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Sample records for amorphous boron coatings

  1. Amorphous boron coatings produced with vacuum arc deposition technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, C. C.; Hazelton, R. C.; Yadlowsky, E. J.; Carlson, E. P.; Keitz, M. D.; Williams, J. M.; Zuhr, R. A.; Poker, D. B.

    2002-05-01

    In principle, boron (B) as a material has many excellent surface properties, including corrosion resistance, very high hardness, refractory properties, and a strong tendency to bond with most substrates. The potential technological benefits of the material have not been realized, because it is difficult to deposit it as coatings. B is difficult to evaporate, does not sputter well, and cannot be thermally sprayed. In this article, first successful deposition results from a robust system, based on the vacuum (cathodic) arc technology, are reported. Adherent coatings have been produced on 1100 Al, CP-Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, 316 SS, hard chrome plate, and 52 100 steel. Composition and thickness analyses have been performed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Hardness (H) and modules (E) have been evaluated by nanoindentation. The coatings are very pure and have properties characteristic of B suboxides. A microhardness of up to 27 GPa has been measured on a 400-nm-thick film deposited on 52 100 steel, with a corresponding modulus of 180 GPa. This gives a very high value for the H/E ratio, a figure-of-merit for impact resistance of the film. A number of applications are contemplated, including corrosion/abrasion protection for die-casting dies and improved wear resistance for biomedical implants.

  2. Amorphous boron coatings produced with vacuum arc deposition technology

    CERN Document Server

    Klepper, C C; Yadlowsky, E J; Carlson, E P; Keitz, M D; Williams, J M; Zuhr, R A; Poker, D B

    2002-01-01

    In principle, boron (B) as a material has many excellent surface properties, including corrosion resistance, very high hardness, refractory properties, and a strong tendency to bond with most substrates. The potential technological benefits of the material have not been realized, because it is difficult to deposit it as coatings. B is difficult to evaporate, does not sputter well, and cannot be thermally sprayed. In this article, first successful deposition results from a robust system, based on the vacuum (cathodic) arc technology, are reported. Adherent coatings have been produced on 1100 Al, CP-Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, 316 SS, hard chrome plate, and 52 100 steel. Composition and thickness analyses have been performed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Hardness (H) and modules (E) have been evaluated by nanoindentation. The coatings are very pure and have properties characteristic of B suboxides. A microhardness of up to 27 GPa has been measured on a 400-nm-thick film deposited on 52 100 steel, with a corresp...

  3. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell–core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell–core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost. (paper)

  4. Shear amorphization of boron suboxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report for the first time the shear-induced local amorphization of boron suboxide subjected to nanoindentation. The amorphous bands have a width of ∼1–3 nm and a length of 200–300 nm along the (01¯11) crystal plane. We show direct experimental evidence that the amorphous shear bands of boron suboxide are driven from the coalescence of dislocation loops under high shear stresses. These observations provide insights into the microscopic deformation and failure of high-strength and lightweight ceramics

  5. Determination of boron content in boron carbide, boron nitride and amorphous boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present article an analyzing method of determination of boron content in boron carbide, boron nitride and amorphous boron described. Examined samples were digested with potassium hydroxide and potassium nitrate in nickel crucible and the boron contents determined subsequently by an alcalimetric titration of boric acid in presence of mannite resp. sorbite. (author)

  6. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  7. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  8. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  9. Mechanical properties of boron coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Internal stress of coatings will cause reliability problems, such as adhesion failure and peeling. We measured the internal stress in boron coatings, which was prepared by the ion plating method, with an apparatus based on the optically levered laser technique. The boron coatings exhibited large compressive stress in the range from -0.5 GPa to -2.6 GPa. It was found that these compressive stresses were decreasing functions of the deposition rate and were increasing functions of the ion bombardment energy. ((orig.))

  10. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Caniello; Espedito Vassallo; Anna Cremona; Giovanni Grosso; David Dellasega; Maurizio Canetti; Enrico Miorin

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coatin...

  11. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses. PMID:24052052

  12. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmazucar, Hasan H.; Guenduez, Guengoer E-mail: ggunduz@metu.edu.tr

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  13. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed

  14. 13C NMR spectroscopy of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the 13C NMR spectrum of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and boron carbide. The amorphous hydrogenated carbon spectra consist primarily of an sp3 line at 40 ppm and an sp2 line at 140 ppm and are in reasonable agreement with the recent theoretical calculations of Mauri, Pfrommer, and Louie, but there are some notable discrepancies. The amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide spectra are very different from those of amorphous hydrogenated carbon, being dominated by one line at 15 ppm. We interpret this line as due to carbon bound in boron carbide icosahedra, because polycrystalline boron carbide with boron carbide icosahedra as the unit cell gives very similar NMR spectra. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  15. Nuclear fuel management and boron carbide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years one way of introducing burnable absorber is to coat the fuel pellets by a thin layer of burnable absorber so called integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). In this method the fuel is coated with boron nitride or boron carbide. Boron has low absorption cross-section and when it exists on the surface of the fuel, it interacts with thermalized neutron. B4C is a boron compound, which can be used for coating the nuclear fuel. It has high thermal stability and withstands high pressure and temperatures. High technology product of boron carbide has different ratio of B: C. But in nuclear reactor when boron carbide is used, it must be rich with boron. In this research chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) has been using boron trichloride and carbon tetra chloride for reactant materials. The experiments were carried out at high temperatures (1050 degree Celsius, 1225 degree Celsius and 1325 degree Celsius). The coated samples were analyzed using X-Ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and will be presented in this paper. It was seen that decreasing the reaction temperature caused an increase on the quality and thickness of the coating

  16. The corrosion resistance and neutron-absorbing properties of coatings based on amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevryukov, O. N.; Polyansky, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The object of the present study was the corrosion-resistant amorphizing alloys with an increased content of boron for cladding the surface of metals, rapidly quenched alloys without boron for protective coatings on a high-boron cladding layer, as well as steel samples with a protective coating with a high content of boron and without boron. The aim of the work is to investigate the corrosion resistance of a coating in water at the temperature of 40 °C in conditions of an open access of oxygen for 1000 h, as well as the features of the microstructure of clad samples before and after the corrosion tests. New data on the corrosion resistance of Cr18Ni10Ti steel samples with a protective layer from a rapidly quenched alloy Ni-19Cr-10Si (in wt.%) on a high-boron coating have been obtained.

  17. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Johann Christian Schön; Alexander Hannemann; Guneet Sethi; Ilya Vladimirovich Pentin; Martin Jansen

    2011-01-01

    Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that th...

  18. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices. PMID:19257688

  19. Enhancement of oxidation resistance via a self-healing boron carbide coating on diamond particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youhong; Meng, Qingnan; Qian, Ming; Liu, Baochang; Gao, Ke; Ma, Yinlong; Wen, Mao; Zheng, Weitao

    2016-02-01

    A boron carbide coating was applied to diamond particles by heating the particles in a powder mixture consisting of H3BO3, B and Mg. The composition, bond state and coverage fraction of the boron carbide coating on the diamond particles were investigated. The boron carbide coating prefers to grow on the diamond (100) surface than on the diamond (111) surface. A stoichiometric B4C coating completely covered the diamond particle after maintaining the raw mixture at 1200 °C for 2 h. The contribution of the boron carbide coating to the oxidation resistance enhancement of the diamond particles was investigated. During annealing of the coated diamond in air, the priory formed B2O3, which exhibits a self-healing property, as an oxygen barrier layer, which protected the diamond from oxidation. The formation temperature of B2O3 is dependent on the amorphous boron carbide content. The coating on the diamond provided effective protection of the diamond against oxidation by heating in air at 1000 °C for 1 h. Furthermore, the presence of the boron carbide coating also contributed to the maintenance of the static compressive strength during the annealing of diamond in air.

  20. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Caniello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coating became three time stronger than in the case of a bare silicon substrate. Physical structure and microstructural proprieties of the coatings were investigated by means of a scan electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the films was measured by a scratch tester.

  1. Compaction of amorphous iron–boron powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mørup, Steen; Koch, Christian;

    1993-01-01

    Large scale practical use of bulk amorphous alloys requires the capability of molding the material to a desired design, for instance by compaction of an amorphous powder. This is a difficult task because the sintering temperature is limited by the crystallization temperature of the alloy.1 Here we......, should facilitate a compaction. The passivation layer, however, impedes a compaction. Isostatic pressing at 540 K at a pressure of 200 MPa clearly illustrated this; pellets pressed from passivated powder were much more brittle than pellets pressed from unpassivated powder. The density of the pellets...... was very low ([approximately-equal-to]25% of the density of bulk FeB). We have designed a die for uniaxial pressing in which the compaction can be performed without exposing the powder to air and have obtained densities larger than 60% of that of bulk FeB. We have reported studies of the dependence...

  2. Simulation of swift boron clusters traversing amorphous carbon foils

    OpenAIRE

    Heredia Ávalos, Santiago; Abril Sánchez, Isabel; Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; García Molina, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    We use a simulation code to study the interaction of swift boron clusters (Bn+, n=2–6, 14) with amorphous carbon foils. We analyze different aspects of this interaction, such as the evolution of the cluster structure inside the target, the energy and angle distributions at the detector or the stopping power ratio. Our simulation code follows in detail the motion of the cluster fragments through the target and in the vacuum until reaching a detector, taking into account the following interacti...

  3. AMORPHOUS COATING FORMING IN THE CONDITIONS OF GAS THERMAL SPRAYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Artemchuk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article the issues of forming amorphous coatings in the conditions of gas thermal spraying of coating are considered. On the basis of theoretical analysis the technological factors, determining possibility of obtaining the amorphous coatings at detonation spraying, are formulated. Two groups of factors, influencing on formation of amorphous structure in detonation sprayed coatings from metallic alloys, are marked.

  4. Boron-nitride coated nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenduez, G. [Orta Dogu Teknik Univ., Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, I. [Tuerkiye Atom Enerjisi Kurumu, Ankara (Turkey); Durmazucar, H.H. [Cumhuriyet Univ., Sivas (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    Pure urania- and urania-gadolinia-containing fuel pellets were coated with boron nitride (BN) to improve the physical and neutronic properties of the fuel. The BN coating seems to have a technological advantage over zirconium-diboride coating. The BN is chemically inert, corrosion resistant, withstands rapid temperature changes, and has a high thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity, the gadolinia content can be lowered in the fuel by coating it with BN. In fact, the existence of two burnable absorbers in a fuel introduces desired nuclear properties since gadolinia is a fast-burning and boron a slow-burning element. The BN was deposited on fuel from two different sources, (a) from the reaction of boron trichloride (BCl{sub 3}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) at 875 K and (b) from the decomposition of trimethylamine borate complex at 1200 K. The infrared and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of BN from both precursors agreed with the available data in the literature. However BN powder from borane complex had a shifted XRD peak due to the presence of carbonaceous material in the structure. The BN powder-coated fuels were heated to 1400, 1525, and 1600 K to sinter the BN. The examination under scanning electron microscope showed that grainy, rod-shaped and layered BN coatings were achieved. Rod-shaped structures were usually seen on gadolinia fuels. The increased thickness of coating favors the formation of a glassy looking layer. The BN from a borane complex seems to form a layered structure more easily than the BN from BCl{sub 3}. The BN coated the surface of the fuels, and it did not penetrate into the fuels.

  5. Boron-nitride coated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure urania- and urania-gadolinia-containing fuel pellets were coated with boron nitride (BN) to improve the physical and neutronic properties of the fuel. The BN coating seems to have a technological advantage over zirconium-diboride coating. The BN is chemically inert, corrosion resistant, withstands rapid temperature changes, and has a high thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity. Since gadolinia fuel has low thermal conductivity, the gadolinia content can be lowered in the fuel by coating it with BN. In fact, the existence of two burnable absorbers in a fuel introduces desired nuclear properties since gadolinia is a fast-burning and boron a slow-burning element. The BN was deposited on fuel from two different sources, (a) from the reaction of boron trichloride (BCl3) and ammonia (NH3) at 875 K and (b) from the decomposition of trimethylamine borate complex at 1200 K. The infrared and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of BN from both precursors agreed with the available data in the literature. However BN powder from borane complex had a shifted XRD peak due to the presence of carbonaceous material in the structure. The BN powder-coated fuels were heated to 1400, 1525, and 1600 K to sinter the BN. The examination under scanning electron microscope showed that grainy, rod-shaped and layered BN coatings were achieved. Rod-shaped structures were usually seen on gadolinia fuels. The increased thickness of coating favors the formation of a glassy looking layer. The BN from a borane complex seems to form a layered structure more easily than the BN from BCl3. The BN coated the surface of the fuels, and it did not penetrate into the fuels

  6. Burnup performances of boron nitride and boron coated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuels of urania (UOV) and 5% and 10% gadolinia (Gd2O3) containing UO2 previously produced by sol-gel technique were coated with first boron nitride (BN) then boron (B) thin layer by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and also by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques to increase the fuel cycle length and to improve the physical properties. From the cross-sectional view of BN and B layers taken from scanning electron microscope (SEM), the excellent adherence of BN onto fuel and B onto BN layer was observed in both cases. The behavior of fuel burnup, depletion of BN and B, the effect of coating thickness and also Gd2O3 content on the burnup performances of the fuels were identified by using the code WIMS-D/4 for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) cores. The optimum thickness ratio of B to BN was found as 4 and their thicknesses were chosen as 40 mm and 10 mm respectively in both reactor types to get extended cycle length. The assemblies consisting of fuels with 5% Gd2O3 and also coated with 10 mm BN and 40 mm B layers were determined as candidates for getting higher burnup in both types of reactors

  7. Improving tribological properties of sputtered boron carbide coatings by process modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckardt, T.; Bewilogua, K. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Schicht- und Oberflaechentechnik, Braunschweig (Germany); van der Kolk, G.; Hurkmans, T.; Trinh, T.; Fleischer, W. [Hauzer Techno Coating Europe BV, Van Heemskerckweg 22, NL-5920, Venlo (Netherlands)

    2000-04-03

    Boron carbide coatings are well-known for extreme hardness and excellent wear resistance. In this paper a d.c. magnetron sputter process for the deposition of boron carbide coatings is described. It is shown that by adding small amounts of a hydrocarbon reactive gas (in this case acetylene) the coefficient of friction can be reduced from 0.8 down to 0.2. Results from a laboratory scale deposition device are successfully transferred to an industrial batch coater. The coating adhesion is well enhanced by a titanium interlayer. From the analysis of the chemical composition and from hardness values it is concluded that a structural modification is responsible for the improvement of sliding behaviour. It is suggested that the introduction of additional bondings reduces the brittleness of boron carbide. Furthermore, a comparison with metal-containing amorphous carbon coatings (Me-DLC) reveals several similarities. (orig.)

  8. Nucleation of amorphous shear bands at nanotwins in boron suboxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Reddy, K Madhav; Qian, Jin; Hemker, Kevin J; Chen, Ming-Wei; Goddard Iii, William A

    2016-01-01

    The roles of grain boundaries and twin boundaries in mechanical properties are well understood for metals and alloys. However, for covalent solids, their roles in deformation response to applied stress are not established. Here we characterize the nanotwins in boron suboxide (B6O) with twin boundaries along the planes using both scanning transmission electron microscopy and quantum mechanics. Then, we use quantum mechanics to determine the deformation mechanism for perfect and twinned B6O crystals for both pure shear and biaxial shear deformations. Quantum mechanics suggests that amorphous bands nucleate preferentially at the twin boundaries in B6O because the twinned structure has a lower maximum shear strength by 7.5% compared with perfect structure. These results, which are supported by experimental observations of the coordinated existence of nanotwins and amorphous shear bands in B6O, provide a plausible atomistic explanation for the influence of nanotwins on the deformation behaviour of superhard ceramics. PMID:27001922

  9. Quantification of corrosion resistance of a new-class of criticality control materials: thermal-spray coatings of high-boron iron-based amorphous metals - Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Shaw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28

    An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was produced as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. Earlier studies have shown that ingots and melt-spun ribbons of these materials have good passive film stability in these environments. Thermal spray coatings of these materials have now been produced, and have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both atmospheric and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here.

  10. Boronized steels with corundum-baddeleyite coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes preparation and properties of anti-corrosion and anti-abrasive coatings from corundum-baddeleyite ceramics deposited on surface of low-carbon boronized steel S235JRH-1.0038 (EN 10025-1 by plasma spraying method. Adhesive interlayers Fe2B reaches bond strength of up to 20 MPa in the pull-off tests, the ZrO2 - Al2O3 - SiO2 coatings have a value of fracture adhesion of 4 - 6 MPa. Hardness of these ceramic coatings on steel is as high as 1 800 HV100 and its polarization resistance is 1 600 Ω/cm2 to 4 000 Ω/cm2.

  11. Vibrations of icosahedron-based networks: Application to amorphous boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of amorphous boron is believed to be an icosahedron-based random network. The vibrational properties of such a network are studied theoretically using a Bethe lattice of connected icosahedra. The local symmetry of each icosahedron, along with the use of effective fields, greatly reduces the complexity of the problem. We show that many intraicosahedral vibrations are not affected by the intericosahedral forces. The peak with the highest frequency, which appears commonly in various spectra of amorphous boron, has been ascribed to the intericosahedral vibrations. It is therefore concluded that the intericosahedral force is stronger than the intraicosahedral force. Examination of the density of states at the low-frequency side leads to a relatively large noncentral force for the intericosahedral bond. These conclusions support the view that the intericosahedral bond has a strong covalent character, which is consistent with available experimental data. Raman scattering and infrared absorption are discussed using the shell model and the bond-polarizability model. In these calculations, the spectra are analyzed using the correlations of atomic displacements between different molecular units. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  12. Tribological properties of cubic, amorphous and hexagonal boron nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubic boron nitride (c-BN), amorphous boron nitride (a-BN) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) films were deposited onto a silicon substrate using a magnetically enhanced plasma ion plating method which has a hot cathode plasma discharge in a parallel magnetic field. A reciprocating tribometer was used to examine friction and wear properties for these three BN films, whose crystal structures were identified by IR spectroscopy. The tribological properties were revealed to be highly dependent on the films' crystal structures. The c-BN film showed the highest wear and peeling resistance of the tested films. The lubricating performance of the c-BN film proved significant with a long lubricating life and low friction. In contrast, the a-BN and h-BN films showed short lubricating endurance lives and large friction changes in spite of the fact that they are good in general as solid lubricants. These unexpected results are speculated to reflect the premature debonding of the h-BN and a-BN films during sliding and the subsequent discharge of their flakes out of the nip between the substrate and the ball indenter, owing to their lower adhesion to the substrate. (orig.)

  13. Boron carbide particles formed from an amorphous boron/graphite powder mixture using a shock-wave technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) particles with filamental, distorted ellipsoidal, platelike, and polyhedral shapes were formed from vapor generated from an amorphous boron/graphite powder mixture with 14% starting density using a cylindrical shock-wave technique. The crystal phases of shocked compact and microstructures of the B4C particles were characterized by X-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy, respectively

  14. Production process for boron carbide coated carbon material and boron carbide coated carbon material obtained by the production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide coated carbon material is used for a plasma facing material of a thermonuclear reactor. The surface of a carbon material is chemically reacted with boron oxide to convert it into boron carbide. Then, it is subjected to heat treatment at a temperature of not lower than 1600degC in highly evacuated or inactive atmosphere to attain a boron carbide coated carbon material. The carbon material used is an artificial graphite or a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite material. In the heat treatment, when the atmosphere is in vacuum, it is highly evacuated to less than 10Pa. Alternatively, in a case of inactive atmosphere, argon or helium gas each having oxygen and nitrogen content of not more than 20ppm is used. With such procedures, there can be obtained a boron carbide-coated carbon material with low content of oxygen and nitrogen impurities contained in the boron carbide coating membrane thereby hardly releasing gases. (I.N.)

  15. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  16. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  17. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials

  18. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Corrosion-Resistant Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-07-18

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Fe-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  19. Amorphous coatings deposited on aluminum alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Yong-jun; XIA Yuan

    2005-01-01

    Amorphous [Al-Si-O] coatings were deposited on aluminum alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO). The process parameters, composition, micrograph, and mechanical property of PEO amorphous coatings were investigated. It is found that the growth rate of PEO coatings reaches 4.44 μm/min if the current density is 0.9 mA/mm2. XRD results show that the PEO coatings are amorphous in the current density range of 0.3 - 0.9mA/mm2. EDS results show that the coatings are composed of O, Si and Al elements. SEM results show that the coatings are porous. Nano indentation results show that the hardness of the coatings is about 3 - 4 times of that of the substrate, while the elastic modulus is about the same with the substrate. Furthermore, a formation mechanism of amorphous PEO coatings was proposed.

  20. Deposition and adhesion of PECVD boron coatings on Ti-6Al-4V substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) has been used to produce elemental boron coatings on Ti-6Al-4V substrates. Deposition has been accomplished using a novel PECVD reactor in which a serpentine, rather than a helical, RF coil has been employed. Transmission electron microscopy has confirmed the amorphous nature of these boron coatings. Scratch adhesion properties of this coating/substrate system, including an investigation of the effects of nitrogen ion implantation energy and fluence prior to deposition, have been determined. Both acoustic emission and frictional force measurements have been recorded during scratch removal traverses to detect incipient coating and/or substrate failure. Differences in failure mechanism have been found to result as a consequence of the substrate surface pretreatment, with untreated substrates giving rise to adhesive failures and ion implanted substrates leading to cohesive coating failures. The acoustic emission technique has demonstrated great sensitivity in the detection of both adhesive and cohesive coating failures, and scanning electron microscopy has been effective in differentiating adhesive failures, such as spallation, from coating microcracking in a cohesive failure mode

  1. boron and boron nitride coated nuclear fuel production in plasma atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these study uranium dioxide (UO2) and 5, 10 % gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) containing UO2 nuclear fuel pellets were coated with first boron nitride (BN) then boron (B) layers as the results of the reactions between boron trichloride (BCl3) with ammonia (NH3) and BCl3 with hydrogen (H2) in the medium of argon (Ar) plasma created at 650 W and 500 W and 27.12 MHz to increase the fuel burnup efficiency and reactor core life by the method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Grainy BN and B structures were observed on the photographs taken from scanning electron microscope (SEM)

  2. Neutron beam monitor based on a boron-coated GEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jian-Rong; LI Yi; SUN Zhi-Jia; LIU Ben; WANG Yan-Feng; YANG Gui-An; ZHOU Liang; XU Hong; DONG Jing; YANG Lei

    2011-01-01

    A new thermal neutron beam monitor with a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is developed to meet the needs of the next generation of neutron facilities. A prototype chamber has been constructed with two 100 mm×100 mm GEM foils. Enriched boron-10 is coated on one surface of the aluminum cathode plate as the neutron convertor. 96 channel pads with an area of 8 mm×8 mm each are used for fast signal readout.In order to study the basic characteristics of a boron-coated GEM, several irradiation tests were carried out with α source 239pu and neutron source 241Am(Be). The signal induced by the neutron source has a high signal-to-noise ratio. A clear image obtained from α source 239pu is presented, which shows that the neutron beam monitor based on a boron-coated GEM has a good two-dimensional imaging ability.

  3. Soft magnetic amorphous Fe-Zr-Si(Cu) boron-free alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Amorphous Fe-Zr-Si(Cu) boron-free alloys were prepared by melt quenching. → Soft magnetic properties were investigated by the specialized rf-Moessbauer technique. → Dependence of coercivity and magnetization on alloy compositions was determined. - Abstract: Amorphous Fe80ZrxSi20-x-yCuy boron-free alloys, in which boron was completely replaced by silicon as a glass forming element, have been prepared in the form of ribbons by using the melt quenching technique. X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements revealed that the as-quenched ribbons with the compositions with x = 6-10 at.% and y = 0, 1 at.% are fully or predominantly amorphous. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements allowed the estimation of crystallization temperatures of the amorphous alloys. Soft magnetic properties have been studied by the specialized rf-Moessbauer technique. Since the rf-collapse effect observed is very sensitive to the local anisotropy fields it was possible to evaluate the soft magnetic properties of the amorphous alloys studied. The rf-Moessbauer studies were accompanied by conventional measurements of hysteresis loops from which the magnetization and coercive fields were estimated. It was found that amorphous Fe-Zr-Si(Cu) alloys are magnetically very soft, comparable with those of the conventional amorphous B-containing Fe-based alloys.

  4. The boron-tailing myth in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckelberger, M.; Park, B.-S.; Bugnon, G.; Despeisse, M; Schüttauf, J.-W.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.

    2015-01-01

    The boron-tailing effect in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells describes the reduced charge collection specifically in the blue part of the spectrum for absorber layers deposited above a critical temperature. This effect limits the device performance of state-of-the art solar cells: For enhanced current density (reduced bandgap), the deposition temperature should be as high as possible, but boron tailing gets detrimental above 200°C. To investigate this limitation and to show...

  5. Metallurgical investigation in weldability of Aluminium Silicon coated boron steel with different coating thickness.

    OpenAIRE

    Aldén, Rickard

    2015-01-01

    Hot-pressed aluminium and silicon coated boron steel is used in the car industry where high tensile strength is of great importance, such as in the safety cage of a car where deformation has to be kept to a minimum in case of a collision. After hot-pressing the AlSi-boron steel shows excellent properties with high tensile strength, minimal spring back and also shows good protection against corrosion. A thickness of the AlSi coating of 150 [g/m2] for AlSi coated boron steel is typically used b...

  6. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed

  7. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V.; Begrambekov, L.; Buzhinsky, O.; Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A.; Klimov, N.; Kurnaev, V.; Mazul, I.; Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-08-01

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  8. Processability of Nickel-Boron Nanolayer Coated Boron Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation work focuses on the processability improvement of B4C, especially the compaction and sintering improvement of B4C by applying a Ni-B nanolayer coating on individual B4C particles. A modified electroless coating procedure was proposed and employed to coat nanometer Ni-B layer onto micron-sized B4C particles. The thickness was able to be tuned and controlled below 100 nm. Key parameters, including the amount of nickel source, the amount of the surface activation agent (PdCl...

  9. Modification of optical surfaces employing CVD boron carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-reflective or high emissivity optical surfaces require materials with given roughness or surface characteristics wherein interaction with incident radiation results in the absorption and dissipation of a specific spectrum of radiation. Coatings have been used to alter optical properties, however, extreme service environments, such as experienced by satellite systems and other spacecraft, necessitate the use of materials with unique combinations of physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Thus, ceramics such as boron carbide are leading candidates for these applications. Boron carbide was examined as a coating for optical baffle surfaces. Boron carbide coatings were deposited on graphite substrates from BCl3, CH4, and H2 gases employing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Parameters including temperature, reactant gas compositions and flows, and pressure were explored. The structures of the coatings were characterized using electron microscopy and compositions were determined using x-ray diffraction. The optical properties of the boron carbide coatings were measured, and relationships between processing conditions, deposit morphology, and optical properties were determined

  10. Boron nitride nanosheets as oxygen-atom corrosion protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research of two-dimensional nanomaterials for anticorrosion applications is just recently burgeoning. Herein, we demonstrate the boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) coatings for protecting polymer from oxygen-atom corrosion. High-quality BNNSs, which are produced by an effective fluid dynamics method with multiple exfoliation mechanisms, can be assembled into coatings with controlled thickness by vacuum filtration. After exposed in atom oxygen, the naked polymer is severely corroded with remarkable mass loss, while the BNNSs-coated polymer remains intact. Barrier and bonding effects of the BNNSs are responsible for the coating's protective performance. These preliminary yet reproducible results pave a way for resisting oxygen-atom corrosion

  11. Molybdenum-boron-silicon coating on VN-3 niobium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat resistance of the complex molybdenum-boron-silicon coating on VN-3 niobium alloy is studied. The coating phase composition in the initial state and after heating in air at 1200 deg C during 100-1300 h is determined using X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction and X-ray spectrum analyses. It is shown that high heat resistance of the coating is ensured due to formation of an external film of silicon oxide and a boride sublayer between the metal and coating

  12. Effect of boron nitride coating on fiber-matrix interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coatings can modify fiber-matrix reactions and consequently interfacial bond strengths. Commercially available mullite, silicon carbide, and carbon fibers were coated with boron nitride via low pressure chemical vapor deposition and incorporated into a mullite matrix by hot-pressing. The influence of fiber-matrix interactions for uncoated fibers on fracture morphologies was studied. These observations are related to the measured values of interfacial shear strengths

  13. Mechanism for amorphization of boron carbide B4C under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Sitaram; Rulis, Paul; Ching, W. Y.

    2011-11-01

    Boron carbide undergoes an amorphization transition under high-velocity impacts, causing it to suffer a catastrophic loss in strength. The failure mechanism is not clear and this limits the ways to improve its resistance to impact. To help uncover the failure mechanism, we used ab initio methods to carry out large-scale uniaxial compression simulations on two polytypes of stoichiometric boron carbide (B4C), B11C-CBC, and B12-CCC, where B11C or B12 is the 12-atom icosahedron and CBC or CCC is the three-atom chain. The simulations were performed on large supercells of 180 atoms. Our results indicate that the B11C-CBC (B12-CCC) polytype becomes amorphous at a uniaxial strain s = 0.23 (0.22) and with a maximum stress of 168 (151) GPa. In both cases, the amorphous state is the consequence of structural collapse associated with the bending of the three-atom chain. Careful analysis of the structures after amorphization shows that the B11C and B12 icosahedra are highly distorted but still identifiable. Calculations of the elastic coefficients (Cij) at different uniaxial strains indicate that both polytypes may collapse under a much smaller shear strain (stress) than the uniaxial strain (stress). On the other hand, separate simulations of both models under hydrostatic compression up to a pressure of 180 GPa show no signs of amorphization, in agreement with experimental observation. The amorphized nature of both models is confirmed by detailed analysis of the evolution of the radial pair distribution function, total density of states, and distribution of effective charges on atoms. The electronic structure and bonding of the boron carbide structures before and after amorphization are calculated to further elucidate the mechanism of amorphization and to help form the proper rationalization of experimental observations.

  14. Nitrogen implantation effects on the chemical bonding and hardness of boron and boron nitride coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S; Felter, T; Hayes, J; Jankowski, A F; Patterson, R; Poker, D; Stamler, T

    1999-02-08

    Boron nitride (BN) coatings are deposited by the reactive sputtering of fully dense, boron (B) targets utilizing an argon-nitrogen (Ar-N{sub 2}) reactive gas mixture. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals features of chemical bonding in the B 1s photoabsorption spectrum. Hardness is measured at the film surface using nanoindentation. The BN coatings prepared at low, sputter gas pressure with substrate heating are found to have bonding characteristic of a defected hexagonal phase. The coatings are subjected to post-deposition nitrogen (N{sup +} and N{sub 2}{sup +}) implantation at different energies and current densities. The changes in film hardness attributed to the implantation can be correlated to changes observed in the B 1s NEXAFS spectra.

  15. Boronized stainless steel with zirconia coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Kolísko, J.; Kubatík, Tomáš František; Mastný, L.; Pokorný, P.; Tej, P.

    Ostrava: TANGER Ltd, 2015, s. 1069-1074. ISBN 978-80-87294-62-8. [METAL 2015. International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials /24./. Brno (CZ), 03.06.2015-05.06.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Boronised steel * plasma spraying * ceramic coatings * bond strength * zirkonia coatings Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  16. Atomistic Explanation of Shear-Induced Amorphous Band Formation in Boron Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Cheng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Boron carbide (B_4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (011 ¯  1 ¯ )/⟨1 ¯ 101⟩ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon ...

  17. Microstructure of boron nitride coated on nuclear fuels by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three nuclear fuels, pure urania, 5% and 10% gadolinia containing fuels were coated with boron nitride to improve nuclear and physical properties. Coating was done by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique by using boron trichloride and ammonia. The specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Boron nitride formed a grainy structure on all fuels. Gadolinia decreased the grain size of boron nitride. The fractal dimensions of fragmentation and of area-perimeter relation were determined. (orig.)

  18. Microstructure of boron nitride coated on nuclear fuels by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmazucar, H.H. [Cumhuriyet Univ., Sivas (Turkey). Kimya Muehendisligi Boeluemue; Guenduez, G. [Kimya Muehendisligi Boeluemue, Orta Dogu Teknik Ueniversitesi, Ankara 06531 (Turkey); Toker, C. [Elektrik-Elektronik Muehendisligi Boeluemue, Orta Dogu Teknik Ueniversitesi, Ankara 06531 (Turkey)

    1998-08-03

    Three nuclear fuels, pure urania, 5% and 10% gadolinia containing fuels were coated with boron nitride to improve nuclear and physical properties. Coating was done by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique by using boron trichloride and ammonia. The specimens were examined under a scanning electron microscope. Boron nitride formed a grainy structure on all fuels. Gadolinia decreased the grain size of boron nitride. The fractal dimensions of fragmentation and of area-perimeter relation were determined. (orig.) 19 refs.

  19. WSP-Sprayed Boron Carbide Coatings for Fusion Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Neufuss, Karel; Ctibor, Pavel; Rohan, Pavel; Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil

    Düsseldorf: DVS, 2002 - (Lugscheider, E.; Berndt, C.), s. 1-5 ISBN 3-87155-783-8. [International Thermal Spray Conference.. Essen (DE), 04.03.2002-06.03.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : thermal spray coatings, boron carbide, fusion reactor materials Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  20. High frequency organ-pipe modes in amorphous boron carbide observed using surface Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous boron carbide films of 2 micron thickness were deposited at room temperature by a thermal deposition process on single-crystal silicon substrates. The elastic constants of an amorphous B4C film have been successfully measured by surface Brillouin scattering as a function of temperature, in the process, revealing a phase transition at about 350 deg.C. Quantized wave-vector components perpendicular to the film surface associated with organ-pipe modes occurring within the film were used in conjunction with elastodynamic Green's function calculations as well as independent measurement of longitudinal frequency from bulk excitations to extract the elastic constants

  1. Atomistic explanation of shear-induced amorphous band formation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-29

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (0111)/ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C. PMID:25215991

  2. Atomistic Explanation of Shear-Induced Amorphous Band Formation in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (011¯ 1¯)/⟨1¯101⟩ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  3. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  4. Boron doping compensation of hydrogenated amorphous and polymorphous germanium thin films for infrared detection applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, M., E-mail: mmoreno@inaoep.mx [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, INAOE, P.O. Box 51 and 216, Puebla, Z. P. 72840 Puebla (Mexico); Delgadillo, N. [Universidad Autónoma de Tlaxcala, Av. Universidad No. 1, Z. P. 90006 Tlaxcala (Mexico); Torres, A. [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, INAOE, P.O. Box 51 and 216, Puebla, Z. P. 72840 Puebla (Mexico); Ambrosio, R. [Technology and Engineering Institute, Ciudad Juarez University UACJ, Av. Del Charro 450N, Z. P. 32310 Chihuahua (Mexico); Rosales, P.; Kosarev, A.; Reyes-Betanzo, C.; Hidalga-Wade, J. de la; Zuniga, C.; Calleja, W. [National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, INAOE, P.O. Box 51 and 216, Puebla, Z. P. 72840 Puebla (Mexico)

    2013-12-02

    In this work we have studied boron doping of hydrogenated amorphous germanium a-Ge:H and polymorphous germanium (pm-Ge:H) in low regimes, in order to compensate the material from n-type (due to oxygen contamination that commonly occurs during plasma deposition) to intrinsic, and in this manner improve the properties that are important for infrared (IR) detection, as activation energy (E{sub a}) and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Electrical, structural and optical characterization was performed on the films produced. Measurements of the temperature dependence of conductivity, room temperature conductivity (σ{sub RT}), E{sub a} and current–voltage characteristics under IR radiation were performed in the compensated a-Ge:H and pm-Ge:H films. Our results demonstrate that, effectively, the values of E{sub a}, TCR and IR detection are improved on the a-Ge:H/pm-Ge:H films, using boron doping in low regimes, which results of interest for infrared detectors. - Highlights: • We reported boron doping compensation of amorphous and polymorphous germanium. • The films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. • The aim is to use the films as thermo-sensing elements in un-cooled microbolometers. • Those films have advantages over boron doped a-Si:H used in commercial detectors.

  5. The boron-tailing myth in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckelberger, M.; Park, B.-S.; Bugnon, G.; Despeisse, M.; Schüttauf, J.-W.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C.

    2015-11-01

    The boron-tailing effect in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells describes the reduced charge collection specifically in the blue part of the spectrum for absorber layers deposited above a critical temperature. This effect limits the device performance of state-of-the art solar cells: For enhanced current density (reduced bandgap), the deposition temperature should be as high as possible, but boron tailing gets detrimental above 200 °C. To investigate this limitation and to show potential paths to overcome it, we deposited high-efficiency a-Si:H solar cells, varying the deposition temperatures of the p-type and the intrinsic absorber (i) layers between 150 and 250 °C. Using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, we study dedicated stacks of i-p-i layers deposited at different temperatures. This allows us to track boron diffusion at the p-i and i-p interfaces as they occur in the p-i-n and n-i-p configurations of a-Si:H solar cells for different deposition conditions. Finally, we prove step-by-step that the common explanation for boron tailing—boron diffusion from the p layer into the i layer leading to enhanced recombination—is not generally true and propose an alternative explanation for the experimentally observed drop in the external quantum efficiency at short wavelengths.

  6. The boron-tailing myth in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuckelberger, M., E-mail: michael.stuckelberger@alumni.ethz.ch; Bugnon, G.; Despeisse, M.; Schüttauf, J.-W.; Haug, F.-J.; Ballif, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Park, B.-S. [SIMS Services, Evans Analytical Group, 810 Kifer Road, Sunnyvale, California 94086 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    The boron-tailing effect in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells describes the reduced charge collection specifically in the blue part of the spectrum for absorber layers deposited above a critical temperature. This effect limits the device performance of state-of-the art solar cells: For enhanced current density (reduced bandgap), the deposition temperature should be as high as possible, but boron tailing gets detrimental above 200 °C. To investigate this limitation and to show potential paths to overcome it, we deposited high-efficiency a-Si:H solar cells, varying the deposition temperatures of the p-type and the intrinsic absorber (i) layers between 150 and 250 °C. Using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, we study dedicated stacks of i-p-i layers deposited at different temperatures. This allows us to track boron diffusion at the p-i and i-p interfaces as they occur in the p-i-n and n-i-p configurations of a-Si:H solar cells for different deposition conditions. Finally, we prove step-by-step that the common explanation for boron tailing—boron diffusion from the p layer into the i layer leading to enhanced recombination—is not generally true and propose an alternative explanation for the experimentally observed drop in the external quantum efficiency at short wavelengths.

  7. The boron-tailing myth in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron-tailing effect in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells describes the reduced charge collection specifically in the blue part of the spectrum for absorber layers deposited above a critical temperature. This effect limits the device performance of state-of-the art solar cells: For enhanced current density (reduced bandgap), the deposition temperature should be as high as possible, but boron tailing gets detrimental above 200 °C. To investigate this limitation and to show potential paths to overcome it, we deposited high-efficiency a-Si:H solar cells, varying the deposition temperatures of the p-type and the intrinsic absorber (i) layers between 150 and 250 °C. Using secondary ion mass spectroscopy, we study dedicated stacks of i-p-i layers deposited at different temperatures. This allows us to track boron diffusion at the p-i and i-p interfaces as they occur in the p-i-n and n-i-p configurations of a-Si:H solar cells for different deposition conditions. Finally, we prove step-by-step that the common explanation for boron tailing—boron diffusion from the p layer into the i layer leading to enhanced recombination—is not generally true and propose an alternative explanation for the experimentally observed drop in the external quantum efficiency at short wavelengths

  8. Autocatalytic reduction and characteristics of boron-containing coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research results of the plating conditions, chemical composition and properties of Ni-B coatings and Ni-Re-B, Ni-Mo-B and Ni-W-B alloys are given. It was shown that introduction of alloying elements (Re, Mo and W) in the composition of Ni-containing coatings modifies the catalytic activity of the alloys' surface, with regard to the parallel reactions of dimethylamino-borane(DMAB) heterogeneous hydrolysis, Ni reduction and evolving of the molecular hydrogen. It was found that with the increase in concentration of alloying element, boron contents in the coatings is decreased to the trace amounts. The effect of alloys composition on hydrogen evolving overvoltage was studied. Due to the low overvoltage of hydrogen evolving (HE) on the alloy Ni-Re-B surface (11 at.% Re), it can be used as electrode for hydrogen generation from water in the electrolytic cell with novel design and improved technical-economical indicators. (authors)

  9. Amorphous silicon carbide coatings for extreme ultraviolet optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortright, J. B.; Windt, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films formed by sputtering techniques are shown to have high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. X-ray scattering verifies that the atomic arrangements in these films are amorphous, while Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy show that the films have composition close to stoichiometric SiC, although slightly C-rich, with low impurity levels. Reflectance vs incidence angle measurements from 24 to 1216 A were used to derive optical constants of this material, which are presented here. Additionally, the measured extreme ultraviolet efficiency of a diffraction grating overcoated with sputtered amorphous silicon carbide is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using these films as coatings for EUV optics.

  10. Ultrathin high-temperature oxidation-resistant coatings of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Gong, Yongji; Zhou, Wu; Ma, Lulu; Yu, Jingjiang; Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Jung, Jeil; MacDonald, Allan H.; Vajtai, Robert; Lou, Jun; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2013-10-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride is a two-dimensional layered material that can be stable at 1,500 °C in air and will not react with most chemicals. Here we demonstrate large-scale, ultrathin, oxidation-resistant coatings of high-quality hexagonal boron nitride layers with controlled thicknesses from double layers to bulk. We show that such ultrathin hexagonal boron nitride films are impervious to oxygen diffusion even at high temperatures and can serve as high-performance oxidation-resistant coatings for nickel up to 1,100 °C in oxidizing atmospheres. Furthermore, graphene layers coated with a few hexagonal boron nitride layers are also protected at similarly high temperatures. These hexagonal boron nitride atomic layer coatings, which can be synthesized via scalable chemical vapour deposition method down to only two layers, could be the thinnest coating ever shown to withstand such extreme environments and find applications as chemically stable high-temperature coatings.

  11. Flow characteristics of aluminum coated boron steel in hot press forming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeong-Hwan JANG; Jae-Ho LEE; Byeong-Don JOO; Young-Hoon MOON

    2009-01-01

    The flow characteristics of aluminum coated boron steel in hot press forming were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of aluminum coated layer on press forming were analyzed during deep drawing. The results show that aluminum coated boron steel exhibits a high sensitivity on temperature and strain rate. Aluminum coating layer appears in surface flaking in a temperature range of 700-800 ℃, but smooth surface is formed above 900 ℃.

  12. Preliminary results of a new boron coated neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gervino, G., E-mail: gervino@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Balma, M.; Devona, D. [SELEX Galileo, San Maurizio Canavese, TO (Italy); Lavagno, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Politecnico di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Palmisano, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); Zamprotta, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Scarfone, A. [ISC-CNR Torino (Italy); INFN Torino (Italy); Tintori, C. [C.A.E.N. S.p.A., Viareggio, LU (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    The proliferation of neutron detection applications based upon {sup 3}He counter has triggered a critical shortage of {sup 3}He gas. Nowadays there is an increasing demand for alternative neutron detectors that can cover large solid angles, have low sensitivity to gamma background and low cost. We present a low cost neutron detector based upon 3 cm diameter, 150 cm long cylindrical metal tube coated on the inside with a thin layer of {sup 10}B-enriched boron carbide ({sup 10}B{sub 4}C) fulfilled by 1 atm nitrogen.

  13. Bacterial adhesion on amorphous and crystalline metal oxide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaguer-Flores, Argelia [Facultad de Odontología, División de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigación, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Silva-Bermudez, Phaedra, E-mail: suriel21@yahoo.com [Unidad de Ingeniería de Tejidos, Terapia Celular y Medicina Regenerativa, Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación, Calzada México-Xochimilco No. 289, Col. Arenal de Guadalupe, 14389 México D.F. (Mexico); Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico); Galicia, Rey; Rodil, Sandra E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the influence of surface properties (surface energy, composition and topography) of biocompatible materials on the adhesion of cells/bacteria on solid substrates; however, few have provided information about the effect of the atomic arrangement or crystallinity. Using magnetron sputtering deposition, we produced amorphous and crystalline TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings with controlled micro and nanoscale morphology. The effect of the structure on the physical–chemical surface properties was carefully analyzed. Then, we studied how these parameters affect the adhesion of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Our findings demonstrated that the nano-topography and the surface energy were significantly influenced by the coating structure. Bacterial adhesion at micro-rough (2.6 μm) surfaces was independent of the surface composition and structure, contrary to the observation in sub-micron (0.5 μm) rough surfaces, where the crystalline oxides (TiO{sub 2} > ZrO{sub 2}) surfaces exhibited higher numbers of attached bacteria. Particularly, crystalline TiO{sub 2}, which presented a predominant acidic nature, was more attractive for the adhesion of the negatively charged bacteria. The information provided by this study, where surface modifications are introduced by means of the deposition of amorphous or crystalline oxide coatings, offers a route for the rational design of implant surfaces to control or inhibit bacterial adhesion. - Highlights: • Amorphous (a) and crystalline (c) TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} coatings were deposited. • The atomic ordering influences the coatings surface charge and nano-topography. • The atomic ordering modifies the bacterial adhesion for the same surface chemistry. • S. aureus adhesion was lower on a-TiO{sub 2} and a-ZrO{sub 2} than on their c-oxide counterpart. • E. coli adhesion on a-TiO{sub 2} was lower than on the c-TiO{sub 2}.

  14. Valence band offset and Schottky barrier at amorphous boron and boron carbide interfaces with silicon and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the fundamental charge transport in a-B:H and a-BX:H (X = C, N, P) compound heterostructure devices, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been utilized to determine the valence band offset and Schottky barrier present at amorphous boron compound interfaces formed with (1 0 0) Si and polished poly-crystalline Cu substrates. For interfaces formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-B4–5C:H on (1 0 0) Si, relatively small valence band offsets of 0.2 ± 0.2 eV were determined. For a-B:H/Cu interfaces, a more significant Schottky barrier of 0.8 ± 0.16 eV was measured. These results are in contrast to those observed for a-BN:H and BP where more significant band discontinuities (>1–2 eV) were observed for interfaces with Si and Cu.

  15. Valence band offset and Schottky barrier at amorphous boron and boron carbide interfaces with silicon and copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, 5200 NE Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); French, Marc; Xu, Guanghai [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, 5200 NE Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States); French, Benjamin [Ocotillo Materials Laboratory, Intel Corporation, 4500 S. Dobson Road, Chandler, AZ 85248 (United States); Jaehnig, Milt; Bielefeld, Jeff; Brockman, Justin; Kuhn, Markus [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, 5200 NE Elam Young Parkway, Hillsboro, OR 97124 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    In order to understand the fundamental charge transport in a-B:H and a-BX:H (X = C, N, P) compound heterostructure devices, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been utilized to determine the valence band offset and Schottky barrier present at amorphous boron compound interfaces formed with (1 0 0) Si and polished poly-crystalline Cu substrates. For interfaces formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of a-B{sub 4–5}C:H on (1 0 0) Si, relatively small valence band offsets of 0.2 ± 0.2 eV were determined. For a-B:H/Cu interfaces, a more significant Schottky barrier of 0.8 ± 0.16 eV was measured. These results are in contrast to those observed for a-BN:H and BP where more significant band discontinuities (>1–2 eV) were observed for interfaces with Si and Cu.

  16. MONTE-CARLO SIMULATION FOR ATOMIC DEPOSITION OF AMORPHOUS ELECTROLESS Ni80P20 COATING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.S. Guan; H.R. Bai; Z.W. Wang; Y.S. Yin

    2002-01-01

    Atomic growth process and structure of Amorphous Electroless Coating have beenstudied, using Monte-Carlo simulation method. The simulation results of amorphousNi80P20 coating show that PDFs are in accordance with practical values. The mi-grations of adatoms in coating's growth are different from that of solidification ofamorphous materials. In some cases, the migrated adatoms in the process of growthof amorphous coating are not enough to occupy all vacancies and traps, so the amor-phous coating is micro-porous. The immovable probability k and the largest migrationdistance of adatoms, which lie on the electroless bath components, affect the PDF,volume density and microporosity remarkably.

  17. Boron nitride - boron hybrid coating on uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuel. Final report for the period 1 November 1996 - 1 November 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes work to develop laboratory-scale technology of the deposition of hybrid boron nitrate-metallic boron coating onto the surface of uranium dioxide ore uranium dioxide - gadolinia dioxide fuel pellets. Methods of chemical vapour deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition were used in the Department of Chemical Engineering of the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. An excellent adherence of boron onto the boron nitrate layer and boron nitrate layer onto the fuel pellet surface was demonstrated. Fine grain-type structure of boron coating and its excellent adherence are good indices for integrated fuel burnable absorber fuels

  18. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  19. In situ mechanical property measurements of amorphous carbon-boron nitride nanotube nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Carpena Núñez, Jennifer; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Lin, Yi; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  20. High power photoconductive semiconductor switches treated with amorphic diamond coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our recent efforts have resulted in implementation and demonstration of several intense photoconductively switched stacked Blumlein pulsers producing high power output pulses with risetimes as fast as 200 ps. A single GaAs photoconductive switch triggered with a low power laser diode array commutates these devices. During the avalanche-mode photoconductive switching of these pulsers at high powers, current filamentation associated with the high gain GaAs switches produces such high current density that switches are damaged near the metal-semiconductor interface and the lifetime is limited. This report presents progress toward improving the switch operation and lifetime by advanced treatments with the amorphic diamond coatings

  1. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  2. AUTOCATALYTIC REDUCTION AND CHARACTERISTICS OF BORON-CONTAINING COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Covaliov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The research results of the plating conditions, chemical composition and properties of Ni-B coatings and Ni-Re-B, Ni-Mo-B and Ni-W-B alloys are given. It was shown that introduction of alloying elements (Re, Мо and W in the composition of Ni-containing coatings modifies the catalytic activity of the alloys’ surface, with regard to the parallel reactions of dimethylamino-borane (DMAB heterogeneous hydrolysis, Ni reduction and evolving of the molecular hydrogen. It was found that with the increase in concentration of alloying element, boron content in the coatings is decreased to the trace amounts. The effect of alloys composition on hydrogen evolving overvoltage was studied. Due to the low overvoltage of hydrogen evolving (HE on the alloy Ni-Re-B surface (11 at.% Re, it can be used as electrode for hydrogen generation from water in the electrolytic cell with novel design and improved technical-economic indicators.

  3. Electrochemical evaluation of corrosion and tribocorrosion behaviour of amorphous and nanocrystalline cobalt–tungsten electrodeposited coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous and nanocrystalline Co–W coatings were electrodeposited on copper substrates from a citrate–ammonia bath. The coatings showed nodular surface morphologies, but a microcrack network was detected in the amorphous coating. However, a better corrosion resistance was achieved for the amorphous coating. During sliding under open circuit potential (OCP) condition, the potential of amorphous coating gradually became more active probably due to the widening of wear scar, and thus expansion of active area. The amorphous coatings showed a higher volume loss at OCP probably due to its lower microhardness. In anodic sliding, a sharp increase in current density was observed due to mass transport and depassivation effects. In all sliding conditions, the proportion of mass transport was higher than wear accelerated corrosion, which implied that the dissolution reaction of the coatings was mainly a mass-transport controlled process. The results also showed that the effect of sliding on degradation is more intense for the nanocrystalline coating. For both coatings, the formation of the superficial microcracks in the vicinity of wear scars indicating on a surface fatigue wear mechanism. - Highlights: • Mass-transport effect had higher proportion in tribocorrosion of Co–W coatings. • The major electrochemical-wear degradation was for the nanocrystalline coating. • The higher proportion of wear accelerated corrosion was for the amorphous coating. • Superficial microcracks were formed near scars due to the coatings brittleness

  4. Electrochemical evaluation of corrosion and tribocorrosion behaviour of amorphous and nanocrystalline cobalt–tungsten electrodeposited coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathollahzade, N.; Raeissi, K., E-mail: k_raeissi@cc.iut.ac.ir

    2014-11-14

    Amorphous and nanocrystalline Co–W coatings were electrodeposited on copper substrates from a citrate–ammonia bath. The coatings showed nodular surface morphologies, but a microcrack network was detected in the amorphous coating. However, a better corrosion resistance was achieved for the amorphous coating. During sliding under open circuit potential (OCP) condition, the potential of amorphous coating gradually became more active probably due to the widening of wear scar, and thus expansion of active area. The amorphous coatings showed a higher volume loss at OCP probably due to its lower microhardness. In anodic sliding, a sharp increase in current density was observed due to mass transport and depassivation effects. In all sliding conditions, the proportion of mass transport was higher than wear accelerated corrosion, which implied that the dissolution reaction of the coatings was mainly a mass-transport controlled process. The results also showed that the effect of sliding on degradation is more intense for the nanocrystalline coating. For both coatings, the formation of the superficial microcracks in the vicinity of wear scars indicating on a surface fatigue wear mechanism. - Highlights: • Mass-transport effect had higher proportion in tribocorrosion of Co–W coatings. • The major electrochemical-wear degradation was for the nanocrystalline coating. • The higher proportion of wear accelerated corrosion was for the amorphous coating. • Superficial microcracks were formed near scars due to the coatings brittleness.

  5. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  6. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  7. Preparation of boron nitride (BN) coatings onto different substrates using the polymer derived ceramics (PDCs) approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Termoss, Hussein

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare boron nitride coatings onto different substrates using the Polymers Derived Ceramics (PDCs) approach. In that way, BN coatings were obtained onto graphite, pure silica and metal especially titanium. The first part of this thesis was to study parameters (of the solution used and of the dip-coating process), to obtain the best coatings in terms of morphology, cristallinity and chemical composition. The second part was dedicated to BN coatings obtained onto me...

  8. Fabrication and microstructure of Fe-based amorphous composite coatings by laser cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Qingjun; Zou Zengda; Qu Shiyao; Wang Xinhong

    2008-01-01

    Fe-based amorphous composite coatings were fabricated on AISI 1045 steel by laser cladding. The results of the X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analyses show the coating is composed of an amorphous phase in majority and a nanocrystalline phase in minority. Phase composition of the coating changes along the depth of the coating. The reasonable scanning speed for fabricating an amorphous composite coating is 3 500mm/min when the laser power is 4 800W and the laser beam diameter is 2mm. If the scanning speed is lower than 3 500mm/min, the intensity of the two main diffraction peaks in X-ray diffraction patterns of the coatings decreases with the scanning speeds increasing. At the same time, a broad halo peak emerges and enlarges. High laser power and fast scanning speed are the essential conditions of amorphization. The coating exhibits high microhardness.

  9. Structure of an amorphous boron carbide film: an experimental and computational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An amorphous boron carbide ceramic is prepared via hot wall chemical vapor deposition at 1000 C using a BCl3/CH4/H2 mixture. Its elemental composition is assessed by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and its structure studied by Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), both X-ray diffraction (XRD) and neutron diffraction, 11B magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and ab initio modeling. The atomic structure factor and pair distribution function derived from neutron diffraction data are compared to those deduced from an atomistic model obtained by a liquid quench ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. The good agreement between experimental data and simulation shows that the as prepared material is essentially made of a random arrangement of icosahedra (B12, B11C, and B10C2) embedded in an amorphous matrix rich in trigonal (BC3 or BC2B) and tetrahedral (CB4) sites. The existence of trigonal boron environments is clearly confirmed by a peak at 50 ppm in both the experimental and simulated 11B MAS NMR spectra, as well as a 190.0 eV component in the XANES-B(1s) spectrum. The inter icosahedral linear C-B-C chains observed in crystalline B4C are absent in the as-processed material. Free hexagonal carbon and B4C crystallites appear in the ceramic when heat-treated at 1300 C/2 h/Ar, as evidenced by high-resolution TEM and Raman spectroscopy. Comparing the pair distribution functions of the heat-treated material with the crystalline B4C model allows confirming the apparition of C-B-C chains in the material. Indeed, two new peaks located at 1.42 and 2.35 Angstroms can only be attributed to a first-neighbor distance between the B and C atoms in the chain and a second-neighbor distance between a chain-boron atom and an icosahedron-boron atom, respectively. (authors)

  10. Turbostratic boron nitride coated on high-surface area metal oxide templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Brorson, M.;

    2007-01-01

    Boron nitride coatings on high-surface area MgAl2O4 and Al2O3 have been synthesized and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by X-ray powder diffraction. The metal oxide templates were coated with boron nitride using a simple nitridation in a flow of ammonia starting from ammonium...... borate adsorbed on MgAl2O4 or gamma-Al2O3. This procedure resulted in the formation of a turbostratic boron nitride film with a thickness of a few individual BN layers....

  11. Effect of amorphous fluorinated coatings on photocatalytic properties of anodized titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persico, Federico [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131, Milano (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali, Via G. Giusti, 9, 50121 Firenze (Italy); Sansotera, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.sansotera@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131, Milano (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali, Via G. Giusti, 9, 50121 Firenze (Italy); Diamanti, Maria Vittoria [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131, Milano (Italy); Magagnin, Luca; Venturini, Francesco; Navarrini, Walter [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica “Giulio Natta”, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131, Milano (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali, Via G. Giusti, 9, 50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2013-10-31

    The photocatalytic activity promoted by anodized titanium surfaces coated with different amorphous perfluoropolymers was evaluated. A copolymer between tetrafluoroethylene and perfluoro-4-trifluoromethoxy-1,3-dioxole and two perfluoropolyethers containing ammonium phosphate and triethoxysilane functionalities, respectively, were tested as coating materials. These coatings revealed good adhesion to the anodized titanium substrate and conferred to it both hydrophobicity and oleophobicity. The photocatalytic activity of the coating on anodized titanium was evaluated by monitoring the degradation of stearic acid via Infrared spectroscopy. The degradation rate of stearic acid was reduced but not set to zero by the presence of the fluorinated coatings, leading to the development of advanced functional coatings. The morphological variations of the coatings as a result of photocatalysis were also determined by atomic force microscopy. - Highlights: • Coated anodized titanium surfaces show a decreased wettability. • Evaluation of the stability of perfluorinated coatings towards photocatalysis. • Amorphous perfluorinated coatings do not hinder photocatalytic activity.

  12. Effect of boron on the thermodynamic stability of amorphous polymer-derived Si-(B-)C-N ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reason for the higher thermal persistence of amorphous polymer-derived Si-B-C-N ceramics (T ∼ 1700–2000 °C) compared to Si-C-N ones (T ∼ 1500 °C) has been a matter of debate for more than a decade. Despite recent experimental results which indicate a major kinetic effect of boron on the thermal persistence of the ceramics, no experimental investigation of the thermodynamic stability of the materials has been reported. In this work, we present measured energetics of a series of the amorphous ceramics with various boron contents (0–8.3 at.%) using high-temperature oxidative drop-solution calorimetry. Through measurement of the drop-solution enthalpies in molten sodium molybdate at 811 °C, the formation enthalpies of the amorphous ceramics from crystalline components (SiC, BN, Si3N4, C) at 25 °C were obtained and found to be between −1.4 and −26.6 kJ g-atom−1. The determined enthalpy data plus the estimated positive entropy of formation values point to the thermodynamic stability of the amorphous ceramics relative to the crystalline phases, but such stabilization diminishes with increasing boron content. In contrast, the higher boron content increases the temperature of Si3N4 crystallization despite less favorable energetics for the amorphous phase, implying more favorable energetics for crystallization. Thus the so-called “stability” of Si-B-C-N ceramics in terms of persistence against Si3N4 crystallization appears to be controlled by kinetics rather than by thermodynamic stability.

  13. Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Clayton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear continuum phase field theory is developed to describe amorphization of crystalline elastic solids under shear and/or pressure loading. An order parameter describes the local degree of crystallinity. Elastic coefficients can depend on the order parameter, inelastic volume change may accompany the transition from crystal to amorphous phase, and transitional regions parallel to bands of amorphous material are penalized by interfacial surface energy. Analytical and simple numerical solutions are obtained for an idealized isotropic version of the general theory, for an element of material subjected to compressive and/or shear loading. Solutions compare favorably with experimental evidence and atomic simulations of amorphization in boron carbide, demonstrating the tendency for structural collapse and strength loss with increasing shear deformation and superposed pressure.

  14. The influence of glass coating on the single domain wall potential in amorphous glass-coated Fe-based microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, Rastislav [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, San Sebastian, 20018 (Spain) and Inst. Phys., Fac. Sci., UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Kosice (Slovakia)]. E-mail: rvarga@upjs.sk; Zhukov, Arcady [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, San Sebastian, 20018 (Spain); Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. de Quimica, UPV/EHU, 1072, 20080, San Sebastian (Spain); Ipatov, Michail [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, San Sebastian, 20018 (Spain); Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. de Quimica, UPV/EHU, 1072, 20080, San Sebastian (Spain); Maria Blanco, Juan [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, San Sebastian, 20018 (Spain); Gonzalez, Julian [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. de Quimica, UPV/EHU, 1072, 20080, San Sebastian (Spain); Zhukova, Valentina [' TAMag Iberica' S.L., P. Tecnologico de Miramon, P. Mikeletegi 56, San Sebastian (Spain); Vojtanik, Pavol [Inst. Phys., Fac. Sci., UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2006-09-15

    The effect of the glass coating on the single domain wall potential in amorphous glass-coated Fe-based microwire has been studied by the switching field distribution technique. The thermoactivated mechanism model is used to describe the thermally activated switching through the complex energy barrier in amorphous FeSiB microwires. Glass removal leads to the increase of the probability of the thermally activated switching pointing to the decrease of the energy barrier.

  15. The influence of glass coating on the single domain wall potential in amorphous glass-coated Fe-based microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the glass coating on the single domain wall potential in amorphous glass-coated Fe-based microwire has been studied by the switching field distribution technique. The thermoactivated mechanism model is used to describe the thermally activated switching through the complex energy barrier in amorphous FeSiB microwires. Glass removal leads to the increase of the probability of the thermally activated switching pointing to the decrease of the energy barrier

  16. Coating on steel ST-37 type with nano powder pack of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel ST-37 is a material widely used in industry. The quality of steel ST-37 can be improved by means of surface coating. At present the development of the technology shows the tendency toward nanoscience and nanotechnology that can be applied to various fields, among others energy, industry, medicine, information technology and communication as well as food necessitated by people at competitive selling prices. The steps in powder pack boronizing include: Pre-treatment, powder preparation, boronizing agent preparation, container preparation, boronizing process, metallography, hardness testing and corrosion testing. From the study, it is concluded as follows. The mechanism of boronizing process is divided into three stages, which are the boride compound formation stage, the diffusion stage, and the grain growth and orientation stage. Carbon in B4C on boronizing process does not diffuse into the substrate. The formation of boride compound begins to occur at a temperature of 600 °C, the diffusion process at 700 °C, and the grain growth and orientation at 800 °C. The hardness of boron coating reaches a value of 1115 VHN. Coating by boronizing process shows corrosion resistance in 10% HCl. (author)

  17. LARGE AREA FILTERED ARC DEPOSITION OF CARBON AND BORON BASED HARD COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Rabi S.

    2003-12-05

    This document is a final report covering work performed under Contract No. DE-FG02-99ER82911 from the Department of Energy under a SBIR Phase II Program. Wear resistant, hard coatings can play a vital role in many engineering applications. The primary goal of this project was to develop coatings containing boron and carbon with hardness greater than 30 GPa and evaluate these coatings for machining applications. UES has developed a number of carbon and boron containing coatings with hardness in the range of 34 to 65 GPa using a combination of filtered cathodic arc and magnetron sputtering. The boron containing coatings were based on TiB2, TiBN, and TiBCN, while the carbon containing coatings ere TiC+C and hydrogen free diamond-like-carbon. Machining tests were performed with single and multilayer coated tools. The turning and milling tests were run at TechSolve Inc., under a subcontract at Ohio State University. Significant increases in tool lives were realized in end milling of H-13 die steel (8X) and titanium alloy (80%) using the TiBN coating. A multilayer TiBN/TiN performed the best in end-milling of highly abrasive Al-Si alloys. A 40% increase in life over the TiAlN benchmark coating was found. Further evaluations of these coatings with commercialization partners are currently in progress.

  18. Dip coating of boron nitride thin films on nicalon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a process involving dip coating of ceramic fibers in H3BO3 solution followed by reaction with NH3 has resulted in the formation of a BN coating on Nicalon and a carbon coated Nicalon fiber. BN coated C-Nicalon fiber maintained its strength during the coating process, while the BN coated Nicalon did not

  19. Valence and conduction band offsets at amorphous hexagonal boron nitride interfaces with silicon network dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Brockman, Justin; Bielefeld, Jeff; French, Marc; Kuhn, Markus [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Paquette, Michelle M.; Otto, Joseph W.; Caruso, A. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); French, Benjamin [Ocotillo Materials Laboratory, Intel Corporation, Chandler, Arizona 85248 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    To facilitate the design of heterostructure devices employing hexagonal/sp{sup 2} boron nitride, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been utilized in conjunction with prior reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy measurements to determine the valence and conduction band offsets (VBOs and CBOs) present at interfaces formed between amorphous hydrogenated sp{sup 2} boron nitride (a-BN:H) and various low- and high-dielectric-constant (k) amorphous hydrogenated silicon network dielectric materials (a-SiX:H, X = O, N, C). For a-BN:H interfaces formed with wide-band-gap a-SiO{sub 2} and low-k a-SiOC:H materials (E{sub g} ≅ 8.2−8.8 eV), a type I band alignment was observed where the a-BN:H band gap (E{sub g} = 5.5 ± 0.2 eV) was bracketed by a relatively large VBO and CBO of ∼1.9 and 1.2 eV, respectively. Similarly, a type I alignment was observed between a-BN:H and high-k a-SiC:H where the a-SiC:H band gap (E{sub g} = 2.6 ± 0.2 eV) was bracketed by a-BN:H with VBO and CBO of 1.0 ± 0.1 and 1.9 ± 0.2 eV, respectively. The addition of O or N to a-SiC:H was observed to decrease the VBO and increase the CBO with a-BN:H. For high-k a-SiN:H (E{sub g} = 3.3 ± 0.2 eV) interfaces with a-BN:H, a slightly staggered type II band alignment was observed with VBO and CBO of 0.1 ± 0.1 and −2.3 ± 0.2 eV, respectively. The measured a-BN:H VBOs were found to be consistent with those deduced via application of the commutative and transitive rules to VBOs reported for a-BN:H, a-SiC:H, a-SiN:H, and a-SiO{sub 2} interfaces with Si (100)

  20. Magnetic anisotropy in rapidly quenched amorphous glass-coated nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Óvári, T.-A.; Rotărescu, C.; Atițoaie, A.; Corodeanu, S.; Lupu, N.; Chiriac, H.

    2016-07-01

    Results on the roles played by the magnetoelastic and magnetostatic anisotropy terms in the magnetic behavior of glass-coated magnetostrictive amorphous nanowires prepared by means of rapid solidification are reported. Their contributions have been analyzed both experimentally, through hysteresis loop measurements, and theoretically, using micromagnetic simulations. All the investigated samples exhibit a magnetically bistable behavior, characterized by a single-step magnetization reversal when the applied field reaches a critical threshold value, called switching field. The combined interpretation of the experimental and theoretical data allows one to understand the effect of the magnetoelastic term on the value of the switching field, on one hand, and the effect of the magnetostatic term on the nucleation mechanism on the other, both with an essential impact on the characteristics of the nanowires' magnetic bistability. The results are crucial for understanding the basic magnetic properties of these novel rapidly solidified ultrathin magnetic wires, as well as for tailoring their properties according to the specific requirements of various sensing applications.

  1. Synthesis of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes dependent on crystallographic structure of boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis and growth of multiwall boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under the B and ZrO2 seed system in the milling–annealing process were investigated. BNNTs were synthesized by annealing a mechanically activated boron powder under nitrogen environment. We explored the aspects of the mechanical activation energy transferred to milled crystalline boron powder producing structural disorder and borothermal reaction of the ZrO2 seed particles on the synthesis of BNNTs during annealing. Under these circumstances, the chemical reaction of amorphous boron coated on the seed nanoparticles with nitrogen synthesizing amorphous BN could be enhanced. It was found that amorphous BN was crystallized to the layer structure and then grown to multiwall BNNTs during annealing. Especially, bamboo-type multiwall BNNTs were mostly produced and grown to the tail-side of the nanotube not to the round head-side. Open gaps with ∼0.3 nm of the bamboo side walls of BNNTs were also observed. Based on these understandings, it might be possible to produce bamboo-type multiwall BNNTs by optimization of the structure and shape of boron coat on the seed nanoparticles. -- Highlights: ► Structure of B is a key factor for BNNT synthesis for milling–annealing method. ► Amorphous boron is coated on the seed during milling of crystalline boron. ► Amorphous BN nanoclusters are crystallized during annealing. ► Growing of bamboo BNNTs is not to the round head-side but to the tail-side.

  2. Properties of boron and phosphorous incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films grown using filtered cathodic vacuum arc process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the electrical, mechanical, structural and field emission properties of as grown and also boron and phosphorous incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films, deposited using a filtered cathodic vacuum arc process. The effect of varying boron and phosphorous content (up to 2.0 at.% in to ta-C) on the conductivity (σD), activation energy (ΔE1), hardness, microstructure, emission threshold (Eturn-ON) and emission current density (J) at 12.5 V/μm of ta-C: B and ta-C: P films deposited at a high negative substrate bias of -300 V are reported. It is observed that both boron and phosphorous incorporation leads to a nearly an order increase in σD and corresponding decrease in ΔE1 and a slight increase in hardness as compared to as grown ta-C films. In the case of field assisted electron emission, it is observed that Eturn-ON increases and J decreases. The changes are attributed to the changes in the sp3/sp2 ratio of the films due to boron and phosphorous incorporation. The effect of boron on ta-C is to give a p-type effect whereas the effect of phosphorous gives n-type doping effect.

  3. Boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Begrambekov, L., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Buzhinsky, O. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Klimov, N. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kurnaev, V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Mazul, I. [Federal State Unitary Interprise Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA Efremov), St-Peterburg (Russian Federation); Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI), Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B{sub 4}C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B{sub 4}C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B{sub 4}C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B{sub 4}C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  4. The production, characterization, and neutronic performance of boron nitride coated uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel pellets produced by sol-gel technique were coated with boron nitride (BN). This was achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron trichloride and ammonia. Mixing and chemical reaction take place at a temperature around 875 K. The coated samples were then sintered at 1600 K. Thermal reactor physics lattice-cell code WIMS-D/4 was used in the neutronic analysis of CANDU fuel bundle to observe the neutronic performance of the coated fuel. Three types of fuel were considered; fuel made of natural uranium, slightly enriched uranium (SEU, enrichment: 0.82 % U-235), and SEU with various BN coatings. The burnup calculations showed that feasible coating thickness is between 1 to 2 μm. (author)

  5. Improvements in Boron Plate Coating Technology for Higher Efficiency Neutron Detection and Coincidence Counting Error Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-25

    This informal report presents the measurement data and information to document the performance of the advanced Precision Data Technology, Inc. (PDT) sealed cell boron-10 plate neutron detector that makes use of the advanced coating materials and procedures. In 2015, PDT changed the boron coating materials and application procedures to significantly increase the efficiency of their basic corrugated plate detector performance. A prototype sealed cell unit was supplied to LANL for testing and comparison with prior detector cells. Also, LANL had reference detector slabs from the original neutron collar (UNCL) and the new Antech UNCL with the removable 3He tubes. The comparison data is presented in this report.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of Fe-based amorphous coatings prepared by high-velocity arc spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Fe-based cored wires were designed to achieve high glass forming ability. • Novel highly amorphous coatings were fabricated by arc spray technology. • The as-obtained amorphous coating possessed high thermal stability up to 873 K. • The as-obtained amorphous coating exhibited a high bonding strength over 44 MPa. - Abstract: Fe-based coatings with a high amorphous content were firstly developed by the traditional twin wires arc spray technology. In consideration of empirical rules, including the multi-component system, an optimal concentration of small atoms, negative heat of mixing and an appropriate atom size mismatch among the main components, the cored wires were designed to contain eight elements, which have an optimized atomic volume strain criterion λn, in range of 0.14–0.21, to render the coatings a high glass forming ability. Then the coatings were prepared using the above-designed cored wires through a rapid arc spray melting and solidification process. Crystalline phases could not be identified from the XRD patterns within the XRD resolution limits, suggesting that the as-sprayed coatings were approximately comprised of fully amorphous phases. With a dense structure and a low porosity of only 2%, the amorphous Fe-based coatings exhibited an attractive combination of high hardness (900–1100 HV0.3) and superior bonding strength (44.9–54.8 MPa). The coating at λn = 0.21 had the lowest Gibbs free energy difference ΔG, exhibited the largest super-cooled liquid region ΔTx, Lu’s criterion factor γ value and the heat of crystallization (ΔH) values, which indicating the highest GFA

  7. Feasibility study of Boron Nitride coating on Lithium-ion battery casing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing in public awareness about global warming and exhaustion of energy resources has led to a flourishing electric vehicle industry that would help realize a zero-emission society. The thermal management of battery packs, which is an essential issue closely linked to a number of challenges for electric vehicles including cost, safety, reliability and lifetime, has been extensively studied. However, relatively little is known about the thermal effect of polymer insulation on the Lithium-ion battery casing. This study investigates the feasibility of replacing the polymer insulation with a Boron Nitride coating on the battery casing using the Taguchi experimental method. The effect of casing surface roughness, coating thickness and their interaction were examined using orthogonal array L9 (34). Nominal the best is chosen for the optimization process to achieve optimum adhesion strength. In addition, the thermal improvements of the coating as compared to conventional polymer insulator on the battery are further investigated. - Highlights: • We studied the Boron Nitride coating on battery casing using Taguchi method. • We investigated the effect of surface roughness and coating thickness on adhesion strength. • We compared the effect of coating and polymer insulator in heat transfer. • The Boron Nitride coating could enhance the thermal management of the battery

  8. Deuterium permeation and thermal behaviors of amorphous silicon carbide coatings on steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, deuterium permeation measurements for SS316 and F82H steels coated with amorphous silicon carbide films by radio frequency magnetron sputtering are performed. The driving deuterium pressure dependence of the coated sample shows a large surface contribution. Deuterium trapping in the amorphous structure is suggested by the temporal change in the permeation flux. Permeation reduction factors of 103 are achieved with 1.5-μm-thick coated F82H at 723-823 K; however, the coating degraded at 873 K. Cracks are generated in the coating because of the tensile stress derived from a large difference in the thermal expansion between the coating and the steel.

  9. Fabrication and characterization of boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond-coated MEMS probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Robert; Sobaszek, Michał; Ficek, Mateusz; Kopiec, Daniel; Moczała, Magdalena; Orłowska, Karolina; Sawczak, Mirosław; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2016-04-01

    Fabrication processes of thin boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) films on silicon-based micro- and nano-electromechanical structures have been investigated. B-NCD films were deposited using microwave plasma assisted chemical vapour deposition method. The variation in B-NCD morphology, structure and optical parameters was particularly investigated. The use of truncated cone-shaped substrate holder enabled to grow thin fully encapsulated nanocrystalline diamond film with a thickness of approx. 60 nm and RMS roughness of 17 nm. Raman spectra present the typical boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond line recorded at 1148 cm-1. Moreover, the change in mechanical parameters of silicon cantilevers over-coated with boron-doped diamond films was investigated with laser vibrometer. The increase of resonance to frequency of over-coated cantilever is attributed to the change in spring constant caused by B-NCD coating. Topography and electrical parameters of boron-doped diamond films were investigated by tapping mode AFM and electrical mode of AFM-Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). The crystallite-grain size was recorded at 153 and 238 nm for boron-doped film and undoped, respectively. Based on the contact potential difference data from the KPFM measurements, the work function of diamond layers was estimated. For the undoped diamond films, average CPD of 650 mV and for boron-doped layer 155 mV were achieved. Based on CPD values, the values of work functions were calculated as 4.65 and 5.15 eV for doped and undoped diamond film, respectively. Boron doping increases the carrier density and the conductivity of the material and, consequently, the Fermi level.

  10. Tribological behaviour of mechanically synthesized titanium-boron carbide nanostructured coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliofkhazraei, M; Rouhaghdam, A Sabour

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, titanium-boron carbide (Ti/B4C) nanocomposite coatings with different B4C nanoparticles contents were fabricated by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) method by using B4C nanoparticles with average nanoparticle size of 40 nm. The characteristics of the nanopowder and coatings were evaluated by microhardness test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Friction and wear performances of nanocomposite coatings and pure titanium substrate were comparatively investigated, with the effect of the boron carbide content on the friction and wear behaviours to be emphasized. The results show the microhardness, friction and wear behaviours of nanocomposite coatings are closely related with boron carbide nanoparticle content. Nanocomposite coating with low B4C content shows somewhat (slight) increased microhardness and wear resistance than pure titanium substrate, while nanocomposite coating with high B4C content has much better (sharp increase) wear resistance than pure titanium substrate. The effect of B4C nanoparticles on microhardness and wear resistance was discussed. PMID:22962832

  11. Enhanced Physical Stability of Amorphous Drug Formulations via Dry Polymer Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Maxx; Davé, Rajesh

    2015-06-01

    Although amorphous solid drug formulations may be advantageous for enhancing the bioavailability of poorly soluble active pharmaceutical ingredients, they exhibit poor physical stability and undergo recrystallization. To address this limitation, this study investigates stability issues associated with amorphous solids through analysis of the crystallization behavior for acetaminophen (APAP), known as a fast crystallizer, using a modified form of the Avrami equation that kinetically models both surface and bulk crystallization. It is found that surface-enhanced crystallization, occurring faster at the free surface than in the bulk, is the major impediment to the stability of amorphous APAP. It is hypothesized that a novel use of a dry-polymer-coating process referred to as mechanical-dry-polymer-coating may be used to inhibit surface crystallization and enhance stability. The proposed process, which is examined, simultaneously mills and coats amorphous solids with polymer, while avoiding solvents or solutions, which may otherwise cause stability or crystallization issues during coating. It is shown that solid dispersions of APAP (64% loading) with a small particle size (28 μm) could be prepared and coated with the polymer, carnauba wax, in a vibratory ball mill. The resulting amorphous solid was found to have excellent stability as a result of inhibition of surface crystallization. PMID:25902736

  12. Selection of boron based tribological hard coatings using multi-criteria decision making methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Boron based coating selection problem for cutting tools was solved. • EXPROM2, TOPSIS and VIKOR methods were used for ranking the alternative materials. • The best coatings for cutting tool were selected as TiBN and TiSiBN. • The ranking results are in good agreement with cutting test results in literature. - Abstract: Mechanical and tribological properties of hard coatings can be enhanced using boron as alloying element. Therefore, multicomponent nanostructured boron based hard coatings are deposited on cutting tools by different methods at different parameters. Different mechanical and tribological properties are obtained after deposition, and it is a difficult task to select the best coating material. In this paper, therefore, a systematic evaluation model was proposed to tackle the difficulty of the material selection with specific properties among a set of available alternatives. The alternatives consist of multicomponent nanostructured TiBN, TiCrBN, TiSiBN and TiAlSiBN coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering and ion implantation assisted magnetron sputtering at different parameters. The alternative coating materials were ranked by using three multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) methods, i.e. EXPROM2 (preference ranking organization method for enrichment evaluation), TOPSIS (technique for order performance by similarity to ideal solution) and VIKOR (VIšekriterijumsko KOmpromisno Rangiranje), in order to determine the best coating material for cutting tools. Hardness (H), Young’s modulus (E), elastic recovery, friction coefficient, critical load, H/E and H3/E2 ratios were considered as material selection criteria. In order to determine the importance weights of the evaluation criteria, a compromised weighting method, which composes of the analytic hierarchy process and Entropy methods, were used. The ranking results showed that TiBN and TiSiBN coatings deposited at given parameters are the best coatings for cutting tools

  13. Amorphous structure in a laser clad Ni-Cr-Al coating on Al-Si alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A mixing microstructure containing Ni-based amorphous structures was observed by TEM in the laser cladzones. As the uniformity of chemical composition and temperature is poor in the laser cladding, the amorphous structurewith some Ni3Al crystals coexists in the cladding. The microhardness of the mixing amorphous structure is HV 600 ~800, which is lower than that of crystal phases in the coating. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) shows that Ni-basedamorphous structure exhibits a higher initial crystallizing temperature (about 588 ℃ ), which is slightly higher than that ofthe eutectic temperature of Al-Si alloy. The wear test results indicate that there are some amorphous structures in the laserclad coating, which reduces the peeling of the granular phases from matrix, and improves the wear resistance

  14. Detonation gun and plasma spraying of amorphous metal coatings with improved corrosion resistance: Simulation and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coating formation in detonation gun or plasma spraying involves direct contact of molten particles with cool metal of the substrate, which results in extra high cooling rates in the melt and enables synthesis of coatings with amorphous or metastable crystalline structure. Mathematical modeling of detonation gun and plasma spraying was carried out to determine the physical and engineering parameters for producing hard corrosion resistant coatings. For an iron-base (Fe-Cr-P-C) and a nickel-base (Ni-Cr-Si-B-C) eutectic alloy, spraying process parameters were determined theoretically. Purely amorphous or amorphous-crystalline coatings can be produced by detonation gun and plasma spraying with the use of values of individual layer thickness, pulse separation, powder feed rate, etc. thus obtained. The structure of these coatings whose hardness may be as high as 1,100 HV was described in more detail in a previous paper. Amorphous coatings are shown to outperform 304 stainless steel in resistance to corrosion in hydrochloric acid by no less than an order of magnitude

  15. boron nitride coating of uranium dioxide and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide fuels by chemical precipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research pure urania and urania-gadolinia (5 and 10 %) fuels were coated with boron nitride (BN). This is achieved through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using boron tricloride BCl3) and ammonia (NH3) at 600 C.Boron tricloride and ammonia are carried to tubular furnace using hydrogen as carrier gas. The coated samples were sintered at 1600 K. The properties of the coated samples were observed using BET surface area analysis, infrared spectra (IR), X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) techniques

  16. Fabrication of amorphous Ti-based coating by pulsed laser deposition with potential for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Conventional biomaterials have been used in a wide range of application in our life. The major problems of these materials are low mechanical and chemical properties in long period of time that make some limits for their application. Idea of using new biomaterials that not only have superior mechanical and corrosion resistance properties but also have long lasting biocompatibility, leads us to use Ti-based amorphous alloys. Development of metallic amorphous alloys production in last decade caused a revolution in material science so that they are known as a new group of materials called metallic glass. However for technical problems it could not be produced in thicknesses more than few millimeters yet, but using metallic glass alloys as thin coat could be economical and operable. In this research a new amorphous bio material was introduced as coating for medical application .This new biocompatible coating with Ti64Cu12Zr11Co5(Mo,Nb)8 chemical formula was deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique using non amorphous composite target. By controlling process conditions such as laser power, amorphicity was maximized and coating was fully metallic glass. Achieved hardness for this coating is (570-600 HV) that was measured by micro hardness machine from generated coating surface. None of the elements known as allergic is used in this coat chemical composition. The cytotoxicity evaluations such as acute toxicity and [MTT tests] provide evidence that this coat doesn't have any toxic effect and could be candidate as a bio material in medical and dental applications. (author)

  17. Chemical composition and structural transformations of amorphous chromium coatings electrodeposited from Cr(III) electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safonova, Olga V. [Swiss-Norwegian Beamlines at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Vykhodtseva, Ludmila N. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Polyakov, Nikolai A. [A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Swarbrick, Janine C. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Sikora, Marcin [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Department of Solid State Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Av. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Glatzel, Pieter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Safonov, Viktor A., E-mail: safon@elch.chem.msu.r [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-12-15

    Amorphous chromium coatings were electrodeposited from Cr(III)-based solutions containing organic (HCOONa) or phosphorus-containing (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}) additives. Their structure was studied by a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Cr K-edge. Metalloid atoms (C or P) incorporated in electroplates structure are chemically bonded to chromium (i.e. are located in the first coordination shell). Upon annealing at elevated temperatures in vacuum, these amorphous coatings crystallize into a mixture of phases containing metallic chromium and chromium carbides or chromium phosphides. Quantitative analysis of valence-to-core XES data demonstrates that the average local structure of chromium in the amorphous coatings does not change significantly during crystallization.

  18. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Widlow, I

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes our most recent findings in the structure and properties of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings, synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering. By careful control of the plasma conditions via proper choice of process parameters such as substrate bias, target power and gas pressure, one can precisely control film structure and properties. With this approach, we were able to produce amorphous carbon nitride films with controlled hardness and surface roughness. In particular, we can synthesize ultrathin (1 nm thick) amorphous carbon nitride films to be sufficiently dense and uniform that they provide adequate corrosion protection for hard disk applications. We demonstrated the strong correlation between ZrN (111) texture and hardness in CN sub x /ZrN superlattice coatings. Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption show the predominance of sp sup 3 -bonded carbon in these superlattice coatings.

  19. Surface analysis of VPS-W coatings boronized by an ICRF discharge in HT-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhongshi, E-mail: zsyang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang Wanjing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Radiosicence Research Laboratory, Shizuoka University, 836 Oya, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Li Qiang; Wu Jing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Okuno, Kenji; Oya, Yasuhisa [Radiosicence Research Laboratory, Shizuoka University, 836 Oya, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Luo Guangnan, E-mail: gnluo@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PO. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-10-01

    To understand the surface compositions and the hydrogen isotope behavior in boronized Vacuum plasma spraying (VPS)-W, the boron coating has been achieved by means of Ion Cyclotron Radio Frequency (ICRF) boronization using carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) powder as the precursor material in HT-7. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used to observe the morphology of the VPS-W and boronized W surfaces. The X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) of W-4f, O-1s, C-1s and B-1s on the VPS-W sample before and after boronization and after plasma exposure have been measured. The B-B and B-C bonds were observed after boronization treatment for VPS-W. Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) experiments were also carried out to investigate the thermal desorption behavior of D implanted into the samples. After HT-7 plasma exposure, the desorption spectrum had a low temperature peak associated with trapping in intrinsic defects in polycrystalline W and a high temperature peak associated with B-O-D and B-C-D bonds.

  20. Boron deposition from fused salts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A partial evaluation of the feasibility of a process to electrodeposit pure coherent coatings of elemental boron from molten fluorides has been performed. The deposit produced was powdery and acicular, unless the fluoride melt was purified to have very low oxygen concentration. When the oxygen activity was reduced in the melt by addition of crystalline elemental boron, dense, amorphous boron deposit was produced. The boron deposits produced had cracks but were otherwise pure and dense and ranged up to 0.35 mm thick. Information derived during this project suggests that similar deposits might be obtained crack-free up to 1.00 mm thick by process modifications and improvements

  1. Formation of borohydride-reduced nickel-boron coatings on various steel substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitry, V.; Delaunois, F.

    2015-12-01

    Electroless nickel-boron coatings are widely used in industrial on various substrates: ferrous and non-ferrous alloys mainly but also in some cases non-metallic materials. However, their growth process is still not fully understood and the influence of the nature of the substrate on this process is completely unknown. The formation of electroless nickel-boron was observed on five ferrous alloys: a mild steel, a high carbon unalloyed steel, a cryogenic steel (that contains 9 wt.% nickel), an austenitic stainless steel and an austeno-ferritic (duplex) stainless steel. Nickel-boron films were prepared by electroless deposition, using sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. Samples were immersed in a plating bath for times ranging from 5 s to 60 min. The influence of the nature of the substrate on the initial deposition of the coatings was investigated in detail: the initiation mechanism was identified for all substrates and it was found to be related to catalytic oxidation of the reducing agent rather than to a displacement process. The delay before initiation was influenced by the nickel content of the coating and by a high number of grain boundaries. In all cases, the plating rate varied with plating time, with a slower period during the first 10 min that corresponds to morphological modification of the coating.

  2. Timescales and mechanisms of formation of amorphous silica coatings on fresh basalts at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai’i

    OpenAIRE

    Chemtob, Steven M.; Rossman, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Young basalts from Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, frequently feature opaque surface coatings, 1–80 μm thick, composed of amorphous silica and Fe-Ti oxides. These coatings are the product of interaction of the basaltic surface with volcanically-derived acidic fluids. Previous workers have identified these coatings in a variety of contexts on Hawai'i, but the timescales of coating development, coating growth rates, and factors controlling lateral coating heterogeneity were largely unconstrained. We ...

  3. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Jeongwoon Hwang; Jisoon Ihm; Kwang-Ryeol Lee; Seungchul Kim

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV). As the incident energy decrease...

  4. Amorphous and crystalline IrO2 thin films as potential stimulation electrode coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous and crystalline iridium oxide thin films with potential use as coating materials for stimulation electrodes were studied. Characterization of these films by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy has revealed a considerable decrease in impedance and an increase in charge capacity of iridium oxide thin films after an electrochemical activation process in 0.9% NaCl solution. The surface morphology of these films was studied by scanning electron microscopy. The two types of IrO2 films were also compared under conditions relevant to applications as stimulation electrodes. The results indicate that amorphous IrO2 films have significantly higher charge storage capacity and lower impedance than crystalline IrO2 films. This makes the amorphous films a preferable coating material for stimulation applications

  5. Thermal neutron response of a boron-coated GEM detector via GEANT4 Monte Carlo code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, M; Rhee, J T; Kim, H G; Ahmad, Farzana; Jeon, Y J

    2014-10-22

    In this work, we report the design configuration and the performance of the hybrid Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. In order to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons, the forward electrode of the GEM has been coated with the enriched boron-10 material, which works as a neutron converter. A total of 5×5cm(2) configuration of GEM has been used for thermal neutron studies. The response of the detector has been estimated via using GEANT4 MC code with two different physics lists. Using the QGSP_BIC_HP physics list, the neutron detection efficiency was determined to be about 3%, while with QGSP_BERT_HP physics list the efficiency was around 2.5%, at the incident thermal neutron energies of 25meV. The higher response of the detector proves that GEM-coated with boron converter improves the efficiency for thermal neutrons detection. PMID:25464183

  6. Microtribology of Nitrogen-doped Amorphous Carbon Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong F. Wang

    2004-01-01

    The friction, wear and lubrication of carbon nitride coatings on silicon substrates are studied using a spherical diamond counter-face with nano-scale asperities. The first part of this paper clarifies the coating thickness effect on frictional behavior of carbon nitride coatings. The second part of this paper reports empirical data on wear properties in repeated sliding contacts through in situ examination and post-sliding observation. The third part will concentrate on wear mechanisms for the transition from "No observable wear particles" to "Wear particle generation." In light of the above tribological study, the application of carbon nitride coatings to MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) is therefore discussed from view points of both microtribology and micromachining.

  7. Study of SEY degradation of amorphous carbon coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Bundaleski, N; Santos, A; Teodoro, O M N D; Silva, A G

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of low secondary electron yield (SEY) carbon coatings by magnetron sputtering onto the inner walls of the accelerator seems to be the most promising solution for suppressing the electron cloud problem. However, these coatings change their electron emission properties during long term exposure to air. The ageing process of carbon coated samples with initial SEY of about 0.9 received from CERN is studied as a function of exposure to different environments. It is shown that samples having the same initial SEY may age with different rates. The SEY increase can be correlated with the surface concentration of oxygen. Annealing of samples in air at 100-200 {\\deg}C reduces the ageing rate and even recovers previously degraded samples. The result of annealing is reduction of the hydrogen content in the coatings by triggering its surface segregation followed by desorption.

  8. Thermal neutron response of a boron-coated GEM detector via GEANT4 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report the design configuration and the performance of the hybrid Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector. In order to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons, the forward electrode of the GEM has been coated with the enriched boron-10 material, which works as a neutron converter. A total of 5×5 cm2 configuration of GEM has been used for thermal neutron studies. The response of the detector has been estimated via using GEANT4 MC code with two different physics lists. Using the QGSPBICHP physics list, the neutron detection efficiency was determined to be about 3%, while with QGSPBERTHP physics list the efficiency was around 2.5%, at the incident thermal neutron energies of 25 meV. The higher response of the detector proves that GEM-coated with boron converter improves the efficiency for thermal neutrons detection. - Highlights: • The results of boron-coated GEM for thermal neutrons are described. • The simulations were performed by GEANT4 MC code. • The evaluation was determined by GEANT4 using two physics lists. • The response of the detector was taken for En=25–100 meV

  9. Tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings for friction reduction of the valve train in internal combustion engines

    OpenAIRE

    Götze, Andreas; Makowski, Stefan; Kunze, Tim; Hübner, Matthias; Zellbeck, Hans; Weihnacht, Volker; Leson, Andreas; Beyer, Eckhard; Joswig, Jan-Ole; Seifert, Gotthard; Abrasonis, Gintautas; Posselt, Matthias; Fassbender, Jürgen; Möller, Wolfhard; Gemming, Sibylle

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) is studied as a tribological coating for the valve train's exhaust camshaft of a combustion engine. The coated camshafts were installed in a non-fired engine, tested in a computerized component test bench under practice-relevant conditions and analyzed for their frictional behavior. A notable reduction of the valve train's drive torque on the test bench is demonstrated. Namely, on a roller cam system with ta-C-coated camshaft the reduction is about 15% in a...

  10. The behaviour of amorphous silica coatings at high temperatures in aggressive environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ayres, C. F.; Bennett, M. J.; Gohil, D.D.; Léon, B.; Pérez-Amor, M.; Pou, J.; Saunders, S

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous silica coatings produced by plasma assisted and laser chemical vapour deposition (PACVD and LCVD) on Incoloy 800H and 21/4 Cr 1 Mo ferritic steel were exposed in air and in simulated coal gasification atmospheres (CGA) for periods of up to two years at temperatures between 450°C and 900°C . In some cases interlayers of TiN were used to promote adhesion and to reduce interdiffusion between the coating and substrate. PACVD silica coatings deposited onto Incoloy 800H provided outstandi...

  11. Investigation of hexagonal boron nitride as an atomically thin corrosion passivation coating in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yang, Yingchao; Lou, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) atomic layers were utilized as a passivation coating in this study. A large-area continuous h-BN thin film was grown on nickel foil using a chemical vapor deposition method and then transferred onto sputtered copper as a corrosion passivation coating. The corrosion passivation performance in a Na2SO4 solution of bare and coated copper was investigated by electrochemical methods including cyclic voltammetry (CV), Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). CV and Tafel analysis indicate that the h-BN coating could effectively suppress the anodic dissolution of copper. The EIS fitting result suggests that defects are the dominant leakage source on h-BN films, and improved anti-corrosion performances could be achieved by further passivating these defects.

  12. Synthesis and Microstructural Evolution of Amorphous/Nanocrystalline Steel Coatings by Different Thermal-Spray Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadaraajan, V.; Guduru, Ramesh K.; Mohanty, P. S.

    2013-04-01

    Amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings are useful in high strength and wear-resistant applications. In the present study, the microstructural evolution of a nanocrystalline high performance steel coatings developed by different spray processes along with a novel "hybrid thermal spray" technique was studied. The hybrid-spray process combines arc and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) techniques, in which the molten metal at the arcing tip is atomized and rapidly propelled toward the substrate by HVOF jet. This so-called hybrid concept offers the benefits of productivity of electric arc spray combined with improved coating densities of HVOF. The microstructural characterization of the hybrid-spray coatings was performed by x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry, and then compared with coatings of the similar material developed by plasma-, HVOF-, and arc-spray processes individually. The HVOF- and plasma-spray coatings showed amorphous structures with very fine nanocrystals embedded, whereas hybrid- and arc-spray techniques yielded completely crystalline coatings with grain size in the range of several nanometers. The final microstructures in different spray processes could be attributed to the precursor materials employed, process temperatures, and cooling rates during the deposition process.

  13. Low temperature irradiation effects on iron boron based amorphous metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three Fe-B amorphous alloys (Fe80B20, Fe27Mo2B20 and Fe75B25) and the crystallized Fe3B alloy have been irradiated at the temperature of liquid hydrogen. Electron irradiation and irradiation by 10B fission fragments induce point defects in amorphous alloys. These defects are characterized by an intrinsic resistivity and a formation volume. The threshold energy for the displacement of iron atoms has also been calculated. Irradiation by 235U fission fragments induces some important structural modifications in the amorphous alloys

  14. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  15. AMORPHOUS ALLOY SURFACE COATINGS FOR HARD CHROMIUM REPLACEMENT - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard chromium coatings (0.25 to10 mil thick) are used extensively for imparting wear and erosion resistance to components in both industrial and military applications. The most common means of depositing hard chromium has been through the use of chromic acid baths containing ...

  16. Study on excimer laser irradiation for controlled dehydrogenation and crystallization of boron doped hydrogenated amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontad, F., E-mail: fran_gontad@yahoo.es [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, E.I. Industrial, Campus de As Lagoas, Marcosende, E-36310, Vigo (Spain); Conde, J.C. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, E.I. Industrial, Campus de As Lagoas, Marcosende, E-36310, Vigo (Spain); Filonovich, S.; Cerqueira, M.F.; Alpuim, P. [Department of Physics, University of Minho, Campus de Azurém, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal); Chiussi, S. [Applied Physics Department, University of Vigo, E.I. Industrial, Campus de As Lagoas, Marcosende, E-36310, Vigo (Spain)

    2013-06-01

    We report on the excimer laser annealing (ELA) induced temperature gradients, allowing controlled crystallization and dehydrogenation of boron-doped a-Si:H/nc-Si:H multilayers. Depth of the dehydrogenation and crystallization process has been studied numerically and experimentally, showing that temperatures below the monohydride decomposition can be used and that significant changes of the doping profile can be avoided. Calculation of temperature profiles has been achieved through numerical modeling of the heat conduction differential equation. Increase in the amount of nano-crystals, but not in their size, has been demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy. Effective dehydrogenation and shape of the boron profile have been studied by time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The relatively low temperature threshold for dehydrogenation, below the monohydride decomposition temperature, has been attributed to both, the large hydrogen content of the original films and the partial crystallization during the ELA process. The results of this study show that UV-laser irradiation is an effective tool to improve crystallinity and dopant activation in p{sup +}-nc-Si:H films without damaging the substrate. - Highlights: • An efficient dehydrogenation is possible through excimer laser annealing. • 140 mJ/cm{sup 2} is enough for dehydrogenation without significant changes in doping profile. • Fluences up to 300 mJ/cm{sup 2} promote partial crystallization of the amorphous structures.

  17. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Michelle M; Li, Wenjing; Sky Driver, M; Karki, Sudarshan; Caruso, A N; Oyler, Nathan A

    2011-11-01

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (B(x)C:H(y)) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the B(x)C:H(y) intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, ∼40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. PMID:21959982

  18. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (BxC:Hy) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the BxC:Hy intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, ∼40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. (paper)

  19. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquette, Michelle M; Sky Driver, M; Karki, Sudarshan; Caruso, A N [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Li Wenjing; Oyler, Nathan A, E-mail: oylern@umkc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

    2011-11-02

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (B{sub x}C:H{sub y}) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the B{sub x}C:H{sub y} intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, {approx}40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases. (paper)

  20. Inprovement of Field Emission Properties of PBS Thin Films by Amorphous Carbon Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead sulfide (PbS nanocrystalline thin films were synthesized at room temperature via chemical bath deposition on both silicon and glass substrates and coated with amorphous carbon of different thickness by varying deposition time in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The as prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and atomic force microscope (AFM. XRD study reveals that coating of amorphous carbon does not change the crystal structure of PbS. From FESEM images it is seen that the average size of PbS nanoparticle does not exceed 100 nm, though sometomes small cubic particles agglomerated to form bigger particles. The coating of amorphous carbon can be clearly visible by the FESEM as well as from AFM micrographs. Field emission study show a significant betterment for the carbon coated sample as compared to the pure PbS. The effect of inter-electrode distance on the field emission characteristics of best field emitting sample has been studied for three different inter-electrode distances.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Multipacting Suppression by amorphous Carbon Coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Holz, Michael

    The presence of electron cloud is considered as the most important limitation concerning the quality of the particle beam in the accelerators, especially with respect to the forthcoming LHC luminosity upgrade. The electron cloud can be mitigated by coating the vacuum beam chambers with thin films of low secondary electron yield (SEY). This technique is applied to two stand-alone main bending dipoles of the SPS, where the RF power is fed through a tungsten wire, stretched inside the vacuum chamber. A dipole with a bare stainless steel chamber shows a clear power threshold initiating an abrupt rise in reflected power and pressure. The effect is enhanced at RF frequencies corresponding to electron cyclotron resonances for given magnetic fields. The first results of a fully coated beam chamber do not exhibit any pressure rise or reflected RF power up to the maximum available input power. Here, reflected power has been observed only once and could not be reproduced. The results of a partially coated beam chamber s...

  2. ICRF Impurity Behavior with Boron Coated Molybdenum Tiles in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Although ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) heating is considered an excellent candidate for bulk heating, minimizing impurity production associated with ICRF operation, particularly with metallic plasma facing components (PFC), remains one of the primary challenges for ICRF utilization. In C-Mod and present experiments, boronization, an in-situ applied boron film, is utilized to control impurities and its effectiveness has a limited lifetime. In C-Mod, the lifetime has been observed to be proportional to integrated injected RF Joules and the degradation is faster than in equivalent ohmic heated discharges the ICRF is enhancing the erosion rate of the boron film. In an effort to identify important erosion and impurity source locations, we have vacuum plasma sprayed ∼ 100 microns of boron on molybdenum tiles from the outer divertor shelf, main plasma limiters, and the RF antennas. We have also modified the shape of the main plasma limiter and increased our spectroscopic monitoring diagnostics of the main plasma limiter. Finally, we have installed a set of probes to monitor the plasma potential and RF fields on field lines connected an antenna. For ICRF heated H-modes, the core molybdenum levels was significantly reduced and remained at low levels for increased integrated injected RF Joules. The core molybdenum levels also no longer scales with RF power in L-mode in contrast with previous results with boronization and molybdenum plasma facing components. Initial Post campaign analysis of the boron coating will also be presented. Boronization and impurity, typically nitrogen or neon, seeded discharges enabled high plasma and ICRF antenna performance. The boronization suggests that other impurity sources are important but are yet to be identified. Impurity seeding had two important effects: reduced core molybdenum levels and suppressed antenna faults due to arcs and injections from antenna structure. The lower core molybdenum level is surprising since

  3. Application of flame spraying coatings of neutron-absorbing boron-polymer composite powder for spent nuclear fuel container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional shielding method was mostly to use a thicker shielding of lead plates, and cast reinforced concrete, etc., mainly by reducing the neutron speed and preventing the passage of neutrons. However, the problem of making or machining the thick protective layers cannot meet the development needs of the security of the nuclear power industry. Currently, most widely used nuclear protective materials are polyethylene plastic plates adding boron carbide, because of polyethylene containing a relatively high content of hydrogen atoms that is an effective neutron moderator by virtue of its scattering power, and boron carbide that is also a good thermal neutron absorber by means of huge thermal neutron absorbing cross section. In this regard, in the present work, polymer flame spraying coatings of neutron-absorbing boron containing polymer composite powder is developed for application in the field of spent nuclear fuel. Changes in the microstructure of the coating layer are discussed with respect to the content of boron carbide and the thickness of the coating layer in view of the neutron absorbing efficiency. In this work, polymer flame spraying coatings of neutron-absorbing boron containing polymer composite powder was developed for application in the field of spent nuclear fuel. From the observation of coating layer, B4C particles were distributed uniformly in the polymer matrix and the LDPE-B4C composite coating layer was joined well with Al substrate without any detachment. The thermal neutron absorbing property is enhanced with an increase in the coating thickness. A flame spraying coating method of boron-containing polymer composite powder is very effective way for the application in a spent nuclear fuel facility

  4. Boron Nitride Coated Carbon Nanotube Arrays with Enhanced Compressive Mechanical Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lin; Tay, Roland Yingjie; Li, Hongling; Tsang, Siu Hon; Tan, Dunlin; Zhang, Bowei; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong; Teo, Edwin Hang Tong

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) array is one of the most promising energy dissipating materials due to its excellent temperature invariant mechanical property. However, the CNT arrays with desirable recoverability after compression is still a challenge. Here, we report on the mechanical enhancement of the CNT arrays reinforced by coating with boron nitride (BN) layers. These BN coated CNT (BN/CNT) arrays exhibit excellent compressive strength and recoverability as compared to those of the as-prepared CNT arrays which totally collapsed after compression. In addition, the BN coating also provides better resistance to oxidation due to its intrinsic thermal stability. This work presented here opens a new pathway towards tuning mechanical behavior of any arbitrary CNT arrays for promising potential such as damper, vibration isolator and shock absorber applications.

  5. Cracking and interfacial debonding of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping of pre-coated boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cracking failure of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping process was investigated. • Microcracks initiated inside the coating during the austenitization. • Microcrack initiation in the hot deformation correlated to the Fe–Al intermetallics. • Macrocracks extended along the Mode I path led to the coating break into segments. • Macrocracks growth followed Mode II path resulted in the interfacial debonding. - Abstract: This study is focused on the mechanisms of cracks initiation, propagation and interfacial debonding of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping of the pre-coated boron steel. The investigation was performed isothermally at three deformation temperatures (700, 750, 800 °C) at a strain rate of 0.1/s. Cracking and interfacial debonding of the coating were observed with optical and scanning electron microscope, to reveal the damage evolution under applied tensile strains. Microstructures and phase inside the coating before and after austenitization were determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that austenitization led to micro-cracks and Kirkendall voids initiation inside the Al–Si coating because of thermal loading, and the cracks were arrested by α-Fe diffusion layer. When the coating on substrate system was submitted to the uniaxial tensile test, the surface coating exhibited multiple cracking normal to the tensile direction. The Kirkendall voids seemed to promote the macro-crack growth through the diffusion layer. The macro-cracks followed a Mode I path, leading to the coating deteriorates to cracked segments. The macro-cracks then continued to propagate following a Mode II path that along the diffusion layer/substrate interface because of shear stress transferred from the deformed substrate, resulting in the interfacial debonding of the coating segments. The crack density firstly increased with the increasing tensile strain and then reached saturation. Decreasing deformation

  6. Cracking and interfacial debonding of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping of pre-coated boron steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gui, Zhong-Xiang; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Yi-Sheng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhu, Bin, E-mail: zhubin26@gmail.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); State Key Laboratory of Materials Processing and Die and Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Cracking failure of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping process was investigated. • Microcracks initiated inside the coating during the austenitization. • Microcrack initiation in the hot deformation correlated to the Fe–Al intermetallics. • Macrocracks extended along the Mode I path led to the coating break into segments. • Macrocracks growth followed Mode II path resulted in the interfacial debonding. - Abstract: This study is focused on the mechanisms of cracks initiation, propagation and interfacial debonding of the Al–Si coating in hot stamping of the pre-coated boron steel. The investigation was performed isothermally at three deformation temperatures (700, 750, 800 °C) at a strain rate of 0.1/s. Cracking and interfacial debonding of the coating were observed with optical and scanning electron microscope, to reveal the damage evolution under applied tensile strains. Microstructures and phase inside the coating before and after austenitization were determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that austenitization led to micro-cracks and Kirkendall voids initiation inside the Al–Si coating because of thermal loading, and the cracks were arrested by α-Fe diffusion layer. When the coating on substrate system was submitted to the uniaxial tensile test, the surface coating exhibited multiple cracking normal to the tensile direction. The Kirkendall voids seemed to promote the macro-crack growth through the diffusion layer. The macro-cracks followed a Mode I path, leading to the coating deteriorates to cracked segments. The macro-cracks then continued to propagate following a Mode II path that along the diffusion layer/substrate interface because of shear stress transferred from the deformed substrate, resulting in the interfacial debonding of the coating segments. The crack density firstly increased with the increasing tensile strain and then reached saturation. Decreasing deformation

  7. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04

    The infrastructure for transportation in the United States allows for a high level of mobility and freight activity for the current population of 300 million residents, and several million business establishments. According to a Department of Transportation study, more than 230 million motor vehicles, ships, airplanes, and railroads cars were used on 6.4 million kilometers (4 million miles) of highways, railroads, airports, and waterways in 1998. Pipelines and storage tanks were considered to be part of this deteriorating infrastructure. The annual direct cost of corrosion in the infrastructure category was estimated to be approximately $22.6 billion in 1998. There were 583,000 bridges in the United States in 1998. Of this total, 200,000 bridges were steel, 235,000 were conventional reinforced concrete, 108,000 bridges were constructed using pre-stressed concrete, and the balance was made using other materials of construction. Approximately 15 percent of the bridges accounted for at this point in time were structurally deficient, primarily due to corrosion of steel and steel reinforcement. Iron-based amorphous metals, including SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been developed, and have very good corrosion resistance. These materials have been prepared as a melt-spun ribbons, as well as gas atomized powders and thermal-spray coatings. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stabilities of these materials were found to be comparable to that of more expensive high-performance alloys, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. These materials also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation

  8. Studies on the influence of surface pre-treatments on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is one of the hard ceramic particles which find application as structural materials and neutron shielding material due to its high neutron capture cross section. Copper coating on boron carbide particle is essential for the synthesis of metal-ceramic composites with enhanced sinterability and dispersibility. Surface characteristics of the substrate and the coating parameters play a foremost role in the formation of effective electroless coating. The effect of surface pre-treatment conditions and pH on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles has been studied. Surface pre-treatement of B4C when compared to acid treated and alkali treated particles were carried out. Uniform copper coating was observed at pH 12 in alkali treated particles when compared to others due to the effective removal of inevitable impurities during the production and processing of commercially available B4C. A threshold pH 11 was required for initiation of copper coating on boron carbide particles. The growth pattern of the copper coating also varies depending on the surface conditions from acicular to spherical morphology.

  9. Amorphous clusters in Co implanted ZnO induced by boron pre-implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potzger, K.; Shalimov, A.; Zhou, S.; Schmidt, H.; Mucklich, A.; Helm, M.; Fassbender, J.; Liberati, M.; Arenholz, E.

    2009-02-09

    We demonstrate the formation of superparamagnetic/ferromagnetic regions within ZnO(0001) single crystals sequently implanted with B and Co. While the pre-implantation with B plays a minor role for the electrical transport properties, its presence leads to the formation of amorphous phases. Moreover, B acts strongly reducing on the implanted Co. Thus, the origin of the ferromagnetic ordering in local clusters with large Co concentration is itinerant d-electrons as in the case of metallic Co. The metallic amorphous phases are non-detectable by common X-ray diffraction.

  10. Application of nitriding to electroless nickel–boron coatings: Chemical and structural effects; mechanical characterization; corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nitriding of electroless nickel–boron coatings is possible and improves properties. ► Nitrided electroless nickel–boron coatings are harder than heat treated coatings. ► Nitrided electroless nickel–boron coatings have a good scratch test resistance. ► Nitrided Ni–B coatings have a better corrosion resistance than untreated coatings. -- Abstract: Electroless nickel–boron coatings, synthesized on mild steel, were submitted to nitridation treatments in varying conditions of pressure, temperature and atmosphere composition. One treatment was carried out under a reduced pressure of a nitrogen-based gas, the other under ambient pressure in a ammonia-based atmosphere. The modifications of the samples’ chemistry after those treatments were investigated by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy), GD-OES (Glow Discharge-Optical Emission Spectroscopy) and ToF-SIMS (Time of flight-Secondary Ions Mass Spectroscopy) analysis. Their structures and morphology were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The mechanical properties of the samples were investigated by micro- and nanohardness measurements successively on the free surface of the sample and on polished cross-sections; their roughness and resistance to scratch test were measured. Electrochemical corrosion tests were also carried out. The effects of both treatments were then compared: after the treatment carried out under lowered pressure, the coatings are dense, present signs of solution hardening and are characterized by a high hardness (close to 1600 hv100). A combination layer is observable on the samples treated under an ammonia-based atmosphere. This outer layer possesses poorer mechanical properties but the inner layer of the coating presents properties similar to those of vacuum nitrided coatings. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is as good as that of heat treated coatings.

  11. Characterisation of electrodeposited Co-W-P amorphous coatings on carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemistry and nucleation mechanism of induced co-deposition of cobalt, tungsten and phosphorus from a citrate bath was investigated using voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques. It was found that the induced co-deposition of the species occurred under diffusion control and followed instantaneous nucleation mechanism. Co-W-P coatings were electrodeposited potentiostatically on plain carbon steels from a citrate bath containing CoSO4, Na2WO4 and NaH2PO2. X-ray diffraction studies of the coatings revealed that the as-deposited Co81W10P9 coatings had amorphous structure. The formation of some stoichiometric compounds like Co3W, Co2P and WP2, however, was observed upon annealing at 600 deg. C. The hardness of the Co-W-P coatings increased with annealing temperature which was possibly due to the formation of these inter-elemental compounds. The corrosion resistance of the Co-W-P coatings increased with increase in annealing temperature which might also be due to the formation of the stoichiometric compounds at elevated temperatures. A comparison between coating characteristics of Co-W-P and chromium showed that the Co-W-P coatings exhibited nobler corrosion potential than chromium coatings

  12. Enhancement of thermal conductive pathway of boron nitride coated polymethylsilsesquioxane composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gyungbok; Ryu, Seung Han; Lee, Jun-Tae; Seong, Ki-Hun; Lee, Jae Eun; Yoon, Phil-Joong; Kim, Bum-Sung; Hussain, Manwar; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2013-11-01

    We report here in the fabrication of enhanced thermal conductive pathway nanocomposites of boron nitride (BN)-coated polymethylsilsesquioxane (PMSQ) composite beads using isopropyl alcohol (IPA) as a mixing medium. Exfoliated and size-reduced boron nitride particles were successfully coated on the PMSQ beads and explained by surface charge differences. A homogeneous dispersion and coating of BN on the PMSQ beads using IPA medium was confirmed by SEM. Each condition of the composite powder was carried into the stainless still mould and then hot pressed in an electrically heated hot press machine. Three-dimensional percolation networks and conductive pathways created by exfoliated BN were precisely formed in the nanocomposites. The thermal conductivity of nanocomposites was measured by multiplying specific gravity, specific heat, and thermal diffusivity, based upon the laser flash method. Densification of the composite resulted in better thermal properties. For an epoxy reinforced composite with 30 vol% BN and PMSQ, a thermal conductivity of nine times higher than that of pristine PMSQ was observed. PMID:24245317

  13. Boron-coated straws as a replacement for 3He-based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Athanasiades, Athanasios; Sun, Liang; Martin, Christopher S.; Lyons, Tom D.; Foss, Michael A.; Haygood, Hal B.

    2011-10-01

    US and international government efforts to equip major seaports with large area neutron detectors, aimed to intercept the smuggling of nuclear materials, have precipitated a critical shortage of 3He gas. It is estimated that the annual demand of 3He for US security applications alone is more than the worldwide supply. This is strongly limiting the prospects of neutron science, safeguards, and other applications that rely heavily on 3He-based detectors. Clearly, alternate neutron detection technologies that can support large sensitive areas, and have low gamma sensitivity and low cost must be developed. We propose a low-cost technology based on long copper tubes (straws), coated on the inside with a thin layer of 10B-enriched boron carbide ( 10B 4C). In addition to the high abundance of boron on Earth and low cost of 10B enrichment, the boron-coated straw (BCS) detector offers distinct advantages over conventional 3He-based detectors, and alternate technologies such as 10BF 3 tubes and 10B-coated rigid tubes. These include better distribution inside moderator assemblies, many-times faster electronic signals, no pressurization, improved gamma-ray rejection, no toxic or flammable gases, and ease of serviceability. We present the performance of BCS detectors dispersed in a solid plastic moderator to address the need for portal monitoring. The design adopts the outer dimensions of currently deployed 3He-based monitors, but takes advantage of the small BCS diameter to achieve a more uniform distribution of neutron converter throughout the moderating material. We show that approximately 63 BCS detectors, each 205 cm long, distributed inside the moderator, can match or exceed the detection efficiency of typical monitors fitted with a 5 cm diameter 3He tube, 187 cm long, pressurized to 3 atm.

  14. Boron-coated straws as a replacement for {sup 3}He-based neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L., E-mail: jlacy@proportionaltech.com [Proportional Technologies, Inc., 8022 El Rio Street, Houston, TX 77054 (United States); Athanasiades, Athanasios; Sun, Liang; Martin, Christopher S.; Lyons, Tom D.; Foss, Michael A.; Haygood, Hal B. [Proportional Technologies, Inc., 8022 El Rio Street, Houston, TX 77054 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    US and international government efforts to equip major seaports with large area neutron detectors, aimed to intercept the smuggling of nuclear materials, have precipitated a critical shortage of {sup 3}He gas. It is estimated that the annual demand of {sup 3}He for US security applications alone is more than the worldwide supply. This is strongly limiting the prospects of neutron science, safeguards, and other applications that rely heavily on {sup 3}He-based detectors. Clearly, alternate neutron detection technologies that can support large sensitive areas, and have low gamma sensitivity and low cost must be developed. We propose a low-cost technology based on long copper tubes (straws), coated on the inside with a thin layer of {sup 10}B-enriched boron carbide ({sup 10}B{sub 4}C). In addition to the high abundance of boron on Earth and low cost of {sup 10}B enrichment, the boron-coated straw (BCS) detector offers distinct advantages over conventional {sup 3}He-based detectors, and alternate technologies such as {sup 10}BF{sub 3} tubes and {sup 10}B-coated rigid tubes. These include better distribution inside moderator assemblies, many-times faster electronic signals, no pressurization, improved gamma-ray rejection, no toxic or flammable gases, and ease of serviceability. We present the performance of BCS detectors dispersed in a solid plastic moderator to address the need for portal monitoring. The design adopts the outer dimensions of currently deployed {sup 3}He-based monitors, but takes advantage of the small BCS diameter to achieve a more uniform distribution of neutron converter throughout the moderating material. We show that approximately 63 BCS detectors, each 205 cm long, distributed inside the moderator, can match or exceed the detection efficiency of typical monitors fitted with a 5 cm diameter {sup 3}He tube, 187 cm long, pressurized to 3 atm.

  15. Static tensile and tensile creep testing of four boron nitride coated ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.; Zimmerman, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Six types of uncoated ceramic fibers were static tensile and tensile creep tested at various elevated temperatures. Three types of boron nitride coated fibers were also tested. Room temperature static tensile tests were initially performed on all fibers, at gage lengths of 1, 2, and 4 inches, to determine the magnitude of end effects from the gripping system used. Tests at one elevated temperature, at gage lengths of 8 and 10 inches, were also conducted, to determine end effects at elevated temperatures. Fiber cross sectional shapes and areas were determined using scanning electron microscopy. Creep testing was typically performed for 4 hours, in an air atmosphere.

  16. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings on implants drastically reduce biofilm formation and water permeation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammations and crystalline bacterial biofilms (encrustations) remain a major complication in long-term artificial urinary tract drainage. To solve this problem we present urological implants with coatings made of amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) that show excellent protection from encrustation in-vitro as well as in-vivo. Part of the success of a-C:H coatings is attributed to their ability to act as a diffusion barrier between an implant and the body, which prevents leaching of solvents from polymeric implants. To further enhance their barrier properties a-C:H coatings are combined with parylene coatings to develop diffusion-barrier multilayer coatings with a total thickness between 0.2 μm and 0.8 μm. The combination of the two types of coatings leads to a reduction of water diffusion by a factor of up to ten with respect to uncoated 25 μm thick polyimide sub-strates. The diffusion of water vapour from a controlled atmospheric pressure chamber through coated foils to a vacuum chamber is measured in a custom-built device

  17. Doping-dependence of solid phase epitaxy in boron implanted amorphous silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of dopant-enhanced solid phase epitaxy (SPE) have been measured over temperature range 460-660 deg C in buried a-Si layers doped with boron, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 30 x 1019 cm-3. The dopant-enhanced SPE data has been modelled by an extension of generalised Fermi level shifting model to include degenerate semiconductor statistics on the crystalline Si side of the interface. The quality of the fits provides compelling evidence that the GFLS model gives an accurate picture of the dopant-dependence of SPE

  18. Corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium surface coated with amorphous tantalum pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) possesses good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. This study aimed to improve the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of titanium (Ti) by coating it with an amorphous Ta2O5 surface layer. An amorphous Ta2O5 layer was prepared on the Ti surface using a simple hydrolysis–condensation process at room temperature. The surface characteristics of the test specimens were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and contact angle measurements. The corrosion resistance of the test specimens was evaluated from the potentiodynamic polarization curves and ion release measurements in simulated blood plasma (SBP). The biocompatibility of the test specimens was evaluated in terms of the protein (albumin) adsorption, cell adhesion, and cell growth of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs). The amorphous Ta2O5 layer with a porous micro-/nano-scale topography, which was deposited on the Ti surface using a simple hydrolysis–condensation process, increased the corrosion resistance (i.e., increased the corrosion potential and decreased the anodic current and ion release) of the Ti in the SBP and improved the surface wettability, albumin adsorption, and cell adhesion. We conclude that the presence of an amorphous Ta2O5 layer on the Ti surface increased the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of Ti. - Highlights: ► Amorphous Ta2O5 layer was coated on Ti using simple hydrolysis–condensation process. ► Ta2O5 surface layer showed a micro-/nano-scale porous topography. ► Ta2O5 layer enhanced wettability and corrosion resistance of Ti. ► Ta2O5 layer enhanced protein adsorption, cell adhesion, and cell proliferation of Ti

  19. Distinct surface hydration behaviors of boron-rich boride thin film coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the surface boron chemical states and surface hydration behaviors of the as-deposited and annealed boron-rich boride thin film coatings, including AlMgB14, TiB2 and AlMgB14–TiB2, were systematically studied by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The XPS results indicate that boron at annealed AlMgB14 film surface can be oxidized; surprisingly, such oxidation does not lead to the formation of boric acid in ambient air. Instead, boric acid can be produced at the surface of annealed TiB2 film and AlMgB14–TiB2 film. It is shown, via the water contact angle measurements, that these boride films exhibit distinct surface wettability characteristics, which are believed to result in the observed surface hydration processes. Furthermore, we found anatase TiO2 formation plays a major role in the surface wetting behaviors for these boride films

  20. Distinct surface hydration behaviors of boron-rich boride thin film coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xinhong [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Liu, Wei [Institute of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Ouyang, Jun [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Tian, Yun, E-mail: ytian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China)

    2014-08-30

    In this work, the surface boron chemical states and surface hydration behaviors of the as-deposited and annealed boron-rich boride thin film coatings, including AlMgB{sub 14}, TiB{sub 2} and AlMgB{sub 14}–TiB{sub 2}, were systematically studied by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The XPS results indicate that boron at annealed AlMgB{sub 14} film surface can be oxidized; surprisingly, such oxidation does not lead to the formation of boric acid in ambient air. Instead, boric acid can be produced at the surface of annealed TiB{sub 2} film and AlMgB{sub 14}–TiB{sub 2} film. It is shown, via the water contact angle measurements, that these boride films exhibit distinct surface wettability characteristics, which are believed to result in the observed surface hydration processes. Furthermore, we found anatase TiO{sub 2} formation plays a major role in the surface wetting behaviors for these boride films.

  1. Tailoring the optical and hydrophobic property of zinc oxide nanorod by coating with amorphous graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, D.; Das, N. S.; Das, B.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized at room temperature on potassium permanganate activated silicon and glass substrate by simple chemical method using zinc acetate as precursor. To modify the surface energy of the as prepared ZnO thin films the samples were coated with amorphous graphene (a-G) synthesized by un-zipping of chemically synthesized amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). All the pure and coated samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The roughness analysis of the as prepared samples was done by atomic force microscopic analysis. The detail optical properties of all the samples were studied with the help of a UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The surface energy of the as prepared pure and coated samples was calculated by measuring the contact angle of two different liquids. It is seen that the water repellence of ZnO nanorods got increased after they are being coated with a-Gs. Also even after UV irradiation the contact angle remain same unlike the case for the uncoated sample where the contact angle gets decreased significantly after UV irradiation. Existing Cassie-Wenzel model has been employed along with the Owen's approach to determine the different components of surface energy.

  2. Boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The trace element boron (B) is of interest in reclamation situations for several reasons. It plays an essential through largely unidentified role in the growth of higher plants. In argronomic situations B deficiencies are common, and deficiencies in reclamation situations have been suggested but not documented. Among micronutrients, B is unique because the range from deficient concentrations to toxic concentrations either in the soil solution or in plant tissue is narrower than for any other micronutrient. In reclamation situations excessive amounts of B can occur in the soil or in near-surface mining wastes and thus interfere with reclamation objectives, especially in arid and semiarid regions. Also, B is mobile and appears subject to both upward transport (and possible contamination of overlying material) and downward transport (and possible contamination of surface water and groundwater)

  3. Structural, mechanical and electrical-contact properties of nanocrystalline-NbC/amorphous-C coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Nedfors, Nils; Tengstrand, Olof; Lewin, Erik; Furlan, Andrej; Eklund, Per; Hultman, Lars; Jansson, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    Niobium-carbide nanocomposite coatings with a carbon content varying from 43 to 64 at.% were deposited by dual DC magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy showed that all coatings consisted of nanometer sized NbC grains embedded in a matrix of amorphous carbon. Mechanical properties and electrical resistivity showed a strong dependency on the amount of amorphous carbon (a-C) and NbC grain size in the coating. The highest hardness (23 GP...

  4. Dextran-coated superparamagnetic amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy for magnetic resonance imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: A dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed serving as a sensitive contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging applications. - Highlights: • Amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was prepared via wet chemical reduction approach. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy is superparamagnetic. • The Fe–Co nanoalloy exhibits T2-weighted MR enhancement both in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: For magnetic resonance imaging applications, a facile approach for water-soluble dextran coated amorphous Fe–Co nanoalloy was developed. The as-synthesized nanoalloy had a diameter of 9 nm with a narrow size distribution and showed superparamagnetic property with a saturated magnetization (Ms) of 25 emu/g. In vitro cytotoxicity test revealed that it was biocompatible at a concentration below 120 μg/mL. It can be uptaken by HeLa cells effectively and resulted in the obvious T2 effect after internalization. Biodistribution studies in conjunction with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) confirmed that Fe–Co nanoalloy was preferentially accumulated in lung and spleen after intravenous injection for 4 h. In vivo MRI, dextran-coated Fe–Co nanoalloy can serve as a sensitive contrast agent for MR imaging, especially in the spleen, so we believe that it maybe hold great promise for diagnosis of splenic disease by appropriately functionalizing their surface

  5. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  6. Investigation of the structure and properties of boron-containing coatings obtained by electron-beam treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of surface-hardened materials obtained by cladding with an electron beam injected into the air atmosphere was carried out. Structural investigations of coatings revealed that an increase in boron carbide concentration in a saturating mixture contributed to a rise of a volume fraction of iron borides in coatings. The maximum hardened depth reached 2 mm. Hardened layers were characterized by the formation of heterogeneous structure which consisted of iron borides and titanium carbides distributed uniformly in the eutectic matrix. Areas of titanium boride conglomerations were detected. It was found that an increase in the boron carbide content led to an enhancement in hardness of the investigated materials. Friction testing against loosely fixed abrasive particles showed that electron-beam cladding of powder mixtures containing boron carbides, titanium, and iron in air atmosphere allowed enhancing a resistance of materials hardened in two times

  7. Investigation of the structure and properties of boron-containing coatings obtained by electron-beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivezhenko, Dina S.; Drobyaz, Ekaterina A.; Bataev, Ivan A.; Chuchkova, Lyubov V.

    2015-10-01

    An investigation of surface-hardened materials obtained by cladding with an electron beam injected into the air atmosphere was carried out. Structural investigations of coatings revealed that an increase in boron carbide concentration in a saturating mixture contributed to a rise of a volume fraction of iron borides in coatings. The maximum hardened depth reached 2 mm. Hardened layers were characterized by the formation of heterogeneous structure which consisted of iron borides and titanium carbides distributed uniformly in the eutectic matrix. Areas of titanium boride conglomerations were detected. It was found that an increase in the boron carbide content led to an enhancement in hardness of the investigated materials. Friction testing against loosely fixed abrasive particles showed that electron-beam cladding of powder mixtures containing boron carbides, titanium, and iron in air atmosphere allowed enhancing a resistance of materials hardened in two times.

  8. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N2) and C2H2 activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  9. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chih-Ho [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, 404 Taiwan (China); Chang, Yin-Yu, E-mail: yinyu@mail2000.com.tw [Department of Mechanical and Computer-Aided Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Huang, Heng-Li [School of Dentistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Ho-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mingdao University, Changhua, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-30

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N{sub 2}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  10. Compatibility of the totally replaced hip. Reduction of wear by amorphous diamond coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavirta, Seppo

    2003-12-01

    Particulate wear debris in totally replaced hips causes adverse local host reactions. The extreme form of such a reaction, aggressive granulomatosis, was found to be a distinct condition and different from simple aseptic loosening. Reactive and adaptive tissues around the totally replaced hip were made of proliferation of local fibroblast like cells and activated macrophages. Methylmethacrylate and high-molecular-weight polyethylene were shown to be essentially immunologically inert implant materials, but in small particulate form functioned as cellular irritants initiating local biological reactions leading to loosening of the implants. Chromium-cobalt-molybdenum is the most popular metallic implant material; it is hard and tough, and the bearings of this metal are partially self-polishing. In total hip implants, prerequisites for longevity of the replaced hip are good biocompatibility of the materials and sufficient tribological properties of the bearings. The third key issue is that the bearing must minimize frictional shear at the prosthetic bone-implant interface to be compatible with long-term survival. Some of the approaches to meet these demands are alumina-on-alumina and metal-on-metal designs, as well as the use of highly crosslinked polyethylene for the acetabular component. In order to avoid the wear-based deleterious properties of the conventional total hip prosthesis materials or coatings, the present work included biological and tribological testing of amorphous diamond. Previous experiments had demonstrated that a high adhesion of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coatings to a substrate can be achieved by using mixing layers or interlayers. Amorphous diamond was found to be biologically inert, and simulator testing indicated excellent wear properties for conventional total hip prostheses, in which either the ball or both bearing surfaces were coated with hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond films. Simulator testing with such total hip prostheses

  11. Low-emissivity coating of amorphous diamond-like carbon/Ag-alloy multilayer on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent low-emissivity (low-e) coatings comprising dielectrics of amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) and Ag-alloy films are investigated. All films have been prepared by dc magnetron sputtering. An index of refraction of the DLC film deposited in a gas mixture of Ar/H2 (4%) shows n = 1.80 + 0.047i at 500 nm wavelength. A multilayer stack of DLC (70 nm thick)/Ag87.5Cu12.5-alloy (10 nm)/DLC (140 nm)/Ag87.5Cu12.5-alloy (10 nm)/DLC (70 nm) has revealed clear interference spectra with spectra selectivity. This coating performs low emittance less than 0.1 for black body radiation at 297 K, exhibiting a transparent heat mirror property embedded in DLC films

  12. Amorphous Carbon Coatings for Mitigation of Electron Cloud in the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Yin Vallgren, Christina; Bauche, Jeremie; Calatroni, Sergio; Chiggiato, Paolo; Cornelis, Karel; Costa Pinto, Pedro; Metral, Elias; Rumolo, Giovanni; Shaposhnikova, Elena; Taborelli, Mauro; Vandoni, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbon thin films have been applied to the liners in the electron cloud monitors and to vacuum chambers of three dipole magnets in the SPS. The electron cloud is completely suppressed for LHC type beams in the liners even after 3 months of air venting and no performance deterioration is observed after more than one year of SPS operation. In stainless steel (StSt) liners upon variation of the magnetic field in the monitors the electron cloud current maintains its intensity down to weak fields of some 40 Gauss. This is in agreement with previous findings and also with dark traces observed on the RF shields made of StSt, which are located between dipoles and quadrupoles. The dynamic pressure rise has been used to monitor the behavior of the dipole magnets. It is about the same for coated and uncoated magnets, apart from a weak improvement in the carbon coated ones under conditions of intense electron cloud

  13. Elastic properties of amorphous boron suboxide based solids studied using ab initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the correlation between chemical composition, structure, chemical bonding and elastic properties of amorphous B6O based solids using ab initio molecular dynamics. These solids are of different chemical compositions, but the elasticity data appear to be a function of density. This is in agreement with previous experimental observations. As the density increases from 1.64 to 2.38 g cm-3, the elastic modulus increases from 74 to 253 GPa. This may be understood by analyzing the cohesive energy and the chemical bonding of these compounds. The cohesive energy decreases from -7.051 to -7.584 eV/atom in the elastic modulus range studied. On the basis of the electron density distributions, Mulliken analysis and radial distribution functions, icosahedral bonding is the dominating bonding type. C and N promote cross-linking of icosahedra and thus increase the density, while H hinders the cross-linking by forming OH groups. The presence of icosahedral bonding is independent of the density

  14. High critical current densities in bulk MgB{sub 2} fabricated using amorphous boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidhar, Miryala; Kenta, Nozaki; Murakami, Masato [Superconducting Materials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology, Tokyo 135-8548 (Japan); Koblischka, Michael R. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, P.O. Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    We prepared bulk MgB{sub 2} from high-purity commercial powders of Mg metal (99.9% purity) and amorphous B (99% purity) powders using a single-step solid state reaction at 775 C for varying sintering duration from 1 to 10 h in pure argon atmosphere. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that all the samples were single phase MgB{sub 2}. The magnetization measurements confirmed a sharp superconducting transition with T{sub c,onset} at around 38.2-38.8 K. The critical current density (J{sub c}) values for the MgB{sub 2} samples produced at 1 h sintering time is the highest one in all processed materials here. Scanning electron microscopy analyses indicated that the sintering time has a crucial influence on the grain size. As a result, the highest J{sub c} value of 270 kA cm{sup -2} at 20 K and self-field was achieved in the sample produced at 775 C for 1 h. Our results clearly demonstrate that the optimization of the sintering conditions is essential to improve the bulk MgB{sub 2} performance. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  16. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Purohit, Sudhaunshu S.; Li, Han; King, Sean W.; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David; Lanford, William A.; Paquette, Michelle M.

    2015-07-01

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-BxC:Hy) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (EU), and Tauc parameter (B1/2)], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-BxC:Hy thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm3, Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 1010 to 1015 Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ˜1.3 g/cm3 (or below ˜35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters EU and B1/2, with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in structural disorder. All of these correlations in a-BxC:Hy are found to be very similar to those

  17. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano-Osorio, D. S.; Vargas, S.; López-Córdoba, L. M.; Ospina, R.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P. J.

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature ( Troom), 100 °C, 150 °C and 200 °C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 °C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 ± 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the ID/ IG or sp 3/sp 2 ratio and not by the absolute sp 3 or sp 2 concentration.

  18. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature (Troom), 100 deg. C, 150 deg. C and 200 deg. C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 deg. C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 ± 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the ID/IG or sp3/sp2 ratio and not by the absolute sp3 or sp2 concentration.

  19. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeano-Osorio, D.S.; Vargas, S.; Lopez-Cordoba, L.M.; Ospina, R. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature (T{sub room}), 100 deg. C, 150 deg. C and 200 deg. C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 deg. C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 {+-} 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the I{sub D}/I{sub G} or sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio and not by the absolute sp{sup 3} or sp{sup 2} concentration.

  20. Magnetic and microwave properties of glass-coated amorphous ferromagnetic microwires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Glass-coated amorphous FeCuNbSiB microwires were prepared by Taylor-Ulitovsky technique. X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate the microstructure and morphology of the glass-coated microwires respectively. The vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analyzer were used to study the magnetostatic and microwave properties of glass-coated microwires. The experimental results show that the effective anisotropy of an array of 150 microwires of 10 mm in length is large than that of one microwire of 10 mm in diameter and an array of 150 microwires of 1 mm in diameter. The natural ferromagnetic resonance takes place as the microwave magnetic component is perpendicular to the microwires axis, and the electric dipole resonance takes place as the microwire is long or the short microwire concentration is moderate. The natural ferromagnetic resonance shifts to higher frequency with the larger microwire concentration. The electric dipole resonance is governed by the microwires length and concentration. The glass-coated FeCuNbSiB microwires can be used to design EMI filters and microwave absorbing materials.

  1. RESEARCH OF PROCESS OF AN ALLOYING OF THE FUSED COATINGS RECEIVED FROM THE SUPERFICIAL ALLOYED WIRE BY BORON WITH IN ADDITIONALLY APPLIED ELECTROPLATED COATING OF CHROME AND COPPER

    OpenAIRE

    V. A. Stefanovich; Borisov, S. V.; A. V. Stefanovich

    2015-01-01

    Researches on distribution of chrome and copper in the fused coating received from the superficial alloyed wire by boron with in additionally applied electroplated coating of chrome and copper were executed. The structure of the fused coating consists of dendrites on which borders the boride eutectic is located. It is established that the content of chrome in dendrites is 1,5– 1,6 times less than in the borid; distribution of copper on structure is uniformed. Coefficients of digestion of chro...

  2. Amorphous structure and properties in laser-clad Ni-Cr-Al coating on Al-Si alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gongying; Wong, T. T.; Su, J. Y.; Woo, C. H.

    1999-09-01

    A Ni-Cr-Al coating was clad by a 5 kW CO2 laser with different laser power on Al-Si alloy. Using transmission electron microscopy, a mixing microstructure containing Ni- based amorphous structures was observed in the laser clad zones. As the uniformity of chemical composition and temperature is poor in the laser cladding, the amorphous structure with some Ni3Al crystals coexisted in the cladding. According to the morphologies of Ni-based amorphous structures, the amorphous structure existed not only in the net-like boundaries surrounding the granular structure but also in the granular structure. The microhardness of the mixture amorphous structure is between HV 600 - 800, which is lower than that of crystal phases in the coating. A differential thermal analysis showed that Ni- based amorphous structure exhibits a higher initial crystallizing temperature (about 588 degree(s)C), which is slightly higher than that of the eutectic temperature of Al- Si alloy. The wear experimental results showed that some amorphous structure exist in the laser cladding can reduce the peeling of the granular phases from matrix, and improve the its wear resistance.

  3. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy

  4. Effect of Boron-Doped Diamond Interlayer on Cutting Performance of Diamond Coated Micro Drills for Graphite Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thin boron doped diamond (BDD film is deposited from trimethyl borate/acetone/hydrogen mixture on Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co micro drills by using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. The boron peak on Raman spectrum confirms the boron incorporation in diamond film. This film is used as an interlayer for subsequent CVD of micro-crystalline diamond (MCD film. The Rockwell indentation test shows that boron doping could effectively improve the adhesive strength on substrate of as deposited thin diamond films. Dry drilling of graphite is chosen to check the multilayer (BDD + MCD film performance. For the sake of comparison, machining tests are also carried out under identical conditions using BDD and MCD coated micro drills with no interlayer. The wear mechanism of the tools has been identified and correlated with the criterion used to evaluate the tool life. The results show that the multilayer (BDD + MCD coated micro drill exhibits the longest tool life. Therefore, thin BDD interlayer is proved to be a new viable alternative and a suitable option for adherent diamond coatings on micro cutting tools.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of hydrogenated amorphous carbon-based tribological coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo

    The development of low friction surfaces is needed to improve performance and energy efficiency for macroscopic and microscopic mechanical systems. Minimizing unwanted friction and wear can lead to dramatic economic and environmental benefits. Such research is an important approach to addressing the world's increasing energy concerns. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (CHx) thin films are ideal for some tribological applications because of their low wear rates and low coefficients of friction. The primary goal of this research is to develop and characterize modified CHx coatings so that they can be used in a variety of applications in humid environments and under higher contact loads. Doping CHx films with a small amount of sulfur (CHx+S) enables them to achieve ultralow coefficients of friction in ambient humidity. Temperature-programmed desorption and quartz crystal microbalance were used to determine that sulfur reduces water adsorption onto the film surface. Sulfur-doped films showed a decrease in the activation energy for desorption of water, or weaker film-water bonding. This decrease causes a shorter residence time of water on the surface and less equilibrium water adsorption. At a given relative humidity, sulfur-doped films adsorbed less water than undoped films. Even at 90% relative humidity, sulfur-doped films adsorbed less than 1 monolayer of water. Sulfur acts to passivate dangling bonds at the film surface susceptible to oxidation and reduces the number of surface dipoles available to attract water. This enhanced hydrophobicity increases the contact angle of adsorbed water islands, which lowers the likelihood of coalescence into a water meniscus on the film surface. The decreased quantity and discontinuity of adsorbed water molecules are responsible for CHx+S being able to achieve lower friction in humid environments. Adding titanium diboride (TiB2) to the CHx coatings yielded films with improved mechanical properties. TiB2 and CH x were synthesized in

  6. Monte Carlo simulation on the application of boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector to the compensated neutron logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The compensated neutron logging technology is widely used in oil exploration and development. The neutron detector commonly used in this technology is the helium-3 proportional counter. Due to the decreasing in supply of the helium-3 gas, the price of the helium-3 proportional counter rises quickly. Purpose: The aim is to develop a new type of neutron detector to replace the helium-3 tubes in the compensated neutron logging technology. Methods: A new thermal neutron detector coated with a layer of thermal neutron converter in the inner glass of the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) was developed. Under the conventional and underbalanced conditions, Monte Carlo method was used to simulate the response of the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector and helium-3 proportional counter employed in compensated neutron logging technology. Results: It is shown that the SS/LS increases with the rise of porosity using either the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector or the helium-3 proportional counter, and the results of these two detectors are basically identical. Conclusion: It indicates that the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector can be used for compensated neutron logging. (authors)

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Mg1-xB2 Bulk Samples and Cu/Nb Sheathed Wires with Low Grade Amorphous Boron Powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Alexiou, Aikaterini; Rubesova, Katerina;

    2014-01-01

    MgB2 bulk and wire samples were prepared using cheap, low grade amorphous boron powders. Based on chemical analysis performed on the starting reagents, three nominal stoichiometries were studied. It was found that the structural and superconducting properties of the bulk samples were not affected...... by the composition, but that residual Mg was left in the wires for the nominal MgB2 composition. In contrast, slightly Mg-deficient compositions were free from residual Mg and exhibited higher critical current densities. The MgB2 phase formation kinetics was not influenced by the variations in the...... nominal powder composition....

  8. Tailoring the Mechanical Properties of High-Aspect-Ratio Carbon Nanotube Arrays using Amorphous Silicon Carbide Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Poelma, R.H.; Morana, B.; Vollebregt, S.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Van Zeijl, H.W.; Fan, X.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2014-01-01

    The porous nature of carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays allows for the unique opportunity to tailor their mechanical response by the infiltration and deposition of nanoscale conformal coatings. Here, we fabricate novel photo-lithographically defined CNT pillars that are conformally coated with amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) to strengthen the interlocking of individual CNTs at junctions using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). We further quantify the mechanical response by performing...

  9. Performance of microdot (MDOT) detectors with conductive coating of doped amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conductive coating of doped amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H) has been used in the fabrication of microdot (MDOT) detectors, to minimize the defocusing, away from the anodes, of the drifting primary electrons. This defocusing is caused by the existence of the readout line passing below the insulating layer. The defocusing effect and other effects of the conductive coating on the performance of these detectors fabricated in this way have been investigated

  10. Computational Evaluation of Amorphous Carbon Coating for Durable Silicon Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongwoon Hwang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of graphite-like amorphous carbon coating on bulky silicon to examine whether it can improve the durability of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries using molecular dynamics simulations and ab-initio electronic structure calculations. Structural models of carbon coating are constructed using molecular dynamics simulations of atomic carbon deposition with low incident energies (1–16 eV. As the incident energy decreases, the ratio of sp2 carbons increases, that of sp3 decreases, and the carbon films become more porous. The films prepared with very low incident energy contain lithium-ion conducting channels. Also, those films are electrically conductive to supplement the poor conductivity of silicon and can restore their structure after large deformation to accommodate the volume change during the operations. As a result of this study, we suggest that graphite-like porous carbon coating on silicon will extend the lifetime of the silicon anodes of lithium-ion batteries.

  11. Study of the Ca/P atomic ratio of the amorphous phase in plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the excellent biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite (HAp), plasma-sprayed HAp is widely used to coat orthopedic protheses. During the plasma spraying process, the thermal decomposition of HAp products tricalcium phosphate (TCP), tetracalcium phosphate (TeCP), calcium oxide (CaO), oxyhydroxyapatite (OxyHAp) and a molten phase. Hence, the coating is made of different phases including TCP, TeCP, CaO, OxyHAp, HAp and an amorphous phase. According to AFNOR standards, 35 samples of plasma-sprayed HAp coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The weight fraction of each phase (TCP, TeCP, CaO, HAp and amorphous phase) was measured with calibration curves. Thus, the Ca/P atomic ratio of the amorphous phase was calculated, the different ratios were between 1.50 and 1.67. The Ca/P atomic ratio of the amorphous phase varies both with the quantity of TCP or TeCP solubilized in the molten phase and with the part of TCP and TeCP which crystallizes from the amorphous phase during cooling

  12. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  13. IR and Near IR Laser Ablative Deposition of Amorphous Titanium Coats Containing Nanocrystalline Grains of Titanium and Titanium Suboxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urbanová, Markéta; Pokorná, Dana; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Medlín, R.; Křenek, T.; Pola, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 67, NOV 2014 (2014), s. 237-244. ISSN 1350-4495 Grant ostatní: GA MŠMT(CZ) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/03.0088 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : laser ablation * laser deposition * amorphous titanium coats Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.550, year: 2014

  14. Influence of working gas on the properties of boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector by Garfield simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) is a kind of gas detector developed in 1995. Purpose: For its excellent time resolution and high efficiency, MRPC is used to detect thermal neutron by coating boron on the inner glass. Methods: The performances of the boron-coated MRPC thermal neutron detector are largely affected by the component or proportion of the working gas, so it is important to optimize the proportion of working gas. Then Garfield was used to simulate the gas parameter, such as Townsend coefficient η, electron attachment coefficient α, drift velocity ν and diffusion coefficient D. Results: The time resolution σt and detection efficiency E of MRPC were calculated. Conclusion: Through the simulation, the proportion of working gas is optimized to provide necessary guidance for the fabrication of the detector. (authors)

  15. Nanoelectromechanical digital logic circuits using curved cantilever switches with amorphous-carbon-coated contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Christopher L.; Grogg, Daniel; Bazigos, Antonios; Bleiker, Simon J.; Fernandez-Bolaños, Montserrat; Niklaus, Frank; Hagleitner, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches have the potential to complement or replace traditional CMOS transistors in the area of ultra-low-power digital electronics. This paper reports the demonstration of prototype circuits including the first 3-stage ring oscillator built using cell-level digital logic elements based on curved NEM switches. The ring oscillator core occupies an area of 30 μm × 10 μm using 6 NEM switches. Each NEM switch device has a footprint of 5 μm × 3 μm, an air gap of 60 μm and is coated with amorphous carbon (a-C) for reliable operation. The ring oscillator operates at a frequency of 6.7 MHz, and confirms the simulated inverter propagation delay of 25 ns. The successful fabrication and measurement of this demonstrator are key milestones on the way towards an optimized, scaled technology with sub-nanosecond switching times, lower operating voltages and VLSI implementation.

  16. A safer disposal of hazardous phosphate coating sludge by formation of an amorphous calcium phosphate matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Blasco, I; Duran, A; Pérez-Nicolás, M; Fernández, J M; Sirera, R; Alvarez, J I

    2015-08-15

    Phosphate coating hazardous wastes originated from the automotive industry were efficiently encapsulated by an acid-base reaction between phosphates present in the sludge and calcium aluminate cement, yielding very inert and stable monolithic blocks of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP). Two different compositions of industrial sludge were characterized and loaded in ratios ranging from 10 to 50 wt.%. Setting times and compressive strengths were recorded to establish the feasibility of this method to achieve a good handling and a safe landfilling of these samples. Short solidification periods were found and leaching tests showed an excellent retention for toxic metals (Zn, Ni, Cu, Cr and Mn) and for organic matter. Retentions over 99.9% for Zn and Mn were observed even for loadings as high as 50 wt.% of the wastes. The formation of ACP phase of low porosity and high stability accounted for the effective immobilization of the hazardous components of the wastes. PMID:26024992

  17. DC and AC linear magnetic field sensor based on glass coated amorphous microwires with Giant Magnetoimpedance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giant Magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect has been studied in amorphous glass-coated microwires of composition (Fe6Co94)72.5Si12.5B15. The impedance of a 1.5 cm length sample has been characterized by using constant AC currents in the range of 400 µA–4 mA at frequencies from 7 to 15 MHz and DC magnetic fields from −900 to 900 A/m. Double peak responses have been obtained, showing GMI ratios up to 107%. A linear magnetic field sensor for DC and AC field has been designed, using two microwires connected in series with a magnetic bias of 400 A/m with opposite direction in each microwire in order to obtain a linear response from ±70 (A/m)rms for AC magnetic field, and ±100 A/m for DC magnetic field. A closed loop feedback circuit has been implemented to extend the linear range to ±1 kA/m for DC magnetic field. - Highlights: • Giant Magneto Impedance phenomenon has been studied in amorphous microwires. • A combination of two microwires with a bias field has been developed to get a linear response. • An electronic circuit has been developed to obtain a sensor with a linear response. • A feedback coil have been added to increase the measurable range of the sensor

  18. SaOS-2 cell response to macro-porous boron-incorporated TiO2 coating prepared by micro-arc oxidation on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qianli; Elkhooly, Tarek A; Liu, Xujie; Zhang, Ranran; Yang, Xing; Shen, Zhijian; Feng, Qingling

    2016-10-01

    The aims of the present study were to develop boron-incorporated TiO2 coating (B-TiO2 coating) through micro-arc oxidation (MAO) and subsequently evaluate the effect of boron incorporation on the in vitro biological performance of the coatings. The physicochemical properties of B-TiO2 coating and its response to osteoblast like cells (SaOS-2) were investigated compared to the control group without boron (TiO2 coating). The morphological and X-ray diffraction results showed that both coatings exhibited similar surface topography and phase composition, respectively. However, the incorporation of B led to an enhancement in the surface hydrophilicity of B-TiO2 coating. The spreading of SaOS-2 cells on B-TiO2 coating was faster than that on TiO2 coating. The proliferation rate of SaOS-2 cells cultured on B-TiO2 decreased after 5days of culture compared to that on TiO2 coating. SaOS-2 cells cultured on B-TiO2 coating exhibited an enhanced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, Collagen I synthesis and in vitro mineralization compared to those on TiO2 coating. The present findings suggest that B-TiO2 coating is a promising candidate surface for orthopedic implants. PMID:27287114

  19. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Paquette, Michelle M., E-mail: paquettem@umkc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Purohit, Sudhaunshu S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Li, Han; King, Sean W. [Logic Technology Development, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States); Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Lanford, William A. [Department of Physics, University at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B{sub x}C:H{sub y}) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (E{sub U}), and Tauc parameter (B{sup 1/2})], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-B{sub x}C:H{sub y} thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm{sup 3}, Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 15} Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ∼1.3 g/cm{sup 3} (or below ∼35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters E{sub U} and B{sup 1/2}, with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in

  20. RESEARCH OF PROCESS OF AN ALLOYING OF THE FUSED COATINGS RECEIVED FROM THE SUPERFICIAL ALLOYED WIRE BY BORON WITH IN ADDITIONALLY APPLIED ELECTROPLATED COATING OF CHROME AND COPPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Stefanovich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Researches on distribution of chrome and copper in the fused coating received from the superficial alloyed wire by boron with in additionally applied electroplated coating of chrome and copper were executed. The structure of the fused coating consists of dendrites on which borders the boride eutectic is located. It is established that the content of chrome in dendrites is 1,5– 1,6 times less than in the borid; distribution of copper on structure is uniformed. Coefficients of digestion of chrome and copper at an argon-arc welding from a wire electrode with electroplated coating are established. The assimilation coefficient for chrome is equal to 0,9–1,0; for copper – 0,6–0,75.

  1. Microstructure and Wear Properties of Fe-based Amorphous Coatings Deposited by High-velocity Oxygen Fuel Spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang WANG; Ping XIAO; Zhong-jia HUANG; Ru-jie HE

    2016-01-01

    Fe-based powder with a composition of Fe42·87 Cr15·98 Mo16·33 C15·94 B8·88 (at·%)was used to fabricate coatings by high-velocity oxygen fuel spraying.The effects of the spraying parameters on the microstructure and the wear properties of the Fe-based alloy coatings were systematically studied.The results showed that the obtained Fe-based coatings with a thickness of about 400μm consisted of a large-volume amorphous phase and some nanocrystals.With increasing the fuel and oxygen flow rates,the porosity of the obtained coatings decreased.The coating deposited un-der optimized parameters exhibited the lowest porosity of 2·8%.The excellent wear resistance of this coating was at-tributed to the properties of the amorphous matrix and the presence of nanocrystals homogeneously distributed with-in the matrix.The wear mechanism of the coatings was discussed on the basis of observations of the worn surfaces.

  2. Ni-WC composite coatings by carburizing electrodeposited amorphous and nanocrystalline Ni-W alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ formation of tungsten carbide in the matrix of FCC nickel has been achieved by carburizing of the electrodeposited Ni-W alloy coatings. The size of the carbide particles ranges between 100 and 500 nm. The carbide phase is also present in the form of very small precipitates inside the nickel grains. The size of such precipitates is between 10 and 40 nm. The carburizing environment was created by introducing a flowing mixture of vaporized 95.5% alcohol (0.25 ml/min, liquid) and argon (0.5 L/min, gas) into the carburizing furnace. Supersaturated nature of electrodeposited amorphous and nanocrystalline alloys, in addition to high diffusivity, have been attributed for the formation of carbide phase in the deposits at a temperature range of 700-850 deg. C. The carbide-metal interface is clean and the composite coatings are compact. Hardness values up to about 1100 KHN are achieved. Hardness increases with tungsten content and carburizing temperature.

  3. Metallic amorphous electrodeposited molybdenum coating from aqueous electrolyte: Structural, electrical and morphological properties under current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemla, Fatima; Cherrad, Djellal

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum coatings are extensively utilized as back contact for CIGS-based solar cells. However, their electrodeposition from aqueous electrolyte still sophisticates, since long time, owing to the high reactivity with oxygen. In this study, we present a successful 30 min electrodeposition experiment of somewhat thick (∼0.98-2.9 μm) and of moderate surface roughness RMS (∼47-58 nm), metallic bright Mo coating from aqueous electrolyte containing molybdate ions. XRD analysis and Hall Effect measurements have been used to confirm the presence of Mo. The crystal structure of deposits was slightly amorphous in nature to body centred cubic structure (bcc) Mo (110), (211) and (220) face. Lattice parameters exhibit some weak fluctuated tensile stress when compared to the reference lattice parameter. Additionally, our calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with some previous works from literature. Discussions on the grain growth prove that they are constrained by grain boundary energy not the thickness effect. Further discussions were made on the electrical resistivity and surface morphology. Resonance scattering of Fermi electrons are expected to contribute towards the variation in the film resistivity through the carrier mobility limitation. However, studied samples might be qualified as candidates for solar cell application.

  4. Formation of ultra-thin amorphous conversion films on zinc alloy coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the two parts of this contribution a detailed investigation of the nucleation and growth of ultra-thin amorphous conversion coatings on hot dip galvanised steel is reported. The first part deals with the composition and reactivity of the native ultra-thin oxyhydroxide films that are formed on the zinc alloy surface during the hot dip galvanising process due to the enrichment of aluminium at the outer surface of the alloy coating. Complimentary surface analytical techniques such as FT-IR-spectroscopy at grazing incidence and X-ray photo electron spectroscopy, high resolution AFM on selected grains to study the surface topography and cyclovoltammetry as well as quasi stationary current potential curves and Kelvin probe measurements to study surface ion and electron transfer reactions were applied. Changes in the chemical composition, the electronic properties and the morphology of the ultra-thin surface could thereby be analysed. The surface of the ZnAl alloy is composed of an about 3-4 nm thick mixed Zn and Al-oxyhydroxide layer with Zn-oxyhydroxide slightly enriched at the outermost surface. This mixed oxyhydroxide causes to a significant inhibition of electron transfer reactions. During alkaline cleaning the surface is nanoscopically roughened and the mixed oxyhydroxide is converted into an electro-conducting hydroxyl rich pure Zn-oxyhydroxide layer with a thickness of about 4 nm. In the second part of this paper the effect of the inorganic surface layer on the film formation is correlated with these findings

  5. Effect of LiF Coating on the Thermal Oxidation Characteristics for Boron Powder%LiF包覆对硼粉热氧化特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈涛; 张先瑞; 王园园; 黄凌; 肖金武

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of LiF coating on the thermal oxidation characteristics for amorphous boron powder,the thermal analysis experiment of boron coated with LiF (BLiF) was conducted by DSC-TC. Propellant samples containing BLif were prepared. The heat of detonation and heat of combustion were determined by an oxygen bomb calorimeter. The effects of BLif on the energy release features in primary combustion and after-burning processes of the propellant were discussed. The results indicate that in comparison with amorphous boron, BLiF shows a fast oxidation reaction at 599 XL ,and a 39. 9% higher percentage of boron participated in B/O reaction. The propellant containing BLiF makes primary combustion and after-burning energy release efficiencies (ηc1 and ηc2) increased and combustion efficiencies of B enhanced significantly from 65.48% to 81 .57%. This is due to the consumption of B2O3 layer on the boron particle surface via endothermic reaction of LiF and B2O3 at high temperature and the acceleration of B/O reaction.%为考察LiF包覆对硼粉热氧化特性的影响,采用DSC-TG技术对LiF包覆硼(BLiF)进行热分析试验.制备了含BLiF的推进剂样品.采用氧弹量热计测试其爆热和热值.考察了BLiF对推进剂一次、二次燃烧过程中能量释放特性的影响.结果表明:与无定形硼相比,BLiF在599℃存在快速氧化反应,有39.9%(质量百分数)的B参与了B/O反应.含BLiF的推进剂使一次能量释放效率和二次能量释放效率明显提高,硼的燃烧效率从65.48%提高到81.57%.这是由高温下LiF通过吸热反应消耗硼粉表面B2O3氧化层,加速B/O反应所引起的.

  6. In Vivo Biodistribution and Toxicity of Highly Soluble PEG-Coated Boron Nitride in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Qi, Wei; Tian, Longlong; Li, Zhan; Miao, Guoying; An, Wenzhen; Liu, Dan; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wu, Wangsuo

    2015-12-01

    The boron nitride (BN) nanoparticles, as the structural analogues of graphene, are the potential biomedicine materials because of the excellent biocompatibility, but their solubility and biosafety are the biggest obstacle for the clinic application. Here, we first synthesized the highly soluble BN nanoparticles coated by PEG (BN-PEG) with smaller size (~10 nm), then studied their biodistribution in vivo through radioisotope (Tc99mO4 -) labeling, and the results showed that BN-PEG nanoparticles mainly accumulated in the liver, lung, and spleen with the less uptake by the brain. Moreover, the pathological changes induced by BN-PEG could be significantly observed in the sections of the liver, lung, spleen, and heart, which can be also supported by the test of biochemical indexes in serum. More importantly, we first observed the biodistribution of BN-PEG in the heart tissues with high toxicity, which would give a warning about the cardiovascular disease, and provide some opportunities for the drug delivery and treatment.

  7. Nanometer-thick amorphous-SnO2 layer as an oxygen barrier coated on a transparent AZO electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Sang; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2016-07-01

    It is necessary for transparent conducting electrodes used in dye-sensitized or perovskite solar cells to have high thermal stability which is required when TiO2 is coated on the electrode. AZO films with their low-cost and good TCO properties are unfortunately unstable above 300 °C in air because of adsorbed oxygen. In this paper, the thermal stability of AZO films is enhanced by depositing an oxygen barrier on AZO films to block the oxygen. As the barrier material, SnO2 is used due to its high heat stability, electrical conductivity, and transmittance. Moreover, when the SnO2 is grown as amorphous phase, the protective effect become greater than the crystalline phase. The thermal stability of the amorphous-SnO2/AZO films varies depending on the thickness of the amorphous SnO2 layer. Because of the outstanding oxygen blocking properties of amorphous SnO2, its optimal thickness is very thin and it results in only a slight decrease in transmittance. The sheet resistance of the amorphous-SnO2/AZO film is 5.4 Ω sq-1 after heat treatment at 500 °C for 30 min in air and the average transmittance in the visible region is 83.4%. The results show that the amorphous-SnO2/AZO films have thermal stability with excellent electrical and optical properties. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Amorphous GeOx-Coated Reduced Graphene Oxide Balls with Sandwich Structure for Long-Life Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Ho; Jung, Kyeong Youl; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous GeOx-coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) balls with sandwich structure are prepared via a spray-pyrolysis process using polystyrene (PS) nanobeads as sacrificial templates. This sandwich structure is formed by uniformly coating the exterior and interior of few-layer rGO with amorphous GeOx layers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis reveals a Ge:O stoichiometry ratio of 1:1.7. The amorphous GeOx-coated rGO balls with sandwich structure have low charge-transfer resistance and fast Li(+)-ion diffusion rate. For example, at a current density of 2 A g(-1), the GeOx-coated rGO balls with sandwich and filled structures and the commercial GeO2 powders exhibit initial charge capacities of 795, 651, and 634 mA h g(-1), respectively; the corresponding 700th-cycle charge capacities are 758, 579, and 361 mA h g(-1). In addition, at a current density of 5 A g(-1), the rGO balls with sandwich structure have a 1600th-cycle reversible charge capacity of 629 mA h g(-1) and a corresponding capacity retention of 90.7%, as measured from the maximum reversible capacity at the 100th cycle. PMID:26047208

  9. Modelling of Boron Trapping at End-of-Range defects in pre-amorphized ultra-shallow junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazizi, E.M. [LAAS/CNRS, University of Toulouse, 7 av. Col. Roche, 31077 Toulouse (France); STMicroelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles Cedex (France); CEMES/CNRS, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France)], E-mail: bazizi@laas.fr; Fazzini, P.F. [LAAS/CNRS, University of Toulouse, 7 av. Col. Roche, 31077 Toulouse (France); Zechner, C.; Tsibizov, A. [Synopsys Switzerland LLC, Affolternstrasse 52, 8050 Zuerich (Switzerland); Kheyrandish, H. [CSMA, Queens Road, Penkhull, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 7LQ (United Kingdom); Pakfar, A.; Ciampolini, L.; Tavernier, C. [STMicroelectronics, 850 rue Jean Monnet, 38926 Crolles Cedex (France); Cristiano, F. [LAAS/CNRS, University of Toulouse, 7 av. Col. Roche, 31077 Toulouse (France)

    2008-12-05

    In this work, the evolution of boron trapping at End-of-Range (EOR) defects was investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Si wafers with a constant boron concentration of 2 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} were implanted with 30 keV germanium and with a dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} and then annealed at 700, 800, or 900 deg. C in an N{sub 2} ambient for various times. The experimental results suggest that the evolution of boron-trapping peak is driven by the evolution of {l_brace}3 1 1{r_brace} defects and that the dislocation loops contribution to the trapping mechanism is less pronounced. An analytic model for the concurrent boron trapping at {l_brace}3 1 1{r_brace} defects and dislocation loops was developed by taking into account the geometry of the EOR defects. The trapped species is represented by neutral BI pairs which can be captured either by {l_brace}3 1 1{r_brace} defects or by dislocation loops. The model accurately reproduces the complex evolution of the trapping peak as a function of both the annealing time and temperature. These results confirm that the evolution of the boron-trapping peak is closely related to the evolution of the {l_brace}3 1 1{r_brace} defects, therefore suggesting that boron trapping is associated to the capture and release of boron atoms at the {l_brace}3 1 1{r_brace} defects formed in the EOR region.

  10. Effects of amorphous silica coating on cerium oxide nanoparticles induced pulmonary responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jane; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cohen, Joel M.; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Recently cerium compounds have been used in a variety of consumer products, including diesel fuel additives, to increase fuel combustion efficiency and decrease diesel soot emissions. However, cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been detected in the exhaust, which raises a health concern. Previous studies have shown that exposure of rats to nanoscale CeO2 by intratracheal instillation (IT) induces sustained pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 or CeO2 coated with a nano layer of amorphous SiO2 (aSiO2/CeO2) by a single IT and sacrificed at various times post-exposure to assess potential protective effects of the aSiO2 coating. The first acellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and BAL cells were collected and analyzed from all exposed animals. At the low dose (0.15 mg/kg), CeO2 but not aSiO2/CeO2 exposure induced inflammation. However, at the higher doses, both particles induced a dose-related inflammation, cytotoxicity, inflammatory cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and tissue inhibitor of MMP at 1 day post-exposure. Morphological analysis of lung showed an increased inflammation, surfactant and collagen fibers after CeO2 (high dose at 3.5 mg/kg) treatment at 28 days post-exposure. aSiO2 coating significantly reduced CeO2-induced inflammatory responses in the airspace and appeared to attenuate phospholipidosis and fibrosis. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis showed Ce and phosphorous (P) in all particle-exposed lungs, whereas Si was only detected in aSiO2/CeO2-exposed lungs up to 3 days after exposure, suggesting that aSiO2 dissolved off the CeO2 core, and some of the CeO2 was transformed to CePO4 with time. These results demonstrate that aSiO2 coating reduce CeO2-induced inflammation, phospholipidosis and fibrosis. PMID:26210349

  11. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl4-C3H6-H2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm3 by Archimedes' principle.

  12. MC3T3-E1 cell response of amorphous phase/TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal composite coating prepared by microarc oxidation on titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Rui [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wei, Daqing, E-mail: daqingwei@hit.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yang, Haoyue; Feng, Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Cheng, Su [Department of Mechanical Engineering, School of Architecture and Civil Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Baoqiang; Wang, Yaming; Jia, Dechang; Zhou, Yu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Bioactive amorphous phase/TiO{sub 2} nanocrystal (APTN) composite coatings were fabricated by microarc oxidation (MAO) on Ti. The APTN coatings are composed of much amorphous phase with Si, Na, Ca, Ti and O elements and a few TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals. With increasing applied voltage, the micropore density of the APTN coating decreases and the micropore size of the APTN coating increases. The results indicate that less MC3T3-E1 cells attach on the APTN coatings as compared to Ti. However, the APTN coatings greatly enhance the cell proliferation ability and the activity of alkaline phosphatase. The amorphous phase and the concentrations of the released Ca and Si from the APTN coatings during cell culture have significant effects on the cell response. - Highlights: • Amorphous phase/TiO2 nanocrystal (APTN) composite coatings were fabricated. • The MC3T3-E1 cell response of the APTN coatings was evaluated. • The APTN coatings greatly enhanced the cell proliferation ability.

  13. Hydrogenation effects on carrier transport in boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite (UNCD/a-C:H) films were deposited by coaxial arc plasma deposition with a boron-blended graphite target at a base pressure of <10−3 Pa and at hydrogen pressures of ≤53.3 Pa. The hydrogenation effects on the electrical properties of the films were investigated in terms of chemical bonding. Hydrogen-scattering spectrometry showed that the maximum hydrogen content was 35 at. % for the film produced at 53.3-Pa hydrogen pressure. The Fourier-transform infrared spectra showed strong absorptions by sp3 C–H bonds, which were specific to the UNCD/a-C:H, and can be attributed to hydrogen atoms terminating the dangling bonds at ultrananocrystalline diamond grain boundaries. Temperature-dependence of the electrical conductivity showed that the films changed from semimetallic to semiconducting with increasing hydrogen pressure, i.e., with enhanced hydrogenation, probably due to hydrogenation suppressing the formation of graphitic bonds, which are a source of carriers. Carrier transport in semiconducting hydrogenated films can be explained by a variable-range hopping model. The rectifying action of heterojunctions comprising the hydrogenated films and n-type Si substrates implies carrier transport in tunneling

  14. In vitro metal ion release and biocompatibility of amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy with/without gelatin coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous zinc-rich Mg–Zn–Ca alloys have exhibited good tissue compatibility and low hydrogen evolution in vivo. However, suboptimal cell–surface interaction on magnesium alloy surface observed in vitro could lead to reduced integration with host tissue for regenerative purpose. This study aims to improve cell–surface interaction of amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy by coating a gelatin layer by electrospinning. Coated/uncoated alloys were immersed and extracted for 3 days under different CO2. The immersion results showed that pH and metal ion release in the alloy extracts were affected by gelatin coating and CO2, suggesting their roles in alloy biocorrosion and a mechanism has been proposed for the alloy–CO2 system with/without coating. Cytotoxicity results are evident that gelatin-coated alloy with 2-day crosslinking not only exhibited no indirect cytotoxicity, but also supported attachment of L929 and MG63 cell lines around/on the alloy with high viability. Therefore, amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy coated with gelatin by electrospinning technique provides a useful method to improve alloy biocompatibility. - Highlights: • Electrospinning is a new method to coat amorphous Mg67Zn28Ca5 alloy with gelatin. • Gelatin-coated alloy has differential effect on pH and ion release at various CO2. • L929 cell proliferation correlates with Mg2+ level in alloy extracts. • Biomimetic gelatin coating significantly improves cell–surface interaction

  15. Performance of microstrip gas chambers with conductive surface coating of doped amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique involves the use of doped amorphous silicon carbide (a-Si:C:H) as a conductive surface coating in the fabrication of microstrip gas chambers, to eliminate the effect of charge accumulation on the substrate surface. The performance of these detectors made in this way has been tested, measuring gas gains with respect to several operating parameters such as time, anode voltage (Va), backplane voltage (Vb), and drift voltage (Vd). Doped a-Si:C:H film is a conductive surface coating that works well, and is an attractive alternative to other surface treatments of the substrate, because its resistivity can be easily controlled over a wide range by doping, it has a naturally good radiation hardness, and large areas can be coated at relatively low cost. (orig.)

  16. Gas barrier properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films coated on polymers by surface-wave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas barrier characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) thin films coated on polymer sheets using the large-area surface-wave plasma (SWP) were studied. With SWP in He and CH4 gas mixture, a-C:H films were deposited over about 100 mm in diameter on high density polyethylene or polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheets at temperature less than 70 deg. C. Experimental results show that gas permeation in the case of a-C:H film coating on PET sheet was reduced by a factor of more than 150 (0.27 cm3/m2 day atm), compared with that before coating. Plasma characteristics of SWP, such as electron density and electron energy distribution functions, and other film characteristics measured with Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscope are presented and discussed

  17. Boron carbide coatings for neutron detection probed by x-rays, ions, and neutrons to determine thin film quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, G., E-mail: Gregor.Nowak@hzg.de; Störmer, M.; Horstmann, C.; Kampmann, R.; Höche, D.; Lorenz, U.; Müller, M.; Schreyer, A. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Becker, H.-W. [RUBION-Zentrale Einrichtung für Ionenstrahlen und Radionuklide, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Haese-Seiller, M.; Moulin, J.-F.; Pomm, M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Außenstelle an der Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching (Germany); Randau, C. [Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Geowissenschaftliches Zentrum, 37077 Göttingen, Germany and Außenstelle an der Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universität München, 85747 Garching (Germany); Hall-Wilton, R. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, 221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-01-21

    Due to the present shortage of {sup 3}He and the associated tremendous increase of its price, the supply of large neutron detection systems with {sup 3}He becomes unaffordable. Alternative neutron detection concepts, therefore, have been invented based on solid {sup 10}B converters. These concepts require development in thin film deposition technique regarding high adhesion, thickness uniformity and chemical purity of the converter coating on large area substrates. We report on the sputter deposition of highly uniform large-area {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings of up to 2 μm thickness with a thickness deviation below 4% using the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht large area sputtering system. The {sup 10}B{sub 4}C coatings are x-ray amorphous and highly adhesive to the substrate. Material analysis by means of X-ray-Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, and Rutherford-Back-Scattering (RBS) revealed low impurities concentration in the coatings. The isotope composition determined by Secondary-Ion-Mass-Spectrometry, RBS, and inelastic nuclear reaction analysis of the converter coatings evidences almost identical {sup 10}B isotope contents in the sputter target and in the deposited coating. Neutron conversion and detection test measurements with variable irradiation geometry of the converter coating demonstrate an average relative quantum efficiency ranging from 65% to 90% for cold neutrons as compared to a black {sup 3}He-monitor. Thus, these converter coatings contribute to the development of {sup 3}He-free prototype detectors based on neutron grazing incidence. Transferring the developed coating process to an industrial scale sputtering system can make alternative {sup 3}He-free converter elements available for large area neutron detection systems.

  18. Boronization of Russian tokamaks from carborane precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new and cheap boronization technique using the nontoxic and nonexplosive solid substance carborane has been developed and successfully applied to the Russian tokamaks T-11M, T-3M, T-10 and TUMAN-3. The glow discharge in a mixture of He and carborane vapor produced the amorphous B/C coating with the B/C ratio varied from 2.0-3.7. The deposition rate was about 150 nm/h. The primary effect of boronization was a significant reduction of the impurity influx and the plasma impurity contamination, a sharp decrease of the plasma radiated power, and a decrease of the effective charge. Boronization strongly suppressed the impurity influx caused by additional plasma heating. ECR- and ICR-heating as well as ECR current drive were more effective in boronized vessels. Boronization resulted in a significant extension of the Ne- and q-region of stable tokamak operation. The density limit rose strongly. In Ohmic H-mode energy confinement time increased significantly (by a factor of 2) after boronization. It rose linearly with plasma current Ip and was 10 times higher than Neo-Alcator time at maximum current. ((orig.))

  19. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  20. Friction reduction in powertrain and engine components by coating with diamond-like, amorphous carbon; Reibungsminderung an Antriebs- und Motorkomponenten durch Beschichtungen mit diamantaehnlichem amorphen Kohlenstoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schork, Willi Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    The author investigated inhowfar coatings with diamond-like amorphous carbon (ta-C) in combination with suitable lubricants may help to reduce friction in selected powertrain and engine components. The influence of the microstructure on the stresses on layers in tribological contact was investigated using simulations. By varying the parameters of the background gas in the coating plant, hydrogen-free amorphous carbon layers of different elasticities and compositions were deposited reproducibly using a pulsed arc technology. For selective analyses of damage mechanisms in high-wear conditions, a novel tribometer for increasing loads was designed and constructed, with oscillating sliding contact and dynamic load. Failure models were established for various stress-related damge mechanisms of layered systems measured by the new tribometer. Practical tests with engines with ta-C coated piston rings proved the applicability of hydrogen-free amorphous carbon in engine applications.

  1. Application of Be-free Zr-based amorphous sputter coatings as a brazing filler metal in CANDU fuel bundle manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous sputter coatings of Be-free multi-component Zr-based alloys were applied as a novel brazing filler metal for Zircaloy-4 brazing. By applying the homogeneous and amorphous-structured layers coated by sputtering the crystalline targets, the highly reliable joints were obtained with the formation of predominantly grown α-Zr grains owing to a complete isothermal solidification, exhibiting high tensile and fatigue strengths as well as excellent corrosion resistance, which were comparable to those of Zircaloy-4 base metal. The present investigation showed that Be-free and Zr-based multi-component amorphous sputter coatings can offer great potential for brazing Zr alloys and manufacturing fuel rods in CANDU fuel bundle system. (author)

  2. Influence of deposition parameters on surface roughness and mechanical properties of boron carbon nitride coatings synthesized by ion beam assisted deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbon nitride (BCN) coatings were deposited on Si(100) wafers and Si3N4 disks by using ion beam assisted deposition from a boron carbide target. The BCN coatings were synthesized by the reaction between boron and carbon vapor as well as nitrogen ion simultaneously. The influence of deposition parameters such as ion acceleration voltage, ion acceleration current density and deposition ratio on the surface roughness and mechanical properties of the BCN coatings was investigated. The surface roughness was determined by using atomic force microscopy and the mechanical properties of the BCN coatings were evaluated by nano-indentation tests and friction tests in N2 gas. The composition and chemical bonding of the BCN coatings were analyzed by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed that the lower deposition rate, the smaller surface roughness and higher nano-hardness the BCN coatings were. The BCN coating with the smoothest surface (R a = 0.25 nm and R P-V = 2.8 nm) and the highest nanohardness of 33 GPa as well as excellent friction property were obtained at 0.5 nm/s and the nitrogen ions were generated at 2.0 kV and 60 μA/cm2, and the chemical composition of this BCN coating was 49 at.% B, 42 at.% C and 9 at.% N. Moreover, there were several bonding states such as B-N, B-C and C-N with B-C-N hybridization in this BCN coating

  3. Investigation of the neutron contamination in IMRT deliveries with a paired magnesium and boron coated magnesium ionization chamber system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and Purpose: Photon beams used in IMRT treatments with high energies (>10 MV) are contaminated with neutrons. Measurement of this neutron dose is of significance to the overall risk estimate of high energy radiotherapy. Materials and methods: For measuring neutron doses a paired magnesium and boron coated magnesium chamber system was used. All measurements were performed inside the solid water phantom EasyCube using abdominal extensions. 4 different clinical treatment plans were studied. Results: The measured neutron dose showed to be homogeneous inside the phantom and increased with increased number of applied monitor units. The sum over all fractions showed neutron doses of 1 - 2 mGy, depending on the kind of treatment. Conclusions: Using large conversion factors of 25 Sv/Gy, none of the studied treatment plans exceeded dose equivalents of 50 mSv for the whole treatment. This dose equivalent has to be considered whole body dose due to the homogeneous distribution of neutrons

  4. Ni-based amorphous alloy-coating for bipolar plate of PEM fuel cell by electrochemical plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the Ni-Cr-P amorphous alloy-coated bipolar plates were produced by electro-plating on the Cu base plates with a flow field. The power generation tests of a single fuel cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates were conducted at 353 K. It was found that the single fuel cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates showed excellent I-V performance as well as that with the carbon graphite bipolar plates. It was also found that the single cell with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates showed better I-V performance than that with the Ni-P amorphous alloy-coated bipolar plates. Furthermore, the long-time operation test was conducted for 440 h with those Ni-Cr-P bipolar plates at the constant current density of 200 mA·cm−2. As a result, it was found that the cell voltage gradually decreased at the beginning of the measurement before 300 h and then the voltage was kept constant after 300 h.

  5. Properties of Boron Carbide Coatings and Free-Standing Parts Prepared by WSP(r)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Nanobashvili, S.; Ctibor, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil; Neufuss, Karel; Chráska, Pavel

    Franfurkt : WerkstoffInformationsgesselschaft, 2002, s. článek č.914. ISBN 3-88355-302-6. [Materials Week 2001.. Mnichov (DE), 01.10.2001-04.10.2001] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : water-stabilized plasma spraying, boron carbide, material properties Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  6. In vitro metal ion release and biocompatibility of amorphous Mg{sub 67}Zn{sub 28}Ca{sub 5} alloy with/without gelatin coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, W.Y., E-mail: chan.wing.yue@sgh.com.sg [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Department of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Chian, K.S.; Tan, M.J. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2013-12-01

    Amorphous zinc-rich Mg–Zn–Ca alloys have exhibited good tissue compatibility and low hydrogen evolution in vivo. However, suboptimal cell–surface interaction on magnesium alloy surface observed in vitro could lead to reduced integration with host tissue for regenerative purpose. This study aims to improve cell–surface interaction of amorphous Mg{sub 67}Zn{sub 28}Ca{sub 5} alloy by coating a gelatin layer by electrospinning. Coated/uncoated alloys were immersed and extracted for 3 days under different CO{sub 2}. The immersion results showed that pH and metal ion release in the alloy extracts were affected by gelatin coating and CO{sub 2}, suggesting their roles in alloy biocorrosion and a mechanism has been proposed for the alloy–CO{sub 2} system with/without coating. Cytotoxicity results are evident that gelatin-coated alloy with 2-day crosslinking not only exhibited no indirect cytotoxicity, but also supported attachment of L929 and MG63 cell lines around/on the alloy with high viability. Therefore, amorphous Mg{sub 67}Zn{sub 28}Ca{sub 5} alloy coated with gelatin by electrospinning technique provides a useful method to improve alloy biocompatibility. - Highlights: • Electrospinning is a new method to coat amorphous Mg{sub 67}Zn{sub 28}Ca{sub 5} alloy with gelatin. • Gelatin-coated alloy has differential effect on pH and ion release at various CO{sub 2}. • L929 cell proliferation correlates with Mg{sup 2+} level in alloy extracts. • Biomimetic gelatin coating significantly improves cell–surface interaction.

  7. Protective properties and structure of amorphous alumosilicophosphate coatings for niobium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of thermal tests of niobium alloy samples with a protective coating in gas media with different content of oxygen are presented. Microhardness of the metal under the coating and of the coating as such prior to and after thermal testing was studied. Near the contact areas of the metal and coating were studied using electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction microprobe and X-ray phase analyses. Information on the structure, elementary and phase compositions of the near the contact areas was obtained. The processes occurring during formation and subsequent long-term annealing of the coating, which give rise to structural changes in the coating providing its adhesion to substrate and high protective efficiency, were interpreted

  8. Corrosion Resistance of Amorphous Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 coating - a new criticality-controlled material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-03-28

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. Modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in various relevant environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  9. Improving the electrochemical properties of nanosized LiFePO4-based electrode by boron doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal treatment of boron phosphate with LiFePO4 provides electrode materials with high performance in lithium half-cells: 160 mAh·g-1 (90% of theoretical capacity) under C/5 rate • The products are composites containing boron-modified LiFePO4, FePO4 and an amorphous phase with ionic diffusion properties • The boron treatment affects textural, conductive and lithium diffusivity of the electrode material leading to higher performance • A limited boron-doping of the phospholivine structure is observed - Abstract: Electrode materials with homogeneous distribution of boron were obtained by heating mixtures of nanosized carbon-coated lithium iron phosphate and BPO4 in 3-9% weight at 700 °C. The materials can be described as nanocomposites containing i) LiFePO4, possibly doped with a low amount of boron, ii) FePO4 and iii) an amorphous layer based on Li4P2O7-derived material that surrounds the phosphate particles. The thermal treatment with BPO4 also triggered changes in the carbon coating graphitic order. Galvanostatic and voltammetric studies in lithium half-cells showed smaller polarisation, higher capacity and better cycle life for the boron-doped composites. For instance, one of the solids, called B6-LiFePO4, provided close to 150 and 140 mAhg-1 (87% and 81% of theoretical capacity, respectively) under C/2.5 and C regimes after several cycles. Improved specific surface area, carbon graphitization, conductivity and lithium ion diffusivity in the boron-doped phospholivine network account for this excellent rate performance. The properties of an amorphous layer surrounding the phosphate particles also account for such higher performance

  10. STEM–EELS analysis reveals stable high-density He in nanopores of amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad interest has been showed recently on the study of nanostructuring of thin films and surfaces obtained by low-energy He plasma treatments and He incorporation via magnetron sputtering. In this paper spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope is used to locate and characterize the He state in nanoporous amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering. A dedicated MATLAB program was developed to quantify the helium density inside individual pores based on the energy position shift or peak intensity of the He K-edge. A good agreement was observed between the high density (∼35–60 at nm−3) and pressure (0.3–1.0 GPa) values obtained in nanoscale analysis and the values derived from macroscopic measurements (the composition obtained by proton backscattering spectroscopy coupled to the macroscopic porosity estimated from ellipsometry). This work provides new insights into these novel porous coatings, providing evidence of high-density He located inside the pores and validating the methodology applied here to characterize the formation of pores filled with the helium process gas during deposition. A similar stabilization of condensed He bubbles has been previously demonstrated by high-energy He ion implantation in metals and is newly demonstrated here using a widely employed methodology, magnetron sputtering, for achieving coatings with a high density of homogeneously distributed pores and He storage capacities as high as 21 at%. (paper)

  11. STEM-EELS analysis reveals stable high-density He in nanopores of amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierholz, Roland; Lacroix, Bertrand; Godinho, Vanda; Caballero-Hernández, Jaime; Duchamp, Martial; Fernández, Asunción

    2015-02-20

    A broad interest has been showed recently on the study of nanostructuring of thin films and surfaces obtained by low-energy He plasma treatments and He incorporation via magnetron sputtering. In this paper spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope is used to locate and characterize the He state in nanoporous amorphous silicon coatings deposited by magnetron sputtering. A dedicated MATLAB program was developed to quantify the helium density inside individual pores based on the energy position shift or peak intensity of the He K-edge. A good agreement was observed between the high density (∼35-60 at nm(-3)) and pressure (0.3-1.0 GPa) values obtained in nanoscale analysis and the values derived from macroscopic measurements (the composition obtained by proton backscattering spectroscopy coupled to the macroscopic porosity estimated from ellipsometry). This work provides new insights into these novel porous coatings, providing evidence of high-density He located inside the pores and validating the methodology applied here to characterize the formation of pores filled with the helium process gas during deposition. A similar stabilization of condensed He bubbles has been previously demonstrated by high-energy He ion implantation in metals and is newly demonstrated here using a widely employed methodology, magnetron sputtering, for achieving coatings with a high density of homogeneously distributed pores and He storage capacities as high as 21 at%. PMID:25627862

  12. Effect of tetrahedral amorphous carbon coating on the resistivity and wear of single-walled carbon nanotube network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ajai; Kaskela, Antti; Novikov, Serguei; Etula, Jarkko; Liu, Xuwen; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Koskinen, Jari

    2016-05-01

    Single walled carbon nanotube networks (SWCNTNs) were coated by tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) to improve the mechanical wear properties of the composite film. The ta-C deposition was performed by using pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc method resulting in the generation of C+ ions in the energy range of 40-60 eV which coalesce to form a ta-C film. The primary disadvantage of this process is a significant increase in the electrical resistance of the SWCNTN post coating. The increase in the SWCNTN resistance is attributed primarily to the intrinsic stress of the ta-C coating which affects the inter-bundle junction resistance between the SWCNTN bundles. E-beam evaporated carbon was deposited on the SWCNTNs prior to the ta-C deposition in order to protect the SWCNTN from the intrinsic stress of the ta-C film. The causes of changes in electrical resistance and the effect of evaporated carbon thickness on the changes in electrical resistance and mechanical wear properties have been studied.

  13. P-type doping of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films with boron by reactive radio-frequency co-sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Suzuki, M.; Sakamoto, N.; Meguro, T.

    2001-12-01

    B has been successfully doped into the hydrogenated amorphous Si films without using explosive and/or toxic gases SiH 4 or B 2H 6 by reactive radio-frequency co-sputtering. The target used for co-sputtering was a composite target composed of a B-doped Si wafer and B chips attached on the Si wafer with silver powder bond. The maximum area fraction of B chips used was 0.11. Argon and hydrogen pressures were 5×10 -3 and 5×10 -4 Torr, respectively. Substrates were kept at 200°C or 250°C during sputtering. The maximum B concentration in the film obtained was 2×10 19 cm -3 from secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurement. Films with resistivity of 10 4-10 5 Ω cm were obtained, which was low for the above acceptor concentration, compared with other group III impurities doping, indicating the high doping efficiency of B. A heterostructure, which was prepared by co-sputtering these B-doped films on an n-type crystalline Si, shows a good rectification characteristic. A small photovoltaic effect is also observed.

  14. Co-sputtered amorphous Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr coatings for corrosion protection of cyclotron targets for [{sup 18}F] production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skliarova, Hanna, E-mail: Hanna.Skliarova@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell’Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Azzolini, Oscar, E-mail: Oscar.Azzolini@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell’Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); Johnson, Richard R., E-mail: richard.johnson@teambest.com [BEST Cyclotron Systems Inc., 8765 Ash Street Unit 7, Vancouver, BC V6P 6T3 (Canada); Palmieri, Vincenzo, E-mail: Vincenzo.Palmieri@lnl.infn.it [National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Legnaro National Laboratories, Viale dell’Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro, Padua (Italy); University of Padua, Padua (Italy)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr alloy films were deposited by co-sputtering. • Co-sputtered Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta alloy coatings had crystalline microstructures. • Diffusion barrier efficiency of Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta decreased with the increase of Nb %. • Co-sputtered Ta–Zr films with 30–73 at.% Ta were amorphous. • Sputtered amorphous Ta–Zr films showed superior diffusion barrier efficiency. - Abstract: Protective corrosion resistant coatings serve for decreasing the amount of ionic contaminants from Havar® entrance foils of the targets for [{sup 18}F] production. The corrosion damage of coated entrance foils is caused mainly by the diffusion of highly reactive products of water radiolysis through the protective film toward Havar® substrate. Since amorphous metal alloys (metallic glasses) are well-known to perform a high corrosion resistance, the glass forming ability, microstructure and diffusion barrier efficiency of binary alloys containing chemically inert Nb, Ta, Zr were investigated. Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr films of different alloy composition and ∼1.5 μm thickness were co-deposited by magnetron sputtering. Diffusion barrier efficiency tests used reactive aluminum underlayer and protons of acid solution and gallium atoms at elevated temperature as diffusing particles. Though co-sputtered Nb–Ta and Nb–Zr alloy films of different contents were crystalline, Ta–Zr alloy was found to form dense amorphous microstructures in a range of composition with 30–73% atomic Ta. The diffusion barrier efficiency of Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta alloy coatings decreased with increase of Nb content. The diffusion barrier efficiency of sputtered Ta–Zr alloy coatings increased with the transition from nanocrystalline columnar microstructure to amorphous for coatings with 30–73 at.% Ta.

  15. Co-sputtered amorphous Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr coatings for corrosion protection of cyclotron targets for [18F] production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr alloy films were deposited by co-sputtering. • Co-sputtered Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta alloy coatings had crystalline microstructures. • Diffusion barrier efficiency of Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta decreased with the increase of Nb %. • Co-sputtered Ta–Zr films with 30–73 at.% Ta were amorphous. • Sputtered amorphous Ta–Zr films showed superior diffusion barrier efficiency. - Abstract: Protective corrosion resistant coatings serve for decreasing the amount of ionic contaminants from Havar® entrance foils of the targets for [18F] production. The corrosion damage of coated entrance foils is caused mainly by the diffusion of highly reactive products of water radiolysis through the protective film toward Havar® substrate. Since amorphous metal alloys (metallic glasses) are well-known to perform a high corrosion resistance, the glass forming ability, microstructure and diffusion barrier efficiency of binary alloys containing chemically inert Nb, Ta, Zr were investigated. Nb–Ta, Nb–Zr and Ta–Zr films of different alloy composition and ∼1.5 μm thickness were co-deposited by magnetron sputtering. Diffusion barrier efficiency tests used reactive aluminum underlayer and protons of acid solution and gallium atoms at elevated temperature as diffusing particles. Though co-sputtered Nb–Ta and Nb–Zr alloy films of different contents were crystalline, Ta–Zr alloy was found to form dense amorphous microstructures in a range of composition with 30–73% atomic Ta. The diffusion barrier efficiency of Nb–Zr and Nb–Ta alloy coatings decreased with increase of Nb content. The diffusion barrier efficiency of sputtered Ta–Zr alloy coatings increased with the transition from nanocrystalline columnar microstructure to amorphous for coatings with 30–73 at.% Ta

  16. Silicon Carbide/Boron Nitride Dual In-Line Coating of Silicon Carbide Fiber Tows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will demonstrate monolayer and dual layer coating of SiC fiber by leveraging Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition techniques developed by Free...

  17. Experimental study on the formation and growth of electroless nickel-boron coatings from borohydride-reduced bath on mild steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitry, Veronique, E-mail: veronique.vitry@umons.ac.be [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Sens, Adeline [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Kanta, Abdoul-Fatah [Service de Sciences des Materiaux, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Delaunois, Fabienne [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initiation mechanism of electroless Ni-B on St-37 steel has been identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different phases of the plating process were observed and identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of chemical heterogeneity on coating morphology was revealed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch replenishment of the plating bath induces new germination phase. - Abstract: Quality and homogeneity of electroless nickel-boron coatings are very important for applications in corrosion and electronics and are completely dependent on the formation of the deposit. The growth and formation process of electroless nickel-boron was investigated by immersing mild steel (St-37) samples in an un-replenished bath for various periods of time (from 5 s to 1 h). The coatings obtained at the different stages of the process were then characterized: thickness was measured by SEM, morphology was observed, weight gain was recorded and top composition of the coatings was obtained from XPS. Three main phases were identified during the coating formation and links between plating time, instantaneous deposition rate, chemistry of last formed deposit and morphology were established. The mechanism for initial deposition on steel substrate for borohydride-reduced electroless nickel bath was also observed. Those results were confronted with chemistry evolution in the unreplenished plating bath during the process. This allowed getting insight about phenomena occurring in the plating bath and their influence on coating formation.

  18. Effect of deposition temperature on boron-doped carbon coatings deposited from a BCl3-C3H6-H2 mixture using low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixture of propylene, hydrogen and boron trichloride was used to fabricate boron-doped carbon coatings by using low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technique. Effect of deposition temperature on deposition rate, morphologies, compositions and bonding states of boron-doped carbon coatings was investigated. Below 1273 K, the deposition rate is controlled by reaction dynamics. The deposition rate increases with increasing deposition temperature. The activation energy is 208.74 kJ/mol. Above 1273 K, the deposition rate decreases due to smaller critical radius rc and higher nuclei formation rate J with increasing temperature. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the structure changes from glass-like to nano-laminates with increasing deposition temperature. The boron concentration decreases with increasing deposition temperature, corresponding with increasing carbon concentration. The five types of bonding states are B-C, B-sub-C, BC2O, BCO2 and B-O. B-sub-C and BC2O are the main bonding states. The reactions are dominant at all temperatures, in which the B-sub-C and PyC are formed.

  19. Reduction of tail state on boron doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide films prepared at high hydrogen dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinjoo; Iftiquar, S M; Lee, Sunwha; Park, Hyeongsik; Shin, Chonghoon; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Youn-Jung; Balaji, Nagarajan; Yi, Junsin

    2013-12-01

    In this report, we have investigated on the defect state of diborane (B2H6) doped wide bandgap hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide (p-type a-SiO:H) films prepared using silane (SiH4), hydrogen (H2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) in a radio frequency (RF) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system with different hydrogen dilutions. The films prepared with higher hydrogen dilution show lower Urbach energy (Eu), lower microstructure (R*), lower short and medium range disorder (omegaTO, Gamma(TO), I(TA)/I(TO), I(LA)/I(TO)), higher dark conductivity (sigma d) and higher refractive index (n) with high optical gap (Eg). Eu decreases from 248 meV to 153 meV, and R* decreases from 0.46 to 0.26, Raman peak omegaTO-TO mode position shifts from 480.24 to 483.28, GammaTO-full width half maximum of omegaTO decreases from 78.16 to 63.87, I(TA)/I(TO)-the ratio of integrated area of TA and TO mode decreases from 0.624 to 0.474, I(LA)/I(TO)-the ratio of integrated area of LA and TO mode deceases from 0.272 to 0.151, sigma d increases from 4.6 x 10(-7) S/cm to 1.1 x 10(-6) S/cm, n increases from 3.70 to 3.86. Reduced Nd, Eu and R* at wide Eg indicates that the films are more useful for solar cell window layer. Applying this layer to a single junction solar cell shows open circuit voltage (Voc) = 0.80 V, short circuit current density (Jsc) = 16.3 mA/cm2, fill factor (FF) = 72%, efficiency (eta) = 9.4%. PMID:24266147

  20. Hydrogen evolution from a copper(I) oxide photocathode coated with an amorphous molybdenum sulphide catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G.; Tilley, S. David; Vrubel, Heron; Graetzel, Michael; HU, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Concerns over climate change resulting from accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the uncertainty in the amount of recoverable fossil fuel reserves are driving forces for the development of renewable, carbon-neutral energy technologies. A promising clean solution is photoelectrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen using abundant solar energy. Here we present a simple and scalable technique for the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulphide films as hydrog...

  1. In vitro biocompatibility of amorphous carbon based coatings by varying of surface chemistry and nitrogen concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of a-C:N coatings at different concentration of nitrogen, their surface chemistry and wettability effect on cell/material response in vitro test was performed. The surface structure of deposited coatings was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. The coatings were characterized with respect to their bonding structure by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The wettability was analysed by means of advanced water contact angle method and the surface free energy (SFE) was calculated according to Robertson equation. The biocompatibility was estimated by standard protocols. The best results were obtained in the case of coatings with the greater parameters of SFE and the minimal values of ratio N2 : C7H8

  2. Controlling corrosion of WC-Co by using an amorphous SiC coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sunmog; Park, Jae-Won

    2012-07-01

    A reduction of WC-Co corrosion was investigated using a potentiodynamic electrochemical test. SiC layers with different thicknesses from 1 to 5 µm were coated on WC-Co by using an ionbeam mixing process. I-V characterization measurements were performed on the SiC-coated WCCo at different conditions: NaOH and H2SO4 solutions and room temperature and 70 °C. The I-V measurements demonstrated that the corrosion current density decreased and the corrosion potential increased as the SiC coating layers got thicker. This finding is evidence that SiC coating layers contact well electrically to WC-Co surfaces and enhance the corrosion properties of WC-Co.

  3. 化学镀Ni-B合金镀层组织形态的研究%A Study of Microstructure of Electroless Nickel-Boron Alloy Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程鑫; 饶群力

    2012-01-01

    The effects of bath composition on the microstructure of electroless Ni-B alloy coatings were investigated. By using contrast experiment design, both crystalline and amorphous coatings were obtained, and technological methods for controlling coating microstructure were acquired.%研究了镀液成分对化学镀Ni-B合金镀层组织形态的影响.通过对比实验设计,获得晶态与非晶态镀层,得到了可调控镀层组织形态的工艺方法.

  4. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  5. Chitosan-coated boron nitride nanospheres enhance delivery of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and induction of cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang H

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Huijie Zhang,1,2 Song Chen,3 Chunyi Zhi,4 Tomohiko Yamazaki,1,2 Nobutaka Hanagata1,2,5 1Graduate School of Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; 2Biomaterials Unit, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Ibaraki, Japan; 3Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan; 4Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 5Nanotechnology Innovation Station, Ibaraki, Japan Background: Cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides activate Toll-like receptor 9, leading to induction of proinflammatory cytokines, which play an important role in induction and maintenance of innate and adaptive immune responses. Previously, we have used boron nitride nanospheres (BNNS as a carrier for delivery of unmodified CpG oligodeoxynucleotides to activate Toll-like receptor 9. However, because CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and BNNS are both negatively charged, electrostatic repulsion between them is likely to reduce the loading of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides onto BNNS. Therefore, the efficiency of uptake of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides is also limited and does not result in induction of a robust cytokine response. To ameliorate these problems, we developed a CpG oligodeoxynucleotide delivery system using chitosan-coated BNNS as a carrier. Methods: To facilitate attachment of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides onto the BNNS and improve their loading capacity, we prepared positively charged BNNS by coating them with chitosan preparations of three different molecular weights and used them as carriers for delivery of CpG oligodeoxynucleotides. Results: The zeta potentials of the BNNS-CS complexes were positive, and chitosan coating improved their dispersity and stability in aqueous solution compared with BNNS. The positive charge of the BNNS-CS complexes greatly improved the loading capacity and cellular uptake efficiency of Cp

  6. Possibilities of Increase of Adhesion of the Cubic Boron Nitride Coatings by Applying an Interfacial Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maciej Kupczyk

    2004-01-01

    In the work the chosen investigations of the adhesion force of thin, superhard coatings to the cutting edges made of cemented carbides are presented. For identification of the adhesion force of coatings to substrate an automatic scratch tester constructed at Poznan University of Technology was applied. The estimation of the adhesion force (value of critical load measured during scratch test) was carried out on the base of the vibration signal. Results of investigations are pointed at the influence of a surface preparation (degreasing, etching, low and high-temperature sputtering) on a critical load values.It was found that the most effective method for surface preparation is low temperature sputtering. The influence of the TiC+Al2O3+TiN interfacial layer on increase of the adhesion force of BN coating to cemented carbides substrate was observed.

  7. Possibilities of Increase of Adhesion of the Cubic Boron Nitride Coatings by Applying an Interfacial Layers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaciejKupczyk

    2004-01-01

    In the work the chosen investigations of the adhesion force of thin, superhard coatings to the cutting edges made of cemented carbides are presented. For identification of the adhesion force of coatings to substrate an automatic scratch tester constructed at Poznan University of Technology was applied. The estimation of the adhesion force (value of critical load measured during scratch test) was carried out on the base of the vibration signal. Results of investigations are pointed at the influence of a surface preparation (degreasing, etching, low and high-temperature sputtering) on a critical load values. It was round that the most effective method for surface preparation is low temperature sputtering. The influence of the TiC+Al2O3+TiN interracial layer on increase of the adhesion force of BN coating to cemented carbides substrate was observed.

  8. Mechanical loss in state-of-the-art amorphous optical coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Granata, Massimo; Morgado, Nazario; Cajgfinger, Alix; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Degallaix, Jérôme; Dolique, Vincent; Forest, Danièle; Franc, Janyce; Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of mechanical characterizations of many different high-quality optical coatings made of ion-beam-sputtered titania-doped tantala and silica, developed originally for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. Our data show that in multi-layer stacks (like high-reflection Bragg mirrors, for example) the measured coating dissipation is systematically higher than the expectation and is correlated with the stress condition in the sample. This has a particular relevance for the noise budget of current advanced gravitational-wave interferometers, and, more generally, for any experiment involving thermal-noise limited optical cavities.

  9. Growth of crystalline silicon nanowires on nickel-coated silicon wafer beneath sputtered amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth of crystalline silicon nanowire of controllable diameter directly from Si wafer opens up another avenue for its application in solar cells and optical sensing. Crystalline Si nanowire can be directly grown from Si wafer upon rapid thermal annealing in the presence of the catalyst such as nickel (Ni). However, the accompanying oxidation immediately changes the crystalline Si nanowire to amorphous SiOx. In this study, amorphous carbon layer was sputtered to on top of the catalyst Ni layer to retard the oxidation. Scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the wires and oxidation process. A model was developed to explain the growth and oxidation process of the crystalline Si nanowire. - Highlights: ► Carbon was sputtered on nickel to retard the oxidation of silicon nanowires. ► Silicon core was controlled by carbon layer thickness and annealing duration. ► An oxidation-accompanying solid–liquid–solid growth mechanism was developed

  10. Energy fluxes in a radio-frequency magnetron discharge for the deposition of superhard cubic boron nitride coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy flux measurements by a calorimetric probe in a rf-magnetron plasma used for the deposition of super-hard c-BN coatings are presented and discussed. Argon as working gas is used for sputtering a h-BN target. Adding a certain amount of N2 is essential for the formation of stoichiometric BN films, since a lack of nitrogen will lead to boron rich films. Subsequently, the contributions of different plasma species, surface reactions, and film growth to the resulting variation of the substrate temperature in dependence on nitrogen admixture are estimated and discussed. In addition, SRIM simulations are performed to estimate the energy influx by sputtered neutral atoms. The influence of magnetron target power and oxygen admixture (for comparison with nitrogen) to the process gas on the total energy flux is determined and discussed qualitatively, too. The results indicate that variation of the energy influx due to additional nitrogen flow, which causes a decrease of electron and ion densities, electron temperature and plasma potential, is negligible, while the admixture of oxygen leads to a drastic increase of the energy influx. The typical hysteresis effect which can be observed during magnetron sputtering in oxygen containing gas mixtures has also been confirmed in the energy influx measurements for the investigated system. However, the underlying mechanism is not understood yet, and will be addressed in further investigations.

  11. Intermediate-temperature environmental effects on boron nitride-coated silicon carbide-fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental effects on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composites at intermediate temperatures were investigated by conducting flexural static-fatigue experiments in air at 600 and 950 C. The material that was studied was a silicon carbide/boron nitride (SiC/BN) dual-coated Nicalon-fiber-reinforced barium magnesium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic. Comparable time-dependent failure responses were found at 600 and 950 C when the maximum tensile stress applied in the bend bar was >60% of the room-temperature ultimate flexural strength of as-received materials. At both temperatures, the materials survived 500 h fatigue tests at lower stress levels. Among the samples that survived the 500 h fatigue tests, a 20% degradation in the room temperature flexural strength was measured in samples that were fatigued at 600 C. The growth rate of the Si-C-O fiber oxidation product at 600 C was not sufficient to seal the stress-induced cracks, so that the interior of the material was oxidized and resulted in a strength degradation and less fibrous fracture. In contrast, the interior of the material remained intact at 950 C because of crack sealing by rapid silicate formation, and strength/toughness of the composite was maintained. Also, at 600 C, BN oxidized via volatilization, because no borosilicate was formed

  12. Boron nitride nanotubes coated with organic hydrophilic agents: Stability and cytocompatibility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Tiago Hilário; Soares, Daniel Crístian Ferreira; Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ornelas da Silva, Paulo Roberto [Serviço de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Gouvêa dos Santos, Raquel [Laboratório de Radiobiologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CNEN/CDTN, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Barros de Sousa, Edésia Martins, E-mail: sousaem@cdtn.br [Serviço de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN, Avenida Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6.627, Campus da UFMG, Pampulha, CEP 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents constituted by glucosamine (GA), polyethylene glycol (PEG){sub 1000}, and chitosan (CH) forming new singular systems. Their size, distribution, and homogeneity were determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, while their surface charge was determined by laser Doppler anemometry. The morphology and structural organization were evaluated by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The functionalization was evaluated by Thermogravimetry analysis and Fourier Transformer Infrared Spectroscopy. The results showed that BNNTs were successfully obtained and functionalized, reaching a mean size and dispersity deemed adequate for in vitro studies. The in vitro stability tests also revealed a good adhesion of functionalized agents on BNNT surfaces. Finally, the in vitro cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs against MCR-5 cells was evaluated, and the results revealed that none of the different functionalization agents disturbed the propagation of normal cells up to the concentration of 50 μg/mL. Furthermore, in this concentration, no significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations or increase in ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) could be observed. Thus, findings from the present study reveal an important stability and cytocompatibility of functionalized BNNTs as new potential drugs or radioisotope nanocarriers to be applied in therapeutic procedures. - Highlights: • BNNTs were synthesized and functionalized with organic hydrophilic agents. • Hydrophilic molecules do not alter the biocompatibility profile of BNNTs. • No significantly chromosomal or morphologic alterations in ROS could be observed.

  13. Analysis of magnetron sputtered boron oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buc, Dalibor [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia); Bello, Igor [City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Caplovicova, Maria [Comenius University in Bratislava (Slovakia); Mikula, Milan; Kovac, Jaroslav; Hotovy, Ivan [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava (Slovakia); Chong, Yat Min [City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Siu, Guei Gu [City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: apggsiu@cityu.edu.hk

    2007-10-15

    Boron oxide films were grown on silicon substrates by radio-frequency (rf) unbalanced magnetron sputtering of a boron target in argon-oxygen gas mixtures with different compositions. Microscopic analyses show that overall boron oxide films are amorphous. The film prepared at oxygen/argon flow rate ratio > 0.05 developed large crystallites of boric acid in localize areas of amorphous boron oxide matrices. These crystallites were unstable and at electron microscopic analysis they continuously transformed to a cubic HBO{sub 2} phase and then completely vanished leaving an underlying amorphous boron oxide film behind. The analyses indicate the coexistence of B{sub 6}O, HBO{sub 2} crystallites and amorphous boron oxide matrices. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed spectral bands of BOH, BO, BOB and BH groups. Nanohardness and elastic modulus of a film prepared at low oxygen concentration approach 30 and 300 GPa, respectively. These parameters however vary with deposition conditions.

  14. Nickel-boron nanolayer evolution on boron carbide particle surfaces during thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is focused on reduction of Ni2O3 and B2O3 in the Ni-B nanolayer on B4C particle surfaces and understanding of the nanolayer composition and morphology changes. Initially, the nanolayer contains Ni2O3, B2O3, and amorphous boron. After 400 oC thermal treatment in a H2-Ar atmosphere, Ni2O3 is reduced to nickel; the nanolayer morphology is maintained and the coated particles demonstrate magnetism. As the thermal treatment temperature is increased to 550 oC, B2O3 is reduced to boron, which reacts with nickel and forms Ni2B. Simultaneously, the nanolayer evolves into nanoparticles. Thermal treatment temperature increase to 700-900 oC only causes Ni2B particle growth but does not fundamentally change the composition or phase.

  15. Hydrogen evolution from a copper(I) oxide photocathode coated with an amorphous molybdenum sulphide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Guio, Carlos G; Tilley, S David; Vrubel, Heron; Grätzel, Michael; Hu, Xile

    2014-01-01

    Concerns over climate change resulting from accumulation of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the uncertainty in the amount of recoverable fossil fuel reserves are driving forces for the development of renewable, carbon-neutral energy technologies. A promising clean solution is photoelectrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen using abundant solar energy. Here we present a simple and scalable technique for the deposition of amorphous molybdenum sulphide films as hydrogen evolution catalyst onto protected copper(I) oxide films. The efficient extraction of excited electrons by the conformal catalyst film leads to photocurrents of up to -5.7 mA cm(-2) at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (pH 1.0) under simulated AM 1.5 solar illumination. Furthermore, the photocathode exhibits enhanced stability under acidic environments, whereas photocathodes with platinum nanoparticles as catalyst deactivate more rapidly under identical conditions. The work demonstrates the potential of earth-abundant light-harvesting material and catalysts for solar hydrogen production. PMID:24402352

  16. Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a 3D electrode for long cycle life symmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasingam, Suresh Kannan; Thirumurugan, Arun; Lee, Jae Sung; Jun, Yongseok

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a binder-free 3D electrode was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The maximum specific capacitance of a single electrode was 83.9 mF cm-2, while it was 41.9 mF cm-2 for the symmetric device. Up to 600% capacitance retention was observed for 4750 cycles.Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a binder-free 3D electrode was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The maximum specific capacitance of a single electrode was 83.9 mF cm-2, while it was 41.9 mF cm-2 for the symmetric device. Up to 600% capacitance retention was observed for 4750 cycles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01200K

  17. Properties of amorphous SiC coatings deposited on WC-Co substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Costa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, silicon carbide films were deposited onto tungsten carbide from a sintered SiC target on a r.f. magnetron sputtering system. Based on previous results about the influence of r.f. power and argon pressure upon the properties of films deposited on silicon substrates, suitable conditions were chosen to produce high quality films on WC-Co pieces. Deposition parameters were chosen in order to obtain high deposition rates (about 30 nm/min at 400 W rf power and acceptable residual stresses (1.5 GPa. Argon pressure affects the energy of particles so that films with higher hardness (30 GPa were obtained at low pressures (0.05 Pa. Wear rates of the coated pieces against a chromium steel ball in a diamond suspension medium were found to be about half of the uncoated ones. Hardness and wear resistance measurements were done also in thermally annealed (200-800 °C samples revealing the effectiveness of SiC coatings to protect tool material against severe mechanical degradation resulting of high temperature (above 500 °C oxidation.

  18. Gas barrier properties of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films coated on polyethylene terephthalate by plasma polymerization in argon/n-hexane gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films were deposited by RF plasma polymerization in argon/n-hexane gas mixture on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) foils. It was found that such deposited films may significantly improve the barrier properties of PET. It was demonstrated that the principal parameter that influences barrier properties of such deposited films towards oxygen and water vapor is the density of the coatings. Moreover, it was shown that for achieving good barrier properties it is advantageous to deposit coatings with very low thickness. According to the presented results, optimal thickness of the coating should not be higher than several tens of nm. - Highlights: • a-C:H films were prepared by plasma polymerization in Ar/n-hexane atmosphere. • Barrier properties of coatings are dependent on their density and thickness. • Highest barrier properties were observed for films with thickness 15 nm

  19. The effect of temperature on the tribological mechanisms and reactivity of hydrogenerated, amorphous diamond-like carbon coatings under oil-lubricated conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Roman, E.; Kalin, Mitjan; Vižintin, Jože

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the wear and friction behaviour of boundary-lubricated, hydrogenated, amorphous, diamond-like carbon coatings (a-C:H), in self-mated a-C:H/a-C:H contacts, at three different testing temperaturesČ 20, 80, 150 °C. We present results from Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman analyses relating to the chemical and structural changes in the diamond-like carbon coatings duringsliding in the presence of mineral oil, with and without additives...

  20. A preliminary study of the preparation and characterization of shielding fabric coated by electrical deposition of amorphous Ni–Fe–P alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Zhentao; Zhang, Xiaoyi, E-mail: zxyzl66@163.com; Li, Haiguang

    2015-02-05

    Highlights: • The manufacturing process of electrical deposition amorphous Ni–Fe–P alloy on copper-coated PET fabric was determined. • The EMI SE is more than 60 dB in the wide frequency range. • This kind of material is easy to mass production, and will have a great application prospect. - Abstract: A flexible shielding fabric with dense uniform coating was prepared after electrical deposition of amorphous Ni–Fe–P alloy on copper-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fabric. The manufacturing process was studied using orthogonal test with 8 factors and 3 levels. The effects of coating composition and the SE were discussed by pH value. The morphology, composition, and structure of coating were analyzed by SEM, EDS, and XRD characterizations. The electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) was also tested. The results indicate that the processing conditions of electrical deposition amorphous Ni–Fe–P alloy coated fabric are: 140 g/L NiSO{sub 4}⋅6H{sub 2}O, 100 g/L FeSO{sub 4}⋅7H{sub 2}O, 10 g/L NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}⋅H{sub 2}O, 24 g/L C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6}, 36 g/L C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}⋅H{sub 2}O, 20 g/L H{sub 3}PO{sub 3}, 65 °C, pH = 1.5, and current density = 13 A/dm{sup 2}. The resulting fabric possesses dense, smooth, and uniform coating, which consists of amorphous Ni–Fe–P alloy with 17.04% P (weight percent). The EMI SE of this coated fabric achieves 59.3–70.2 dB, in a broad frequency range between 300 kHz and 1.5 GHz.

  1. Corrosion resistance of amorphous hydrogenated SiC and diamond-like coatings deposited by r.f.-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the properties and corrosion resistance of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and amorphous hydrogenated SiC films deposited by r.f.-plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition at low temperatures (below 200 C). SiC coatings were prepared from SiH4-CH4 gas mixtures. Hydrogenated diamond-like coatings were deposited from classical CH4-H2 mixtures. The influence of various deposition parameters was investigated. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the films were studied (density, hydrogen content, nanohardness, internal stress, critical load and friction coefficient). Two examples of corrosion resistance are given: (1) the corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of SiC and diamond-like coatings deposited on metal implants (Ti alloy) (the corrosion resistance is evaluated through potentiodynamic polarization tests in biological media; the biocompatibility of coated and uncoated metals is compared using differentiated human cell cultures); and (2) the corrosion resistance of SiC-coated magnesium in chloride-containing boric borate buffer at pH = 9.3 evaluated from anodic polarization curves and scanning electron microscopy studies. (orig.)

  2. Physicochemical Characterization and In Vivo Evaluation of Amorphous and Partially Crystalline Calcium Phosphate Coatings Fabricated on Ti-6Al-4V Implants by the Plasma Spray Method

    OpenAIRE

    Bonfante, Estevam A.; Lukasz Witek; Nick Tovar; Marcelo Suzuki; Charles Marin; Rodrigo Granato; Paulo G. Coelho

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To characterize the topographic and chemical properties of 2 bioceramic coated plateau root form implant surfaces and evaluate their histomorphometric differences at 6 and 12 weeks in vivo. Methods. Plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (PSHA) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), interferometry (IFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Implants were placed in the radius epiphysis,...

  3. Characterization of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride particles and coatings obtained in a CH4/N2 radiofrequency discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN x:H) particles and coatings have been prepared in a CH4/N2 13.56 MHz radiofrequency discharge. Particles and films have been examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and by infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy for different nitrogen contents. SEM micrographs show that the dust particles are spherical with diameters in the range 0.2-4 μm. The surface morphology of the particles is strongly modified with the increase of the nitrogen content in the gas mixture. In the particle and film IR spectra, four predominant absorption bands have been observed. They reveal the presence of C-H, C=C, C=N and/or N-H (1300-1800 cm-1), -C≡N and -N≡C (2000-2300 cm-1), C-H (2800-3100 cm-1) and N-H and/or O-H (3200-3600 cm-1) bonds. These absorption bands are studied in order to determine the influence of the nitrogen incorporation

  4. Development of amorphous carbon protective coatings on poly(vinyl)chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great versatility of polymers has promoted their application in a series of ordinary situations. The development of specific devices from polymers, however, requires modifications to fit specific stipulations. In this work the surface properties of thin films grown onto polyvinylchloride (PVC) were investigated. Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from acetylene and argon plasmas excited by radiofrequency (13.56 MHz, 70 W) power. The proportion of acetylene in the gas feed was varied against that of argon, keeping the total pressure constant at 2.5 Pa. Deposition time was 1800 s. Film elemental composition was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS. Water contact angle measurements were performed using the sessile drop technique. The root mean squared roughness was derived from 50 x 50 μm2 surface topographic images, acquired by scanning probe microscopy. Nanoindentation and pin-on-disk techniques were employed on the determination of film hardness and sliding wear, respectively. Oxidation resistance was obtained through the etching rate of the samples in oxygen radiofrequency (1.3 Pa, 50 W) plasmas. From XPS analysis it was detected oxygen and nitrogen contamination in all the samples. It was also found that sp3/sp2 ratio depends on the proportion of argon in the plasma. At lower argon concentrations, hardness, wear and oxidation resistances were all improved with respect to the uncoated PVC. In such conditions, the surface wettability is low indicating a moderate receptivity to water. This combination of properties, ascribed to a balance between the ion bombardment and deposition processes, is suitable for materials exposed to rigorous weathering conditions.

  5. Characterization and simulation on antireflective coating of amorphous silicon oxide thin films with gradient refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Jin, Qi; Qu, Xingling; Jin, Jing; Jiang, Chaochao; Yang, Weiguang; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin

    2016-08-01

    The optical reflective properties of silicon oxide (SixOy) thin films with gradient refractive index are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The thin films are widely used in photovoltaic as antireflective coatings (ARCs). An effective finite difference time domain (FDTD) model is built to find the optimized reflection spectra corresponding to structure of SixOy ARCs with gradient refractive index. Based on the simulation analysis, it shows the variation of reflection spectra with gradient refractive index distribution. The gradient refractive index of SixOy ARCs can be obtained in adjustment of SiH4 to N2O ratio by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The optimized reflection spectra measured by UV-visible spectroscopy confirms to agree well with that simulated by FDTD method.

  6. Corrosion resistant amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publication data on corrosion resistance of amorphous alloys and the methods of amorphization of surface layers of massive materials (laser treatment, iron implantation, detonation-gas spraying, cathode and ion sputtering, electrodeposition) was made. A study was made on corrosion properties of Fe66Cr11B10Si4 alloy in cast state and after laser irradiation, rendering the surface amorphous as well as the samples of Arenco iron and steel 20 with ion-plasma coatings of Fe-Cr-Ni-Ti alloy. It was established that amorphous coatings posses much higher corrosion resistance as compared to crystalline alloys on the same base

  7. Magnetron sputter deposition of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of X-ray optical coatings with greater reflectivity required the development of sputter deposition processes for boron and boron carbide. The use of high density boron and boron carbide (B4C) and a vacuum-brazed target design was required to achieve the required sputter process stability and resistance to the thermal stress created by high rate sputtering. Our results include a description of the target fabrication procedures and sputter process parameters necessary to fabricate B4C and boron modulated thin film structures. (orig.)

  8. XPS, SIMS and FTIR-ATR characterization of boronized graphite from the thermonuclear plasma device RFX-mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, F.; Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R.; Canton, A.; Dal Bello, S.; Rais, B.; Anderle, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the characterization of a thin (tens of nanometers) boron layer on fine grain polycrystalline graphite substrate is presented. The boron film is used as conditioning technique for the full graphite wall of the Reversed Field eXperiment-modified (RFX-mod) experiment, a device for the magnetic confinement of plasmas of thermonuclear interest. Aim of the present analysis is to enlighten the chemical structure of the film, the trapping mechanism that makes it a getter for oxygen and hydrogen and the reason of its loss of effectiveness after exposure to about 100 s of hydrogen plasma. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy in combination with the Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) were used to obtain the structure and the chemical composition of graphitic samples as coated or coated and subsequently exposed to hydrogen plasma after boron deposition. The boron layers on the only coated samples were found to be amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide plus a variety of bonds like B-B, B-H, B-O, B-OH, C-C, C-H, C-O, C-OH. Both the thickness and the homogeneity of the layers were found to depend on the distance of the sample from the anode during the deposition. The samples contained oxygen along the layer thickness, at level of 5%, bound to boron. The gettering action of the boron is therefore already active during the deposition itself. The exposure to plasma caused erosion of the boron film and higher content of H and O bound to boron throughout the whole thickness. The interaction of the B layer with plasma is therefore a bulk phenomenon.

  9. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Resistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report No. Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  10. Study on Preparation of Amorphous Cr-C Alloy Coating%非晶态Cr-C合金镀层的制备研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨毕学; 揭晓华; 卢国辉

    2011-01-01

    A new formula used to prepare amorphous CrC alloy coating by electrodepositing was studied with optimization study on tartaric acid additive. The microstructore and surface morphology of the coating was detected by X-my diffraction and SEM. The microhardness and adhesion of the coating was tested. The results show that a broad diffraction peaks appeares on the X-ray diffraction pattern and the coating has a smooth, dense surface without pinhole and crack, and has maximum microhardness and binding force when the dosage of tartaric acid is 40 g/L. The main reasons to result in generation of amorphous Cr-C alloy coating are that alien atoms mixed into Cr layer and the active point on the layer surface are adsorbed by tartaric acid in the process of electrodeposition.%通过对添加剂酒石酸的优化研究,研究电沉积制备非晶态Cr-C合金镀层的新配方.用X射线衍射和扫描电子显微镜对镀层结构和形貌进行表征,并对镀层硬度及结合力进行测试.结果表明,当酒石酸加入量为40g/L时,镀层的X射线衍射图出现非晶态的宽化峰,镀层的硬度和结合力最高,表面平整、致密,无裂纹和针孔,异类原子的加入和酒石酸对表面活性点的吸附作用是形成非晶态结构的主要原因.

  11. Superhard, conductive coatings for atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    OpenAIRE

    Ronning, Carsten; Wondratschek, Oliver; Büttner, Michael; Hofsäss, Hans Christian; Zimmermann, Jörg; Leiderer, Paul; Boneberg, Johannes

    2001-01-01

    Boron carbide thin films were grown by mass selected ion beam deposition using low energy 11B+ and 12C+ ions at room temperature. The amorphous films exhibit any desired stoichiometry controlled by the ion charge ratio B+/C+. Films with a stoichiometry of B4C showed the optimal combination of a high mechanical strength and a low electrical resistivity for the coating of atomic force microscopy (AFM) silicon cantilevers. The properties of such AFM tips were evaluated and simultaneous topograph...

  12. 等离子喷涂B4C涂层的抗辐射性能研究%Anti-radiation behavior of plasma sprayed boron carbide coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李龙根; 徐志勇; 钱浩

    2009-01-01

    目的 研究用等离子技术喷涂的碳化硼(B4C)涂层的抗辐射能力.方法 将0.1 mm厚度B4C涂在16号锰钢上,研究它对加速器产生的6、10、15 MV高能射线,6、9、12、15 MeV高能电子线,60Co γ线和快中子辐射的防护作用.同时将0.1 mm B4C涂在纸板上,研究它对深部X线机的X线辐射的防护作用.结果 等离子喷涂制备B4C涂层对高能X线和60Co γ线没有防护作用.对电子线有一定防护作用,且随深度的增加有增大趋势,但作用不大.对快中子有较大防护作用.对深部X线机X线有防护作用,防护能力较强.0.1 mm厚的涂层就可带来15%的衰减.结论 用等离子技术喷涂的B4C涂层可在医学领域用来防护千伏级射线.%Objective To study anti-radiation behavior of plasma sprayed boron carbide coatings. Methods The anti-radiation capacity of 16Mn steel which was coated with 0.1 mm plasma sprayed boron carbide were studied. The irradiation beams were 6,10,15 MY X-ray and 6,9,12,15 MeV electron emitted by accelerator, X-ray emitted by 60Co machine,fast neutron, and X-ray emitted by kilovoltage X-ray ma-chine. Results Anti-radiation capacity of plasma sprayed boron carbide coatings was not found for X-ray beams emitted by accelerator and 60Co machine. For electron beams,the anti-radiation capacity were found. The deeper of location, the stronger was anti-radiation. However, the anti-radiation capacity was not good. For fast neutron,the anti-radiation capacity was good. For X-ray emitted by kilovoltage X-ray machine,the anti-radiation was good,and only 0.1 nun plasma sprayed boron carbide had 15% attenuation. Conclusions The plasma sprayed boron carbide coatings have the anti-radiation capacity for X-ray emitted by kilovoltage X-ray machine in medical field.

  13. Synthesis and high temperature stability of amorphous Si(B)CN-MWCNT composite nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandavat, Romil; Singh, Gurpreet

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate synthesis of a hybrid nanowire structure consisting of an amorphous polymer-derived silicon boron-carbonitride (Si-B-C-N) shell with a multiwalled carbon nanotube core. This was achieved through a novel process involving preparation of a boron-modified liquid polymeric precursor through a reaction of trimethyl borate and polyureasilazane under atmospheric conditions; followed by conversion of polymer to glass-ceramic on carbon nanotube surfaces through controlled heating. Chemical structure of the polymer was studied by liquid-NMR while evolution of various ceramic phases was studied by Raman spectroscopy, solid-NMR, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirms presence of amorphous Si(B)CN coating on individual nanotubes for all specimen processed below 1400 degree C. Thermogravimetric analysis, followed by TEM revealed high temperature stability of the carbon nanotube core in flowing air up to 1300 degree C.

  14. Effect of boron paste thickness on the growth kinetics of polyphase boride coatings during the boriding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth kinetics of FeB and Fe2B phases forming on AISI M2 steel by paste boriding was studied using different values of paste thickness, treating temperature and exposure time. The growth of iron boride layers is described by the mass balance equation between phases in thermodynamic equilibrium, assuming that the boron concentration at the interfaces remain constant during the treatment. The experimental results show that boron mobility and growth kinetics of iron borides are considerably increased when the paste thickness is increased at constant values of temperature and exposure time

  15. The effect of temperature on the tribological mechanisms and reactivity of hydrogenated, amorphous diamond-like carbon coatings under oil-lubricated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we present the wear and friction behaviour of boundary-lubricated, hydrogenated, amorphous, diamond-like carbon coatings (a-C:H), in self-mated a-C:H/a-C:H contacts, at three different testing temperatures: 20, 80, 150 deg. C. We present results from Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman analyses relating to the chemical and structural changes in the diamond-like carbon coatings during sliding in the presence of mineral oil, with and without additives. We show, that chemical reactions between the a-C:H coatings and the oil additives take place, which are dependent on the temperature, on the presence of additives and the type of additives used. At high temperatures the extreme pressure additive interacts with the diamond-like carbon surface and forms a tribochemical layer with a four-times lower sulphur/phosphorous ratio than the additive formulation. In the absence of additives, however, graphitisation of the coating occurs under these conditions, which results in high-wear and low-friction behaviour. Another result from this study is that a-C:H coatings can oxidise during room-temperature experiments, suggesting that some interactions and adsorptions are also possible at lower temperatures

  16. Researches on the electrolysis of metal oxides dissolved in boric anhydride or in melt borates. New methods of preparation of amorphous boron, borides and some metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports the investigation of the electrolysis of alkaline borates, alkaline earth borates and magnesium borate, and the investigation of mixtures containing a metal oxide dissolved in a bath formed by a tetraborate and a fluoride. The author more particularly studies the chemical products separated at the cathode level, i.e. boron (more or less pure), borates and other metals (zinc, tungsten, molybdenum)

  17. Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashish Jain; C Ghosh; T R Ravindran; S Anthonysamy; R Divakar; E Mohandas; G S Gupta

    2013-12-01

    Structural characterization of electrodeposited boron was carried out by using transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Electron diffraction and phase contrast imaging were carried out by using transmission electron microscopy. Phase identification was done based on the analysis of electron diffraction patterns and the power spectrum calculated from the lattice images from thin regions of the sample. Raman spectroscopic examination was carried out to study the nature of bonding and the allotropic form of boron obtained after electrodeposition. The results obtained from transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of nanocrystallites embedded in an amorphous mass of boron. Raman microscopic studies showed that amorphous boron could be converted to its crystalline form at high temperatures.

  18. Non-crystalline composite tissue engineering scaffolds using boron-containing bioactive glass and poly(d,l-lactic acid) coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsos, T; Chatzistavrou, X; Roether, J A; Boccaccini, A R [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hupa, L; Arstila, H, E-mail: a.boccaccini@imperial.ac.u [Process Chemistry Centre, Abo Akademi University, Piispankatu 8, FI-20500 Turku (Finland)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of this study was the fabrication of three-dimensional, highly porous, bioactive scaffolds using a recently developed bioactive glass powder, denominated '0106', with nominal composition (in wt%): 50 SiO{sub 2}, 22.6 CaO, 5.9 Na{sub 2}O, 4 P{sub 2}O{sub 5}, 12 K{sub 2}O, 5.3 MgO and 0.2 B{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The optimum sintering conditions for the fabrication of scaffolds by the foam-replica method were identified (sintering temperature: 670 deg, C and dwell time: 5 h). Composite samples were also fabricated by applying a biopolymer coating of poly({sub D,L}-lactic acid) (PDLLA) using a dip coating process. The average compressive strength values were 0.4 MPa for uncoated and 0.6 MPa for coated scaffolds. In vitro bioactivity studies in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that a carbonate hydroxyapatite (HCAp) layer was deposited on uncoated and coated scaffolds after only 4 days of immersion in SBF, demonstrating the high in vitro bioactivity of the scaffolds. It was also confirmed that the scaffold structure remained amorphous (no crystallization) after the specific heat treatment used, with scaffolds exhibiting mechanical properties and bioactivity suitable for use in bone tissue engineering applications.

  19. Non-crystalline composite tissue engineering scaffolds using boron-containing bioactive glass and poly(D,L-lactic acid) coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantsos, T; Chatzistavrou, X; Roether, J A; Hupa, L; Arstila, H; Boccaccini, A R

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was the fabrication of three-dimensional, highly porous, bioactive scaffolds using a recently developed bioactive glass powder, denominated '0106', with nominal composition (in wt%): 50 SiO(2), 22.6 CaO, 5.9 Na(2)O, 4 P(2)O(5), 12 K(2)O, 5.3 MgO and 0.2 B(2)O(3). The optimum sintering conditions for the fabrication of scaffolds by the foam-replica method were identified (sintering temperature: 670 degrees C and dwell time: 5 h). Composite samples were also fabricated by applying a biopolymer coating of poly((D,L)-lactic acid) (PDLLA) using a dip coating process. The average compressive strength values were 0.4 MPa for uncoated and 0.6 MPa for coated scaffolds. In vitro bioactivity studies in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that a carbonate hydroxyapatite (HCAp) layer was deposited on uncoated and coated scaffolds after only 4 days of immersion in SBF, demonstrating the high in vitro bioactivity of the scaffolds. It was also confirmed that the scaffold structure remained amorphous (no crystallization) after the specific heat treatment used, with scaffolds exhibiting mechanical properties and bioactivity suitable for use in bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:19776493

  20. Non-crystalline composite tissue engineering scaffolds using boron-containing bioactive glass and poly(d,l-lactic acid) coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was the fabrication of three-dimensional, highly porous, bioactive scaffolds using a recently developed bioactive glass powder, denominated '0106', with nominal composition (in wt%): 50 SiO2, 22.6 CaO, 5.9 Na2O, 4 P2O5, 12 K2O, 5.3 MgO and 0.2 B2O3. The optimum sintering conditions for the fabrication of scaffolds by the foam-replica method were identified (sintering temperature: 670 deg, C and dwell time: 5 h). Composite samples were also fabricated by applying a biopolymer coating of poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) using a dip coating process. The average compressive strength values were 0.4 MPa for uncoated and 0.6 MPa for coated scaffolds. In vitro bioactivity studies in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed that a carbonate hydroxyapatite (HCAp) layer was deposited on uncoated and coated scaffolds after only 4 days of immersion in SBF, demonstrating the high in vitro bioactivity of the scaffolds. It was also confirmed that the scaffold structure remained amorphous (no crystallization) after the specific heat treatment used, with scaffolds exhibiting mechanical properties and bioactivity suitable for use in bone tissue engineering applications.

  1. Physico-chemical studies of cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) nanoparticles coated on amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johan, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: mrafiej@um.edu.my; Meriam Suhaimy, Syazwan Hanani; Yusof, Yusliza, E-mail: yus_liza@siswa.um.edu.my

    2014-01-15

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at a temperature (∼250 °C) in an air furnace. As- synthesized α-CNTs were purified with deionized water and hydrochloric acid. A purified α-CNTs were hybridized with cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu{sub 2}O) through a simple chemical process. Morphology of the samples was analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra showed the attachment of acidic functional groups onto the surface of α-CNTs and the formation of hybridized α-CNTs-Cu{sub 2}O. Raman spectra reveal the amorphous nature of the carbon. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed the amorphous phase of the carbon and the formation of Cu{sub 2}O crystalline phase. The coating of Cu{sub 2}O was confirmed by FESEM, TEM, and XRD. Optical absorption of the samples has also been investigated and the quantum confinement effect was illustrated in the absorption spectra.

  2. Amorphous Fe2O3 nanoshells coated on carbonized bacterial cellulose nanofibers as a flexible anode for high-performance lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang; Lin, Zixia; Zheng, Mingbo; Wang, Tianhe; Yang, Jiazhi; Yuan, Fanshu; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Lin; Sun, Dongping

    2016-03-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) carbonaceous aerogel derived from biomass bacterial cellulose (BC) is introduced as a flexible framework for iron oxides in Li-ion batteries (LIBs). The 3D carbonized BC (CBC) with highly interconnected nanofibrous structure exhibits good electrical conductivity and mechanical stability. The amorphous Fe2O3 is tightly coated on the nanofibers of CBC through a simple in situ thermal decomposition method. The obtained amorphous Fe2O3 anode (denoted as A-Fe2O3@CBC) exhibits stable cycling performance and high rate capability when assembled into a half-cell, which is supposed to benefit from the well-dispersed Fe2O3 nanoshells and the hierarchical pores in A-Fe2O3@CBC composite. The rational design of the nanostructure could improve the transportation of electrons/ions and effectively alleviate volume changes of Fe2O3 during the electrochemical cycling. Meanwhile, the amorphous nature of the Fe2O3 in anode provides an enhanced capacitive-like lithium storage and flexible structure of the active materials, resulting in much higher specific capacity and longer cycle life when compared with its crystalline counterpart. This work provides a promising approach to design and construct the flexible metal oxide anode materials based on 3D carbonaceous aerogel for high-performance LIBs.

  3. Investigation of interactions between poly-l-lysine-coated boron nitride nanotubes and C2C12 cells: up-take, cytocompatibility, and differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, G; Ricotti, L; Danti, S; Moscato, S; Nesti, C; D’Alessandro, D; Dinucci, D; Chiellini, F; Pietrabissa, A; Petrini, M; Menciassi, A

    2010-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have generated considerable interest within the scientific community by virtue of their unique physical properties, which can be exploited in the biomedical field. In the present in vitro study, we investigated the interactions of poly-l-lysine-coated BNNTs with C2C12 cells, as a model of muscle cells, in terms of cytocompatibility and BNNT internalization. The latter was performed using both confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, we investigated myoblast differentiation in the presence of BNNTs, evaluating the protein synthesis of differentiating cells, myotube formation, and expression of some constitutive myoblastic markers, such as MyoD and Cx43, by reverse transcription – polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We demonstrated that BNNTs are highly internalized by C2C12 cells, with neither adversely affecting C2C12 myoblast viability nor significantly interfering with myotube formation. PMID:20463944

  4. Influences of carbon content and coating carbon thickness on properties of amorphous CoSnO3@C composites as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The thickness of carbon coating layers can be successfully controlled through varying molar concentration of aqueous glucose solution. • Coating carbon thickness and carbon content are two important factors on the electrochemical performances of CoSnO3@C. • CoSnO3@C under optimized conditions exhibits the optimal balance between the volume buffering effect and reversible capacity. • As-prepared CoSnO3@C under optimized conditions shows excellent electrochemical performances, whose reversible capacity could reach 491 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles. - Abstract: A series of core–shell carbon coated amorphous CoSnO3 (CoSnO3@C) with different carbon content are synthesized. Effects of carbon content and coating carbon thickness on the physical and electrochemical performances of the samples were studied in detail. The samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), galvanostatic charge–discharge and AC impedance spectroscopy, respectively. The results indicate that controlling the concentration of aqueous glucose solution influences the generation of in-situ carbon layer thickness. The optimal concentration of aqueous glucose solution, carbon content and carbon layer thickness are suggested as 0.25 M, 35.1% and 20 nm, respectively. CoSnO3@C composite prepared under the optimal conditions exhibits excellent cycling performance, whose reversible capacity could reach 491 mA h g−1 after 100 cycles

  5. Development of a novel neutron detection technique by using a boron layer coating a Charge Coupled Device

    OpenAIRE

    Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Estrada, Juan; Tartaglione, Aureliano; Haro, Miguel Sofo; Moroni, Guillermo Fernández; Cancelo, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design features and the first test measurements obtained during the installation of a novel high resolution 2D neutron detection technique. The technique proposed in this work consists of a boron layer (enriched in ${^{10}}$B) placed on a scientific Charge Coupled Device (CCD). After the nuclear reaction ${^{10}}$B(n,$\\alpha$)${^{7}}$Li, the CCD detects the emitted charge particles thus obtaining information on the neutron absorption position. The above mentioned io...

  6. Stress dependence of the domain wall potential in amorphous CoFeSiB glass-coated microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a method to study the domain wall potential through the thermal activation of the domain wall across the energy barrier. Two contributions to the domain wall potential in amorphous microwires are recognized: magnetoelastic and relaxation. The role of each contribution is studied by measuring the switching field distribution at different frequencies and under applied stress

  7. High temperature corrosion of thermally sprayed NiCr- and amorphous Fe-based coatings covered with a KCl-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varis, T.; Suhonen, T.; Tuurna, S.; Ruusuvuori, K.; Holmstroem, S.; Salonen, J. [VTT, Espoo (Finland); Bankiewicz, D.; Yrjas, P. [Aabo Akademi Univ., Turku (Finland)

    2010-07-01

    New process conditions due to the requirement of higher efficiency together with the use of high-chlorine and alkali containing fuels such as biomass and waste fuels for heat and electricity production will challenge the resistance and life of tube materials. In conventional materials the addition of alloying elements to increase the corrosion resistance in aggressive combustion conditions increases costs relatively rapidly. Thermally sprayed coating offer promising, effective, flexible and cost efficient solutions to fulfill the material needs for the future. Some heat exchanger design alteractions before global commercialization have to be overcome, though. High temperature corrosion in combustion plants can occur by a variety of mechanisms including passive scale degradation with subsequent rapid scaling, loss of adhesion and scale detachment, attack by melted or partly melted deposits via fluxing reactions and intergranular-/interlamellar corrosion. A generally accepted model of the ''active oxidation'' attributes the responsibility for inducing corrosion to chlorine. The active oxidation mechanism plays a key role in the thermally sprayed coatings due to their unique lamellar structure. In this study, the corrosion behaviour of NiCr (HVOF and Wire Arc), amorphous Fe-based, and Fe13Cr (Wire Arc) thermally sprayed coatings, were tested in the laboratory under simplified biomass combustion conditions. The tests were carried out by using a KCl-K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt mixture as a synthetic biomass ash, which was placed on the materials and then heat treated for one week (168h) at two different temperatures (550{sup 0}C and 600 C) and in two different gas atmospheres (air and air+30%H{sub 2}O). After the exposures, the metallographic cross sections of the coatings were studied with SEM/EDX analyzer. The results showed that the coatings behaved relatively well at the lower test temperature while critical corrosion through the lamella boundaries

  8. Investigation of wear and tool life of coated carbide and cubic boron nitride cutting tools in high speed milling

    OpenAIRE

    Twardowski, P.; Legutko, S.; G. Krolczyk; S. Hloch

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was analysis of the wear of milling cutters made of sintered carbide and of boron nitride. The article presents the life period of the cutting edges and describes industrial conditions of the applicability of tools made of the materials under investigation. Tests have been performed on modern toroidal and ball-end mill cutters. The study has been performed within a production facility in the technology of high speed machining of 55NiCrMoV6 and X153CrMoV1...

  9. High quality boron carbon nitride/ZnO-nanorods p-n heterojunctions based on magnetron sputtered boron carbon nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbon nitride (BCN) films were synthesized on Si (100) and fused silica substrates by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering from a B4C target in an Ar/N2 gas mixture. The BCN films were amorphous, and they exhibited an optical band gap of ∼1.0 eV and p-type conductivity. The BCN films were over-coated with ZnO nanorod arrays using hydrothermal synthesis to form BCN/ZnO-nanorods p-n heterojunctions, exhibiting a rectification ratio of 1500 at bias voltages of ±5 V

  10. The coat protein of Alternanthera mosaic virus is the elicitor of a temperature-sensitive systemic necrosis in Nicotiana benthamiana, and interacts with a host boron transporter protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different isolates of Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV; Potexvirus), including four infectious clones derived from AltMV-SP, induce distinct systemic symptoms in Nicotiana benthamiana. Virus accumulation was enhanced at 15 °C compared to 25 °C; severe clone AltMV 3-7 induced systemic necrosis (SN) and plant death at 15 °C. No interaction with potexvirus resistance gene Rx was detected, although SN was ablated by silencing of SGT1, as for other cases of potexvirus-induced necrosis. Substitution of AltMV 3-7 coat protein (CPSP) with that from AltMV-Po (CPPo) eliminated SN at 15 °C, and ameliorated symptoms in Alternanthera dentata and soybean. Substitution of only two residues from CPPo [either MN(13,14)ID or LA(76,77)IS] efficiently ablated SN in N. benthamiana. CPSP but not CPPo interacted with Arabidopsis boron transporter protein AtBOR1 by yeast two-hybrid assay; N. benthamiana homolog NbBOR1 interacted more strongly with CPSP than CPPo in bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and may affect recognition of CP as an elicitor of SN. - Highlights: • Alternanthera mosaic virus CP is an elicitor of systemic necrosis in N. benthamiana. • Virus-induced systemic necrosis is enhanced at 15 °C compared to 25 °C. • Induction of systemic necrosis is dependent on as few as two CP amino acid residues. • These residues are at subunit interfaces within the same turn of the virion helix. • Inducer/non-inducer CPs interact differentially with a boron transporter protein

  11. The coat protein of Alternanthera mosaic virus is the elicitor of a temperature-sensitive systemic necrosis in Nicotiana benthamiana, and interacts with a host boron transporter protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyoun-Sub, E-mail: hyounlim@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Jiryun, E-mail: jilyoon@naver.com [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Eun-Young, E-mail: sey22@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Moon, E-mail: moonlit51@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Vaira, Anna Maria, E-mail: a.vaira@ivv.cnr.it [Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit, US National Arboretum, USDA-ARS, 10300 Baltimore Avenue B-010A, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Istituto di Virologia Vegetale, CNR, Strada delle Cacce 73, Torino 10135 (Italy); Bae, Hanhong, E-mail: hanhongbae@ynu.ac.kr [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Geongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Chan-Yong, E-mail: sunbispirit@gmail.com [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Ho, E-mail: chlee1219@hanmail.net [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Seokyoung University, Seoul 136-704 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Gi, E-mail: hgkim@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Biology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Roh, Mark, E-mail: marksroh@gmail.com [Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit, US National Arboretum, USDA-ARS, 10300 Baltimore Avenue B-010A, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States); Laboratory of Floriculture and Plant Physiology, School of Bio-Resource Science, Dankook University, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea, Republic of); Hammond, John, E-mail: john.hammond@ars.usda.gov [Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit, US National Arboretum, USDA-ARS, 10300 Baltimore Avenue B-010A, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Different isolates of Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV; Potexvirus), including four infectious clones derived from AltMV-SP, induce distinct systemic symptoms in Nicotiana benthamiana. Virus accumulation was enhanced at 15 °C compared to 25 °C; severe clone AltMV 3-7 induced systemic necrosis (SN) and plant death at 15 °C. No interaction with potexvirus resistance gene Rx was detected, although SN was ablated by silencing of SGT1, as for other cases of potexvirus-induced necrosis. Substitution of AltMV 3-7 coat protein (CP{sub SP}) with that from AltMV-Po (CP{sub Po}) eliminated SN at 15 °C, and ameliorated symptoms in Alternanthera dentata and soybean. Substitution of only two residues from CP{sub Po} [either MN(13,14)ID or LA(76,77)IS] efficiently ablated SN in N. benthamiana. CP{sub SP} but not CP{sub Po} interacted with Arabidopsis boron transporter protein AtBOR1 by yeast two-hybrid assay; N. benthamiana homolog NbBOR1 interacted more strongly with CP{sub SP} than CP{sub Po} in bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and may affect recognition of CP as an elicitor of SN. - Highlights: • Alternanthera mosaic virus CP is an elicitor of systemic necrosis in N. benthamiana. • Virus-induced systemic necrosis is enhanced at 15 °C compared to 25 °C. • Induction of systemic necrosis is dependent on as few as two CP amino acid residues. • These residues are at subunit interfaces within the same turn of the virion helix. • Inducer/non-inducer CPs interact differentially with a boron transporter protein.

  12. Investigation of interactions between poly-L-lysine-coated boron nitride nanotubes and C2C12 cells: up-take, cytocompatibility, and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Ciofani

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available G Ciofani1, L Ricotti1, S Danti2,3, S Moscato4, C Nesti2, D D’Alessandro2,4, D Dinucci5, F Chiellini5, A Pietrabissa3, M Petrini2,3, A Menciassi1,61Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy; 2CUCCS-RRMR, Center for the Clinical Use of Stem Cells – Regional Network of Regenerative Medicine, 3Department of Oncology, Transplants and Advanced Technologies, 4Department of Human Morphology and Applied Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 5Laboratory of Bioactive Polymeric Materials for Biomedical and Environmental Applications (BIOlab, UdR INSTM, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, University of Pisa, San Piero a Grado, Italy; 6Italian Institute of Technology, Genova, ItalyAbstract: Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs have generated considerable interest within the scientific community by virtue of their unique physical properties, which can be exploited in the biomedical field. In the present in vitro study, we investigated the interactions of poly-L-lysine-coated BNNTs with C2C12 cells, as a model of muscle cells, in terms of cytocompatibility and BNNT internalization. The latter was performed using both confocal and transmission electron microscopy. Finally, we investigated myoblast differentiation in the presence of BNNTs, evaluating the protein synthesis of differentiating cells, myotube formation, and expression of some constitutive myoblastic markers, such as MyoD and Cx43, by reverse transcription – polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We demonstrated that BNNTs are highly internalized by C2C12 cells, with neither adversely affecting C2C12 myoblast viability nor significantly interfering with myotube formation.Keywords: boron nitride nanotubes, C2C12 cells, cytocompatibility, up-take, differentiation, MyoD, connexin 43

  13. Fractal analysis and atomic force microscopy measurements of surface roughness for Hastelloy C276 substrates and amorphous alumina buffer layers in coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, F.; Shi, K.; Xiao, S.-Z.; Zhang, Y.-Y. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhao, Z.-J. [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangzhi@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Wei, J.-J.; Han, Z. [Applied Superconductivity Research Center, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-02-01

    In coated conductors, surface roughness of metallic substrates and buffer layers could significantly affect the texture of subsequently deposited buffer layers and the critical current density of superconductor layer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is usually utilized to measure surface roughness. However, the roughness values are actually relevant to scan scale. Fractal geometry could be exerted to analyze the scaling performance of surface roughness. In this study, four samples were prepared, which were electro polished Hastelloy C276 substrate, mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 substrate and the amorphous alumina buffer layers deposited on both the substrates by ion beam deposition. The surface roughness, described by root mean squared (RMS) and arithmetic average (R{sub a}) values, was analyzed considering the scan scale of AFM measurements. The surfaces of amorphous alumina layers were found to be fractal in nature because of the scaling performance of roughness, while the surfaces of Hastelloy substrates were not. The flatten modification of AFM images was discussed. And the calculation of surface roughness in smaller parts divided from the whole AFM images was studied, compared with the results of actual AFM measurements of the same scan scales.

  14. Fractal analysis and atomic force microscopy measurements of surface roughness for Hastelloy C276 substrates and amorphous alumina buffer layers in coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, F.; Shi, K.; Xiao, S.-Z.; Zhang, Y.-Y.; Zhao, Z.-J.; Wang, Z.; Wei, J.-J.; Han, Z.

    2012-02-01

    In coated conductors, surface roughness of metallic substrates and buffer layers could significantly affect the texture of subsequently deposited buffer layers and the critical current density of superconductor layer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is usually utilized to measure surface roughness. However, the roughness values are actually relevant to scan scale. Fractal geometry could be exerted to analyze the scaling performance of surface roughness. In this study, four samples were prepared, which were electro polished Hastelloy C276 substrate, mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 substrate and the amorphous alumina buffer layers deposited on both the substrates by ion beam deposition. The surface roughness, described by root mean squared (RMS) and arithmetic average (Ra) values, was analyzed considering the scan scale of AFM measurements. The surfaces of amorphous alumina layers were found to be fractal in nature because of the scaling performance of roughness, while the surfaces of Hastelloy substrates were not. The flatten modification of AFM images was discussed. And the calculation of surface roughness in smaller parts divided from the whole AFM images was studied, compared with the results of actual AFM measurements of the same scan scales.

  15. Fractal analysis and atomic force microscopy measurements of surface roughness for Hastelloy C276 substrates and amorphous alumina buffer layers in coated conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In coated conductors, surface roughness of metallic substrates and buffer layers could significantly affect the texture of subsequently deposited buffer layers and the critical current density of superconductor layer. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is usually utilized to measure surface roughness. However, the roughness values are actually relevant to scan scale. Fractal geometry could be exerted to analyze the scaling performance of surface roughness. In this study, four samples were prepared, which were electro polished Hastelloy C276 substrate, mechanically polished Hastelloy C276 substrate and the amorphous alumina buffer layers deposited on both the substrates by ion beam deposition. The surface roughness, described by root mean squared (RMS) and arithmetic average (Ra) values, was analyzed considering the scan scale of AFM measurements. The surfaces of amorphous alumina layers were found to be fractal in nature because of the scaling performance of roughness, while the surfaces of Hastelloy substrates were not. The flatten modification of AFM images was discussed. And the calculation of surface roughness in smaller parts divided from the whole AFM images was studied, compared with the results of actual AFM measurements of the same scan scales.

  16. Tribological Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (a-C: H DLC Coating when Lubricated with Biodegradable Vegetal Canola Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Mobarak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing environmental awareness and demands for lowering energy consumptions are strong driving forces behind the development of the vehicles of tomorrow. Without the advances of lubricant chemistry and adequate lubricant formulation, expansion of modern engines would not have been possible. Considering environmental awareness factors as compared to mineral oils, vegetal oil based biolubricants are renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic and have a least amount of greenhouse gases. Furthermore, improvement in engine performance and transmission components, which were impossible to achieve by applying only lubricants design, is now possible through diamond like carbon (DLC coatings. DLC coatings exhibit brilliant tribological properties, such as good wear resistance and low friction. In this regard, tribological performance of a-C: H DLC coating when lubricated with Canola vegetal oil has been investigated by the help of a ball-on-flat geometry. Experimental results demonstrated that the a-C: H DLC coating exhibited better performance with Canola oil in terms of friction and wear as compared to the uncoated materials. Large amount of polar components in the Canola oil significantly improved the tribological properties of the a-C:H coating. Thus, usage of a-C: H DLC coating with Canola oil in the long run may have a positive impact on engine life.

  17. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping. PMID:25427850

  18. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  19. Energy and particle balance studies under full boron and lithium-coated walls in TJ-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spanish stellarator TJ-II has been operated under lithium wall conditions for two years so far. Important changes in plasma parameters and, in particular, on particle recycling have been recorded with respect to the normal, boronized wall conditions previously prevailing. The specific effects that the new recycling scenario could have on the improved plasma parameters, and in particular to the global energy balance of electrons and protons are addressed in the present work. In addition, the possible increase in ion energies impinging on the walls should be mirrored by the incoming flux of sputtered lithium atoms. However, a strong decrease of the corresponding sputtering yield is recorded. This effect is analyzed in terms of possible material mixing effects among others. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Development of a novel neutron detection technique by using a boron layer coating a Charge Coupled Device

    CERN Document Server

    Blostein, Juan Jerónimo; Tartaglione, Aureliano; Haro, Miguel Sofo; Moroni, Guillermo Fernández; Cancelo, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the design features and the first test measurements obtained during the installation of a novel high resolution 2D neutron detection technique. The technique proposed in this work consists of a boron layer (enriched in ${^{10}}$B) placed on a scientific Charge Coupled Device (CCD). After the nuclear reaction ${^{10}}$B(n,$\\alpha$)${^{7}}$Li, the CCD detects the emitted charge particles thus obtaining information on the neutron absorption position. The above mentioned ionizing particles, with energies in the range 0.5-5.5 MeV, produce a plasma effect in the CCD which is recorded as a circular spot. This characteristic circular shape, as well as the relationship observed between the spot diameter and the charge collected, is used for the event recognition, allowing the discrimination of undesirable gamma events. We present the first results recently obtained with this technique, which has the potential to perform neutron tomography investigations with a spatial resolution better than that...

  1. Preparation and oxidation protection of CVD SiC/a-BC/SiC coatings for 3D C/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An amorphous boron carbide (a-BC) coating was prepared by LPCVD process from BCl3-CH4-H2-Ar system. XPS result showed that the boron concentration was 15.0 at.%, and carbon was 82.0 at.%. One third of boron was distributed to a bonding with carbon and 37.0 at.% was dissolved in graphite lattice. A multiple-layered structure of CVD SiC/a-BC/SiC was coated on 3D C/SiC composites. Oxidation tests were conducted at 700, 1000, and 1200 deg. C in 14 vol.% H2O/8 vol.% O2/78 vol.% Ar atmosphere up to 100 h. The 3D C/SiC composites with the modified coating system had a good oxidation resistance. This resulted in the high strength retained ratio of the composites even after the oxidation.

  2. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm2 aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiNx/a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiNx/a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiNx/a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance

  3. Silicon nitride and intrinsic amorphous silicon double antireflection coatings for thin-film solar cells on foreign substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Da; Kunz, Thomas [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wolf, Nadine [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Energy Efficiency, Am Galgenberg 87, 97074 Wuerzburg (Germany); Liebig, Jan Philipp [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Wittmann, Stephan; Ahmad, Taimoor; Hessmann, Maik T.; Auer, Richard [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Göken, Mathias [Materials Science and Engineering, Institute I, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research (ZAE Bayern), Division: Photovoltaics and Thermosensoric, Haberstr. 2a, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-29

    Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) was investigated as a surface passivation method for crystalline silicon thin film solar cells on graphite substrates. The results of the experiments, including quantum efficiency and current density-voltage measurements, show improvements in cell performance. This improvement is due to surface passivation by an a-Si:H(i) layer, which increases the open circuit voltage and the fill factor. In comparison with our previous work, we have achieved an increase of 0.6% absolute cell efficiency for a 40 μm thick 4 cm{sup 2} aperture area on the graphite substrate. The optical properties of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack were studied using spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. Scanning transmission electron microscopy inside a scanning electron microscope was applied to characterize the cross section of the SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stack using focus ion beam preparation. - Highlights: • We report a 10.8% efficiency for thin-film silicon solar cell on graphite. • Hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon was applied for surface passivation. • SiN{sub x}/a-Si:H(i) stacks were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometer techniques. • Cross-section micrograph was obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy. • Quantum efficiency and J-V measurements show improvements in the cell performance.

  4. Alumina-coated patterned amorphous silicon as the anode for a lithium-ion battery with high coulombic efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yu.; Yu, Xiqian; Wang, Yanhong; Li, Hong; Huang, Xuejie [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2011-11-09

    A patterned silicon electrode as the anode of lithium ion batteries is fabricated by microfabrication technology. An ultrathin alumina layer is coated on the patterned electrode by atomic layer deposition (ALD). This results in obviously enhanced coulombic efficiency and cycling performance. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Heat Flux Calculation and Problem of Flaking of Boron Carbide Coatings on the Faraday Screen of the ICRH Antennas During Tore Supra High Power, Long Pulse Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corre, Y. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Lipa, M. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy (F4E), Barcelona, Spain; Basiuk, V. [CEA IRFM, St. Paul-lez-Durance, France; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Courtois, X. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Dumont, R. J. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance; Ekedahl, A. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Gardarein, J. L. [University of Aix, Marseille, France; Klepper, C Christopher [ORNL; Martin, V. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Institute for Magnetic Fusion Research (IRFM); Moncada, V. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Portafaix, C. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Rigollet, F. [University of Aix, Marseille, France; Tawizgant, R. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Travere, J. M. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France; Valliez, K. [CEA, St. Paul Les Durance, France

    2011-01-01

    Reliable and repetitive high power and long pulse tokamak operation is strongly dependant of the ability to secure the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In Tore Supra, a network of 7 infrared (IR) video cameras is routinely used to prevent PFCs overheating and damage in selected regions. Real time feedback control and offline analysis are essential for basic protection and understanding of abnormal thermal events. One important limitation detected by the IR real time feed-back loop during high power RF operation (injected power of 9.5 MW over 26 s and 12 MW over 10 s have been achieved respectively in 2006 and 2008) is due to the interaction between fast ions which increase the power flux density and flaking of the boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen box of the ICRH antennas. An IR-based experimental procedure is proposed in order to detect new flakes during plasma operation. The thermal response of the B4C coating is studied with and without flaking during plasma operation. The experimental heat flux deposited by fast ion losses on the Faraday screen is calculated for high (3.8 T) and low magnetic field (2 T) during high RF power operation (with fundamental hydrogen minority and second harmonic ICRH heating schemes respectively). The paper addresses both thermal science issues applied to machine protection and limitation due to fast ions issues during high RF power, long pulse operation. Safety margin to critical heat flux and number of fatigue cycles under heat load are presented in the paper.

  6. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-03-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3•0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes.

  7. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-01-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes. PMID:27001370

  8. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  9. MgO-Al2O3-ZrO2 Amorphous Ternary Composite: A Dense and Stable Optical Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoo, Naba K.; Shapiro, Alan P.

    1998-01-01

    The process-parameter-dependent optical and structural properties of MgO-Al2O3-ZrO2 ternary mixed-composite material were investigated. Optical properties were derived from spectrophotometric measurements. The surface morphology, grain size distributions, crystallographic phases, and process- dependent material composition of films were investigated through the use of atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction analysis, and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis made evident the correlation between the optical constants and the process-dependent compositions in the films. It is possible to achieve environmentally stable amorphous films with high packing density under certain optimized process conditions.

  10. Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dennis G.

    1989-01-01

    This review covers analytical techniques applicable to the examination of coatings, raw materials, and substrates upon which coatings are placed. Techniques include chemical and electrochemical methods, chromatography, spectroscopy, thermal analysis, microscopy, and miscellaneous techniques. (MVL)

  11. Heat flux calculation and problem of flaking of boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen of the ICRH antennas during Tore Supra high power, long pulse operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corre, Y., E-mail: yann.corre@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lipa, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Agarici, G. [Fusion for Energy, C/Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Basiuk, V.; Colas, L.; Courtois, X.; Dunand, G.; Dumont, R.; Ekedahl, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gardarein, J.-L. [IUSTI UMR-CNRS 65-95. Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Klepper, C.C. [USA ORNL, Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Martin, V.; Moncada, V.; Portafaix, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Rigollet, F. [IUSTI UMR-CNRS 65-95. Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Tawizgant, R.; Travere, J.-M.; Vulliez, K. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > We summarize the problem of flaking of the B{sub 4}C coatings in the scope of PFC protection with infrared Real Time Control safety system, during high ICRH power, long discharge operation in the Tore Supra tokamak > We compute the heat flux deposited by fast ions on the Faraday screen of the ICRH antennas > The heat loads attributed to fast ions are evaluated during fundamental hydrogen minority (B = 3.7 T) and second harmonic (B = 2 T) ICRH heating scenarios > We investigate the safety margin to critical heat flux and number of fatigue cycles under heat load for the two heating scenarios. - Abstract: Reliable and repetitive high power and long pulse tokamak operation is strongly dependant of the ability to secure the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In Tore Supra, a network of 7 infrared (IR) video cameras is routinely used to prevent PFCs overheating and damage in selected regions. Real time feedback control and offline analysis are essential for basic protection and understanding of abnormal thermal events. One important limitation detected by the IR real time feed-back loop during high power RF operation (injected power of 9.5 MW over 26 s and 12 MW over 10 s have been achieved respectively in 2006 and 2008) is due to the interaction between fast ions which increase the power flux density and flaking of the boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen box of the ICRH antennas. An IR-based experimental procedure is proposed in order to detect new flakes during plasma operation. The thermal response of the B{sub 4}C coating is studied with and without flaking during plasma operation. The experimental heat flux deposited by fast ion losses on the Faraday screen is calculated for high (3.8 T) and low magnetic field (2 T) during high RF power operation (with fundamental hydrogen minority and second harmonic ICRH heating schemes respectively). The paper addresses both thermal science issues applied to machine protection and limitation due to fast ions

  12. Heat flux calculation and problem of flaking of boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen of the ICRH antennas during Tore Supra high power, long pulse operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We summarize the problem of flaking of the B4C coatings in the scope of PFC protection with infrared Real Time Control safety system, during high ICRH power, long discharge operation in the Tore Supra tokamak → We compute the heat flux deposited by fast ions on the Faraday screen of the ICRH antennas → The heat loads attributed to fast ions are evaluated during fundamental hydrogen minority (B = 3.7 T) and second harmonic (B = 2 T) ICRH heating scenarios → We investigate the safety margin to critical heat flux and number of fatigue cycles under heat load for the two heating scenarios. - Abstract: Reliable and repetitive high power and long pulse tokamak operation is strongly dependant of the ability to secure the Plasma Facing Components (PFCs). In Tore Supra, a network of 7 infrared (IR) video cameras is routinely used to prevent PFCs overheating and damage in selected regions. Real time feedback control and offline analysis are essential for basic protection and understanding of abnormal thermal events. One important limitation detected by the IR real time feed-back loop during high power RF operation (injected power of 9.5 MW over 26 s and 12 MW over 10 s have been achieved respectively in 2006 and 2008) is due to the interaction between fast ions which increase the power flux density and flaking of the boron carbide coatings on the Faraday screen box of the ICRH antennas. An IR-based experimental procedure is proposed in order to detect new flakes during plasma operation. The thermal response of the B4C coating is studied with and without flaking during plasma operation. The experimental heat flux deposited by fast ion losses on the Faraday screen is calculated for high (3.8 T) and low magnetic field (2 T) during high RF power operation (with fundamental hydrogen minority and second harmonic ICRH heating schemes respectively). The paper addresses both thermal science issues applied to machine protection and limitation due to fast ions

  13. A Template Roure to Prepare Nanowire Arrays of Amorphous Cabon Nanotube-coated Single Crystal Tin Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Tin oxide is an important n-type semiconductor of wide band due to its numerous potential applications in resistors, gas sensors, dye-based solar cells, and transparent conducting coatings for glasses and electrodes. It is also prospective anode material for high-energy density lithium ion batteries[1]. So far much work has been conducted on one-dimensional (1-D) metal oxides because their large ratio of surface/volume and their congruence of the carrier screening length with their lateral dim...

  14. Fabrication of boron-phosphide neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron phosphide is a potentially viable candidate for high neutron flux neutron detectors. The authors have explored chemical vapor deposition methods to produce such detectors and have not been able to produce good boron phosphide coatings on silicon carbide substrates. However, semi-conducting quality films have been produced. Further testing is required

  15. High-temperature tensile behavior of a boron nitride-coated silicon carbide-fiber glass-ceramic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tensile properties of a cross-ply glass-ceramic composite were investigated by conducting fracture, creep, and fatigue experiments at both room temperature and high temperatures in air. The composite consisted of a barium magnesium aluminosilicate (BMAS) glass-ceramic matrix reinforced with SiC fibers with a SiC/BN coating. The material exhibited retention of most tensile properties up to 1,200 C. Monotonic tensile fracture tests produced ultimate strengths of 230--300 MPa with failure strains of ∼1%, and no degradation in ultimate strength was observed at 1,100 and 1,200 C. In creep experiments at 1,100 C, nominal steady-state creep rates in the 10-9 s-1 range were established after a period of transient creep. Tensile stress rupture experiments at 1,100 and 1,200 C lasted longer than one year at stress levels above the corresponding proportional limit stresses for those temperatures. Tensile fatigue experiments were conducted in which the maximum applied stress was slightly greater than the proportional limit stress of the matrix, and, in these experiments, the composite survived 105 cycles without fracture at temperatures up to 1,200 C. Microscopic damage mechanisms were investigated by TEM, and microstructural observations of tested samples were correlated with the mechanical response. The SiC/BN fiber coatings effectively inhibited diffusion and reaction at the interface during high-temperature testing. The BN layer also provided a weak interfacial bond that resulted in damage-tolerant fracture behavior

  16. Analysis of boronized wall in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boronization has been carried out in some experimental fusion devices as one of wall conditioning Methods. The well-known merits of the boronization are as follows: 1) coated-boron on the first wall has strong gettering function for oxygen impurities and oxygen has been kept into boron films as a boron-oxide and 2) boron film covers first wall with apparently low Z materials facing the plasma. However, an operation scenario of boronization for next generation devices such as ITER is not optimized. In this paper, we discuss an optimized method of coated film uniformity in a wide area and a lifetime of boron film as an oxygen getter using experimental data in the large helical device (LHD). In LHD, boronization by glow discharges has been carried out a few times during each experimental campaign. Helium-diborane mixtured gas is used and plasma facing components (PFM) are stainless steel (SS) for the first wall and carbon for the divertor plates kept in the room temperature. Material probes made of SS316 and Si were installed in the vacuum vessel and exposed during the experimental campaign. Depth profiles of their impurities were analyzed using the X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and the Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Two types of gettering process by boron film have been investigated. One is the process during boronization and the other is that after boronization. Concerning a lifetime of boron film, the distribution of oxygen near the top surface region (0 to 20 nm) indicates a process of oxygen gettering, it shows a contribution after boronization. In this paper, these kinds of process using material probes are shown. (authors)

  17. Boron carbide-based ceramics via polymer route synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material with excellent high temperature physical properties. As compared to conventional techniques, the preparation of boron carbide from polymeric precursors is attractive as this technique offers a number of unique advantages. In this paper, the screening of polymeric precursors to boron carbide will be discussed. Two promising boron carbide, carborane containing polymeric precursors have resulted in 60-70 wt.% ceramic yields. The chemistry of polymer synthesis and the transformations from the polymer to amorphous and crystalline boron carbide were investigated with infrared spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and x-ray diffraction

  18. Reciprocating sliding behaviour of self-mated amorphous diamond-like carbon coatings on Si3N4 ceramics under tribological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering have been deposited on silicon nitride based substrates for tribological purposes. A conductive Si3N4/30% vol.TiN composite was produced for bias substrate application. Friction and wear properties of carbon coated self-mated pairs were assessed using a reciprocal motion ball-on-flat setup in unlubricated conditions with applied normal loads of 3 N and 5 N. The worn surfaces were studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to identify the prevalent wear mechanism. Unbiased and biased substrates behaved differently, the former undergoing premature delamination while the latter endured the tribological test conditions (3 N, ∼ 43 m). Very low friction coefficient values of ∼ 0.015 were sustained assuring remarkable wear behaviour. Surface grooving and wear debris accumulation in the sliding track lead to a roughness increase from the nominal rms value of ∼ 12 nm to ∼ 97 nm, although no weight loss and surface profile modification was quantifiable

  19. Physicochemical Characterization and In Vivo Evaluation of Amorphous and Partially Crystalline Calcium Phosphate Coatings Fabricated on Ti-6Al-4V Implants by the Plasma Spray Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estevam A. Bonfante

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize the topographic and chemical properties of 2 bioceramic coated plateau root form implant surfaces and evaluate their histomorphometric differences at 6 and 12 weeks in vivo. Methods. Plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (PSHA and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, interferometry (IFM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. Implants were placed in the radius epiphysis, and the right limb of dogs provided implants that remained for 6 weeks, and the left limb provided implants that remained 12 weeks in vivo. Thin sections were prepared for bone-to-implant contact (BIC and bone-area-fraction occupancy (BAFO measurements (evaluated by Friedman analysis <0.05. Results. Significantly, higher Sa (<0.03 and Sq (<0.02 were observed for ACP relative to PSHA. Chemical analysis revealed significantly higher HA, calcium phosphate, and calcium pyrophosphate for the PSHA surface. BIC and BAFO measurements showed no differences between surfaces. Lamellar bone formation in close contact with implant surfaces and within the healing chambers was observed for both groups. Conclusion. Given topographical and chemical differences between PSHA and ACP surfaces, bone morphology and histomorphometric evaluated parameters showed that both surfaces were osseoconductive in plateau root form implants.

  20. Structured analysis of iron-based amorphous alloy coating dep osited by AC-HVAF spray%通过AC-HVAF方法制备铁基非晶合金涂层的结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶凤霞; 陈燕; 余鹏; 罗强; 曲寿江; 沈军

    2014-01-01

    本研究通过活性燃烧高速燃气喷涂(AC-HVAF)方法制备出了均匀致密的铁基非晶化合金涂层。通过调制AC-HVAF喷涂过程的工艺参数,研究了喷涂枪长、喷涂距离和送粉率对涂层非晶化程度的影响,得出控制枪长是形成高质量非晶化涂层的关键,而喷涂距离和送粉率决定了涂层的厚度和形成速率。制备出的铁基非晶合金与基体结合致密,孔隙率较低,完全的非晶化结构有效的保持了铁基非晶合金优异的力学性能,可以对基体材料进行很好的防护。%The uniform and compact Fe-based amorphous alloy coating was prepared by active combustion high velocity air fuel (AC-HVAF) spray method. By tuning the parameters of AC-HVAF spray process, the influence of the spraying gun length, spraying distance, and powder feed rate on non-crystallization has been studied carefully. Results indicate that spraying gun length is the key factor in forming perfect amorphous coating. Spraying distance and powder feed rate may determine the thickness and formation rate of the coating. The prepared coatings have a tight adhesion with the substrate, low porosity, and good non-crystallization, which would effectively maintain the excellent mechanical properties of the Fe-based amorphous alloy. The coating can provide a good protection for the substrate material.

  1. Ion beam-assisted deposition of boron nitride from a condensed layer of diborane and ammonia at 78 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) of thin boron nitride films using cryogenically condensed precursors. Low energy (1100 eV) argon ad (2000 eV) deuterated ammonia beams with currents of 600--850 nA were used to mix and initiate reactions in frozen (90 K) layers of diborane (B2H6 and ammonia (NH3) or only B2H6, respectively. The resulting film is shown to be an amorphous BN coating approximately 30 Angstrom thick

  2. Efficiently-cooled plasmonic amorphous silicon solar cells integrated with a nano-coated heat-pipe plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Du, Yanping; Shum, Clifford; Cai, Boyuan; Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Chen, Xi; Duck, Benjamin; Fell, Christopher; Zhu, Yonggang; Gu, Min

    2016-04-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) are emerging as a major alternative energy source. The cost of PV electricity depends on the efficiency of conversion of light to electricity. Despite of steady growth in the efficiency for several decades, little has been achieved to reduce the impact of real-world operating temperatures on this efficiency. Here we demonstrate a highly efficient cooling solution to the recently emerging high performance plasmonic solar cell technology by integrating an advanced nano-coated heat-pipe plate. This thermal cooling technology, efficient for both summer and winter time, demonstrates the heat transportation capability up to ten times higher than those of the metal plate and the conventional wickless heat-pipe plates. The reduction in temperature rise of the plasmonic solar cells operating under one sun condition can be as high as 46%, leading to an approximate 56% recovery in efficiency, which dramatically increases the energy yield of the plasmonic solar cells. This newly-developed, thermally-managed plasmonic solar cell device significantly extends the application scope of PV for highly efficient solar energy conversion.

  3. Efficiently-cooled plasmonic amorphous silicon solar cells integrated with a nano-coated heat-pipe plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Du, Yanping; Shum, Clifford; Cai, Boyuan; Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Chen, Xi; Duck, Benjamin; Fell, Christopher; Zhu, Yonggang; Gu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Solar photovoltaics (PV) are emerging as a major alternative energy source. The cost of PV electricity depends on the efficiency of conversion of light to electricity. Despite of steady growth in the efficiency for several decades, little has been achieved to reduce the impact of real-world operating temperatures on this efficiency. Here we demonstrate a highly efficient cooling solution to the recently emerging high performance plasmonic solar cell technology by integrating an advanced nano-coated heat-pipe plate. This thermal cooling technology, efficient for both summer and winter time, demonstrates the heat transportation capability up to ten times higher than those of the metal plate and the conventional wickless heat-pipe plates. The reduction in temperature rise of the plasmonic solar cells operating under one sun condition can be as high as 46%, leading to an approximate 56% recovery in efficiency, which dramatically increases the energy yield of the plasmonic solar cells. This newly-developed, thermally-managed plasmonic solar cell device significantly extends the application scope of PV for highly efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:27113558

  4. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ghosh, C. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ravindran, T.R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  5. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron (10B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of 10B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron

  6. Boron-enhanced diffusion of boron from ultralow-energy boron implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have investigated the diffusion enhancement mechanism of BED (boron enhanced diffusion), wherein the boron diffusivity is enhanced three to four times over the equilibrium diffusivity at 1,050 C in the proximity of a silicon layer containing a high boron concentration. It is shown that BED is associated with the formation of a fine-grain polycrystalline silicon boride phase within an initially amorphous Si layer having a high B concentration. For 0.5 keV B+, the threshold implantation dose which leads to BED lies between 3 x 1014 and of 1 x 1015/cm-2. Formation of the shallowest possible junctions by 0.5 keV B+ requires that the implant dose be kept lower than this threshold

  7. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  8. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D' Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  9. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  10. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph; Choi, Jor-Shan; Saw, Cheng; Haslam, Jeffrey; Day, Dan; Hailey, Phillip; Lian, Tiangan; Rebak, Raul; Perepezko, John; Payer, Joe; Branagan, Daniel; Beardsley, Brad; D'Amato, Andy; Aprigliano, Lou

    2009-06-01

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition, materials synthesis, thermal stability, corrosion resistance, environmental cracking, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, radiation effects, and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as meltspun ribbons (MSRs), dropcast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of MSRs and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently, thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests; good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while the open-circuit corrosion potentials (OCPs) were simultaneously monitored; reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber and suitable for criticality-control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and Ni-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  11. X-ray diffraction study of boron produced by pyrolysis of boron tribromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, David

    formation are not fully understood or agreed upon in the literature. In this research, the method of pyrolysis of boron tribromide (hydrogen reduction of boron tribromide) was used to deposit boron on a tantalum filament. The goal was to refine this method, or potentially use it in combination with a second method (amorphous boron crystallization), to the point where it is possible to grow large, high purity alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals with consistency. A pyrolysis apparatus was designed and built, and a number of trials were run to determine the conditions (reaction temperature, etc.) necessary for alpha-rhombohedral boron production. This work was focused on the x-ray diffraction analysis of the boron deposits; x-ray diffraction was performed on a number of samples to determine the types of boron (and other compounds) formed in each trial and to guide the choices of test conditions for subsequent trials. It was found that at low reaction temperatures (in the range of around 830-950 °C), amorphous boron was the primary form of boron produced. Reaction temperatures in the range of around 950-1000 °C yielded various combinations of crystalline boron and amorphous boron. In the first trial performed at a temperature of 950 °C, a mix of amorphous boron and alpha-rhombohedral boron was formed. Using a scanning electron microscope, it was possible to see small alpha-rhombohedral boron crystals (on the order of ~1 micron in size) embedded in the surface of the deposit. In subsequent trials carried out at reaction temperatures in the range of 950 °C -- 1000 °C, it was found that various combinations of alpha-rhombohedral boron, beta-rhombohedral boron, and amorphous boron were produced; the results tended to be unpredictable (alpha-rhombohedral boron was not produced in every trial), and the factors leading to success/failure were difficult to pinpoint. These results illustrate how sensitive of a process producing alpha-rhombohedral boron can be, and indicate that

  12. Tribological properties of amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) diamond-like carbon coatings under jatropha biodegradable lubricating oil at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, H. M.; Masjuki, H. H.; Mohamad, E. Niza; Kalam, M. A.; Rashedul, H. K.; Rashed, M. M.; Habibullah, M.

    2014-10-01

    The application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on automotive components is emerging as a favorable strategy to address the recent challenges in the industry. DLC coatings can effectively lower the coefficient of friction (CoF) and wear rate of engine components, thereby improving their fuel efficiency and durability. The lubrication of ferrous materials can be enhanced by a large amount of unsaturated and polar components of oils. Therefore, the interaction between nonferrous coatings (e.g., DLC) and vegetable oil should be investigated. A ball-on-plate tribotester was used to run the experiments. Stainless steel plates coated with amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) DLC and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC that slide against 440C stainless steel ball were used to create a ball-on-plate tribotester. The wear track was investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies were used to analyze the tribofilm inside the wear track. Raman analysis was performed to investigate the structural changes in the coatings. At high temperatures, the CoF in both coatings decreased. The wear rate, however, increased in the a-C:H but decreased in the ta-C DLC-coated plates. The CoF and the wear rate (coated layer and counter surface) were primarily influenced by the graphitization of the coating. Tribochemical films, such as polyphosphate glass, were formed in ta-C and acted as protective layers. Therefore, the wear rate of the ta-C DLC was lower than that of the-C:H DLC.

  13. Effect of Annealing Temperature on Hardness and Wear Resistance of Electroless Ni-B-Mo Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serin, Ihsan Gökhan; Göksenli, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Formation of nickel-boron-molybdenum (Ni-B-Mo) coating on steel by electroless plating and evaluation of their morphology, hardness and tribological properties post heat treatment at different temperatures for 1 h is investigated. The 25 μm thick coating is uniform and adhesion between the substrate and coating is good. Ni-B-Mo coating was amorphous-like structure in their as-plated condition and by 400°C heat-treated coating, nickel fully crystallized and nickel borides and molybdenum carbide were formed. All coatings exhibited higher hardness than the substrate steel. Hardness values of all coatings up to 400°C did not change distinctively but decreased partly beyond 400°C. Friction coefficient reached lowest value post heat treatment at 300°C but later increased with increasing tempering temperature. Wear resistance was lowest in as-plated coating; however it reached the highest value at 300°C. Worn surface of the coatings showed the abrasive wear as the dominant wear mechanism. An additional adhesive wear mechanism was detected in coating tempered at 550°C. Moreover, our results confirmed that the molybdenum addition improved the thermal stability of the resulting coating. Therefore, Ni-B-Mo coating has potential for application in precision mould, optical parts mould or bipolar plates, where thermal stability is essential.

  14. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Jiang, Jianzhong

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials are...

  15. Amorphous Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    Digital computers have always been constructed to behave as precise arrangements of reliable parts, and our techniques for organizing computations depend upon this precision and reliability. Two emerging technologies, however, are begnning to undercut these assumptions about constructing and programming computers. These technologies -- microfabrication and bioengineering -- will make it possible to assemble systems composed of myriad information- processing units at almost no cost, provided: 1) that not all the units need to work correctly; and 2) that there is no need to manufacture precise geometrical arrangements or interconnection patterns among them. Microelectronic mechanical components are becoming so inexpensive to manufacture that we can anticipate combining logic circuits, microsensors, actuators, and communications devices integrated on the same chip to produce particles that could be mixed with bulk materials, such as paints, gels, and concrete. Imagine coating bridges or buildings with smart paint that can sense and report on traffic and wind loads and monitor structural integrity of the bridge. A smart paint coating on a wall could sense vibrations, monitor the premises for intruders, or cancel noise. Even more striking, there has been such astounding progress in understanding the biochemical mechanisms in individual cells, that it appears we'll be able to harness these mechanisms to construct digital- logic circuits. Imagine a discipline of cellular engineering that could tailor-make biological cells that function as sensors and actuators, as programmable delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals, as chemical factories for the assembly of nanoscale structures. Fabricating such systems seem to be within our reach, even if it is not yet within our grasp Fabrication, however, is only part of the story. We can envision producing vast quantities of individual computing elements, whether microfabricated particles, engineered cells, or macromolecular computing

  16. Surface Design and Engineering Toward Wear-Resistant, Self-Lubricant Diamond Films and Coatings. Chapter 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1999-01-01

    This chapter describes three studies on the surface design, surface engineering, and tribology of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films and coatings toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. Friction mechanisms and solid lubrication mechanisms of CVD diamond are stated. Effects of an amorphous hydrogenated carbon on CVD diamond, an amorphous, nondiamond carbon surface layer formed on CVD diamond by carbon and nitrogen ion implantation, and a materials combination of cubic boron nitride and CVD diamond on the adhesion, friction, and wear behaviors of CVD diamond in ultrahigh vacuum are described. How surface modification and the selected materials couple improved the tribological functionality of coatings, giving low coefficient of friction and good wear resistance, is explained.

  17. Tribological properties of amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) diamond-like carbon coatings under jatropha biodegradable lubricating oil at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We tested a-C:H and ta-C DLC coatings as a function of temperature. • Jatropha oil contains large amounts of polar components that enhanced the lubricity of coatings. • CoF decreases with increasing temperature for both contacts. • Wear rate increases with increasing temperature in a-C:H and decreases in ta-C DLC. • At high temperature, ta-C coatings confer more protection than a-C:H coatings. - Abstract: The application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on automotive components is emerging as a favorable strategy to address the recent challenges in the industry. DLC coatings can effectively lower the coefficient of friction (CoF) and wear rate of engine components, thereby improving their fuel efficiency and durability. The lubrication of ferrous materials can be enhanced by a large amount of unsaturated and polar components of oils. Therefore, the interaction between nonferrous coatings (e.g., DLC) and vegetable oil should be investigated. A ball-on-plate tribotester was used to run the experiments. Stainless steel plates coated with amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) DLC and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC that slide against 440C stainless steel ball were used to create a ball-on-plate tribotester. The wear track was investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies were used to analyze the tribofilm inside the wear track. Raman analysis was performed to investigate the structural changes in the coatings. At high temperatures, the CoF in both coatings decreased. The wear rate, however, increased in the a-C:H but decreased in the ta-C DLC-coated plates. The CoF and the wear rate (coated layer and counter surface) were primarily influenced by the graphitization of the coating. Tribochemical films, such as polyphosphate glass, were formed in ta-C and acted as protective layers. Therefore, the wear rate of the ta-C DLC was lower than that of the-C:H DLC

  18. Tribological properties of amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) diamond-like carbon coatings under jatropha biodegradable lubricating oil at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobarak, H.M., E-mail: mobarak.ho31@yahoo.com; Masjuki, H.H.; Mohamad, E. Niza, E-mail: edzrol@um.edu.my; Kalam, M.A.; Rashedul, H.K.; Rashed, M.M.; Habibullah, M.

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • We tested a-C:H and ta-C DLC coatings as a function of temperature. • Jatropha oil contains large amounts of polar components that enhanced the lubricity of coatings. • CoF decreases with increasing temperature for both contacts. • Wear rate increases with increasing temperature in a-C:H and decreases in ta-C DLC. • At high temperature, ta-C coatings confer more protection than a-C:H coatings. - Abstract: The application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on automotive components is emerging as a favorable strategy to address the recent challenges in the industry. DLC coatings can effectively lower the coefficient of friction (CoF) and wear rate of engine components, thereby improving their fuel efficiency and durability. The lubrication of ferrous materials can be enhanced by a large amount of unsaturated and polar components of oils. Therefore, the interaction between nonferrous coatings (e.g., DLC) and vegetable oil should be investigated. A ball-on-plate tribotester was used to run the experiments. Stainless steel plates coated with amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) DLC and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC that slide against 440C stainless steel ball were used to create a ball-on-plate tribotester. The wear track was investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies were used to analyze the tribofilm inside the wear track. Raman analysis was performed to investigate the structural changes in the coatings. At high temperatures, the CoF in both coatings decreased. The wear rate, however, increased in the a-C:H but decreased in the ta-C DLC-coated plates. The CoF and the wear rate (coated layer and counter surface) were primarily influenced by the graphitization of the coating. Tribochemical films, such as polyphosphate glass, were formed in ta-C and acted as protective layers. Therefore, the wear rate of the ta-C DLC was lower than that of the-C:H DLC.

  19. Formation of amorphous silicon by light ion damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphization by implantation of boron ions (which is the lightest element generally used in I.C. fabrication processes) has been systematically studied for various temperatures, various voltages and various dose rates. Based on theoretical considerations and experimental results, a new amorphization model for light and intermediate mass ion damage is proposed consisting of two stages. The role of interstitial type point defects or clusters in amorphization is emphasized. Due to the higher mobility of interstitials out-diffusion to the surface particularly during amorphization with low energy can be significant. From a review of the idealized amorphous structure, diinterstitial-divacancy pairs are suggested to be the embryos of amorphous zones formed during room temperature implantation. The stacking fault loops found in specimens implanted with boron at room temperature are considered to be the origin of secondary defects formed during annealing

  20. Understanding the hydrogen and oxygen gas pressure dependence of the tribological properties of silicon oxide-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Koshigan, KD; Mangolini, F; McClimon, JB; Vacher, B.; Bec, S; Carpick, RW; Fontaine, J

    2015-01-01

    Silicon oxide-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a–C:H:Si:O) are amorphous thin films used as solid lubricants in a range of commercial applications, thanks to its increased stability in extreme environments, relative to amorphous hydrogenated carbons (a–C:H). This work aims to develop a fundamental understanding of the environmental impact on the tribology of a–C:H:Si:O. Upon sliding an a–C:H:Si:O film against a steel counterbody, two friction regimes develop: high friction in high vacuum...

  1. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO and DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent

  2. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  3. Synthesis of well-aligned boron nanowires and their structural stability under high pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Cao Li Min; Gao Cun Xiao; Li Yan Cun; Li Xiao Dong; Wang, Y Q; Zhang, Z; Cui Qi Liang; Zou Guang Tian; Sun Li; Wang Wen Kui

    2002-01-01

    Owing to its unusual bonding and vast variety of unique crystal structures, boron is one of the most fascinating elements in the periodic table. Here we report the large-scale synthesis of well-ordered boron nanowires and their structural stability at high pressure. Boron nanowires with uniform diameter and length grown vertically on silicon substrates were synthesized by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering with a target of pure boron using argon as the sputtering atmosphere without involvement of templates and catalysts. Detailed characterization by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction indicates that the boron nanowires are amorphous. Structural stability of the boron nanowires at room temperature has been investigated by means of in situ high-pressure energy-dispersive x-ray powder diffraction using synchrotron radiation in a diamond anvil cell. No crystallization was observed up to a pressure of 103.5 GPa, suggesting that the amorphous structure of boron nanowires is s...

  4. Effect of diborane on the microstructure of boron-doped silicon nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ling; Lew, Kok-Keong; Redwing, Joan M.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.

    2005-04-01

    Boron-doped silicon (Si) nanowires, with nominal diameters of 80 nm, were grown via the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism using gold (Au) as a catalyst and silane (SiH 4) and diborane (B 2H 6) as precursors. The microstructure of the nanowires was studied by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. At lower B 2H 6 partial pressure and thus lower doping levels (⩽1×10 18 cm -3), most of the boron-doped Si nanowires exhibited high crystallinity. At higher B 2H 6 partial pressure (˜2×10 19 cm -3 doping level), the majority of the wires exhibited a core-shell structure with an amorphous Si shell (20-30 nm thick) surrounding a crystalline Si core. Au nanoparticles on the outer surface of the nanowires were also observed in structures grown with high B/Si gas ratios. The structural changes are believed to result from an increase in the rate of Si thin-film deposition on the outer surface of the nanowire at high B 2H 6 partial pressure, which produces the amorphous coating and also causes an instability at the liquid/solid interface resulting in a loss of Au during nanowire growth.

  5. 吲哚美辛微观结晶机制及纳米包衣的影响%Microcosmic mechanisms of amorphous indomethacin crystallization and the influence of nano-coating on crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳辉; 易涛; 郑琴; 刘峰

    2011-01-01

    药物的无定形状态比晶态具有更大的溶解度,可以促进吸收,提高口服生物利用度,但是稳定性差,易转变为晶体状态.本文采用偏光显微镜、扫描电子显微镜、差示扫描量热法、X-射线衍射法和拉曼光谱法等研究无定形吲哚美辛的微观结晶机制,并对药物表面进行喷金包衣,厚度为10nm,研究结晶行为变化.结果发现,无定形吲哚美辛自由表面的结晶速率远大于其内部,金包衣可显著抑制自由表面的结晶.这提示,自由表面的结晶是影响无定形药物稳定性的关键因素,纳米包衣可用于增强无定形药物的稳定性.%Amorphous drugs have higher solubility, better oral bioavailability and are easier to be absorbed than their crystalline counterparts. However, the amorphous drugs, with weak stability, are so easy to crystallize that they will lose the onginal advantages. Polarization microscope, scanning electron microscope, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractomer and Raman spectroscopy were used to study the microcosmic crystallizarion mechanisms of amorphous indometacin and the performance of the drug crystals. The results showed that the growth rate of amorphous indometacin crystals at the free surface was markedly faster than that through the bulk, and that the crystal growth rate decreased observably after spraying an ultrathin melting gold (10 nm) at the free surface of the drug. These results indicated that the high growth rates of amorphous drugs crystals at the free surface were the key to their stability and that an ultrathin coating could be applied to enhance the stability of amorphous drugs.

  6. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D' Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  7. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  8. Preparation of Cubic Boron Nitride Coating on WC-Co Substrate by Micro/Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Interlayer%基于微纳米金刚石过渡层的cBN刀具涂层制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐锋; 左敦稳; 张旭辉; 户海峰; 张骋; 王珉

    2013-01-01

    Cubic Boron Nitride(cBN) is a super-hard material, of which hardness is only less than diamond. But it has excellent chemical stability, especially no chemical reaction with ferrous materials. The cBN coating has irreplaceable function in the application of modern cutting tools. Research is carried out on the preparation of cBN coating on YG6 by micro/nanocrystalline diamond (M/NCD) film inter-layer. The micro/nanocrystalline diamond film is deposited in hot filament chemical vapor deposition system and cBN is deposited in radio frequency magnetron sputtering system. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman, atomic force microscopy(AFM), Fourier transferred infrared(FTIR) and in-denter are used to investigate the content, morphology and adhesion of the coating. The results show that the adhesion of cBN coating on WC-Co by micro/nanocrystalline diamond interlayer is much higher than that by nano diamond interlayer. The moderate bias voltage is important for the cBN film deposition in the magnetron sputtering process.%立方氮化硼(Cubic Boron Nitride,cBN)是仅次于金刚石的超硬材料,比金刚石具有更高的化学稳定性,可以胜任铁系金属的加工.本文在YG6硬质合金上基于微纳米金刚石过渡层开展cBN涂层的制备研究.本文在热丝化学气相沉积系统中制备微纳米金刚石过渡层(Micro/nanocrystalline diamond,M/NCD),在射频磁控溅射系统中制备cBN涂层,并对M/NCD与cBN涂层进行了成分、微观形貌与结合性能的研究.研究结果发现,在硬质合金基体上,M/NCD过渡层的结合性能明显优于NCD过渡层.磁控溅射制备cBN涂层过程中,存在适合cBN沉积的衬底偏压阈值,过高或过低的衬底偏压均不利于cBN含量的提高.

  9. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  10. Amorphous drugs and dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, K.; Priemel, P.;

    2013-01-01

    The transformation to an amorphous form is one of the most promising approaches to address the low solubility of drug compounds, the latter being an increasing challenge in the development of new drug candidates. However, amorphous forms are high energy solids and tend to recry stallize. New...... formulation principles are needed to ensure the stability of amorphous drug forms. The formation of solid dispersions is still the most investigated approach, but additional approaches are desirable to overcome the shortcomings of solid dispersions. Spatial separation by either coating or the use of micro......-containers has shown potential to prevent or delay recrystallization. Another recent approach is the formation of co-amorphous mixtures between either two drugs or one drug and one low molecular weight excipient. Molecular interactions between the two molecules provide an energy barrier that has to be overcome...

  11. Brazed boron-silicon carbide/aluminum structural panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W. E., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Brooks, T. G.; Lawson, A. G.; Mitchell, P. D.; Royster, D. M.; Wiant, R.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxless brazing process minimizes degradation of mechanical properties composite material of silicon carbide coated boron fibers in an aluminum matrix. Process is being used to fabricate full-scale Boron-Silicon Carbide/Aluminum-Titanium honeycomb core panels for flight testing and ground testing.

  12. 电沉积非晶态Ni-Fe-P合金屏蔽织物的制备及其表征∗%Preparation and characterization of shielding fabric coated by electrical deposition of amorphous Ni-Fe-P alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓艺; 安振涛; 宣兆龙; 闫军

    2015-01-01

    A flexible shielding fabric with dense uniform coating was prepared after electrical deposition of amor-phous Ni-Fe-P alloy on copper-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET)fabric.The manufacturing process was studied using orthogonal test with 8 factors and 3 levels.Analyzed the components of the plating solution on the influence of the disposition rate and composition of coating.The morphology,composition,and structure of coating were analyzed by SEM,EDS and XRD characterizations.The EMI shielding effectiveness was also test-ed.The results indicate the processing conditions of electrical deposition amorphous Ni-Fe-P alloy coated fabric are:135 g/L NiSO4 ·6H2O,105 g/L FeSO4 ·7H2O,8 g/L NaH2PO2 ·H2O,24 g/L C6H8O6,36 g/L C6H8O7,22 g/L H3PO3,65 ℃,pH=1.5,and current density =13 A/dm2.The results fabric possesses dense,smooth,and uniform coating,which consists of amorphous Ni-Fe-P alloy with 18.67wt% P.The EMI shielding effectiveness of this coated fabric achieves 60.82-73.63 dB in a broad frequency range between 300 kHz-1 .5 GHz.%在已镀铜涤纶织物表面采用电镀技术制备了一种非晶态 Ni-Fe-P 合金屏蔽织物。选用8因素3水平的正交试验对制备工艺进行了探讨研究,分析了电镀液组成对镀层沉积速率及组分的影响,借助SEM、EDS和XRD对镀层表面形貌、成分及结构进行了分析,并测试了合金织物的电磁屏蔽效能。结果表明,制备非晶态 Ni-Fe-P 合金织物的电镀工艺为硫酸镍135 g/L,硫酸亚铁105 g/L,次亚磷酸钠8 g/L,抗坏血酸24 g/L,柠檬酸36 g/L,亚磷酸22 g/L,温度65℃,pH 值=1.5,电流密度13 A/dm2,合金织物表面镀层致密均匀,结晶细致,镀层为非晶态结构的 Ni-Fe-P合金,其中 P 的质量分数为18.67%,在300 kHz~1.5 GHz频率范围内,合金织物电磁屏蔽效能达到了60.82~73.63 dB。

  13. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  14. Dissolution kinetics of calcium phosphate coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, E M; Lucas, L C

    1998-01-01

    Plasma spray and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) techniques produce coatings with varying composition and amounts of amorphous and crystalline phases. For coatings containing greater amorphous phases, a higher release of calcium ions is evident when samples are placed in Hank's calcium-free balanced salt solutions. Calcium is released from the amorphous phases in the coating, a conclusion that is supported by x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) results. Ion beam sputtering and RF magnetron sputtering under lower energy conditions produce amorphous coatings that will dissolve in a very short time period. When heat treated, crystalline phases are produced in the coatings. Heat-treated coatings are significantly more stable than the amorphous coatings. The dissolution rates of both amorphous and crystalline coatings produced by RF magnetron sputtering have been measured under constant solution conditions at pH 6.50. No reprecipitation is possible under these conditions. The amorphous coating dissolved at a significantly higher rate than the heat-treated coating. Reprecipitation of calcium phosphate onto amorphous coatings is possible in a physiological pH solution. Under these conditions, the dissolution rate of the amorphous coating is four times slower than at the pH 6.50 conditions. PMID:10196809

  15. Growth of Boron-Rich Nanowires by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Kleebe

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available B-rich nanowires are grown on Ni coated oxidized Si(111 substrate using diborane as the gas precursor in a CVD process at 20 torr and 900C∘. These nanowires have diameters around 20–100 nanometers and lengths up to microns. Icosahedron B12 is shown to be the basic building unit forming the amorphous B-rich nanowires as characterized by EDAX, XRD, XPS, and Raman spectroscopies. The gas chemistry at low [B2H6]/ [N2] ratio is monitored by the in situ mass spectroscopy, which identified N2 as an inert carrier gas leading to formation of the B-rich compounds. A nucleation controlled growth mechanism is proposed to explain the rugged nanowire growth of boron. The role of the Ni catalyst in the synthesis of the B-rich nanostructures is also discussed.

  16. Effects of temperature and holding time on bonding W and W–Cu composites with an amorphous W–Fe coated copper foil as the interlayer by hot-pressing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Pei [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Wang, Song [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100840 (China); Guo, Shibin; Chen, Yixiang [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Ling, Yunhan [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100840 (China); Li, Jiangtao, E-mail: ljt0012@vip.sina.com [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-07-15

    W and W–Cu composites were bonded with an amorphous W–Fe coated copper foil as the interlayer at different temperature and holding time by hot pressing method. Effects of the bonding temperature and holding time on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of the bonded specimens were investigated. The thermal conductivity of the bonded sample increased with the bonding temperature and reached the maximum at 1000 °C, but essentially unchanged with the holding time. Because at 1000 °C more W–Fe compounds would be formed at the interlayer, which were helpful for tight bonding of W and W–Cu composites, and the grain size was larger which could reduce thermal resistance. The W–Cu FGM bonded by this method showed good resistance to thermal load, and performed well when facing to short pulse plasma in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (the first full superconductive fusion device in the world)

  17. Effects of temperature and holding time on bonding W and W–Cu composites with an amorphous W–Fe coated copper foil as the interlayer by hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W and W–Cu composites were bonded with an amorphous W–Fe coated copper foil as the interlayer at different temperature and holding time by hot pressing method. Effects of the bonding temperature and holding time on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of the bonded specimens were investigated. The thermal conductivity of the bonded sample increased with the bonding temperature and reached the maximum at 1000 °C, but essentially unchanged with the holding time. Because at 1000 °C more W–Fe compounds would be formed at the interlayer, which were helpful for tight bonding of W and W–Cu composites, and the grain size was larger which could reduce thermal resistance. The W–Cu FGM bonded by this method showed good resistance to thermal load, and performed well when facing to short pulse plasma in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (the first full superconductive fusion device in the world)

  18. Effects of temperature and holding time on bonding W and W-Cu composites with an amorphous W-Fe coated copper foil as the interlayer by hot-pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pei; Wang, Song; Guo, Shibin; Chen, Yixiang; Ling, Yunhan; Li, Jiangtao

    2013-07-01

    W and W-Cu composites were bonded with an amorphous W-Fe coated copper foil as the interlayer at different temperature and holding time by hot pressing method. Effects of the bonding temperature and holding time on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of the bonded specimens were investigated. The thermal conductivity of the bonded sample increased with the bonding temperature and reached the maximum at 1000 °C, but essentially unchanged with the holding time. Because at 1000 °C more W-Fe compounds would be formed at the interlayer, which were helpful for tight bonding of W and W-Cu composites, and the grain size was larger which could reduce thermal resistance. The W-Cu FGM bonded by this method showed good resistance to thermal load, and performed well when facing to short pulse plasma in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (the first full superconductive fusion device in the world).

  19. Behavior of Disordered Boron Carbide under Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W.; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-01

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6GPa≈P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2 3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  20. A system to deposit boron films (boronization) in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system has been added to the D3-D tokamak to coat its plasma facing surfaces with a film of boron using diborane gas. The system includes special health and safety equipment for handling the diborane gas which is toxic and inflammable. The purpose of the boron film is to reduce the levels of impurity atoms in the D3-D plasmas. Experiments following the application of the boron film in D3-D have led to significant reductions in plasma impurity levels and the observation of a new, very high confinement regime. 9 refs., 1 fig

  1. Elementary boron and metal-boron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elementary boron is of interest for its peculiar and difficult bonding behaviour in solids. Due to its high oxygen affinity we find no elementary boron in nature. For the same reason it is difficult to isolate pure, elementary boron, and much confusion about 'boron crystals' has been the result of more than 100 years of research. The polymorphic forms of elementary boron and its closely related higher carbides and higher metal borides as well as the simple metal borides, B3C and BN are reported. The quantum-mechanical background responsible for structure and stoichiometry of these crystals is given. (orig.)

  2. Effect of Rare Earth Metals on Structure and Properties of Electroless Co-B Alloy Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣天鹏; 张雷; 黄秋华

    2002-01-01

    The effect of rare earth metals cerium, lanthanum and yttrium on chemical composition, structure and properties of electroless Co-B alloy coating was studied. By plasma transmitting spectrograph, electron energy spectrometer, X-ray diffractometter, micro-hardometer and vibratory sample magnetometer the chemical constitution, structure and properties of the alloy coatings were analyzed and inspected. The results show that with a tiny quantity of rare earth metal added into Co-B alloy coating, the content of boron is decreased in the alloy coatings, and the kinds of rare earth metal have enormous effect on the structure and properties of electroless Co-B alloy coating. At the same time electroless Co-B alloy with amorphous structure is transformed to electroless Co-B-RE alloy with microcrystalline or crystalline structure. In this way microhardness of the coatings is increased remarkably. Cerium and lanthanum would also increase the saturated magnetic intensity and decrease coercitive force of the coating. So soft magnetization of the coatings would be improved.

  3. Effect of pre-treatment of the substrate surface by energetic C+ ion bombardment on structure and nano-tribological characteristics of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rismani, E.; Sinha, S. K.; Tripathy, S.; Yang, H.; Bhatia, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    Depositing an ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coating on the surface of the recording heads in magnetic tape drives can improve the tribological problems at the head/tape interface. In this work the effect of pre-treatment of the surface of AlTiC substrate (main bearing surface of head in contact with tape) by C+ ions of moderate energy (smaller than 400 eV) on the structural and tribo-mechanical behaviours of the coated surfaces is studied. Sample preparation consisted of two separate stages of surface pre-treatment and deposition of the protective film, and was done by means of filtered cathodic vacuum arc. Structure of the ta-C film and its interface with the substrate were studied by transmission electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. The results revealed the formation of a broader, dense atomically mixed layer at the ta-C film-substrate interface of the pre-treated samples comparing with that of the samples without pre-treatment. Chemical characterization of thin diamond-like carbon coatings was conducted by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface pre-treatment was found to have a remarkable effect on increasing the sp3 hybridization fraction in the ta-C overcoat. Nano-tribological properties of the treated surfaces were examined using ball-on-flat wear test at very low load (20 mN). There was a good correlation between the surface and structure characteristics of the film, and the tribological results and the pre-treated surfaces presented a very low coefficient of friction and higher wear life. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of bombardment of the surface with C+ ions of moderate ion energy to improve the structural and tribo-mechanical properties of the protective ta-C films on the magnetic head substrate material.

  4. Effect of pre-treatment of the substrate surface by energetic C+ ion bombardment on structure and nano-tribological characteristics of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depositing an ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coating on the surface of the recording heads in magnetic tape drives can improve the tribological problems at the head/tape interface. In this work the effect of pre-treatment of the surface of AlTiC substrate (main bearing surface of head in contact with tape) by C+ ions of moderate energy (smaller than 400 eV) on the structural and tribo-mechanical behaviours of the coated surfaces is studied. Sample preparation consisted of two separate stages of surface pre-treatment and deposition of the protective film, and was done by means of filtered cathodic vacuum arc. Structure of the ta-C film and its interface with the substrate were studied by transmission electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. The results revealed the formation of a broader, dense atomically mixed layer at the ta-C film-substrate interface of the pre-treated samples comparing with that of the samples without pre-treatment. Chemical characterization of thin diamond-like carbon coatings was conducted by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface pre-treatment was found to have a remarkable effect on increasing the sp3 hybridization fraction in the ta-C overcoat. Nano-tribological properties of the treated surfaces were examined using ball-on-flat wear test at very low load (20 mN). There was a good correlation between the surface and structure characteristics of the film, and the tribological results and the pre-treated surfaces presented a very low coefficient of friction and higher wear life. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of bombardment of the surface with C+ ions of moderate ion energy to improve the structural and tribo-mechanical properties of the protective ta-C films on the magnetic head substrate material.

  5. Effect of pre-treatment of the substrate surface by energetic C{sup +} ion bombardment on structure and nano-tribological characteristics of ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rismani, E; Sinha, S K [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Block EA, 07-08, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Tripathy, S [Institute of Material Research and Engineering (IMRE), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore); Yang, H; Bhatia, C S, E-mail: elebcs@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Block E4, Level 5, Room 45, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2011-03-23

    Depositing an ultra-thin tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) protective coating on the surface of the recording heads in magnetic tape drives can improve the tribological problems at the head/tape interface. In this work the effect of pre-treatment of the surface of AlTiC substrate (main bearing surface of head in contact with tape) by C{sup +} ions of moderate energy (smaller than 400 eV) on the structural and tribo-mechanical behaviours of the coated surfaces is studied. Sample preparation consisted of two separate stages of surface pre-treatment and deposition of the protective film, and was done by means of filtered cathodic vacuum arc. Structure of the ta-C film and its interface with the substrate were studied by transmission electron microscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiling. The results revealed the formation of a broader, dense atomically mixed layer at the ta-C film-substrate interface of the pre-treated samples comparing with that of the samples without pre-treatment. Chemical characterization of thin diamond-like carbon coatings was conducted by means of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface pre-treatment was found to have a remarkable effect on increasing the sp{sup 3} hybridization fraction in the ta-C overcoat. Nano-tribological properties of the treated surfaces were examined using ball-on-flat wear test at very low load (20 mN). There was a good correlation between the surface and structure characteristics of the film, and the tribological results and the pre-treated surfaces presented a very low coefficient of friction and higher wear life. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of bombardment of the surface with C{sup +} ions of moderate ion energy to improve the structural and tribo-mechanical properties of the protective ta-C films on the magnetic head substrate material.

  6. First gaseous boronization during pulsed discharge cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J., E-mail: jinseok@nfri.re.kr [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Den Hartog, D.J.; Goetz, J.A.; Weix, P.J.; Limbach, S.T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-01-15

    The first successful gaseous boronization during a pulsed discharge is reported. Sublimation of o-carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) combined with pulsed discharge plasmas with a repetition rate of 1 Hz is used to produce a hard boron-containing coating for reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with Ar ion beam etching for silicon coupons installed at the plasma boundary shows about 60% boron concentration in the deposited layer. Both profilometer and scanning electron microscope analyses of the silicon coupons imply a strong toroidally non-uniform deposition depending on the location of the o-carborane injection. The layer thickness ranges from 50 to 300 nm. Ellipsometry calibrated with the profilometer results yields a refractive index of 2.2-2.3 for the films. The high refractive index implies that the coating is hard and has a well-ordered morphology. A reduction in wall recycling has consistently been observed after all boronization sessions. Comparison of the X-ray spectra in standard RFP plasmas before and after boronization indicates a slight decrease in the effective ionic charge.

  7. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Studies of the magnetostriction of as-prepared and annealed glass-coated Co-rich amorphous microwires by SAMR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, V.; Blanco, J. M.; Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J.

    2001-11-01

    The saturation magnetostriction constant, λs, of as-prepared and current annealed glass-covered Co57Fe6.1Ni10B15.9Si11, Co67.5Fe4Ni1.5B14Si12Mo1, Co69.1Fe5.2Ni1B14.8Si9.9 and Co69.5Fe3.9Ni1B12.8Si10.8Mo2 amorphous microwires has been measured by the small angle magnetization rotation method. As-prepared samples exhibit negative λs ranging between -0.9×10-6 and -0.3×10-6. Current annealing results in a significant change of λs, that is, a general tendency to increase towards zero.

  8. Engineering and Scaling the Spontaneous Magnetization Reversal of Faraday Induced Magnetic Relaxation in Nano-Sized Amorphous Ni Coated on Crystalline Au

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsien Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on the generation of large inverse remanent magnetizations in nano-sized core/shell structure of Au/Ni by turning off the applied magnetic field. The remanent magnetization is very sensitive to the field reduction rate as well as to the thermal and field processes before the switching off of the magnetic field. Spontaneous reversal in direction and increase in magnitude of the remanent magnetization in subsequent relaxations over time were found. All of the various types of temporal relaxation curves of the remanent magnetizations are successfully scaled by a stretched exponential decay profile, characterized by two pairs of relaxation times and dynamic exponents. The relaxation time is used to describe the reduction rate, while the dynamic exponent describes the dynamical slowing down of the relaxation through time evolution. The key to these effects is to have the induced eddy current running beneath the amorphous Ni shells through Faraday induction.

  9. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, J.; Lee, C.(Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan); Farmer, J.; Day, D.; Wall, M.; Saw, C.; Boussoufi, M.; Liu, H.B.; Egbert, H.; Branagan, D.; D'Amato, A.

    2006-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials (235U, 239Pu, 241Pu, etc.). To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, BoralTM, MetamicTM, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion- Resistant Material (HPCRM)1 can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance...

  10. Structural evolution, thermomechanical recrystallization and electrochemical corrosion properties of Ni-Cu-Mg amorphous coating on mild steel fabricated by dual-anode electrolytic processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulwahab, M.; Fayomi, O. S. I.; Popoola, A. P. I.

    2016-07-01

    The electrolytic Ni-Cu based alloy coating with admixed interfacial blend of Mg have been successfully prepared on mild steel substrate by dual anode electroplating processes over a range of applied current density and dwell time. The electrocodeposition of Ni-Cu-Mg coating was investigated in the presence of other bath additives. The influence of deposition current on surface morphology, adhesion behavior, preferred crystal orientation, surface topography and electrochemical activity of Ni-Cu-Mg alloy coating on mild steel were systematically examined. The thermal stability of the developed composite materials was examined via isothermal treatment. Scanning electron microscope equipped with EDS, X-ray diffraction, Atomic force microscope, micro-hardness tester and 3 μmetrohm Potentiostat/galvanostat were used to compare untreated and isothermally treated electrocodeposited composite. The induced activity of the Ni-Cu-Mg alloy changed the surface modification and results to crystal precipitation within the structural interface by the formation of Cu, Ni2Mg3 phase. The obtained results showed that the introduction of Mg particles in the plating bath generally modified the surface and brings an increase in the hardness and corrosion resistance of Ni-Cu-Mg layers fabricated. Equally, isothermally treated composites demonstrated an improved properties indicating 45% increase in the micro-hardness and 79.6% corrosion resistance which further showed that the developed composite is thermally stable.

  11. Adsorption characteristics of arsenic and boron by soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to obtain baseline data concerning the surface and ground water pollution caused by coal ash disposal, adsorption characteristics of arsenic (III) and boron by soil have been studied through laboratory experiments. The main results are as follows: (1) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil was strongly dependent on pH with adsorption maxima at pH 8 and 8-9, respectively. (2) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil over the entire concentration ranges investigated could be described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm, respectively. The Henry adsorption isotherm was also applicable over the lower concentration ranges of arsenic (III) and boron (As (III): < 0.1 deltag/ml; B: < 5deltag/ml.) (3) Arsenic (III) and boron adsorption on soil is controlled mainly by the contents of extractable Fe oxide and hydroxide for arsenic (III) and by the contents of extractable Al hydroxide and allophane (amorphous aluminium silicates) for boron. (4) Adsorption and movement of arsenic (III) and boron during the infiltration of coal ash leachate in soil layer were investigated by means of the unsteady-state, one-dimensional convective-diffusive mass transport model. This model is very useful for evaluation and prediction of the contamination of ground water by trace elements such as arsenic (III) and boron leached at coal ash disposal site.

  12. CVD of refractory amorphous metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a novel process is described for the fabrication of multi-metallic amorphous metal alloy coatings using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. Of special interest in this work are amorphous metal alloys containing Mo and/or Cr which have high crystallization temperatures and readily available low decomposition temperature metal-bearing precursors. The conditions for amorphous alloy formation via CVD are described as well as the chemical properties of these materials. High temperature, aqueous corrosion tests have shown these materials (especially those containing Cr) are among the most corrosion resistant metal alloys known

  13. Carbon coating on the wall of nuclear fusion devices and plasma-surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma-assisted carbon-film coating of the inner walls of nuclear fusion devices, which is a new technical trend, is reviewed in view of plasma-surface interactions. A great advantage of the easiness for both wide-area and repeated coatings is due to the so-called in situ coating of the walls compared with the precoating. The amorphous carbon films produced by this in situ plasma coating contain ordinarily a large number of H atoms (H/C = 0.4∼0.6), which lead to recycling of a large amount of hydrogen (release and implantation of H atoms) in nuclear fusion discharges. This demerit of the plasma method can be covered by reducing the H content in the films under suitable coating conditions, and also by conditioning the film surface with a helium glow discharge. A simple model for the interaction between a-C : H film and hydrogen plasma is proposed. Further, another low-Z material coating, that is in situ boron coating, is briefly discussed. (author)

  14. Cyclic formation of boron suboxide crystallites into star-shaped nanoplates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Star-shaped boron suboxide (B6O) nanoplates were formed through a liquid-phase reaction of amorphous boron and boron oxide. The formation of the five-vertex B6O crystal is attributed to the oxygen-deficient state of B6Ox, where x < 1, which correlates to the lattice parameters. The mechanical properties of spark plasma sintered B6O show a hardness of 34.8 GPa and a fracture toughness of 4.0 MPa.m1/2. The understanding of the relationship between crystal atomic structure and crystal morphology could be employed in the design of other boron-rich compounds

  15. Reactive sputter deposition of boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of fully dense, boron targets for use in planar magnetron sources has lead to the synthesis of Boron Nitride (BN) films by reactive rf sputtering. The deposition parameters of gas pressure, flow and composition are varied along with substrate temperature and applied bias. The films are characterized for composition using Auger electron spectroscopy, for chemical bonding using Raman spectroscopy and for crystalline structure using transmission electron microscopy. The deposition conditions are established which lead to the growth of crystalline BN phases. In particular, the growth of an adherent cubic BN coating requires 400--500 C substrate heating and an applied -300 V dc bias

  16. Sputtering behavior of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputtering yields of boron were measured with D+ and B+ ions for normal and oblique angles of incidence. Self-sputtering data of boron carbide were simulated in the experiment by using Ne+ ions. The energies of the impinging ions were between 20 eV and 10 keV. The measured data are compared with computer simulated values calculated with the TRIMSP program. The boron data for normal ion impact are higher than the calculated values, whereas those for oblique ion incidence are smaller than the calculation predicts. This discrepancy is explained by the surface roughness and supported by SEM micrographs. The comparison of the boron carbide data with TRIMSP calculations shows much better agreement than the boron data. In this case the target surface was much smoother. (orig.)

  17. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 oC according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 1012-101'3 cm-3. For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind of plasma. Diborane dissociation

  18. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  19. Thin boron nitride nanotubes formed during annealing in ammonia gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We present a mechano-thermal process to synthesis thin boron nitride nanotubes of diameter around 7 nanometers. They were produced by mechanical milling of amorphous boron powder at ambient temperature, followed by thermal annealing in ammonia gas. High energy ball milling creates a precursor containing a high density of nanocrystalline BN seeds and fine particles of metal catalyst. Nanotubes grow out from the milled boron powder during subsequent annealing. The novelty of this approach lies in the formation of the thin BN nanotubes by annealing in ammonia gas instead of nitrogen gas. The boron nitride nanotubes produced have a well-defined crystalline structure and there is no iron within them. If nitrogen gas is used, thicker nanotubes of diameter in the range of 20-100 nm were obtained and iron was more likely to be found inside the nanotubes. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  20. Mass spectrometric determination of boron isotope in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron isotopes in boron carbide are measured by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. Boron is converted to sodium borate by fusion of the boron carbide with sodium hydroxide (or sodium carbonate) directly on the rhenium filament. The boron isotopic ratios are measured by using the Na2BO2+ ion

  1. Boron-lined proportional counters with improved neutron sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Dighe, P M; Prasad, K R; Kataria, S K; Athavale, S N; Pappachan, A L; Grover, A K

    2003-01-01

    Boron-lined proportional counters with higher neutron sensitivity have been developed by introducing baffle structures within the sensitive volume. the results are compared to devices developed with multiple cathode assemblies in a single enclosure. in either case, the increase in the boron-coated surface area results in higher neutron sensitivity. one of these counters has 51 annular baffles coated with natural boron with 10 mm hole for the anode wire to pass through. filled with p-10 gas at 20 cm hg, it has an overall diameter of 30 and 300 mm length. multiple dip coating method was employed for better uniformity in boron thickness. the neutron sensitivity of this counter is 1.6 cps/nv, which is 2.5 times that of a counter with standard electrode geometry. another counter was developed with three cathode assemblies (30 mm IDx300 mm) coated with 92% sup 1 sup 0 B while the third has seven assemblies coated with natural boron (16 mm IDx750 mm length). the neutron sensitivity is 10 and 5.5 cps/nv, respectively...

  2. Thermal properties of boron and borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of point defects on the thermal conductivity of polycrystalline β-B has been measured from 1 to 1000 K. Above 300 K, samples containing 2 at. % Hf and Zr have thermal conductivities close to that of amorphous boron, indicating very strong phonon scattering. A thermal conductivity of equal magnitude has also been measured near and below room temperature for nearly stoichiometric single crystals of the theoretical composition YB68. On the basis of a comparison with earlier measurements to temperatures as low as 0.1 K, it is concluded that the thermal conductivity of crystalline YB68 is indeed very similar, if not identical, to that expected for amorphous boron over the entire temperature range of measurement (0.1--300 K). Measurements of the specific heat of nearly stoichiometric YB68 between 1.5 and 30 K also reveal a linear-specific-heat anomaly of the same magnitude as is characteristic for amorphous solids, in fair agreement with earlier measurements by Bilir et al. It is concluded that the lattice vibrations of crystalline YB68 are glasslike

  3. Cubic boron nitride- a new material for ultracold neutron application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, the Fermi potential of cubic boron nitride (cBN) was measured at the ultra cold neutron source at the TRIGA reactor, Mainz using the time of flight method (TOF). The investigated samples have a Fermi potential of about 300 neV. Because of its good dielectric characteristics, cubic boron nitride could be used as suitable coating for insulator in storage chambers of future EDM projects. This talk presents recent results and an outlook on further investigations.

  4. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  5. Microstructural Characterization and Properties Evaluation of Ni-Based Hardfaced Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by High Velocity Oxyfuel Coating Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2013-01-01

    The present study concerns a detailed investigation of microstructural evolution of nickel based hardfaced coating on AISI 304 stainless steel by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) deposition technique. The work has also been extended to study the effect of coating on microhardness, wear resistance and corrosion resistance of the surface. Deposition has been conducted on sand blasted AISI 304 stainless steel by HVOF spraying technique using nickel (Ni)-based alloy [Ni: 68.4 wt pct, chromium (Cr): 17 wt pct, boron (B): 3.9 wt pct, silicon (Si): 4.9 wt pct and iron (Fe): 5.8 wt pct] of particle size 45 to 60 μm as precursor powder. Under the optimum process parameters, deposition leads to development of nano-borides (of chromium, Cr2B and nickel, Ni3B) dispersion in metastable and partly amorphous gamma nickel (γ-Ni) matrix. The microhardness of the coating was significantly enhanced to 935 VHN as compared to 215 VHN of as-received substrate due to dispersion of nano-borides in grain refined and partly amorphous nickel matrix. Wear resistance property under fretting wear condition against WC indenter was improved in as-deposited layer (wear rate of 4.65 × 10-7 mm3/mm) as compared to as-received substrate (wear rate of 20.81 × 10-7 mm3/mm). The corrosion resistance property in a 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution was also improved.

  6. Initial results and long-term clinical follow-up of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon-carbide-coated stent in daily practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanekamp, Clara EE; Bonnier, Hans JRM; Michels, Rolf H; Peels, Kathinka H; Heijmen, Eric PCM; Hagen Ev, Eduard van; Koolen, Jacques J

    1998-01-01

    The hemocompatibility and biocompatibility of a stent are determined by the physical and electrochemical properties of the stent surface. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, safety and efficacy of implantation of a stent coated with silicon carbide. Baseline characteristics were collected prospectively. The occurrence of cardiac adverse events and the angina score were assessed at clinical follow-up. A total of 193 Tensum stents were implanted in 174 patients. In hospital, one patient experienced stent thrombosis and in 6% of the patients a creatinine kinase elevation to 240 U/l or more occurred. Long-term follow-up was performed in 172 patients, with a mean follow-up of 454 +/- 181 days. Ninety-seven per cent were still alive, 15% had undergone target-vessel revascularization, and 2% had angiographic restenosis and were treated with medication only. Seventy-one per cent of the patients were free of anginal complaints, and 20% had anginal complaints in Canadian Cardiac Society class I or II. The Tensum coronary stent showed to be a safe and efficacious device in this study, with a high primary success rate and favorable long-term clinical followup. PMID:12623396

  7. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  8. Superior critical current density obtained in MgB2 bulks through low-cost carbon-encapsulated boron powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unavailability of high quality precursor is encouraging researchers to seek effective ways to fabricate magnesium diboride (MgB2) wire. Herein, cost-effective amorphous boron powder produced through a diborane (B2H6) gas process is investigated for the possibility of further industrial application. A thin carbon layer to encapsulate the boron particles is simultaneously deposited by pyrolysis of hydrocarbon. We found that the carbon-encapsulated amorphous boron has a high upper critical field due to impurity scattering, and thereby, enhanced high-field critical current density

  9. Low-temperature approach to synthesize iron nitride from amorphous iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yi; Wang, Huamin; Zhang, Minghui; Su, Ming; Li, Wei; Tao, Keyi

    2008-02-18

    Iron nitride was prepared by a nitridation reaction in NH 3 using amorphous iron as precursor. The precursor was prepared at ambient temperature through the process of reducing ferrous sulfate by potassium borohydride, followed by the nitridation at different temperatures. The nitridation reaction occurred at 548 K, and -Fe 2-3N was formed at 573 K. The reaction temperature was much lower than that using crystallized iron because of the characteristics of the amorphous materials. The existence of a small quantity of boron (1.6 wt.%) improved the stability of the amorphous precursor, which guaranteed an amorphous iron precursor at nitriding temperatures in excess of 548 K. PMID:18198828

  10. Magnetron sputtering synthesis of large area well-ordered boron nanowire arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO; Limin; ZHANG; Ze; WANG; Wenkui

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensionally nanostructured materials, such as nanowires and nanotubes, are the smallest dimensional structures for efficient transport of electrons and excitons, and are therefore critical building blocks for nanoscale electronic and mechanical devices. In this paper, boron nanowires with uniform diameters from 20 to 80nm were synthesized by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering of pure boron powder and B2O3 powder mixtures in argon atmosphere. The boron nanowires produced stand vertically on the substrate surface to form well-ordered arrays over large areas with selforganized arrangements without involvement of any template and patterned catalyst. The high-density boron nanowires are parallel to each other and well distributed, forming highly ordered and uniform arrays. A more interesting and unique feature of the boron nanowires is that most of their tips are flat rather than hemispherical in morphologies.Detailed studies on its structure and composition indicate that boron nanowires are amorphous. Boron nanowire appears as a new member in the family of one-dimensional nanostructures. Considering the unique properties of boron-rich solids and other nanostructures, it is reasonable to expect that the boron nanowires will display some exceptional and interesting properties. A vapor-cluster-solid (VCS) mechanism was proposed to explain the growth of boron nanowires based on our experimental observations.

  11. Electron-phonon interaction in boron-doped silicon nanocrystals: effect of Fano interference on combined light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arrays of the silicon nanocrystals in the boron-doped amorphous silicon films are studied by the method of the light combined scattering spectroscopy. The nanocrystals were formed in the initial amorphous films under the pulse effect of the excimer laser. The effects of the electron-phonon interaction were experimentally identified in the silicon nanocrystal/amorphous matrix heterostructure. These effects may be described within the frames of the known Fano interference model

  12. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS CVD SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Hirose, M.

    1981-01-01

    Amorphous silicon produced from the chemical vapor decomposition of silane at ~600 °C offers a pure silicon network containing no bonded-hydrogen and involving native defects of the order of 1 x 1019 cm-3. Doped phosphorus or boron atoms in the CVD a-Si interact with the defects to reduce the gap states and the spin density as well. The mechanism of the defect compensation has been interpreted in terms of complex-defect formation through the reaction between three-fold dopant atoms and divaca...

  13. Electrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 90oCElectrochemical Studies of Passive Film Stability on Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4 Amorphous Metal in Seawater at 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J; Day, S D; Lian, T; Saw, C K; Hailey, P D; Choi, J S; Rebak, R B; Yang, N; Payer, J H; Perepezko, J H; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Branagan, D J; Buffa, E J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-04-25

    An iron-based amorphous metal, Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} (SAM2X5), with very good corrosion resistance was developed. This material was prepared as a melt-spun ribbon, as well as gas atomized powder and a thermal-spray coating. During electrochemical testing in several environments, including seawater at 90 C, the passive film stability was found to be comparable to that of high-performance nickel-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. This material also performed very well in standard salt fog tests. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provided corrosion resistance, and boron (B) enabled glass formation. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. This material and its parent alloy maintained corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature, and remained in the amorphous state during exposure to relatively high neutron doses.

  14. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; Day, S D; Lian, T; Aprigliano, L F; Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C

    2007-02-18

    Iron-based amorphous alloys possess enhanced hardness and are highly resistant to corrosion, which make them desirable for wear applications in corrosive environments. It was of interest to examine the behavior of amorphous alloys during anodic polarization in concentrated salt solutions and in the salt-fog testing. Results from the testing of one amorphous material (SAM2X5) both in ribbon form and as an applied coating are reported here. Cyclic polarization tests were performed on SAM2X5 ribbon as well as on other nuclear engineering materials. SAM2X5 showed the highest resistance to localized corrosion in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} solution at 105 C. Salt fog tests of 316L SS and Alloy 22 coupons coated with amorphous SAM2X5 powder showed resistance to rusting. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated pinpoint rust spots in some coatings.

  15. Improved electrochemical performance of boron-doped SiO negative electrode materials in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jihoon; Baek, Seong-Ho; Park, Jung-Soo; Jeong, Young-Min; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a one-step process that consists of thermal disproportionation and impurity doping to enhance the reversible capacity and electrical conductivity of silicon monoxide (SiO)-based negative electrode materials in Li-ion batteries. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) results reveal that thermally treated SiO at 900 °C (H-SiO) consists of uniformly dispersed nano-crystalline Si (nc-Si) in an amorphous silicon oxide (SiOx) matrix. Compared to that of prinstine SiO, the electrochemical performance of H-SiO shows improved specific capacity, due mainly to the increased reversible capacity by nc-Si and to the reduced volume expansion by thermally disproportionated SiOx matrix. Further electrochemical improvements can be obtained by boron-doping on SiO (HB-SiO) using solution dopant during thermal disproportionation. HB-SiO electrode without carbon coating exhibits significantly enhanced specific capacity superior to that of undoped H-SiO electrode, having 947 mAh g-1 at 0.5C rate and excellent capacity retention of 93.3% over 100 cycles. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement reveals that the internal resistance of the HB-SiO electrode is significantly reduced by boron doping.

  16. Determination of boron and silicon in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sodium carbonate fusion technique for the dissolution of boron carbide followed by the determination of boron by alkalimetric titration and silicon impurity by spectrophotometry is described. The elemental boron content in the commercially available boron carbide ranged from 77.2 to 77.60 % and the silicon in the range 1170 to 2500 ppm. (author)

  17. Optimization of operational parameters and bath control for electrodeposion of Ni-Mo-B amorphous alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Marinho Fabiano A.; Santana François S. M.; Vasconcelos André L. S.; Santana Renato A. C.; Prasad Shiva

    2002-01-01

    Optimization of operational parameters of an electrodeposition process for deposition of boron-containing amorphous metallic layer of nickel-molybdenum alloy onto a cathode from an electrolytic bath having nickel sulfate, sodium molybdate, boron phosphate, sodium citrate, sodium-1-dodecylsulfate and ammonia for pH adjustments to 9.5 has been studied. Detailed studies of the efects on bath temperature, mechanical agitation, cathode current density and anode format have led to optimum operation...

  18. Magnetic Compton scattering study of the ferromagnetic amorphous alloys Fe1-xBx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron contribution to the total spin moment in the amorphous alloys Fe1-xBx (x=0.2,0.24) has been determined using magnetic Compton scattering. The magnitude of the induced boron moment was found to be ∼-0.04μB per formula unit which is a factor of ∼2 less than that suggested by supercell linearized muffin-tin orbital electronic structure calculations

  19. Optical multilayer films based on an amorphous fluoropolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilayered coatings were made by physical vapor deposition (PVD) of a perfluorinated amorphous polymer, Teflon AF2400, and with other optical materials. A high reflector for 1064 nm light was made with ZnS and AF2400. An all-organic 1064 nm reflector was made from AF2400 and polyethylene. Oxide (HfO2 and SiO2) compatibility with AF2400 was also tested. The multilayer morphologies were influenced by coating stress and unintentional temperature rises from the PVD process. Analysis by liquid nuclear magnetic resonance of the thin films showed slight compositional variations between the coating and starting materials of perfluorinated amorphous polymers

  20. Thermal coatings for titanium-aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnington, George R.; Clark, Ronald K.; Robinson, John C.

    1993-01-01

    Titanium aluminides and titanium alloys are candidate materials for use in hot structure and heat-shield components of hypersonic vehicles because of their good strength-to-weight characteristics at elevated temperature. However, in order to utilize their maximum temperature capability, they must be coated to resist oxidation and to have a high total remittance. Also, surface catalysis for recombination of dissociated species in the aerodynamic boundary layer must be minimized. Very thin chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coatings are attractive candidates for this application because of durability and very light weight. To demonstrate this concept, coatings of boron-silicon and aluminum-boron-silicon compositions were applied to the titanium-aluminides alpha2 (Ti-14Al-21Nb), super-alpha2 (Ti-14Al-23-Nb-2V), and gamma (Ti-33Al-6Nb-1Ta) and to the titanium alloy beta-21S (Ti-15Mo-3Al-3Nb-0.2Si). Coated specimens of each alloy were subjected to a set of simulated hypersonic vehicle environmental tests to determine their properties of oxidation resistance, surface catalysis, radiative emittance, and thermal shock resistance. Surface catalysis results should be viewed as relative performance only of the several coating-alloy combinations tested under the specific environmental conditions of the LaRC Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System (HYMETS) arc-plasma-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. Tests were also conducted to evaluate the hydrogen transport properties of the coatings and any effects of the coating processing itself on fatigue life of the base alloys. Results are presented for three types of coatings, which are as follows: (1) a single layer boron silicon coating, (2) a single layer aluminum-boron-silicon coating, and (3) a multilayer coating consisting of an aluminum-boron-silicon sublayer with a boron-silicon outer layer.

  1. Synthesis of one-dimensional boron-related nanostructures by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li

    in the submicron range were used to synthesize aligned BNNTs. Fine BN nanostructures with a diameter around 10-20 nm and length up to 10 microns were grown and dispersed in the Ni dots. Nanosized Ni dots were suggested for the growth of the vertically aligned BNNTs. Boron nanowires (BNWs) were also grown by the decomposition of diborane using a thermal CVD process at a temperature of 900°C, a pressure of 20 torr, diborane flow rate (5 vol.% in hydrogen) of 5 sccm, and nitrogen flow rate of 55 sccm. These BNWs had diameters in a range of 20-200 nanometers and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. Repeatable Raman spectra indicated icosahedra B12 to be the basic building units forming the B nanowires. Amorphous BNWs with rough surface were obtained without any catalysts on different substrates, such as Si wafer or ZrB2 powders. A vapor-solid (VS) growth was proposed for the amorphous BNWs, in which the solid phase precipitated directly from the vapor phase reactions. The amorphous BNWs were modified for size and composition using a plasma CVD process containing argon, ammonia and hydrogen. The diameters of these BNWs were reduced from 200 nm to several tens of nanometers, and a small amount of N was incorporated into BNWs after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, the metal catalyst proved to be effective for the growth of crystalline BNWs. Tetragonal BNWs with smooth surface were grown on thin Ni film (1 nm) coated Si substrates. Ni attachment was observed at the tip of the BNW for the first time, which indicated that the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism can be used for synthesis of the BNW. The diameters of these BNWs were strongly dependent on the size of the metal particles encapsulated in the BNWs. In summary, two boron-related nanostructures were synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in this work. A new method was successfully developed to decrease the substrate temperature more than 400°C to fabricate boron nitride nanotubes in a

  2. Growth of atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films by diffusion through a metal film and precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomically thin hexagonal boron nitride films were grown on both the top and bottom surfaces of a polycrystalline Co or Ni film by annealing a Co (Ni)/amorphous boron nitride/SiO2 structure in vacuum. This method of growing hexagonal boron nitride is much simpler than other methods, such as thermal chemical vapour deposition. B and N atoms diffuse through the metal film, although N is almost completely insoluble in both Co and Ni, and precipitation occurs at the topmost surface. The mass transport is considered to be caused by grain boundary diffusion.

  3. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    mechanistic difference in the processes of shock compression between the LANL data and that of the other studies is the markedly larger inelastic deformation and dissipation experienced in the shock event brought about by compaction of the substantially larger porosity LANL test ceramics. High-pressure diamond anvil cell experiments reveal extensive amorphization, reasoned to be a reversion product of a higher-pressure crystallographic phase, which is a consequence of application of both high pressure and shear deformation to the boron carbide crystal structure. A dependence of shock-induced high-pressure phase transformation in boron carbide on the extent of shear deformation experienced in the shock process offers a plausible explanation for the differences observed in the LANL Hugoniot data on porous ceramic and that of other shock data on near-full-density boron carbide

  4. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, Dennis E. [Applied Research Associates, Southwest Division, 4300 San Mateo Blvd NE, A-220, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-129 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    mechanistic difference in the processes of shock compression between the LANL data and that of the other studies is the markedly larger inelastic deformation and dissipation experienced in the shock event brought about by compaction of the substantially larger porosity LANL test ceramics. High-pressure diamond anvil cell experiments reveal extensive amorphization, reasoned to be a reversion product of a higher-pressure crystallographic phase, which is a consequence of application of both high pressure and shear deformation to the boron carbide crystal structure. A dependence of shock-induced high-pressure phase transformation in boron carbide on the extent of shear deformation experienced in the shock process offers a plausible explanation for the differences observed in the LANL Hugoniot data on porous ceramic and that of other shock data on near-full-density boron carbide.

  5. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.; Hansen, T.; Jensen, M. R.; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Bjørnholm, T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded with...... boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  6. Boron nitride nanotubes as a reinforcement for brittle matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tatarko, Peter; Grasso, S.; Porwal, H.; Saggar, Richa; Chlup, Zdeněk; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 14 (2014), s. 3339-3349. ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 264526 - GLACERCO Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Amorphous borosilicate glass * Boron nitride nanotubes * Composite * Toughening mechanisms * Scratch resistance Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2014

  7. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co......-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in...... studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from...

  8. Influence of the Discharge Voltage during Pulse-Plasma Process on the Durability of Edges coated with Superhard Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaciejKupczyk

    2004-01-01

    In the paper the experimental results concerning the functional quality of thin, superhard coatings produced on cutting edges is described. Boron nitride coatings were deposited on insert cutting edges made cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method. The comparative investigations of mentioned coatings have been concerned of tool life of edges during steel machining. In these investigations for the purpose of additional increase of coated edge durability an interfacial layers were applied. Presented investigations particularly pointed out to essential influence of the values of discharge voltage on the coating structure and durability of edges coated with boron nitfide.

  9. Influence of the Discharge Voltage during Pulse-Plasma Process on the Durability of Edges coated with Superhard Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maciej Kupczyk

    2004-01-01

    In the paper the experimental results concerning the functional quality of thin, superhard coatings produced on cutting edges is described. Boron nitride coatings were deposited on insert cutting edges made cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method. The comparative investigations of mentioned coatings have been concerned of tool life of edges during steel machining. In these investigations for the purpose of additional increase of coated edge durability an interfacial layers were applied. Presented investigations particularly pointed out to essential influence of the values of discharge voltage on the coating structure and durability of edges coated with boron nitride.

  10. Boron carbide composite carbon material, method of manufacturing the same and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide composite material of the present invention is formed by compositing boron carbide, which is a material suitable as a plasma facing material especially for a thermonuclear reactor. Boron carbide is filled in open cells of a carbon fiber-carbon composite material containing carbon fibers and a carbon matrix. In addition, a boron carbide film is formed on the surface of the composite material. A CVD method and a plasma flaming method are generally known, but they involve problems of occurrence of cracks and peeling of coating film due to thermal stresses. Then, a boron compound is chemically reacted with the surface of a carbon material to convert the carbon on the surface to boron carbide. The composite material contains carbon fibers oriented in one direction, and a boron carbide coating film is formed on the plasma facing surface. With such a constitution, there can be obtained a useful plasma facing material which has excellent strength especially in the direction of the fibers and having heat resistance, chemical stability and ware resistance even after the boron carbide coating film is exhausted and the base material is exposed. (T.M.)

  11. First boronization in KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S.H., E-mail: sukhhong@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, K.S.; Kim, K.M.; Kim, H.T.; Kim, G.P. [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Sun, J.H.; Woo, H.J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.M.; Kim, W.C.; Kim, H.K.; Park, K.R.; Yang, H.L.; Na, H.K. [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahangno, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Edge Plasma Science (cEps), Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    First boronization in KSTAR is reported. KSTAR boronization system is based on a carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) injection system. The design, construction, and test of the system are accomplished and it is tested by using a small vacuum vessel before it is mounted to a KSTAR port. After the boronization in KSTAR, impurity levels are significantly reduced by factor of 3 (oxygen) and by 10 (carbon). Characteristics of a-C/B:H thin films deposited by carborane vapor are investigated. Re-condensation of carborane vapor during the test phase has been reported.

  12. Supplement to report on boron disposition from fused salts. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this project was to develop a process to fabricate pure, dense, coherent boron coatings 1 mm thick on graphite or copper substrates. Electrodeposition from molten fluoride salts was the technique chosen for development. The investigation was begun by making a thorough search of the relevant literature and consulting with workers active in the field or related fields. As a result of this search, the technique selected from the literature was a process whereby boron is electrodeposited from a molten equimolal mixture of potassium and lithium fluorides containing dissolved boron trifluoride gas. Initial tests at Bendix consisted of a material evaluation study of 0.02-mm-thick, boron-coated copper specimens. The properties of the boron deposit determined from this material evaluation study were such that an apparatus was designed, constructed, and tested at Bendix Kansas City

  13. Electrophoretic deposits of boron on duralumin plates used for measuring neutron flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of boron thin film deposits of around 1 mg per cm2 on duralumin plates with a diameter of 8 cm. The boron coated plates for ionization chambers were originally prepared at the CEA by pulverization of boron carbides on sodium silicates. This method is not controlling precisely enough the quantity of boron deposit. Thus, an electrophoretic method is considered for a better control of the quantity of boron deposit in the scope of using in the future boron 10 which is costly and rare. The method described by O. Flint is not satisfying enough and a similar electrophoretic process has been developed. Full description of the method is given as well as explanation of the use of dried methanol as solvent, tannin as electrolyte and magnesium chloride to avoid alumina formation. (M.P.)

  14. Preparation and characterization of boron nitride/carbon fiber composite with high specific surface area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron nitride can be used as a good catalyst carrier because of its high thermal conductivity and chemical stability. However, a high specific surface area of boron nitride is still desirable. In this work, a carbon fiber composite coated with boron nitride villous nano-film was prepared, and was also characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis. The results indicated that the carbon fibers were covered by uniform villous boron nitride films whose thickness was about 150 - 200 nm. The specific surface area of the boron nitride/carbon fiber composite material was 96 m2 g-1, which was markedly improved compared with conventional boron nitride materials. (orig.)

  15. Study of α-phase precipitation on crystallization of Fe88B12 amorphous alloy by NMR method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR method is used to study processes, occurring at heating of Fe88B12 amorphous alloy to determine the possibility of preparation of supersaturated boron solid solution in α-iron. Samples in the form of 15-25 mcm thickness tape were prepared by means of spinning. Crystallization of amorphous matrix begins over 593 K and passes two stages. α-Fe precipitates during the first stage. Crystallization second stage starts over 723 K and results in essential structural variations. At this stage the residual amorphous matrix is crystallized with formation of metastable tetragonal boride Fe3B. Thus, one may conclude, that boron eurichment of amorphous matrix at heating results in change of orthorhombic Fe3B type short-range order for tetragonal F3B. At 730 K residual amorphous phase approaches stoichiometric boride-Fe3B-composition

  16. Boron in sillimanite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grew, E S; Hinthorne, J R

    1983-08-01

    Sillimanite in six granulite-facies, kornerupine-bearing rocks contains 0.035 to 0.43 percent B(2)O(3) and 0.02 to 0.23 percent MgO (by weight). Substitution of boron for silicon and magnesium for aluminum is coupled such that the ratio of magnesium to boron is about 0.5. Sillimanite incorporates more than 0.1 percent B(2)O(3) only at high temperatures in a boron-rich environment at very low partial pressures of water. In the amphibolite facies, the sillimanite boron contents are too low to appreciably affect the stability relations of sillimanite with kyanite and andalusite. PMID:17830955

  17. Boron nitride composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Ellsworth, German F.; Swenson, Fritz J.; Allen, Patrick G.

    2016-02-16

    According to one embodiment, a composite product includes hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and a plurality of cubic boron nitride (cBN) particles, wherein the plurality of cBN particles are dispersed in a matrix of the hBN. According to another embodiment, a composite product includes a plurality of cBN particles, and one or more borate-containing binders.

  18. Temperature dependence of damage in boron-implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have performed a systematic investigation of boron implantation at 30 keV into n-type silicon in the 77-300 K temperature range and mostly at 9 x 1015 cm-2 fluence. The analyses have been performed with ion channeling and cross sectional transmission electron microscopy both in as-implanted samples and in samples annealed in vacuum furnace at 500 degree C and 850 degree C for 30 min. They confirm the impossibility of amorphization at room temperature and the presence of residual damage mainly located at the boron projected range. On the contrary, a continuous amorphous layer can be obtained for implants at 77 K and 193 K; the thickness of the implanted layer is increased by lowering the temperature, at the same time the amorphous-crystalline interface becomes sharper. Sheet resistance measurements performed after isochronal annealing shows an apparent reverse annealing of the dopant only in the sample implanted at 273 K. The striking differences between light and heavy ions observed at room temperature implantation disappears at 77 K and full recovery with no residual damage of the amorphous layer is observed. 10 refs., 5 figs

  19. Wear mechanism of electrodeposited amorphous Ni-Fe-P alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高诚辉; 赵源

    2004-01-01

    The wear mechanism of amorphous Ni-Fe-P coating was discussed. The wear resistance of the amor phous Ni-Fe-P coatings was tested on a Timken wear apparatus, and the wear track of the amorphous Ni-Fe-P coat ings as-deposited and heated at various temperatures was observed by SEM. The results show that the wear resistthe coating will change with the heating temperature increasing from pitting+plowing at 200 ℃ to pitting at 400 ℃,and to plowing at 600 ℃. The pits on the worn surface of the amorphous Ni-Fe-P coating result from the tribo-fatigue fracture. The cracks of spalling initiate at pits and propagate at certain angle with the sliding direction on sur face, and then extend into sub-surface along the poor P layers or the interface between layers. Finally under repeated action of the stress in the rubbing process the cracks meet and the debris forms. The generation of the pits and spal-ling is related with the internal stress, brittleness and layer structure of the amorphous Ni-Fe-P coating.

  20. Raman effect in icosahedral boron-rich solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Werheit, Volodymyr Filipov, Udo Kuhlmann, Ulrich Schwarz, Marc Armbrüster, Andreas Leithe-Jasper, Takaho Tanaka, Iwami Higashi, Torsten Lundström, Vladimir N Gurin and Maria M Korsukova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Raman spectra of numerous icosahedral boron-rich solids having the structure of α-rhombohedral, β-rhombohedral, α-tetragonal, β-tetragonal, YB66, orthorhombic or amorphous boron. The spectra were newly measured and, in some cases, compared with reported data and discussed. We emphasize the importance of a high signal-to-noise ratio in the Raman spectra for detecting weak effects evoked by the modification of compounds, accommodation of interstitial atoms and other structural defects. Vibrations of the icosahedra, occurring in all the spectra, are interpreted using the description of modes in α-rhombohedral boron by Beckel et al. The Raman spectrum of boron carbide is largely clarified. Relative intra- and inter-icosahedral bonding forces are estimated for the different structural groups and for vanadium-doped β-rhombohedral boron. The validity of Badger's rule is demonstrated for the force constants of inter-icosahedral B–B bonds, whereas the agreement is less satisfactory for the intra-icosahedral B–B bonds.

  1. Exploring new W–B coating materials for the aqueous corrosion–wear protection of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallia, B., E-mail: bertram.mallia@um.edu.mt [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Malta, Msida MSD 2080 (Malta); Dearnley, P.A. [nCATS National Centre for Advanced Tribology Southampton, Engineering Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-31

    The material loss of metallic surfaces through corrosion–wear is a serious concern in many application sectors, ranging from bio-medical implants to marine, oil and gas field components to transport vehicle and nuclear reactor devices. In principle, self-passivating alloys, like stainless steels, can be protected from surface degradation caused by corrosion–wear through the application of protective thin, hard surface coatings. In this work the suitability of using W matrix coating materials supersaturated with varying levels of boron were applied to austenitic stainless steel substrates (Ortron 90) and assessed for this purpose. These materials were compared to a highly corrosion–wear resistant “datum” surface engineered material (CrN coated Ti–6Al–4V) in sliding contact tests against a chemically inert aluminium oxide ball, whilst immersed in 0.9% NaCl solution at 37 °C. The work demonstrated that all the coated materials to be very much more resistant to material loss through corrosion–wear (by nearly an order of magnitude) compared to uncoated stainless steel, and two coatings, W–13%B and W–23%B coated Ortron 90 were similarly resistant as CrN coated Ti–6Al–4V. Three fundamental types of corrosion–wear were discovered that represented differing levels of passive film durability. The total material loss rate (TMLR) during corrosion–wear testing showed linear proportionality with the change in open circuit potential δ{sub OCP} which obeyed the governing equation: TMLR = m δ{sub OCP} + C. - Highlights: • Magnetron sputtered W–(B) coatings displayed a crystalline to amorphous transition. • W–(B) coatings displayed excellent corrosion–wear resistance under OCP conditions. • Three kinds of corrosion–wear behaviour were determined in this study. • A linear correlation between total material loss and change in OCP was discovered. • Static CV tests were not useful for predicting dynamic corrosion–wear behaviour.

  2. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    OpenAIRE

    Goedele Craye; Korbinian Löbmann; Holger Grohganz; Thomas Rades; Riikka Laitinen

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin–lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon sp...

  3. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  4. A STUDY OF TIN IMPURITY ATOMS IN AMORPHOUS SILICON

    OpenAIRE

    Rabchanova, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Using the Mössbauer spectroscopy method for the 119 Sn isotope the state of tin impurity atoms in amorphous a-Si silicon is studied. The electrical and optical properties of tin doped films of thermally spray-coated amorphous silicon have been studied. It is shown that in contrast to the crystalline silicon where tin is an electrically inactive substitution impurity, in vacuum deposited amorphous silicon it produces an acceptor band near the valence band and a fraction of the tin atoms become...

  5. Boronated liposome development and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, M.F. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The boronated liposome development and evaluation effort consists of two separate tasks. The first is the development of new boron compounds and the synthesis of known boron species with BNCT potential. These compounds are then encapsulated within liposomes for the second task, biodistribution testing in tumor-bearing mice, which examines the potential for the liposomes and their contents to concentrate boron in cancerous tissues.

  6. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO2/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ∼25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ∼2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications

  7. Direct growth of nanocrystalline hexagonal boron nitride films on dielectric substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tay, Roland Yingjie [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Temasek Laboratories@NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Tsang, Siu Hon [Temasek Laboratories@NTU, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Loeblein, Manuela; Chow, Wai Leong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CNRS-International NTU Thales Research Alliance CINTRA UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Loh, Guan Chee [Institue of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Toh, Joo Wah; Ang, Soon Loong [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Teo, Edwin Hang Tong, E-mail: htteo@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-03-09

    Atomically thin hexagonal-boron nitride (h-BN) films are primarily synthesized through chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various catalytic transition metal substrates. In this work, a single-step metal-catalyst-free approach to obtain few- to multi-layer nanocrystalline h-BN (NCBN) directly on amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si and quartz substrates is demonstrated. The as-grown thin films are continuous and smooth with no observable pinholes or wrinkles across the entire deposited substrate as inspected using optical and atomic force microscopy. The starting layers of NCBN orient itself parallel to the substrate, initiating the growth of the textured thin film. Formation of NCBN is due to the random and uncontrolled nucleation of h-BN on the dielectric substrate surface with no epitaxial relation, unlike on metal surfaces. The crystallite size is ∼25 nm as determined by Raman spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the NCBN formed sheets of multi-stacked layers with controllable thickness from ∼2 to 25 nm. The absence of transfer process in this technique avoids any additional degradation, such as wrinkles, tears or folding and residues on the film which are detrimental to device performance. This work provides a wider perspective of CVD-grown h-BN and presents a viable route towards large-scale manufacturing of h-BN substrates and for coating applications.

  8. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yimao; Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres

    2015-12-01

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiNx) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiNx stack, recombination current density J0 values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm2 are obtained on 10 Ω.cm n-type, 0.8 Ω.cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J0 on n-type 10 Ω.cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm2 when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiNx stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N2 for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance-voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiNx stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  9. Formation mechanism of amorphous Ni-Fe-P alloys by electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Cheng-hui

    2005-01-01

    The formation mechanism of the amorphous Ni-Fe-P coating was studied by analysis of the forming thermodynamics, dynamics, and crystallography of the amorphous alloy. The results show that, in the initial stage of deposition a thin "crystal epitaxial growth" layer first forms, and then transforms to amorphous gradually. The cross section in Ni-Fe-P coatings by electrolytic etching exhibits a banded structure of alternate dark and light bands. It is proposed that the banded structure is caused by a change in the P content with thickness,which is due to alternated depletion and enrichment of [OH-] in the diffusion layer resulting from the generation and evolution of hydrogen gas. The amorphous Ni-Fe-P coating will be formed in proper composition, high nucleation rate and strongly hindered growth of the crystal nucleus. Amorphous Ni-Fe-P alloys form as islands, and grow up by layer.

  10. Mapping boron in silicon solar cells using electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amorphous silicon solar cells typically consist of stacked layers deposited on plastic or metallic substrates making sample preparation for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) difficult. The amorphous silicon layer - the active part of the solar cell - is sandwiched between 10-nm-thick n- and p...... focused ion beam milling in order to map the boron distribution across a 200-nm-thick n-p amorphous silicon junction using energy-filtered TEM and EELS spectrum acquisition. EELS line scans are used to detect boron concentrations as low as 10^20cm-3. We also use monochromated EELS to measure changes in...... resolution using TEM is highly challenging [3]. Recently, scanning TEM (STEM) combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and spherical aberration-correction has allowed the direct detection of dopant concentration of 10^20cm-3 in 65-nm-wide silicon devices [4]. Here, we prepare TEM samples by...

  11. Amorphous silicon thermometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon glass resistance thermometers (CGRT) shows an unstable drift by heat cycles. Since we were looking for a more stable element of thermometer for cryogenic and high magnetic field environments, we selected amorphous silicon as a substitute for CGRT. The resistance of many amorphous samples were measured at 4K, at 77K, and 300K. We eventually found an amorphous silicon (Si-H) alloy whose the sensitivity below 77K was comparable to that of the germanium resistance thermometer with little magnetic field influence. (author)

  12. Folate Functionalized Boron Nitride Nanotubes and their Selective Uptake by Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells: Implications for their Use as Boron Carriers in Clinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is increasingly being used in the treatment of several aggressive cancers, including cerebral glioblastoma multiforme. The main requirement for this therapy is selective targeting of tumor cells by sufficient quantities of10B atoms required for their capture/irradiation with low-energy thermal neutrons. The low content of boron targeting species in glioblastoma multiforme accounts for the difficulty in selective targeting of this very malignant cerebral tumor by this radiation modality. In the present study, we have used for the first time boron nitride nanotubes as carriers of boron atoms to overcome this problem and enhance the selective targeting and ablative efficacy of BNCT for these tumors. Following their dispersion in aqueous solution by noncovalent coating with biocompatible poly-l-lysine solutions, boron nitride nanotubes were functionalized with a fluorescent probe (quantum dots) to enable their tracking and with folic acid as selective tumor targeting ligand. Initial in vitro studies have confirmed substantive and selective uptake of these nanovectors by glioblastoma multiforme cells, an observation which confirms their potential clinical application for BNCT therapy for these malignant cerebral tumors. PMID:20596476

  13. Microplasma Processed Ultrathin Boron Nitride Nanosheets for Polymer Nanocomposites with Enhanced Thermal Transport Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ri-Chao; Sun, Dan; Lu, Ai; Askari, Sadegh; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Joseph, Paul; Dixon, Dorian; Ostrikov, Kostya; Maguire, Paul; Mariotti, Davide

    2016-06-01

    This Research Article reports on the enhancement of the thermal transport properties of nanocomposite materials containing hexagonal boron nitride in poly(vinyl alcohol) through room-temperature atmospheric pressure direct-current microplasma processing. Results show that the microplasma treatment leads to exfoliation of the hexagonal boron nitride in isopropyl alcohol, reducing the number of stacks from >30 to a few or single layers. The thermal diffusivity of the resulting nanocomposites reaches 8.5 mm(2) s(-1), 50 times greater than blank poly(vinyl alcohol) and twice that of nanocomposites containing nonplasma treated boron nitride nanosheets. From TEM analysis, we observe much less aggregation of the nanosheets after plasma processing along with indications of an amorphous carbon interfacial layer, which may contribute to stable dispersion of boron nitride nanosheets in the resulting plasma treated colloids. PMID:27153343

  14. Boron cures cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the authors cite a few examples of the use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in nuclear medicine. They point to the possibility of boron neutron capture therapy and the use for the neutron capture therapy of other light elements.

  15. Boron effects on the ductility of a nano-cluster-strengthened ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Cu-rich nano-particle precipitation strengthens the ferritic steels. → Boron doping suppresses brittle intergranular fracture. → Moisture-induced environmental embrittlement can be alleviated by surface coating. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of Cu-rich nano-cluster-strengthened ferritic steels with and without boron doping were investigated. Tensile tests at room temperature in air showed that the B-doped ferritic steel has similar yield strength but a larger elongation than that without boron doping after extended aging at 500 deg. C. There are three mechanisms affecting the ductility and fracture of these steels: brittle cleavage fracture, week grain boundaries, and moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement. Our study reveals that boron strengthens the grain boundary and suppresses the intergranular fracture. Furthermore, the moisture-induced embrittlement can be alleviated by surface coating with vacuum oil.

  16. Axial channeling of boron ions into silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, A.; Galvagno, G.; Raineri, V.; Setola, R.; Rimini, E.; Carbera, A.; Gasparotto, A.

    1992-04-01

    Channeling boron implants were performed into (100) and (110) silicon substrates in the energy range 80-700 keV. The dose ranged between 3.5 × 10 11 and 1 × 10 15 atoms/cm 2. The axial channeling concentration profiles of implanted B + were compared with that obtained for incidence along the random direction of the crystal and with that obtained by implantation in amorphous silicon. The electrical and chemical boron distributions were obtained by spreading resistance and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements, respectively. The inelastic stopping power, Sc, was extracted from the experimental maximum ranges for the [100] and [110] axis. The energ dependence of the electronic stopping power is given by Sc = KEp with p[100] = 0.469±0.010 and p[110] = 0.554±0.004. Simulations obtained by the MARLOWE code, using the Oen-Robinson impact parameter dependent formula, for the electronic energy loss reproduce quite well the experimental depth profiles.

  17. Axial channeling of boron ions into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channeling boron implants were performed into (100) and (110) silicon substrates in the energy range 80-700 keV. The dose ranged between 3.5x1011 and 1x1015 atoms/cm2. The axial channeling concentration profiles of implanted B+ were compared with that obtained for incidence along the random direction of the crystal and with that obtained by implantation in amorphous silicon. The electrical and chemical boron distributions were obtained by spreading resistance and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements, respectively. The inelastic stopping power, Sc, was extracted from the experimental maximum ranges for the [100] and [110] axis. The energy dependence of the electronic stopping power is given by Se = KEp with p[100] = 0.469±0.010 and p[110] = 0.554±0.004. Simulations obtained by the MARLOWE code, using the Oen-Robinson impact parameter dependent formula, for the electronic energy loss reproduce quite well the experimental depth profiles. (orig.)

  18. Axial channeling of boron ions into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Ferla, A.; Galvagno, G. (Ist. di Tecnologie e Metodologie per la Microelettronica, CNR, Dipt. di Fisica, Catania (Italy)); Raineri, V.; Setola, R.; Rimini, E. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Catania (Italy)); Carnera, A.; Gasparotto, A. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Padova (Italy))

    1992-04-01

    Channeling boron implants were performed into (100) and (110) silicon substrates in the energy range 80-700 keV. The dose ranged between 3.5x10{sup 11} and 1x10{sup 15} atoms/cm{sup 2}. The axial channeling concentration profiles of implanted B{sup +} were compared with that obtained for incidence along the random direction of the crystal and with that obtained by implantation in amorphous silicon. The electrical and chemical boron distributions were obtained by spreading resistance and secondary ion mass spectrometry measurements, respectively. The inelastic stopping power, S{sub c}, was extracted from the experimental maximum ranges for the (100) and (110) axis. The energy dependence of the electronic stopping power is given by S{sub e} = KE{sup p} with p{sub (100)} = 0.469{+-}0.010 and p{sub (110)} = 0.554{+-}0.004. Simulations obtained by the MARLOWE code, using the Oen-Robinson impact parameter dependent formula, for the electronic energy loss reproduce quite well the experimental depth profiles. (orig.).

  19. Boron contamination in drinking - irrigation water and boron removal methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Bilici Başkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Boron presents in IIIA group of periodic table and has high ionization capacity. Therefore it is classified as a metalloid. Average boron concentration in earth's crust is 10 mg/kg. It presents in the environment as a salts of Ca, Na, and Mg. Boron reserves having high concentration and economical extent are found mostly in Turkey and in arid, volcanic and high hydrothermal activity regions of U.S. as compounds of boron attached to oxygen. Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, although it may be toxic at higher levels. The range in which it is converted from a nutrient to a contaminant is quite narrow. Boron presents in water environment as a boric acid and rarely borate salts. The main boron sources, whose presence is detected in surface waters, are urban wastes and industrial wastes, which can come from a wide range of different activities as well as several chemical products used in agriculture. In Turkey, the most pollutant toxic element in drinking and irrigation water is boron. Therefore boron removal is very important in terms of human health and agricultural products in high quality. Mainly boron removal methods from drinking water and irrigation water are ion exchange, ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, and adsorption.

  20. Study on the Structures and Properties of Ni-W-B-CeO2 Composite Coatings Prepared by Pulse Electrodeposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Ruidong; Wang Junli; Guo Zhongcheng; Wang Hua

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research is to pulse co-deposit nano-CeO2 particles into Ni-W-B alloy coatings in order to improve the surface properties. The influence of pulse frequency and duty circle on deposition rate, microhardness and microstructures, and the influence of heat treatment temperature on phase structures, microhardness and abrasivity of Ni-W-B-CeO2 composite coatings were investigated. The results indicated that the pulse co-deposition of nickel, tungsten, boron and nano-CeO2 particle from the bath which nano-CeO2 particle was suspended by high speed mechanical stirring led to the Ni-W-B-CeO2 composite coatings, possessing better microhardness and abrasion resistance when heat-treated at 400℃ for 1h. The microhardness as-deposited with 636Hz and the deposition rate with 0.0281mm·h-1 was the highest at pulse frequency with 1000Hz and pulse duty circle with 10%. Microstructures analysis displays that decreasing pulse duty cycle leads to refinement in grain structures and the improvement of microstructures. X-ray diffraction shows that the composite coating as-deposited was mainly in the amorphous state and partially crystallized, but when heat treated at 400℃, the crystallization trend was strenthened further.

  1. Low-Cost Preparation of Boron Nitride Ceramic Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Duan; ZHANG Changrui; LI Bin; CAO Feng; WANG Siqing; LIU Kun; FANG Zhenyu

    2012-01-01

    The amorphous boron nitride ceramic powders were prepared at 750-950 ℃ by the lowcost urea route,and the effects of preparation temperatures,molar ratios of the raw materials and oxidation treatment on the composition,structure and surface morphology of the products were investigated through FTIR,XRD and SEM.The results show that the products ceramize and crystallize gradually with the increase of the temperature.When the molar ratio and reaction temperature are 3:2 and 850 ℃,respectively,the products have high purity,compact structure and nice shape.The oxidation treatment at 450 ℃ will not impair the composition and structure of boron nitfide but effectively remove the impurities.

  2. Long-Term Corrosion Tests of Prototypical SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C K; Rebak, R H; Day, S D; Lian, T; Hailey, P D; Payer, J H; Branagan, D J; Aprigliano, L F

    2007-05-10

    An iron-based amorphous metal with good corrosion resistance and a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons has been developed and is reported here. This amorphous alloy has the approximate formula Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} and is known as SAM2X5. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) were added to provide corrosion resistance, while boron (B) was added to promote glass formation and the absorption of thermal neutrons. Since this amorphous metal has a higher boron content than conventional borated stainless steels, it provides the nuclear engineer with design advantages for criticality control structures with enhanced safety. While melt-spun ribbons with limited practical applications were initially produced, large quantities (several tons) of gas atomized powder have now been produced on an industrial scale, and applied as thermal-spray coatings on prototypical half-scale spent nuclear fuel containers and neutron-absorbing baskets. These prototypes and other SAM2X5 samples have undergone a variety of corrosion testing, including both salt-fog and long-term immersion testing. The modes and rates of corrosion have been determined in the various environments, and are reported here. While these coatings have less corrosion resistance than melt-spun ribbons and optimized coatings produced in the laboratory, substantial corrosion resistance has been achieved.

  3. Investigation of the hot ductility of a high-strength boron steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the high-temperature ductility behaviour of an Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 sheet was investigated. The mechanical properties of Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 boron steel were examined via hot tensile tests performed at temperatures ranging from 400 to 900 °C at a strain rate of 0.083 s−1. The deformation and fracture mechanisms under hot tensile testing were considered in relation to the testing data and to the fracture-surface observations performed via SEM. The hot ductility of the tested boron steel was observed as a function of increasing temperature and the Al–Si-coated 22MnB5 boron steel exhibited a ductility loss at 700 °C

  4. Thermal Studies on Boron-Based Initiator Formulation.

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. Rajendran; R. Anandavally Ammal; C. B. Kartha; V. V. Babu

    1996-01-01

    Boron-potassium nitrate pyrotechnic composition can be converted into a hot wire-sensitive initiator formulation by the addition of an extra fuel. viz. lead thiocyanate. The ignition temperature of this composition depends on the percentage of thiocyanate in the mix and follows a binomial fit. The kinetic parameters. viz. activation energy E and pre-exponential factor A of the charge have been calculated from TG and DSC curves using different approaches developed by Coats-Redfern and Kissinge...

  5. Sintered boron, production and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microhardness HV, tensile properties and Young modulus of sintered boron of different porosity were studied. It was shown that with density growth tensile properties improve. HV and brittle-ductile transition temperature Tsub(b) of sintered boron on the one hand and for silicon and titanium carbide on the other were compared and discussed. It was noted that the general level of HV and Tsub(b) for boron is rather high and at similar relative temperatures these characteristics are much higher. Temperature dependences of linear expansion coefficient, thermal capacity, thermal and temperature conductivity of sintered boron of 20% porosity were studied. Gruneisen parameter was evaluated

  6. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties. PMID:19687534

  7. Experimental Study Of The Boron Redistribution In Two Series Of Bilayer Films Silicon-Based

    OpenAIRE

    SACI, Lynda; MAHAMDI, Ramdane; MANSOUR, Farida; TEMPLE-BOYER, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The present work focuses on the study two sets of films bilayers obtained by Low Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition (LPCVD), for use as material to MOS gate structures (transistors, chemical sensor ISFET, etc.). The first series of films are composed by two layers, silicon amorphous un-doped layer (poly1) and polysilicon boron doped in situ (poly2). The second series are constituted by boron doped polysilicon (polySi) and nitrogen doped polysilicon (NIDOS). These films (poly1/poly2/SiO2 and p...

  8. CVD Delta-Doped Boron Surface Layers for Ultra-Shallow Junction Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Sarubbi, F.; Nanver, L.K.; Scholtes, T.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    A new doping technique is presented that uses a pure boron atmospheric/low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (AP/LPCVD) in a commercially available epitaxial reactor to form less than 2-nm-thick δ-doped boron-silicide (BxSi) layers on the silicon surface. For long exposure B segregates at the surface to form a very slow growing amorphous layer of pure B (α-B). The electrical properties of the as-deposited α- B/BxSi stack have been studied by fabricating and measuring diodes where the B depos...

  9. Residual defects following rapid annealing of boron implanted silicon with and without preamorphisation by silicon implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implants of boron into silicon which has been made amorphous by silicon implantation have a shallower depth profile than the same implants into silicon. This results in higher activation and restricted diffusion of the B implants after annealing, and there are also significant differences in the microstructure after annealing compared with B implants into silicon. Rapid isothermal heating with an electron beam and furnace treatments are used to characterize the defect structure as a function of time and temperature. Defects are seen to influence the diffusion of non-substitutional boron. (author)

  10. Crystallization and densification of plasma H.F synthetized boron powder

    OpenAIRE

    Boulanger, J; Autissier, D.

    1993-01-01

    Boron powder was synthetized by reducing a boron halide in a microwave plasma : BCl3 + 3/2 H2[MATH]B + 3 HCl Synthetized powder is under micro sized, amorphous and contains high chlorine level. It is necessary to inflict a thermal treatment to purify and recrystallize the powder before densification. Direct hot isostatic pressing on this powder conducts to broken samples. It is realized in a vacuum furnace at temperaure between 1500 and 2000°C on 30 * 30 mm cylinders made using cold isostatic...

  11. Synthesis and oxidation behavior of boron-substituted carbon powders by hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Boron-substituted carbon powder, BxC1-x with x up to 0.17, has been successfully synthesized by hot filament chemical vapor deposition. The boron concentration in prepared BxC1-x samples can be controlled by varying the relative proportions of methane and diborane. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectrum confirm the successful synthesis of an amorphous BC5 compound, which consists of 10―20 nm particles with disk-like morphology. Thermogravimetry measurement shows that BC5 compound starts to oxidize ap-proximately at 620℃ and has a higher oxidation resistance than carbon.

  12. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome

  13. Electrochromism of amorphous ruthenium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Se-Hee; Liu, Ping; Tracy, C. Edwin; Deb, Satyen K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Center for Basic Sciences, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Cheong, Hyeonsik M. [Sogang University, Shinsoo-Dong, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-01

    We report on the electrochromic behavior of amorphous ruthenium oxide thin films and their electrochemical characteristics for use as counterelectrodes for electrochromic devices. Hydrous ruthenium oxide thin films were prepared by cyclic voltammetry on ITO coated glass substrates from an aqueous ruthenium chloride solution. The cyclic voltammograms of this material show the capacitive behavior including two redox reaction peaks in each cathodic and anodic scan. The ruthenium oxide thin film electrode exhibits a 50% modulation of optical transmittance at 670 nm wavelength with capacitor charge/discharge.

  14. Properties of amorphous FeCoB alloy particles (abstract)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charles, S. W.; Wells, S.; Meagher, A.;

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous and crystalline alloy particles (0.05–0.5 nm) of FexCoyBz in which the ratio x:y ranges from 0 to 1 have been prepared by the borohydride reduction of iron and cobalt salts in aqueous solution. The structure of the particles has been studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy and x....... 1). It has been shown that the fraction of boron in the alloys (10–35 at. %) is dependent upon the rate of addition of salts to borohydride and the concentration of cobalt present; this in turn influences the crystallinity and magnetic properties . Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted...

  15. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  16. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic (''thermal'' or ''fumed'') silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physico-chemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no

  17. A general method to coat colloidal particles with titiana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirors, A.F.; van Blaaderen, A.; Imhof, A.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a general one-pot method for coating colloidal particles with amorphous titania. Various colloidal particles such as silica particles, large silver colloids, gibbsite platelets, and polystyrene spheres were successfully coated with a titania shell. Although there are several ways of coat

  18. Tool life of the edges coated with the c-BN+h-BN coatings with different structures during hard machinable steel machining

    OpenAIRE

    Kupczyk, M; Misiak, W.

    2005-01-01

    In the presented paper the experimental results concerning the functional quality (durability during steel machining) of thin, superhard coatings produced on the cutting edges are described. Differences among mentioned properties of coatings mainly result from a coating structure. But the structure of coatings results from deposition parameters Superhard boron nitride coatings were deposited on insert cutting edges made of cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method applying different values...

  19. Design of Polymer Coatings in Automotive Engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Han-lin; ZHANG Ga; BORDES Jean-Michel; CHRISTIAN Coddet

    2004-01-01

    Driven by economical and ecological reasons, thermoplastics based coatings were more and more used in automotive engines. Two design concepts, flame spraying and serigraphy PEEK coatings on light metal substrate, were introduced in this paper. The friction and wear behavior of PEEK based coatings were investigated systematically. Coatings with different crystallinities can be obtained when cooling speed is controlled. Among three sprayed coatings considered with different crystallinities, the one with highest crystallinity exhibits best friction and wear behavior under dry sliding condition. Under lubricated sliding condition, however, the amorphous coating gives lower friction coefficient. The micron particles such as SiC,MoS2 and graphite in composite coatings can improve significantly the coating wear resistance and have a impact on coating friction behavior.

  20. Practical application of amorphous solar cells. High quality production technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    The targets of the project are to develop production technology of amorphous solar cells for electric power generation which will possess good reproducibility and be highly sensitive to solar light, and to elucidate their technological and economical applicability. During the years of from 1980 to 1982, studies on research and development of amorphous solar cells with multi-layer structure were made, and the conversion efficiency of the amorphous sollar cell was improved to 82.5% (10 cm square cell). (1) Amorphous growth equipment for continuous formation of tandem structure was designed and constructed. Boron concentration when grown in independent separate reaction chambers was found to be less than 1/10 of that grown in the single chanber. Film formation rate of 7/sup 0/ A/sec was achieved using Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/ for the growth of a-Si:H(i). (2) In the technology for stainless steel substrate modules, modules of the sizes specified by NEDO were assembled with the super strail structure employing tempered glass, achieving 4.7% conversion rate. (3) For materials and formation technology of the transparent conductive film grid electrode, light transmittance and resistance of the film made by sputtering evaporation of ITO film were studied. (4) As regards reliability technology, it was found that the tandem structure will greatly decreace the deterioration rate as compared with the single layer structure. The modules with super strait structre proved to be weatherproof. (4 figs)

  1. Boron thermal regeneration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ion exchanger which allows flow in both directions along a selected flow path is described. A separator plate divides the exchanger tank into two chambers each of which has a flow conduit so that flow may enter or leave from either chamber while prohibiting the resin particles from migrating from one side of the tank to the other. This ion exchanger permits a dual-directional flow process to be practised which results in immediate changes in the boron concentration within a nuclear reactor coolant system even if the ion exchanger resins have not been completely equilibrated during a previous operation. (author)

  2. BORONIZING OF STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzum ULUKÖY

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Boride layer has many advantages in comparison with traditional hardening methods. The boride layer has high hardening value and keeps it's hardeness at high temperatures, and it also shows favorible properties, such as the resistance to wear, oxidation and corrosion. The process can be applied at variety of materials, for instance steel, cast iron, cast steel, nickel and cobalt alloys and cermets. In this rewiew, boronizing process properties, boride layer on steel surfaces and specifications and the factors that effect boride layer are examined

  3. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid solidification, sputtering and electroless chemical deposition have been used to produce amorphous metal alloys which possess excellent corrosion and abrasion resistance. This paper discusses a new technique for obtaining amorphous metal alloy coatings. Plasma decomposition of Ni(CO)4 and PH3 in argon and hydrogen carrier gases [Ni(CO4/PH3--8/1] yielded films that were black and silver, respectively, in appearance. Both films were amorphous as determined by transmission electron microscopy. Films deposited using a hydrogen carrier gas were three orders of magnitude more conductive than those deposited using an argon carrier gas. Analysis of both films using electron microprobe analysis and inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy showed an enrichment of P in the films over the P content in the plasma gas mixtures. Reducing the P content of the plasma gas mixture [Ni(CO)4/PH3--17/11 yielded crystalline films with no P enrichment. The grain size in these films was --60Δ as determined by x-ray line-broadening

  4. Potential of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Johannes; Spitznagel, J.; Kroll, U.; Bucher, C.; Faÿ Sylvie; Moriarty, T.; Shah, Arvind

    2008-01-01

    Low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LP-CVD) ZnO as front transparent conductive oxide (TCO), developed at IMT, has excellent light-trapping properties for a-Si:H p-i-n single-junction and ‘micromorph’ (amorphous/microcrystalline silicon) tandem solar cells. A stabilized record efficiency of 9.47% has independently been confirmed by NREL for an amorphous silicon single-junction p-i-n cell (~1 cm2) deposited on LP-CVD ZnO coated glass. Micromorph tandem cells with an initial efficiency of ...

  5. Deposition of thin layers of boron nitrides and hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon assisted by high current direct current arc plasma; Deposition assistee par un plasma a arc a haut courant continu de couches minces de Nitrure de Bore et de Silicium microcristallin hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1999-09-01

    In the frame of this thesis, a high current direct current arc (HCDCA) used for the industrial deposition of diamond, has been adapted to study the deposition of two types of coatings: a) boron nitride, whose cubic phase is similar to diamond, for tribological applications, b) hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon, for applications in the semiconductor fields (flat panel displays, solar cells,...). For the deposition of these coatings, the substrates were placed in the diffusion region of the arc. The substrate heating is mainly due to atomic species recombining on its surface. The deposition temperature, varying from 300 to 900 {sup o}C according to the films deposited, is determined by the substrate position, the arc power and the injected gas fluxes, without the use of any external heating or cooling system. Measurements performed on the arc plasma show that the electronic temperature is around 2 eV (23'000 K) while the gas temperature is lower than 5500 K. Typical electronic densities are in the range of 10{sup 12}-10{sup 1'}3 cm{sup -3}. For the deposition of boron nitride films, different boron precursors were used and a wide parameter range was investigated. The extreme difficulty of synthesising cubic boron nitride films by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) did not allow to stabilize the cubic phase of boron nitride in HCDCA. Coatings resulted in hexagonal or amorphous boron nitride with a chemical composition close to stoichiometric. The presence of hydrogen leads to the deposition of rough and porous films. Negative biasing of the samples, for positive ion bombardment, is commonly used to stabilize the cubic phase. In HCDCA and in our biasing range, only a densification of the films could be observed. A boron nitride deposition plasma study by infrared absorption spectroscopy in a capacitive radio frequency reactor has demonstrated the usefulness of this diagnostic for the understanding of the various chemical reactions which occur in this kind

  6. Amorphous TM1−xBx alloy particles prepared by chemical reduction (invited)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Mørup, Steen

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous transition-metal boron (TM-B) alloy particles can be prepared by chemical reduction of TM ions by borohydride in aqueous solutions. ln the last few years systematic studies of the parameters which control the composition, and, in turn, many of the properties of the alloy particles, have...... been performed and are reviewed in the present paper. The most important preparation parameters which influence the composition are the concentration of the borohydride solution and the pH of the TM salt solution. By controlling these parameters it is possible to prepare amorphous alloy samples...

  7. Determination of the Influence of c-BN+h-BN Coating Structure on Brittleness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maciej Kupczyk; Adam Lejwoda; Przemyslaw Cieszkowski; Przemyslaw Libuda

    2004-01-01

    In the article is presented the brittleness study of boron nitride coatings deposited on cutting edges made of cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method (PPD). Influences of the structure (density, pores, microcracks) of coating material on the brittleness and on selected technological parameters of boron nitride formation by PPD method particularly taking into account discharge voltage on brittleness are shown. Differences between values of both a1(300) and a1(500)coefficients characterized susceptibility to coatings cracking of investigated coating manufactured using different values of discharge voltage were defined. Results of an investigations have been confirmed usefulness of Palmqvist's method for measurement of coating susceptibility to brittle cracking.

  8. Determination of the Influence of c-BN+h-BN Coating Structure on Brittleness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MaciejKupczyk; AdamLejwoda; PrzemyslawCieszkowski; PrzemyslawLibuda

    2004-01-01

    In the article is presented the brittleness study of boron nitride coatings deposited on cutting edges made of cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method (PPD). Influences of the structure (density, pores, microcracks) of coating material on the brittleness and on selected technological parameters of boron nitride formation by PPD method particularly taking into account discharge voltage on brittleness are shown. Differences between values of both a1(300) and a1(500)coefficients characterized susceptibility to coatings cracking of investigated coating manufactured using different values of discharge voltage were defined. Results of an investigations have been confirmed usefulness of Palmqyist's method for measurement of coating susceptibility to brittle cracking.

  9. Large-scale fabrication of boron nitride nanotubes with high purity via solid-state reaction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    An effective solid-state reaction method is reported for synthesizing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in large scale and with high purity by annealing amorphous boron powder and ferric chloride (FeCl3) catalyst in ammonia atmosphere at elevated temperatures. FeCl3 that has rarely been utilized before is introduced not only as a catalyst but also as an efficient transforming agent which converts boron powder into boron chloride (BCl3) vapor in situ. The nanotubes are bamboo in shape and have an average diameter of about 90 nm. The effect of synthetic temperatures on nanotube morphology and yield is investigated. The photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows emission bands of the nanotubes at 354, 423, 467, and 666 nm. A combined growth mechanism of vapor–liquid-solid (VLS) and solid–liquid-solid (SLS) model is proposed for the formation of the BNNTs. PMID:25313303

  10. FTIR and electrical characterization of a-Si:H layers deposited by PECVD at different boron ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has found applications in flat panel displays, photovoltaic solar cell and recently has been employed in boron doped microbolometer array. We have performed electrical and structural characterizations of a-Si:H layers prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method at 540 K on glass substrates at different diborane (B2H6) flow ratios (500, 250, 150 and 50 sccm). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements obtained by specular reflectance sampling mode, show Si-Si, B-O, Si-H, and Si-O vibrational modes (611, 1300, 2100 and 1100 cm-1 respectively) with different strengths which are associated to hydrogen and boron content. The current-voltage curves show that at 250 sccm flow of boron the material shows the lowest resistivity, but for the 150 sccm boron flow it is obtained the highest temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR).

  11. Use of renewable coatings in thermonuclear devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of simple (C, B, Ce) and complex (TiC, TiN, SiC, TiB2) coatings in fusion devices with magnetic plasma confinement is discussed. Attention is focused on simple coatings - the technology for depositing and removing them, their physical and chemical properties, and their influence on the properties of the confined plasma. Thin-film carbon coatings are widely used because well-developed techniques are available for their deposition and removal, and for controlling their thickness. At the present stage of research, carbon coatings also have the important advantage that the materials (CH4, C2H2) used to synthesize the coating, and the coating material itself, are nontoxic. By contrast, coatings that contain boron or beryllium are either toxic in themselves (finely dispersed Be and BeO particles), or else must by synthesized from toxic materials (primarily diborane, B2H6)

  12. Dietary boron, brain function, and cognitive performance.

    OpenAIRE

    Penland, J G

    1994-01-01

    Although the trace element boron has yet to be recognized as an essential nutrient for humans, recent data from animal and human studies suggest that boron may be important for mineral metabolism and membrane function. To investigate further the functional role of boron, brain electrophysiology and cognitive performance were assessed in response to dietary manipulation of boron (approximately 0.25 versus approximately 3.25 mg boron/2000 kcal/day) in three studies with healthy older men and wo...

  13. Electron microscope study of stacking fault formation in boron implanted silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upon annealing silicon, implanted with boron at fluences greater than 5 x 1015 B+/cm2, stacking faults in concentrations up to 2 x 108/cm2 were observed on all four brace 111 brace planes to a depth of 1800 A below the specimen surface. The faults were enclosed by interstitial Frank sessile loops. Annihilation occurred on annealing between 980 to 10000C. The region in which the loops nucleate is assumed to contain silicon rendered amorphous at this high fluence, and the faults are believed to be condensed sheets of silicon atoms whose sites become occupied by boron atoms upon annealing between 800 to 9500C. Annihilation at temperatures close to 10000C may be caused by solute stress due to enhanced boron diffusion. Additional data on anneals in dry O2 at 11500C are presented. (author)

  14. Conductive epoxypolyamide coating composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirabeau, M.N.; Rohrbacher, F.

    1991-10-01

    This patent describes a conductive coating composition comprising a film forming binder and pigment in a pigment to binder weight ratio of about 15:100 to 100:100. It comprises 40-70% by weight of an amine component having at least two reactive amine groups selected from the group consisting of an amine, polyamide, polyamido amine resin or mixtures thereof; and 30-60% by weight of an epoxy resin having at least two epoxy groups per resin molecule; wherein the pigment comprises an electrically conductive pigment that comprises silica selected from the group consisting of amorphous silica, a silica containing material or silica coated pigment, the silica being in association with a two- dimensional network of antimony-containing tin oxide crystallites in which the antimony content ranges from about 1-30% by weight of the tin oxide and the composition forms a coating having a surface conductivity of at least 100 Ransburg units.

  15. Banishing brittle bones with boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A 6-month study indicates that boron, not even considered an essential nutrient for people and animals, may be a key to preventing osteoporosis, say nutritionist Forrest H. Nielsen and anatomist Curtiss D. Hunt at ARS' Grand Forks, North Dakota, Human Nutrition Research Center. They believe the results of the study - the first to look at the nutritional effects of boron in humans - will generate a lot of interest in the element. In the study, 12 postmenopausal women consumed a very low boron diet (0.25 milligrams per day) for 17 weeks then were given a daily 3-mg supplement - representing the boron intake from a well-balanced diet - for 7 more weeks. Within 8 days after the supplement was introduced, the lost 40 percent less calcium, one-third less magnesium, and slightly less phosphorus through the urine. In fact, their calcium and magnesium losses were lower than prestudy levels, when they were on their normal diets. Since boron isn't considered essential for people, there is not recommended intake and no boron supplement on the market. Nielsen says the supplement of sodium borate used in the study was specially prepared based on the amount of boron a person would get from a well-balanced diet containing fruits and vegetables. He says the average boron intake is about 1.5 mg - or half the experimental dose - but average means a lot of people get less and a lot get more. Hunt cautioned that large doses of boron can be toxic, even lethal. The lowest reported lethal dose of boric acid is about 45 grams (1.6 ounces) for an adult and only 2 grams (0.07 ounce) for an infant.

  16. Boron carbide nitride derived from amine-boranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that amine-boranes such as pyridine- or piperazine-borane can be converted into infusible polymers by thermal crosslinking at temperatures up to 420 degrees C. Further rise of the temperature up to 1050 degrees C in argon results in transformation of the polymers into black residues. Microstructural (TEM/EELS, ESCA) and chemical investigations indicate the presence of single phase boron carbide nitrides which exhibit a graphite-like, turbostratic structure with a homogeneous distribution of the elements B, N, and C. Subsequent annealing at 2200 degrees C in argon gives rise to crystallization of the pyrolytic material generating the thermodynamically stable phases BN, C, and B4C. The semiconducting properties of the X-ray amorphous boron carbide nitride synthesized at 1050 degrees C depend on the B/N/C-ratio which can be influenced by the type of amine-borane-precursor and by the applied atmosphere (Ar or NH3) during pyrolysis. The amine-boranes can be converted into boron carbide nitride- and BN-monoliths at 1050 degrees C under argon or reactive gas (NH3), respectively. The monoliths are transformed into composites with 91% rel. density containing BN, C, and B4C when heated up to 2200 degrees C

  17. Plasma Sprayed Coatings for RF Wave Absorption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nanobashvili, S.; Matějíček, Jiří; Žáček, František; Stöckel, Jan; Chráska, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil

    307-311, - (2002), s. 1334-1338. ISSN 0022-3115 Grant ostatní: COST(XE) Euratom DV4/04(TWO) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide, thermal spray coatings, fusion materials, RF wave absorption Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2002

  18. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B4C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B4C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  19. Evidence of amorphisation of B4C boron carbide under slow, heavy ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, D.; Miro, S.; Doriot, S.; Victor, G.; Motte, V.

    2015-12-01

    Boron carbide is widely used either as armor-plate or neutron absorber. In both cases, a good structural stability is required. However, a few studies have shown amorphisation may occur in severe conditions. Hard impacts lead to the formation of amorphous bands. Some irradiations in electronic regime with H or He ions have also shown amorphisation of the material. Most authors however consider the structure is not drastically affected by irradiations in the ballistic regime. Here, we have irradiated at room temperature dense boron carbide pellets with Au 4 MeV ions, for which most of the damage is in the ballistic regime. This study is part of a program devoted to the behavior of boron carbide under irradiation. Raman observations have been performed after the irradiations together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman observations show a strong structural damage at moderate fluences (1014/cm2, about 0.1 dpa), in agreement with previous studies. On the other hand, TEM shows the structure remains crystalline up to 1015/cm2 then partially amorphises. The amorphisation is heterogeneous, with the formation of nanometric amorphous zones with increasing density. It then appears short range and long range disorder occurs at quite different damage levels. Further experiments are in progress aiming at studying the structural stability of boron carbide and isostructural materials (α-B, B6Si,…).

  20. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents. PMID:26877036

  1. Electrochemical synthesis of hafnium diboride from cryolite-alumina melts containing hafnium and boron oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical synthesis of hafnium diboride in cryolite-alumina melts containing boron and hafnium oxides is studied at 1000-1020 deg C. It is proved that the process is a single-stage one, which follows from thermodynamic evaluation of the practicability of the synthesis and volt-ampere studies. Protective coatings of hafnium diboride are prepared electrolytically on a nickel substrate

  2. STUDY ON THE CARDANOL-ALDEHYDE CONDENSATION POLYMER CONTAINING BORON-NITROGEN COORDINATE BOND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Cardanol-aldehyde condensation polymer containing boron-nitrogen coordinate bond (CFBN) has been synthesized and characterized by IR, XPS, HPLC and DTA-TG. Its properties were also investigated. The results show that the coating film of CFBN has excellent physico-mechanical properties, good anticorrosive properties and stable at high temperature.

  3. Fabrication of silicon nitride/boron nitride nanocomposite powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Si3N4/BN nanocomposite powders with the microstructure of the micro-sized α-Si3N4 particles coated with nano-sized BN particles were synthesized via the chemical reaction of boric acid, urea, and α-Si3N4 powder in a hydrogen gas. The results of XRD, TEM, and selected area electron diffraction showed that amorphous BN and a little amount of turbostratic BN(t-BN) were coated on Si3N4 particles as the second phase after reaction at 1100℃. After reheating the composite powders at 1450℃ in a nitrogen gas, the amorphous and turbostratic BN is transformed into h-BN. These nanocomposite powders can be used to prepare Si3N4/BN ceramic composites by hot-pressing at 1800℃, which have perfect machinability and can be drilled with normal metal tools.

  4. Field Emission Properties of Nitrogen-doped Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon thin films are deposited on the ceramic substrates coated with Ti film by using direct current magnetron sputtering technique at N2 and Ar gas mixture atmosphere during deposition. The field emission properties of the deposited films have been investigated. The threshold field as low as 5.93V/μm is obtained and the maximum current density increases from 4μA/cm2 to 20.67μA/cm2 at 10.67V/μm comparing with undoped amorphous film. The results show that nitrogen doping plays an important role in field emission of amorphous carbon thin films.

  5. Passivation of c-Si surfaces by sub-nm amorphous silicon capped with silicon nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Yimao, E-mail: yimao.wan@anu.edu.au; Yan, Di; Bullock, James; Zhang, Xinyu; Cuevas, Andres [Research School of Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2015-12-07

    A sub-nm hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film capped with silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) is shown to provide a high level passivation to crystalline silicon (c-Si) surfaces. When passivated by a 0.8 nm a-Si:H/75 nm SiN{sub x} stack, recombination current density J{sub 0} values of 9, 11, 47, and 87 fA/cm{sup 2} are obtained on 10 Ω·cm n-type, 0.8 Ω·cm p-type, 160 Ω/sq phosphorus-diffused, and 120 Ω/sq boron-diffused silicon surfaces, respectively. The J{sub 0} on n-type 10 Ω·cm wafers is further reduced to 2.5 ± 0.5 fA/cm{sup 2} when the a-Si:H film thickness exceeds 2.5 nm. The passivation by the sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thermally stable at 400 °C in N{sub 2} for 60 min on all four c-Si surfaces. Capacitance–voltage measurements reveal a reduction in interface defect density and film charge density with an increase in a-Si:H thickness. The nearly transparent sub-nm a-Si:H/SiN{sub x} stack is thus demonstrated to be a promising surface passivation and antireflection coating suitable for all types of surfaces encountered in high efficiency c-Si solar cells.

  6. Amorphous Alloy Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulter, K

    2013-09-30

    At the beginning of this project, thin film amorphous alloy membranes were considered a nascent but promising new technology for industrial-scale hydrogen gas separations from coal- derived syngas. This project used a combination of theoretical modeling, advanced physical vapor deposition fabricating, and laboratory and gasifier testing to develop amorphous alloy membranes that had the potential to meet Department of Energy (DOE) targets in the testing strategies outlined in the NETL Membrane Test Protocol. The project is complete with Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), Georgia Institute of Technology (GT), and Western Research Institute (WRI) having all operated independently and concurrently. GT studied the hydrogen transport properties of several amorphous alloys and found that ZrCu and ZrCuTi were the most promising candidates. GT also evaluated the hydrogen transport properties of V, Nb and Ta membranes coated with different transition-metal carbides (TMCs) (TM = Ti, Hf, Zr) catalytic layers by employing first-principles calculations together with statistical mechanics methods and determined that TiC was the most promising material to provide catalytic hydrogen dissociation. SwRI developed magnetron coating techniques to deposit a range of amorphous alloys onto both porous discs and tubular substrates. Unfortunately none of the amorphous alloys could be deposited without pinhole defects that undermined the selectivity of the membranes. WRI tested the thermal properties of the ZrCu and ZrNi alloys and found that under reducing environments the upper temperature limit of operation without recrystallization is ~250 °C. There were four publications generated from this project with two additional manuscripts in progress and six presentations were made at national and international technical conferences. The combination of the pinhole defects and the lack of high temperature stability make the theoretically identified most promising candidate amorphous alloys

  7. Boron diffusion in silicon devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Kim, Dong Seop; Nakayashiki, Kenta; Rounsaville, Brian

    2010-09-07

    Disclosed are various embodiments that include a process, an arrangement, and an apparatus for boron diffusion in a wafer. In one representative embodiment, a process is provided in which a boric oxide solution is applied to a surface of the wafer. Thereafter, the wafer is subjected to a fast heat ramp-up associated with a first heating cycle that results in a release of an amount of boron for diffusion into the wafer.

  8. Amorphous silicon based particle detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N; Franco, A; Riesen, Y.; Despeisse, M; S. Dunand; Powolny, F; Jarron, P.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation hard monolithic particle sensors can be fabricated by a vertical integration of amorphous silicon particle sensors on top of CMOS readout chip. Two types of such particle sensors are presented here using either thick diodes or microchannel plates. The first type based on amorphous silicon diodes exhibits high spatial resolution due to the short lateral carrier collection. Combination of an amorphous silicon thick diode with microstrip detector geometries permits to achieve micromete...

  9. Thermal Studies on Boron-Based Initiator Formulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Rajendran

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Boron-potassium nitrate pyrotechnic composition can be converted into a hot wire-sensitive initiator formulation by the addition of an extra fuel. viz. lead thiocyanate. The ignition temperature of this composition depends on the percentage of thiocyanate in the mix and follows a binomial fit. The kinetic parameters. viz. activation energy E and pre-exponential factor A of the charge have been calculated from TG and DSC curves using different approaches developed by Coats-Redfern and Kissinger. Ignition delays measured from isothermal TG runs were found to yield equally good values of E and A. A comparison of these values for the tricomponent system' with those of the bicomponent systems as well as of the ingredients suggests that the starting reaction in this formulation is the reaction between lead thiocyanate and potassium nitrate which energises the main reaction between boron and potassium nitrate. leading to ignition.

  10. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell and manufacturing method. Hishoshitsu handotai taiyo denchi oyobi sono seizo hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjuku, T. (Taiyo Yuden Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-19

    This invention provides a manufacturing method of a transparent conductive film for an amorphous semiconductor soler cell, which can be easily molded with less cost without using a vacuum film formation process. In other words, in this invention, an ITO, which is practical for use with low ilumination intensity, is obtained by thinly coating a solution mixture of organic indium and organic tin compounds on an amorphous semiconductor layer followed by a heat treatment. In an amorphous semiconductor solar cell comprising a back electrode, amorphous semiconductor layer, a transparent conductive layer and a protective layer laminated sequentially on a surface insulated metal substrate, the said transparent conductive film is one wherein a solution mixture of organic indium and organic tin compounds is thinly coated on an semiconductor layer by means of a dipping process, dried, and heat-treated to form a film.

  11. Pyrolytic transformation from polydihydrosilane to hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    OpenAIRE

    Masuda, Takashi; Matsuki, Yasuo; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    The fabrication of thin film silicon devices based on solution processes rather than on conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest since cost reductions may result. Using a solution process, we coated substrates with polydihydrosilane solution and studied the pyrolytic transformation of the material into hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). From thermal gravimetry and differential thermal analysis data a significant reduction in weight of the material and a construction of S...

  12. Boron Fullerenes: A First-Principles Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez Szwacki Nevill

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractA family of unusually stable boron cages was identified and examined using first-principles local-density functional method. The structure of the fullerenes is similar to that of the B12icosahedron and consists of six crossing double-rings. The energetically most stable fullerene is made up of 180 boron atoms. A connection between the fullerene family and its precursors, boron sheets, is made. We show that the most stable boron sheets are not necessarily precursors of very stable boron cages. Our finding is a step forward in the understanding of the structure of the recently produced boron nanotubes.

  13. Relationship between adsorption of arsenic(III) and boron by soil and soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, M.

    1987-11-01

    The distribution coefficients (K/sub d/) for arsenic(III) and boron in a linear adsorption isotherm were determined for 15 subsurface soils collected from different sites in Japan, and the relationship between those K/sub d/ values and soil properties was examined. The soils differed greatly in their chemical and physical properties. The K/sub d/ value for arsenic(III) was significantly correlated with the dithionite-extractable Fe content in the soils (r = 0.90), whereas a high positive correlation was also found between the K/sub d/ value for boron and the oxalate-extractable Al content in the soils (r = 0.98). These relationships imply that the adsorption of arsenic(III) and boron by soil is controlled mainly by levels of amorphous iron oxides and hydroxides for arsenic(III) and by levels of allophane for boron and are very useful for assessing the adsorption of arsenic(III) and boron released in the underlying soil layer at coal ash disposal sites. 22 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  14. The prospects of using boron nitride in nuclear reactors as an absorbant and decelerator of neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The given work tells us that there are a widespread materials having an ability of amorphism, magnezation, hightemperature stability, wear resistance and corrosion resisting. To special requests which being presented to modern materials by some spheres of science and technics concern an ability of materials to work not only within the conditions of radioactive irradiation nor also capture heating neutrons. Hexagonal boron nitride has the most of these features. Boron nitride is used by the aircraft industry, because of its hightemperature resistance for a long time in extreme conditions. That is why the given material had been suggested as a neutron immerse material during production of containers for radioactive wastes long-lived storage. Using of enriched boron nitride in the first wall of thermonuclear reactor gives an oppotunity of refining nuclear and physical characteristics of reactor installation as a whole. Boron nitride has feeble activation in reactor neutron shell and high radiation resistance. All abovementioned boron nitride features, also its lower atmoic weight are very important for application in plasma devices, such as for using in installations of thermonuclear synthesis.

  15. Electrophoretically applied dielectrics for amorphous metal foils used in pulsed power saturable reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous metal foil-wound inductors have been tested as ferromagnetic saturable inductive elements for pulse-power (multi-terawatt) switching nodules. Saturation switching may provide large 100 ns current bursts necessary to accelerate ion beams for the fusion fuel pellet implosion required, for example, in PBFA (particle beam fusion accelerator) operation. In simulated capacitor testing premature dielectric breakdown of thin polyethylene terephthalate film insulation in the inductor windings occurs at considerably below 2500 V. This appears to be due to inadvertent dielectric damage from micro-spikes on the amorphous foil surface. Electron micrographs and dielectric breakdown data illustrate that electrophoretically-applied dielectric coatings, deposited from organic aqueous colloid dispersions, can be used to provide insulating coatings on the foil which provide a 240% improvement (6000 V) in the breakdown strength of wound amorphous foil inductors. The theory and operation of a dedicated electrophoretic continuous coating system is described

  16. Dispersion of boron carbide in a tungsten carbide/cobalt matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particles of boron carbide (105-125 microns) were coated with a layer (10-12 microns) of titanium carbide in a fluidized bed. These coated particles have been successfully incorporated in a tungsten carbide--cobalt matrix by hot pressing at 1 tonf/in2, (15.44 MN/m2) at 13500C. Attempts to produce a similar material by a cold pressing and sintering technique were unsuccessful because of penetration of the titanium carbide layer by liquid cobalt. Hot-pressed material containing boron carbide had a static strength in bend of approximately 175,000 lbf/in2, (1206MN/m2) which compares favorably with the strength of conventionally produced tungsten carbide/cobalt. The impact strength of the material containing boron carbide was however considerably lower than tungsten carbide/cobalt. In rock drilling tests on Darley Dale sandstone at low speeds and low loads, the material containing boron carbide drilled almost ten times as far without seizure as tungsten carbide/cobalt. In higher speed and higher load rotary drilling tests conducted by the National Coal Board, the material containing boron carbide chipped badly compared with normal NCB hardgrade material

  17. Amorphous Structures in Laser Cladding of ZL111 Aluminum Alloy:Semi-quantitative Study by Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xianqin; CHENG Zhaogu; XIA Jin'an; XU Guoliang; LIANG Gongying

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with amorphous structures in the laser cladding. ZL111 alloy is the substrate and Ni-Cr-Al alloy is sprayed on the substrate as the coating material. The coating is clad by a 5 kW transverse flow CO2 laser. The observation of SEM and TEM reveal that in the laser cladding there are amorphous structures of two different morphologies: one is space curved flake-like, and exists in the white web-like structures; the other is fir leaf-like, and exists in the grain-like structures. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) is used to semi-quantitatively determine the content of the amorphous structures. A relation is obtained between the content of amorphous structures and the dimensionless laser cladding parameter C. We also show the changes of the amorphous structures after annealing.

  18. Wettability of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wettability of boron carbide has been examined by means of the sessile drop method, using the following candidate alloys: (96wt%AG-4wt%Ti), (Ag-26.5wt%Cu-3wt%Ti), (Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti), Sn(99.95wt%) and Al(99.99wt%). The results show that B4C is completely wetted by the Ag-based alloys. Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti alloy and pure Al partly wet the B4C surface, while pure Sn does not wet B4C at all. For all the alloys used, except pure Sn, a reaction layer was observed at the interface between the ceramic part and the metal drop. Although the spreading kinetics of the Al-drop was much slower compared with the Ti-containing alloys, the reaction rate was considerably higher in the former case. This suggests that aluminium is an attractive candidate material for brazing of B4C. Formation of the low melting B2O3 at the B4C surface may cause oxidation of the filler metal during joining, which, in turn, leads to a low bond strength

  19. Nanostructured thin films and coatings mechanical properties

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    The first volume in "The Handbook of Nanostructured Thin Films and Coatings" set, this book concentrates on the mechanical properties, such as hardness, toughness, and adhesion, of thin films and coatings. It discusses processing, properties, and performance and provides a detailed analysis of theories and size effects. The book presents the fundamentals of hard and superhard nanocomposites and heterostructures, assesses fracture toughness and interfacial adhesion strength of thin films and hard nanocomposite coatings, and covers the processing and mechanical properties of hybrid sol-gel-derived nanocomposite coatings. It also uses nanomechanics to optimize coatings for cutting tools and explores various other coatings, such as diamond, metal-containing amorphous carbon nanostructured, and transition metal nitride-based nanolayered multilayer coatings.

  20. Thermal conductivity of boron carbide-boron nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that because of their preferred orientation, the addition of boron nitride dispersions to hot-pressed boron carbide was found to result in a considerable degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity of the resulting composite, indicated by an increase in the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 3 at the highest boron nitride volume fractions of this study, and a decrease in the thermal conductivity parallel to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 2. The composite data were found to be below the values expected from composite theory, which may represent indirect evidence for the existence of an interfacial thermal barrier