles. No variation of the lag-period has been observed in this case. Use of the short chain additive with 2 kDa enabled increase of the additive concentration up to 100 mg/L and resulted in a significant increase of the lag-period. This fact, together with the finding that the resulting hybrid particles remained stable in the latter case, identified short chain sodium polyacrylates as more efficient modulators than long chain polyacrylates. PMID:22256962

  15. Development of amorphous carbon protective coatings on poly(vinyl)chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great versatility of polymers has promoted their application in a series of ordinary situations. The development of specific devices from polymers, however, requires modifications to fit specific stipulations. In this work the surface properties of thin films grown onto polyvinylchloride (PVC) were investigated. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from acetylene and argon plasmas excited by radiofrequency (13.56 MHz, 70 W) power. The proportion of acetylene in the gas feed was varied against that of argon, keeping the total pressure constant at 2.5 Pa. Deposition time was 1800 s. Film elemental composition was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS. Water contact angle measurements were performed using the sessile drop technique. The root mean squared roughness was derived from 50 x 50 μm2 surface topographic images, acquired by scanning probe microscopy. Nanoindentation and pin-on-disk techniques were employed on the determination of film hardness and sliding wear, respectively. Oxidation resistance was obtained through the etching rate of the samples in oxygen radiofrequency (1.3 Pa, 50 W) plasmas. From XPS analysis it was detected oxygen and nitrogen contamination in all the samples. It was also found that sp3/sp2 ratio depends on the proportion of argon in the plasma. At lower argon concentrations, hardness, wear and oxidation resistances were all improved with respect to the uncoated PVC. In such conditions, the surface wettability is low indicating a moderate receptivity to water. This combination of properties, ascribed to a balance between the ion bombardment and deposition processes, is suitable for materials exposed to rigorous weathering conditions.

  16. Influence of Substrate Mineralogy on Bacterial Mineralization of Calcium Carbonate: Implications for Stone Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jroundi, Fadwa; Schiro, Mara; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; González-Muñoz, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    The influence of mineral substrate composition and structure on bacterial calcium carbonate productivity and polymorph selection was studied. Bacterial calcium carbonate precipitation occurred on calcitic (Iceland spar single crystals, marble, and porous limestone) and silicate (glass coverslips, porous sintered glass, and quartz sandstone) substrates following culturing in liquid medium (M-3P) inoculated with different types of bacteria (Myxococcus xanthus, Brevundimonas diminuta, and a carb...

  17. Oxidation and Carbidation of Laser-Ablated Amorphized Ti Particles in Carbon Monoxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jandová, Věra; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bastl, Zdeněk; Šubrt, Jan; Pola, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, MAY (2013), s. 104-110. ISSN 1293-2558 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388980 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : titanium * laser ablation * amorphization Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.679, year: 2013

  18. Performance of carbon-based hot frit substrates: I, Low pressure helium and hydrogen testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of various carbon-based materials in flowing, high-temperature helium and hydrogen is described. These materials which are candidate hot frit substrates for possible application in a PBR include various grades of graphite, carbon-carbon and vitreous carbon. Vitreous carbon showed extremely good performance in helium, while that of the various graphite grades was quite variable and, in some cases, poor. Purified grades performed better than unpurified grades, but in all cases large sample-to-sample variations in weight loss were observed. For carbon-carbon samples, the performance was intermediate. Since the weight loss in these samples was in large measure due to the loss of the densification media, improvements in the performance of carbon-carbon may be possible. With respect to the performance in hydrogen, high weight losses were observed, re-enforcing the need for coating carbon-based materials for service in a flowing hydrogen environment

  19. Performance of carbon-based hot frit substrates: I, Low pressure helium and hydrogen testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barletta, R.; Adams, J.; Svandrlik, J.; Powell, J.R.

    1993-07-01

    The performance of various carbon-based materials in flowing, high-temperature helium and hydrogen is described. These materials which are candidate hot frit substrates for possible application in a PBR include various grades of graphite, carbon-carbon and vitreous carbon. Vitreous carbon showed extremely good performance in helium, while that of the various graphite grades was quite variable and, in some cases, poor. Purified grades performed better than unpurified grades, but in all cases large sample-to-sample variations in weight loss were observed. For carbon-carbon samples, the performance was intermediate. Since the weight loss in these samples was in large measure due to the loss of the densification media, improvements in the performance of carbon-carbon may be possible. With respect to the performance in hydrogen, high weight losses were observed, re-enforcing the need for coating carbon-based materials for service in a flowing hydrogen environment.

  20. Influence of the substrate temperature on the properties of nanocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon composite films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kulisch, W.; Popov, C.; Boycheva, S.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Gibson, P. N.; Vorlíček, Vladimír

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 200, - (2006), s. 4731-4736. ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010110 Grant ostatní: Marie Curie EIF - 6th EC Framework Programme(XE) MEIF-CT-2004-500038 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : nanocrystalline diamond * microwave plasma CVD * growth rate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2006

  1. Anoxic carbon degradation in Arctic sediments: Microbial transformations of complex substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnosti, Carol; Finke, Niko; Larsen, Ole;

    2005-01-01

    Complex substrates are degraded in anoxic sediments by the concerted activities of diverse microbial communities. To explore the effects of substrate complexity on carbon transformations in permanently cold anoxic sediments, four substrates—Spirulina cells, Isochrysis cells, and soluble high...... of carbon degradation diverged, with an additional 43%, 32%, 33%, and 8% of Isochrysis, Iso-Ex, Spirulina, and Spir-Ex carbon respired to CO2 over the next 750 h of incubation. Somewhat surprisingly, the soluble, carbohydrate-rich extracts did not prove to be more labile substrates than the whole...... cells from which they were derived. Although Spirulina and Iso-Ex differed in physical and chemical characteristics (solid/soluble, C/N ratio, lipid and carbohydrate content), nearly identical quantities of carbon were respired to CO2. In contrast, only 15% of Spir-Ex carbon was respired, despite the...

  2. The effect of relatively low hydrogen dilution on the properties of carbon-rich hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-rich hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si1-xCx:H) films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using silane, ethylene and hydrogen as gas sources. The effect of relatively low hydrogen dilution on the properties of as-deposited samples was investigated. A variety of techniques including Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman scattering (RS), UV-VIS spectrophotometer and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used to characterize the grown films. The deposition rate decreases with hydrogen dilution. The silicon to carbon ratio increases slightly with the addition of hydrogen. The phenomenon can be attributed to the dissipation of power density caused by hydrogen dilution. Raman G peak position shifting to a lower wave number indicates that hydrogen dilution reduces the size and concentration of sp2 carbon clusters, which is caused by the etching effect by atomic hydrogen. The optical band gap, which is controlled by the sp2 carbon clusters and Si/C ratio, changes unmonotonously. The as-deposited samples exhibited a blue-green room-temperature (RT) PL well visible to the naked eye with UV excitation. The PL band can be attributed to the radiative recombination of electron-hole pairs within small sp2 clusters containing C=C and C-H units in a sp3 amorphous matrix.

  3. Flexible substrates as basis for photocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob; Mikkelsen, Mette; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    A photocatalytic system for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide was designed and constructed. The system relies on thin films of the photocatalyst prepared at low temperature using spray coating. We formulated inks based on the well-known photocatalyst titanium dioxide and characterized...

  4. Synthesis and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous carbon-based tribological coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo

    The development of low friction surfaces is needed to improve performance and energy efficiency for macroscopic and microscopic mechanical systems. Minimizing unwanted friction and wear can lead to dramatic economic and environmental benefits. Such research is an important approach to addressing the world's increasing energy concerns. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (CHx) thin films are ideal for some tribological applications because of their low wear rates and low coefficients of friction. The primary goal of this research is to develop and characterize modified CHx coatings so that they can be used in a variety of applications in humid environments and under higher contact loads. Doping CHx films with a small amount of sulfur (CHx+S) enables them to achieve ultralow coefficients of friction in ambient humidity. Temperature-programmed desorption and quartz crystal microbalance were used to determine that sulfur reduces water adsorption onto the film surface. Sulfur-doped films showed a decrease in the activation energy for desorption of water, or weaker film-water bonding. This decrease causes a shorter residence time of water on the surface and less equilibrium water adsorption. At a given relative humidity, sulfur-doped films adsorbed less water than undoped films. Even at 90% relative humidity, sulfur-doped films adsorbed less than 1 monolayer of water. Sulfur acts to passivate dangling bonds at the film surface susceptible to oxidation and reduces the number of surface dipoles available to attract water. This enhanced hydrophobicity increases the contact angle of adsorbed water islands, which lowers the likelihood of coalescence into a water meniscus on the film surface. The decreased quantity and discontinuity of adsorbed water molecules are responsible for CHx+S being able to achieve lower friction in humid environments. Adding titanium diboride (TiB2) to the CHx coatings yielded films with improved mechanical properties. TiB2 and CH x were synthesized in

  5. Influences of carbon content and coating carbon thickness on properties of amorphous CoSnO3@C composites as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The thickness of carbon coating layers can be successfully controlled through varying molar concentration of aqueous glucose solution. • Coating carbon thickness and carbon content are two important factors on the electrochemical performances of CoSnO3@C. • CoSnO3@C under optimized conditions exhibits the optimal balance between the volume buffering effect and reversible capacity. • As-prepared CoSnO3@C under optimized conditions shows excellent electrochemical performances, whose reversible capacity could reach 491 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles. - Abstract: A series of core–shell carbon coated amorphous CoSnO3 (CoSnO3@C) with different carbon content are synthesized. Effects of carbon content and coating carbon thickness on the physical and electrochemical performances of the samples were studied in detail. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), galvanostatic charge–discharge and AC impedance spectroscopy, respectively. The results indicate that controlling the concentration of aqueous glucose solution influences the generation of in-situ carbon layer thickness. The optimal concentration of aqueous glucose solution, carbon content and carbon layer thickness are suggested as 0.25 M, 35.1% and 20 nm, respectively. CoSnO3@C composite prepared under the optimal conditions exhibits excellent cycling performance, whose reversible capacity could reach 491 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles

  6. Process of Energetic Carbon Atom Deposition on Si (001) Substrate by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于威; 滕晓云; 李晓苇; 傅广生

    2002-01-01

    The process of energetic C atom deposition on Si (001)-(2×1) is studied by the molecular dynamics method using the semi-empirical many-bond Tersoff potential. It is found that the incident energy of the carbon atom has an important effect on the collision process and its diffusion process on the substrate. Most of the incident energy of the carbon atom is transferred to the substrate atoms within the initial two vibration periods of substrate atoms and its value increases with the incident energy. The spreading distance and penetration depth of the incident atom increasing with the incident energy are also identified. The simulated results imply that an important effect of energy of incident carbon on the film growth at Iow substrate temperature provides activation energy for silicon carbide formation through the vibration enhancement of local substrate atoms. In addition, suppressing carbon atom inhomogeneous collection and dispensing with the silicon diffusion process may be effectively promoted by the spreading and penetration of the energetic carbon atom in the silicon substrate.

  7. Wetting and reaction characteristics of crystalline and amorphous SiO2 derived rice-husk ash and SiO2/SiC substrates with Al-Si-Mg alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, A.; Pech-Canul, M. I.; Gutiérrez, C. A.; Soltani, N.

    2015-12-01

    A study of the wetting behavior of three substrate types (SiC, SiO2-derived RHA and SiC/SiO2-derived RHA) by two Al-Si-Mg alloys using the sessile drop method has been conducted, using amorphous and crystalline SiO2 in the experiment. Mostly, there is a transition from non-wetting to wetting contact angles, being the lowest θ values achieved with the alloy of high Mg content in contact with amorphous SiO2. The observed wetting behavior is attributed to the deposited Mg on the substrates. A strong diffusion of Si from the SiC/Amorphous RHA substrate into the metal drop explains the free Si segregated at the drop/substrate interface and drop surface. Although incorporation of both SiO2-derived RHA structures into the SiC powder compact substrates increases the contact angles in comparison with the SiC substrate alone, the still observed acute contact angles in RHA/SiC substrates make them promising for fabrication of composites with high volume fraction of reinforcement by the pressureless infiltration technique. The observed wetting characteristics, with decrease in surface tension and contact angles is explained by surface related phenomena. Based on contact angle changes, drop dimensions and surface tension values, as well as on the interfacial elemental mapping, and XRD analysis of substrates, some wetting and reaction pathways are proposed and discussed.

  8. Thermal instability of the microstructure and surface mechanical properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal stability of the microstructure and surface mechanical properties of two types of hydrogenated carbon film (''hard'' and ''soft'' versions, both about 2000 A thick) deposited from methane onto Si(100) wafers by a r.f.-plasma-assisted chemical vapour deposition process have been investigated. Whilst Raman spectroscopy indicates the presence of some degree of sp3 bonding in the hard film, the soft coating luminesced and burned away easily in the laser beam. IR reflectance shows the presence of CHx in both films but the amount, and whether it is CH2 or CH3, could not be deduced owing to the strong IR absorbance of the silicon substrate. On annealing in air (in the temperature range 20-600degC), scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis show that both films are completely oxidized by 500degC. On annealing in vacuum (at 10-6 Torr or less) a system of bubbles forms in the hard film at about 530degC, owing to the liberation of trapped argon, and leads to a decohesion of the coating-substrate interface. Also, after annealing in vacuum, transmission electron microscopy shows further marked changes in the nanostructure of the films at elevated temperatures. As expected from these microstructural changes, the microhardness and contact damage resistance of both films are drastically degraded at only relatively modest temperatures. Further, the hard composite exhibits thermal hysteresis of hardness, suggesting the presence of significant compressive residual stress in the film. These results are presented and discussed alongside further insights gained from surface displacement experiments with a nanoindenter. (orig.)

  9. Isotopic tracer evidence for the amorphous calcium carbonate to calcite transformation by dissolution-reprecipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffre, Anthony J.; Gagnon, Alexander C.; De Yoreo, James J.; Dove, Patricia M.

    2015-09-01

    Observations that some biogenic and sedimentary calcites grow from amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) raise the question of how this mineralization process influences composition. However, the detailed pathway and geochemical consequences of the ACC to calcite transformation are not well constrained. This experimental study investigated the formation of calcite from ACC by using magnesium and calcium stable isotope labeling to directly probe the transformation pathway and controls on composition. Four processes were considered: dissolution-reprecipitation, solid state transformation, and combinations of these end-members. To distinguish between these scenarios, ACC was synthesized from natural isotope abundance solutions and subsequently transferred to spiked solutions that were enriched in 43Ca and 25Mg for the transformation to calcite. Isotope measurements by NanoSIMS determined the 43Ca/40Ca, and 25Mg/24Mg ratios of the resulting calcite crystals. Analysis of the data shows the transformation is best explained by a dissolution-reprecipitation process. We find that when a small amount of ACC is transferred, the isotopic signals in the resulting calcite are largely replaced by the composition of the surrounding spiked solution. When larger amounts of ACC are transferred, calcite compositions reflect a mixture between the ACC and initial solution end-member. Comparisons of the measurements to the predictions of a simple mixing model indicate that calcite compositions (1) are sensitive to relative amounts of ACC and the surrounding solution reservoir and (2) are primarily governed by the conditions at the time of ACC transformation rather than the initial ACC formation. Shifts in calcite composition over the duration of the transformation period reflect the progressive evolution of the local solution conditions. This dependence indicates the extent to which there is water available would change the end point composition on the mixing line. While these findings have

  10. Loading amorphous Asarone in mesoporous silica SBA-15 through supercritical carbon dioxide technology to enhance dissolution and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzan; Quan, Guilan; Wu, Qiaoli; Zhou, Chan; Li, Feng; Bai, Xuequn; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to load amorphous hydrophobic drug into ordered mesoporous silica (SBA-15) by supercritical carbon dioxide technology in order to improve the dissolution and bioavailability of the drug. Asarone was selected as a model drug due to its lipophilic character and poor bioavailability. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of the obtained Asarone-SBA-15 were significantly improved as compared to the micronized crystalline drug. This study offers an effective, safe, and environmentally benign means of solving the problems relating to the solubility and bioavailability of hydrophobic molecules. PMID:25720818

  11. Carbonate-coordinated metal complexes precede the formation of liquid amorphous mineral emulsions of divalent metal carbonates†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Stephan E.; Müller, Lars; Barrea, Raul; Kampf, Christopher J.; Leiterer, Jork; Panne, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    During the mineralisation of metal carbonates MCO3 (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Cd, Pb) liquid-like amorphous intermediates emerge. These intermediates that form via a liquid/liquid phase separation behave like a classical emulsion and are stabilized electrostatically. The occurrence of these intermediates is attributed to the formation of highly hydrated networks whose stability is mainly based on weak interactions and the variability of the metal-containing pre-critical clusters. Their existence and compositional freedom are evidenced by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Liquid intermediates in non-classical crystallisation pathways seem to be more common than assumed. PMID:21218241

  12. Atomic layer deposition of amorphous iron phosphates on carbon nanotubes as cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A non-aqueous approach was developed to synthesize iron phosphate cathode materials by the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. Deposition of iron phosphate thin films was achieved on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) by combining ALD subcycles of Fe2O3 (ferrocene-ozone) and POx (trimethyl phosphate-water) at 200 – 350 °C. The thickness of iron phosphate thin films depends linearly on the ALD cycle, indicating their self-limiting growth behavior. The growth per cycle of iron phosphate thin films was determined to be ∼ 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.5 Å, at 200, 250, 300, and 350 °C, respectively. Characterization by SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques revealed uniform and conformal coating of amorphous iron phosphates on the surface of NCNTs. XANES analysis confirmed Fe−O−P bonding in the iron phosphates prepared by ALD. Furthermore, electrochemical measurement verified the high electrochemical activity of the amorphous iron phosphate as a cathode material in lithium-ion batteries. It is expected that the amorphous iron phosphate prepared by this facile and cost-effective ALD approach will find applications in the next generation of lithium-ion batteries and thin film batteries as either cathode materials or surface coating materials

  13. Simulation of the Elastic and Ultimate Tensile Properties of Diamond, Graphene, Carbon Nanotubes, and Amorphous Carbon Using a Revised ReaxFF Parametrization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D; Wise, Kristopher E; Odegard, Gregory M

    2015-09-17

    In light of the enduring interest in using nanostructured carbon materials as reinforcing elements in composite materials, there is a significant need for a reliable computational tool capable to predict the mechanical properties, both elastic properties and properties at the point of fracture, in large-scale atomistic simulations. A revised version of the ReaxFF reactive force field parametrization for carbon, ReaxFFC-2013, was recently published and is notable because of the inclusion of density functional theory (DFT)-derived mechanical data for diamond and graphite in the fitting set. The purpose of the present work is to assess the accuracy of this new force field for predicting the mechanical properties for several allotropes of carbon, both in the elastic regime and during fracture. The initial discussion focuses on the performance of ReaxFFC-2013 for diamond and graphene, the two carbon forms for which mechanical properties were included in the parametrization data set. After it is established that simulations conducted with the new force field yield results that agree well with DFT and experimental data for most properties of interest, its transferability to amorphous carbon and carbon nanotubes is explored. ReaxFFC-2013 is found to produce results that, for the most part, compare favorably with available experimental data for single and multiwalled nanotubes and for amorphous carbon models prepared over a range of densities. Although there is opportunity for improvement in some predicted properties, the ReaxFFC-2013 parametrization is shown to generally perform well for each form of carbon and to compare favorably with DFT and experimental data. PMID:26315717

  14. Improving Correlated SERS Measurements with Scanning Electron Microscopy: An Assessment of the Problem Arising from the Deposition of Amorphous Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Christine H.; Xia, Xiaohu; Xia, Younan

    2013-01-01

    For surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with nonspherical symmetry, it is critical to correlate spectroscopy measurements with imaging by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, the deposition of carbon resulting from e-beam exposure during SEM imaging contaminates the surface of nanoparticles, potentially preventing their further functionalization with Raman probe molecules. In addition, the deposited carbon leads to unwanted background SERS signals. In this study, we sy...

  15. VPO catalysts synthesized on substrates with modified activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VPO catalysts were prepared on oxidized and unoxidized activated carbons differing in initial porous structure. Carbons were oxidized under relatively soft (30% H2O2, 200 deg. C) and hard (50% H2O2, 350 deg. C) conditions. Carbon modification was carried out hydrothermally in a traditional autoclave (HTT) or a microwave reactor (MWT). The synthesis was also carried out under hydrothermal (HTS or MWS) conditions. V2O5 and NH4VO3 were used as precursors. The samples are characterized by diversified porous structure at SBET = 732-1617 m2/g and Vpor = 0.44-0.90 cm3/g, as well as various degree of VPO crystallinity. Possibility of preparation of the VPO catalysts under ecologically appropriate conditions, i.e. in aqueous solutions, was shown.

  16. Tunnel magnetoresistance in textured Co2FeAl/MgO/CoFe magnetic tunnel junctions on a Si/SiO2 amorphous substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhenchao; Sukegawa, Hiroaki; Mitani, Seiji; Inomata, Koichiro

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic tunnel junctions with B2-ordered Co2FeAl full Heusler alloy as a ferromagnetic electrode were fabricated by sputtering on thermally oxidized Si/SiO2 amorphous substrates. A Co2FeAl/MgO/Co50Fe50 structure showed a highly (001)-textured structure and the tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 166% at room temperature and 252% at 48 K were achieved. The temperature dependence of TMR can be fitted with spin wave excitation model, and the bias voltage dependence of differential conductance demonstrated that the high TMR was mainly contributed by coherent tunneling. This work suggests the B2-Co2FeAl is one of the promising candidates for practical spintronic applications.

  17. Sub-micron gap in-plane micromechanical resonators based on low-temperature amorphous silicon thin-films on glass substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, high-frequency bulk mode resonators made from low stress hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a–Si:H) thin-films are demonstrated. The microelectromechanical structures are fabricated using surface micromachining techniques at a maximum processing temperature of 175 °C on glass substrates. The silicon thin-film based resonators presented here are temperature compatible with post processing on standard CMOS. The resonators are capacitively driven and sensed across 400 nm air gaps. A proof of concept design consisting of a 200 µm side length square has been selectively excited in the Lamé-mode at a characteristic vibration frequency of 13.64 MHz. The quality factor of the resonators is in the 103 range and the motional resistance was measured to be approximately 21.8 MΩ at a DC bias voltage of 40 V. (paper)

  18. Ni-YSZ Substrate Degradation during Carbon Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Carbon deposition on various Ni-YSZ catalytic composites with average Ni particle size from 0.44 mm to 0.98 mm was studied under dry CH4-Ar and humidified CH4-Ar conditions. The change in the catalytic activity was monitored both as a mass gain due to carbon deposition and hydrogen evolution due to CH4 dehydrogenation on Ni-YSZ. Regarding the start of methane decomposition and subsequent catalyst deactivation rate, composites with smaller Ni-grains were much more active in compari...

  19. Effect of pressure on the deposition of hydrogen-free amorphous carbon and carbon nitride films by the pulsed cathodic arc discharge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) and carbon nitride (a-C:N) films were deposited using the pulsed cathodic arc discharge at different argon and nitrogen pressures. The surface and mechanical properties of these films were found to strongly depend on the gas pressure. The tetrahedral amorphous carbon and hard a-C:N films with smooth surfaces (rms roughness: 0.15 nm) were prepared at lower gas pressures (-2 Pa). Incorporation of an increasing amount of nitrogen in a-C:N films caused a decrease in film hardness. All the films were covered with the thin (0.3-2 nm) graphite-like surface layers. The film hardness was correlated to the soft surface layer thickness, and the films with thinner surface layers exhibit higher hardness. The mean energies of pulsed plasma beams were measured as the functions of argon and nitrogen pressures. The mean energies of plasma beams decrease in an exponential fashion with increasing gas pressure due to the carbon ion collisions with the neutral gas species. The effects of mean energies of deposited species on the film deposition were explained in terms of the thermal spike migration of surface atoms. The formation of graphite-like surface layers is associated with the low-energy deposition process. The low-energy (10 eV) species may produce the strong thermal spike at film surface, and contribute to the formation of sp3 bonded structure at a sp3 bonded matrix

  20. Physical vapor deposition synthesis of tungsten monocarbide (WC) thin films on different carbon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of tungsten monocarbide (WC) thin films has been performed by physical vapor deposition on various substrates including glassy carbon, carbon fiber sheet, carbon foam, and carbon cloth. The WC and W2C phase contents of these films have been evaluated with bulk and surface analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. These characterization techniques were also used to determine the effects of synthesis by nonreactive and reactive sputtering. The synthesis of WC particles supported on the carbon fiber substrate has also been accomplished using the temperature programmed reaction method. Overall, the results demonstrate that the phase purity of tungsten carbides can be controlled by the deposition environment and annealing temperatures

  1. A novel pattern transfer technique for mounting glassy carbon microelectrodes on polymeric flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomero, Maria; van Niekerk, Pieter; Nguyen, Vivian; Gong, Nick; Hirabayashi, Mieko; Cinopri, Alessio; Logan, Kyle; Moghadasi, Ali; Varma, Priya; Kassegne, Sam

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel technology for transferring glassy carbon microstructures, originally fabricated on a silicon wafer through a high-temperature process, to a polymeric flexible substrate such as polyimide. This new transfer technique addresses a major barrier in Carbon-MEMS technology whose widespread use so has been hampered by the high-temperature pyrolysis process (⩾900 °C), which limits selection of substrates. In the new approach presented, patterning and pyrolysis of polymer precursor on silicon substrate is carried out first, followed by coating with a polymer layer that forms a hydrogen bond with glassy carbon and then releasing the ensuing glassy carbon structure; hence, transferring it to a flexible substrate. This enables the fabrication of a unique set of glassy carbon microstructures critical in applications that demand substrates that conform to the shape of the stimulated/actuated or sensed surface. Our findings based on Fourier transform infared spectroscopy on the complete electrode set demonstrate—for the first time—that carbonyl groups on polyimide substrate form a strong hydrogen bond with hydroxyl groups on glassy carbon resulting in carboxylic acid dimers (peaks at 2660 and 2585 cm-1). This strong bond is further confirmed by a tensile test that demonstrated an almost perfect bond between these materials that behave as an ideal composite material. Further, mechanical characterization shows that ultimate strain for such a structure is as high as 15% with yield stress of ~20 MPa. We propose that this novel technology not only offers a compelling case for the widespread use of carbon-MEMS, but also helps move the field in new and exciting directions.

  2. A novel pattern transfer technique for mounting glassy carbon microelectrodes on polymeric flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel technology for transferring glassy carbon microstructures, originally fabricated on a silicon wafer through a high-temperature process, to a polymeric flexible substrate such as polyimide. This new transfer technique addresses a major barrier in Carbon-MEMS technology whose widespread use so has been hampered by the high-temperature pyrolysis process (⩾900 °C), which limits selection of substrates. In the new approach presented, patterning and pyrolysis of polymer precursor on silicon substrate is carried out first, followed by coating with a polymer layer that forms a hydrogen bond with glassy carbon and then releasing the ensuing glassy carbon structure; hence, transferring it to a flexible substrate. This enables the fabrication of a unique set of glassy carbon microstructures critical in applications that demand substrates that conform to the shape of the stimulated/actuated or sensed surface. Our findings based on Fourier transform infared spectroscopy on the complete electrode set demonstrate—for the first time—that carbonyl groups on polyimide substrate form a strong hydrogen bond with hydroxyl groups on glassy carbon resulting in carboxylic acid dimers (peaks at 2660 and 2585 cm−1). This strong bond is further confirmed by a tensile test that demonstrated an almost perfect bond between these materials that behave as an ideal composite material. Further, mechanical characterization shows that ultimate strain for such a structure is as high as 15% with yield stress of ∼20 MPa. We propose that this novel technology not only offers a compelling case for the widespread use of carbon-MEMS, but also helps move the field in new and exciting directions. (paper)

  3. Sugars as the optimal biosynthetic carbon substrate of aqueous life throughout the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous analysis of the energetics of metabolism showed that both the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids from sugars, and the fermentation of organic substrates, were energetically driven by electron transfer reactions resulting in carbon redox disproportionation (Weber, 1997). Redox disproportionation--the spontaneous (energetically favorable) direction of carbon group transformation in biosynthesis--is brought about and driven by the energetically downhill transfer of electron pairs from more oxidized carbon groups (with lower half-cell reduction potentials) to more reduced carbon groups (with higher half-cell reduction potentials). In this report, we compare the redox and kinetic properties of carbon groups in order to evaluate the relative biosynthetic capability of organic substrates, and to identify the optimal biosubstrate. This analysis revealed that sugars (monocarbonyl alditols) are the optimal biosynthetic substrate because they contain the maximum number of biosynthetically useful high energy electrons/carbon atom while still containing a single carbonyl group needed to kinetically facilitate their conversion to useful biosynthetic intermediates. This conclusion applies to aqueous life throughout the Universe because it is based on invariant aqueous carbon chemistry--primarily, the universal reduction potentials of carbon groups.

  4. Optical absorption parameters of amorphous carbon films from Forouhi-Bloomer and Tauc-Lorentz models: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laidani, N [Fondazione Bruno Kessler-Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive, 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Bartali, R [Fondazione Bruno Kessler-Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive, 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Gottardi, G [Fondazione Bruno Kessler-Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive, 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Anderle, M [Fondazione Bruno Kessler-Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica, Via Sommarive, 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Cheyssac, P [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere Condensee (UMR CNRS 6622), Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France)

    2008-01-09

    Parametrization models of optical constants, namely Tauc-Lorentz (TL), Forouhi-Bloomer (FB) and modified FB models, were applied to the interband absorption of amorphous carbon films. The optical constants were determined by means of transmittance and reflectance measurements in the visible range. The studied films were prepared by rf sputtering and characterized for their chemical properties. The analytical models were also applied to other optical data published in the literature pertaining to films produced by various deposition techniques. The different approaches used to determine important physical parameters of the interband transition yielded different results. A figure-of-merit was introduced to check the applicability of the models and the results showed that FB modified for an energy dependence of the dipole matrix element adequately represents the interband transition in the amorphous carbons. Further, the modified FB model shows a relative superiority over the TL ones for concerning the determination of the band gap energy, as it is the only one to be validated by an independent, though indirect, gap measurement by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Finally, the application of the modified FB model allowed us to establish some important correlations between film structure and optical absorption properties.

  5. Optical absorption parameters of amorphous carbon films from Forouhi-Bloomer and Tauc-Lorentz models: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parametrization models of optical constants, namely Tauc-Lorentz (TL), Forouhi-Bloomer (FB) and modified FB models, were applied to the interband absorption of amorphous carbon films. The optical constants were determined by means of transmittance and reflectance measurements in the visible range. The studied films were prepared by rf sputtering and characterized for their chemical properties. The analytical models were also applied to other optical data published in the literature pertaining to films produced by various deposition techniques. The different approaches used to determine important physical parameters of the interband transition yielded different results. A figure-of-merit was introduced to check the applicability of the models and the results showed that FB modified for an energy dependence of the dipole matrix element adequately represents the interband transition in the amorphous carbons. Further, the modified FB model shows a relative superiority over the TL ones for concerning the determination of the band gap energy, as it is the only one to be validated by an independent, though indirect, gap measurement by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Finally, the application of the modified FB model allowed us to establish some important correlations between film structure and optical absorption properties

  6. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, S.K.; Jha, A. [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [Thin Film & Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.

  7. Atomically resolved surface structures of vapor deposited amorphous silicon-carbon alloys: An atomic force microscopy and spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide alloys are widely used in high-tech applications due to their interesting combination of chemical, mechanical and electronic properties. Growing thin films of this material in a simple and controlled way is a hot topic in modern material's science. In particular, the possibility to tailor the film properties just by tuning the deposition temperature would be an important progress. In the present work amorphous silicon-carbon alloys thin films have been deposited by electron beam sublimation of a poly-crystalline silicon carbide target in vacuum environment. The deposition temperature was varied from Room Temperature to about 1300 K. The resulting films were analyzed by means of Ultra High Vacuum-Atomic Force Microscopy (UHV-AFM) down to even atomic resolution. The observed features agree with literature data, e.g. interatomic bond lengths, as achieved by others methods, and the structural arrangements of silicon and carbon atoms as concluded from IR and Raman spectroscopy measurements carried out on the same samples. The results not only allow a correlation between film properties and deposition temperature but also support the notion of the UHV-AFM images of the amorphous surfaces being atomically resolved.

  8. Polystyrene-Templated Aerosol Synthesis of MoS2 -Amorphous Carbon Composite with Open Macropores as Battery Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ho; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-07-01

    MoS2 -amorphous carbon (MoS2 -AC) composite microspheres with macroporous structure were fabricated by one-pot spray pyrolysis. Single- or few-layered MoS2 were uniformly dispersed and oriented in random directions in the amorphous carbon microsphere with macropores sizes between 50 and 90 nm. The macroporous microspheres having a high contact area with liquid electrolyte exhibited overall superior Li- and Na-ion storage properties compared with those of the dense microspheres. After 250 charge/discharge cycles at a current density of 1.5 A g(-1) , the discharge capacities of the MoS2 -AC microspheres with dense and macroporous structures for Li-ion storage were 694 and 896 mAh g(-1) , respectively. In the case of Na-ion storage, discharge capacities of 336 and 425 mAh g(-1) were achieved for the dense and macroporous microspheres, respectively, after 100 cycles at 0.3 A g(-1) . PMID:26098539

  9. Friction reduction in powertrain and engine components by coating with diamond-like, amorphous carbon; Reibungsminderung an Antriebs- und Motorkomponenten durch Beschichtungen mit diamantaehnlichem amorphen Kohlenstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schork, Willi Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    The author investigated inhowfar coatings with diamond-like amorphous carbon (ta-C) in combination with suitable lubricants may help to reduce friction in selected powertrain and engine components. The influence of the microstructure on the stresses on layers in tribological contact was investigated using simulations. By varying the parameters of the background gas in the coating plant, hydrogen-free amorphous carbon layers of different elasticities and compositions were deposited reproducibly using a pulsed arc technology. For selective analyses of damage mechanisms in high-wear conditions, a novel tribometer for increasing loads was designed and constructed, with oscillating sliding contact and dynamic load. Failure models were established for various stress-related damge mechanisms of layered systems measured by the new tribometer. Practical tests with engines with ta-C coated piston rings proved the applicability of hydrogen-free amorphous carbon in engine applications.

  10. Large-scale and patternable graphene: direct transformation of amorphous carbon film into graphene/graphite on insulators via Cu mediation engineering and its application to all-carbon based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ze; Medina, Henry; Lin, Hung-Chiao; Tsai, Hung-Wei; Su, Teng-Yu; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition of graphene was the preferred way to synthesize graphene for multiple applications. However, several problems related to transfer processes, such as wrinkles, cleanness and scratches, have limited its application at the industrial scale. Intense research was triggered into developing alternative synthesis methods to directly deposit graphene on insulators at low cost with high uniformity and large area. In this work, we demonstrate a new concept to directly achieve growth of graphene on non-metal substrates. By exposing an amorphous carbon (a-C) film in Cu gaseous molecules after annealing at 850 °C, the carbon (a-C) film surprisingly undergoes a noticeable transformation to crystalline graphene. Furthermore, the thickness of graphene could be controlled, depending on the thickness of the pre-deposited a-C film. The transformation mechanism was investigated and explained in detail. This approach enables development of a one-step process to fabricate electrical devices made of all carbon material, highlighting the uniqueness of the novel approach for developing graphene electronic devices. Interestingly, the carbon electrodes made directly on the graphene layer by our approach offer a good ohmic contact compared with the Schottky barriers usually observed on graphene devices using metals as electrodes.Chemical vapour deposition of graphene was the preferred way to synthesize graphene for multiple applications. However, several problems related to transfer processes, such as wrinkles, cleanness and scratches, have limited its application at the industrial scale. Intense research was triggered into developing alternative synthesis methods to directly deposit graphene on insulators at low cost with high uniformity and large area. In this work, we demonstrate a new concept to directly achieve growth of graphene on non-metal substrates. By exposing an amorphous carbon (a-C) film in Cu gaseous molecules after annealing at 850 °C, the carbon (a

  11. Surface treatment of glass substrates for the preparation of long-lived carbon stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass substrates having uniformly distributed microscopic grains on the surfaces are useful to make long-lived carbon stripper foils for heavy ions. A method of surface treatment of glass substrates to form the surface structure is described. This method consists of precipitation of glass components, such as soda, onto the surfaces in a hot and humid atmosphere and a fogging treatment of forming microscopic grains of the precipitated substances. Some results of studies on the treatment conditions are also presented. (author)

  12. Rapid growth of amorphous carbon films on the inner surface of micron-thick and hollow-core fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrathick (> 25 μm) carbon films were obtained on the inner surface of hollow and micron-thick quartz fibers by confining CH4/He or C2H2/He microplasmas in their hollow cores. The resulting carbon films were studied by using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The microplasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique resulted in the uniform growth of amorphous carbon films on the inner surface of very long (> 1 m) hollow-core fibers. Film deposition is performed by using microplasmas at atmospheric pressure and at 50 Pa. The carbon films obtained with the latter show the smooth inner surfaces and the well continuity across the film/optical fiber. Low-pressure CH4/He and C2H2/He microplasmas can lead to a rapid growth (∼ 2.00 μm/min) of carbon films with their thickness of > 25 μm. The optical emission measurements show that various hydrocarbon species were formed in these depositing microplasmas due to the collisions between CH4/C2H2 molecules and energetic species. The microplasma-enhanced CVD technique running without the complicated fabrication processes shows its potentials for rapidly depositing the overlong carbon tubes with their inner diameters of tens of microns. - Highlights: • The microplasma device is applied for coating deposition inside hollow-core fibers. • The microplasma device results in > 25 μm-thick carbon films. • The microplasma device is simple for deposition of ultralong carbon tubes

  13. Mechanical and Surface Characterization of Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings onto Polymeric Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Martí-González, Joan; Bertran, Enric

    2015-01-01

    In this master thesis, diamond-like carbon DLC/Cr bilayer systems, with thickness up to 1278 nm were formed on ABS, glass and Si substrates. Substrates surface were prepared by oxygen plasma cleaning process. The chromium thin film, which acts as a buffer layer, was grown by magnetron sputtering deposition. Diamond-like carbon was deposited by pulsed-DC PECVD, with methane and hydrogen as reactants. A Plackett-Burman experimental design was carried out in order to determine the influence of t...

  14. Carbon nanotube field emitters on KOVAR substrate modified by random pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the field emission characteristics of patterned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on KOVAR substrates with different surface morphologies. The substrate with a micro-sized random pattern was fabricated through chemical wet etching, whereas the substrate with a nano-sized random pattern was formed by surface roughening process of polymer and chemical wet etching. The field emission characteristics of these substrates were the compared with those of non-treated substrates. It was clearly revealed that the field emission characteristics of CNTs were influenced by the surface morphology of the cathode substrate. When the surface of cathode was modified by random pattern, the modified substrate provided a large surface area and a wider print area. Also, the modified surface morphology of the cathode provided strong adhesion between the CNT paste and the cathode. Particularly, the substrate with the nano-sized random pattern showed that the turn-on field value decreases and the field enhancement factor value improves as compared with non-treated substrate

  15. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Na; Yun, Ki Nam; Yu, Hyun-Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin, E-mail: cjlee@korea.ac.kr [School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Joon Hyung [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 10{sup 6} and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm{sup 2}/V·s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics.

  16. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 106 and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm2/V·s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics

  17. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Joester, Derk

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP) as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse e...

  18. Intermittent chemical vapor deposition of thick electrically conductive diamond-like amorphous carbon films using i-C4H10/N2 supermagnetron plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrically conductive diamond-like amorphous carbon (DAC) films with nitrogen (DAC:N) were deposited on Si and SiO2 wafers using the i-C4H10/N2 supermagnetron plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Resistivity and hardness decreased with increase of upper electrode rf power (UPRF) under constant lower electrode rf power (LORF). Film thickness increased linearly to over 0.3 μm with deposition time via intermittent deposition. The film exhibited good adhesion to the substrate. Low-resistance thick films were deposited using alternating multilayer CVD at UPRF/LORFs of 1 kW/1 kW and 300 W/300 W. In the deposited alternating multiple layers, resistivity significantly decreased with the increase of H layer (1 kW/1 kW) thickness, and film thickness significantly increased with the increase of L layer (300 W/300 W) thickness. By the deposition of H/L multiple layers, a film of 2.1 μm thickness and 0.14 Ω cm resistivity was obtained

  19. Hydrogenation effects on carrier transport in boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite (UNCD/a-C:H) films were deposited by coaxial arc plasma deposition with a boron-blended graphite target at a base pressure of <10−3 Pa and at hydrogen pressures of ≤53.3 Pa. The hydrogenation effects on the electrical properties of the films were investigated in terms of chemical bonding. Hydrogen-scattering spectrometry showed that the maximum hydrogen content was 35 at. % for the film produced at 53.3-Pa hydrogen pressure. The Fourier-transform infrared spectra showed strong absorptions by sp3 C–H bonds, which were specific to the UNCD/a-C:H, and can be attributed to hydrogen atoms terminating the dangling bonds at ultrananocrystalline diamond grain boundaries. Temperature-dependence of the electrical conductivity showed that the films changed from semimetallic to semiconducting with increasing hydrogen pressure, i.e., with enhanced hydrogenation, probably due to hydrogenation suppressing the formation of graphitic bonds, which are a source of carriers. Carrier transport in semiconducting hydrogenated films can be explained by a variable-range hopping model. The rectifying action of heterojunctions comprising the hydrogenated films and n-type Si substrates implies carrier transport in tunneling

  20. Preparation of tantalum carbide films by reaction of electrolytic carbon coating with the tantalum substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Massot, Laurent; Chamelot, Pierre; Taxil, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    This article demonstrates that coatings of tantalum carbide can be obtained by electrodeposition of carbon in molten fluorides on a tantalum substrate as an alternative to the CVD process. The structural characteristics of the carbon deposited by the electrolytic route lead to a high reactivity of this element towards a tantalum cathode to produce tantalum carbide. Mutual reactivity was shown to be enhanced if tantalum plate is replaced by an electrodeposited layer of tantalum, where th...

  1. Variability in the origin of carbon substrates for bacterial communities in mangrove sediments

    OpenAIRE

    BOUILLON, S; Moens, T.; N. Koedam; Dahdouh-Guebas, F.; Baeyens, W.; F. Dehairs

    2004-01-01

    Organic carbon in mangrove sediments originates from both local sources (mangroves, microphytobenthos) and tidal inputs (e.g. phytoplankton, seagrass-derived material). The relative inputs of these sources may vary strongly, both within and between different mangrove sites. We combined elemental (TOC/TN) and bulk d13C analysis on sediment cores from various mangrove sites with d13C data of bacteria-specific phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) in order to identify the dominant carbon substrates u...

  2. Electrophoretic Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes on 3-Amino-Propyl-Triethoxysilane (APTES) Surface Functionalized Silicon Substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Theda Daniels-Race; Anirban Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of uniform thin coatings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by electrophoretic deposition (EPD) on semiconductor (silicon) substrates with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES) surface functionalization has been studied extensively in this report. The gradual deposition and eventual film formation of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is greatly assisted by the Coulombic force of attraction existing between the positively charged –NH2 surface groups of APTES and the acid treated, ...

  3. Immobilization of sericin molecules via amorphous carbon plasma modified-polystyrene dish for serum-free culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunma, Somruthai [The Graduate School, Chiang Mai University, 239 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), 239 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Song, Doo-Hoon [Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si-Eun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam [Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jeon-Geon [Center for Advanced Plasma Surface Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Boonyawan, Dheerawan, E-mail: dheerawan.b@cmu.ac.th [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), 239 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, 239 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we focused on sericin hydrolysates, originating from silkworm used in serum-free human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) culture. We reported the effect of a covalent linkage between a bioactive protein molecule and polystyrene dish surface via a carbon intermediate layer which can slow down the release rate of protein compounds into the phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. Films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and functionalized-carbon were deposited on PS culture dish surfaces by using a DC magnetron sputtering system and RF PECVD system. We found that a-C based-films can increase the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of polystyrene (PS) dishes, especially a-C films and a-C:N{sub 2} films showed good attachment of hBM-MSCs at 24 h. However, in the case of silica surface (a-C:SiO{sub x} films), the cells showed a ragged and unattached boundary resulting from the presence of surface silanol groups. For the UV–vis absorbance, all carbon modified-PS dishes showed a lower release rate of sericin molecules into PBS solution than PS control. This revealed that the functionalized carbon could be enhanced by specific binding properties with given molecules. The carbon-coated PS dishes grafting with sericin protein were used in a serum-free condition. We also found that hBM-MSCs have higher percentage of proliferated cells at day 7 for the modified dishes with carbon films and coated with sericin than the PS control coated with sericin. The physical film properties were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and contact angle measurement. The presence of -NH{sub 2} groups of sericin compounds on the PS dish was revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The stability of covalent bonds of sericin molecules after washing out ungrafted sericin was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  4. Immobilization of sericin molecules via amorphous carbon plasma modified-polystyrene dish for serum-free culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunma, Somruthai; Song, Doo-Hoon; Kim, Si-Eun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Han, Jeon-Geon; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we focused on sericin hydrolysates, originating from silkworm used in serum-free human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) culture. We reported the effect of a covalent linkage between a bioactive protein molecule and polystyrene dish surface via a carbon intermediate layer which can slow down the release rate of protein compounds into the phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. Films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and functionalized-carbon were deposited on PS culture dish surfaces by using a DC magnetron sputtering system and RF PECVD system. We found that a-C based-films can increase the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of polystyrene (PS) dishes, especially a-C films and a-C:N2 films showed good attachment of hBM-MSCs at 24 h. However, in the case of silica surface (a-C:SiOx films), the cells showed a ragged and unattached boundary resulting from the presence of surface silanol groups. For the UV-vis absorbance, all carbon modified-PS dishes showed a lower release rate of sericin molecules into PBS solution than PS control. This revealed that the functionalized carbon could be enhanced by specific binding properties with given molecules. The carbon-coated PS dishes grafting with sericin protein were used in a serum-free condition. We also found that hBM-MSCs have higher percentage of proliferated cells at day 7 for the modified dishes with carbon films and coated with sericin than the PS control coated with sericin. The physical film properties were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and contact angle measurement. The presence of sbnd NH2 groups of sericin compounds on the PS dish was revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The stability of covalent bonds of sericin molecules after washing out ungrafted sericin was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  5. Production of carbon-13-labeled cadaverine by engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum using carbon-13-labeled methanol as co-substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leßmeier, Lennart; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Carnicer, Marc; Heux, Stephanie; Portais, Jean-Charles; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-12-01

    Methanol, a one-carbon compound, can be utilized by a variety of bacteria and other organisms as carbon and energy source and is regarded as a promising substrate for biotechnological production. In this study, a strain of non-methylotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum, which was able to produce the polyamide building block cadaverine as non-native product, was engineered for co-utilization of methanol. Expression of the gene encoding NAD+-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) from the natural methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus increased methanol oxidation. Deletion of the endogenous aldehyde dehydrogenase genes ald and fadH prevented methanol oxidation to carbon dioxide and formaldehyde detoxification via the linear formaldehyde dissimilation pathway. Heterologous expression of genes for the key enzymes hexulose-6-phosphate synthase and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway in this strain restored growth in the presence of methanol or formaldehyde, which suggested efficient formaldehyde detoxification involving RuMP key enzymes. While growth with methanol as sole carbon source was not observed, the fate of 13C-methanol added as co-substrate to sugars was followed and the isotopologue distribution indicated incorporation into central metabolites and in vivo activity of the RuMP pathway. In addition, 13C-label from methanol was traced to the secreted product cadaverine. Thus, this synthetic biology approach led to a C. glutamicum strain that converted the non-natural carbon substrate methanol at least partially to the non-native product cadaverine. PMID:26276544

  6. Amorphous-silicon@silicon oxide/chromium/carbon as an anode for lithium-ion batteries with excellent cyclic stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new amorphous-Si@SiOx/Cr/carbon anode composite for lithium-ion batteries is synthesized by a simple method. • At a current density of 100 mA g−1, this as-prepared composite exhibit a stable discharge capacity of about 810 mAh g−1 with good capacity retention up to 200 cycles. Even at a current density of 800 mA g−1, a stable discharge capacity of 570 mAh g−1 can be obtained. • This work creates a new method to improve the electrochemical performance of SiO-based electrode materials. - Abstract: A new amorphous-Si@SiOx/Cr/carbon (a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C) anode composite for lithium-ion batteries is synthesized, using SiO, chromium powder and graphite as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) are employed to characterize the composition, morphology and microstructure of the composite. Coin-type cells are assembled to investigate the electrochemical behaviors of the as-prepared composites by constant current charge–discharge technique, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that chromium facilitates the crush of Si@SiOx and graphite during milling, and thus improves their mutual dispersion in the composite. When cycled at 100 mA g−1, the a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C exhibits a stable discharge capacity of about 810 mAh g−1 (calculated on the mass of a-Si@SiOx/Cr/C) with good capacity retention up to 200 cycles. The improved electrochemical performance is attributed to the reduced particle size of a-Si@SiOx and the synergistic effect of carbon and chromium

  7. Microstructure and magnetic properties of (001) textured L1(0) FePt films on amorphous glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speliotis, T; Varvaro, G; Testa, AM; Giannopoulos, G; Agostinelli, E; Li, W; Hadjipanayis, G; Niarchos, D

    2015-05-15

    L1(0) FePt thin films with an island-like morphology and magnetic perpendicular anisotropy were grown at low temperature (300 < T-dep< 375 degrees C) by magnetron sputtering on Hoya glass substrates using a 30-nm thick Cr (2 0 0) underlayer. An MgO buffer layer with a thickness of 2 nm was used to inhibit the diffusion from the Cr underlayer and promote the growth of (0 0 1) oriented L1(0) FePt films by inducing an in-plane lattice distortion. By varying the substrate temperature and the Ar sputter pressure (3.5 < P-Ar< 15 mTorr) during the deposition, the degree of chemical order, the microstructure and the magnetic properties were tuned and the best properties in term of squareness ratio (M-r/M-s similar to 0.95) and coercive field (H-c similar to 14 kOe) were observed for films deposited at T-dep = 350 degrees C and P-Ar= 5 mTorr, due to the appearance of a tensile strain, which favors the perpendicular anisotropy. The analysis of the angular dependence of remanent magnetization curves on the optimized sample suggests that the magnetization reversal is highly incoherent due to the inter-island interactions. Our results provide useful information on the low temperature growth of FePt films with perpendicular anisotropy onto glass substrates, which are relevant for a variety of technological applications, such as magnetic recording and spintronic devices. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CNx films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N2/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, Vs, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at Vs ≥ 60 V, Vs ≥ 100 V, and Vs = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of Vs for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all Vs, while CNx films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2 GPa. Nanoindentation showed a significant increase in film

  9. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D., E-mail: konba@ifm.liu.se; Schmidt, Susann; Garbrecht, Magnus; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Jensen, Jens; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CN{sub x} films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, V{sub s}, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at V{sub s} ≥ 60 V, V{sub s} ≥ 100 V, and V{sub s} = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of V{sub s} for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all V{sub s}, while CN{sub x} films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2

  10. Ion-beam-induced bending of freestanding amorphous nanowires: The importance of the substrate material and charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-beam irradiation offers great flexibility and controllability in the construction of freestanding nanostructures with multiple advanced functionalities. Here, we present and discuss the bending of free-standing nanowires, against, towards, and ultimately parallel to a flux of directional ion irradiation. Bending components both along and perpendicular to the incident ion beam were observed, and the bending behavior was found to depend both on the ion beam scanning strategy and on the conductivity of the supporting substrate. This behavior is explained by an ion-irradiation-related electrostatic interaction. Our findings suggest the prospect of exploiting this technique to engineer 3D nanostructures for advanced applications.

  11. Activated carbon addition affects substrate pH and germination of six plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabouw, P.; Nab, M.; Dam, van M.

    2010-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is widely used in ecological studies for neutralizing allelopathic compounds. However, it has been suggested that AC has direct effects on plants because it alters substrate parameters such as nutrient availability and pH. These side-effects of AC addition may interfere with al

  12. Enhancement of orimulsion biodegradation through the addition of natural marine carbon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proctor, L.M.; Toy, E.; Lapham, L.; Cherrier, J.; Chanton, J.P. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (USA). Dept. of Oceanography

    2001-04-01

    Orimulsion is a bitumen-based heavy fuel that is a less expensive alternative to traditional fuel oils. However, because its density is intermediate between that of freshwater and seawater, in the event of a spill, the fuel could strand in the sediments. Previous work indicated that only 0.6 - 2.7% of the bitumen would degrade in long incubations of marine sediments. Various natural carbon substrates were added to stimulate the degradation of bitumen by native populations of benthic bacteria. The concentration and carbon isotopic signature of the respired carbon dioxide was measured to partition the substrates that supported bacterial respiration. It was found that the addition of seagrass and pinfish stimulated the degradation of bitumen by as much as 2 to 9-fold relative to incubations without these substrates. Biodegradation of bitumen may be enhanced by the addition of natural marine carbon substrates and may be a useful approach for bioremediation. Preadaption of the bacteria to bitumen did not significantly enhance their ability to degrade it. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tab.

  13. Green synthesis of carbon-supported nanoparticle catalysts by physical vapor deposition on soluble powder substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Hee-Young Park; Injoon Jang; Namgee Jung; Young-Hoon Chung; Jae Yoon Ryu; In Young Cha; Hyung Juhn Kim; Jong Hyung Jang; Sung Jong Yoo

    2015-01-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) supported on high surface area carbon (NP/Cs) were prepared by the physical vapor deposition of bulk materials on an α-D-glucose (Glu) substrate, followed by the deposition of the NPs on carbon supports. Using Glu as a carrier for the transport of NPs from the bulk materials to the carbon support surfaces, ultrafine NPs were obtained, exhibiting a stabilizing effect through OH moieties on the Glu surfaces. This stabilizing effect was strong enough to ...

  14. Hydrogen reverses the clustering tendency of carbon in amorphous silicon oxycarbide

    OpenAIRE

    Hepeng Ding; Demkowicz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) is of great technological interest. However, its atomic-level structure is not well understood. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the clustering tendency of C atoms in SiOC is extremely sensitive to hydrogen (H): without H, the C-C interaction is attractive, leading to enrichment of aggregated SiC[subscript 4] tetrahedral units; with hydrogen, the C-C interaction is repulsive, leading to enrichment of randomly distributed SiCO[subsc...

  15. Structural characteristics of copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by microwave plasma-assisted deposition processes from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Cu/a-C:H) composite films have been deposited on silicon substrates by a hybrid technique combining microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and sputter-deposition from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures. The major objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the carbon gas precursor on the structural characteristics of Cu/a-C:H composite films deposited at ambient temperature. The major characteristics of CH4-argon and C2H2-argon plasmas were analyzed by Langmuir probe measurements. The composition of films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, energy recoil detection analyses and nuclear reaction analyses. The carbon content in the films was observed to vary in the range 20-77 at.% and 7.5-99 at.% as the CH4 and C2H2 concentrations in the gas phase increased from 10 to 100%, respectively. The atom number ratio H/C in the films was scattered approximately 0.4 whatever the carbon gas precursor used. The crystallographic structure and the size of copper crystallites incorporated in the a-C were determined by X-ray diffraction techniques. The copper crystallite size decreased from 20 nm in pure copper films to less than 5 nm in Cu/a-C:H films containing more than 40 at.% of carbon. Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to investigate the size distribution and distance of copper crystallites as functions of the deposition parameters. The structural characteristics of copper crystallites were dependent on the hydrocarbon gas precursor used. The crystallite size and the width of the size distribution were homogeneous in films deposited from CH4. Copper crystallites with an anisotropic shape were found in films deposited from C2H2. The major radicals formed in the plasma and condensed on the surface of growing films, namely CH and C2H radicals for films produced from CH4 and C2H2, respectively, play probably a crucial role in the growth

  16. Novel supercritical carbon dioxide impregnation technique for the production of amorphous solid drug dispersions: a comparison to hot melt extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Catherine; Tian, Yiwei; Walker, Gavin; McCoy, Colin; Hornsby, Peter; Donnelly, Conor; Jones, David S; Andrews, Gavin P

    2015-05-01

    The formulation of BCS Class II drugs as amorphous solid dispersions has been shown to provide advantages with respect to improving the aqueous solubility of these compounds. While hot melt extrusion (HME) and spray drying (SD) are among the most common methods for the production of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs), the high temperatures often required for HME can restrict the processing of thermally labile drugs, while the use of toxic organic solvents during SD can impact on end-product toxicity. In this study, we investigated the potential of supercritical fluid impregnation (SFI) using carbon dioxide as an alternative process for ASD production of a model poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin (INM). In doing so, we produced ASDs without the use of organic solvents and at temperatures considerably lower than those required for HME. Previous studies have concentrated on the characterization of ASDs produced using HME or SFI but have not considered both processes together. Dispersions were manufactured using two different polymers, Soluplus and polyvinylpyrrolidone K15 using both SFI and HME and characterized for drug morphology, homogeneity, presence of drug-polymer interactions, glass transition temperature, amorphous stability of the drug within the formulation, and nonsink drug release to measure the ability of each formulation to create a supersaturated drug solution. Fully amorphous dispersions were successfully produced at 50% w/w drug loading using HME and 30% w/w drug loading using SFI. For both polymers, formulations containing 50% w/w INM, manufactured via SFI, contained the drug in the γ-crystalline form. Interestingly, there were lower levels of crystallinity in PVP dispersions relative to SOL. FTIR was used to probe for the presence of drug-polymer interactions within both polymer systems. For PVP systems, the nature of these interactions depended upon processing method; however, for Soluplus formulations this was not the case. The area under

  17. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán de Villoria, R; Figueredo, S L; Hart, A J; Steiner, S A; Slocum, A H; Wardle, B L

    2009-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al2O3 catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of approximately 1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s(-1). Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport. PMID:19752503

  18. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al2O3 catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of ∼1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s-1. Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport.

  19. Enhancing the Properties of Carbon and Gold Substrates by Surface Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Anne Harnisch

    2002-06-27

    The properties of both carbon and gold substrates are easily affected by the judicious choice of a surface modification protocol. Several such processes for altering surface composition have been published in literature. The research presented in this thesis primarily focuses on the development of on-column methods to modify carbon stationary phases used in electrochemically modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC). To this end, both porous graphitic carbon (PGC) and glassy carbon (GC) particles have been modified on-column by the electroreduction of arenediazonium salts and the oxidation of arylacetate anions (the Kolbe reaction). Once modified, the carbon stationary phases show enhanced chromatographic performance both in conventional liquid chromatographic columns and EMLC columns. Additionally, one may also exploit the creation of aryl films to by electroreduction of arenediazonium salts in the creation of nanostructured materials. The formation of mercaptobenzene film on the surface of a GC electrode provides a linking platform for the chemisorption of gold nanoparticles. After deposition of nanoparticles, the surface chemistry of the gold can be further altered by self-assembled monolayer (SAM) formation via the chemisorption of a second thiol species. Finally, the properties of gold films can be altered such that they display carbon-like behavior through the formation of benzenehexathiol (BHT) SAMs. BHT chemisorbs to the gold surface in a previously unprecedented planar fashion. Carbon and gold substrates can be chemically altered by several methodologies resulting in new surface properties. The development of modification protocols and their application in the analytical arena is considered herein.

  20. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) obtained through chemical vapor deposition assisted by plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) were deposited using one source of microwave plasma with magnetic field (type ECR), using mixtures of H2/CH4 in relationship of 80/20 and 95/05 as precursory gases, with work pressures of 4X10-4 to 6x10-4 Torr and an incident power of the discharge of microwaves with a constant value of 400 W. It was analyzed the influence among the properties of the films, as the deposit rate, the composition and the bonding types, and the deposit conditions, such as the flow rates of the precursory gases and the polarization voltage of the sample holders. (Author)

  1. Structural and Physical Characteristics of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films Deposited Using a Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, You; Nagano, Akira; Ohtani, Ryota; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Sumitani, Kazushi; Agawa, Yoshiaki; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2010-01-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were formed without initial nucleation using a coaxial arc plasma gun. The UNCD crystallite diameters estimated from the X-ray diffraction peaks were approximately 2 nm. The Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum exhibited an intense sp3-CH peak that might originate from the grain boundaries between UNCD crystallites whose dangling bonds are terminated with hydrogen atoms. A narrow sp3 peak in the photoemission spectrum implied that the film comprises a large number of UNCD crystallites. Large optical absorption coefficients at photon energies larger than 3 eV that might be due to the grain boundaries are specific to the UNCD/a-C:H films.

  2. Gas barrier properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films coated on polymers by surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas barrier characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin films coated on polymer sheets using the large-area surface-wave plasma (SWP) were studied. With SWP in He and CH4 gas mixture, a-C:H films were deposited over about 100 mm in diameter on high density polyethylene or polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets at temperature less than 70 deg. C. Experimental results show that gas permeation in the case of a-C:H film coating on PET sheet was reduced by a factor of more than 150 (0.27 cm3/m2 day atm), compared with that before coating. Plasma characteristics of SWP, such as electron density and electron energy distribution functions, and other film characteristics measured with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope are presented and discussed

  3. Amorphous to crystalline phase transition in carbon induced by intense femtosecond x-ray free-electron laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results of an experiment where amorphous carbon undergoes a phase transition induced by femtosecond 830 eV x-ray free-electron laser pulses. The phase transition threshold fluence is found to be 282 ± 11 mJ/cm2. Atomic force microscopy, photoelectron microscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy give experimental evidence for the phase transition in terms of a volume expansion, graphitization, and change of local order of the irradiated sample area. The interaction is modeled by an accurate time-dependent treatment of the ionization dynamics coupled to a two-temperature model. At the phase transition fluence threshold the free-electron density Ne is found to be at maximum 9 * 1020 cm-3 while the ion (atom) temperature is found to be 1050 K, e.g., above the crystallization activation temperature reported in the literature. This low ionization rate and high atom temperature suggest a thermally activated phase transition. (authors)

  4. Amorphous to crystalline phase transition in carbon induced by intense femtosecond x-ray free-electron laser pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaudin, J.; Peyrusse, O.; Chalupský, Jaromír; Toufarová, Martina; Vyšín, Luděk; Hájková, Věra; Sobierajski, R.; Burian, Tomáš; Dastjani-Farahani, S.; Graf, A.; Amati, M.; Gregoratti, L.; Hau-Riege, S.P.; Hoffmann, G.; Juha, Libor; Krzywinski, J.; London, R.A.; Moeller, S.; Sinn, H.; Schorb, S.; Störmer, M.; Tschentscher, T.; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Vu, H.; Bozek, J.; Bostedt, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 2 (2012), "024103-1"-"024103-7". ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1312; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0087 Grant ostatní: OP VK 2 LaserGen(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0087 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : amorphous carbon * phase transition * graphitization * x-ray laser * free-electron laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012

  5. Removal of a hydrogenated amorphous carbon film from the tip of a micropipette electrode using direct current corona discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Naoto; Okuyama, Naoki; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-02-01

    Micropipette electrodes are fabricated by coating glass micropipettes first with metal and then with hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) as an electrical insulator. Furthermore, at the tip of the micropipette electrode, the deposited a-C:H film needs to be removed to expose the metal-coated surface and hollow for the purposes of electrical measurement and injection. This paper describes a convenient and reliable method for removing the a-C:H film using direct current corona discharge in atmospheric air. The initial film removal occurred at an applied voltage of 1.5-2.0 kV, accompanied by an abrupt increase in the discharge current. The discharge current then became stable at a microampere level in the glow corona mode, and the removed area gradually extended. PMID:20192514

  6. Structural and band tail state photoluminescence properties of amorphous SiC films with different amounts of carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Guang-Sheng; Wang Xin-Zhan; Lu Wan-Bing; Dai Wan-Le; Li Xing-Kuo; Yu Wei

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films are deposited by the plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique,and optical emissions from the near-infrared to the visible are obtained.The optical band gap of the films increases from 1.91 eV to 2.92 eV by increasing the carbon content,and the photoluminescence (PL) peak shifts from 1.51 eV to 2.16 eV.The band tail state PL mechanism is confirmed by analysing the optical band gap,PL intensity,the Stocks shift of the PL,and the Urbach energy of the film.The PL decay times of the samples are in the nanosecond scale,and the dependence of the PL lifetime on the emission energy also supports that the optical emission is related to the radiative recombination in the band tail state.

  7. Facile synthesis and high anode performance of carbon fiber-interwoven amorphous nano-SiOx/graphene for rechargeable lithium batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dan Thien; Nguyen, Cao Cuong; Kim, Jong-Seon; Kim, Je Young; Song, Seung-Wan

    2013-11-13

    We present the first report on carbon fiber-interwoven amorphous nano-SiOx/graphene prepared by a simple and facile room temperature synthesis of amorphous SiOx nanoparticles using silica, followed by their homogeneous dispersion with graphene nanosheets and carbon fibers in room temperature aqueous solution. Transmission and scanning electron microscopic imaging reveal that amorphous SiOx primary nanoparticles are 20-30 nm in diameter and carbon fibers are interwoven throughout the secondary particles of 200-300 nm, connecting SiOx nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets. Carbon fiber-interwoven nano-SiO0.37/graphene electrode exhibits impressive cycling performance and rate-capability up to 5C when evaluated as a rechargeable lithium battery anode, delivering discharge capacities of 1579-1263 mAhg(-1) at the C/5 rate with capacity retention of 80% and Coulombic efficiencies of 99% over 50 cycles, and nearly sustained microstructure. The cycling performance is attributed to synergetic effects of amorphous nano-SiOx, strain-tolerant robust microstructure with maintained particle connectivity and enhanced electrical conductivity. PMID:24111701

  8. Effects of prolonged illumination with white light on the photo-response of carbon-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon photo-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the photo-response behaviour of carbon-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon photo-detectors over 2800 h of continuous illumination with white light is presented. Both direct and inverse Staebler–Wronski effects are observed in the data.

  9. MnO2-Based Electrochemical Supercapacitors on Flexible Carbon Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadjer, Marko J.; Mastro, Michael A.; Rojo, José M.; Mojena, Alberto Boscá; Calle, Fernando; Kub, Francis J.; Eddy, Charles R.

    2014-04-01

    Manganese dioxide films were grown on large area flexible carbon aerogel substrates. Characterization by x-ray diffraction confirmed α-MnO2 growth. Three types of films were compared as a function of hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) concentration during growth. The highest concentration of HM TA produced MnO2 flower-like films, as observed by scanning electron microscopy, whose thickness and surface coverage lead to both a higher specific capacitance and higher series resistance. Specific capacitance was measured to be 64 F/g using a galvanostatic setup, compared to the 47 F/g-specific capacitance of the carbon aerogel substrate. Such supercapacitor devices can be fabricated on large area sheets of carbon aerogel to achieve high total capacitance.

  10. Structural stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon overcoats used in heat-assisted magnetic recording investigated by rapid thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films are extensively used as protective overcoats of magnetic recording media. Increasing demands for even higher storage densities have necessitated the development of new storage technologies, such as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which uses laser-assisted heating to record data on high-stability media that can store single bits in extremely small areas (∼1 Tbit/in.2). Because HAMR relies on locally changing the coercivity of the magnetic medium by raising the temperature above the Curie temperature for data to be stored by the magnetic write field, it raises a concern about the structural stability of the ultrathin a-C film. In this study, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments were performed to examine the thermal stability of ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Structural changes in the a-C:H films caused by RTA were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and conductive atomic force microscopy. The results show that the films exhibit thermal stability up to a maximum temperature in the range of 400-450 °C. Heating above this critical temperature leads to hydrogen depletion and sp 2 clustering. The critical temperature determined by the results of this study represents an upper bound of the temperature rise due to laser heating in HAMR hard-disk drives and the Curie temperature of magnetic materials used in HAMR hard disks. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  11. A simple chemical synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes–MnO2 flake hybrids for cold cathode application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Amorphous carbon nanotubes (aCNTs) have been synthesized chemically. • The walls of the aCNTs have been anchored by MnO2 nanoflakes. • It is seen for the first time that MnO2 modified aCNTs show much better field emission property. • Experimental result has also been supported theoretically. • This can acts as doorstep to develop a new hybrid system as a novel cold cathode material. - Abstract: A simple approach has been implemented to synthesize amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) and manganese oxide (MnO2) hybrid nanostructure at temperature as low as ∼250 °C in open atmosphere. Microscopic studies of the samples revealed that the walls of the a-CNTs were coated uniformly by MnO2 nanoflakes. The composition of the as prepared sample was studied with the help of energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electron field emission study was done in a custom built high vacuum field emission setup for the prepared a-CNT and manganese oxide (MnO2) hybrid nanostructure. It is seen that the performance of the a-CNTs as cold cathode emitter has been enhanced greatly when MnO2 nanoflakes were coated uniformly over it. The turn on field has been reduced from 7.17 to value as low as 3.82 V/mm with enhancement factor increases from 2428 to 6965. Finite element based simulation study theoretically confirms the enhancement of field emission properties of as prepared MnO2 nanoflake coated a-CNTs. The results have been explained due to enhanced surface roughness leading to higher enhancement factor and overall increase of emission sites

  12. A simple chemical synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes–MnO{sub 2} flake hybrids for cold cathode application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Sourav [Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Banerjee, Diptonil; Das, Nirmalya Sankar [School of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar, E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); School of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous carbon nanotubes (aCNTs) have been synthesized chemically. • The walls of the aCNTs have been anchored by MnO{sub 2} nanoflakes. • It is seen for the first time that MnO{sub 2} modified aCNTs show much better field emission property. • Experimental result has also been supported theoretically. • This can acts as doorstep to develop a new hybrid system as a novel cold cathode material. - Abstract: A simple approach has been implemented to synthesize amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) and manganese oxide (MnO{sub 2}) hybrid nanostructure at temperature as low as ∼250 °C in open atmosphere. Microscopic studies of the samples revealed that the walls of the a-CNTs were coated uniformly by MnO{sub 2} nanoflakes. The composition of the as prepared sample was studied with the help of energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electron field emission study was done in a custom built high vacuum field emission setup for the prepared a-CNT and manganese oxide (MnO{sub 2}) hybrid nanostructure. It is seen that the performance of the a-CNTs as cold cathode emitter has been enhanced greatly when MnO{sub 2} nanoflakes were coated uniformly over it. The turn on field has been reduced from 7.17 to value as low as 3.82 V/mm with enhancement factor increases from 2428 to 6965. Finite element based simulation study theoretically confirms the enhancement of field emission properties of as prepared MnO{sub 2} nanoflake coated a-CNTs. The results have been explained due to enhanced surface roughness leading to higher enhancement factor and overall increase of emission sites.

  13. Biological characteristics of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells on composite tantalum carbide/amorphous carbon films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Yu Chang

    Full Text Available Tantalum (Ta is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C, was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics.

  14. Biological characteristics of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells on composite tantalum carbide/amorphous carbon films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yin-Yu; Huang, Heng-Li; Chen, Ya-Chi; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Tsai, Ming-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC) and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C), was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics. PMID:24760085

  15. Thermal dehydrogenation of amorphous silicon deposited on c-Si: Effect of the substrate temperature during deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Calheiros Velozo, A. [Dept. de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico (UTL), Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lavareda, G. [Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia (UNL), 2825-114 Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Tecnologias e Sistemas, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia (UNL), 2825-114 Caparica (Portugal); Nunes de Carvalho, C. [Dept. de Ciencia dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia (UNL), 2825-114 Caparica (Portugal); Inst. Ciencia e Eng. de Materiais e Superficies, Instituto Superior Tecnico (UTL), Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Amaral, A. [Dept. de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico (UTL), Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Inst. Ciencia e Eng. de Materiais e Superficies, Instituto Superior Tecnico (UTL), Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-10-15

    Samples of doped and undoped a-Si:H were deposited at temperatures ranging from 100 C to 350 C and then submitted to different dehydrogenation temperatures (from 350 C to 550 C) and times (from 1 h to 4 h). a-Si:H films were characterised after deposition through the measurements of specific material parameters such as: the optical gap, the conductivity at 25 C, the thermal activation energy of conductivity and its hydrogen content. Hydrogen content was measured after each thermal treatment. Substrate dopant contamination from phosphorus-doped a-Si thin films was evaluated by SIMS after complete dehydrogenation and a junction depth of 0.1 mm was obtained. Dehydrogenation results show a strong dependence of the hydrogen content of the as-deposited film on the deposition temperature. Nevertheless, the dehydrogenation temperature seems to determine the final H content in a way almost independent from the initial content in the sample. H richer films dehydrogenate faster than films with lower hydrogen concentration (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Surface morphology and grain analysis of successively industrially grown amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catena, Alberto [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); McJunkin, Thomas [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 43210 Columbus, Ohio (United States); Agnello, Simonpietro; Gelardi, Franco M. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Palermo, 90100 Palermo (Italy); Wehner, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); Fischer, Christian B., E-mail: chrbfischer@uni-koblenz.de [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two different a-C:H coatings in various thicknesses on Si (1 0 0) have been studied. • For both types no significant difference in surface morphology is detectable. • The grain number with respect to their height appears randomly distributed. • In average no grain higher than 14 nm and larger than 0.05 μm{sup 2} was observed. • A height to area correlation confines all detected grains to a limited region. - Abstract: Silicon (1 0 0) has been gradually covered by amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films via an industrial process. Two types of these diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, one more flexible (f-DLC) and one more robust (r-DLC), have been investigated. Both types have been grown by a radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique with acetylene plasma. Surface morphologies have been studied in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the DLC structure. Both types appeared to have very similar morphology and sp{sup 2} carbon arrangement. The average height and area for single grains have been analyzed for all depositions. A random distribution of grain heights was found for both types. The individual grain structures between the f- and r-type revealed differences: the shape for the f-DLC grains is steeper than for the r-DLC grains. By correlating the average grain heights to the average grain areas for all depositions a limited region is identified, suggesting a certain regularity during the DLC deposition mechanisms that confines both values. A growth of the sp{sup 2} carbon entities for high r-DLC depositions is revealed and connected to a structural rearrangement of carbon atom hybridizations and hydrogen content in the DLC structure.

  17. Surface morphology and grain analysis of successively industrially grown amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two different a-C:H coatings in various thicknesses on Si (1 0 0) have been studied. • For both types no significant difference in surface morphology is detectable. • The grain number with respect to their height appears randomly distributed. • In average no grain higher than 14 nm and larger than 0.05 μm2 was observed. • A height to area correlation confines all detected grains to a limited region. - Abstract: Silicon (1 0 0) has been gradually covered by amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films via an industrial process. Two types of these diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, one more flexible (f-DLC) and one more robust (r-DLC), have been investigated. Both types have been grown by a radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique with acetylene plasma. Surface morphologies have been studied in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the DLC structure. Both types appeared to have very similar morphology and sp2 carbon arrangement. The average height and area for single grains have been analyzed for all depositions. A random distribution of grain heights was found for both types. The individual grain structures between the f- and r-type revealed differences: the shape for the f-DLC grains is steeper than for the r-DLC grains. By correlating the average grain heights to the average grain areas for all depositions a limited region is identified, suggesting a certain regularity during the DLC deposition mechanisms that confines both values. A growth of the sp2 carbon entities for high r-DLC depositions is revealed and connected to a structural rearrangement of carbon atom hybridizations and hydrogen content in the DLC structure

  18. The wetting behaviour of silver on carbon, pure and carburized nickel, cobalt and molybdenum substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity or the expansion behaviour of silver matrix composites with carbon based inclusions are strongly affected by the contact angle between carbon and silver. In order to promote wetting of carbon, insertion of metallic interlayers such as nickel, cobalt or molybdenum is a feasible approach. This paper presents contact angle measurements done with the sessile drop method on carbon substrates (glassy carbon, polycrystalline graphite) and on pure nickel, cobalt and molybdenum foils. The ability of these interlayer elements to lower the high contact angles of silver on glassy carbon (117 deg.) and polycrystalline graphite (124 deg.) under vacuum conditions was verified. Unlike nickel (30 deg.) and cobalt (26 deg.), molybdenum (107 deg.) nevertheless was not wettable by liquid silver (at 1273 K) under vacuum conditions. ToF-SIMS was used to identify oxygen on the surface, causing higher contact angles than expected. After oxide reduction a contact angle of 18 deg. on molybdenum was detected. Furthermore, the influence of carbon diffusion on the contact angle was investigated by gas phase carburization of the metal foils. ToF-SIMS and XRD identified dissolved carbon (Ni, Co) and carbide formation (Mo). However, only nickel and cobalt showed a slight decrease of the contact angle due to carbon uptake.

  19. Efficient field emission from coiled carbon nano/microfiber on copper substrate by dc-PECVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystalline coiled carbon nano/micro fibers in thin film form have been synthesized via direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on copper substrates with acetylene as a carbon precursor at 10 mbar pressure and 750 deg. C substrate temperature. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD pattern as well as selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern showed that the samples were crystalline in nature. SEM and HRTEM studies showed that as synthesized coiled carbon fibers are having average diameter ∼100 nm and are several micrometers in length. The as-prepared samples showed moderately good electron field emission properties with a turn-on field as low as 1.96 V/μm for an inter-electrode distance 220 μm. The variation of field emission properties with inter-electrode distance has been studied in detail. The field emission properties of the coiled carbon fibrous thin films are compared with that of crystalline multiwalled carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanostructures.

  20. Peptide Induced Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate on Wrinkle Patterned Substrate: Implications for Chitin Formation in Molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M. Weiss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We here present the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate under the influence of synthetic peptides on topographically patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS substrates, which have a controlled density of defects between the wrinkles. Experiments with two lysine-rich peptides derived from the extracellular conserved domain E22 of the mollusc chitin synthase Ar-CS1, AKKKKKAS (AS8 and EEKKKKKES (ES9 on these substrates showed their influence on the calcium carbonate morphology. A transition from polycrystalline composites to single crystalline phases was achieved with the peptide AS8 by changing the pH of the buffer solution. We analyzed three different pH values as previous experiments showed that E22 interacts with aragonite biominerals more strongly at pH 7.75 than at pH 9.0. At any given pH, crystals appeared in characteristic morphologies only on wrinkled substrates, and did not occur on the flat, wrinkle-free PDMS substrate. These results suggest that these wrinkled substrates could be useful for controlling the morphologies of other mineral/peptide and mineral/protein composites. In nature, these templates are formed enzymatically by glycosyltransferases containing pH-sensitive epitopes, similar to the peptides investigated here. Our in vitro test systems may be useful to gain understanding of the formation of distinct 3D morphologies in mollusc shells in response to local pH shifts during the mineralization of organic templates.

  1. Formation, Structure and Properties of Amorphous Carbon Char from Polymer Materials in Extreme Atmospheric Reentry Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbonaceous char produced from the pyrolysis of polymer solids has many desirable properties for ablative heat shields for space vehicles. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to study the transformation of the local atomic structure from virgin polymer to a dense, disordered char [1]. Release of polymer hydrogen is found to be critical to allow the system to collapse into a highly coordinated char structure. Mechanisms of the char formation process and the morphology of the resulting structures are elucidated. Thermal conductivity and mechanical response of the resulting char are evaluated [2]. During reenty, the optical response and oxidative reactivity of char are also important properties. Results of ab initio computations of char optical functions [3] and char reactivity [4] are also presented.

  2. Hydrogen reverses the clustering tendency of carbon in amorphous silicon oxycarbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hepeng; Demkowicz, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) is of great technological interest. However, its atomic-level structure is not well understood. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the clustering tendency of C atoms in SiOC is extremely sensitive to hydrogen (H): without H, the C-C interaction is attractive, leading to enrichment of aggregated SiC4 tetrahedral units; with hydrogen, the C-C interaction is repulsive, leading to enrichment of randomly distributed SiCO3 tetrahedral units. Our results suggest that conflicting experimental characterizations of C distributions may be due to differing amounts of H present in the samples investigated. Our work also opens a path for tailoring the properties of SiOC by using the total H content to control the C distribution. PMID:26269200

  3. Excitation of the aromatic infrared emission bands: Chemical energy in hydrogenated amorphous carbon particles?

    CERN Document Server

    Duley, Walter W

    2011-01-01

    We outline a model for the heating of hydrogenated amorphous (HAC) dust via the release of stored chemical energy and show that this energy (~12 kJ/mole) is sufficient to heat dust grains of classical size (50-1000 {\\AA}) to temperatures at which they can emit at 3.3 {\\mu}m and other "UIR" wavelengths. Using laboratory data, we show that this heating process is consistent with a concentration of a few percent of dangling bonds in HAC and may be initiated by the recombination of trapped H atoms. We suggest that the release of chemical energy from dust represents an additional source of excitation for the UIR bands relaxing the previous requirement that only stochastically heated molecules having fewer than ~ 50 atoms can produce emission at 3.3 {\\mu}m.

  4. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical and experimental results. The thickness of a-C films deposited at different incidence angles was investigated in the light of Monte Carlo simulations, and the calculated depth profiles were compared with those obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The topography and structure of the a-C films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The film thickness decreased with the increase of the incidence angle, while the surface roughness increased and the content of tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp 3) decreased significantly with the increase of the incidence angle above 45° , measured from the surface normal. TEM, AFM, and XPS results indicate that the smoothest and thinnest a-C films with the highest content of sp 3 carbon bonding were produced for an incidence angle of 45°. The findings of this study have direct implications in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording, where ultrathin and smooth a-C films with high sp 3 contents are of critical importance. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. An ab initio study of the nickel-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon into graphene in rapid thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Lu, Yong Feng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are employed to investigate the chemical mechanism underlying the Ni-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon (a-C) into graphene in the rapid thermal processing (RTP) experiment to directly grow graphene on various dielectric surfaces via the evaporation of surplus Ni and C at 1100 °C (below the melting point of bulk Ni). It is found that the a-C-to-graphene transformation entails the metal-induced crystallization and layer exchange mechanism, rather than the conventional dissolution/precipitation mechanism typically involved in Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. The multi-layer graphene can be tuned by changing the relative thicknesses of deposited a-C and Ni thin films. Our AIMD simulations suggest that the easy evaporation of surplus Ni with excess C is likely attributed to the formation of a viscous-liquid-like Ni-C solution within the temperature range of 900-1800 K and to the faster diffusion of C atoms than that of Ni atoms above 600 K. Even at room temperature, sp3-C atoms in a-C are quickly converted to sp2-C atoms in the course of the simulation, and the graphitic C formation can occur at low temperature. When the temperature is as high as 1200 K, the grown graphitic structures reversely dissolve into Ni. Because the rate of temperature increase is considerably faster in the AIMD simulations than in realistic experiments, defects in the grown graphitic structures are kinetically trapped. In this kinetic growth stage, the carbon structures grown from sp3-carbon or from sp2-carbon exhibit marked differences.Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are employed to investigate the chemical mechanism underlying the Ni-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon (a-C) into graphene in the rapid thermal processing (RTP) experiment to directly grow graphene on various dielectric surfaces via the evaporation of surplus Ni and C at 1100 °C (below the melting point of bulk

  6. Growth of Few-Layer Graphene on Sapphire Substrates by Directly Depositing Carbon Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Chao-Yang; TANG Jun; LIU Zhong-Liang; LI Li-Min; YAN Wen-Sheng; WEI Shi-Qiang; XU Peng-Shou

    2011-01-01

    Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber.The reflection high energy diffraction,Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample,which confirm the formation of graphene layers.The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2 nm and the layer number is about 2-3.The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated a-SiC surface.Graphene,a monolayer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms,is a quasi two-dimensional (2D) material.It has attracted great interest because of its distinctive band structure and physical properties.[1] Graphene can now be obtained by several different approaches including micromechanical[1] and chemical[2] exfoliation of graphite,epitaxial growth on hexagonal SiC substrates by Si sublimation in vacuum,[3] and CVD growth on metal substrates.[4] However,these preparation methods need special substrates,otherwise,in order to design microelectronic devices,the prepared graphene should be transferred to other appropriate substrates.Thus the growth of graphene on the suitable substrates is motivated.%Few-layer graphene (FLG) is successfully grown on sapphire substrates by directly depositing carbon atoms at the substrate temperature of 1300℃ in a molecular beam epitaxy chamber. The reflection high energy diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure are used to characterize the sample, which confirm the formation of graphene layers. The mean domain size of FLG is around 29.2nm and the layer number is about 2-3. The results demonstrate that the grown FLG displays a turbostratic stacking structure similar to that of the FLG produced by annealing C-terminated α-SiC surface.

  7. An ab initio study of the nickel-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon into graphene in rapid thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Lu, Yong Feng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-05-14

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are employed to investigate the chemical mechanism underlying the Ni-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon (a-C) into graphene in the rapid thermal processing (RTP) experiment to directly grow graphene on various dielectric surfaces via the evaporation of surplus Ni and C at 1100 °C (below the melting point of bulk Ni). It is found that the a-C-to-graphene transformation entails the metal-induced crystallization and layer exchange mechanism, rather than the conventional dissolution/precipitation mechanism typically involved in Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. The multi-layer graphene can be tuned by changing the relative thicknesses of deposited a-C and Ni thin films. Our AIMD simulations suggest that the easy evaporation of surplus Ni with excess C is likely attributed to the formation of a viscous-liquid-like Ni-C solution within the temperature range of 900-1800 K and to the faster diffusion of C atoms than that of Ni atoms above 600 K. Even at room temperature, sp(3)-C atoms in a-C are quickly converted to sp(2)-C atoms in the course of the simulation, and the graphitic C formation can occur at low temperature. When the temperature is as high as 1200 K, the grown graphitic structures reversely dissolve into Ni. Because the rate of temperature increase is considerably faster in the AIMD simulations than in realistic experiments, defects in the grown graphitic structures are kinetically trapped. In this kinetic growth stage, the carbon structures grown from sp(3)-carbon or from sp(2)-carbon exhibit marked differences. PMID:27117235

  8. Stable carbon isotope analysis of nucleic acids to trace sources of dissolved substrates used by estuarine bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Coffin, R B; Velinsky, D J; R. Devereux; Price, W A; Cifuentes, L A

    1990-01-01

    The natural abundance of stable carbon isotopes measured in bacterial nucleic acids extracted from estuarine bacterial concentrates was used to trace sources of organic matter for bacteria in aquatic environments. The stable carbon isotope ratios of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and nucleic acids extracted from cultures resembled those of the carbon source on which bacteria were grown. The carbon isotope discrimination between the substrate and total cell carbon from bacterial cultures averaged 2.3%...

  9. Synthesis of carbon nanofibers on impregnated powdered activated carbon as cheap substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Mamun, A. A.; Y.M. Ahmed; S.A. Muyibi; M.F.R. Al-Khatib; A.T. Jameel; M.A. AlSaadi

    2016-01-01

    The catalysis and characterization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) composite are reported in this work. Carbon nanofibers were produced on oil palm shell powdered activated carbon (PAC), which was impregnated with nickel. Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) of C2H2 was used in the presence of hydrogen at ∼650 °C. The flow rates of carbon source and hydrogen were fixed. The CNFs formed directly on the surface of the impregnated PAC. Variable weight percentages (1%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 9%) of the catalyst s...

  10. All-carbon-based field effect transistors fabricated by aerosol jet printing on flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An all-carbon-based field effect transistor (FET) was fabricated on flexible polyethylene terephthalate substrates by the aerosol jet printing method described in this paper. Three different types of homogeneous conductive inks were made and then printed layer-by-layer to form the FET chips. The conducting-reduced graphene oxide was used as electrodes (source and drain) and channel, respectively. Graphene oxide was used as dielectrics while multi-walled carbon nanotubes acted as the gate electrode. The all-carbon-based FET shows a good mobility of 350 cm2 (V s)–1 at a drain bias of −1 V. This simple and novel method explores a promising way to fabricate all-carbon-based, flexible and low-cost electronic devices. (paper)

  11. Inductively coupled plasma etching of chemical-vapor-deposited amorphous carbon in N2/H2/Ar chemistries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we investigated the etching characteristics and the mechanism of an amorphous carbon (a-C) layer for a multi-level resist (MLR) structure. CVD (chemical-vapor-deposited) a-C layers with a SiO2 hard-mask were etched in an ICP (inductively coupled plasma) etcher while varying the process parameters, such as the top electrode power, the bottom electrode power, and the gas flow ratio in the N2/H2/Ar plasma. The results indicated that the etch rate and the profile angle of the CVD a-C increased with increasing H2 gas flow ratio in the N2/H2/Ar plasma. As the H2 flow ratio increased, the etch rate and the profile angle increase, due to the increased formation of H radicals in the plasma, leading to enhanced chemical reactions with carbon atoms. Also, the etch rate of the CVD a-C increased with increasing top and bottom electrode powers.

  12. Synthesis, characterization and microwave absorption properties of dendrite-like Fe3O4 embedded within amorphous sugar carbon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Liuding; Wu, Hongjing

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite dendrites/sugar carbon (MDs/SC) nanocomposites, embedding MDs within amorphous SC matrix, were prepared by simple carbonization-reduction method using α-Fe2O3 dendrites (HDs) as precursor of MDs and sucrose as SC source, while still maintain the dendritic shape of the precursor. The morphology, composition, structure and static magnetic properties of the as-prepared MDs/SC nanocomposites were characterized by various techniques thoroughly. Particularly, the electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties of the MDs/SC and MDs paraffin composites (40 wt.%) were compared over 2-14 GHz. The results show that the microwave absorption performance of MDs/SC samples is comparable or even superior to that of MDs case. The absorption band with reflection loss (RL) below -20 dB for one of the MDs/SC samples can cover the whole X-band (8-12 GHz) with thickness of 1.8-2.4 mm when the content of MDs in the MDs/SC nanocomposite is 25.8 wt.%, and the minimum RL can reach -49.9 dB at 12.1 GHz when the layer thickness is only 1.9 mm. The excellent microwave absorption properties of the MDs/SC paraffin composites are attributed to the proper match between the complex permittivity and permeability, and the unique fractal structures of MDs.

  13. Stopping power and energy straggling of protons in graphite and amorphous carbon obtained from a resonance in BS spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosaki, Mitsuo [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: tosaki@barium.rirc.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Isozumi, Yasuhito [Radioisotope Research Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Backscattering (BS) spectra with a sharp 4.8-MeV resonance for carbon targets have been measured using proton beams in an energy range 4.85-6.1 MeV per 100-keV step. By systematic analyses of the resonance peak profiles, values of stopping power and energy straggling have been deduced for proton energies from 0.8 to 3.4 MeV which corresponds to a penetration depth of 88 {mu}m. In particular, to investigate the difference in stopping power and straggling caused by target inhomogeneity, we used two target materials which were highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG, 2.26 g/cm{sup 3}) as a homogeneous material and amorphous carbon (1.73 g/cm{sup 3}) as an inhomogeneous material. We describe a method of measuring stopping power and straggling using a resonance in the BS spectra. The stopping powers obtained are compared with the values determined by SRIM-2006. Moreover, collision straggling and a density straggling due to the inhomogeneity of the target materials are evaluated from the width broadening of resonance peaks.

  14. Stopping power and energy straggling of protons in graphite and amorphous carbon obtained from a resonance in BS spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backscattering (BS) spectra with a sharp 4.8-MeV resonance for carbon targets have been measured using proton beams in an energy range 4.85-6.1 MeV per 100-keV step. By systematic analyses of the resonance peak profiles, values of stopping power and energy straggling have been deduced for proton energies from 0.8 to 3.4 MeV which corresponds to a penetration depth of 88 μm. In particular, to investigate the difference in stopping power and straggling caused by target inhomogeneity, we used two target materials which were highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG, 2.26 g/cm3) as a homogeneous material and amorphous carbon (1.73 g/cm3) as an inhomogeneous material. We describe a method of measuring stopping power and straggling using a resonance in the BS spectra. The stopping powers obtained are compared with the values determined by SRIM-2006. Moreover, collision straggling and a density straggling due to the inhomogeneity of the target materials are evaluated from the width broadening of resonance peaks.

  15. Mechanical properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films fabricated on polyethylene terephthalate foils by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition. The influence of deposition parameters such as gas pressure, bias voltage, and nitrogen incorporation on the mechanical properties of the a-C:H films are investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the ratio of sp3 to sp2 is 0.24 indicating that the film is mainly composed of graphitelike carbon. Nanoindentation tests disclose enhanced surface hardness of ∼6 GPa. The friction coefficient of the film deposited at higher gas pressure, for instance, 2.0 Pa, is lower than that of the film deposited at a lower pressure such as 0.5 Pa. The films deposited using a low bias voltage tend to fail easily in the friction tests and nitrogen incorporation into the a-C:H films decreases the friction coefficient. Mechanical folding tests show that deformation failure is worse on a thinner a-C:H film

  16. Designed synthesis of tunable amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) by a novel route and their oxidation resistance properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Longlong Xu; Yifu Zhang; Xiongzhi Zhang; Yu Huang; Xiaoyu Tan; Chi Huang; Xiao Mei; Fei Niu; Changgong Meng; Gongzhen Cheng

    2014-10-01

    Tunable amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were successfully synthesized using V3O7.H2O and glucose solution as the starting materials by a novel route for the first time. The as-obtained samples were separately characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR) and Raman spectrum. The results showed that the as-obtained a-CNTs had uniform diameters with outer diameter ranging from 140 to 250 nm and inner diameter about 28 nm on an average, and their length was up to several micrometres. No VO residues remaining in a-CNTs showed the as-obtained a-CNTs with high purity. The as-prepared a-CNTs were a kind of hydrogenated a-CNTs containing both the 3- and 2-type carbons. Furthermore, the thermal stability of the as-obtained a-CNTs in the air atmosphere were investigated by thermo-gravimetric/differential thermal analyser (TG-DTA), revealing that the as-obtained a-CNTs had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 300 °C in air.

  17. Deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an element, carbon is rather unique and offers a range of rare opportunities for the design and fabrication of zero-, one-, two-, and three-dimensional nanostructured novel materials and coatings such as fullerenes, nanotubes, thin films, and free-standing nano-to-macroscale structures. Among these, carbon-based two-dimensional thin films (such as diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC)) have attracted an overwhelming interest in recent years, mainly because of their exceptional physical, chemical, mechanical, electrical, and tribological properties. In particular, certain DLC films were found to provide extremely low friction and wear coefficients to sliding metallic and ceramic surfaces. Since the early 1990s, carbon has been used at Argonne National Laboratory to synthesize a class of novel DLC films that now provide friction and wear coefficients as low as 0.001 and 10-11-10-10 mm3 N-1 m-1, respectively, when tested in inert or vacuum test environments. Over the years, we have optimized these films and applied them successfully to all kinds of metallic and ceramic substrates and evaluated their friction and wear properties under a wide range of sliding conditions. In this paper, we will provide details of our recent work on the deposition, characterization, and tribological applications of near-frictionless carbon films on glass and ceramic substrates. We will also provide chemical and structural information about these films and describe the fundamental tribological mechanisms that control their unusual friction and wear behaviour

  18. Thin film transistors of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly on glass substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a transistor of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes on a glass substrate. The carbon nanotube networks acting as the active components of the thin film transistor were selectively formed on the transistor channel areas that were previously patterned with catalysts to avoid the etching process for isolating nanotubes. The nanotube density was more than 50 μm-2, which is much larger than the percolation threshold. Transistors were successfully fabricated with a conducting and transparent ZnO for the back-side gate and the top-side gate. This allows the transparent electronics or suggests thin film applications of nanotubes for future opto-electronics

  19. Amorphous silicon carbon films prepared by hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor/sputtering deposition system: Effects of r.f. power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbon films were deposited using a hybrid radio frequency (r.f.) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)/sputtering deposition system at different r.f. powers. This deposition system combines the advantages of r.f. PECVD and sputtering techniques for the deposition of silicon carbon films with the added advantage of eliminating the use of highly toxic silane gas in the deposition process. Silicon (Si) atoms were sputtered from a pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) target by argon (Ar) ions and carbon (C) atoms were incorporated into the film from C based growth radicals generated through the discharge of methane (CH4) gas. The effects of r.f. powers of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 150 W applied during the deposition process on the structural and optical properties of the films were investigated. Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the silicon carbon films contain amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) and amorphous carbon (a-C) phases. The r.f. power showed significant influence on the C incorporation in the film structure. The a-C phases became more ordered in films with high C incorporation in the film structure. These films also produced high photoluminescence emission intensity at around 600 nm wavelength as a result of quantum confinement effects from the presence of sp2 C clusters embedded in the a-SiC and a-C phases in the films. - Highlights: ► Effects of radio frequency (r.f.) power on silicon carbon (SiC) films were studied. ► Hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition/sputtering technique was used. ► r.f. power influences C incorporation in the film structure. ► High C incorporation results in higher ordering of the amorphous C phase. ► These films produced high photoluminescence emission intensity

  20. Direct growth and patterning of multilayer graphene onto a targeted substrate without an external carbon source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongseok; Kim, Won-Jun; Lim, Jung Ah; Song, Yong-Won

    2012-07-25

    Using only a simple tube furnace, we demonstrate the synthesis of patterned graphene directly on a designed substrate without the need for an external carbon source. Carbon atoms are absorbed onto Ni evaporator sources as impurities, and incorporated into catalyst layers during the deposition. Heat treatment conditions were optimized so that the atoms diffused out along the grain boundaries to form nanocrystals at the catalyst-substrate interfaces. Graphene patterns were obtained under patterned catalysts, which restricted graphene formation to within patterned areas. The resultant multilayer graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to verify the high crystallinity and two-dimensional nanomorphology. Finally, a metal-semiconductor diode with a catalyst-graphene contact structure were fabricated and characterized to assess the semiconducting properties of the graphene sheets with respect to the display of asymmetric current-voltage behavior. PMID:22709270

  1. Series-connected substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitors with voltage-management circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Banerjee; R Srinivasan; A K Shukla

    2015-02-01

    Cell voltage for a fully charged-substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitor is about 2.3 V. Therefore, for applications requiring higher DC voltage, several of these ultracapacitors need to be connected in series. However, voltage distribution across each series-connected ultracapacitor tends to be uneven due to tolerance in capacitance and parasitic parallel-resistance values. Accordingly, voltage-management circuit is required to protect constituent ultracapacitors from exceeding their rated voltage. In this study, the design and characterization of the substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitor with co-located terminals is discussed. Voltage-management circuit for the ultracapacitor is presented, and its effectiveness is validated experimentally.

  2. Laser synthesis of hierarchically organized nanostructured TiO2 films on microfibrous carbon paper substrate: Characterization and electrocatalyst supporting properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youling; Tabet-Aoul, Amel; Mohamedi, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Titanium dioxide is cheap, non-toxic, exhibits a high mechanical resistance, very stable in acidic and oxidative environments is being studied as alternative to carbon as catalyst support in low-temperature fuel cells. Herein, via pulsed laser deposition, various morphologies of TiO2 thin films are synthesized at room temperature onto conductive microfibrous carbon paper substrate, which is the type of substrate, employed in energy storage and conversion devices. TiO2 films deposited under vacuum and in the presence of mild pressure of oxygen are very smooth and dense. Instead, TiO2 films deposited in the presence of helium atmosphere are of porous structures and vertically aligned. An increase in the helium pressure leads to the formation of forest-like vertically aligned nanostructures. Micro-Raman spectroscopy reveals that the films are amorphous and of rutile phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that Ti is in fully oxidized state of Ti4+. The electrocatalytic supporting properties to Pt are investigated in H2SO4 and O2-saturated H2SO4 solution. It is found that regardless of the film morphology, all the synthesized TiO2 films dramatically increase the electroactive surface area of Pt and enhance its electroactivity towards oxygen reduction reaction as compared with bare Pt electrode.

  3. Investigation of carbon nanotube-containing film on silicon substrates and its tribological behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiyong; Cheng, Xianhua

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were functionalized with Lanthanum (La) modifier and appropriate acid-treatment methods. CNT-containing film was deposited on silicon substrates via a self-assembly process. The formation and microstructure of La treated CNTs and CNT-containing film were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and water contact angle (WCA). Its tribological properties were evaluated with a UMT-2MT reciprocating friction tester. The results show that CNTs were adsorbed on silicon substrates by means of chemically bonding between La and oxygen-containing functional groups. The friction coefficient of the silicon substrates is reduced from 0.87 to 0.12 after the deposition of CNT-containing film on its surface. CNT-containing film shows excellent antiwear, friction reducing ability and load-carrying capacity due to excellent mechanical and self-lubrication properties of CNTs.

  4. Production of extracellular proteases by Mucor circinelloides using D-glucose as carbon source / substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Vânia Sousa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, some Mucorales species have been reported as protease producers. The production of extracellular proteases by Mucor circinelloides using glucose as substrate was studied. Experiments were carried out with different D-glucose concentrations (40, 60 and 80 g/L. Biomass, pH and protease activity were determined. Although biomass production had reached best yields for the medium containing D-glucose in a concentration of 80 g/L, the enzymatic production was higher when the substrate concentration was reduced to 40 g/L. The yield factor for product on cell growth and the yield factor for product on carbon substrate were higher when the microorganism grew in medium containing 40 g/L glucose. The kinetics parameters suggest that this strain seems to be promising as an alternative microorganism for protease production.

  5. Roll to plate printed stretchable silver electrode using single walled carbon nanotube on elastomeric substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minhun; Noh, Jinsoo; Kim, Junseok; Kim, Donghwan; Cho, Gyoujin

    2013-08-01

    Stretchable electronics may open new applications in display, sensors and actuators. To attain the stretchable electronics, the ink formulation should be compatible with elastomeric substrates. Here, we present the formulation of silver nanoparticles and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for printing stretchable silver electrodes on the elastomeric substrates. Highly conductive stretchable electrodes can be printed directly on the poly(styrene-b-butadiene-b-styrene) (PSBS) substrates by roll to plate (R2P) gravure printer. During the stretching test, R2P printed silver based stretchable electrodes show the high conductivity of 1000 S cm(-1) at 0.27 wt% of SWNT loading. Furthermore, the resistance of the printed silver electrode was not changed up to 15% of tensile strain. PMID:23882805

  6. Carbon nanotube-based substrates for modulation of human pluripotent stem cell fate

    OpenAIRE

    Pryzhkova, Marina V; Aria, Indrat; Cheng, Qingsu; Harris, Greg M.; Zan, Xingjie; Gharib, Morteza; Jabbarzadeh, Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the biological response of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) cultured on a carbon nanotube (CNT) array-based substrate with the long term goal to direct hPSC germ layer specification for a wide variety of tissue engineering applications. CNT arrays were fabricated using a chemical vapor deposition system allowing for control over surface roughness and mechanical stiffness. Our results demonstrated that hPSCs readily attach to hydrophilized and extracellular matrix coated CN...

  7. Study of negatronic device based on amorphous carbon/nickel nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite based on pyrogallol and formaldehyde (PF) reached by NiO nanoparticles has been prepared using sol–gel method to obtain negatronic PF/Ni devices. The obtained materials were subjected to heat treatment under inert atmosphere at 650 °C for 2 h. The X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) shows that PF sample was composed of amorphous material while PF/Ni XRD spectra exhibited the presence of metallic nickel characteristic lines. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate that PF sample was formed by homogenous material, and metallic nickel nanoparticles sized around 30 nm were dispersed in the PF/Ni nanocomposite. dc I(V) characteristics indicate a symmetric and non-linear behavior and the presence of negative differential resistance (RDN) phase in the PF/Ni sample. The dc conductivity (σdc) can be explained by Variable Range Hopping (3D-VRH) conduction model in both samples. The ac conductance shows the dominance of hopping conduction mechanism in PF sample; however, the Correlated Barrier Hopping (CBH) model seems to be dominant in the PF/Ni nanocomposite. The Nyquist plots were used to identify an equivalent circuit with the aim to study the possible contribution of the grains and boundary grains to the samples conductivities.

  8. Studies on 12 V substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Banerjee; A K Shukla

    2015-05-01

    A cost-effective 12 V substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitor is developed and performance tested. These hybrid ultracapacitors employ flexible-graphite sheets as negative plate currentcollectors that are coated amperometrically with a thin layer of conducting polymer, namely poly-aniline to provide good adhesivity to activated-carbon layer. The positive plate of the hybrid ultracapacitors comprise conventional lead-sheet that is converted electrochemically into a substrate-integrated lead-dioxide electrode. 12 V substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitors both in absorbent-glass-mat and polymeric silicagel electrolyte configurations are fabricated and characterized. It is possible to realize 12 V configurations with capacitance values of ∼200 F and ∼300 F, energy densities of ∼1.9 Wh kg−1 and ∼2.5 Wh kg−1 and power densities of ∼2 kW kg−1 and ∼0.8 kW kg−1, respectively, having faradaic-efficiency values of ∼90 % with cycle-life in excess of 100,000 cycles. The effective cost of the mentioned hybrid ultracapacitors is estimated to be about ∼4 US$/Wh as compared to ∼20 US$/Wh for commercially available ultracapacitors.

  9. The growth of N-doped carbon nanotube arrays on sintered Al2O3 substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertically oriented bamboo-like nitrogen-containing carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were grown on an alumina (Al2O3) substrate by the injection chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process using ethanol as a carbon source and ethylenediamine as a nitrogen source. The substrate is a sintered Al2O3 plate with a rough surface consisting of polycrystalline Al2O3 micro-grains. The concentration of ferrocene in ethanol played a major role in the growth of CNT arrays. Aligned multi-walled CNT arrays were obtained under optimized catalyst concentrations (0.015 g/ml) and growth temperature (900 deg. C) with the height of the arrays attaining 160 μm after the growth for 1 h. The growth of CNT occurred predominately between 30 and 40 min and ceased growth beyond 60 min. X-ray photoelectronic spectrum detects the incorporation of nitrogen atoms in the CNTs with an atomic ratio of 1.2%. The present study indicates that it is possible to grow high quality carbon nanotube arrays over a cheap alumina substrate of a rough surface

  10. Comparative Study on Hydrogenated and Deuterated Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by RF PECVD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buršíková, V.; Stoica, A.; Peřina, Vratislav; Mikšová, Romana; Slavíček, P.; Mocanu, V.

    Innsbruck: Innsbruck univesity press, 2012, s. 242-246. ISBN 978-3-902719-52-2. [XVIIIth Symposium on Atomic, cluster and Surface Physics 2012 (SAPS 2012). Alpe d´Huez (FR), 22.01.2012-27.01.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/1669 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : hydrogenated carbon thin films * deuterated carbon thin films * PECVD * RBS * ERDA * OES * coating properties Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.uibk.ac.at/iup/buch_pdfs/it_sasp_2012sw_131211.pdf

  11. Influence of post-deposition heat treatment on optical properties derived from UV–vis of cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films deposited on amorphous substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Annealing-induced change in optical parameters of CdTe film was derived from UV–vis study. • Optical constants of the films were evaluated using Swanepoel method. • Dispersion energy data obeyed the single oscillator of the Wemple−Didomenico model. • Cd deficiency of the film confirmed the p-type conductive nature. - Abstract: In this work, we report on post-deposition heat treatment (annealing)-induced change in optical properties derived from UV–vis study of CdTe thin films prepared on amorphous glass substrate by electron beam evaporation technique. Annealing effect gives rise to the enhancement in crystalline nature (zinc blende structure) of CdTe films with (1 1 1) preferred orientation. The average transmittance was increased with the annealing temperature and the slight shift in transmission threshold towards higher wavelength region revealed the systematic reduction in optical energy band gap. The existence of shallow level just below the conduction band, within the band gap was identified in the range of 0.23 and 0.14 eV for the films annealed at 200 and 450 °C, respectively. The optical quality of deposited films was confirmed by the photoluminescence study. In addition, the scanning electron microscopic measurement supports the result of X-ray diffraction study. The Swanepoel, Hervé-Vandamme, and Wemple−DiDomenico models have been employed to evaluate the various optical parameters of CdTe films. These results are correlated well with other physical properties and discussed with the possible concepts underlying the phenomena

  12. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, S. A.; Baumann, T. F.; Kong, J.; Satcher, J. H.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2007-02-20

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  13. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. III. Diffusion of photo-produced H2 as a function of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Doménech, R.; Dartois, E.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) has been proposed as one of the carbonaceous solids detected in the interstellar medium. Energetic processing of the a-C:H particles leads to the dissociation of the C-H bonds and the formation of hydrogen molecules and small hydrocarbons. Photo-produced H2 molecules in the bulk of the dust particles can diffuse out to the gas phase and contribute to the total H2 abundance. Aims: We have simulated this process in the laboratory with plasma-produced a-C:H and a-C:D analogs under astrophysically relevant conditions to investigate the dependence of the diffusion as a function of temperature. Methods: Experimental simulations were performed in a high-vacuum chamber, with complementary experiments carried out in an ultra-high-vacuum chamber. Plasma-produced a-C:H and a-C:D analogs were UV-irradiated using a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. Molecules diffusing to the gas-phase were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer, providing a measurement of the outgoing H2 or D2 flux. By comparing the experimental measurements with the expected flux from a one-dimensional diffusion model, a diffusion coefficient D could be derived for experiments carried out at different temperatures. Results: Dependence on the diffusion coefficient D with the temperature followed an Arrhenius-type equation. The activation energy for the diffusion process was estimated (ED(H2) = 1660 ± 110 K, ED(D2) = 2090 ± 90 K), as well as the pre-exponential factor (D0(H2) = 0.0007 cm2 s-1, D0(D2) = 0.0045 cm2 s-1). Conclusions: The strong decrease of the diffusion coefficient at low dust particle temperatures exponentially increases the diffusion times in astrophysical environments. Therefore, transient dust heating by cosmic rays needs to be invoked for the release of the photo-produced H2 molecules in cold photon-dominated regions, where destruction of the aliphatic component in hydrogenated amorphous carbons most probably takes place.

  14. Study of adhesion of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes to a substrate by atomic-force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, O. A.; Blinov, Yu. F.; Il'ina, M. V.; Il'in, O. I.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2016-02-01

    The adhesion to a substrate of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA CNT) produced by plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition has been experimentally studied by atomic-force microscopy in the current spectroscopy mode. The longitudinal deformation of VA CNT by applying an external electric field has been simulated. Based on the results, a technique of determining VA CNT adhesion to a substrate has been developed that is used to measure the adhesion strength of connecting VA CNT to a substrate. The adhesion to a substrate of VA CNT 70-120 nm in diameter varies from 0.55 to 1.19 mJ/m2, and the adhesion force from 92.5 to 226.1 nN. When applying a mechanical load, the adhesion strength of the connecting VA CNT to a substrate is 714.1 ± 138.4 MPa, and the corresponding detachment force increases from 1.93 to 10.33 μN with an increase in the VA CNT diameter. As an external electric field is applied, the adhesion strength is almost doubled and is 1.43 ± 0.29 GPa, and the corresponding detachment force is changed from 3.83 to 20.02 μN. The results can be used in the design of technological processes of formation of emission structures, VA CNT-based elements for vacuum microelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering, and also the methods of probe nanodiagnostics of VA CNT.

  15. Growth and sporulation of Trichoderma polysporum on organic substrates by addition of carbon and nitrogen sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the present study nine different organic substrates viz., rice grains, sorghum grains, wheat grains, millet grains, wheat straw, rice husk, cow dung, sawdust and poultry manure were used for mass multiplication of Trichoderma polysporum. Grains, especially sorghum grains were found to be the best substrate for T. polysporum. Wheat straw and rice husk were less suitable, whereas, cow dung, sawdust and poultry manure were not suitable for growth of the fungus. Sucrose at the rate of 30,000 ppm and ammonium nitrate at the rate of 3,000 ppm were found to be the best carbon and nitrogen sources for growth and sporulation of T. polysporum. Amendment of the selected C and N sources to wheat straw, rice husk and millet grains resulted in significantly higher growth and conidia production by T. polysporum as compared to un-amended substrates. Sorghum and rice grains showed suppression in growth and sporulation of T. polysporum when amended with C and N sources. During studies on shelf life, populations of T. polysporum attained the peck at 60-135 days intervals on different substrates and declined gradually thereafter. However, even after 330 days, the populations were greater than the population at 0-day. At 345-360 days interval, populations were less than the initial populations at 0- days. Shelf life on C+N amended wheat straw and rice husk were more as compared to un-amended substrates. (author)

  16. Green synthesis of carbon-supported nanoparticle catalysts by physical vapor deposition on soluble powder substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Young; Jang, Injoon; Jung, Namgee; Chung, Young-Hoon; Ryu, Jae Yoon; Cha, In Young; Kim, Hyung Juhn; Jang, Jong Hyung; Yoo, Sung Jong

    2015-09-01

    Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) supported on high surface area carbon (NP/Cs) were prepared by the physical vapor deposition of bulk materials on an α-D-glucose (Glu) substrate, followed by the deposition of the NPs on carbon supports. Using Glu as a carrier for the transport of NPs from the bulk materials to the carbon support surfaces, ultrafine NPs were obtained, exhibiting a stabilizing effect through OH moieties on the Glu surfaces. This stabilizing effect was strong enough to stabilize the NPs, but weak enough to not significantly block the metal surfaces. As only the target materials and Glu are required in our procedure, it can be considered environmentally friendly, with the NPs being devoid of hazardous chemicals. Furthermore, the resulting NP/Cs exhibited an improvement in activity for various electrochemical reactions, mainly attributed to their high surface area.

  17. Amorphous silicon thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon glass resistance thermometers (CGRT) shows an unstable drift by heat cycles. Since we were looking for a more stable element of thermometer for cryogenic and high magnetic field environments, we selected amorphous silicon as a substitute for CGRT. The resistance of many amorphous samples were measured at 4K, at 77K, and 300K. We eventually found an amorphous silicon (Si-H) alloy whose the sensitivity below 77K was comparable to that of the germanium resistance thermometer with little magnetic field influence. (author)

  18. Experimental Observations of the Patterns of Fungi-Mineral Surfaces Interactions with Muscovite, Biotite, Bauxite, Chromite, Hematite, Galena, Malachite, Manganite and Carbonate Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, P.

    2006-12-01

    In an in vitro experimental work, mineral substrates of muscovite, biotite, bauxite, chromite, hematite, galena, malachite, manganite and carbonate were exposed to free fungal growth and interaction in Petri dishes under open conditions. All of the experimental minerals were examined by XRD for identity and purity. The 12-week experiment resulted in significant alteration of the mineral substrates. SEM, EDX, and XRD analysis showed secondary mineral biomineralization represented by different crystal morphologies of Ca- and Mg- oxalates (weddelite: CaC2O4·2H2O, whewellite CaC2O4·H2O and glushinskite: MgC2O4·2H2O), struvite: (NH4) MgPO4·6H2O, gypsum CaSO4.2H2O, and possible dolomite. Metals bioleached from the substrates included: Fe, Pb, S, Cu, Al as single crystals or aggregates, amorphous layers, amorphous aggregates, and linear forms influenced by the fungal filaments. Bauxite and manganite showed the strongest cases of bioleaching where Fe and Al were fungally extracted and deposited as separate mineral species from the Al-Fe oxides mixture, while Ca and S were extracted from the manganite substrate and deposited as gypsum. The bioleached metals were either deposited on the mineral substrates, attached to fungal filaments, embedded in the fungal mycelium or in the extracellular polysaccharide substance (EPS) layer. The EDX microanalysis of the fungal hyphae frequently revealed metal content adsorbed on the hyphae sheath surface. During the short period of the experiment, fungal interaction with the mineral surfaces produced significant biomechanical and biochemical bioweathering features: strong pitting of the mineral surfaces, exfoliation, tunnelling, dissolution, honeycomb-alveolar structures, perforations, fragmentation, and cementation. One important aspect of these interactions is the strong affinity of fungal hyphae to mineral surfaces. The fungi engulfed whole blocks of minerals in the hyphal network, irrespective of mineral surface topography with

  19. Effects of H2 gas addition into process and H ion implantation on the microstructure of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films prepared by bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films are deposited on Si(1 0 0) and SiO2 glass substrates by a bipolar-type plasma based ion implantation system. The films are prepared using toluene gas at a constant flow rate of 2 sccm. The effects of H2 gas addition during deposition on the microstructure of the films are examined by electrical conductivity measurements, Raman spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and optical spectroscopy. In addition, H implantation is also carried out using H2 plasma discharge. Thickness of the films is approximately 60 nm for all samples. It is found that electrical conductivity slightly increases with increasing additive H2 flow rate. However, the conductivity drastically decreases after H implantation. Raman analysis reveals that H2 gas addition slightly causes the film graphitization, but the H implantation does it amorphization. The results of ERDA show that the H concentration in the films slightly decreases with increasing H2 gas addition, but increases by H implantation. In spite of H2 gas addition, the optical band gap is not changed and kept approximately 0.7 eV. However, H implantation makes it increase up to approximately 1.0 eV

  20. Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a 3D electrode for long cycle life symmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasingam, Suresh Kannan; Thirumurugan, Arun; Lee, Jae Sung; Jun, Yongseok

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a binder-free 3D electrode was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The maximum specific capacitance of a single electrode was 83.9 mF cm-2, while it was 41.9 mF cm-2 for the symmetric device. Up to 600% capacitance retention was observed for 4750 cycles.Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a binder-free 3D electrode was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The maximum specific capacitance of a single electrode was 83.9 mF cm-2, while it was 41.9 mF cm-2 for the symmetric device. Up to 600% capacitance retention was observed for 4750 cycles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01200K

  1. Characterization of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride particles and coatings obtained in a CH4/N2 radiofrequency discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN x:H) particles and coatings have been prepared in a CH4/N2 13.56 MHz radiofrequency discharge. Particles and films have been examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy for different nitrogen contents. SEM micrographs show that the dust particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.2-4 μm. The surface morphology of the particles is strongly modified with the increase of the nitrogen content in the gas mixture. In the particle and film IR spectra, four predominant absorption bands have been observed. They reveal the presence of C-H, C=C, C=N and/or N-H (1300-1800 cm-1), -C≡N and -N≡C (2000-2300 cm-1), C-H (2800-3100 cm-1) and N-H and/or O-H (3200-3600 cm-1) bonds. These absorption bands are studied in order to determine the influence of the nitrogen incorporation

  2. Deposition and field-emission characterization of electrically conductive nitrogen-doped diamond-like amorphous carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the fabrication of high performance field emitters, diamond-like amorphous carbon films doped with nitrogen (DAC:N) were formed using an intermittent supermagnetron plasma chemical vapor deposition technique. DAC:N films were deposited using isobutane plasma to investigate the influence of discharge-off time and electrode spacing on the physical properties of the films at upper- and lower-electrode radio frequency (rf) powers (LORF) of 800 W/50-800 W. At LORF of 100 W, a discharge-on time of 1 min, and a discharge-off time (cooling time) of 30 s-10 min, resistivity was decreased with a decrease of the cooling time. By reducing the electrode spacing from 60 to 20 mm at a LORF of 50 and 800 W, the optical band gap of DAC:N film was decreased from 0.85 and 0.23 eV to 0.6 and 0 eV, respectively. A flat DAC:N film of 700 A thickness was deposited on a n-Si wafer at rf powers of 800 W/800 W. Using this flat DAC:N film, a threshold electric field of 18 V/μm was observed and maximum field-emission current density of 2.2 mA/cm2 was observed at the electric field of 32 V/μm

  3. Physical properties of nitrogen-doped diamond-like amorphous carbon films deposited by supermagnetron plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like amorphous carbon films doped with nitrogen (DAC:N) were deposited on Si and glass wafers intermittently using i-C4H10/N2 repetitive supermagnetron plasma chemical vapor deposition. Deposition duration, which is equal to a plasma heating time of wafer, was selected to be 40 or 60 s, and several layers were deposited repetitively to form one thick film. DAC:N films were deposited at a lower-electrode temperature of 100 deg. C as a function of upper- and lower-electrode rf powers (200 W/200 W-1 kW/1 kW) and N2 concentration (0%-80%). With an increase in N2 concentration and rf power, the resistivity and the optical band gap decreased monotonously. With increase of the deposition duration from 40 to 60 s, resistivity decreased to 0.03Ω cm and optical band gap decreased to 0.02 eV (substantially equal to 0 eV within the range of experimental error), at an N2 concentration of 80% and rf power of 1 kW(/1 kW)

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. III. Diffusion of photo-produced H2 as a function of temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Doménech, Rafael; Caro, Guillermo M Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) has been proposed as one of the carbonaceous solids detected in the interstellar medium. Energetic processing of the a-C:H particles leads to the dissociation of the C-H bonds and the formation of hydrogen molecules and small hydrocarbons. Photo-produced H2 molecules in the bulk of the dust particles can diffuse out to the gas phase and contribute to the total H2 abundance. We have simulated this process in the laboratory with plasma-produced a-C:H and a-C:D analogs under astrophysically relevant conditions to investigate the dependence of the diffusion as a function of temperature. Plasma-produced a-C:H analogs were UV-irradiated using a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. Molecules diffusing to the gas-phase were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer, providing a measurement of the outgoing H2 or D2 flux. By comparing the experimental measurements with the expected flux from a one-dimensional diffusion model, a diffusion coefficient D could be derived for expe...

  5. Electrochemical behavior of gold nanoparticles modified nitrogen incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon and its application in glucose sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiping; Wu, Huaping; Qiu, Xu; Tang, Weihua

    2011-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (NPs) with 10-50 nm in diameter were synthesized on nitrogen incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C:N) thin film electrode by electrodeposition. The deposition and nucleation processes of Au on ta-C:N surface were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The morphology of Au NPs was characterized by scanned electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties of Au NPs modified ta-C:N (ta-C:N/Au) electrode and its ability to sense glucose were investigated by voltammetric and amperometric measurements. The potentiostatic current-time transients showed a progressive nucleation process and diffusion growth of Au on the surface of ta-C:N film according to the Scharifker-Hills model. The Au NPs acted as microelectrodes improved the electron transfer and electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose on ta-C:N electrode. The ta-C:N/Au electrode exhibited fast current response, a linear detection range of glucose from 0.5 to 25 mM and a detection limit of 120 microM, which hinted its potential application as a glucose biosensor. PMID:22409057

  6. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, R.; Cremona, M.; Achete, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq3) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq3/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  7. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, R [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru SN, Lima (Peru); Cremona, M [Departamento de Fisica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica de Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, Cx. Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Achete, C A, E-mail: rreyes@uni.edu.pe [Departamento de Engenheria Metalurgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq{sub 3}/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  8. Raman shift on n-doped amorphous carbon thin films grown by electron beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo P., B. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Freire L., F. Jr. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lozada M., R.; Palomino M., R. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Jimenez S., S. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Laboratorio de Investigacion en Materiales, Queretaro (Mexico); Zelaya A., O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, P.O. Box 14-740, Mexico 07360 D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    The structural properties of carbon thin films synthesized under an atmosphere of nitrogen by means of electron beam evaporation were studied by Raman scattering spectroscopy. The electron beam evaporation technique is an important alternative to grown layers of this material with interesting structural properties. The observed shift of the Raman G band shows that the structure of the films tends to become more graphitic upon the increase of the deposition time. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Selective synthesis of double helices of carbon nanotube bundles grown on treated metallic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes-Sodi, Felipe; Iniguez-Rabago, Agustin; Rosas-Melendez, Samuel; Ballesteros-Villarreal, Monica [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Iberoamericana, Prolongacion Paseo de la Reforma 880, Lomas de Santa Fe (Mexico); Vilatela, Juan J. [IMDEA Materials Institute, E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Madrid (Spain); Reyes-Gutierrez, Lucio G.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Jose A. [Ingenieria Industrial, Grupo JUMEX, Ecatepec de Morelos, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Palacios, Eduardo [Lab. de Microscopia Electronica de Ultra Alta Resolucion, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, San Bartolo Atepehuacan (Mexico); Terrones, Mauricio [Department of Physics, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); Research Center for Exotic Nanocarbons (JST), Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Double-helix microstructures consisting of two parallel strands of hundreds of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition of ferrocene/toluene vapours on metal substrates. Growth of coiled carbon nanostructures with site selectivity is achieved by varying the duration of thermochemical pretreatment to deposit a layer of SiO{sub x} on the metallic substrate. Production of multibranched structures of MWCNTs converging in SiO{sub x} microstructure is also reported. In the abstract figure, panel (a) shows a coloured micrograph of a typical double-helix coiled microstructure of MWCNTs grown on SiO{sub x} covered steel substrate. Green and blue show each of the two individual strands of MWCNTs. Panel (b) is an amplification of a SiO{sub x} microparticle (white) on the tip of the double-stranded coil (green and blue). The microparticle guides the collective growth of hundreds of MWCNTs to form the coiled structure. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Electron-beam assisted selective growth of graphenic carbon thin films on SiO2/Si and quartz substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Knyazev, Maxim; Sedlovets, Daria; Trofimov, Oleg; Redkin, Arkady

    2015-01-01

    The first selective growth of graphenic carbon thin films on silicon dioxide is reported. A preliminary e-beam exposure of the substrate is found to strongly affect the process of such films growth. The emphasis is placed on the influence of substrate exposure on the rate of carbon deposition. The explanation of this effect is proposed. The data of electrical and optical measurements and the results of atomic force and scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies are reported. ...

  11. Development and optimization of a secure injection CVD process to grow aligned carbon nanotubes on large substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S.; Magga, Y.; Belkady, L.; Hibert, E.; Porterat, D.; Boulanger, P.; Pinault, M.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.

    2013-04-01

    Growth of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) by a secure injection CVD process on large quartz substrates and carbon fiber (CF) cloths has been reported in this study. Adjustments of CVD setup and synthesis parameters have been achieved to control the CNT growth in terms of homogeneous covering of the substrates and to tailor the length of CNT. Two parameters have been optimized such as the precursor feeding rate per reactor surface unit and the carrier gas flow rate.

  12. Physico-chemical studies of cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) nanoparticles coated on amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johan, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: mrafiej@um.edu.my; Meriam Suhaimy, Syazwan Hanani; Yusof, Yusliza, E-mail: yus_liza@siswa.um.edu.my

    2014-01-15

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at a temperature (∼250 °C) in an air furnace. As- synthesized α-CNTs were purified with deionized water and hydrochloric acid. A purified α-CNTs were hybridized with cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu{sub 2}O) through a simple chemical process. Morphology of the samples was analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra showed the attachment of acidic functional groups onto the surface of α-CNTs and the formation of hybridized α-CNTs-Cu{sub 2}O. Raman spectra reveal the amorphous nature of the carbon. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed the amorphous phase of the carbon and the formation of Cu{sub 2}O crystalline phase. The coating of Cu{sub 2}O was confirmed by FESEM, TEM, and XRD. Optical absorption of the samples has also been investigated and the quantum confinement effect was illustrated in the absorption spectra.

  13. Directed assembly of high density single-walled carbon nanotube patterns on flexible polymer substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report an effective technique for the controlled assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and demonstrate organized high density network architectures on soft polymeric substrates. We utilize the surface energy differential between a plasma treated (hydrophilic) parylene-C surface and a photoresist (hydrophobic) surface to create microscale patterns of SWNT networks on a 10 μm thick parylene-C substrate. The large scale fabrication of patterned SWNT structures presented is achieved by performing site-selective fluidic assembly of SWNTs. Electrically continuous nanotube network micro-arrays as small as 4 μm wide that are up to 1500 μm long with controlled separation have been fabricated by dissolving the photoresist after assembly. Electrical and mechanical characterization of nanotube networks on the flexible substrate in both static and dynamic modes indicates that the structure can handle both compressive and tensile deformations with no hysteresis. The technology presented has immediate applications in making thin film transistors, interconnects and sensors on flexible substrates.

  14. Molecular dynamics study on heat transport from single-walled carbon nanotubes to Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ya; Zhu, Jie, E-mail: zhujie@iet.cn; Tang, Da-Wei

    2015-02-06

    In this paper, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the heat transport between a vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and Si substrate, to find out the influence of temperature and system sizes, including diameter and length of SWNT and measurements of substrate. Results revealed that high temperature hindered heat transport in SWNT itself but was a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at interface of SWNT and Si. Furthermore, the system sizes strongly affected the peaks in vibrational density of states of Si, which led to interfacial thermal conductance dependent on system sizes. - Highlights: • NEMD is performed to simulate the heat transport from SWNT to Si substrate. • We analyze both interfacial thermal conductance and thermal conductivity of SWNT. • High temperature is a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at the interface. • Interfacial thermal conductance strongly depends on the sizes of SWNT and substrate. • We calculate VDOS of C and Si atoms to analyze phonon couplings between them.

  15. Substrate pre-treatment of flexible material for printed electronics with carbon nanotube based ink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, an innovative solution was developed in order to make paper-based material, used traditionally in the packaging and labelling industries, compatible with the printing of functional conductive inks. In order to avoid the deterioration of the ink functionalities due to different paper properties, a UV-curing inkjettable primer layer was developed. This pre-treatment enables homogeneous surface properties such as smoothness, absorption capacity and surface energy to be obtained, for almost all the examined substrates. To confirm the positive impact of such pre-treatment, conductivity has been measured when using a new conductive ink, combining the processability of the PEDOT-PSS conductive polymer with the high electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Significant improvement has been measured for all paper materials and similar conductivity (close to reference PET film) has been obtained whatever the substrate involved. This pre-treatment now makes it possible to consider paper-based material as a potential substrate for printed electronics. In this case, the substrate adaptation technique offers an innovative solution to produce low-cost and flexible electronics.

  16. Fabrication and Corrosion Resistance of Superhydrophobic Hydroxide Zinc Carbonate Film on Aluminum Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superhydrophobic hydroxide zinc carbonate (HZC films were fabricated on aluminum substrate through a convenient in situ deposition process. Firstly, HZC films with different morphologies were deposited on aluminum substrates through immersing the aluminum substrates perpendicularly into aqueous solution containing zinc nitrate hexahydrate and urea. Secondly, the films were then modified with fluoroalkylsilane (FAS: CH3(CF26(CH23Si(OCH33 molecules by immersing in absolute ethanol solution containing FAS. The morphologies, hydrophobicity, chemical compositions, and bonding states of the films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, water contact angle measurement (CA, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, respectively. It was shown by surface morphological observation that HZC films displayed different microstructures such as microporous structure, rose petal-like structure, block-shaped structure, and pinecone-like structure by altering the deposition condition. A highest water contact angle of 156.2° was obtained after FAS modification. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of the superhydrophobic surface on aluminum substrate was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements. The EIS measurements’ results revealed that the superhydrophobic surface considerably improved the corrosion resistance of aluminum.

  17. Fabrication and Corrosion Resistance of Super hydrophobic Hydroxide Zinc Carbonate Film on Aluminum Substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Super hydrophobic hydroxide zinc carbonate (HZC) films were fabricated on aluminum substrate through a convenient in situ deposition process. Firstly, HZC films with different morphologies were deposited on aluminum substrates through immersing the aluminum substrates perpendicularly into aqueous solution containing zinc nitrate hexahydrate and urea. Secondly, the films were then modified with fluoroalkylsilane (FAS: CH3(CF2)6(CH2))3Si(OCH3)3) molecules by immersing in absolute ethanol solution containing FAS. The morphologies, hydrophobicity, chemical compositions, and bonding states of the films were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), water contact angle measurement (CA), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. It was shown by surface morphological observation that HZC films displayed different microstructures such as microporous structure, rose petal-like structure, block-shaped structure, and pine cone-like structure by altering the deposition condition. A highest water contact angle of 156.2° was obtained after FAS modification. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of the super hydrophobic surface on aluminum substrate was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The EIS measurements’ results revealed that the super hydrophobic surface considerably improved the corrosion resistance of aluminum.

  18. Molecular dynamics study on heat transport from single-walled carbon nanotubes to Si substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the heat transport between a vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and Si substrate, to find out the influence of temperature and system sizes, including diameter and length of SWNT and measurements of substrate. Results revealed that high temperature hindered heat transport in SWNT itself but was a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at interface of SWNT and Si. Furthermore, the system sizes strongly affected the peaks in vibrational density of states of Si, which led to interfacial thermal conductance dependent on system sizes. - Highlights: • NEMD is performed to simulate the heat transport from SWNT to Si substrate. • We analyze both interfacial thermal conductance and thermal conductivity of SWNT. • High temperature is a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at the interface. • Interfacial thermal conductance strongly depends on the sizes of SWNT and substrate. • We calculate VDOS of C and Si atoms to analyze phonon couplings between them

  19. Fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensors on flexible sensing skin substrates for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Andrew R.; Kurata, Masahiro; Nishino, Hiromichi; Lynch, Jerome P.

    2016-04-01

    New advances in nanotechnology and material processing is creating opportunities for the design and fabrication of a new generation of thin film sensors that can used to assess structural health. In particular, thin film sensors attached to large areas of the structure surface has the potential to provide spatially rich data on the performance and health of a structure. This study focuses on the development of a fully integrated strain sensor that is fabricated on a flexible substrate for potentially use in sensing skins. This is completed using a carbon nanotube-polymer composite material that is patterned on a flexible polyimide substrate using optical lithography. The piezoresistive carbon nanotube elements are integrated into a complete sensing system by patterning copper electrodes and integrating off-the-shelf electrical components on the flexible film for expanded functionality. This diverse material utilization is realized in a versatile process flow to illustrate a powerful toolbox for sensing severity, location, and failure mode of damage on structural components. The fully integrated patterned carbon nanotube strain sensor is tested on a quarter-scale, composite beam column connection. The results and implications for future structural damage detection are discussed.

  20. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots as A New Substrate for Sensitive Glucose Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanxu Ji

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are introduced as a novel substrate suitable for enzyme immobilization in electrochemical detection metods. Nitrogen-doped carbon dots are easily synthesised from polyacrylamide in just one step. With the help of the amino group on chitosan, glucose oxidase is immobilized on nitrogen-doped carbon dots-modified carbon glassy electrodes by amino-carboxyl reactions. The nitrogen-induced charge delocalization at nitrogen-doped carbon dots can enhance the electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of O2. The specific amino-carboxyl reaction provides strong and stable immobilization of GOx on electrodes. The developed biosensor responds efficiently to the presence of glucose in serum samples over the concentration range from 1 to 12 mM with a detection limit of 0.25 mM. This novel biosensor has good reproducibility and stability, and is highly selective for glucose determination under physiological conditions. These results indicate that N-doped quantum dots represent a novel candidate material for the construction of electrochemical biosensors.