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Sample records for amorphization complex ceramic

  1. Particle-induced amorphization of complex ceramics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    The crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition is of fundamental importance. Particle irradiations provide an important, highly controlled means of investigating this phase transformation and the structure of the amorphous state. The interaction of heavy-particles with ceramics is complex because these materials have a wide range of structure types, complex compositions, and because chemical bonding is variable. Radiation damage and annealing can produce diverse results, but most commonly, single crystals become aperiodic or break down into a polycrystalline aggregate. The authors continued the studies of the transition from the periodic-to-aperiodic state in natural materials that have been damaged by α-recoil nuclei in the uranium and thorium decay series and in synthetic, analogous structures. The transition from the periodic to aperiodic state was followed by detailed x-ray diffraction analysis, in-situ irradiation/transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy/x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy and other spectroscopic techniques. These studies were completed in conjunction with bulk irradiations that can be completed at Los Alamos National Laboratory or Sandia National Laboratories. Principal questions addressed in this research program included: (1) What is the process at the atomic level by which a ceramic material is transformed into a disordered or aperiodic state? (2) What are the controlling effects of structural topology, bond-type, dose rate, and irradiation temperature on the final state of the irradiated material? (3) What is the structure of the damaged material? (4) What are the mechanisms and kinetics for the annealing of interstitial and aggregate defects in these irradiated ceramic materials? (5) What general criteria may be applied to the prediction of amorphization in complex ceramics?

  2. Amorphization of complex ceramics by heavy-particle irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewing, R.C.; Wang, L.M.

    1994-11-01

    Complex ceramics, for the purpose of this paper, include materials that are generally strongly bonded (mixed ionic and covalent), refractory and frequently good insulators. They are distinguished from simple, compact ceramics (e.g., MgO and UO 2 ) by structural features which include: (1) open network structures, best characterized by a consideration of the shape, size and connectivity of coordination polyhedra; (2) complex compositions which characteristically lead to multiple cation sites and lower symmetry; (3) directional bonding; (4) bond-type variations within the structure. The heavy particle irradiations include ion-beam irradiations and recoil-nucleus damage resulting from a-decay events from constituent actinides. The latter effects are responsible for the radiation-induced transformation to the metamict state in minerals. The responses of these materials to irradiation are complex, as energy may be dissipated ballistically by transfer of kinetic energy from an incident projectile or radiolytically by conversion of radiation-induced electronic excitations into atomic motion. This results in isolated Frenkel defect pairs, defect aggregates, isolated collision cascades or bulk amorphization. Thus, the amorphization process is heterogeneous. Only recently have there been systematic studies of heavy particle irradiations of complex ceramics on a wide variety of structure-types and compositions as a function of dose and temperature. In this paper, we review the conditions for amorphization for the tetragonal orthosilicate, zircon [ZrSiO 4 ]; the hexagonal orthosilicate/phosphate apatite structure-type [X 10 (ZO 4 ) 6 (F,Cl,O) 2 ]; the isometric pyrochlores [A 1-2 B 2 O 6 (O,OH,F) 0-1p H 2 O] and its monoclinic derivative zirconotite [CaZrTi 2 O 7 ]; the olivine (derivative - hcp) structure types, α- VI A 2 IV BO 4 , and spinel (ccp), γ- VI A 2 IV BO 4

  3. Amorphization of ceramics by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.; Williams, J.M.; Appleton, B.R.; Naramoto, H.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of the implantation parameters fluence, substrate temperature, and chemical species on the formation of amorphous phases in Al 2 O 3 and α-SiC was studied. At 300 0 K, fluences in excess of 10 17 ions.cm -2 were generally required to amorphize Al 2 O 3 ; however, implantation of zirconium formed the amorphous phase at a fluence of 4 x 10 16 Zr.cm -2 . At 77 0 K, the threshold fluence was lowered to about 2 x 10 15 Cr.cm -2 . Single crystals of α-SiC were amorphized at 300 0 K by a fluence of 2 x 10 14 Cr.cm -2 or 1 x 10 15 N.cm -2 . Implantation at 1023 0 K did not produce the amorphous phase in SiC. The micro-indentation hardness of the amorphous material was about 60% of that of the crystalline counterpart

  4. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  5. Generation of amorphous ceramic capacitor coatings on titanium using a continuous sol-gel process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, B.G.; Walsh, M.A. III; Phillips, P.G.; Morris, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    Thin amorphous films of ceramic capacitor materials were successfully deposited using sol-gel chemistry onto titanium wire using a continuous, computer controlled process. By repeatedly depositing and calcining very thin layers of material, smooth and even coats can be produced. Surface analyses revealed the layered nature of these thin coats, as well as the amorphous nature of the ceramic. The electrical properties of the better coatings, all composed of niobium, bismuth, zinc oxides, were then evaluated. copyright 1995 Materials Research Society

  6. Fiscal 2000 survey report. Basic research on hot molding of amorphous ceramics; 2000 nendo amorphous netsukan ceramics seikeiho ni kansuru kiso kenkyu chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Experiments were conducted on the plasticity processing of heat resistant ceramics making use of the viscous deformation of amorphous ceramics in the supercooled liquid temperature domain. Concerning the preparation of powder of amorphous ceramics, the plasma rotating electrode method of Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, was employed, and a bamboo leaf shaped amorphous flake was successfully fabricated by increasing the arc discharge current. In a search of texture easy to turn amorphous, it was observed that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 2}O{sub 3} had a supercooled liquid domain of as large as 70K, and this enabled a conclusion that it was a promising candidate for hot molding in a supercooled liquid domain. In an experiment of molding in a supercooled liquid domain, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} was used in a press molding process. As the result, a compact bulk mold was obtained in a temperature domain far lower than in the case of conventional sintering. Crystallization had already advanced in all the molds experimentally fabricated by press molding, and this disabled a study of characteristics to be exhibited by an amorphous mold, but it was found that they had a compressive strength of approximately 1,800MPa. (NEDO)

  7. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-01-01

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed with excellent corrosion resistance and neutron absorption. These coatings, with further development, could be cost-effective options to enhance the corrosion resistance of drip shields and waste packages, and limit nuclear criticality in canisters for the transportation, aging, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten have shown the corrosion resis...

  8. Porous ceramic scaffolds with complex architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munch, E.; Franco, J.; Deville, S.; Hunger, P.; Saiz, E.; Tomsia, A. P.

    2008-06-01

    This work compares two novel techniques for the fabrication of ceramic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering with complex porosity: robocasting and freeze casting. Both techniques are based on the preparation of concentrated ceramic suspensions with suitable properties for the process. In robocasting, the computer-guided deposition of the suspensions is used to build porous materials with designed three dimensional geometries and microstructures. Freeze casting uses ice crystals as a template to form porous lamellar ceramic materials. Preliminary results on the compressive strengths of the materials are also reported.

  9. Post-treatment of Plasma-Sprayed Amorphous Ceramic Coatings by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chraska, T.; Pala, Z.; Mušálek, R.; Medřický, J.; Vilémová, M.

    2015-04-01

    Alumina-zirconia ceramic material has been plasma sprayed using a water-stabilized plasma torch to produce free standing coatings. The as-sprayed coatings have very low porosity and are mostly amorphous. The amorphous material crystallizes at temperatures above 900 °C. A spark plasma sintering apparatus has been used to heat the as-sprayed samples to temperatures above 900 °C to induce crystallization, while at the same time, a uniaxial pressure of 80 MPa has been applied to their surface. After such post-treatment, the ceramic samples are crystalline and have very low open porosity. The post-treated material exhibits high hardness and significantly increased flexural strength. The post-treated samples have a microstructure that is best described as nanocomposite with the very small crystallites embedded in an amorphous matrix.

  10. Influence of irradiation spectrum and implanted ions on the amorphization of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    Polycrystalline Al2O3, magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4), MgO, Si3N4, and SiC were irradiated with various ions at 200-450 K, and microstructures were examined following irradiation using cross-section TEM. Amorphization was not observed in any of the irradiated oxide ceramics, despsite damage energy densities up to ∼7 keV/atom (70 displacements per atom). On the other hand, SiC readily amorphized after damage levels of ∼0.4 dpa at room temperature (RT). Si3N4 exhibited intermediate behavior; irradiation with Fe 2+ ions at RT produced amorphization in the implanted ion region after damage levels of ∼1 dpa. However, irradiated regions outside the implanted ion region did not amorphize even after damage levels > 5 dpa. The amorphous layer in the Fe-implanted region of Si3N4 did not appear if the specimen was simultaneoulsy irradiated with 1-MeV He + ions at RT. By comparison with published results, it is concluded that the implantation of certain chemical species has a pronounced effect on the amorphization threshold dose of all five materials. Intense ionizing radiation inhibits amorphization in Si3N4, but does not appear to significantly influence the amorphization of SiC

  11. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Thermal Spray Amorphous Metal and Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blink, J.; Farmer, J.; Choi, J.; Saw, C.

    2009-06-01

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed with excellent corrosion resistance and neutron absorption. These coatings, with further development, could be cost-effective options to enhance the corrosion resistance of drip shields and waste packages, and limit nuclear criticality in canisters for the transportation, aging, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Iron-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials and their stability at high neutron doses enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for waste package and drip shield applications, although the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas-atomized powders and applied as near full density, nonporous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This article summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers and as neutron absorbers. This article also presents a simple cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials.

  12. On the Mass Fractal Character of Si-Based Structural Networks in Amorphous Polymer Derived Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Sen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The intermediate-range packing of SiNxC4−x (0 ≤ x ≤ 4 tetrahedra in polysilycarbodiimide and polysilazane-derived amorphous SiCN ceramics is investigated using 29Si spin-lattice relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance (SLR NMR spectroscopy. The SiCN network in the polysilylcarbodiimide-derived ceramic consists predominantly of SiN4 tetrahedra that are characterized by a 3-dimensional spatial distribution signifying compact packing of such units to form amorphous Si3N4 clusters. On the other hand, the SiCN network of the polysilazane-derived ceramic is characterized by mixed bonded SiNxC4−x tetrahedra that are inefficiently packed with a mass fractal dimension of Df ~2.5 that is significantly lower than the embedding Euclidean dimension (D = 3. This result unequivocally confirms the hypothesis that the presence of dissimilar atoms, namely, 4-coordinated C and 3-coordinated N, in the nearest neighbor environment of Si along with some exclusion in connectivity between SiCxN4−x tetrahedra with widely different N:C ratios and the absence of bonding between C and N result in steric hindrance to an efficient packing of these structural units. It is noted that similar inefficiencies in packing are observed in polymer-derived amorphous SiOC ceramics as well as in proteins and binary hard sphere systems.

  13. On the Mass Fractal Character of Si-Based Structural Networks in Amorphous Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Widgeon, Scarlett

    2015-03-17

    The intermediate-range packing of SiN x C 4- x (0 ≤ x ≤ 4) tetrahedra in polysilycarbodiimide and polysilazane-derived amorphous SiCN ceramics is investigated using 29 Si spin-lattice relaxation nuclear magnetic resonance (SLR NMR) spectroscopy. The SiCN network in the polysilylcarbodiimide-derived ceramic consists predominantly of SiN₄ tetrahedra that are characterized by a 3-dimensional spatial distribution signifying compact packing of such units to form amorphous Si₃N₄ clusters. On the other hand, the SiCN network of the polysilazane-derived ceramic is characterized by mixed bonded SiN x C 4- x tetrahedra that are inefficiently packed with a mass fractal dimension of D f ~2.5 that is significantly lower than the embedding Euclidean dimension ( D = 3). This result unequivocally confirms the hypothesis that the presence of dissimilar atoms, namely, 4-coordinated C and 3-coordinated N, in the nearest neighbor environment of Si along with some exclusion in connectivity between SiC x N 4- x tetrahedra with widely different N:C ratios and the absence of bonding between C and N result in steric hindrance to an efficient packing of these structural units. It is noted that similar inefficiencies in packing are observed in polymer-derived amorphous SiOC ceramics as well as in proteins and binary hard sphere systems.

  14. Oxidation studies of β-sialon ceramics containing amorphous and / or crystalline intergranular phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, J.; Kall, P.O.; Jansson, K.; Nygren, M.

    1992-01-01

    β-sialon ceramics of equal overall compositions but containing amorphous, partly crystalline and almost completely crystalline intergranular phase(s) have been oxidized in oxygen at 1350 deg C for 20 hours. The obtained weight gain curves do not follow the parabolic rate law (ΔW/A 0 ) 2 = k p t + β. To the extent that crystallization occurs in the oxide scale during the oxidation experiment, the amorphous cross section area through which oxygen most easily diffuses will decrease with time. A brief description of this new rate law is given, and the obtained oxidation curves will be discussed within that framework. 4 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  15. On electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kewei; Li, Xuqin; Ma, Baisheng; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Ligong; An, Linan

    2014-06-01

    The electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics was studied by combining measurements of temperature-dependent conductivity and optical absorption. By comparing the experimental results to theoretical models, electronic structure was constructed for a carbon-rich amorphous silicon carbide, which revealed several unique features, such as deep defect energy level, wide band-tail band, and overlap between the band-tail band and defect level. These unique features were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the material and used to explain the electric behavior.

  16. Crystallization kinetics of amorphous alumina–zirconia–silica ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chráska, Tomáš; Hostomský, Jiří; Klementová, Mariana; Dubský, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 15 (2009), s. 3159-3165 ISSN 0955-2219 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300430651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : Nanocomposites * Al2O3 * ZrO2 * SiO2 * Solid-state reaction Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 2.090, year: 2009 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TX0-4WH6KHP-1&_user=6542793&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1024128242&_rerunOrigin= google &_acct=C000070123&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=6542793&md5=8650ab2f962a23013a2036628c8ec87f

  17. Primary Damage in Ceramics: Complexity and Inapplicability of the NRT Dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crocombette, Jean-Paul

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the studies on ceramics bring even more complexity is an already difficult situation about the NRT dpa. First in ceramics amorphized by direct impact, the very concept of surviving FPs which is what the NRT dpa is supposed to measure is meaningless. One then has to return to the bare number of displaced atoms to quantify the damage. Second in more complex situations where the damage is mixed between amorphization and creation of point defects, it is almost impossible to define a quantity to measure atomic disorder induced by cascades. Finally it was shown that the amount and nature of damage depends not only on the energy of the PKA but also on its nature. Finally one should keep in mind that even in the regular cases, the number of surviving Frenkel pairs may vary with temperature as their recombinations can be thermally activated

  18. Impurity-defect complexes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.H.; Fong, C.Y.; Nichols, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The two most outstanding features observed for dopants in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-a shift in the Fermi level accompanied by an increase in the defect density and an absence of degenerate doping have previously been postulated to stem from the formation of substitutional dopant-dangling bond complexes. Using first-principles self-consistent pseudopotential calculations in conjunction with a supercell model for the amorphous network and the ability of network relaxation from the first-principles results. The authors have studied the electronic and structural properties of substitutional fourfold-coordinated phosphorus and boron at the second neighbor position to a dangling bond defect. This paper demonstrates that such impurity-defect complexes can account for the general features observed experimentally in doped a-Si:H

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and in-vitro cytocompatibility of amorphous β-tri-calcium magnesium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun, E-mail: bol11@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Banerjee, Ipsita [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Biphasic mixtures of crystalline β-tricalcium magnesium phosphate (β-TCMP) and an amorphous calcium magnesium phosphate have been synthesized and reported to support enhanced hMSC differentiation in comparison to β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) due to the release of increased amounts of bioactive ions. In the current study, completely amorphous β-TCMP has been synthesized which is capable of releasing increased amounts of Mg{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions, rather than a biphasic mixture as earlier reported. The amorphous phase formed was observed to crystallize between temperatures of 400–600 °C. The scaffolds prepared with amorphous β-TCMP were capable of supporting enhanced hMSC proliferation and differentiation in comparison to commercially available β-TCP. However, a similar gene expression of mature osteoblast markers, OCN and COL-1, in comparison to biphasic β-TCMP was observed. To further study the role of Mg{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions in regulating hMSC osteogenic differentiation, the capability of hMSCs to mineralize in growth media supplemented with Mg{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions was studied. Interestingly, 5 mM PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} supported mineralization while the addition of 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} to 5 mM PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} inhibited mineralization. It was therefore concluded that the release of Ca{sup 2+} ions from β-TCMP scaffolds also plays a role in regulating osteogenic differentiation on these scaffolds and it is noted that further work is required to more accurately determine the exact role of Mg{sup 2+} in regulating hMSC osteogenic differentiation. - Highlights: • Synthesis of amorphous Mg containing beta tricalcium phosphate ceramicsAmorphous beta TCMP supports enhanced hMSC proliferation and differentiation. • Amorphous beta TCMP shows comparable OCN and COL-1 expression to biphasic TCMP. • Presence of 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions in growth media inhibits hMSC mineralization.

  20. Red-clay ceramic powders as geopolymer precursors: Consideration of amorphous portion and CaO content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keppert, M.; Vejmelková, E.; Bezdička, Petr; Doleželová, M.; Čáchová, M.; Scheinherrová, L.; Pokorný, J.; Vyšvařil, M.; Rovnaníková, P.; Černý, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 161, SEP (2018), s. 82-89 ISSN 0169-1317 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Amorphous content * Calcium oxide * Composition * Geopolymers * Red-clay ceramics Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 3.101, year: 2016

  1. Accuracy in quantitative phase analysis of mixtures with large amorphous contents. The case of stoneware ceramics and bricks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gualtieri, A. F.; Riva, V.; Bresciani, A.; Maretti, S.; Tamburini, M.; Viani, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 3 (2014), s. 835-846 ISSN 0021-8898 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : amorphous phases * bricks * ceramics * internal standards * quantitative phase analysis Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 3.720, year: 2014 http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/paper?S160057671400627X

  2. Direct conversion of radioactive and chemical waste containing metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    The Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (CMODS) is a new process for direct conversion of radioactive, mixed, and chemical wastes to glass. The wastes can be in the chemical forms of metals, ceramics, amorphous solids, and organics. GMODS destroys organics and it incorporates heavy metals and radionuclides into a glass. Processable wastes may include miscellaneous spent fuels (SF), SF hulls and hardware, plutonium wastes in different forms, high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, ion-exchange resins, failed equipment, and laboratory wastes. Thermodynamic calculations indicate theoretical feasibility. Small-scale laboratory experiments (< 100 g per test) have demonstrated chemical laboratory feasibility for several metals. Additional work is needed to demonstrate engineering feasibility

  3. Complex structural hierarchies observed in Y2O3–Al2O3–SiO2 eutectic ceramics prepared by laser melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian-Zheng Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous Y2O3–Al2O3–SiO2 beads were directly melted by a Nd:YAG laser. The structural features in multi-scale of the samples after solidification were investigated. The results showed that the cooling speed in the applied processing conditions was not high enough to retain the amorphous nature of ceramic beads into the consolidated bulks. In addition to an amorphous phase two crystalline phases, YAG and α-Al2O3, were formed yielding the formation of complex structural hierarchies.

  4. Quantitative determination of amorphous content in ceramic materials using x-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchinski, M.A.; Hubbard, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    A quantitative technique which employs a modified method of additions approach to analyze for low amorphous content in crystalline matrices was developed and tested. Known amounts of amorphous material are added to the starting powder. The method uses the ratio of a measure of the intensity of the amorphous phase corrected for background to the background corrected intensity of a reference line from a crystalline phase. The amorphous spiking phase must be close in composition to the amorphous phase existing in the analyte. A critical step of the method is to correctly establish the background intensity. A completely crystalline material of similar scattering power was used to establish background intensity

  5. First principles-based multiparadigm, multiscale strategy for simulating complex materials processes with applications to amorphous SiC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naserifar, Saber [Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1211 (United States); Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Goddard, William A. [Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad, E-mail: moe@usc.edu [Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1211 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Progress has recently been made in developing reactive force fields to describe chemical reactions in systems too large for quantum mechanical (QM) methods. In particular, ReaxFF, a force field with parameters that are obtained solely from fitting QM reaction data, has been used to predict structures and properties of many materials. Important applications require, however, determination of the final structures produced by such complex processes as chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, and formation of ceramic films by pyrolysis of polymers. This requires the force field to properly describe the formation of other products of the process, in addition to yielding the final structure of the material. We describe a strategy for accomplishing this and present an example of its use for forming amorphous SiC films that have a wide variety of applications. Extensive reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to simulate the pyrolysis of hydridopolycarbosilane. The reaction products all agree with the experimental data. After removing the reaction products, the system is cooled down to room temperature at which it produces amorphous SiC film, for which the computed radial distribution function, x-ray diffraction pattern, and the equation of state describing the three main SiC polytypes agree with the data and with the QM calculations. Extensive MD simulations have also been carried out to compute other structural properties, as well the effective diffusivities of light gases in the amorphous SiC film.

  6. Post-treatment of Plasma-Sprayed Amorphous Ceramic Coatings by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chráska, Tomáš; Pala, Zdeněk; Mušálek, Radek; Medřický, Jan; Vilémová, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 4 (2015), s. 637-643 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/12/1922 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : ceramic s * heat treatment * nanostructured materials Subject RIV: JH - Ceramic s, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2015

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF COMPLEX EQUIPMENT FOR PLASMA SPRAY CERAMIC COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Okovity

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Develop a set equipment for plasma forming ceramic coatings. The article presents characteristics and parameters of the developed complex equipment for formation of plasma ceramic coatings as well as results of its testing. Methods of research is based on studies of structural elements composite plasma coatings system ZrO2 – Y2O3  obtained  using  developed complex equipment. One of the most effective ways to protect the components from high temperature corrosion and oxidation is formation on the surface of plasma thermal barrier coatings. For thermal barrier coating has very strict requirements: сharacterized by a smooth change of physico-mechanical properties (porosity, microhardness, elastic modulus in the cross section of the metal substrate to the outer ceramic layer; to withstand multiple cycles of thermal cycling from room temperature to the operating temperature; to maintain gastightness under operating conditions and thus ensure a sufficiently high level of adhesive strength. For realization of new technological schemes applying thermal barrier coatings with high operational characteristics was developed, patented and manufactured a range of new equipment. The experiments show that authors developed PBG-1 plasmatron and powder feeder PPBG-04 have at least 2–3 times the service life during the deposition of ceramic materials compared to the standard equipment of the company "Plasma-Technik", by changing the structure of the cathode-anode plasma torch assembly and construction of the delivery unit of the feeder to facilitate the uniform supply of the powder into the plasma jet and the best of his penetration. The result is better plasma coatings with improved operational characteristics: adhesion strength is increased to 1.3–2 times, material utilization in 1.5–1.6 times microhardness 1.2–1.4 times the porosity is reduced by 2–2.5 times.

  8. Amorphous intergranular films in silicon nitride ceramics quenched from high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinibulk, M.K.; Kleebe, H.; Schneider, G.A.; Ruehle, M.

    1993-01-01

    High-temperature microstructure of an MgO-hot-pressed Si 3 N 4 and a Yb 2 O 3 + Al 2 O 3 -sintered/annealed Si 3 N 4 were obtained by quenching thin specimens from temperatures between 1,350 and 1,550 C. Quenching materials from 1,350 C produced no observable exchanges in the secondary phases at triple-grain junctions or along grain boundaries. Although quenching from temperatures of ∼1,450 C also showed no significant changes in the general microstructure or morphology of the Si 3 N 4 grains, the amorphous intergranular film thickness increased substantially from an initial ∼1 nm in the slowly cooled material to 1.5--9 nm in the quenched materials. The variability of film thickness in a given material suggests a nonequilibrium state. Specimens quenched from 1,550 C revealed once again thin (1-nm) intergranular films at all high-angle grain boundaries, indicating an equilibrium condition. The changes observed in intergranular-film thickness by high-resolution electron microscopy can be related to the eutectic temperature of the system and to diffusional and viscous processes occurring in the amorphous intergranular film during the high-temperature anneal prior to quenching

  9. Study on the substrate-induced crystallisation of amorphous SiC-precursor ceramics. TIB/A; Untersuchungen zur substratinduzierten Kristallisation amorpher SiC-Precursorkeramiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, C.

    2000-12-01

    In the present thesis the crystallization behaviour of amorphous silicon-carbon materials (SiC{sub x}) was studied. The main topic of the experimental studies formed thereby the epitactical crystallization of thin silicon carbide layers on monocrystalline substrates of silicon carbides or silicon. Furthermore by thermolysis of the polymer amorphous SiC{sub x}-powder was obtained.

  10. Effective and highly recyclable ceramic membrane based on amorphous nanosilica for dye removal from t

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan M.K. Tolba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an adsorptive ceramic membrane was prepared by a simple dry pressing of a mixture of nanosilica produced from low cost rice husk by hydrothermal technique at sub-critical water conditions, calcium phosphate, and ammonium acetate together and then calcined at 600 °C in air. Optimization of the raw materials ratio was found to be necessary to avoid crack formation during sintering process. The membrane microstructure, dye removal efficiency and the permeation flux of the membranes were investigated. The membrane was tested to remove the methylene blue from aqueous solution. Results show that the removal of the dye increases as the silica content increases in the all given membranes and it decreases with an increase in the ammonium acetate. Moreover, the water flux decreases with an increase in the silica content. The methylene blue adsorbed onto the silica membrane can be removed by calcination and the membrane could be recycled several times without any obvious loss in the adsorption performance. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a convenient strategy to prepare an effective adsorptive membrane, which can be applied as a highly recyclable membrane for the adsorption of organic maters.

  11. Economic interdependence and complexity: Falaj agriculture and ceramic production in the southeast Arabian iron age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, P.

    1997-01-01

    Over the last fifteen years surveys and excavations in the United Arab Emirates and Sultanate of Oman have revealed a widespread and distinctive material culture dating to the late second and first millennium BC. In this paper the results of PIXE-PIGME analysis of ceramics from the Iron II period (1100-600 BC) are presented. In combination with ceramic distribution data, the analysis permits the identification of ceramic production areas. More importantly, however, the analysis, when combined with environmental and subsistence strategy data, provides an insight into the relationship between agricultural intensification and ceramic production and the varying degrees of economic complexity which existed at this time

  12. Phase Field Theory and Analysis of Pressure-Shear Induced Amorphization and Failure in Boron Carbide Ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Clayton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A nonlinear continuum phase field theory is developed to describe amorphization of crystalline elastic solids under shear and/or pressure loading. An order parameter describes the local degree of crystallinity. Elastic coefficients can depend on the order parameter, inelastic volume change may accompany the transition from crystal to amorphous phase, and transitional regions parallel to bands of amorphous material are penalized by interfacial surface energy. Analytical and simple numerical solutions are obtained for an idealized isotropic version of the general theory, for an element of material subjected to compressive and/or shear loading. Solutions compare favorably with experimental evidence and atomic simulations of amorphization in boron carbide, demonstrating the tendency for structural collapse and strength loss with increasing shear deformation and superposed pressure.

  13. Characterization of amorphous yttria layers deposited by aqueous solutions of Y-chelate alkoxides complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Soon, E-mail: kyscjb@i-sunam.com; Lee, Yu-Ri; Kim, Byeong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Hun; Moon, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Hunju

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Economical method for crack-free amorphous yttria layer deposition by dip coating. • Simpler process for planar yttria film as a diffusion barrier and nucleation layer. • Easy control over the film properties with better characteristics. • Easy control over the thickness of the deposited films. • A feasible process that can be easily adopted by HTSCC industries. - Abstract: Crack-free amorphous yttria layers were deposited by dip coating in solutions of different Y-chelate alkoxides complex. Three Y-chelate solutions of different concentrations were prepared using yttrium acetate tetrahydrate, yttrium stearic acid as Y source materials. PEG, diethanolamine were used as chelating agents, while ethanol, methanol and tetradecane were used as solvent. Three different combinations of chelating and solvents were used to prepare solutions for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dip coating on SUS, electropolished and non-electropolished Hastelloy C-276 substrates. The thickness of the films was varied by changing the number of dipping cycles. At an optimized condition, the substrate surface roughness (rms) value was reduced from ∼50 nm to ∼1 nm over a 10 × 10 μm{sup 2} area. After Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition, MgO was deposited using ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD), then LaMnO{sub 3} (LMO) was deposited using sputtering and GdBCO was deposited using reactive co-evaporation by deposition and reaction (RCE-DR). Detailed X-ray study indicates that LMO/MgO/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and GdBCO/LMO/MgO/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} stack films have good out-of-plane and in-plane textures with strong c-axis alignment. The critical current (Ic) of GdBCO/LMO/MgO/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} multilayer structure varied from 190 to 420 A/cm with different solutions, when measured at 77 K. These results demonstrated that amorphous yttria can be easily deposited by dip coating using Y-chelates complex as a diffusion barrier and nucleation layer.

  14. Characterization of amorphous yttria layers deposited by aqueous solutions of Y-chelate alkoxides complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Soon; Lee, Yu-Ri; Kim, Byeong-Joo; Lee, Jae-Hun; Moon, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Hunju

    2015-01-01

    Crack-free amorphous yttria layers were deposited by dip coating in solutions of different Y-chelate alkoxides complex. Three Y-chelate solutions of different concentrations were prepared using yttrium acetate tetrahydrate, yttrium stearic acid as Y source materials. PEG, diethanolamine were used as chelating agents, while ethanol, methanol and tetradecane were used as solvent. Three different combinations of chelating and solvents were used to prepare solutions for Y2O3 dip coating on SUS, electropolished and non-electropolished Hastelloy C-276 substrates. The thickness of the films was varied by changing the number of dipping cycles. At an optimized condition, the substrate surface roughness (rms) value was reduced from ∼50 nm to ∼1 nm over a 10 × 10 μm2 area. After Y2O3 deposition, MgO was deposited using ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD), then LaMnO3 (LMO) was deposited using sputtering and GdBCO was deposited using reactive co-evaporation by deposition and reaction (RCE-DR). Detailed X-ray study indicates that LMO/MgO/Y2O3 and GdBCO/LMO/MgO/Y2O3 stack films have good out-of-plane and in-plane textures with strong c-axis alignment. The critical current (Ic) of GdBCO/LMO/MgO/Y2O3 multilayer structure varied from 190 to 420 A/cm with different solutions, when measured at 77 K. These results demonstrated that amorphous yttria can be easily deposited by dip coating using Y-chelates complex as a diffusion barrier and nucleation layer.

  15. Surface modification of aluminum nitride by polysilazane and its polymer-derived amorphous silicon oxycarbide ceramic for the enhancement of thermal conductivity in silicone rubber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsien Tang; Sukachonmakul, Tanapon; Kuo, Ming Tai; Wang, Yu Hsiang; Wattanakul, Karnthidaporn

    2014-02-01

    Polysilazane (PSZ) and its polymer-derived amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) ceramic were coated on aluminum nitride (AlN) by using a dip-coating method to allow moisture-crosslinking of PSZ on AlN, followed by heat treatment at 700 °C in air to convert PSZ into SiOC on AlN. The results from FTIR, XPS and SEM indicated that the surface of AlN was successfully coated by PSZ and SiOC film. It was found that the introduction of PSZ and SiOC film help improve in the interfacial adhesion between the modified AlN (PSZ/AlN and SiOC/AlN) and silicone rubber lead to the increase in the thermal conductivity of the composites since the thermal boundary resistance at the filler-matrix interface was decreased. However, the introduction of SiOC as an intermediate layer between AlN and silicone rubber could help increase the thermal energy transport at the filler-matrix interface rather than using PSZ. This result was due to the decrease in the surface roughness and thickness of SiOC film after heat treatment at 700 °C in air. Thus, in the present work, a SiOC ceramic coating could provide a new surface modification for the improvement of the interfacial adhesion between the thermally conductive filler and the matrix in which can enhance the thermal conductivity of the composites.

  16. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04

    . The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. These amorphous alloys appear to maintain their corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature. Visionary research is proposed to extend the application of corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous metal coatings, and variants of these coatings, to protection of the Nation's transportation infrastructure. Specific objectives of the proposed work are: (1) fabrication of appropriate test samples for evaluation of concept; (2) collection of production and test data for coated steel reinforcement bars, enabling systematic comparison of various coating options, based upon performance and economic considerations; and (3) construction and testing of concrete structures with coated steel reinforcement bars, thereby demonstrating the value of amorphous-metal coatings. The benefits of ceramic coatings as thermal barriers will also be addressed.

  17. Complex-shaped ceramic composites obtained by machining compact polymer-filler mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria da Rocha

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Research in the preparation of ceramics from polymeric precursors is giving rise to increased interest in ceramic technology because it allows the use of several promising polymer forming techniques. In this work ceramic composite pieces were obtained by pyrolysis of a compacted mixture of a polysiloxane resin and alumina/silicon powder. The mixture consists of 60 vol% of the polymer phase and 40 vol% of the filler in a 1:1 ratio for alumina/silicon, which was hot pressed to crosslink the polymer, thus forming a compact body. This green body was trimmed into different geometries and pyrolised in nitrogen atmosphere at temperatures up to 1600 °C. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of phases such as mullite and Si2ON2 during pyrolysis, that result from reactions between fillers, polymer decomposition products and nitrogen atmosphere. The porosity was found to be less than 20% and the mass loss around 10%. The complex geometry was maintained after pyrolysis and shrinkage was approximately 8%, proving pyrolisis to be a suitable process to form near-net-shaped bulk ceramic components.

  18. Multipoint alignment monitoring with amorphous silicon position detectors in a complex light path

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Ferrando, A., E-mail: antonio.ferrando@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L. [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria. CSIC-University of Cantabria, Santander (Spain)

    2010-12-01

    This document presents an application of the new generation of amorphous silicon position detecting (ASPD) sensors to multipoint alignment. Twelve units are monitored along a 20 m long laser beam, where the light path is deflected by 90{sup o} using a pentaprism.

  19. Multipoint alignment monitoring with amorphous silicon position detectors in a complex light path

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    This document presents an application of the new generation of amorphous silicon position detecting (ASPD) sensors to multipoint alignment. Twelve units are monitored along a 20 m long laser beam, where the light path is deflected by 90 o using a pentaprism.

  20. Rapid prototyping of a complex model for the manufacture of plaster molds for slip casting ceramic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. C. Velazco

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer assisted designing (CAD is well known for several decades and employed for ceramic manufacturing almost since the beginning, but usually employed in the first part of the projectual ideation processes, neither in the prototyping nor in the manufacturing stages. The rapid prototyping machines, also known as 3D printers, have the capacity to produce in a few hours real pieces using plastic materials of high resistance, with great precision and similarity with respect to the original, based on unprecedented digital models produced by means of modeling with specific design software or from the digitalization of existing parts using the so-called 3D scanners. The main objective of the work is to develop the methodology used in the entire process of building a part in ceramics from the interrelationship between traditional techniques and new technologies for the manufacture of prototypes. And to take advantage of the benefits that allow us this new reproduction technology. The experience was based on the generation of a complex piece, in digital format, which served as the model. A regular 15 cm icosahedron presented features complex enough not to advise the production of the model by means of the traditional techniques of ceramics (manual or mechanical. From this digital model, a plaster mold was made in the traditional way in order to slip cast clay based slurries, freely dried in air and fired and glazed in the traditional way. This experience has shown the working hypothesis and opens up the possibility of new lines of work to academic and technological levels that will be explored in the near future. This technology provides a wide range of options to address the formal aspect of a part to be performed for the field of design, architecture, industrial design, the traditional pottery, ceramic art, etc., which allow you to amplify the formal possibilities, save time and therefore costs when drafting the necessary and appropriate matrixes

  1. Study of hMSC proliferation and differentiation on Mg and Mg–Sr containing biphasic β-tricalcium phosphate and amorphous calcium phosphate ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Satish S.; Roy, Abhijit; Lee, Boeun; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-01-01

    Biphasic mixtures of either Mg"2"+ or combined Mg"2"+ and Sr"2"+ cation substituted β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) were prepared using a low temperature chemical phosphatizing and hydrolysis reaction approach. Scaffolds prepared using the cation substituted calcium phosphates were capable of supporting similar levels of human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation in comparison to commercially available β-TCP. The concentrations of Mg"2"+, Sr"2"+, and PO_4"3"− released from these scaffolds were also within the ranges desired from previous reports to support both hMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Interestingly, hMSCs cultured directly on scaffolds prepared with only Mg"2"+ substituted β-TCP were capable of supporting statistically significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity, osteopontin, and osteoprotegerin expression in comparison to all compositions containing both Mg"2"+ and Sr"2"+, and commercially available β-TCP. hMSCs cultured in the presence of scaffold extracts also exhibited similar trends in the expression of osteogenic markers as was observed during direct culture. Therefore, it was concluded that the enhanced differentiation observed was due to the release of bioactive ions rather than the surface microstructure. The role of these ions on transforming growth factor-β and bone morphogenic protein signaling was also evaluated using a PCR array. It was concluded that the release of these ions may support enhanced differentiation through SMAD dependent TGF-β and BMP signaling. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Mg and Mg-Sr containing biphasic beta tricalcium phosphate ceramics • Magnesium substitution influences ALP activity compared to strontium content. • Solution extract plays a more dominant role on hMSC differentiation. • Direct and indirect Mg and Mg-Sr TCP culture show similar OPG and OPN expression.

  2. Study of hMSC proliferation and differentiation on Mg and Mg–Sr containing biphasic β-tricalcium phosphate and amorphous calcium phosphate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Satish S., E-mail: sss42@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit, E-mail: abr20@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Lee, Boeun [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Craniofacial Regeneration, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Biphasic mixtures of either Mg{sup 2+} or combined Mg{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+} cation substituted β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) were prepared using a low temperature chemical phosphatizing and hydrolysis reaction approach. Scaffolds prepared using the cation substituted calcium phosphates were capable of supporting similar levels of human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation in comparison to commercially available β-TCP. The concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} released from these scaffolds were also within the ranges desired from previous reports to support both hMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Interestingly, hMSCs cultured directly on scaffolds prepared with only Mg{sup 2+} substituted β-TCP were capable of supporting statistically significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity, osteopontin, and osteoprotegerin expression in comparison to all compositions containing both Mg{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+}, and commercially available β-TCP. hMSCs cultured in the presence of scaffold extracts also exhibited similar trends in the expression of osteogenic markers as was observed during direct culture. Therefore, it was concluded that the enhanced differentiation observed was due to the release of bioactive ions rather than the surface microstructure. The role of these ions on transforming growth factor-β and bone morphogenic protein signaling was also evaluated using a PCR array. It was concluded that the release of these ions may support enhanced differentiation through SMAD dependent TGF-β and BMP signaling. - Highlights: • Synthesis of Mg and Mg-Sr containing biphasic beta tricalcium phosphate ceramics • Magnesium substitution influences ALP activity compared to strontium content. • Solution extract plays a more dominant role on hMSC differentiation. • Direct and indirect Mg and Mg-Sr TCP culture show similar OPG and OPN expression.

  3. Bone regeneration effect after the addition of a vitamin complex in two bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beolchi, Rafael da Silva

    2009-01-01

    One of the goals of the Biomaterials research is the development of devices that help bone regeneration. Two synthetic ceramics has been widely used with that purpose: hydroxyapatite (HAp) and beta tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP). In many situations it is desirable that the resorption rate of these materials by the body matches the bone growth rate. In these cases, the use of a mixture between the two phases is beneficial. The material resorption and bone growth are complexes physiological processes, influenced amongst other things by the inflammatory response of the surgical site. That being said, an exacerbated inflammatory response is potentially hazardous, since it may induce an increase of the oxidative stress due to the free radicals production. The free radicals attack causes, amongst other hazardous effects, the cell membrane degeneration which in turn may lead to cell necrosis and/or apoptosis within the surgical site. In this work, two ceramics were implanted in rats femora: β-TCP or the biphasic mixture of 60:40% in mass of HAp:β-TCP. The bone growth was assessed by both optical and fluorescence microscopy, using fluorescent bone markers. Moreover, it was also evaluated the effect of the presence of a vitamin complex, mediator of the inflammatory response. It was concluded that the pure β-TCP was more readily absorbed when compared with the mixture β-TCP-HAp, and there it was signs that the presence of the vitamin complex may have helped in a favorable way the bone neo formation. (author)

  4. Theoretical Studies on the Electronic Structures and Properties of Complex Ceramic Crystals and Novel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ching, Wai-Yim

    2012-01-14

    This project is a continuation of a long program supported by the Office of Basic Energy Science in the Office of Science of DOE for many years. The final three-year continuation started on November 1, 2005 with additional 1 year extension to October 30, 2009. The project was then granted a two-year No Cost Extension which officially ended on October 30, 2011. This report covers the activities within this six year period with emphasis on the work completed within the last 3 years. A total of 44 papers with acknowledgement to this grant were published or submitted. The overall objectives of this project are as follows. These objectives have been evolved over the six year period: (1) To use the state-of-the-art computational methods to investigate the electronic structures of complex ceramics and other novel crystals. (2) To further investigate the defects, surfaces/interfaces and microstructures in complex materials using large scale modeling. (3) To extend the study on ceramic materials to more complex bioceramic crystals. (4) To initiate the study on soft condensed matters including water and biomolecules. (5) To focus on the spectroscopic studies of different materials especially on the ELNES and XANES spectral calculations and their applications related to experimental techniques. (6) To develop and refine computational methods to be effectively executed on DOE supercomputers. (7) To evaluate mechanical properties of different crystals and those containing defects and relate them to the fundamental electronic structures. (8) To promote and publicize the first-principles OLCAO method developed by the PI (under DOE support for many years) for applications to large complex material systems. (9) To train a new generation of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in modern computational materials science and condensed matter physics. (10) To establish effective international and domestic collaborations with both experimentalists and theorists in materials

  5. Cost-effective alternative to nano-encapsulation: Amorphous curcumin-chitosan nanoparticle complex exhibiting high payload and supersaturation generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Hiep; Yu, Hong; Kiew, Tie Yi; Hadinoto, Kunn

    2015-10-01

    While the wide-ranging therapeutic activities of curcumin have been well established, its successful delivery to realize its true therapeutic potentials faces a major challenge due to its low oral bioavailability. Even though nano-encapsulation has been widely demonstrated to be effective in enhancing the bioavailability of curcumin, it is not without drawbacks (i.e. low payload and costly preparation). Herein we present a cost-effective bioavailability enhancement strategy of curcumin in the form of amorphous curcumin-chitosan nanoparticle complex (or curcumin nanoplex in short) exhibiting a high payload (>80%). The curcumin nanoplex was prepared by a simple yet highly efficient drug-polysaccharide complexation method that required only mixing of the curcumin and chitosan solutions under ambient condition. The effects of (1) pH and (2) charge ratio of chitosan to curcumin on the (i) physical characteristics of the nanoplex (i.e. size, colloidal stability and payload), (ii) complexation efficiency, and (iii) production yield were investigated from which the optimal preparation condition was determined. The nanoplex formation was found to favor low acidic pH and charge ratio below unity. At the optimal condition (i.e. pH 4.4. and charge ratio=0.8), stable curcumin nanoplex (≈260nm) was prepared at >90% complexation efficiency and ≈50% production yield. The amorphous state stability, colloidal stability, and in vitro non-cytotoxicity of the nanoplex were successfully established. The curcumin nanoplex produced prolonged supersaturation (3h) in the presence of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) at five times of the saturation solubility of curcumin. In addition, curcumin released from the nanoplex exhibited improved chemical stability owed to the presence of chitosan. Both results (i.e. high supersaturation and improved chemical stability) bode well for the ability of the curcumin nanoplex to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin clinically. Copyright © 2015

  6. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C [Tracy, CA; Wong, Frank M. G. [Livermore, CA; Haslam, Jeffery J [Livermore, CA; Yang, Nancy [Lafayette, CA; Lavernia, Enrique J [Davis, CA; Blue, Craig A [Knoxville, TN; Graeve, Olivia A [Reno, NV; Bayles, Robert [Annandale, VA; Perepezko, John H [Madison, WI; Kaufman, Larry [Brookline, MA; Schoenung, Julie [Davis, CA; Ajdelsztajn, Leo [Walnut Creek, CA

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  7. Theoretical Investigation of OCN(-) Charge Transfer Complexes in Condensed Phase Media: Spectroscopic Properties in Amorphous Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Woon, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of cyanate (OCN(-)) charge-transfer complexes were performed to model the "XCN" feature observed in interstellar icy grain mantles. OCN(-) charge-transfer complexes were formed from precursor combinations of HNCO or HOCN with either NH3 or H2O. Three different solvation strategies for realistically modeling the ice matrix environment were explored, including (1) continuum solvation, (2) pure DFT cluster calculations, and (3) an ONIOM DFT/PM3 cluster calculation. The model complexes were evaluated by their ability to reproduce seven spectroscopic measurements associated with XCN: the band origin of the OCN(-) asymmetric stretching mode, shifts in that frequency due to isotopic substitutions of C, N, O, and H, plus two weak features. The continuum solvent field method produced results consistent with some of the experimental data but failed to account for other behavior due to its limited capacity to describe molecular interactions with solvent. DFT cluster calculations successfully reproduced the available spectroscopic measurements very well. In particular, the deuterium shift showed excellent agreement in complexes where OCN(-) was fully solvated. Detailed studies of representative complexes including from two to twelve water molecules allowed the exploration of various possible solvation structures and provided insights into solvation trends. Moreover, complexes arising from cyanic or isocyanic acid in pure water suggested an alternative mechanism for the formation of OCN(-) charge-transfer complexes without the need for a strong base such as NH3 to be present. An extended ONIOM (B3LYP/PM3) cluster calculation was also performed to assess the impact of a more realistic environment on HNCO dissociation in pure water.

  8. Spectroscopic and calorimetric investigation of short and intermediate-range structures and energetics of amorphous SiCO, SiCN, and SiBCN polymer-derived ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widgeon, Scarlett J.

    Polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) are a new class of amorphous ceramics in the Si-B-C-N system that are synthesized by the pyrolysis of silicon-based organic polymers. PDCs are lightweight and are resistant to creep, crystallization, and oxidation at temperatures near 1800 K making them ideal for a variety of high temperature applications. In spite of being X-ray amorphous, these materials display structural heterogeneity at the nanometer length scale. Their structure and resulting properties can be drastically altered by the utilization of preceramic polymers with differing chemistry and architectures. Fundamental understanding of the atomic structure is critical in deciphering the structure-property relationships and ultimately in controlling their properties for specific engineering applications. The short-range atomic structure has been extensively investigated using a variety of techniques, however, the structures at length scales beyond next-nearest neighbors remained highly controversial. Here we report the results of a spectroscopic and calorimetric study of short and intermediate -range structure and energetic of SiOC and SiBCN PDCs derived from a wide variety of precursors. SiOC PDCs with different carbon contents were synthesized from polysiloxane precurors and their structures were studied using high-resolution 13C and 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The results suggest that these PDCs consists of a continuous mass fractal backbone of corner-shared SiC xO4-x tetrahedral units with "voids" occupied by sp 2-hybridized graphitic carbon. The oxygen-rich SiCxO 4-x units are located at the interior of this backbone with a mass fractal dimension of ~ 2.5, while the carbon-rich units occupy the two-dimensional interface between the backbone and the free carbon nanodomains. Such fractal topology is expected to give rise to unusual mechanical and transport properties characteristic of fractal percolation networks. For example, elastic moduli and

  9. Design of glass-ceramic complex microstructure with using onset point of crystallization in differential thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Seongjin; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Hyo-Soon; Kim, Jong-Hee; Kim, Hyungsun

    2008-01-01

    Two types of frits with different compositions were used to develop a high strength substrate in electronic packaging using a low temperature co-fired ceramic process. In order to reveal the crystallization stage during heating to approximately 900 deg. C, a glass-ceramic consisting of the two types of frits, which had been crystallized to diopside and anorthite after firing, was tested at different mixing ratios of the frits. The exothermal peaks deconvoluted by a Gauss function in the differential thermal analysis curves were used to determine the onset point of crystallization of diopside or anorthite. The onset points of crystallization were affected by the mixing ratio of the frits, and the microstructure of the glass-ceramic depended on the onset point of crystallization. It was found that when multicrystalline phases appear in the microstructure, the resulting complex microstructure could be predicted from the onset point of crystallization obtained by differential thermal analysis

  10. Basaltic scorias from Romania - complex building material us for concrete, glazing tiles, ceramic glazes, glass ceramics, mineral wool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marica, S.; Cetean, V. [PROCEMA S.A., Bucharest (Romania)

    2002-07-01

    The most spectacular deposit of basaltic scoria from Romania is the Heghes Hill from Racos, locality situated in the central part of country. This deposit emerged as grains of various dimensions, as volcanic ash with specific porosity up to 30% and vacuolar basaltic rocks. All types of basaltic scorias have specific vacuolar appearance, red- brick or blackish - grey coloured, scoria textures and similar chemical composition with others basalts of the world. The physical and mechanical characteristics determined included the scorias in the Heghes Hill in the following categories : light rocks (2,98 g/ dmc), porous(11,04%), similar to expanded slag, slightly absorbing rocks (3,86%), with low compression strengths (1700 daN/cmp). Basaltic scoria from Heghes is a very good row material for the manufacture of concrete, for obtain decorative cutting tiles glazing with ceramic and basaltic glazes (up to 40%) varied the range of colours and for obtaining glass ceramic, mineral wool, crushing sand for road maintenance, heat -insulating bricks and shid -proof material. (orig.)

  11. Formation, aggregation and reactivity of amorphous ferric oxyhydroxides on dissociation of Fe(III)-organic complexes in dilute aqueous suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bligh, Mark W.; Waite, T. David

    2010-10-01

    While chemical reactions that take place at the surface of amorphous ferric oxides (AFO) are known to be important in aquatic systems, incorporation of these reactions into kinetic models is hindered by a lack of ability to reliably quantify the reactivity of the surface and the changes in reactivity that occur over time. Long term decreases in the reactivity of iron oxides may be considered to result from changes in the molecular structure of the solid, however, over shorter time scales where substantial aggregation may occur, the mechanisms of reactivity loss are less clear. Precipitation of AFO may be described as a combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions, however, despite its potentially significant role, the latter reaction is usually neglected in kinetic models of aquatic processes. Here, we investigate the role of AFO in scavenging dissolved inorganic ferric (Fe(III)) species (Fe') via the heterogeneous precipitation reaction during the net dissociation of organically complexed Fe(III) in seawater. Using sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) as a model ligand, AFO was shown to play a significant role in inducing the net dissociation of the Fe-SSA complexes with equations describing both the heterogeneous precipitation reaction and the aging of AFO being required to adequately describe the experimental data. An aggregation based mechanism provided a good description of AFO aging over the short time scale of the experiments. The behaviour of AFO described here has implications for the bioavailability of iron in natural systems as a result of reactions involving AFO which are recognised to occur over time scales of minutes, including adsorption of Fe' and AFO dissolution, precipitation and ageing.

  12. Amorphous metal matrix composite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barczy, P.; Szigeti, F.

    1998-01-01

    Composite ribbons with amorphous matrix and ceramic (SiC, WC, MoB) particles were produced by modified planar melt flow casting methods. Weldability, abrasive wear and wood sanding examinations were carried out in order to find optimal material and technology for elevated wear resistance and sanding durability. The correlation between structure and composite properties is discussed. (author)

  13. Investigation of amorphous and crystalline phosphates in magnesium phosphate ceramics with solid-state H-1 and P-31 NMR spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Mali, G.; Mácová, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 8 (2017), s. 6571-6579 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : sol-gel processes * spectroscopy * MgO * chemically-bonded ceramics Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Materials engineering Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027288421730278X

  14. The 10 μm amorphous silicate feature of fractal aggregates and compact particles with complex shapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Min, M.; Dominik, C.; Hovenier, J.W.; de Koter, A.; Waters, L.B.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    We model the 10 μm absorption spectra of nonspherical particles composed of amorphous silicate. We consider two classes of particles, compact ones and fractal aggregates composed of homogeneous spheres. For the compact particles we consider Gaussian random spheres with various degrees of

  15. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    More than 95% of silicate minerals and other oxides found in meteorites were melted, or vaporized and recondensed in the Solar Nebula prior to their incorporation into meteorite parent bodies. Gravitational accretion energy and heating via radioactive decay further transformed oxide minerals accreted into planetesimals. In such an oxygen-rich environment the carbonaceous dust that fell into the nebula as an intimate mixture with oxide grains should have been almost completely converted to CO. While some pre-collapse, molecular-cloud carbonaceous dust does survive, much in the same manner as do pre-solar oxide grains, such materials constitute only a few percent of meteoritic carbon and are clearly distinguished by elevated D/H, N-15/N-16, C-13/C-12 ratios or noble gas patterns. Carbonaceous Dust in Meteorites: We argue that nearly all of the carbon in meteorites was synthesized in the Solar Nebula from CO and that this CO was generated by the reaction of carbonaceous dust with solid oxides, water or OH. It is probable that some fraction of carbonaceous dust that is newly synthesized in the Solar Nebula is also converted back into CO by additional thermal processing. CO processing might occur on grains in the outer nebula through irradiation of CO-containing ice coatings or in the inner nebula via Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) reactions on grain surfaces. Large-scale transport of both gaseous reaction products and dust from the inner nebula out to regions where comets formed would spread newly formed carbonaceous materials throughout the solar nebula. Formation of Organic Carbon: Carbon dust in the ISM might easily be described as inorganic graphite or amorphous carbon, with relatively low structural abundances of H, N, O and S . Products of FTT reactions or organics produced via irradiation of icy grains contain abundant aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. aldehydes, keytones, acids, amines and amides.. The net result of the massive nebular carbon cycle is to convert

  16. Complex nano-patterning of structural, optical, electrical and electron emission properties of amorphous silicon thin films by scanning probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fait, Jan; Čermák, Jan; Stuchlík, Jiří; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 428, Jan (2018), s. 1159-1165 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01809S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : amorphous silicon * nano-templates * nanostructures * electrical conductivity * electron emission * atomic force microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  17. Mechanical property evaluations of an amorphous metallic/ceramic multilayer and its role in improving fatigue properties of 316L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheng-Min [Nano Technology Center, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Jeng, R.J.; Yu, Chia-Chi; Chang, Chia-Hao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Li, Chia-Lin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Chu, Jinn P., E-mail: jpchu@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Nano Technology Center, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    We have used nanoindentation to investigate mechanical properties of 200-nm-thick amorphous multilayer consisting of alternating layers of Zr-based thin film metallic glass (TFMG) and holmium scandium oxide (HSO). Nanoindentation results show that TFMG/HSO multilayer exhibits the high hardness and Young's modulus. Owing to its high hardness, smooth surface, and good adhesion properties, TFMG/HSO multilayer is then employed as a protective coating to improve the four-point bending fatigue properties of 316L stainless steel. With coating, the fatigue life is increased from 2.4×10{sup 5} to 4.9×10{sup 6} cycles, at the stress of 700 MPa. A crack retardation mechanism has been proposed to explain the role of TFMG/HSO multilayer in improving fatigue properties of 316L stainless steel substrate.

  18. Amorphous nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, Toralf

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the first comprehensive overview over amorphous nano-optical and nano-photonic systems. Nanophotonics is a burgeoning branch of optics that enables many applications by steering the mould of light on length scales smaller than the wavelength with devoted nanostructures. Amorphous nanophotonics exploits self-organization mechanisms based on bottom-up approaches to fabricate nanooptical systems. The resulting structures presented in the book are characterized by a deterministic unit cell with tailored geometries; but their spatial arrangement is not controlled. Instead of periodic, the structures appear either amorphous or random. The aim of this book is to discuss all aspects related to observable effects in amorphous nanophotonic material and aspects related to their design, fabrication, characterization and integration into applications. The book has an interdisciplinary nature with contributions from scientists in physics, chemistry and materials sciences and sheds light on the topic fr...

  19. Reciprocating sliding behaviour of self-mated amorphous diamond-like carbon coatings on Si3N4 ceramics under tribological stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vila, M.; Abreu, C.S.; Salgueiredo, E.; Almeida, F.A.; Fernandes, A.J.S.; Costa, F.M.; Gomes, J.R.; Silva, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering have been deposited on silicon nitride based substrates for tribological purposes. A conductive Si 3 N 4 /30% vol.TiN composite was produced for bias substrate application. Friction and wear properties of carbon coated self-mated pairs were assessed using a reciprocal motion ball-on-flat setup in unlubricated conditions with applied normal loads of 3 N and 5 N. The worn surfaces were studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in order to identify the prevalent wear mechanism. Unbiased and biased substrates behaved differently, the former undergoing premature delamination while the latter endured the tribological test conditions (3 N, ∼ 43 m). Very low friction coefficient values of ∼ 0.015 were sustained assuring remarkable wear behaviour. Surface grooving and wear debris accumulation in the sliding track lead to a roughness increase from the nominal rms value of ∼ 12 nm to ∼ 97 nm, although no weight loss and surface profile modification was quantifiable

  20. Large ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development. Ceramic-to-ceramic sealing has applications for several technologies that require large and/or complex vacuum-tight ceramic shapes. Information is provided concerning the assembly of complex monolithic ceramic shapes by bonding of subassemblies at temperatures ranging from 450 to 1500 0 C. Future applications and fabrication techniques for various materials are presented

  1. Forming of superplastic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesuer, D.R.; Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-05-01

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of ceramic components are given. Recent work in biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics is provided. These include yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP), a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid ceramic-metal structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  2. Amorphous superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missell, F.P.

    1985-01-01

    We describe briefly the strong coupling superconductivity observed in amorphous alloys based upon simple metals. For transition metal alloys we discuss the behavior of the superconducting transition temperature T c , the upper critical field H (sub)c2 and the critical current J c . A survey of current problems is presented. (author) [pt

  3. Assessing the Validity of the Simplified Potential Energy Clock Model for Modeling Glass-Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grillet, Anne M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strong, Kevin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Glass-ceramic seals may be the future of hermetic connectors at Sandia National Laboratories. They have been shown capable of surviving higher temperatures and pressures than amorphous glass seals. More advanced finite-element material models are required to enable model-based design and provide evidence that the hermetic connectors can meet design requirements. Glass-ceramics are composite materials with both crystalline and amorphous phases. The latter gives rise to (non-linearly) viscoelastic behavior. Given their complex microstructures, glass-ceramics may be thermorheologically complex, a behavior outside the scope of currently implemented constitutive models at Sandia. However, it was desired to assess if the Simplified Potential Energy Clock (SPEC) model is capable of capturing the material response. Available data for SL 16.8 glass-ceramic was used to calibrate the SPEC model. Model accuracy was assessed by comparing model predictions with shear moduli temperature dependence and high temperature 3-point bend creep data. It is shown that the model can predict the temperature dependence of the shear moduli and 3- point bend creep data. Analysis of the results is presented. Suggestions for future experiments and model development are presented. Though further calibration is likely necessary, SPEC has been shown capable of modeling glass-ceramic behavior in the glass transition region but requires further analysis below the transition region.

  4. Effect of fluoridated casein phospopeptide-amorphous-calcium phosphate complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets: A comparative in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Abdul Shahariyar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of casein phosphopeptide amorphous calcium-phosphate (CPP-ACP complex, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash on shear bond strengths (SBSs of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: About sixty extracted healthy human premolar teeth with intact buccal enamel were divided into two equal groups to which brackets were bonded using self-etching primers (SEPs and conventional means respectively. These were further equally divided into three subgroups - (1 control (2 CPP-ACP (3 chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash. The SBSs were then measured using a universal testing machine. Results: SBS of the conventional group was significantly higher than the self-etching group. The intragroup differences were statistically insignificant. Conclusion: CPP-ACP, chlorhexidine fluoride mouthwash did not adversely affect SBS of orthodontic brackets irrespective of the method of conditioning. Brackets bonded with conventional technique showed greater bond strengths as compared to those bonded with SEP.

  5. Radiation-induced aperiodicity in irradiated ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, L.W.

    1993-02-01

    The experimental program is designed to reveal details of the metamict (amorphization, or crystal-to-glass) transformation in irradiated ceramics (silica compounds, less-connected lead phosphates). The silica compounds were amorphized using electrons, neutrons, and ions, while the phosphates were amorphized using ions (primarily) and neutrons. Energy-filtered electron microdiffraction, high-resoltuion transmission electron microscopy, and high-performance liquid-phase chromatography are being used

  6. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fareed, Ali [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States); Craig, Phillip A. [Honeywell Advanced Composites Inc. (HACI), Newark, DE (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  7. Hardness of ion implanted ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, W.C.; McHargue, C.J.; Farlow, G.C.; White, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that the wear behavior of ceramic materials can be modified through ion implantation. Studies have been done to characterize the effect of implantation on the structure and composition of ceramic surfaces. To understand how these changes affect the wear properties of the ceramic, other mechanical properties must be measured. To accomplish this, a commercially available ultra low load hardness tester has been used to characterize Al 2 O 3 with different implanted species and doses. The hardness of the base material is compared with the highly damaged crystalline state as well as the amorphous material

  8. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  9. Heavy ion irradiation effects of brannerite-type ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, J.; Wang, L.M.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Ewing, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Brannerite, UTi 2 O 6 , occurs in polyphase Ti-based, crystalline ceramics that are under development for plutonium immobilization. In order to investigate radiation effects caused by α-decay events of Pu, a 1 MeV Kr + irradiation on UTi 2 O 6 , ThTi 2 O 6 , CeTi 2 O 6 and a more complex material, composed of Ca-containing brannerite and pyrochlore, was performed over a temperature range of 25-1020 K. The ion irradiation-induced crystalline-to-amorphous transformation was observed in all brannerite samples. The critical amorphization temperatures of the different brannerite compositions are: 970 K, UTi 2 O 6 ; 990 K, ThTi 2 O 6 ; 1020 K, CeTi 2 O 6 . The systematic increase in radiation resistance from Ce-, Th- to U-brannerite is related to the difference of mean atomic mass of A-site cation in the structure. As compared with the pyrochlore structure-type, brannerite phases are more susceptible to ion irradiation-induced amorphization. The effects of structure and chemical compositions on radiation resistance of brannerite-type and pyrochlore-type ceramics are discussed

  10. Radiation amorphization of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neklyudov, I.M.; Chernyaeva, T.P.

    1993-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical research on radiation amorphization are presented in this analytical review. Mechanism and driving forces of radiation amorphization are described, kinetic and thermodynamic conditions of amorphization are formulated. Compositional criteria of radiation amorphization are presented, that allow to predict irradiation behaviour of materials, their tendency to radiation amorphization. Mechanism of transition from crystalline state to amorphous state are considered depending on dose, temperature, structure of primary radiation damage and flux level. (author). 134 refs., 4 tab., 25 fig

  11. Separation of metallic cations by means of coupled filtration on a ceramic membrane. Use of a complexing heteropolyanion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, Stephane

    1999-01-01

    In the field of the high level nuclear waste reprocessing, the Nuclear French Agency is currently carrying out studies on several processes (including the SESAME process) which aim at separating radioactive elements in order to dispose them specifically or to transmute them. One of these processes concerns the selective extraction of americium at an upper oxidation state than Ill. This work deals with the separation of Am(IV) from Ln(Ill) by means of complexation-coupled tangential filtration on alumina-titanium ceramic membranes. The chosen selective complexing agent is a lacunar heteropolyanion from the tungstophosphate family α_2P_2W_1_7O_6_1"1"0"-, which synthesis and various properties in solution have been studied. The polyanion stability in 0.5 M nitric solution strongly depends on the quality of the synthesised product. Two analytical techniques were developed to check the quality of the synthesised sets: "3"1P NMR and arsenazo-lanthanum complexometric titration. The separation studies on the cerium (IV)-neodymium (Ill) system were carried out to simulate americium(IV)/lanthanides(Ill) system. For the two alumina-titanium membranes studied (ultrafiltration and nano-filtration), the solvent flow can be described through a capillary mechanism which is characteristic of porous membranes. The ion transfer through the membranes, mainly governed by electrostatic interactions, strongly depends on the ionic strength at the membrane-solution interface. The best separation results, using nano-filtration, still remain below the expected performances, with a Ce(IV)/Nd(Ill) separation factor of 35 on a single stage in 0,5 M nitric medium. (author) [fr

  12. Atomic profile imaging of ceramic oxide surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursill, L.A.; Peng JuLin; Sellar, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Atomic surface profile imaging is an electron optical technique capable of revealing directly the surface crystallography of ceramic oxides. Use of an image-intensifier with a TV camera allows fluctuations in surface morphology and surface reactivity to be recorded and analyzed using digitized image data. This paper reviews aspects of the electron optical techniques, including interpretations based upon computer-simulation image-matching techniques. An extensive range of applications is then presented for ceramic oxides of commercial interest for advanced materials applications: including uranium oxide (UO 2 ); magnesium and nickel oxide (MgO,NiO); ceramic superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.7 ); barium titanate (BaTiO 3 ); sapphire (α-A1 2 O 3 ); haematite (α-Fe-2O 3 ); monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic monocrystalline forms of zirconia (ZrO 2 ), lead zirconium titanate (PZT + 6 mol.% NiNbO 3 ) and ZBLAN fluoride glass. Atomic scale detail has been obtained of local structures such as steps associated with vicinal surfaces, facetting parallel to stable low energy crystallographic planes, monolayer formation on certain facets, relaxation and reconstructions, oriented overgrowth of lower oxides, chemical decomposition of complex oxides into component oxides, as well as amorphous coatings. This remarkable variety of observed surface stabilization mechanisms is discussed in terms of novel double-layer electrostatic depolarization mechanisms, as well as classical concepts of the physics and chemistry of surfaces (ionization and affinity energies and work function). 46 refs., 16 figs

  13. Amorphous metal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, M.A.; Lupinski, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    This patent discloses an improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite

  14. Mechanochemically assisted solid-state and citric acid complex syntheses of Cu-doped sodium cobaltite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pršić, S.; Savić, S.M.; Branković, Z.; Vrtnik, S.; Dapčević, A.; Branković, G.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sodium cobaltite was synthesized by mechanochemically assisted solid-state reaction and citric acid complex (CAC) method. • We investigated effect of Cu-doping in NaCo 2−x Cu x O 4 (x = 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05). • ICP analysis showed that the controlling of the samples composition is easier by the CAC method. • The Seebeck coefficient in Cu-doped samples was higher compared to the undoped one. • The highest figure of merit was observed in the sample with the lowest Cu concentration. - Abstract: In the last decade, the sodium cobaltite ceramic became a promising candidate for potential thermoelectric applications, because of its large thermopower and low resistivity. In this work, polycrystalline samples of NaCo 2−x Cu x O 4 (x = 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05) were prepared using mechanochemically assisted solid-state reaction method (MASSR) and the citric acid complex method (CAC). Bulk samples were prepared by pressing into disc-shaped pellets and subsequently subjected to a thermal treatment at 880 °C in inert argon atmosphere. Changes in structural and microstructural characteristics of the samples, caused by the substitution of Cu for Co, were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis showed that the compositions of the final products correspond to γ-NaCo 2 O 4 and confirmed that desired compound was obtained in both syntheses procedures. The advantages and disadvantages of these two syntheses procedures have been observed and discussed: the CAC method enabled obtaining samples with higher density and fine microstructure compared to the MASSR method, thus better thermoelectric properties. The Cu 2+ substitution led to the increase in Seebeck coefficient in both synthesis routes. The highest figure of merit of 0.022 at 300 K was observed for the sample doped with 1 mol% Cu, obtained by the CAC method, and it was almost twice

  15. Mechanochemically assisted solid-state and citric acid complex syntheses of Cu-doped sodium cobaltite ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pršić, S., E-mail: sanjaprsic@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Višeslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Savić, S.M., E-mail: slavicas@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Višeslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Branković, Z., E-mail: zorica.brankovic@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Višeslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Vrtnik, S., E-mail: stane.vrtnik@ijs.si [Institute Jožef Stefan, Condensed Matter Physics, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dapčević, A., E-mail: hadzi-tonic@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Branković, G., E-mail: goran.brankovic@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Višeslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Sodium cobaltite was synthesized by mechanochemically assisted solid-state reaction and citric acid complex (CAC) method. • We investigated effect of Cu-doping in NaCo{sub 2−x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05). • ICP analysis showed that the controlling of the samples composition is easier by the CAC method. • The Seebeck coefficient in Cu-doped samples was higher compared to the undoped one. • The highest figure of merit was observed in the sample with the lowest Cu concentration. - Abstract: In the last decade, the sodium cobaltite ceramic became a promising candidate for potential thermoelectric applications, because of its large thermopower and low resistivity. In this work, polycrystalline samples of NaCo{sub 2−x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05) were prepared using mechanochemically assisted solid-state reaction method (MASSR) and the citric acid complex method (CAC). Bulk samples were prepared by pressing into disc-shaped pellets and subsequently subjected to a thermal treatment at 880 °C in inert argon atmosphere. Changes in structural and microstructural characteristics of the samples, caused by the substitution of Cu for Co, were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis showed that the compositions of the final products correspond to γ-NaCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} and confirmed that desired compound was obtained in both syntheses procedures. The advantages and disadvantages of these two syntheses procedures have been observed and discussed: the CAC method enabled obtaining samples with higher density and fine microstructure compared to the MASSR method, thus better thermoelectric properties. The Cu{sup 2+} substitution led to the increase in Seebeck coefficient in both synthesis routes. The highest figure of merit of 0.022 at 300 K was observed for the sample doped with 1 mol% Cu, obtained by

  16. Phase composition of yttrium-doped zirconia ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Christoph; Scheinost, Andreas C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures; Weiss, Stephan [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements; Gumeniuk, R. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Physik

    2017-06-01

    Ceramic material might be an alternative to borosilicate glass for the immobilization of nuclear waste. The crystallinity of ceramic material increases the corrosion resistance over several magnitudes in relation to amorphous glasses. The stability of such ceramics depend on several parameters, among them the crystal phase composition. A reliable quantitative phase analysis is necessary to correlate the macroscopic material properties with structure parameters. We performed a feasibility study based on yttrium-doped zirconia ceramics as analogue for trivalent actinides to ascertain that the nanosized crystal phases in zirconia ceramics can be reliably determined.

  17. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.) [pt

  18. Advanced ceramic in structural engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Rodea, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The work deals with "Advanced Ceramics in Structural Engineering”. Throughout this work we present the different types of ceramic that are currently in wider use, and the main research lines that are being followed. Ceramics have very interesting properties, both mechanical and electrical and refractory where we can find some of the most interesting points of inquiry. Through this work we try tounderstand this complex world, analyzing both general and specific properties of ...

  19. Colors and the evolution of amorphous galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, J.S. III; Hunter, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    UBVRI and H-alpha photometric observations are presented for 16 amorphous galaxies and a comparison sample of Magellanic irregular (Im) and Sc spiral galaxies. These data are analyzed in terms of star-formation rates and histories in amorphous galaxies. Amorphous galaxies have mean global colors and star-formation rates per unit area that are similar to those in giant Im systems, despite differences in spatial distributions of star-forming centers in these two galactic structural classes. Amorphous galaxies differ from giant Im systems in having somewhat wider scatter in relationships between B - V and U - B colors, and between U - B and L(H-alpha)/L(B). This scatter is interpreted as resulting from rapid variations in star-formation rates during the recent past, which could be a natural consequence of the concentration of star-forming activity into centrally located, supergiant young stellar complexes in many amorphous galaxies. While the unusual spatial distribution and intensity of star formation in some amorphous galaxies is due to interactions with other galaxies, several amorphous galaxies are relatively isolated and thus the processes must be internal. The ultimate evolutionary fate of rapidly evolving amorphous galaxies remains unknown. 77 references

  20. Theory of amorphous ices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, David T; Chandler, David

    2014-07-01

    We derive a phase diagram for amorphous solids and liquid supercooled water and explain why the amorphous solids of water exist in several different forms. Application of large-deviation theory allows us to prepare such phases in computer simulations. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between these two amorphous solids. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. Whereas the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly aging glasses, their melting can lead quickly to the formation of crystalline ice. Further, melting of the higher density amorphous solid at low pressures takes place in steps, transitioning to the lower-density glass before accessing a nonequilibrium liquid from which ice coarsens.

  1. Frequency-dependent complex modulus at the glass transition in Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 bulk amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.L.; Li, Y.; Feng, Y.P.; Carter, W.C.

    2003-01-01

    We report frequency-dependent measurements of the dynamic elastic modulus of a Pd 40 Cu 30 Ni 10 P 20 bulk amorphous phase near its glass transition temperature. The storage and loss moduli exhibit a structural relaxation similar to those observed by other characterization techniques. Parameters obtained by fitting to the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman equation and the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts model exhibit similar behaviors to those other methods

  2. Ceramic injection molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueda, Horacio; Russo, Diego

    1988-01-01

    Interest in making complex net-shape ceramic parts with good surface finishing and sharp tolerances without machining is a driving force for studying the injection molding technique. This method consists of softhening the ceramic material by means of adding some plastic and heating in order to inject the mixture under pressure into a relatively cold mold where solidification takes place. Essentially, it is the same process used in thermoplastic industry but, in the present case, the ceramic powder load ranges between 80 to 90 wt.%. This work shows results obtained from the fabrication of pieces of different ceramic materials (alumina, barium titanate ferrites, etc.) in a small scale, using equipments developed and constructed in the laboratory. (Author) [es

  3. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  4. Perspectives of the Si3N4-TiN ceramic composite as a biomaterial and manufacturing of complex-shaped implantable devices by electrical discharge machining (EDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciotti, Francesco; Mazzocchi, Mauro; Bellosi, Alida

    2010-01-01

    In this work we investigated the suitability of electroconductive silicon nitride/titanium nitride composite for biomedical implantable devices with particular attention on the processing route that allows the net-shaping of complex components by electrical discharge machining (EDM). The composite, constituted mainly of a beta-Si3N4, dispersed TiN grains and a glassy grain boundary phase, exhibited a low density and high hardness, strength and toughness. Bulk, surface characteristics and properties of the Si3N4-TiN composite were analyzed. After the EDM process, the microstructure of the machined surface was examined. The obtained results showed that the Si3N4-TiN ceramic composite together with the EDM manufacturing process might potentially play a key role in implantable load-bearing prosthesis applications.

  5. Sensitive Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    Sensitive Ceramics is showing an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics. The experiment is working on two levels. One which has to do with designing compositions and patterns in a virtual 3d universe based on a digital dynamic system that responds on ...... with realizing the modules in ceramics by 3d printing directly in porcelain with a RapMan printer that coils up the 3d shape in layers. Finally the ceramic modules are mounted in a laser cut board that reflects the captured composition of the movement of the hands....

  6. Amorphous metal based nanoelectromechanical switch

    KAUST Repository

    Mayet, Abdulilah M.; Smith, Casey; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch is an interesting ultra-low power option which can operate in the harsh environment and can be a complementary element in complex digital circuitry. Although significant advancement is happening in this field, report on ultra-low voltage (pull-in) switch which offers high switching speed and area efficiency is yet to be made. One key challenge to achieve such characteristics is to fabricate nano-scale switches with amorphous metal so the shape and dimensional integrity are maintained to achieve the desired performance. Therefore, we report a tungsten alloy based amorphous metal with fabrication process development of laterally actuated dual gated NEM switches with 100 nm width and 200 nm air-gap to result in <5 volts of actuation voltage (Vpull-in). © 2013 IEEE.

  7. Amorphous metal based nanoelectromechanical switch

    KAUST Repository

    Mayet, Abdulilah M.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch is an interesting ultra-low power option which can operate in the harsh environment and can be a complementary element in complex digital circuitry. Although significant advancement is happening in this field, report on ultra-low voltage (pull-in) switch which offers high switching speed and area efficiency is yet to be made. One key challenge to achieve such characteristics is to fabricate nano-scale switches with amorphous metal so the shape and dimensional integrity are maintained to achieve the desired performance. Therefore, we report a tungsten alloy based amorphous metal with fabrication process development of laterally actuated dual gated NEM switches with 100 nm width and 200 nm air-gap to result in <5 volts of actuation voltage (Vpull-in). © 2013 IEEE.

  8. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  9. [Ceramic posts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie; Legros, Caroline; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    As a result of ceramics and all-ceram technologies development esthetic inlay core and abutments flooded the market. Their tooth-colored appearance enhances restoration biomimetism principally on the marginal gingiva area. This article reviews indications and types of cores designed for natural teeth and implants.

  10. Anterior provisional restorations used to determine form, function, and esthetics for complex restorative situations, using all-ceramic restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshad, Mamaly; Cascione, Domenico; Kim, Tae

    2010-02-01

    A technique is proposed for the restoration of a large and visible maxillary anterior defect. The importance of proper diagnosis, treatment planning, and communication is emphasized. Irreversible treatment should only be rendered once patient approval has been obtained through objective evaluation with provisional restorations. The techniques presented in this article use a combination of ceramic systems currently available to satisfy functional demands while achieving acceptable esthetics. A controlled series of steps, where the provisional restorative components are being replaced by the definitive ones is planned. The only difference between the provisional and definitive restorative components is the material used. The definitive restorations consisted of an implant-supported zirconium oxide framework. Individual pressed porcelain restorations were luted to the framework and a natural tooth. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE Provisional restorations allow an objective form of communication. Vertical and horizontal transitional lines can be effectively masked with appropriate treatment planning and a skilled ceramist. Many traditional dental laboratory steps may be eliminated or simplified without compromising the definitive restorations.

  11. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peercy, P.S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH 1 ) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon

  12. Oxide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryshkewitch, E.; Richerson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    The book explores single-phase ceramic oxide systems from the standpoint of physical chemistry and technology. This second edition also focuses on advances in technology since publication of the original edition. These include improvements in raw materials and forming and sintering techniques, and the major role that oxide ceramics have had in development of advanced products and processes. The text is divided into five major sections: general fundamentals of oxide ceramics, advances in aluminum oxide technology, advances in zirconia technology, and advances in beryllium oxide technology

  13. Amorphization within the tablet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doreth, Maria; Hussein, Murtadha Abdul; Priemel, Petra A.

    2017-01-01

    , the feasibility of microwave irradiation to prepare amorphous solid dispersions (glass solutions) in situ was investigated. Indomethacin (IND) and polyvinylpyrrolidone K12 (PVP) were tableted at a 1:2 (w/w) ratio. In order to study the influence of moisture content and energy input on the degree of amorphization......, tablet formulations were stored at different relative humidity (32, 43 and 54% RH) and subsequently microwaved using nine different power-time combinations up to a maximum energy input of 90 kJ. XRPD results showed that up to 80% (w/w) of IND could be amorphized within the tablet. mDSC measurements...

  14. Physics of amorphous metals

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalenko, Nikolai P; Krey, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of bulk metallic glasses has led to a large increase in the industrial importance of amorphous metals, and this is expected to continue. This book is the first to describe the theoretical physics of amorphous metals, including the important theoretical development of the last 20 years.The renowned authors stress the universal aspects in their description of the phonon or magnon low-energy excitations in the amorphous metals, e.g. concerning the remarkable consequences of the properties of these excitations for the thermodynamics at low and intermediate temperatures. Tunneling

  15. Soluble and meltable hyperbranched polyborosilazanes toward high-temperature stable SiBCN ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jie; Wang, Minjun; Zou, Jianhua; An, Linan

    2015-04-01

    High-temperature stable siliconborocarbonitride (SiBCN) ceramics produced from single-source preceramic polymers have received increased attention in the last two decades. In this contribution, soluble and meltable polyborosilazanes with hyperbranched topology (hb-PBSZ) were synthesized via a convenient solvent-free, catalyst-free and one-pot A2 + B6 strategy, an aminolysis reaction of the A2 monomer of dichloromethylsilane and the B6 monomer of tris(dichloromethylsilylethyl)borane in the presence of hexamethyldisilazane. The amine transition reaction between the intermediates of dichlorotetramethyldisilazane and tri(trimethylsilylmethylchlorosilylethyl)borane led to the formation of dendritic units of aminedialkylborons rather than trialkylborons. The cross-linked hb-PBSZ precursors exhibited a ceramic yield higher 80%. The resultant SiBCN ceramics with a boron atomic composition of 6.0-8.5% and a representative formula of Si1B(0.19)C(1.21)N(0.39)O(0.08) showed high-temperature stability and retained their amorphous structure up to 1600 °C. These hyperbranched polyborosilazanes with soluble and meltable characteristics provide a new perspective for the design of preceramic polymers possessing advantages for high-temperature stable polymer-derived ceramics with complex structures/shapes.

  16. Positrons in amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, Pierre.

    1981-07-01

    Positron annihilation techniques give interesting informations about ''empty spaces'' in amorphous alloys. The results of an extensive research work on the properties of either pre-existing or irradiation induced ''empty spaces'' in four amorphous alloys are presented. The pre-existing empty spaces appear to be small vacancy-like defects. The irradiation induced defects are ''close pairs'' with widely distributed configurations. There is a strong interaction between vacancy like and interstitial like components. A model is proposed, which explains the radiation resistance mechanism of the amorphous alloys. An extensive joint research work to study four amorphous alloys, Fe 80 B 20 ,Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 , Cu 50 Ti 50 , Pd 80 Si 20 , is summarized

  17. Superplasticity of amorphous alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Yu.B.; Likhachev, V.L.; Sen'kov, O.N.

    1988-01-01

    Results of mechanical tests of Co 57 Ni 10 Fe 5 Si 11 B 17 amorphous alloy are presented and the effect of crystallization, occurring during deformation process, on plastic low characteristics is investiagted. Superplasticity of amorphous tape is investigated. It is shown, that this effect occurs only when during deformation the crystallization takes place. Process model, based on the usage disclination concepts about glass nature, is suggested

  18. Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms for immobilizing ICPP high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, A.B.; Flintoff, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    Polyphase ceramic and glass-ceramic forms have been consolidated from simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant wastes by hot isostatic pressing calcined waste and chemical additives by 1000 0 C or less. The ceramic forms can contain over 70 wt% waste with densities ranging from 3.5 to 3.85 g/cm 3 , depending upon the formulation. Major phases are CaF 2 , CaZrTi 207 , CaTiO 3 , monoclinic ZrO 2 , and amorphous intergranular material. The relative fraction of the phases is a function of the chemical additives (TiO 2 , CaO, and SiO 2 ) and consolidation temperature. Zirconolite, the major actinide host, makes the ceramic forms extremely leach resistant for the actinide simulant U 238 . The amorphous phase controls the leach performance for Sr and Cs which is improved by the addition of SiO 2 . Glass-ceramic forms were also consolidated by HIP at waste loadings of 30 to 70 wt% with densities of 2.73 to 3.1 g/cm 3 using Exxon 127 borosilicate glass frit. The glass-ceramic forms contain crystalline CaF 2 , Al 203 , and ZrSi 04 (zircon) in a glass matrix. Natural mineral zircon is a stable host for 4+ valent actinides. 17 references, 3 figures, 5 tables

  19. Silsesquioxane-derived ceramic fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, F. I.; Farmer, S. C.; Terepka, F. M.; Leonhardt, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    Fibers formed from blends of silsesquioxane polymers were characterized to study the pyrolytic conversion of these precursors to ceramics. The morphology of fibers pyrolyzed to 1400 C revealed primarily amorphous glasses whose conversion to beta-SiC is a function of both blend composition and pyrolysis conditions. Formation of beta-SiC crystallites within the glassy phase is favored by higher than stoichiometric C/Si ratios, while carbothermal reduction of Si-O bonds to form SiC with loss of SiO and CO occurs at higher methyl/phenylpropyl silsesquioxane (lower C/Si) ratios. As the carbothermal reduction is assumed to be diffusion controlled, the fibers can serve as model systems to gain understanding of the silsesquioxane pyrolysis behavior, and therefore are useful in the development of polysilsesquioxane-derived ceramic matrices and coatings as well.

  20. Rapidly quenched amorphous and microcrystalline solders for atomic power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalin, V.A.; Fedotov, V.T.; Sevryukov, O.N.; Grigor'ev, A.E.; Skuratov, L.A.; Sulaberidze, V.Sh.; Yurchenko, A.D.; Sokolov, V.F.; Rodionov, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of using strip amorphous brazing alloys STEMET on Ni, Cu, Ti or Al base to braze various materials (stainless steels - zirconium, ceramics - metal, copper alloys, titanium alloys, cermets, molybdenum, beryllium) is under study. Experimental bench is designed and brazing regimes are developed for various dissimilar materials. Mechanical and corrosion tests of brazed joints show that rapidly quenching STEMET type brazing alloys are promising materials for manufacturing components of irradiating devices [ru

  1. Effect of B-site substitution of complex ions on dielectric and piezoelectric properties in (Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3 piezoelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Changrong; Liu Xinyu

    2008-01-01

    The effect of B-site substitution of complex ions on dielectric and piezoelectric properties in (Bi 1/2 Na 1/2 )Ti 1-x (Zn 1/3 Nb 2/3 ) x O 3 (BNTZN-100x) lead-free piezoelectric ceramics was investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the materials are mono-perovskite phase. The morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) of BNTZN-100x ceramics between rhombohedral and tetragonal locates in the range of 0.5% ≤ x ≤ 2.0%. Temperature dependence of dielectric constant shows that these compounds are relaxor ferroelectrics. The compositions near the MPB exhibit relatively high piezoelectric properties. The piezoelectric constant (d 33 ) and the electromechanical coupling factor (k t ) show the maximum values of d 33 = 97 pC N -1 and k t = 0.46 at x = 2.0% and x = 1.0%, respectively. The BNTZN-100x ceramics are good candidate for use as ultrasonic transducer ceramics for high anisotropic with high k t value and low k p value

  2. Acid-base properties of ceramic powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleier, A.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter addresses the fundamental aspects of potentiometric titration, electrokinetics, and conductometric titration in evaluating surface and interfacial thermodynamic behavior. Emphasizes the characterization of aqueous systems which are pertinent to the processing of ceramic powders. Attempts to clarify the role of novel analytical techniques that will increasingly contribute to the advanced characterization of ceramic powders. Evaluates recently developed acid-base and complexation concepts and their applications to the processing of oxide ceramics

  3. Structural amorphous steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.P.; Liu, C.T.; Porter, W.D.; Thompson, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist's dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed

  4. Investigation of the setting reaction in magnesium phosphate ceramics with quasielastic neutron scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Zbiri, M.; Bordallo, H. N.; Gualtieri, A. F.; Mácová, Petra

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 21 (2017), s. 11355-11367 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics * amorphous materials * NMR-spectroscopy Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 4.536, year: 2016 http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.jpcc.7b01396

  5. Quantitative firing transformations of a triaxial ceramic by X-ray diffraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conconi, M.S.; Gauna, M.R.; Serra, M.F.; Suarez, G.; Aglietti, E.F.; Rendtorff, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    The firing transformations of traditional (clay based) ceramics are of technological and archaeological interest, and are usually reported qualitatively or semi quantitatively. These kinds of systems present an important complexity, especially for X-ray diffraction techniques, due to the presence of fully crystalline, low crystalline and amorphous phases. In this article we present the results of a qualitative and quantitative X-ray diffraction Rietveld analysis of the fully crystalline (kaolinite, quartz, cristobalite, feldspars and/or mullite), the low crystalline (metakaolinite and/or spinel type pre-mullite) and glassy phases evolution of a triaxial (clay-quartz-feldspar) ceramic fired in a wide temperature range between 900 and 1300 deg C. The employed methodology to determine low crystalline and glassy phase abundances is based in a combination of the internal standard method and the use of a nanocrystalline model where the long-range order is lost, respectively. A preliminary sintering characterization was carried out by contraction, density and porosity evolution with the firing temperature. Simultaneous thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis was carried out to elucidate the actual temperature at which the chemical changes occur. Finally, the quantitative analysis based on the Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction patterns was performed. The kaolinite decomposition into metakaolinite was determined quantitatively; the intermediate (980 deg C) spinel type alumino-silicate formation was also quantified; the incongruent fusion of the potash feldspar was observed and quantified together with the final mullitization and the amorphous (glassy) phase formation.The methodology used to analyze the X-ray diffraction patterns proved to be suitable to evaluate quantitatively the thermal transformations that occur in a complex system like the triaxial ceramics. The evaluated phases can be easily correlated with the processing variables and materials

  6. Quantitative firing transformations of a triaxial ceramic by X-ray diffraction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conconi, M.S.; Gauna, M.R.; Serra, M.F. [Centro de Tecnologia de Recursos Minerales y Ceramica (CETMIC), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Suarez, G.; Aglietti, E.F.; Rendtorff, N.M., E-mail: rendtorff@cetmic.unlp.edu.ar [Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), Buenos Aires (Argentina). Fac. de Ciencias Exactas. Dept. de Quimica

    2014-10-15

    The firing transformations of traditional (clay based) ceramics are of technological and archaeological interest, and are usually reported qualitatively or semi quantitatively. These kinds of systems present an important complexity, especially for X-ray diffraction techniques, due to the presence of fully crystalline, low crystalline and amorphous phases. In this article we present the results of a qualitative and quantitative X-ray diffraction Rietveld analysis of the fully crystalline (kaolinite, quartz, cristobalite, feldspars and/or mullite), the low crystalline (metakaolinite and/or spinel type pre-mullite) and glassy phases evolution of a triaxial (clay-quartz-feldspar) ceramic fired in a wide temperature range between 900 and 1300 deg C. The employed methodology to determine low crystalline and glassy phase abundances is based in a combination of the internal standard method and the use of a nanocrystalline model where the long-range order is lost, respectively. A preliminary sintering characterization was carried out by contraction, density and porosity evolution with the firing temperature. Simultaneous thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis was carried out to elucidate the actual temperature at which the chemical changes occur. Finally, the quantitative analysis based on the Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction patterns was performed. The kaolinite decomposition into metakaolinite was determined quantitatively; the intermediate (980 deg C) spinel type alumino-silicate formation was also quantified; the incongruent fusion of the potash feldspar was observed and quantified together with the final mullitization and the amorphous (glassy) phase formation.The methodology used to analyze the X-ray diffraction patterns proved to be suitable to evaluate quantitatively the thermal transformations that occur in a complex system like the triaxial ceramics. The evaluated phases can be easily correlated with the processing variables and materials

  7. Quantitative firing transformations of a triaxial ceramic by X-ray diffraction methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Conconi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The firing transformations of traditional (clay based ceramics are of technological and archeological interest, and are usually reported qualitatively or semiquantitatively. These kinds of systems present an important complexity, especially for X-ray diffraction techniques, due to the presence of fully crystalline, low crystalline and amorphous phases. In this article we present the results of a qualitative and quantitative X-ray diffraction Rietveld analysis of the fully crystalline (kaolinite, quartz, cristobalite, feldspars and/or mullite, the low crystalline (metakaolinite and/or spinel type pre-mullite and glassy phases evolution of a triaxial (clay-quartz-feldspar ceramic fired in a wide temperature range between 900 and 1300 ºC. The employed methodology to determine low crystalline and glassy phase abundances is based in a combination of the internal standard method and the use of a nanocrystalline model where the long-range order is lost, respectively. A preliminary sintering characterization was carried out by contraction, density and porosity evolution with the firing temperature. Simultaneous thermo-gravimetric and differential thermal analysis was carried out to elucidate the actual temperature at which the chemical changes occur. Finally, the quantitative analysis based on the Rietveld refinement of the X-ray diffraction patterns was performed. The kaolinite decomposition into metakaolinite was determined quantitatively; the intermediate (980 ºC spinel type alumino-silicate formation was also quantified; the incongruent fusion of the potash feldspar was observed and quantified together with the final mullitization and the amorphous (glassy phase formation.The methodology used to analyze the X-ray diffraction patterns proved to be suitable to evaluate quantitatively the thermal transformations that occur in a complex system like the triaxial ceramics. The evaluated phases can be easily correlated with the processing variables and

  8. Development of a beam current monitor by using an amorphous magnetic core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Ueda, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Miya, K.; Tagawa, S.; Kobayashi, H.

    1993-01-01

    The high performance amorphous magnetic core monitor (ACM) for the measurement of electron beam currents has been developed. This monitor is composed of an amorphous magnetic core, radiation shields, a winding, magnetic absorbers, a ceramic vacuum duct and a SMA connecter. The ACM showed the very fast rise and fall times (< 1 ns), the high sensitivity (5 V/A at 50 Ω load), the good linearity, and good S/N ratio due to the high permeability of the amorphous magnetic core. The monitor works as a primary transformer. The time-response was simulated by an electric circuit analysis code. (orig.)

  9. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  10. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  11. Structure of amorphous sulfur

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Eichinger, BE

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The lambda-transition of elemental sulfur occurring at about 159°C has long been associated with the conversion of cyclic S8 rings (c-S8) to amorphous polymer (a-S) via a ring opening polymerization. It is demonstrated, with the use of both density...

  12. Grain boundary engineering of highly deformable ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecartney, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    Highly deformable ceramics can be created with the addition of intergranular silicate phases. These amorphous intergranular phases can assist in superplastic deformation by relieving stress concentrations and minimizing grain growth if the appropriate intergranular compositions are selected. Examples from 3Y-TZP and 8Y-CSZ ceramics are discussed. The grain boundary chemistry is analyzed by high resolution analytical TEM is found to have a strong influence on the cohesion of the grains both at high temperature and at room temperature. Intergranular phases with a high ionic character and containing large ions with a relatively weak bond strength appear to cause premature failure. In contrast, intergranular phases with a high degree of covalent character and similar or smaller ions than the ceramic and a high ionic bond strength are the best for grain boundary adhesion and prevention of both cavitation at high temperatures and intergranular fracture at room temperature

  13. Characterization techniques to predict mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated by ceramic microstereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adake, Chandrashekhar V.; Bhargava, Parag; Gandhi, Prasanna

    2018-02-01

    Ceramic microstereolithography (CMSL) has emerged as solid free form (SFF) fabrication technology in which complex ceramic parts are fabricated from ceramic suspensions which are formulated by dispersing ceramic particles in UV curable resins. Ceramic parts are fabricated by exposing ceramic suspension to computer controlled UV light which polymerizes resin to polymer and this polymer forms rigid network around ceramic particles. A 3-dimensional part is created by piling cured layers one over the other. These ceramic parts are used to build microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices after thermal treatment. In many cases green ceramic parts can be directly utilized to build MEMS devices. Hence characterization of these parts is essential in terms of their mechanical behaviour prior to their use in MEMS devices. Mechanical behaviour of these green ceramic parts depends on cross link density which in turn depends on chemical structure of monomer, concentrations of photoinitiator and UV energy dose. Mechanical behaviour can be determined with the aid of nanoindentation. And extent of crosslinking can be verified with the aid of DSC. FTIR characterization is used to analyse (-C=C-) double bond conversion. This paper explains characterization tools to predict the mechanical behaviour of green ceramic bodies fabricated in CMSL

  14. Determination of crystallinity of ceramic materials from the Ruland Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Gomes Junior, J.C.; Lima, J.C. de; Riella, H.G.; Kuhnen, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    Some methods found in literature approach the different characteristics between crystalline and amorphous phases by X ray diffraction technique. These methods use the relation between the intensities of the crystalline peaks and background amorphous or the absolute intensity of one of these to determine the relative amount of crystalline and amorphous material. However, a crystalline substance presents shows coherent diffuse scattering and a loss in the intensity of the peaks of diffraction in function of thermal vibrations of atoms and imperfections in the crystalline structure. A correct method for the determination of the crystallinity must take in account these effects. This work has as objective to determine the crystallinity of ceramic materials obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ashes, using the X ray diffraction technique and the Ruland Method, that considers the diminution of the intensity of the crystalline peak because of the disorder affects. The Ruland Method shows adequate for the determination of the crystallinity of the ceramic materials. (author)

  15. Ceramics as nuclear reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeve, K.D.

    1975-01-01

    Ceramics are widely accepted as nuclear reactor fuel materials, for both metal clad ceramic and all-ceramic fuel designs. Metal clad UO 2 is used commercially in large tonnages in five different power reactor designs. UO 2 pellets are made by familiar ceramic techniques but in a reactor they undergo complex thermal and chemical changes which must be thoroughly understood. Metal clad uranium-plutonium dioxide is used in present day fast breeder reactors, but may eventually be replaced by uranium-plutonium carbide or nitride. All-ceramic fuels, which are necessary for reactors operating above about 750 0 C, must incorporate one or more fission product retentive ceramic coatings. BeO-coated BeO matrix dispersion fuels and silicate glaze coated UO 2 -SiO 2 have been studied for specialised applications, but the only commercial high temperature fuel is based on graphite in which small fuel particles, each coated with vapour deposited carbon and silicon carbide, are dispersed. Ceramists have much to contribute to many aspects of fuel science and technology. (author)

  16. Industrial ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mengelle, Ch.

    1999-04-01

    After having given the definition of the term 'ceramics', the author describes the different manufacturing processes of these compounds. These materials are particularly used in the fields of 1)petroleum industry (in primary and secondary reforming units, in carbon black reactors and ethylene furnaces). 2)nuclear industry (for instance UO 2 and PuO 2 as fuels; SiC for encapsulation; boron carbides for control systems..)

  17. Avaliação das propriedades mecânicas de juntas cerâmicas usando fitas amorfas como metal de adição Evaluation of the mechanical properties of ceramic joint using amorphous ribbons as filler metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielton Gomes dos Santos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo determinar os melhores parâmetros para brasagem de juntas cerâmicas de Al2O3 pré-metalizadas com Ti por processo a plasma utilizando fitas amorfas de ligas Cu49Ag45Cx e como metal de adição. As ligas foram preparadas em forno a arco, e, posteriormente processadas por melt-spinning, variando conteúdo Ce de 4-6. %. A brasagem foi realizada em forno à vácuo e as seguintes variáveis analisadas: tempo de deposição do filme de Ti e temperatura e tempo de brasagem , que foram relacionados com a resistência à flexão em 3 pontos da junta brazada. A equação de regressão linear foi obtida, e verificou-se a interação entre estes fatores. As superfícies cerâmicas metalizadas apresentaram excelente uniformidade e as juntas brasadas muito boa adesão atingindo valores de resistência à flexão de até 176,8 MPa.This work had as objective to establish de best brazing parameter to joint Al2O3 pre-metalized with Ti by plasma process using amorphous ribbons of Cu49g45Ce x alloys as filler metals. The alloys were prepared in arc furnace and processed by melt-spinning process varying the Ce percentiles from 4 to 6. % . The brazing was accomplished in vacuum furnace and the following variables analyzed: deposition time of Ti film, brazing temperature and brazing times which were related to the brazed joint 3-point bending resistance. The interaction between those factors was obtained by linear regression equation. The metalized ceramic surfaces presented an good uniformity and the joint a very good adhesion reaching bending resistance up to 176,8 MPa.

  18. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  19. Mechanism of interaction of Co-B and Fe-B melts with ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filonov, M.R.; Anikin, D.Yu.; Pecherkin, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    Stability of ceramic materials has been studied in the medium of melts being rendered amorphous. Measurements of limiting wetting angle for these materials were carried out on the ceramic surface. Two conclusions were made from the results of the experiments: melt-ceramics interaction takes place mainly through the slag phase; boron nitride is the most stable ceramics for melting and pouring of melts being rendered amorphous in the air. Materials on the basis of BN were synthesized by the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis. Other refractory compounds were introduced in the ceramics composition for the purpose of improving such service properties as fire resistance, thermal resistance, mechanical strength, stability of compounds to the effect of reaction-active melts. The most promising refractory compositions were determined from the results of the studies [ru

  20. Formation of Micro and Mesoporous Amorphous Silica-Based Materials from Single Source Precursors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazri Mohd Sokri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Polysilazanes functionalized with alkoxy groups were designed and synthesized as single source precursors for fabrication of micro and mesoporous amorphous silica-based materials. The pyrolytic behaviors during the polymer to ceramic conversion were studied by the simultaneous thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry (TG-MS analysis. The porosity of the resulting ceramics was characterized by the N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm measurements. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic analyses as well as elemental composition analysis were performed on the polymer-derived amorphous silica-based materials, and the role of the alkoxy group as a sacrificial template for the micro and mesopore formations was discussed from a viewpoint to establish novel micro and mesoporous structure controlling technologies through the polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs route.

  1. Methods of amorphization and investigation of the amorphous state

    OpenAIRE

    EINFALT, TOMAŽ; PLANINŠEK, ODON; HROVAT, KLEMEN

    2013-01-01

    The amorphous form of pharmaceutical materials represents the most energetic solid state of a material. It provides advantages in terms of dissolution rate and bioavailability. This review presents the methods of solid-state amorphization described in literature (supercooling of liquids, milling, lyophilization, spray drying, dehydration of crystalline hydrates), with the emphasis on milling. Furthermore, we describe how amorphous state of pharmaceuticals differ depending on method of prepara...

  2. The Stabilization of Amorphous Zopiclone in an Amorphous Solid Dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Marnus; Liebenberg, Wilna; Aucamp, Marique

    2015-10-01

    Zopiclone is a poorly soluble psychotherapeutic agent. The aim of this study was to prepare and characterize an amorphous form of zopiclone as well as the characterization and performance of a stable amorphous solid dispersion. The amorphous form was prepared by the well-known method of quench-cooling of the melt. The solid dispersion was prepared by a solvent evaporation method of zopiclone, polyvinylpyrrolidone-25 (PVP-25), and methanol, followed by freeze-drying. The physico-chemical properties and stability of amorphous zopiclone and the solid dispersion was studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), hot-stage microscopy (HSM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), solubility, and dissolution studies. The zopiclone amorphous solid-state form was determined to be a fragile glass; it was concluded that the stability of the amorphous form is influenced by both temperature and water. Exposure of amorphous zopiclone to moisture results in rapid transformation of the amorphous form to the crystalline dihydrated form. In comparison, the amorphous solid dispersion proved to be more stable with increased aqueous solubility.

  3. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These ceramics are developed by chemical synthesis, in other words, they ... Science in 1980 and was a post doctoral ... complex crystal structures that have anisotropic characteristics. (Box 1) .... is a rare-earth or transition metal ion) and hexagonal ferrites. .... dielectric loss factor and dielectric strength normally determine.

  4. Ion implantation and amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohmuth, K.; Rauschenbach, B.

    1981-01-01

    This review deals with ion implantation of metals in the high concentration range for preparing amorphous layers (>= 10 at%, implantation doses > 10 16 ions/cm 2 ). Different models are described concerning formation of amorphous phases of metals by ion implantation and experimental results are given. The study of amorphous phases has been carried out by the aid of Rutherford backscattering combined with the channeling technique and using transmission electron microscopy. The structure of amorphous metals prepared by ion implantation has been discussed. It was concluded that amorphous metal-metalloid compounds can be described by a dense-random-packing structure with a great portion of metal atoms. Ion implantation has been compared with other techniques for preparing amorphous metals and the adventages have been outlined

  5. Origins of amorphous interstellar grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, H.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of amorphous interstellar grains has been suggested from infrared observations. Some carbon stars show the far infrared emission with a lambda -1 wavelength dependence. Far infrared emission supposed to be due to silicate grains often show the lambda -1 wavelength dependence. Mid infrared spectra around 10 μm have broad structure. These may be due to the amorphous silicate grains. The condition that the condensed grains from the cosmic gas are amorphous is discussed. (author)

  6. Amorphous silicon based particle detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wyrsch, N.; Franco, A.; Riesen, Y.; Despeisse, M.; Dunand, S.; Powolny, F.; Jarron, P.; Ballif, C.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation hard monolithic particle sensors can be fabricated by a vertical integration of amorphous silicon particle sensors on top of CMOS readout chip. Two types of such particle sensors are presented here using either thick diodes or microchannel plates. The first type based on amorphous silicon diodes exhibits high spatial resolution due to the short lateral carrier collection. Combination of an amorphous silicon thick diode with microstrip detector geometries permits to achieve micromete...

  7. Amorphous drugs and dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, K.; Priemel, P.

    2013-01-01

    The transformation to an amorphous form is one of the most promising approaches to address the low solubility of drug compounds, the latter being an increasing challenge in the development of new drug candidates. However, amorphous forms are high energy solids and tend to recry stallize. New...... formulation principles are needed to ensure the stability of amorphous drug forms. The formation of solid dispersions is still the most investigated approach, but additional approaches are desirable to overcome the shortcomings of solid dispersions. Spatial separation by either coating or the use of micro-containers...... before single molecules are available for the formation of crystal nuclei, thus stabilizing the amorphous form....

  8. The Enhancement of the Selectivity of Complex Reactions by a Catalytic Membrane Reactor -Ethylene Oxidation Over a Ag Catalyst Supported in a Ceramic Membrane-

    OpenAIRE

    馮, 臨; 小林, 正義; Lin, FENG; Masayoshi, KOBAYASHI

    1991-01-01

    This research demonstrated that, using a membrane reactor consisting of a tubular, microporous, glass-ceramic membrane, it is possible to achieve selective oxidation of ethylene to ethylene oxide with an Ag catalyst. In experiments which a reaction temperature range of 115 to 300℃ and a contact time of 1.5 to 5 seconds, resulting data illustrated the following characteristics of this membrane reactor : 1) compared with a classic tubular reactor, the selectivity of ethylene oxide is increased ...

  9. Using rice straw to manufacture ceramic bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov German Ivanovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the co-authors offer their advanced and efficient methodologies for the recycling of the rice straw, as well as the novel approaches to the ceramic brick quality improvement through the application of the rice straw as the combustible additive and through the formation of amorphous silica in the course of the rice straw combustion. The co-authors provide characteristics of the raw materials, production techniques used to manufacture ceramic bricks, and their basic properties in the article. The co-authors describe the simulated process of formation of amorphous silica. The process in question has two independent steps (or options: 1 rice straw combustion and ash formation outside the oven (in the oxidizing medium, and further application of ash as the additive in the process of burning clay mixtures; 2 adding pre-treated rice straw as the combustible additive into the clay mixture, and its further burning in compliance with the pre-set temperature mode. The findings have proven that the most rational pre-requisite of the rice straw application in the manufacturing of ceramic bricks consists in feeding milled straw into the clay mixture to be followed by molding, drying and burning. Brick samples are highly porous, and they also demonstrate sufficient compressive strength. The co-authors have also identified optimal values of rice straw and ash content in the mixtures under research.

  10. High-dose ion implantation of ceramics: benefits and limitations for tribology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, S.J.; Page, T.F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effects of ion implantation on sapphire and soda-lime-silica glass. It establishes the complex interplay between radiation damage, hardness, surface stress and, for the first time, friction. For sapphire, both the shallow indentation hardness response and the integrated near-surface stress increase with damage and exhibit maxima as the surface eventually amorphizes. For the glass, initial damage is shown to result in structural softening before rehardening at higher doses; the radiation-induced stress is a complex function of dose and seems partly linked to electronic rather than displacement processes. Some structural change also eventually occurs akin to amorphization in crystals and is accompanied by changes in hardness and surface stress. Superimposed on these patterns of behaviour are changes in the friction behaviour, part of which is ascribed to increased adhesion presumed due to implantation changing the surface affinity for water adsorption. These effects are demonstrated and discussed in the context of ion-implanted ceramics finding application as controlled friction and/or wear components in engineering applications. Other effects such as gas bubble formation, crazing and sputtering are shown to lead to surface microstructures which can also play a deleterious role in tribological behaviour. (author)

  11. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  12. Applications in the Nuclear Industry for Corrosion-Resistant Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, J; Choi, J

    2007-01-01

    Amorphous metal and ceramic thermal spray coatings have been developed that can be used to enhance the corrosion resistance of containers for the transportation, aging and disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive wastes. Fe-based amorphous metal formulations with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten have shown the corrosion resistance believed to be necessary for such applications. Rare earth additions enable very low critical cooling rates to be achieved. The boron content of these materials, and their stability at high neutron doses, enable them to serve as high efficiency neutron absorbers for criticality control. Ceramic coatings may provide even greater corrosion resistance for container applications, though the boron-containing amorphous metals are still favored for criticality control applications. These amorphous metal and ceramic materials have been produced as gas atomized powders and applied as near full density, non-porous coatings with the high-velocity oxy-fuel process. This paper summarizes the performance of these coatings as corrosion-resistant barriers, and as neutron absorbers. Relevant corrosion models are also discussed, as well as a cost model to quantify the economic benefits possible with these new materials

  13. Ceramics based on calcium pyrophosphate nanopowders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Safronova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Present work is aimed at the fabrication of resorbable bioceramics based on calcium pyrophosphate (CPP from the synthesized powders of amorphous hydrated calcium pyrophosphate (AHCPP. Amorphous hydratedcalcium pyrophosphate in the form of nanopowders was precipitated from Ca(NO3 2 and (NH4 4P2O7 solutions at room temperature in the presence of PO3– ions. Crystalline CPP powder was fabricated from AHCPP by its thermal decomposition at 600 °C and consisted of β- and α- phase. Small particles, with the size less than 200 nm, were formed promoting sintering of the ceramic material. The final sample, sintered at 900 °C, exhibits microstructure with submicron grains, apparent density of 87% of theoretical density (TD and demonstrates tensile strength of 70 MPa.

  14. Precursors-Derived Ceramic Membranes for High-Temperature Separation of Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji, Iwamoto

    2007-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the development of hydrogen-permselective ceramic membranes derived from organometallic precursors. Microstructure and gas transport property of microporous amorphous silica-based membranes are briefly described. Then, high-temperature hydrogen permselectivity, hydrothermal stability as well as hydrogen/steam selectivity of the amorphous silica-based membranes are discussed from a viewpoint of application to membrane reactors for conversion enhancement...

  15. Ceramics research in a high-energy neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The studies on the irradiation effect to ceramics have added much to the basic understanding of their behavior, for example, the amorphous state of ceramics related to radiation-induced metamictization, the radiation-induced strengthening and toughening due to ultrafine defect aggregates, the in situ degradation of electrical resistivity, the role of radiation-induced defects on thermal conductivity and so on. Most of the irradiation testing on ceramics in the fields of structural and thermal properties have been carried out by using fast fission neutrons of about 1 MeV, but if this energy could be significantly changed, the size and nature of damage cascade and the quantity of transmutation gases produced would change. The significance of neutron source parameters, the special test requirement for ceramics such as the use of miniature specimens, the control of test environment, the transient reduction of electrical resistivity and so on are discussed. A special case of ceramic studies is that on new oxide superconductors. These materials can be made into amorphous state at about 1 dpa using 1 MeV electrons, and are considered to be fairly damage-sensitive. (K.I.)

  16. [Research on the aging of all-ceramics restoration materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongjiao; Chen, Xinmin

    2011-10-01

    All-ceramic crowns and bridges have been widely used for dental restorations owing to their excellent functionality, aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, the premature clinical failure of all-ceramic crowns and bridges may easily occur when they are subjected to the complex environment of oral cavity. In the oral environment, all-ceramic materials are prone to aging. Aging can lead all-ceramic materials to change color, to lower bending strength, and to reduce anti-fracture toughness. There are many factors affecting the aging of the all-ceramic materials, for example, the grain size, the type of stabilizer, the residual stress and the water environment. In order to analyze the aging behavior, to optimize the design of all-ceramic crowns and bridges, and to evaluate the reliability and durability, we review in this paper recent research progress of aging behavior for all-ceramics restoration materials.

  17. Radiation damage in nuclear waste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, R.P.; Roberts, F.P.; Rusin, J.M.; Wald, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The text contains a number of specific observations about the radiation-induced changes in glass, glass-ceramic, and supercalcine nuclear waste forms. Other, more general conclusions can be summarized: Radiation-induced property changes follow an exponential ingrowth curve to saturation. Actinide host phases in both crystalline waste forms become X-ray amorphous. The magnitudes of the waste-form density changes observed could not be directly related to observed changes in the primary actinide phases. Although large crystal-structure changes occur in the materials studied, obvious physical degradation was not observed

  18. Crystallization inhibitors for amorphous oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznitskij, L.A.; Filippova, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Data for the last 10 years, in which experimental results of studying the temperature stabilization of x-ray amorphous oxides (including R 3 Fe 5 O 12 R-rare earths, ZrO 2 , In 2 O 3 , Sc 2 O 3 ) and their solid solution are presented, are generalized. Processes of amorphous oxide crystallization with the production of simple oxides, solid solutions and chemical compounds with different polyhedral structure, are investigated. Energy and crystallochemical criteria for selecting the doping inhibitor-components stabilizing the amorphous state are ascertained, temperatures and enthalpies of amorpous oxide crystallization are determined, examination of certain provisions of iso,orphous miscibility theory is conducted

  19. The precursors effects on biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar; Aydınoğlu, Aysu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, effects of the starting material on chemical, physical, and biological properties of biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders (BHA) were investigated. Characterization and chemical analysis of BHA powders were performed by using XRD, FT-IR, and ICP-AES. Microstructural features such as size and morphology of the resulting BHA powders were characterized by using BET, nano particle sizer, pycnometer, and SEM. Additionally, biological properties of the BHA ceramic powders were also investigated by using water-soluble tetrazolium salts test (WST-1). According to the chemical analysis of BHA ceramic powders, chemical structures of ceramics which are prepared under different conditions and by using different starting materials show differences. Ceramic powders which are produced at 80°C are mainly composed of hydroxyapatite, dental hydroxyapatite (contain Na and Mg elements in addition to Ca), and calcium phosphate sulfide. However, these structures are altered at high temperatures such as 900°C depending on the features of starting materials and form various calcium phosphate ceramics and/or their mixtures such as Na-Mg-hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, Mg-Whitlockit, and chloroapatite. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that amorphous ceramics produced at 80°C and ceramics containing chloroapatite structure as main or secondary phases were found to be extremely cytotoxic. Furthermore, cell culture studies showed that highly crystalline pure hydroxyapatite structures were extremely cytotoxic due to their high crystallinity values. Consequently, the current study indicates that the selection of starting materials which can be used in the production of calcium phosphate ceramics is very important. It is possible to produce calcium phosphate ceramics which have sufficient biocompatibility at physiological pH values and by using appropriate starting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of setting reaction in magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics with time resolved infrared spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mácová, Petra; Viani, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 205, October (2017), s. 62-66 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : amorphous materials * magnesium potassium phosphate cements * FTIR Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass OBOR OECD: Ceramics Impact factor: 2.572, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167577X17309552

  1. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  2. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghera, Jasbinder; Kim, Woohong; Villalobos, Guillermo; Shaw, Brandon; Baker, Colin; Frantz, Jesse; Sadowski, Bryan; Aggarwal, Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements. PMID:28817044

  3. Kinetically Controlled Two-Step Amorphization and Amorphous-Amorphous Transition in Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Yong, Xue; Tse, John S.; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-09-01

    We report the results of in situ structural characterization of the amorphization of crystalline ice Ih under compression and the relaxation of high-density amorphous (HDA) ice under decompression at temperatures between 96 and 160 K by synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The results show that ice Ih transforms to an intermediate crystalline phase at 100 K prior to complete amorphization, which is supported by molecular dynamics calculations. The phase transition pathways show clear temperature dependence: direct amorphization without an intermediate phase is observed at 133 K, while at 145 K a direct Ih-to-IX transformation is observed; decompression of HDA shows a transition to low-density amorphous ice at 96 K and ˜1 Pa , to ice Ic at 135 K and to ice IX at 145 K. These observations show that the amorphization of compressed ice Ih and the recrystallization of decompressed HDA are strongly dependent on temperature and controlled by kinetic barriers. Pressure-induced amorphous ice is an intermediate state in the phase transition from the connected H-bond water network in low pressure ices to the independent and interpenetrating H-bond network of high-pressure ices.

  4. Complex dielectric modulus and relaxation response at low microwave frequency region of dielectric ceramic Ba6-3xNd8+2xTi18O54

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chian Heng Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The desirable characteristics of Ba6-3xNd8+2xTi18O54 include high dielectric constant, low loss tangent, and high quality factor developed a new field for electronic applications. The microwave dielectric properties of Ba6-3xNd8+2xTi18O54, with x = 0.15 ceramics at different sintering temperatures (600–1300°C were investigated. The phenomenon of polarization produced by the applied electric field was studied. The dielectric properties with respect to frequency from 1 MHz to 1.5 GHz were measured using Impedance Analyzer, and the results were compared and analyzed. The highest dielectric permittivity and lowest loss factor were defined among the samples. The complex dielectric modulus was evaluated from the measured parameters of dielectric measurement in the same frequency range, and used to differentiate the contribution of grain and grain boundary.

  5. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  6. Amorphous track models: a numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Hahn, Ute

    in carbon ion treatment at the particle facility HIT in Heidelberg. Apparent differences between the LEM and the Katz model are the way how interactions of individual particle tracks and how extended targets are handled. Complex scenarios, however, can mask the actual effect of these differences. Here, we......Amorphous track models such as Katz' Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach [1, 2] or the Local Effect Model (LEM) [3, 4] had reasonable success in predicting the response of solid state dosimeters and radiobiological systems. LEM is currently applied in radiotherapy for biological dose optimization...

  7. Amorphous Ti-Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinkin, A.; Liebermann, H.; Pounds, S.; Taylor, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is the first report on processing, properties and potential application of amorphous titanium/zirconium-base alloys produced in the form of a good quality continuous and ductile ribbon having up to 12.5 mm width. To date, the majority of titanium brazing is accomplished using cooper and aluminum-base brazing filler metals. The brazements produced with these filler metals have rather low (∼300 degrees C) service temperature, thus impeding progress in aircraft and other technologies and industries. The attempt to develop a generation of high temperature brazing filler metals was made in the late sixties-early seventies studies in detail were a large number of Ti-, Zr-Ti-Zr, Ti-V and Zr-V-Ti based alloys. The majority of these alloys has copper and nickel as melting temperature depressants. The presence of nickel and copper converts them into eutectic alloys having [Ti(Zr)] [Cu(Ni)], intermetallic phases as major structural constituents. This, in turn, results in high alloy brittleness and poor, if any, processability by means of conventional, i.e. melting-ingot casting-deformation technology. In spite of good wettability and high joint strength achieved in dozens of promising alloys, only Ti-15Cu-15Ni is now widely used as a brazing filler metal for high service temperature. Up until now this material could not be produced as a homogeneous foil and is instead applied as a clad strip consisting of three separate metallic layers

  8. Anomalous magnetoresistance in amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'menko, V.M.; Vladychkin, A.N.; Mel'nikov, V.I.; Sudovtsev, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetoresistance of amorphous Bi, Ca, V and Yb films is investigated in fields up to 4 T at low temperatures. For all metals the magnetoresistance is positive, sharply decreases with growth of temperature and depends anomalously on the magnetic field strength. For amorphous superconductors the results agree satisfactorily with the theory of anomalous magnetoresistance in which allowance is made for scattering of electrons by the superconducting fluctuations

  9. Aerospace Ceramic Materials: Thermal, Environmental Barrier Coatings and SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for Turbine Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2018-01-01

    Ceramic materials play increasingly important roles in aerospace applications because ceramics have unique properties, including high temperature capability, high stiffness and strengths, excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance. Ceramic materials also generally have lower densities as compared to metallic materials, making them excellent candidates for light-weight hot-section components of aircraft turbine engines, rocket exhaust nozzles, and thermal protection systems for space vehicles when they are being used for high-temperature and ultra-high temperature ceramics applications. Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), including non-oxide and oxide CMCs, are also recently being incorporated in gas turbine engines for high pressure and high temperature section components and exhaust nozzles. However, the complexity and variability of aerospace ceramic processing methods, compositions and microstructures, the relatively low fracture toughness of the ceramic materials, still remain the challenging factors for ceramic component design, validation, life prediction, and thus broader applications. This ceramic material section paper presents an overview of aerospace ceramic materials and their characteristics. A particular emphasis has been placed on high technology level (TRL) enabling ceramic systems, that is, turbine engine thermal and environmental barrier coating systems and non-oxide type SiC/SiC CMCs. The current status and future trend of thermal and environmental barrier coatings and SiC/SiC CMC development and applications are described.

  10. Synthesis and high temperature stability of amorphous Si(B)CN-MWCNT composite nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandavat, Romil; Singh, Gurpreet

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate synthesis of a hybrid nanowire structure consisting of an amorphous polymer-derived silicon boron-carbonitride (Si-B-C-N) shell with a multiwalled carbon nanotube core. This was achieved through a novel process involving preparation of a boron-modified liquid polymeric precursor through a reaction of trimethyl borate and polyureasilazane under atmospheric conditions; followed by conversion of polymer to glass-ceramic on carbon nanotube surfaces through controlled heating. Chemical structure of the polymer was studied by liquid-NMR while evolution of various ceramic phases was studied by Raman spectroscopy, solid-NMR, Fourier transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirms presence of amorphous Si(B)CN coating on individual nanotubes for all specimen processed below 1400 degree C. Thermogravimetric analysis, followed by TEM revealed high temperature stability of the carbon nanotube core in flowing air up to 1300 degree C.

  11. Creep in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is one of its kind, since there are no other books on Creep in Ceramics. The book consist of two parts: A and B. In part A general knowledge of creep in ceramics is considered, while part B specifies creep in technologically important ceramics. Part B covers creep in oxide ceramics, carnides and nitrides. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials and characterization of creep in ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  12. Ceramic Parts for Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Carpenter, Harry W.; Tellier, Jim; Rollins, Clark; Stormo, Jerry

    1987-01-01

    Abilities of ceramics to serve as turbine blades, stator vanes, and other elements in hot-gas flow of rocket engines discussed in report. Ceramics prime candidates, because of resistance to heat, low density, and tolerance of hostile environments. Ceramics considered in report are silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and new generation of such ceramic composites as transformation-toughened zirconia and alumina and particulate- or whisker-reinforced matrices. Report predicts properly designed ceramic components viable in advanced high-temperature rocket engines and recommends future work.

  13. Ceramic gas turbine shroud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.

    2014-07-22

    An example gas turbine engine shroud includes a first annular ceramic wall having an inner side for resisting high temperature turbine engine gasses and an outer side with a plurality of radial slots. A second annular metallic wall is positioned radially outwardly of and enclosing the first annular ceramic wall and has a plurality of tabs in communication with the slot of the first annular ceramic wall. The tabs of the second annular metallic wall and slots of the first annular ceramic wall are in communication such that the first annular ceramic wall and second annular metallic wall are affixed.

  14. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  15. Ceramic-intermetallic composites produced by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering

    CERN Document Server

    Cabanas-Moreno, J G; Martínez-Sanchez, R; Delgado-Gutierrez, O; Palacios-Gomez, J; Umemoto, M

    1998-01-01

    Nano-and microcomposites of intermetallic (Co/sub 3/Ti, AlCo/sub 2 /Ti) and ceramic (TiN, Ti(C, N), Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) phases have been produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS) of powders resulting from mechanical alloying of Al-Co-Ti elemental powder mixtures. The mechanically alloyed powders consisted of mixtures of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases which, on sintering, transformed into complex microstructures of the intermetallic and ceramic phases. For Al contents lower than about 30 at% in the original powder mixtures, the use of SPS led to porosities of 1-2% in the sintered compacts and hardness values as high as ~1700 kg/mm/sup 2/; in these cases, the composite matrix was TiN and Ti(C, N), with the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ phase found as finely dispersed particles in the matrix and the Co /sub 3/Ti and AlCo/sub 2/Ti phases as interdispersed grains. (19 refs).

  16. Applications of advanced electron microscopy techniques to the studies of radiation effects in ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes some recent results from the application of several advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to the studies of radiation effects in insulators with the main focus on radiation-induced amorphization. These techniques include in situ TEM during ion-beam irradiation at cryogenic and elevated temperatures, cross-sectional TEM, high-resolution TEM, and image simulation on partially damaged materials, as well as digital TEM with image processing and analysis. The combination of these techniques may often provide very detailed information about the microstructure evolution during energetic particle irradiation, especially at the early stages, which is unobtainable with any other analytical methods. These techniques have been successfully applied to the analysis of a large group of ion-beam-irradiated ceramics, including quartz, silicon carbides, uranium oxide, apatite, spinel and other complex mineral phases. The advantages and limitations of each technique, as well as some important technical details for the analysis of radiation damage in ceramics are presented. (orig.)

  17. Structure and properties of interfaces in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnell, D.; Ruehle, M.; Chowdhry, U.

    1995-01-01

    The motivation for the symposium was the observation that interfaces in crystallographically and compositionally complex systems often dictate the performance and reliability of devices that utilize functional ceramics. The current level of understanding of interface-property relations in silicon-based devices required over 30 years of intensive research. Similar issues influence the relationship between atomic bonding at interfaces and properties in functional ceramic systems. The current understanding of these complex interfaces does not allow correlation between atomic structure and interface properties, in spite of their importance to a number of emerging technologies (wireless communications, radar-based positioning systems, sensors, etc.). The objective of this symposium was to focus attention on these fundamental issues by featuring recent theoretical and experimental work from various disciplines that impact the understanding of interface chemistry, structure, and properties. The emphasis was on relating properties of surfaces and interfaces to structure through an understanding of atomic level phenomena. Interfaces of interest include metal/ceramic, ceramic/ceramic, ceramic/vapor, etc., in electronic, magnetic, optical, ferroelectric, piezoelectric, and dielectric applications. Sixty one papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  18. Additive manufacturing of polymer-derived ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Zak C.; Zhou, Chaoyin; Martin, John H.; Jacobsen, Alan J.; Carter, William B.; Schaedler, Tobias A.

    2016-01-01

    The extremely high melting point of many ceramics adds challenges to additive manufacturing as compared with metals and polymers. Because ceramics cannot be cast or machined easily, three-dimensional (3D) printing enables a big leap in geometrical flexibility. We report preceramic monomers that are cured with ultraviolet light in a stereolithography 3D printer or through a patterned mask, forming 3D polymer structures that can have complex shape and cellular architecture. These polymer structures can be pyrolyzed to a ceramic with uniform shrinkage and virtually no porosity. Silicon oxycarbide microlattice and honeycomb cellular materials fabricated with this approach exhibit higher strength than ceramic foams of similar density. Additive manufacturing of such materials is of interest for propulsion components, thermal protection systems, porous burners, microelectromechanical systems, and electronic device packaging.

  19. Continuum modeling of twinning, amorphization, and fracture: theory and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. D.; Knap, J.

    2018-03-01

    A continuum mechanical theory is used to model physical mechanisms of twinning, solid-solid phase transformations, and failure by cavitation and shear fracture. Such a sequence of mechanisms has been observed in atomic simulations and/or experiments on the ceramic boron carbide. In the present modeling approach, geometric quantities such as the metric tensor and connection coefficients can depend on one or more director vectors, also called internal state vectors. After development of the general nonlinear theory, a first problem class considers simple shear deformation of a single crystal of this material. For homogeneous fields or stress-free states, algebraic systems or ordinary differential equations are obtained that can be solved by numerical iteration. Results are in general agreement with atomic simulation, without introduction of fitted parameters. The second class of problems addresses the more complex mechanics of heterogeneous deformation and stress states involved in deformation and failure of polycrystals. Finite element calculations, in which individual grains in a three-dimensional polycrystal are fully resolved, invoke a partially linearized version of the theory. Results provide new insight into effects of crystal morphology, activity or inactivity of different inelasticity mechanisms, and imposed deformation histories on strength and failure of the aggregate under compression and shear. The importance of incorporation of inelastic shear deformation in realistic models of amorphization of boron carbide is noted, as is a greater reduction in overall strength of polycrystals containing one or a few dominant flaws rather than many diffusely distributed microcracks.

  20. Manufacturing process, characterization and optical investigation of amorphous 1D zinc oxide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysiak, Wiktor; Tański, Tomasz; Zaborowska, Marta

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to produce amorphous ZnO nanowires via the electrospinning process from a polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)/zinc acetate dihydrate (Zn(COOH)2)/dimethylformamide (DMF) and ethanol (EtOH) solution. The as obtained nanofibers were calcined at temperatures ranging from 400 to 600 °C to remove the organic phase. The one-dimensional zinc oxide nanostructures were studied using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) to analyse the influence of the used temperature on the morphology and structures of the obtained ceramic nanomaterials. In order to examine the chemical structure of nanowires, the energy dispersive spectrometry (EDX) was used. Besides, a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was performed to show the polymer concentration loss in a function of temperature in order to obtain pure zinc oxide nanowires. The optical property analysis was performed on the basis of UV-vis spectra of absorbance as a function of the wavelength. Using the modified Swanepoel method, which the authors proposed, and the recorded absorbance spectra determined the banded refractive index n, real n‧ and imaginary k part of the refractive index as a function of the wavelength, complex dielectric permeability ɛ, real and imaginary part εr and εi of the dielectric permeability as a function of the radiation energy of the produced ZnO nanowires.

  1. Structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon from ab initio molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buda, F. (Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 174 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, Ohio (USA)); Chiarotti, G.L. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Laboratorio Tecnologie Avanzate Superfici e Catalisi del Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale di Fisica della Materia, Padriciano 99, I-34012 Trieste (Italy)); Car, R. (International School for Advanced Studies, Strada Costiera 11, I-34014 Trieste (Italy) Institut Romard de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland Department of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Geneva, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)); Parrinello, M. (IBM Research Division, Zurich Research Laboratory, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland))

    1991-09-15

    We have generated a model of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by first-principles molecular dynamics. Our results are in good agreement with the available experimental data and provide new insight into the microscopic structure of this material. The calculation lends support to models in which monohydride complexes are prevalent, and indicates a strong tendency of hydrogen to form small clusters.

  2. Ceramic Integration Technologies for Advanced Energy Systems: Critical Needs, Technical Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2010-01-01

    Advanced ceramic integration technologies dramatically impact the energy landscape due to wide scale application of ceramics in all aspects of alternative energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, gas turbine propulsion systems, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Ceramic integration technologies play a key role in fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts with multifunctional properties. However, the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance requires the understanding of many thermochemical and thermomechanical factors, particularly for high temperature applications. In this presentation, various needs, challenges, and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic metal) material www.nasa.gov 45 ceramic-ceramic-systems have been discussed. Experimental results for bonding and integration of SiC based Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) LDI fuel injector and advanced ceramics and composites for gas turbine applications are presented.

  3. State of the art: alumina ceramics for energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauth, W.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1978-01-01

    Prominent ceramic raw materials and products manufacturers were surveyed to determine the state of the art for alumina ceramic fabrication. This survey emphasized current capabilities and limitations for fabrication of large, high-density, high-purity, complex shapes. Some directions are suggested for future needs and development

  4. Recent Progress in Some Amorphous Materials for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Xu, Yuxia; Zheng, Shasha; Guo, Xiaotian; Xue, Huaiguo; Pang, Huan

    2018-05-14

    A breakthrough in technologies having "green" and sustainable energy storage conversion is urgent, and supercapacitors play a crucial role in this area of research. Owing to their unique porous structure, amorphous materials are considered one of the best active materials for high-performance supercapacitors due to their high specific capacity, excellent cycling stability, and fast charging rate. This Review summarizes the synthesis of amorphous materials (transition metal oxides, carbon-based materials, transition metal sulfides, phosphates, hydroxides, and their complexes) to highlight their electrochemical performance in supercapacitors. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Mg-phosphate ceramics produced from the product of thermal transformation of cement-asbestos

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pérez-Estébanez, Marta; Mácová, Petra; Šašek, Petr; Viani, Alberto; Gualtieri, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2014), s. 187-192 ISSN 1640-4920. [Conference on Environment and Mineral Processing /18./. Ostrava, 29.05.2014-31.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : cement -asbestos * magnesium phosphate ceramics * amorphous Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage http://www.potopk.com.pl/archiwum.html

  6. Utilisation of drinking water treatment sludge for the manufacturing of ceramic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizinievič, O.; Kizinievič, V.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of the additive of drinking water treatment sludge on the physical and mechanical properties, structural parameters, microstructure of the ceramic products is analysed in the research. Drinking water treatment sludge is renewable, environmentally-friendly, economical additive saving expensive natural raw materials when introduced into the ceramic products. The main drinking water treatment sludge component is amorphous Fe2O3 (70%). Formation masses are prepared by incorporating from 5 % to 60 % of drinking water treatment additive and by burning out at the temperature 1000 °C. Investigation showed that the physical and mechanical properties, microstructure of the ceramic bodies vary depending on the amount of drinking water treatment additive incorporated. In addition, drinking water treatment additive affects the ceramic body as a pigment that dyes the ceramic body in darker red colour.

  7. Fundamentals of amorphous solids structure and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2014-01-01

    Long awaited, this textbook fills the gap for convincing concepts to describe amorphous solids. Adopting a unique approach, the author develops a framework that lays the foundations for a theory of amorphousness. He unravels the scientific mysteries surrounding the topic, replacing rather vague notions of amorphous materials as disordered crystalline solids with the well-founded concept of ideal amorphous solids. A classification of amorphous materials into inorganic glasses, organic glasses, glassy metallic alloys, and thin films sets the scene for the development of the model of ideal amorph

  8. Chemical vapor deposition of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus alloy films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin Jinhong; Waheed, Abdul; Winkenwerder, Wyatt A.; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Agapiou, Kyriacos; Jones, Richard A.; Hwang, Gyeong S.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition growth of amorphous ruthenium-phosphorus films on SiO 2 containing ∼ 15% phosphorus is reported. cis-Ruthenium(II)dihydridotetrakis-(trimethylphosphine), cis-RuH 2 (PMe 3 ) 4 (Me = CH 3 ) was used at growth temperatures ranging from 525 to 575 K. Both Ru and P are zero-valent. The films are metastable, becoming increasingly more polycrystalline upon annealing to 775 and 975 K. Surface studies illustrate that demethylation is quite efficient near 560 K. Precursor adsorption at 135 K or 210 K and heating reveal the precursor undergoes a complex decomposition process in which the hydride and trimethylphosphine ligands are lost at temperatures as low at 280 K. Phosphorus and its manner of incorporation appear responsible for the amorphous-like character. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to suggest the local structure in the films and the causes for phosphorus stabilizing the amorphous phase

  9. Plasma deposition of amorphous silicon-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Giovanni; Madan, Arun

    1995-01-01

    Semiconductors made from amorphous silicon have recently become important for their commercial applications in optical and electronic devices including FAX machines, solar cells, and liquid crystal displays. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon-Based Materials is a timely, comprehensive reference book written by leading authorities in the field. This volume links the fundamental growth kinetics involving complex plasma chemistry with the resulting semiconductor film properties and the subsequent effect on the performance of the electronic devices produced. Key Features * Focuses on the plasma chemistry of amorphous silicon-based materials * Links fundamental growth kinetics with the resulting semiconductor film properties and performance of electronic devices produced * Features an international group of contributors * Provides the first comprehensive coverage of the subject, from deposition technology to materials characterization to applications and implementation in state-of-the-art devices.

  10. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurath, D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures

  11. Steady state simulation of Joule heated ceramic melter for vitrification of high level liquid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugilal, G; Wattal, P K; Theyyunni, T K [Process Engineering and Systems Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Iyer, K N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Inst. of Tech., Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The Joule heated ceramic melter is emerging as an attractive alternative to metallic melters for high level waste vitrification. The inherent limitations with metallic melters viz., low capacity and short melter life, are overcome in a ceramic melter which can be adopted for continuous mode of operation. The ceramic melter has the added advantage of better operational flexibility. This paper describes the three dimensional model used for simulating the complex design conditions of the ceramic melter. (author).

  12. Steady state simulation of Joule heated ceramic melter for vitrification of high level liquid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugilal, G.; Wattal, P.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.; Iyer, K.N.

    1994-01-01

    The Joule heated ceramic melter is emerging as an attractive alternative to metallic melters for high level waste vitrification. The inherent limitations with metallic melters viz., low capacity and short melter life, are overcome in a ceramic melter which can be adopted for continuous mode of operation. The ceramic melter has the added advantage of better operational flexibility. This paper describes the three dimensional model used for simulating the complex design conditions of the ceramic melter. (author)

  13. Amorphous and Crystalline Particulates: Challenges and Perspectives in Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Hisham; Majumder, Mridul; Bari, Fiza

    2017-01-01

    Crystalline and amorphous dispersions have been the focus of academic and industrial research due to their potential role in formulating poorly water-soluble drugs. This review looks at the progress made starting with crystalline carriers in the form of eutectics moving towards more complex crystalline mixtures. It also covers using glassy polymers to maintain the drug as amorphous exhibiting higher energy and entropy. However, the amorphous form tends to recrystallize on storage, which limits the benefits of this approach. Specific interactions between the drug and the polymer may retard this spontaneous conversion of the amorphous drug. Some studies have shown that it is possible to maintain the drug in the amorphous form for extended periods of time. For the drug and the polymer to form a stable mixture they have to be miscible on a molecular basis. Another form of solid dispersions is pharmaceutical co-crystals, for which research has focused on understanding the chemistry, crystal engineering and physico-chemical properties. USFDA has issued a guidance in April 2013 suggesting that the co-crystals as a pharmaceutical product may be a reality; but just not yet! While some of the research is still oriented towards application of these carriers, understanding the mechanism by which drug-carrier miscibility occurs is also covered. Within this context is the use of thermodynamic models such as Flory-Huggins model with some examples of studies used to predict miscibility. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7?mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large r...

  15. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    SiC-based ceramic fibers are derived from polycarbosilane or polymetallocarbosilane precursors and are classified into three groups according to their chemical composition, oxygen content, and C/Si atomic ratio. The first-generation fibers are Si-C-O (Nicalon) fibers and Si-Ti-C-O (Tyranno Lox M) fibers. Both fibers contain more than 10-wt% oxygen owing to oxidation during curing and lead to degradation in strength at temperatures exceeding 1,300°C. The maximum use temperature is 1,100°C. The second-generation fibers are SiC (Hi-Nicalon) fibers and Si-Zr-C-O (Tyranno ZMI) fibers. The oxygen content of these fibers is reduced to less than 1 wt% by electron beam irradiation curing in He. The thermal stability of these fibers is improved (they are stable up to 1,500°C), but their creep resistance is limited to a maximum of 1,150°C because their C/Si atomic ratio results in excess carbon. The third-generation fibers are stoichiometric SiC fibers, i.e., Hi-Nicalon Type S (hereafter Type S), Tyranno SA, and Sylramic™ fibers. They exhibit improved thermal stability and creep resistance up to 1,400°C. Stoichiometric SiC fibers meet many of the requirements for the use of ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature structural application. SiBN3C fibers derived from polyborosilazane also show promise for structural applications, remain in the amorphous state up to 1,800°C, and have good high-temperature creep resistance.

  16. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabloff, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  17. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 2. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Advanced Ceramics: Structural Ceramics and Glasses. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 5 Issue 2 February 2000 pp 4-11 ...

  18. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  19. [Ceramic inlays and onlays].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Pelt, A W; de Kloet, H J; van der Kuy, P

    1996-11-01

    Large direct composite restorations can induce shrinkage related postoperative sensitivity. Indirect resin-bonded (tooth colored) restorations may perhaps prevent these complaints. Indirect bonded ceramics are especially attractive because of their biocompatibility and esthetic performance. Several procedures and techniques are currently available for the fabrication of ceramic restorations: firing, casting, heat-pressing and milling. In this article the different systems are described. Advantages, disadvantages and clinical performance of ceramic inlays are compared and discussed.

  20. Ceramic Electron Multiplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.

    1996-01-01

    The Ceramic Electron Multipliers (CEM) is a compact, robust, linear and fast multi-channel electron multiplier. The Multi Layer Ceramic Technique (MLCT) allows to build metallic dynodes inside a compact ceramic block. The activation of the metallic dynodes enhances their secondary electron emission (SEE). The CEM can be used in multi-channel photomultipliers, multi-channel light intensifiers, ion detection, spectroscopy, analysis of time of flight events, particle detection or Cherenkov imaging detectors. (auth)

  1. Displacive Transformation in Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-28

    PZT ), ceramics have attracted natural abundance. much attention for use in nonvolatile semiconductor mem- We attribute the observed spectra in Fig. I to...near a crack tip in piezoelectric ceramics of lead zirconate titanate ( PZT ) and barium titanate. They reasoned that the poling of ferroelectric... Texture in Ferroelastic Tetragonal Zirconia," J. Am. Ceram . Soc., 73 (1990) no. 6: 1777-1779. 27. J. F. Jue and A. Virkar, "Fabrication, Microstructural

  2. Piezo-electrostrictive ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ho Gi; Shin, Byeong Cheol

    1991-09-01

    This book deals with principle and the case of application of piezo-electrostrictive ceramics, which includes definition of piezoelectric materials and production and development of piezoelectric materials, coexistence of Pb(zr, Ti)O 3 ceramics on cause of coexistence in MPB PZT ceramics, electrostrictive effect of oxide type perovskite, practical piezo-electrostrictive materials, and breaking strength, evaluation technique of piezoelectric characteristic, and piezoelectric accelerometer sensor like printer head, ink jet and piezoelectric relay.

  3. Method of sintering ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Dykes, Norman L.

    1992-01-01

    A method for sintering ceramic materials is described. A ceramic article is coated with layers of protective coatings such as boron nitride, graphite foil, and niobium. The coated ceramic article is embedded in a container containing refractory metal oxide granules and placed within a microwave oven. The ceramic article is heated by microwave energy to a temperature sufficient to sinter the ceramic article to form a densified ceramic article having a density equal to or greater than 90% of theoretical density.

  4. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  5. Ceramic piezoelectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszuwara, W.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic piezoelectric materials conert reversibility electric energy into mechanical energy. In the presence of electric field piezoelectric materials exhibit deformations up to 0.15% (for single crystals up to 1.7%). The deformation energy is in the range of 10 2 - 10 3 J/m 3 and working frequency can reach 10 5 Hz. Ceramic piezoelectric materials find applications in many modern disciplines such as: automatics, micromanipulation, measuring techniques, medical diagnostics and many others. Among the variety of ceramic piezoelectric materials the most important appear to be ferroelectric materials such as lead zirconate titanate so called PZT ceramics. Ceramic piezoelectric materials can be processed by methods widely applied for standard ceramics, i.e. starting from simple precursors e.g. oxides. Application of sol-gel method has also been reported. Substantial drawback for many applications of piezoelectric ceramics is their brittleness, thus much effort is currently being put in the development of piezoelectric composite materials. Other important research directions in the field of ceramic piezoelectric materials composite development of lead free materials, which can exhibit properties similar to the PZT ceramics. Among other directions one has to state processing of single crystals and materials having texture or gradient structure. (author)

  6. Corrosion of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Non-oxide ceramics are promising materials for a range of high temperature applications. Selected current and future applications are listed. In all such applications, the ceramics are exposed to high temperature gases. Therefore it is critical to understand the response of these materials to their environment. The variables to be considered here include both the type of ceramic and the environment to which it is exposed. Non-oxide ceramics include borides, nitrides, and carbides. Most high temperature corrosion environments contain oxygen and hence the emphasis of this chapter will be on oxidation processes.

  7. Small recuperated ceramic microturbine demonstrator concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.; Rodgers, Colin

    2008-01-01

    It has been about a decade since microturbines first entered service in the distributed generation market, and the efficiencies of these turbogenerators rated in the 30-100 kW power range have remained essentially on the order of 30%. In this time frame the cost of fuel (natural gas and oil) has increased substantially, and efforts are now underway to increase the efficiency of microturbines to 40% or higher. Various near-term means of achieving this are underway by utilizing established gas turbine technology, but now based on more complex thermodynamic cycles. A longer-term approach of improving efficiency is proposed in this paper based on the retention of the basic recuperated Brayton cycle, but now operating at significantly higher levels of turbine inlet temperature. However, in small low pressure ratio recuperated microturbines embodying radial flow turbomachinery this necessitates the use of ceramic components, including the turbine, recuperator and combustor. A development approach is proposed to design, fabricate and test a 7.5 kW ceramic microturbine demonstrator concept, which for the first time would involve the coupling of a ceramic radial flow turbine, a ceramic combustor, and a compact ceramic fixed-boundary high effectiveness recuperator. In a period of some three years, the major objectives of the proposed small ceramic microturbine R and D effort would be to establish a technology base involving thermal and stress analysis, design methodology, ceramic component fabrication techniques, and component development, these culminating in the assembly and testing to demonstrate engine structural integrity, and to verify performance. This would provide a benchmark for more confidently advancing to increased size ceramic-based turbogenerators with the potential for efficiencies of over 40%. In addition, the power size of the tested prototype could possibly emerge as a viable product, namely as a natural gas-fired turbogenerator with the capability of

  8. Production of amorphous alloys by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, W.A.; Chadderton, L.T.; Johnson, E.

    1978-01-01

    Recent data are reported on the use of ion implantation to produce amorphous metallic alloys. In particular data on the dose dependence of the crystalline to amorphous transition induced by P + implantation of nickel is presented. (Auth.)

  9. Amorphous nanoparticles — Experiments and computer simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Vo Van; Ganguli, Dibyendu

    2012-01-01

    The data obtained by both experiments and computer simulations concerning the amorphous nanoparticles for decades including methods of synthesis, characterization, structural properties, atomic mechanism of a glass formation in nanoparticles, crystallization of the amorphous nanoparticles, physico-chemical properties (i.e. catalytic, optical, thermodynamic, magnetic, bioactivity and other properties) and various applications in science and technology have been reviewed. Amorphous nanoparticles coated with different surfactants are also reviewed as an extension in this direction. Much attention is paid to the pressure-induced polyamorphism of the amorphous nanoparticles or amorphization of the nanocrystalline counterparts. We also introduce here nanocomposites and nanofluids containing amorphous nanoparticles. Overall, amorphous nanoparticles exhibit a disordered structure different from that of corresponding bulks or from that of the nanocrystalline counterparts. Therefore, amorphous nanoparticles can have unique physico-chemical properties differed from those of the crystalline counterparts leading to their potential applications in science and technology.

  10. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  11. Radiation tolerance of amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaides, R.V.; DeFeo, S.; Doremus, L.W.

    1976-01-01

    In an attempt to determine the threshold radiation damage in amorphous semiconductors, radiation tests were performed on amorphous semiconductor thin film materials and on threshold and memory devices. The influence of flash x-rays and neutron radiation upon the switching voltages, on- and off-state characteristics, dielectric response, optical transmission, absorption band edge and photoconductivity were measured prior to, during and following irradiation. These extensive tests showed the high radiation tolerance of amorphous semiconductor materials. Electrical and optical properties, other than photoconductivity, have a neutron radiation tolerance threshold above 10 17 nvt in the steady state and 10 14 nvt in short (50 μsec to 16 msec) pulses. Photoconductivity increases by 1 1 / 2 orders of magnitude at the level of 10 14 nvt (short pulses of 50 μsec). Super flash x-rays up to 5000 rads (Si), 20 nsec, do not initiate switching in off-state samples which are voltage biased up to 90 percent of the threshold voltage. Both memory and threshold amorphous devices are capable of switching on and off during nuclear radiation transients at least as high as 2 x 10 14 nvt in 50 μsec pulses

  12. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...

  13. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  14. Development of novel Mg–Ni60Nb40 amorphous particle reinforced composites with enhanced hardness and compressive response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayalakshmi, S.; Sahu, Shreyasi; Sankaranarayanan, S.; Gupta, Sujasha; Gupta, M.

    2014-01-01

    Development of amorphous alloy/glassy particle reinforced light metal composites is an emerging research field. In this investigation, we have synthesized and characterized Ni 60 Nb 40 amorphous alloy particle reinforced Mg-composites with varying volume fractions. Microwave-assisted two-directional rapid sintering technique followed by hot extrusion was used to produce these pure Mg-based composites. The structural and mechanical properties of the developed composites were investigated, and are discussed using structure–property relationship. Structural analysis indicated the retention of amorphous structure of the reinforcement in all the composites. It was found that the distribution of the reinforcement was strongly dependent on the volume fraction (V f ). The addition of Ni 60 Nb 40 amorphous alloy particles modified the preferred crystal orientation of Mg, as was observed from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The composites showed significant improvement in hardness (increment up to 120%) and compressive strength (∼85% increase at 5% V f ). Comparison of mechanical properties of the developed composites with those of conventional Mg-composites having ceramic/metallic reinforcements, highlight the effectiveness of using amorphous particles as promising reinforcement materials. - Highlights: • Novel Mg-composites reinforced with Ni 60 Nb 40 amorphous particles were developed . • Microwave sintering and hot extrusion were used to synthesize the composites. • Reinforcements retained the amorphous structure, and changed Mg-crystal orientation. • Composites showed significant enhancement in hardness and compressive properties. • Performance of developed composites are superior/competitive to conventional MMCs

  15. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  16. Processing and characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kander, R.G.; Namboodri, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    One way to more easily process a brittle high-temperature ceramic superconductor into a useful structure is to combine it with a polymer to form a composite material. Processing of polymer-based composites into complex shapes is well established and relatively easy when compared with traditional ceramic processing unit operations. In addition, incorporating a ceramic superconductor into a polymer matrix can improve mechanical performance as compared with a monolithic ceramic. Finally, because ceramic superconductors are susceptible to attack by moisture, a polymer-based composite structure can also provide protection from deleterious environmental effects. This paper focuses on the processing and subsequent characterization of ceramic superconductor/polymer composites designed primarily for electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic applications. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x [YBCO] ceramic superconductor is combined with poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] to form novel composite structures. Composite structures have been molded with both a discontinuous superconducting phase (i.e., ceramic particulate reinforced polymers) and with a continuous superconducting phase (i.e., polymer infiltrated porous ceramics). Characterization of these composite structures includes the determination of diamagnetic strength, electromagnetic shielding effectiveness, mechanical performance, and environmental resistance. The goal of this program is to produce a composite structure with increased mechanical integrity and environmental resistance at liquid nitrogen temperatures without compromising the electromagnetic shielding and diamagnetic properties of the superconducting phase. Composites structures of this type are potentially useful in numerous magnetic applications including electromagnetic shielding, magnetic sensors, energy storage, magnetic levitation, and motor windings

  17. New ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, R.; Dominguez-Rodriguez, A.

    2010-01-01

    This article is to provide a new ceramic materials in which, with a control of their processing and thus their microstructural properties, you can get ceramic approaching ever closer to a metal, both in its structural behavior at low as at high temperatures. (Author) 30 refs.

  18. On Failure in Polycrystalline and Amorphous Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N. K.

    2009-12-01

    The performance of behaviour of brittle materials depends upon discrete deformation mechanisms operating during the loading process. The critical mechanisms determining the behaviour of armour ceramics have not been isolated using traditional ballistics. It has recently become possible to measure strength histories in materials under shock. The data gained for the failed strength of the armour are shown to relate directly to the penetration measured into tiles. Further the material can be loaded and recovered for post-mortem examination. Failure is by micro-fracture that is a function of the defects and then cracking activated by plasticity mechanisms within the grains and failure at grain boundaries in the amorphous intergranular phase. Thus it is the shock-induced plastic yielding of grains at the impact face that determines the later time penetration through the tile.

  19. Adsorption of selenium by amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and manganese dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistrieri, L.S.; Chao, T.T.

    1990-01-01

    This work compares and models the adsorption of selenium and other anions on a neutral to alkaline surface (amorphous iron oxyhydroxide) and an acidic surface (manganese dioxide). Selenium adsorption on these oxides is examined as a function of pH, particle concentration, oxidation state, and competing anion concentration in order to assess how these factors might influence the mobility of selenium in the environment. The data indicate that 1. 1) amorphous iron oxyhydroxide has a greater affinity for selenium than manganese dioxide, 2. 2) selenite [Se(IV)] adsorption increases with decreasing pH and increasing particle concentration and is stronger than selenate [Se(VI)] adsorption on both oxides, and 3. 3) selenate does not adsorb on manganese dioxide. The relative affinity of selenate and selenite for the oxides and the lack of adsorption of selenate on a strongly acidic surface suggests that selenate forms outer-sphere complexes while selenite forms inner-sphere complexes with the surfaces. The data also indicate that the competition sequence of other anions with respect to selenite adsorption at pH 7.0 is phosphate > silicate > molybdate > fluoride > sulfate on amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and molybdate ??? phosphate > silicate > fluoride > sulfate on manganese dioxide. The adsorption of phosphate, molybdate, and silicate on these oxides as a function of pH indicates that the competition sequences reflect the relative affinities of these anions for the surfaces. The Triple Layer surface complexation model is used to provide a quantitative description of these observations and to assess the importance of surface site heterogeneity on anion adsorption. The modeling results suggest that selenite forms binuclear, innersphere complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide and monodentate, inner-sphere complexes with manganese dioxide and that selenate forms outer-sphere, monodentate complexes with amorphous iron oxyhydroxide. The heterogeneity of the oxide surface sites

  20. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  1. Ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaHaye, Paul G.; Rahman, Faress H.; Lebeau, Thomas P. E.; Severin, Barbara K.

    1998-01-01

    A tube containment system. The tube containment system does not significantly reduce heat transfer through the tube wall. The contained tube is internally pressurized, and is formed from a ceramic material having high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good thermal shock resistance. The tube containment system includes at least one ceramic fiber braid material disposed about the internally pressurized tube. The material is disposed about the tube in a predetermined axial spacing arrangement. The ceramic fiber braid is present in an amount sufficient to contain the tube if the tube becomes fractured. The tube containment system can also include a plurality of ceramic ring-shaped structures, in contact with the outer surface of the tube, and positioned between the tube and the ceramic fiber braid material, and/or at least one transducer positioned within tube for reducing the internal volume and, therefore, the energy of any shrapnel resulting from a tube fracture.

  2. Amorphous Semiconductors: From Photocatalyst to Computer Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Mayur

    encouraging but inconclusive. Then the method was successfully demonstrated on mesoporous TiO2SiO 2 by showing a shift in its optical bandgap. One of the special class of amorphous semiconductors is chalcogenide glasses, which exhibit high ionic conductivity even at room temperature. When metal doped chalcogenide glasses are under an electric field, they become electronically conductive. These properties are exploited in the computer memory storage application of Conductive Bridging Random Access Memory (CBRAM). CBRAM is a non-volatile memory that is a strong contender to replace conventional volatile RAMs such as DRAM, SRAM, etc. This technology has already been commercialized, but the working mechanism is still not clearly understood especially the nature of the conductive bridge filament. In this project, the CBRAM memory cells are fabricated by thermal evaporation method with Agx(GeSe 2)1-x as the solid electrolyte layer, Ag as the active electrode and Au as the inert electrode. By careful use of cyclic voltammetry, the conductive filaments were grown on the surface and the bulk of the solid electrolyte. The comparison between the two filaments revealed major differences leading to contradiction with the existing working mechanism. After compiling all the results, a modified working mechanism is proposed. SAXS is a powerful tool to characterize nanostructure of glasses. The analysis of the SAXS data to get useful information are usually performed by different programs. In this project, Irena and GIFT programs were compared by performing the analysis of the SAXS data of glass and glass ceramics samples. Irena was shown to be not suitable for the analysis of SAXS data that has a significant contribution from interparticle interactions. GIFT was demonstrated to be better suited for such analysis. Additionally, the results obtained by programs for samples with low interparticle interactions were shown to be consistent.

  3. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Applications of sol gel ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, D.

    1996-01-01

    The sol gel method is a chemical technique in which polycrystalline ceramic films are fabricated from a solution of organometallic precursors. The technique is attractive for many industrial applications because it is a simple (films are processed in air), flexible (can be used to coat complex geometries) and cost effective (does not require expensive equipment) process. In addition, dense, high quality coatings can be achieved at much lower temperatures than is generally required for sintering bulk ceramics. In this paper the conventional sol gel method and the new datec process are reviewed and potential applications of sol gel coatings in automotive, aerospace, petrochemical, nuclear and electronic industries are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Transient photoconductivity in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mpawenayo, P.

    1997-07-01

    Localized states in amorphous semiconductors are divided in disorder induced shallow trap levels and dangling bonds deep states. Dangling bonds are assumed here to be either neutral or charged and their energy distribution is a single gaussian. Here, it is shown analytically that transient photocurrent in amorphous semiconductors is fully controlled by charge carriers transitions between localized states for one part and tunneling hopping carriers on the other. Localized dangling bonds deep states act as non radiative recombination centres, while hopping tunnelling is assisted by the Coulomb interaction between defects sites. The half-width of defects distribution is the disorder parameter that determines the carrier hopping time between defects sites. The macroscopic time that explains the long decay response times observed will all types of amorphous semiconductors is duly thought to be temperature dependent. Basic equations developed by Longeaud and Kleider are solved for the general case of a semiconductor after photo-generation. It turns out that the transient photoconductivity decay has two components; one with short response times from carriers trap-release transitions between shallow levels and extended states and a hopping component made of inter-dependent exponentials whose time constants span in larger ranges depending on disorder. The photoconductivity hopping component appears as an additional term to be added to photocurrents derived from existing models. The results of the present study explain and complete the power law decay derived in the multiple trapping models developed 20 years ago only in the approximation of the short response time regime. The long response time regime is described by the hopping macroscopic time. The present model is verified for all samples of amorphous semiconductors known so far. Finally, it is proposed to improved the modulated photoconductivity calculation techniques by including the long-lasting hopping dark documents

  6. Magnetic excitations in amorphous ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continentino, M.A.

    The propagation of magnetic excitations in amorphous ferromagnets is studied from the point of view of the theory of random frequency modulation. It is shown that the spin waves in the hydrodynamic limit are well described by perturbation theory while the roton-like magnetic excitations with wavevector about the peak in the structure factor are not. A criterion of validity of perturbation theory is found which is identical to a narrowing condition in magnetic resonance. (author) [pt

  7. Electrical and optical properties of amorphous indium zinc oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, N.; Sato, Y.; Song, P.K.; Kaijio, A.; Inoue, K.; Shigesato, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Valence electron control and electron transport mechanisms on the amorphous indium zinc oxide (IZO) films were investigated. The amorphous IZO films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering using an oxide ceramic IZO target (89.3 wt.% In 2 O 3 and 10.7 wt.% ZnO). N-type impurity dopings, such as Sn, Al or F, could not lead to the increase in carrier density in the IZO. Whereas, H 2 introduction into the IZO deposition process was confirmed to be effective to increase carrier density. By 30% H 2 introduction into the deposition process, carrier density increased from 3.08 x 10 2 to 7.65 x 10 2 cm -3 , which must be originated in generations of oxygen vacancies or interstitial Zn 2+ ions. Decrease in the transmittance in the near infrared region and increase in the optical band gap were observed with the H 2 introduction, which corresponded to the increase in carrier density. The lowest resistivity of 3.39 x 10 -4 Ω cm was obtained by 10% H 2 introduction without substrate heating during the deposition

  8. Electrical machining method of insulating ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Y.; Mohri, N.; Tani, T.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a new electrical discharge machining method for insulating ceramics using an assisting electrode with either a sinking electrical discharge machine or a wire electrical discharge machine. In this method, the metal sheet or mesh is attached to the ceramic surface as an assisting material for the discharge generation around the insulator surface. When the machining condition changes from the attached material to the workpiece, a cracked carbon layer is formed on the workpiece surface. As this layer has an electrical conductivity, electrical discharge occurs in working oil between the tool electrode and the surface of the workpiece. The carbon is formed from the working oil during this electrical discharge. Even after the material is machined, an electrical discharge occurs in the gap region between the tool electrode and the ceramic because an electrically conductive layer is generated continuously. Insulating ceramics can be machined by the electrical discharge machining method using the above mentioned surface modification phenomenon. In this paper the authors show a machined example demonstrating that the proposed method is available for machining a complex shape on insulating ceramics. Copyright (1999) AD-TECH - International Foundation for the Advancement of Technology Ltd

  9. Industrial ceramics - Properties, forming and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantozzi, Gilbert; Niepce, Jean-Claude; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Alary, J.A.; Allard, B.; Ayral, A.; Bassat, J.M.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Beauvy, M.; Bertrand, G.; Bignon, A.; Billieres, D.; Blanc, J.J.; Blumenfeld, P.; Bonnet, J.P.; Bougoin, M.; Bourgeon, M.; Boussuge, M.; Thorel, A.; Bruzek, C.E.; Cambier, F.; Carrerot, H.; Casabonne, J.M.; Chaix, J.M.; Chevalier, J.; Chopinet, M.H.; Couque, H.; Courtois, C.; Leriche, A.; Dhaler, D.; Denape, J.; Euzen, P.; Ganne, J.P.; Gauffinet, S.; Girard, A.; Gonon, M.; Guizard, C.; Hampshire, S.; Joulin, J.P.; Julbe, A.; Ferrato, M.; Fontaine, M.L.; Lebourgeois, R.; Lopez, J.; Maquet, M.; Marinel, S.; Marrony, M.; Martin, J.F.; Mougin, J.; Pailler, R.; Pate, M.; Petitpas, E.; Pijolat, C.; Pires-Franco, P.; Poirier, C.; Poirier, J.; Pourcel, F.; Potier, A.; Tulliani, J.M.; Viricelle, J.P.; Beauger, A.

    2013-01-01

    After a general introduction to ceramics (definition, general properties, elaboration, applications, market data), this book address conventional ceramics (elaboration, material types), thermo-structural ceramics (oxide based ceramics, non-oxide ceramics, fields of application, functional coatings), refractory ceramics, long fibre and ceramic matrix composites, carbonaceous materials, ceramics used for filtration, catalysis and the environment, ceramics for biomedical applications, ceramics for electronics and electrical engineering (for capacitors, magnetic, piezoelectric, dielectric ceramics, ceramics for hyper-frequency resonators), electrochemical ceramics, transparent ceramics (forming and sintering), glasses, mineral binders. The last chapter addresses ceramics used in the nuclear energy sector: in nuclear fuels and fissile material, absorbing ceramics and shields, in the management of nuclear wastes, new ceramics for reactors under construction or for future nuclear energy

  10. Electron beam treatments of electrophoretic ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Riccardis, M.F.; Carbone, D.; Piscopiello, E.; Antisari, M. Vittori

    2008-01-01

    In this work a method to densify ceramic coating obtained by electrophoresis and to improve its adhesion to the substrate is proposed. It consists in irradiating the coating surface by electron beam (EB). Alumina and alumina-zirconia coatings were deposited on stainless steel substrates and treated by low power EB. SEM, XRD and TEM characterizations demonstrated that the sintering occurred. Moreover, it is shown that on alumina-zirconia coating the EB irradiation produced a composite material consisting principally of tetragonal zirconia particles immersed in an amorphous alumina matrix. The adhesion stress of EB treated coating was estimated by stud pull test and it was found to be comparable to that of plasma-sprayed coatings

  11. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  12. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Saharoui; Mughal, Asad Jahangir

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  13. Electrochemical study of lithium insertion into carbon-rich polymer-derived silicon carbonitride ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaspar, Jan; Mera, Gabriela; Nowak, Andrzej P.; Graczyk-Zajac, Magdalena; Riedel, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the lithium insertion into carbon-rich polymer-derived silicon carbonitride (SiCN) ceramic synthesized by the thermal treatment of poly(diphenylsilylcarbodiimide) at three temperatures, namely 1100, 1300, and 1700 o C under 0.1 MPa Ar atmosphere. At lower synthesis temperatures, the material is X-ray amorphous, while at 1700 o C, the SiCN ceramic partially crystallizes. Anode materials prepared from these carbon-rich SiCN ceramics without any fillers and conducting additives were characterized using cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometric charging/discharging. We found that the studied silicon carbonitride ceramics demonstrate a promising electrochemical behavior during lithium insertion/extraction in terms of capacity and cycling stability. The sample synthesized at 1300 o C exhibits a reversible capacity of 392 mAh g -1 . Our study confirms that carbon-rich SiCN phases are electrochemically active materials in terms of Li inter- and deintercalation.

  14. Use of isoconcentrational phase diagrams for prediction of amorphization of binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarev, A.I.; Belashchenko, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    Based on the application of isoconcentrational diagrams of phase equilibria of liquid with solid solutions of various crystal structures the thermodynamic method was considered for prediction of concentration ranges of amorphization in binary systems.To confirm the applicability of the thermodynamic criterion in practice caclulations of phase diagrams were accomplished for complex binary eutectic systems (Hf-Be, Zr-Be) with the known concentration ranges of amorphization

  15. Integration Science and Technology of Silicon-Based Ceramics and Composites:Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic and composite parts starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance for high temperature applications, detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different technical approaches are required for the integration of ceramic to ceramic and ceramic to metal systems. Active metal brazing, in particular, is a simple and cost-effective method to integrate ceramic to metallic components. Active braze alloys usually contain a reactive filler metal (e.g., Ti, Cr, V, Hf etc) that promotes wettability and spreading by inducing chemical reactions with the ceramics and composites. In this presentation, various examples of brazing of silicon nitride to themselves and to metallic systems are presented. Other examples of joining of ceramic composites (C/SiC and SiC/SiC) using ceramic interlayers and the resulting microstructures are also presented. Thermomechanical characterization of joints is presented for both types of systems. In addition, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and integrated system testing under simulated application conditions will also be presented.

  16. Electrical characterization of strontium titanate borosilicate glass ceramics system with bismuth oxide addition using impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, O.P.; Kumar, Devendra; Parkash, Om; Pandey, Lakshman

    2003-01-01

    The ac electrical data, measured in the frequency range 0.1 kHz-1 MHz, were used to study the electrical response of strontium titanate borosilicate glass ceramic system with bismuth oxide addition. Complex plane plots from these electrical data for various glass ceramic samples reveal contributions from simultaneously operating polarization mechanisms to overall dielectric behavior. The complex modulus (M * ) representation of electrical data for various glass ceramic samples were found to be more informative. Equivalent circuit models, which represent the electrical behavior of glass ceramic samples, were determined using complex non-linear least square (CNLS) fitting. An attempt has been made to understand the dielectric behavior of various glass ceramics in terms of contributions arising from different polarization processes occurring at glassy matrix, crystalline phases, glass to crystal interface region and blocking electrodes. Glass ceramics containing SrTiO 3 and TiO 2 (rutile) phases show thermally stable dielectric behavior

  17. Ceramic breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    The breeding blanket is a key component of the fusion reactor because it directly involves tritium breeding and energy extraction, both of which are critical to development of fusion power. The lithium ceramics continue to show promise as candidate breeder materials. This promise was recognized by the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER) design team in its selection of ceramics as the first option for the ITER breeder material. Blanket design studies have indicated properties in the candidate materials data base that need further investigation. Current studies are focusing on tritium release behavior at high burnup, changes in thermophysical properties with burnup, compatibility between the ceramic breeder and beryllium multiplier, and phase changes with burnup. Laboratory and in-reactor tests, some as part of an international collaboration for development of ceramic breeder materials, are underway. 32 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  19. Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Applications of Piezoelectric Ceramics. Piezoelectric Actuators. Nano and Micropositioners. Vibration Control Systems. Computer Printers. Piezoelectric Transformers,Voltage Generators, Spark Plugs, Ultrasonic Motors,. Ultrasonic Generators and Sensors. Sonars, Medical Diagnostic. Computer Memories. NVFRAM ...

  20. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1996-01-01

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  1. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  2. Hydrogen in disordered and amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambakidis, G; Bowman, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topoics: elements of the theory of amorphous semiconductors; electronic structure of alpha-SiH; fluctuation induced gap states in amorphous hydrogenated silicon; hydrogen on semiconductor surfaces; the influence of hydrogen on the defects and instabilities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon; deuteron magnetic resonance in some amorphous semiconductors; formation of amorphous metals by solid state reactions of hydrogen with an intermetallic compound; NMR studies of the hydrides of disordered and amorphous alloys; neutron vibrational spectroscopy of disordered metal-hydrogen system; dynamical disorder of hydrogen in LaNi /SUB 5-y/ M /SUB y/ hydrides studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering; recent studies of intermetallic hydrides; tritium in Pd and Pd /SUB 0.80/ Sg /SUB 0.20/ ; and determination of hydrogen concentration in thin films of absorbing materials

  3. A standardless method of quantitative ceramic analysis using X-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumdar, S.

    1999-01-01

    A new procedure using X-ray powder diffraction data for quantitative estimation of the crystalline as well as the amorphous phase in ceramics is described. Classification of the crystalline and amorphous X-ray scattering was achieved by comparison of the slopes at two successive points of the powder pattern at scattering angles at which the crystalline and amorphous phases superimpose. If the second slope exceeds the first by a stipulated value, the intensity is taken as crystalline; otherwise the scattering is considered as amorphous. Crystalline phase analysis is obtained by linear programming techniques using the concept that each observed X-ray diffraction peak has contributions from n component phases, the proportionate analysis of which is required. The method does not require the measurement of calibration data for use as an internal standard, but knowledge of the approximate crystal structure of each phase of interest in the mixture is necessary. The technique is also helpful in qualitative analysis because each suspected phase is characterized by the probability that it will be present when a reflection zone is considered in which the suspected crystalline phase could contribute. The amorphous phases are determined prior to the crystalline ones. The method is applied to ceramic materials and some results are presented. (orig.)

  4. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  5. Cavitation damage of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.I.; Marinin, V.G.

    1988-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of investigation of ceramic material damage under the effect of cavitation field on their surface, formed in water under the face of exponential concentrator, connected with ultrasonic generator UZY-3-0.4. Amplitude of vibrations of concentrator face (30+-2)x10 -6 m, frequency-21 kHz. It was established that ceramics resistance to cavitation effect correlated with the product of critical of stress intensity factor and material hardness

  6. Amorphous silicon based radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Cho, G.; Drewery, J.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Qureshi, S.; Wildermuth, D.; Fujieda, I.; Street, R.A.

    1991-07-01

    We describe the characteristics of thin(1 μm) and thick (>30μm) hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n diodes which are optimized for detecting and recording the spatial distribution of charged particles, x-rays and γ rays. For x-ray, γ ray, and charged particle detection we can use thin p-i-n photosensitive diode arrays coupled to evaporated layers of suitable scintillators. For direct detection of charged particles with high resistance to radiation damage, we use the thick p-i-n diode arrays. 13 refs., 7 figs

  7. Inelastic scattering from amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.L.

    1985-08-01

    The potential of inelastic neutron scattering techniques for surveying various aspects of the dynamics of amorphous solids is briefly reviewed. The recent use of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source to provide detailed information on the optical vibrations of glasses is discussed in more detail. The density of states represents an averaged quantity which gives information about the general characteristics of the structure and bonding. More extensive information can be obtained by studying the detailed wavevector dependence of the dynamic structure factor. 15 refs., 7 figs

  8. Mechanical properties of ion implanted ceramic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis investigates the mechanisms by which ion implantation can affect those surface mechanical properties of ceramics relevant to their tribological behaviour, specifically hardness and indentation fracture. A range of model materials (including single crystal Si, SiC, A1 2 0 3 , Mg0 and soda-lime-silica glass) have been implanted with a variety of ion species and at a range of ion energies. Significant changes have been found in both low-load microhardness and indentation fracture behaviour. The changes in hardness have been correlated with the evolution of an increasingly damaged and eventually amorphous thin surface layer together with the operation of radiation-, solid-solution- and precipitation-hardening mechanisms. Compressive surface stresses have been shown to be responsible for the observed changes in identation fracture behaviour. In addition, the levels of surface stress present have been correlated with the structure of the surface layer and a simple quantitative model proposed to explain the observed stress-relief upon amorphisation. Finally, the effects of ion implantation upon a range of polycrystalline ceramic materials has been investigated and the observed properties modifications compared and contrasted to those found for the model single crystal materials. (author)

  9. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, Sharma, E-mail: issaranu@gmail.com; Gayatri, Sharma, E-mail: sharmagayatri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  10. The history of ceramic filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, S

    2000-01-01

    The history of ceramic filters is surveyed. Included is the history of piezoelectric ceramics. Ceramic filters were developed using technology similar to that of quartz crystal and electro-mechanical filters. However, the key to this development involved the theoretical analysis of vibration modes and material improvements of piezoelectric ceramics. The primary application of ceramic filters has been for consumer-market use. Accordingly, a major emphasis has involved mass production technology, leading to low-priced devices. A typical ceramic filter includes monolithic resonators and capacitors packaged in unique configurations.

  11. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  12. Sol-gel coatings of ceramic fibres for composites with ceramic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, B.; Grathwohl, G.; Spallek, M.; Pannhorst, W.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this work was to show the feasibility in principle of sol-gel coating of ceramic reinforcement components for composites from technical aspects as well. The complexity of the coating task rises with the transition from individual fibres to bundles of fibres of different thickness to weaves, and finally to composites. (orig.) [de

  13. Microstructure characterization of porous microalloyed aluminium-silicate ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purenović Jelena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaolinite and bentonite clay powders mixed with active additives, based on Mg(NO32 and Al(NO32, sintered at high temperatures produce very porous ceramics with microcrystalline and amorphous regions and highly developed metalized surfaces (mainly with magnesium surplus. Microstructure investigations have revealed non-uniform and highly porous structure with broad distribution of grain size, specifically shaped grains and high degree of agglomeration. The ceramics samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD and IR spectroscopy analysis, prior and after treatment in “synthetic water”, i.e. in aqueous solution of arsenic-salt. Grain size distribution for untreated and treated samples was done with software SemAfore 4. It has shown great variety in size distribution of grains from clay powders to sintered samples.

  14. Electronic Conductivity of Vanadium-Tellurite Glass-Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Yue, Yuanzheng; Bragatto, Caio B.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the electronic conductivity of 2TeO2-V2O5 glass-ceramics with crystallinity ranging from 0 to 100 wt.%, i.e., from entirely amorphous to completely crystalline. The glass is prepared by the melt quenching technique, and the crystal is prepared by subsequent heat...... spectroscopy. We find similar activation energies for both glass and crystal, implying that they have similar conduction mechanisms, i.e., thermally activated hopping. The electronic conductivity of 2TeO2-V2O5 glass is about one order of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding crystal......, and a percolation phenomenon occurs at a glass fraction of 61 wt.%, increasing from a lower conductivity in the crystal to a higher conductivity in the glass. We explain the behavior of electronic conduction in the 2TeO2-V2O5 glass-ceramics by considering constriction effects between particles as well...

  15. Surface modification of ceramics. Ceramics no hyomen kaishitsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hioki, T. (Toyota Central Research and Development Labs., Inc., Nagoya (Japan))

    1993-07-05

    Surface modification of ceramics and some study results using in implantation in surface modification are introduced. The mechanical properties (strength, fracture toughness, flaw resistance) of ceramics was improved and crack was repaired using surface modification by ion implantation. It is predicted that friction and wear properties are considerably affected because the hardness of ceramics is changed by ion implantation. Cementing and metalization are effective as methods for interface modification and the improvement of the adhesion power of the interface between metal and ceramic is their example. It was revealed that the improvement of mechanical properties of ceramics was achieved if appropriate surface modification was carried out. The market of ceramics mechanical parts is still small, therefore, the present situation is that the field of activities for surface modification of ceramics is also narrow. However, it is thought that in future, ceramics use may be promoted surely in the field like medicine and mechatronics. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Fabrication of nano-scaled polymer-derived SiAlCN ceramic components using focused ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ye; Shao, Gang; Wang, Xingwei; An, Linan

    2013-09-01

    Fully dense polymer-derived amorphous silicoaluminum carbonitride (SiAlCN) ceramics were synthesized from polysilazane as preceramic precursors followed by a thermal decomposition process. The nanofabrication of amorphous SiAlCN ceramics was implemented with a focused ion beam (FIB). FIB conditions such as the milling rate, the beam current, and the number of passes were considered. It was found that nanopatterns with a feature size of less than 100 nm could be fabricated onto polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) precisely and quickly. Specific nanostructures of thin walls, nozzle, and gear have been fabricated as demonstrations, indicating that the FIB technique was a promising method to realize nanostructures on PDCs, especially for microelectromechanical system and micro/nano-sensor applications.

  17. Fabrication of nano-scaled polymer-derived SiAlCN ceramic components using focused ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Ye; Wang, Xingwei; Shao, Gang; An, Linan

    2013-01-01

    Fully dense polymer-derived amorphous silicoaluminum carbonitride (SiAlCN) ceramics were synthesized from polysilazane as preceramic precursors followed by a thermal decomposition process. The nanofabrication of amorphous SiAlCN ceramics was implemented with a focused ion beam (FIB). FIB conditions such as the milling rate, the beam current, and the number of passes were considered. It was found that nanopatterns with a feature size of less than 100 nm could be fabricated onto polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs) precisely and quickly. Specific nanostructures of thin walls, nozzle, and gear have been fabricated as demonstrations, indicating that the FIB technique was a promising method to realize nanostructures on PDCs, especially for microelectromechanical system and micro/nano-sensor applications. (paper)

  18. High energy storage property and breakdown strength of Bi{sub 0.5}(Na{sub 0.82}K{sub 0.18}){sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3} ceramics modified by (Al{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}){sup 4+} complex-ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yangyang [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Information Materials, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Xu, Jiwen, E-mail: csuxjw@126.com [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Information Materials, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Guangxi Experiment Center of Information Science, Guilin 541004 (China); Yang, Ling; Zhou, Changrong [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Information Materials, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China); Guangxi Experiment Center of Information Science, Guilin 541004 (China); Lu, Xiaopeng; Yuan, Changlai; Li, Qingning; Chen, Guohua; Wang, Hua [Guangxi Key Laboratory of Information Materials, Guilin University of Electronic Technology, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2016-05-05

    The influence of B-site (Al{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}){sup 4+} complex-ion substitution on the phase transition, microstructure, dielectric, ferroelectric, and energy-storage properties of Bi{sub 0.5}(Na{sub 0.82}K{sub 0.18}){sub 0.5}Ti{sub 1–x}(Al{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}){sub x}O{sub 3} (BNKT-xAN) ceramics were systematically investigated. BNKT-xAN ceramics showed single-phase perovskite structure without an obvious phase transition after adding AN. Compact and uniform microstructure with almost the same grain morphology and size was obtained. The AN doping produced slimmer P-E loops and thus improved energy storage property. Meanwhile, the energy storage density increases drastically, and a maximum value of 1.41 J/cm{sup 3} at 105 kV/cm was achieved in BNKT-0.08AN through increasing greatly its breakdown strength with more AN content. The temperature dependence of dielectric constant and dielectric loss of BNKT-xAN ceramics illustrated the obvious relaxor phase transition characteristics. Low ionic conductivity and electronic conductivity indicated the BNKT-xAN ceramics have excellent dielectric properties. These results indicated that the BNKT-AN system may be a promising lead-free material for high energy storage density capacitor. - Highlights: • The (Al{sub 0.5}Nb{sub 0.5}){sup 4+} B-site complex ions were introduced into BNT-BKT system. • The P-E loops were pinched and the P{sub r} and E{sub c} were decreased by complex ions. • Impedance spectrum revealed excellent dielectric property of complex-ion modified BNT-BNK. • Breakdown strength of BNT-BKT was enhanced by complex ions. • The energy storage density was improved to 1.41 J/cm{sup 3} by complex ions.

  19. A small angle neutron scattering study of mica based glass-ceramics with applications in dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcoyne, S.H.; Bentley, P.M.; Al-Jawad, M.; Bubb, N.L.; Al-Shammary, H.A.O.; Wood, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    We are currently developing machinable and load-bearing mica-based glass-ceramics for use in restorative dental surgery. In this paper we present the results of an ambient temperature small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of several such ceramics with chemical compositions chosen to optimise machinability and strength. The SANS spectra are all dominated by scattering from the crystalline-amorphous phase interface and exhibit Q -4 dependence (Porod scattering) indicating that, on a 100 A scale, the surface of the crystals is smooth

  20. Early Medieval ceramics from the Viile Tecii archaeological site (Romania: an optical and XRD study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Ionescu

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical and petrographic studies of Early Medieval potshards exhumed in the Viile Tecii archaeological site (North Transylvania, Romania show a ceramic body composed of a microcrystalline to amorphous matrix, various clasts and voids. The microscopical features and XRD patterns indicate that illitic-kaolinitic clays were used as raw materials, together with quartzitic sands as tempering material. The ceramic vessels were obtained with the potter’s wheel, but the fabric is only slightly oriented, due either to the fast modeling or to the coarseness of the clayish paste. The thermal alteration of mineral phases points to relatively high firing-temperatures, between 800 and 900°C.

  1. Additive manufacturing of ceramics: Stereolithography versus binder jetting

    OpenAIRE

    Nachum, Sarig; Vogt, Joachim; Raether, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Stereolithography and Binder Jetting are two promising Additive Manufacturing techniques for the fabrication of complex ceramics components. The Fraunhofer Center for High Temperature Material and Design HTL/DE has experience in the fabrication and development of ceramic and metallic components with both technologies. This paper describes and compares the respective process setups as well as the advantages and disadvantages of both techniques, and discusses future challenges and developments ...

  2. Producing transparent PLZT ceramics using different synthesis method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dambekalne, M.; Antonova, M.; Livinsh, M.; Kalvane, A.; Plonska, M.; Garbarz-Glos, B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Ceramic samples of Pb 1-x La x (Zr 0.65 Ti 0.35 )O 3 (x 8, 9, 10) were prepared from powders being sintered by two methods: 1) peroxohydroxopolimer (PHP), where as precursors were used solutions of inorganic salts TiCl 4 , ZrOCl 4 ·8H 2 O, Pb(NO 3 ) 2 , La(NO 3 ) 3 ·6H 2 O); 2) sol-gel, using as precursors solutions of metal organic salts Pb(COOCH 3 ) 2 ·3H 2 O, La(COOCH 3 ) 3 ·1.5H 2 O, Zr(OCH 2 CH 2 CH 3 ) 4 , Ti(OCH 2 CH 2 CH 3 ) 4 . The thermal regimes for both powders were similar: synthesis at 600 0 C for 2 - 4h, obtaining amorphous nanopowder. Ceramic samples were produced by hot pressing at 1100 - 1200 0 C for 2 - 6h and pressure of 20Mpa.Optical transmittance of ceramic samples from PHP derived powders was higher than that from sol- gel derived. The transparency of poled plates with thickness of 0.3mm (wavelength λ = 630nm) was 67 - 69% and 56 - 59%, respectively. It can be explained by lack of technical support for sol-gel processing in atmosphere of neutral gas, as metal organic precursors are extremely sensitive to moisture of air. X-ray and DTA studies were used for powders. Dielectrics, ferroelectric and optical properties as well as studies of icrostructure were carried out for ceramic samples. The grain size of ceramics produced from PHP powders is 3- 4μ, for sol-gel ceramics less than 1μ

  3. Synthesis of nucleated glass-ceramics using oil shale fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Jingde; Li Aimin; Su Tong; Cui Xiaobo

    2010-01-01

    Nucleated glass-ceramics materials were produced from oil shale fly ash obtained from Huadian thermal power plant in China with the addition of analytic reagent CaO. On basis of differential thermal analysis (DTA) results, the nucleation and crystallization temperature of two parent glass samples with different alkalinity (Ak=m CaO /m SiO 2 ) were identified as Tn 1 = 810 deg. C, Tc 1 = 956 deg. C and Tn 2 = 824 o C, Tc 2 = 966 deg. C, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the produced nucleated glass-ceramics materials revealed that there was a coexistence phenomenon of multi-crystalline phase and the main crystalline phase was anorthite ([Ca,Na][AI,Si] 2 Si 2 O 8 ). The microstructure of the glass-ceramics materials was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM observation indicated that there was an increase in the quantity of sphere-shaped crystals when crystallization time increased. Furthermore, the increase of alkalinity caused more amorphous phase occurring in glass-ceramics materials. Through the tests of physical and mechanical properties, the glass-ceramics materials with more crystalline phase and fine microstructure had high density, fine performance of resisting compression (328.92 MPa) and negligible water absorption. Through chemical resistance tests, the glass-ceramics samples showed strong corrosion resistance. Overall results indicated that it was a feasible attempt to produce nucleated glass-ceramics materials for building and decorative materials from oil shale fly ash.

  4. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05 %, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02 %. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7 %) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Effect of pyrolysis atmospheres on the morphology of polymer-derived silicon oxynitrocarbide ceramic films coated aluminum nitride surface and the thermal conductivity of silicone rubber composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsien T.; Sukachonmakul, Tanapon; Wang, Chen H.; Wattanakul, Karnthidaporn; Kuo, Ming T.; Wang, Yu H.

    2014-02-01

    Amorphous silicon oxycarbide (SiOC) and silicon oxynitrocarbide (SiONC) ceramic films coated aluminum nitride (AlN) were prepared by using preceramic-polysilazane (PSZ) with dip-coating method, followed by pyrolysis at 700 °C in different (air, Ar, N2 and NH3) atmospheres to converted PSZ into SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic. The existence of amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface was characterized by FTIR, XRD and XPS. The interfacial adhesion between silicone rubber and AlN was significantly improved after the introduction of amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface. It can be observed from AFM that the pyrolysis of PSZ at different atmosphere strongly affected to films morphology on AlN surface as SiOCair and SiONCNH3 ceramic films were more flat and smooth than SiONCN2 and SiONCAr ceramic films. Besides, the enhancement of the thermal conductivity of silicone rubber composites was found to be related to the decrease in the surface roughness of SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films on AlN surface. This present work provided an alternative surface modification of thermally conductive fillers to improve the thermal conductivity of silicon rubber composites by coating with amorphous SiOCair and SiONC(Ar,N2andNH3) ceramic films.

  6. Testing method for ceramic armour and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNO developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this alternative test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armour are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  7. Testing method for ceramic armor and bare ceramic tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Roebroeks, G.H.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    TNO has developed an alternative, more configuration independent ceramic test method than the standard Depth-of-Penetration test method. In this test ceramic tiles and ceramic based armor are evaluated as target without a semi-infinite backing layer. An energy approach is chosen to evaluate and rank

  8. Photoexcitation-induced processes in amorphous semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and Logistics, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)]. E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au

    2005-07-30

    Theories for the mechanism of photo-induced processes of photodarkening (PD), volume expansion (VE) in amorphous chalcogenides are presented. Rates of spontaneous emission of photons by radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors are also calculated and applied to study the excitonic photoluminescence in a-Si:H. Results are compared with previous theories.

  9. Analytical theory of noncollinear amorphous metallic magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakehashi, Y.; Uchida, T.

    2001-01-01

    Analytical theory of noncollinear magnetism in amorphous metals is proposed on the basis of the Gaussian model for the distribution of the interatomic distance and the saddle-point approximation. The theory removes the numerical difficulty in the previous theory based on the Monte-Carlo sampling method, and reasonably describes the magnetic properties of amorphous transition metals

  10. Challenges in amorphous silicon solar cell technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaaij, van R.A.C.M.M.; Zeman, M.; Korevaar, B.A.; Smit, C.; Metselaar, J.W.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is nowadays extensively used for a range of devices, amongst others solar cells, Solar cell technology has matured over the last two decades and resulted in conversion efficiencies in excess of 15%. In this paper the operation of amorphous silicon solar cells is

  11. Photoconductivity of amorphous silicon-rigorous modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brada, P.; Schauer, F.

    1991-01-01

    It is our great pleasure to express our gratitude to Prof. Grigorovici, the pioneer of the exciting field of amorphous state by our modest contribution to this area. In this paper are presented the outline of the rigorous modelling program of the steady-state photoconductivity in amorphous silicon and related materials. (Author)

  12. Photoexcitation-induced processes in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jai

    2005-01-01

    Theories for the mechanism of photo-induced processes of photodarkening (PD), volume expansion (VE) in amorphous chalcogenides are presented. Rates of spontaneous emission of photons by radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors are also calculated and applied to study the excitonic photoluminescence in a-Si:H. Results are compared with previous theories

  13. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  14. Fatigue of dental ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-12-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ceramic combustor mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Melvin G.; Janneck, Frank W.

    1982-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine engine includes a metal engine block including a wall portion defining a housing for a combustor having ceramic liner components. A ceramic outlet duct is supported by a compliant seal on the metal block and a reaction chamber liner is stacked thereon and partly closed at one end by a ceramic bypass swirl plate which is spring loaded by a plurality of circumferentially spaced, spring loaded guide rods and wherein each of the guide rods has one end thereof directed exteriorly of a metal cover plate on the engine block to react against externally located biasing springs cooled by ambient air and wherein the rod spring support arrangement maintains the stacked ceramic components together so that a normal force is maintained on the seal between the outlet duct and the engine block under all operating conditions. The support arrangement also is operative to accommodate a substantial difference in thermal expansion between the ceramic liner components of the combustor and the metal material of the engine block.

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  17. Ceramic impregnated superabrasives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P.; Sherman, Andrew

    2009-02-10

    A superabrasive fracture resistant compact is formed by depositing successive layers of ceramic throughout the network of open pores in a thermally stable self-bonded polycrystalline diamond or cubic boron nitride preform. The void volume in the preform is from approximately 2 to 10 percent of the volume of the preform, and the average pore size is below approximately 3000 nanometers. The preform is evacuated and infiltrated under at least about 1500 pounds per square inch pressure with a liquid pre-ceramic polymerizable precursor. The precursor is infiltrated into the preform at or below the boiling point of the precursor. The precursor is polymerized into a solid phase material. The excess is removed from the outside of the preform, and the polymer is pyrolized to form a ceramic. The process is repeated at least once more so as to achieve upwards of 90 percent filling of the original void volume. When the remaining void volume drops below about 1 percent the physical properties of the compact, such as fracture resistance, improve substantially. Multiple infiltration cycles result in the deposition of sufficient ceramic to reduce the void volume to below 0.5 percent. The fracture resistance of the compacts in which the pores are lined with formed in situ ceramic is generally at least one and one-half times that of the starting preforms.

  18. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  19. Assessment of DNA damage in ceramic workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlar, Hatice Gul; Taner, Gokce; Bacanli, Merve; Iritas, Servet; Kurt, Turker; Tutkun, Engin; Yilmaz, Omer Hinc; Basaran, Nursen

    2018-02-24

    It is known that ceramic workers are potentially exposed to complex mixture of chemicals such as silica, inorganic lead, lime, beryllium and aluminum that can be associated with an increased risk of several diseases. All operations in the ceramic industries such as mixing, moulding, casting, shaking out and finishing jobs, have been associated with the higher exposure levels and in most of the silica-related industries, average overall exposure exceeded permissible exposure levels for respirable crystalline silica. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible genotoxic damage in ceramic workers exposed to complex mixture of chemicals mainly crystalline silica. For this purpose, the blood and buccal epithelial cell samples were taken from the ceramic workers (n = 99) and their controls (n = 81). The genotoxicity was assessed by the alkaline comet assay in isolated lymphocytes and whole blood. Micronucleus (MN), binucleated (BN), pyknotic (PYC), condensed chromatin (CC), karyolytic (KYL), karyorrhectic (KHC) and nuclear bud (NBUD) frequencies in buccal epithelial cells and plasma 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) levels were also evaluated. In the study, 38 workers were diagnosed with silicosis, 9 workers were suspected to have silicosis, whereas 52 workers were found to be healthy. DNA damage in blood and lymphocytes; MN, CC + KHC, PYC frequencies in buccal epithelial cells and 8-oxodG levels in plasma were increased in workers compared to their controls. These results showed that occupational chemical mixture exposure in ceramic industry may cause genotoxic damage that can lead to important health problems in the workers.

  20. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 x 10 25 n/m 2 . Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C

  1. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO 2 . The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia

  2. Quenching effect on properties of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconducting ceramics of various composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amitin, E.B.; Gromilov, S.A.; Naumov, V.N.; Royak, A.Ya.; Starikov, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Bismuth ceramics quenching effect on superconducting properties of samples of various composition is investigated. Two types of quenching effect on sample properties are detected: an increase of superconducting transition temperature T c by 15-20 K; broadening of temperature interval of the phase transition without anynatable T c displacement. X ray diffraction investigations have not detected sufficient differences in diffraction patterns of quenched and non-quenched samples. Within the limits of composition analysis by oxygen (±3%) no change of its content prior to and after quenching is detected. A correlation between the presence of an amorphous phase in a sample and the type of quenching effect is observed: T c increases in ceramics where an amorphous component is detected

  3. High flow ceramic pot filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more

  4. Ceramic composites: Enabling aerospace materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Ceramics and ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have the potential for significant impact on the performance of aerospace propulsion and power systems. In this paper, the potential benefits are discussed in broad qualitative terms and are illustrated by some specific application case studies. The key issues in need of resolution for the potential of ceramics to be realized are discussed.

  5. [Spectroscopic Research on Slag Nanocrystal Glass Ceramics Containing Rare Earth Elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Shun-li; Li, Bao-wei; Zhang, Xue-feng; Jia, Xiao-lin; Zhao, Ming; Deng, Lei-bo

    2015-08-01

    The research group prepared the high-performance slag nanocrystal glass ceramics by utilizing the valuable elements of the wastes in the Chinese Bayan Obo which are characterized by their symbiotic or associated existence. In this paper, inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (Raman) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are all used in the depth analysis for the composition and structure of the samples. The experiment results of ICP, XRD and SEM showed that the principal crystalline phase of the slag nanocrystal glass ceramics containing rare earth elements is diopside, its grain size ranges from 45 to 100 nm, the elements showed in the SEM scan are basically in consistent with the component analysis of ICP. Raman analysis indicated that its amorphous phase is a three-dimensional network structure composed by the structural unit of silicon-oxy tetrahedron with different non-bridging oxygen bonds. According to the further analysis, we found that the rare earth microelement has significant effect on the network structure. Compared the nanocrystal slag glass ceramic with the glass ceramics of similar ingredients, we found that generally, the Raman band wavenumber for the former is lower than the later. The composition difference between the glass ceramics and the slag nanocrystal with the similar ingredients mainly lies on the rare earth elements and other trace elements. Therefore, we think that the rare earth elements and other trace elements remains in the slag nanocrystal glass ceramics have a significant effect on the network structure of amorphous phase. The research method of this study provides an approach for the relationship among the composition, structure and performance of the glass ceramics.

  6. Stereolithography of SiOC Ceramic Microcomponents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Erika; Cattaldo, Marco; Franchin, Giorgia; Schwentenwein, Martin; Homa, Johannes; Brusatin, Giovanna; Colombo, Paolo

    2016-01-13

    The first example of the fabrication of complex 3D polymer-derived-ceramic structures is presented with micrometer-scale features by a 3D additive manufacturing (AM) technology, starting with a photosensitive preceramic precursor. Dense and crack-free silicon-oxycarbide-based microparts with features down to 200 μm are obtained after pyrolysis at 1000 °C in a nitrogen atmosphere. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Verification of Ceramic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar-Lafenetre, Stephanie; Cornillon, Laurence; Rancurel, Michael; De Graaf, Dennis; Hartmann, Peter; Coe, Graham; Laine, Benoit

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the “Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures” contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instrument structures. It has been written in order to be applicable to most types of ceramic or glass-ceramic materials - typically Cesic®, HBCesic®, Silicon Nitride, Silicon Carbide and ZERODUR®. The proposed guideline describes the activities to be performed at material level in order to cover all the specific aspects of ceramics (Weibull distribution, brittle behaviour, sub-critical crack growth). Elementary tests and their post-processing methods are described, and recommendations for optimization of the test plan are given in order to have a consistent database. The application of this method is shown on an example in a dedicated article [7]. Then the verification activities to be performed at system level are described. This includes classical verification activities based on relevant standard (ECSS Verification [4]), plus specific analytical, testing and inspection features. The analysis methodology takes into account the specific behaviour of ceramic materials, especially the statistical distribution of failures (Weibull) and the method to transfer it from elementary data to a full-scale structure. The demonstration of the efficiency of this method is described in a dedicated article [8]. The verification is completed by classical full-scale testing activities. Indications about proof testing, case of use and implementation are given and specific inspection and protection measures are described. These additional activities are necessary to ensure the required reliability. The aim of the guideline is to describe how to reach the same reliability level as for structures made of more classical materials (metals, composites).

  8. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  9. Cyclic mechanical fatigue in ceramic-ceramic composites: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D. III

    1983-01-01

    Attention is given to cyclic mechanical fatigue effects in a number of ceramics and ceramic composites, including several monolithic ceramics in which significant residual stresses should be present as a result of thermal expansion mismatches and anisotropy. Fatigue is also noted in several BN-containing ceramic matrix-particulate composites and in SiC fiber-ceramic matrix composites. These results suggest that fatigue testing is imperative for ceramics and ceramic composites that are to be used in applications subject to cyclic loading. Fatigue process models are proposed which provide a rationale for fatigue effect observations, but do not as yet provide quantitative results. Fiber composite fatigue damage models indicate that design stresses in these materials may have to be maintained below the level at which fiber pullout occurs

  10. Formation peculiarities of superconducting Bi-Sr-Ca -cuprates from glass ceramic quenched melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furmakova, O.E.; Zinov'ev, S.Yu.; Glushkova, V.B.; Bugakov, A.G.; Sulejmanov, S.Kh.

    1992-01-01

    Specimens of varying composition of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system, X-ray amorphous Alakes and glass ceramic ingots were prepared by means of different rate quenching of melts. Crystallization temperatures of flakes were determined and sequence of phase formation in both types of specimens during annealing was studied. Microstructure and distribution of elements by volume of specimen in initial and annealed ingot were investigated

  11. Characterisation and development of fine porosity in magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Radulescu, A.; Pérez-Estébanez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 161, December (2015), s. 628-630 ISSN 0167-577X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : amorphous materials * chemically-bonded ceramics * microstructure * Rietveld-RIR method * small-angle neutron scattering * specific surface area Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 2.437, year: 2015 https://juser.fz-juelich.de/record/255737

  12. Characterization of dense lead lanthanum titanate ceramics prepared from powders synthesized by the oxidant peroxo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Alexandre H. [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod.Washington Luis km 235, CP 676 Sao Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Souza, Flavio L., E-mail: flavio.souza@ufabc.edu.br [Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Rua Santa Adelia 166, Bangu, Santo Andre, SP 09210-170 (Brazil); Chiquito, Adenilson J., E-mail: chiquito@df.ufscar.br [Departamento de Fisica, UFSCar-Federal University of Sao Carlos, Rod.Washington Luis km 235, CP 676 Sao Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Longo, Elson, E-mail: elson@iq.unesp.br [Instituto de Quimica de Araraquara, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Francisco Degni, CP 355 Araraquara, SP 14801-907 (Brazil); Leite, Edson R., E-mail: derl@power.ufscar.br [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod.Washington Luis km 235, CP 676 Sao Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Camargo, Emerson R., E-mail: camargo@ufscar.br [LIEC-Laboratorio Interdisciplinar de Eletroquimica e Ceramica, Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Rod.Washington Luis km 235, CP 676 Sao Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2010-12-01

    Nanosized powders of lead lanthanum titanate (Pb{sub 1-x}La{sub x}TiO{sub 3}) were synthesized by means of the oxidant-peroxo method (OPM). Lanthanum was added from 5 to 30% in mol through the dissolution of lanthanum oxide in nitric acid, followed by the addition of lead nitrate to prepare a solution of lead and lanthanum nitrates, which was dripped into an aqueous solution of titanium peroxo complexes, forming a reactive amorphous precipitate that could be crystallized by heat treatment. Crystallized powders were characterized by FT-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, showing that tetragonal perovskite structure is obtained for samples up to 25% of lanthanum and cubic perovskite for samples with 30% of lanthanum. Powders containing 25 and 30% in mol of lanthanum were calcined at 700 deg. C for 2 h, and in order to determine the relative dielectric permittivity and the phase transition behaviour from ferroelectric-to-paraelectric, ceramic pellets were prepared and sintered at 1100 or 1150 deg. C for 2 h and subjected to electrical characterization. It was possible to observe that sample containing 25% in mol of La presented a normal behaviour for the phase transition, whereas the sample containing 30% in mol of La presented a diffuse phase transition and relaxor behaviour.

  13. Characterization of dense lead lanthanum titanate ceramics prepared from powders synthesized by the oxidant peroxo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Alexandre H.; Souza, Flavio L.; Chiquito, Adenilson J.; Longo, Elson; Leite, Edson R.; Camargo, Emerson R.

    2010-01-01

    Nanosized powders of lead lanthanum titanate (Pb 1-x La x TiO 3 ) were synthesized by means of the oxidant-peroxo method (OPM). Lanthanum was added from 5 to 30% in mol through the dissolution of lanthanum oxide in nitric acid, followed by the addition of lead nitrate to prepare a solution of lead and lanthanum nitrates, which was dripped into an aqueous solution of titanium peroxo complexes, forming a reactive amorphous precipitate that could be crystallized by heat treatment. Crystallized powders were characterized by FT-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, showing that tetragonal perovskite structure is obtained for samples up to 25% of lanthanum and cubic perovskite for samples with 30% of lanthanum. Powders containing 25 and 30% in mol of lanthanum were calcined at 700 deg. C for 2 h, and in order to determine the relative dielectric permittivity and the phase transition behaviour from ferroelectric-to-paraelectric, ceramic pellets were prepared and sintered at 1100 or 1150 deg. C for 2 h and subjected to electrical characterization. It was possible to observe that sample containing 25% in mol of La presented a normal behaviour for the phase transition, whereas the sample containing 30% in mol of La presented a diffuse phase transition and relaxor behaviour.

  14. Stereolithographic processing of ceramics: Photon diffusion in colloidal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajeev

    The technique of ceramic stereolithography (CSL) has been developed for fabricating near net shape ceramic objects. In stereolithography, the three-dimensional computer design file of the object is sliced into thin layers. Each layer is physically fabricated by photocuring the surface of a liquid photo-polymerizable resin bath by raster scanning an ultra-violet laser across the surface of the resin. In CSL, the liquid resin is a high concentration colloidal dispersion in a solution of ultraviolet curable polymers. The ceramic green body fabricated by ceramic stereolithography technique is subjected to the post processing steps of drying, binder burnout and sintering to form a dense ceramic object. An aqueous alumina dispersion in photocuring polymers with particle volume fraction greater than 0.5 was formulated for CSL process. Low molecular weight solution polymers were found to be best suited for formulating ceramic resins due to their inherently low viscosity and favorable interactions with the ceramic dispersant. A hydroxyapatite ceramic resin was also developed for the use in the CSL technique. A model is developed to describe the photocuring process in concentrated ceramic dispersion. The curing profile in ceramic dispersion is governed by multiple scattering from the ceramic particles and absorption by the photocuring polymers. Diffusion theory of light transport is used to model the multiple scattering and absorption phenomena. It is found that diffusive transport adequately describes the phenomena of laser pulse propagation in highly concentrated colloidal dispersions. A model was developed to describe the absorption in highly concentrated ceramic dispersion. Various complex-shaped monolithic alumina and hydroxyapatite objects were fabricated by CSL and shown to possess uniform microstructure. The mechanical properties and sintering behavior of the parts fabricated by CSL are shown to be comparable to those fabricated by other ceramic processing technique

  15. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects

  16. Modeling amorphization of tetrahedral structures under local approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesurum, C.E.; Pulim, V.; Berger, B.; Hobbs, L.W.

    1997-01-01

    Many crystalline ceramics can be topologically disordered (amorphized) by disordering radiation events involving high-energy collision cascades or (in some cases) successive single-atom displacements. The authors are interested in both the potential for disorder and the possible aperiodic structures adopted following the disordering event. The potential for disordering is related to connectivity, and among those structures of interest are tetrahedral networks (such as SiO 2 , SiC and Si 3 N 4 ) comprising corner-shared tetrahedral units whose connectivities are easily evaluated. In order to study the response of these networks to radiation, the authors have chosen to model their assembly according to the (simple) local rules that each corner obeys in connecting to another tetrahedron; in this way they easily erect large computer models of any crystalline polymorphic form. Amorphous structures can be similarly grown by application of altered rules. They have adopted a simple model of irradiation in which all bonds in the neighborhood of a designated tetrahedron are destroyed, and they reform the bonds in this region according to a set of (possibly different) local rules appropriate to the environmental conditions. When a tetrahedron approaches the boundary of this neighborhood, it undergoes an optimization step in which a spring is inserted between two corners of compatible tetrahedra when they are within a certain distance of one another; component forces are then applied that act to minimize the distance between these corners and minimize the deviation from the rules. The resulting structure is then analyzed for the complete adjacency matrix, irreducible ring statistics, and bond angle distributions

  17. Novel gelforming process for near net shape ceramic component production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, G.V.; Johnson, S.B.; Dunstan, D.E.

    2000-01-01

    A novel gelforming process for producing near-net shape ceramic components has been developed. A low viscosity, high volume fraction, ceramic suspension containing a small amount of bio-polymer is poured or injected into a mould. The suspension is gelled within the mould by a temperature activated crosslinking mechanism. The rheological behaviour of the body within the mould is changed from liquid-like to solid-like in a short period of time. The wet mechanical strength of the gelled bodies is sufficient to allow the body to be demoulded and handled without damaging the component. Near net shapes of complex geometry are formed in this way. The wet green body is then dried and densified using traditional methods. Potentially this process can be used to produce inexpensive reliable high strength ceramic components quickly and safely. Copyright (2000) The Australian Ceramic Society

  18. Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention, Conference, Keramik Museum, Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Invited conference speaker, Westerwald Keramik Museum, August 2009. Paper title: Distorting the ceramic familiar: materiality and non-ceramic intervention.\\ud \\ud This paper will examine the integration of non-ceramic media into the discourse of ceramics.

  19. High temperature microplasticity of fine-grained ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakki, A.; Schaller, R.

    1996-01-01

    Several fine-grained ceramics exhibit enhanced ductility or even structural superplasticity at high temperature. Grain boundaries play a dominant role in the deformation process of these materials which usually involves diffusion-accommodated grain boundary sliding. Sliding is either lubricated by an amorphous intergranular phase or takes place by glide and climb of grain boundary dislocations. At high temperature, anelastic deformation precedes plastic deformation and stems from the short range motion of lattice defects, such as dislocations and grain boundaries. The energy loss (''mechanical loss'') associated with such motion can be measured by using the technique of mechanical spectroscopy. Moreover, at the onset of plasticity (''microplasticity''), long range irrecoverable motion of defects contributes to additional mechanical loss. Mechanical loss spectra may then give an insight into mechanisms operating at the transition between anelastic and plastic deformation. As an illustration, the spectra of three fine-grained ceramics (Si 3 N 4 , ZrO 2 , Al 2 O 3 ) are presented. In all cases, anelastic relaxation phenomena (peak and background) have been observed at high temperature (> 1200 K), bearing a close relation with creep behaviour. Their analysis permits to distinguish between different types of microstructrual elements: bulk regions of amorphous intergranular phase at triple points, grain boundaries separated by a thin glassy film and ''clean'' grain boundaries. (orig.)

  20. Piezoelectric displacement in ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Cain, M.; Gee, M.

    1999-01-01

    This Good Practice Guide is intended to aid a user to perform displacement measurements on piezoelectric ceramic materials such as PZT (lead zirconium titanate) in either monolithic or multilayer form. The various measurement issues that the user must consider are addressed, and good measurement practise is described for the four most suitable methods. (author)

  1. Dense ceramic articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockbain, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the manufacture of articles of substantially pure dense ceramic materials, for use in severe environments. Si N is very suitable for use in such environments, but suffers from the disadvantage that it is not amenable to sintering. Some disadvantages of the methods normally used for making articles of Si N are mentioned. The method described comprises mixing a powder of the substantially pure ceramic material with an additive that promotes densification, and which is capable of nuclear transmutation into a gas when exposed to radiation, and hot pressing the mixture to form a billet. The billet is then irradiated to convert the additive into a gas which is held captive in the billet, and it is then subjected to a hot forging operation, during which the captive gas escapes and an article of substantially pure dense ceramic material is forged. The method is intended primarily for use for Si N, but may be applied to other ceramic materials. The additive may be Li or Be or their compounds, to the extent of at least 5 ppm and not more than 5% by weight. Irradiation is effected by proton or neutron bombardment. (UK)

  2. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendfra Nagabhushana

    2001-07-01

    The mechanical properties of model systems were analyzed. A reasonably accurate finite element model was implemented and a rational metric to predict the strength of ceramic/metal concentrical joints was developed. The mode of failure of the ceramic/metal joints was determined and the importance of the mechanical properties of the braze material was assessed. Thermal cycling experiments were performed on the model systems and the results were discussed. Additionally, experiments using the concept of placing diffusion barriers on the ceramic surface to limit the extent of the reaction with the braze were performed. It was also observed that the nature and morphology of the reaction zone depends greatly on the nature of the perovskite structure being used. From the experiments, it is observed that the presence of Cr in the Fe-occupied sites decreases the tendency of Fe to segregate and to precipitate out of the lattice. In these new experiments, Ni was observed to play a major role in the decomposition of the ceramic substrate.

  3. Dissolution of crystalline ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    The present program objectives are to lay out the fundamentals of crystalline waste form dissolution. Nuclear waste ceramics are polycrystalline. An assumption of the work is that to the first order, the release rate of a particular radionuclide is the surface-weighted sum of the release rates of the radionuclide from each crystalline form that contains it. In the second order, of course, there will be synergistic effects. There will be also grain boundary and other microstructural influences. As a first approximation, we have selected crystalline phases one at a time. The sequence of investigations and measurements is: (i) Identification of the actual chemical reactions of dissolution including identification of the solid reaction products if such occur. (ii) The rates of these reactions are then determined empirically to give what may be called macroscopic kinetics. (iii) Determination of the rate-controlling mechanisms. (iv) If the rate is controlled by surface reactions, the final step would be to determine the atomic kinetics, that is the specific atomic reactions that occur at the dissolving interface. Our concern with the crystalline forms are in two areas: The crystalline components of the reference ceramic waste form and related ceramics and the alumino-silicate phases that appear in some experimental waste forms and as waste-rock interaction products. Specific compounds are: (1) Reference Ceramic Phases (zirconolite, magnetoplumbite, spinel, Tc-bearing spinel and perovskite); (2) Aluminosilicate phases (nepheline, pollucite, CsAlSi 5 O 12 , Sr-feldspar). 5 figures, 1 table

  4. Ceramic analysis in Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilditch, J.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific, analytical or ‘archaeometric’ techniques for investigating ceramic material have been used within archaeology for over 50 years and now constitute an indispensable tool for archaeologists in the Aegean world (see Jones 1986 for a detailed summary of early work in Greece and Italy) and

  5. Ceramic solid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Center for Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-02-15

    Strategies for the design of ceramic solid electrolytes are reviewed. Problems associated with stoichiometric and doped compounds are compared. In the illustration of design principles, emphasis is given to oxide-ion electrolytes for use in solid-oxide fuel cells, oxygen pumps, and oxygen sensors

  6. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  7. Photonic crystals, amorphous materials, and quasicrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edagawa, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Photonic crystals consist of artificial periodic structures of dielectrics, which have attracted much attention because of their wide range of potential applications in the field of optics. We may also fabricate artificial amorphous or quasicrystalline structures of dielectrics, i.e. photonic amorphous materials or photonic quasicrystals. So far, both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted to reveal the characteristic features of their optical properties, as compared with those of conventional photonic crystals. In this article, we review these studies and discuss various aspects of photonic amorphous materials and photonic quasicrystals, including photonic band gap formation, light propagation properties, and characteristic photonic states.

  8. Synthesis of amorphous acid iron phosphate nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, E.; Leret, P.; Fernández, J. F.; Aza, A. H. De; Rodríguez, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    A simple method to precipitate nanoparticles of iron phosphate with acid character has been developed in which the control of pH allows to obtain amorphous nanoparticles. The acid aging of the precipitated amorphous nanoparticles favored the P–O bond strength that contributes to the surface reordering, the surface roughness and the increase of the phosphate acid character. The thermal behavior of the acid iron phosphate nanoparticles has been also studied and the phosphate polymerization at 400 °C produces strong compacts of amorphous nanoparticles with interconnected porosity.

  9. Structure of a new dense amorphous ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finney, J.L.; Bowron, D.T.; Soper, A.K.; Loerting, T.; Mayer, E.; Hallbrucker, A.

    2002-01-01

    The detailed structure of a new dense amorphous ice, VHDA, is determined by isotope substitution neutron diffraction. Its structure is characterized by a doubled occupancy of the stabilizing interstitial location that was found in high density amorphous ice, HDA. As would be expected for a thermally activated unlocking of the stabilizing 'interstitial', the transition from VHDA to LDA (low-density amorphous ice) is very sharp. Although its higher density makes VHDA a better candidate than HDA for a physical manifestation of the second putative liquid phase of water, as for the HDA case, the VHDA to LDA transition also appears to be kinetically controlled

  10. Peculiarities of Vibration Characteristics of Amorphous Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gets, Kirill V.; Subbotin, Oleg S.; Belosludov, Vladimir R.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic properties of low (LDA), high (HDA) and very high (VHDA) density amorphous ices were investigated within the approach based on Lattice Dynamics simulations. In this approach, we assume that the short-range molecular order mainly determines the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of amorphous ices. Simulation cell of 512 water molecules with periodical boundary conditions and disordering allows us to study dynamical properties and dispersion curves in the Brillouin zone of pseudo-crystal. Existence of collective phenomena in amorphous ices which is usual for crystals but anomalous for disordered phase was confirmed in our simulations. Molecule amplitudes of delocalized (collective) as well as localized vibrations have been considered.

  11. 3D Ceramic Microfluidic Device Manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Govindarajan; Humenik, James N

    2006-01-01

    Today, semiconductor processing serves as the backbone for the bulk of micromachined devices. Precision lithography and etching technology used in the semiconductor industry are also leveraged by alternate techniques like electroforming and molding. The nature of such processing is complex, limited and expensive for any manufacturing foundry. This paper details the technology elements developed to manufacture cost effective and versatile microfluidic devices for applications ranging from medical diagnostics to characterization of bioassays. Two applications using multilayer ceramic technology to manufacture complex 3D microfluidic devices are discussed

  12. Surface magnetic structures in amorphous ferromagnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usov, N.A., E-mail: usov@obninsk.ru [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS», 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, IZMIRAN, 108840 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Serebryakova, O.N.; Gudoshnikov, S.A. [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS», 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation); Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences, IZMIRAN, 108840 Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tarasov, V.P. [National University of Science and Technology «MISIS», 119049 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-01

    The spatial period of magnetization perturbations that occur near the surface of magnetic nanotube or nanowire under the influence of surface magnetic anisotropy is determined by means of numerical simulation as a function of the sample geometry and material parameters. The surface magnetization distribution obtained is then used to estimate the period of the surface magnetic texture in amorphous microwire of several micrometers in diameter by means of appropriate variational procedure. The period of the surface magnetic texture in amorphous microwire is found to be significantly smaller than the wire diameter. - Highlights: • Magnetic structure may arise near the magnetic nanotube surface under the influence of surface magnetic anisotropy. • The period of the surface magnetization pattern is calculated as a function of the sample geometry. • Similar magnetic structure may exist in amorphous microwire of several micrometers in diameter. • The period of the surface magnetic structure in amorphous wire is found to be significantly smaller than the wire diameter.

  13. Amorphous uranium alloy and use thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambino, R.J.; McElfresh, M.W.; McGuire, T.R.; Plaskett, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    An amorphous alloy containing uranium and a member selected from the group N, P, As, Sb, Bi, S, Se, Te, Po and mixtures thereof; and use thereof for storage medium, light modulator or optical isolator. (author) figs

  14. Magnetomechanical coupling in thermal amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschel, H. George E.; Ilyin, Valery; Mondal, Chandana; Procaccia, Itamar

    2018-05-01

    Standard approaches to magnetomechanical interactions in thermal magnetic crystalline solids involve Landau functionals in which the lattice anisotropy and the resulting magnetization easy axes are taken explicitly into account. In glassy systems one needs to develop a theory in which the amorphous structure precludes the existence of an easy axis, and in which the constituent particles are free to respond to their local amorphous surroundings and the resulting forces. We present a theory of all the mixed responses of an amorphous solid to mechanical strains and magnetic fields. Atomistic models are proposed in which we test the predictions of magnetostriction for both bulk and nanofilm amorphous samples in the paramagnetic phase. The application to nanofilms with emergent self-affine free interfaces requires a careful definition of the film "width" and its change due to the magnetostriction effect.

  15. Improved polyphase ceramic form for high-level defense nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, A.B.; Morgan, P.E.D.; Clarke, D.R.; Flintoff, J.J.; Shaw, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    An improved ceramic nuclear waste form and fabrication process have been developed using simulated Savannah River Plant defense high-level waste compositions. The waste form provides flexibility with respect to processing conditions while exhibiting superior resistance to ground water leaching than other currently proposed forms. The ceramic, consolidated by hot-isostatic pressing at 1040 0 C and 10,000 psi, is composed of six major phases, nepheline, zirconolite, a murataite-type cubic phase, magnetite-type spinel, a magnetoplumbite solid solution, and perovskite. The waste form provides multiple crystal lattice sites for the waste elements, minimizes amorphous intergranular material, and can accommodate waste loadings in excess of 60 wt %. The fabrication of the ceramic can be accomplished with existing manufacturing technology and eliminates the effects of radionuclide volatilization and off-gas induced corrosion experienced with the molten processes for vitreous form production

  16. Development of a Repeatable Protocol to Uniformly Coat Internal Complex Geometries of Fine Featured 3D Printed Objects with Ceramic Material, including Determination of Viscosity Limits to Properly Coat Certain Pore Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-05-18

    HEPA filters are commonly used in air filtration systems ranging in application from simple home systems to the more advanced networks used in research and development. Currently, these filters are most often composed of glass fibers with diameter on the order of one micron with polymer binders. These fibers, as well as the polymers used, are known to be fragile and can degrade or become extremely brittle with heat, severely limiting their use in high temperature applications. Ceramics are one promising alternative and can enhance the filtration capabilities compared to the current technology. Because ceramic materials are more thermally resistant and chemically stable, there is great interest in developing a repeatable protocol to uniformly coat fine featured polymer objects with ceramic material for use as a filter. The purpose of this experiment is to determine viscosity limits that are able to properly coat certain pore sizes in 3D printed objects, and additionally to characterize the coatings themselves. Latex paint was used as a surrogate because it is specifically designed to produce uniform coatings.

  17. Wonderland of ceramics superplasticity; Ceramics chososei no sekai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakai, F. [National Industrial Research Inst. of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    1995-07-01

    It has been ten years since it was found that ceramics, which is strong and hard at room temperatures and does not deform at all, may exhibit a superplasticity phenomenon at high temperatures that it endlessly elongates when pulled as if it were chewing gum. This phenomenon is one of peculiar behaviours which nano-crystal ceramics, pulverized to an extent that the crystalline particle size is on the order of nanometers, show. The application of superplasticity made the material engineers`s old dream come true that hard ceramics are arbitrarily deformed and machined like metal. Using as models materials such as silicone nitride, alumina and zirconia, this paper describes the history and deformation mechanism of ceramics superplasticity, material design aiming at superplasticization and application of ceramics superplasticity to the machining technology. Furthermore, it describes the trend and future development of international joint researches on the basic surveys on ceramics superplasticity. 25 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Using containerless methods to develop amorphous pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J K R; Benmore, C J; Suthar, K J; Tamalonis, A J; Alderman, O L G; Sendelbach, S; Kondev, V; Yarger, J; Rey, C A; Byrn, S R

    2017-01-01

    Many pipeline drugs have low solubility in their crystalline state and require compounding in special dosage forms to increase bioavailability for oral administration. The use of amorphous formulations increases solubility and uptake of active pharmaceutical ingredients. These forms are rapidly gaining commercial importance for both pre-clinical and clinical use. Synthesis of amorphous drugs was performed using an acoustic levitation containerless processing method and spray drying. The structure of the products was investigated using in-situ high energy X-ray diffraction. Selected solvents for processing drugs were investigated using acoustic levitation. The stability of amorphous samples was measured using X-ray diffraction. Samples processed using both spray drying and containerless synthesis were compared. We review methods for making amorphous pharmaceuticals and present data on materials made by containerless processing and spray drying. It was shown that containerless processing using acoustic levitation can be used to make phase-pure forms of drugs that are known to be difficult to amorphize. The stability and structure of the materials was investigated in the context of developing and making clinically useful formulations. Amorphous compounds are emerging as an important component of drug development and for the oral delivery of drugs with low solubility. Containerless techniques can be used to efficiently synthesize small quantities of pure amorphous forms that are potentially useful in pre-clinical trials and for use in the optimization of clinical products. Developing new pharmaceutical products is an essential enterprise to improve patient outcomes. The development and application of amorphous pharmaceuticals to increase absorption is rapidly gaining importance and it provides opportunities for breakthrough research on new drugs. There is an urgent need to solve problems associated with making formulations that are both stable and that provide high

  19. Amorphization Mechanism of Icosahedral Platinum Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apra, Edoardo; Baletto, Francesca; Ferrando, Riccardo; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2004-01-01

    The amorphization mechanism of high-symmetry pt nanoclusters is investigated by a combination of Molecular Dynamics simulations and Density Functional calculations. A general mechanism for amorphization, involving rosette-like structural transformations at fivefold vertices, is proposed. IN the tosette, a fivefold vertex is transformed into a hexagonal ring. We show that for icosahedral Pt nanoclusters, this transformation is associated with an energy gain, so that their most favorable structures have a low symmetry even at icosahedral magic numbers

  20. Immobilization technology for krypton in amorphous zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takusagawa, Atsushi; Ishiyama, Keiichi

    1989-01-01

    Radioactive krypton recovered from the offgas of a reprocessing plant requires long-term storage on the order of 100 years. Immobilization technology for krypton into amorphous zeolite 5A is considered one of the best methods for long-term storage. In this report, conditions for immobilization treatment and stability of amorphous zeolite 5A loaded krypton against heat, radiation and water are discussed, and a treatment system using this technology is described. (author)

  1. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfeng He

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/ÖHz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor.

  2. Structure-Property Relationships in Polymer Derived Amorphous/Nano-Crystalline Silicon Carbide for Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zunjarrao, Suraj C.; Singh, Abhishek K.; Singh, Raman P.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a promising candidate for several applications in nuclear reactors owing to its high thermal conductivity, high melting temperature, good chemical stability, and resistance to swelling under heavy ion bombardment. However, fabricating SiC by traditional powder processing route generally requires very high temperatures for pressureless sintering. Polymer derived ceramic materials offer unique advantages such as ability to fabricate net shaped components, incorporate reinforcements and relatively low processing temperatures. Furthermore, for SiC based ceramics fabricated using polymer infiltration process (PIP), the microstructure can be tailored by controlling the processing parameters, to get an amorphous, nanocrystalline or crystalline SiC. In this work, fabrication of polymer derived amorphous and nano-grained SiC is presented and its application as an in-core material is explored. Monolithic SiC samples are fabricated by controlled pyrolysis of allyl-hydrido-poly-carbo-silane (AHPCS) under inert atmosphere. Chemical changes, phase transformations and microstructural changes occurring during the pyrolysis process are studied as a function of the processing temperature. Polymer cross-linking and polymer to ceramic conversion is studied using infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) are performed to monitor the mass loss and phase change as a function of temperature. X-ray diffraction studies are done to study the intermediate phases and microstructural changes. Variation in density is carefully monitored as a function of processing temperature. Owing to shrinkage and gas evolution during pyrolysis, precursor derived ceramics are inherently porous and composite fabrication typically involves repeated cycles of polymer re-infiltration and pyrolysis. However, there is a limit to the densification that can be achieved by this method and porosity in the final materials presents

  3. FIBROUS CERAMIC-CERAMIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS PROCESSING AND PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    Naslain , R.

    1986-01-01

    The introduction of continuous fibers in a ceramic matrix can improve its toughness, if the fiber-matrix bonding is weak enough, due to matrix microcracking and fiber pull-out. Ceramic-ceramic composite materials are processed according to liquid or gas phase techniques. The most important are made of glass, carbide, nitride or oxide matrices reinforced with carbon, SiC or Al2O3 fibers.

  4. Salt splitting using ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Many radioactive aqueous wastes in the DOE complex have high concentrations of sodium that can negatively affect waste treatment and disposal operations. Sodium can decrease the durability of waste forms such as glass and is the primary contributor to large disposal volumes. Waste treatment processes such as cesium ion exchange, sludge washing, and calcination are made less efficient and more expensive because of the high sodium concentrations. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City UT) are developing an electrochemical salt splitting process based on inorganic ceramic sodium (Na), super-ionic conductor (NaSICON) membranes that shows promise for mitigating the impact of sodium. In this process, the waste is added to the anode compartment, and an electrical potential is applied to the cell. This drives sodium ions through the membrane, but the membrane rejects most other cations (e.g., Sr{sup +2}, Cs{sup +}). The charge balance in the anode compartment is maintained by generating H{sup +} from the electrolysis of water. The charge balance in the cathode is maintained by generating OH{sup {minus}}, either from the electrolysis of water or from oxygen and water using an oxygen cathode. The normal gaseous products of the electrolysis of water are oxygen at the anode and hydrogen at the cathode. Potentially flammable gas mixtures can be prevented by providing adequate volumes of a sweep gas, using an alternative reductant or destruction of the hydrogen as it is generated. As H{sup +} is generated in the anode compartment, the pH drops. The process may be operated with either an alkaline (pH>12) or an acidic anolyte (pH <1). The benefits of salt splitting using ceramic membranes are (1) waste volume reduction and reduced chemical procurement costs by recycling of NaOH; and (2) direct reduction of sodium in process streams, which enhances subsequent operations such as cesium ion exchange, calcination, and vitrification.

  5. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husband, P.; Bartošová, I.; Slugeň, V.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics.

  6. Positron annihilation in transparent ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husband, P; Selim, F A; Bartošová, I; Slugeň, V

    2016-01-01

    Transparent ceramics are emerging as excellent candidates for many photonic applications including laser, scintillation and illumination. However achieving perfect transparency is essential in these applications and requires high technology processing and complete understanding for the ceramic microstructure and its effect on the optical properties. Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) is the perfect tool to study porosity and defects. It has been applied to investigate many ceramic structures; and transparent ceramics field may be greatly advanced by applying PAS. In this work positron lifetime (PLT) measurements were carried out in parallel with optical studies on yttrium aluminum garnet transparent ceramics in order to gain an understanding for their structure at the atomic level and its effect on the transparency and light scattering. The study confirmed that PAS can provide useful information on their microstructure and guide the technology of manufacturing and advancing transparent ceramics. (paper)

  7. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, E.S.; Forsythe, G.D.; Domanski, D.M.; Chambers, J.A.; Rajendran, G.P.

    1999-05-11

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter is described having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during back pulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  8. Ceramic hot-gas filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Elizabeth Sokolinski; Forsythe, George Daniel; Domanski, Daniel Matthew; Chambers, Jeffrey Allen; Rajendran, Govindasamy Paramasivam

    1999-01-01

    A ceramic hot-gas candle filter having a porous support of filament-wound oxide ceramic yarn at least partially surrounded by a porous refractory oxide ceramic matrix, and a membrane layer on at least one surface thereof. The membrane layer may be on the outer surface, the inner surface, or both the outer and inner surface of the porous support. The membrane layer may be formed of an ordered arrangement of circularly wound, continuous filament oxide ceramic yarn, a ceramic filler material which is less permeable than the filament-wound support structure, or some combination of continuous filament and filler material. A particularly effective membrane layer features circularly wound filament with gaps intentionally placed between adjacent windings, and a filler material of ceramic particulates uniformly distributed throughout the gap region. The filter can withstand thermal cycling during backpulse cleaning and is resistant to chemical degradation at high temperatures.

  9. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying responses to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today that will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications. (author)

  10. Ceramics for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a variety of uses in both near-term fusion devices and in commercial powerplants. These materials must retain adequate structural and electrical properties under conditions of neutron, particle, and ionizing irradiation; thermal and applied stresses; and physical and chemical sputtering. Ceramics such as Al 2 O 3 , MgAl 2 O 4 , BeO, Si 3 N 4 and SiC are currently under study for fusion applications, and results to date show widely-varying response to the fusion environment. Materials can be identified today which will meet initial operating requirements, but improvements in physical properties are needed to achieve satisfactory lifetimes for critical applications

  11. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  12. Radiation-disorder and aperiodicity in irradiated ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, L.W.

    1992-01-01

    This final technical report documents the accomplishments of the program of research entitled ''Radiation Disorder and Aperiodicity in Irradiated Ceramics'' for the period June 22, 1989--June 21, 1992. This research forms the latest part on an on-going program, begun at MIT in 1983 under DOE support, which has had as its objectives investigation of the responses in radiation environments of ceramics heavily-irradiated with electrons, neutrons and ions, with potential applications to fusion energy technology and high-level nuclear waste storage. Materials investigated have included SiO 2 , MgAl 2 O 4 , Al 23 O 27 N 5 , SiC, BeO, LiAlO 2 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , CaTiO 3 KTaO 3 and Ca(Zr, Pu)Ti 2 O 7 . The program initially proposed for 1989 had as its major objectives two main thrusts: (1) research on defect aggregation in irradiated non-oxide ceramics, and (2) research on irradiation-induced amorphization of network silicas and phosphates

  13. The technical ceramics (second part)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auclerc, S.; Poulain, E.

    2004-01-01

    This work deals with ceramics used in the nuclear and the automotive industries. Concerning the nuclear sector, ceramics are particularly used in reactors, in the treatment of radioactive wastes and for the storage of the ultimate wastes. Details are given about the different ceramics used. In the automobile sector, aluminium is principally used for its lightness and cordierite, basic material of catalyst supports is especially used in the automobile devices of cleansing. (O.M.)

  14. Ceramic superconductors II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    This volume compiles papers on ceramic superconductors. Topics include: structural patterns in High-Tc superconductors, phase equilibria of barium oxide superconductors, localized electrons in tetragonal YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-δ/, lattice and defect structure and properties of rare earth/alkaline earth-copper-oxide superconductors, alternate candidates for High-Tc superconductors, perovskite-structure superconductors; superconductive thin film fabrication, and superconductor/polymer composites

  15. Piezoelectric Ceramics Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jordan, T

    2001-01-01

    ... the behavior of a piezoelectric material. We have attempted to cover the most common measurement methods as well as introduce parameters of interest. Excellent sources for more in-depth coverage of specific topics can be found in the bibliography. In most cases, we refer to lead zirconate titanate (PZT) to illustrate some of the concepts since it is the most widely used and studied piezoelectric ceramic to date.

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2001-01-01

    Conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels and chemicals is a major goal for the Nation as it enters the 21st Century. Technically robust and economically viable processes are needed to capture the value of the vast reserves of natural gas on Alaska's North Slope, and wean the Nation from dependence on foreign petroleum sources. Technologies that are emerging to fulfill this need are all based syngas as an intermediate. Syngas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) is a fundamental building block from which chemicals and fuels can be derived. Lower cost syngas translates directly into more cost-competitive fuels and chemicals. The currently practiced commercial technology for making syngas is either steam methane reforming (SMR) or a two-step process involving cryogenic oxygen separation followed by natural gas partial oxidation (POX). These high-energy, capital-intensive processes do not always produce syngas at a cost that makes its derivatives competitive with current petroleum-based fuels and chemicals. This project has the following 6 main tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques

  17. Ion conductivity of nasicon ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoj, J.W.; Engell, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Nasicon ss ,Na 1 + X Zr 2 Si X P 3 - X O 12 o , X , 3, includes some of the best solid state sodium conductors known today. Compositions in the interval 1.6 , X , 2.6 show conductivities comparable to the best β double-prime-alumina ceramics. It is well known that the ion conductivity of β-alumina is strongly dependent on the texture of the ceramic. Here a similar behavior is reported for Nasicon ceramics. Ceramics of the bulk composition Na 2.94 Zr 1.49 Si 2.20 P 0.80 O 10.85 were prepared by a gel method. The final ceramics consist of Nasicon crystals with x = 2.14 and a glass phase. The grain size and texture of the ceramics were controlled by varying the thermal history of the gel based raw materials and the sintering conditions. The room temperature resistivity of the resulting ceramics varies from 3.65*10 3 ohm cm to 1.23*10 3 ohm cm. Using the temperature comparison method and estimates of the area of grain boundaries in the ceramics, the resistivity of the Nasicon phase is estimated to be 225 ohm cm at 25 degrees C. B 2 O 3 - or Al 2 O 3 -doping of the glass bearing Nasicon ceramic lower the room temperature resistivity by a factor 2 to 5. The dopants do not substitute into the Nasicon phase in substantial amounts

  18. Unusual pleural involvement after exposure to amorphous silicates (Liparitosis): report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazziotti, S.; Ascenti, G.; Lamberto, S.; Scribano, E.; Costa, C.

    2002-01-01

    Liparitosis is a rare pneumoconiosis determined by inhalation of pumice, an amorphous complex silicate extracted in the quarries of Lipari (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). We describe two cases of subjects occupationally exposed to pumice dust in which high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) revealed the presence of pleural lesions without parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  19. Unusual pleural involvement after exposure to amorphous silicates (Liparitosis): report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazziotti, S.; Ascenti, G.; Lamberto, S.; Scribano, E. [Institute of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , University of Messina (Italy); Costa, C. [Social Health Department, Messina (Italy)

    2002-05-01

    Liparitosis is a rare pneumoconiosis determined by inhalation of pumice, an amorphous complex silicate extracted in the quarries of Lipari (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy). We describe two cases of subjects occupationally exposed to pumice dust in which high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) revealed the presence of pleural lesions without parenchymal involvement. (orig.)

  20. Crystallization study of amorphous system Fe84-xWxB16 (x = 3;5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakova, A.A.; Sidorova, G.V.; Kiseleva, T.Yu.; Szasz, A.

    1992-01-01

    A complex study of the crystallization process of the amorphous system was carried out by Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and DTA. Alloy samples crystallized at 600deg C contain the following phases: α-Fe, Fe 3 B and solid solution (Fe, W) 3 B. (orig.)

  1. Inverse simulated annealing: Improvements and application to amorphous InSb

    OpenAIRE

    Los, Jan H.; Gabardi, Silvia; Bernasconi, Marco; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    An improved inverse simulated annealing method is presented to determine the structure of complex disordered systems from first principles in agreement with available experimental data or desired predetermined target properties. The effectiveness of this method is demonstrated by revisiting the structure of amorphous InSb. The resulting network is mostly tetrahedral and in excellent agreement with available experimental data.

  2. Finite size effects in a model for platicity of amorphous composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyukodi, Botond; Lemarchand, Claire A.; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the plastic behavior of an amorphous matrix reinforced by hard particles. A mesoscopic depinning-like model accounting for Eshelby elastic interactions is implemented. Only the effect of a plastic disorder is considered. Numerical results show a complex size dependence of the effective...

  3. Effects of the amorphization on hysteresis loops of the amorphous spin-1/2 Ising system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essaoudi, I.; Ainane, A.; Saber, M.; Miguel, J.J. de

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effects of the amorphization on the hysteresis loops of the amorphous spin-1/2 Ising system using the effective field theory within a probability distribution technique that accounts for the self-spin correlation functions. The magnetization, the transverse and longitudinal susceptibilities, and pyromagnetic coefficient are also studied in detail

  4. Ab initio simulation of amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N.C.; McKenzie, D.R.; Goringe, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: A first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous silicon is presented. Density Functional Theory is used to describe the forces between the atoms in a 64 atom supercell which is periodically repeated throughout space in order to generate an infinite network of atoms (a good approximation to a real solid). A quench from the liquid phase is used to achieve a quenched amorphous structure, which is subjected to an annealing cycle to improve its stability. The final, annealed network is in better agreement with experiment than any previous simulation of amorphous silicon. Significantly, the predicted average first-coordination numbers of 3.56 and 3.84 for the quenched and annealed structures from this simulation agree very closely with the experimental values of 3.55 and 3.90 respectively, whereas all previous simulations yielded first coordination numbers greater than 4. This improved agreement in coordination numbers is important because it supports the experimental finding that dangling bonds (which are associated with under-coordinated atoms) are more prevalent than floating bonds (the strained, longer bond of a five coordinate atom) in pure amorphous silicon. Finally, the effect of adding hydrogen to amorphous silicon was investigated by specifically placing hydrogen atoms at the likely defect sites. After a structural relaxation to optimise the positions of these hydrogen atoms, the localised electronic states associated with these defects are absent. Thus hydrogen is responsible for removing these defect states (which are able to trap carriers) from the edge of the band gap of the amorphous silicon. These results confirm the widely held ideas about the effect of hydrogen in producing remarkable improvements in the electronic properties of amorphous silicon

  5. Additive Manufacturing of SiC Based Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael Charles; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics and SiC fiber reinforcedSiC ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMCs) offer high payoff as replacements for metals in turbine engine applications due to their lighter weight, higher temperature capability, and lower cooling requirements. Additive manufacturing approaches can offer game changing technologies for the quick and low cost fabrication of parts with much greater design freedom and geometric complexity. Four approaches for developing these materials are presented. The first two utilize low cost 3D printers. The first uses pre-ceramic pastes developed as feed materials which are converted to SiC after firing. The second uses wood containing filament to print a carbonaceous preform which is infiltrated with a pre-ceramic polymer and converted to SiC. The other two approaches pursue the AM of CMCs. The first is binder jet SiC powder processing in collaboration with rp+m (Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing). Processing optimization was pursued through SiC powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of nanofibers into the powder bed. The second approach was laminated object manufacturing (LOM) in which fiber prepregs and laminates are cut to shape by a laser and stacked to form the desired part. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted on materials from all approaches with select approaches also characterized with XRD, TGA, and bend testing.

  6. Fracture strength of three all-ceramic systems: Top-Ceram compared with IPS-Empress and In-Ceram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quran, Firas Al; Haj-Ali, Reem

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the fracture loads and mode of failure of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using Top-Ceram and compare it with all-ceramic crowns fabricated from well-established systems: IPS-Empress II, In-Ceram. Thirty all-ceramic crowns were fabricated; 10 IPS-Empress II, 10 In-Ceram alumina and 10 Top-Ceram. Instron testing machine was used to measure the loads required to introduce fracture of each crown. Mean fracture load for In-Ceram alumina [941.8 (± 221.66) N] was significantly (p > 0.05) higher than those of Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II. There was no statistically significant difference between Top-Ceram and IPS-Empress II mean fracture loads; 696.20 (+222.20) and 534 (+110.84) N respectively. Core fracture pattern was highest seen in Top- Ceram specimens.

  7. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  8. Swelling induced by alpha decay in monazite and zirconolite ceramics: A XRD and TEM comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschanels, X.; Seydoux-Guillaume, A. M.; Magnin, V.; Mesbah, A.; Tribet, M.; Moloney, M. P.; Serruys, Y.; Peuget, S.

    2014-05-01

    Zirconolite and monazite matrices are potential ceramics for the containment of actinides (Np, Cm, Am, Pu) which are produced over the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Actinides decay mainly through the emission of alpha particles, which in turn causes most ceramics to undergo structural and textural changes (amorphization and/or swelling). In order to study the effects of alpha decays on the above mentioned ceramics two parallel approaches were set up. The first involved the use of an external irradiation source, Au, which allowed the deposited recoil energy to be simulated. The second was based on short-lived actinide doping with 238Pu, (i.e. an internal source), via the incorporation of plutonium oxide into both the monazite and zirconolite structures during synthesis. In both types of irradiation experiments, the zirconolite samples became amorphous at room temperature with damage close to 0.3 dpa; corresponding to a critical dose of 4 × 1018 α g-1 (i.e. ∼1.3 × 1021 keV cm-3). Both zirconolite samples also showed the same degree of macroscopic swelling at saturation (∼6%), with ballistic processes being the predominant damaging effect. In the case of the monazite however, the macroscopic swelling and amorphization were dependent on the nature of the irradiation. Externally, (Au), irradiated samples became amorphous while also demonstrating a saturation swelling of up to 8%. In contrast to this, the swelling of the 238Pu doped samples was much smaller at ∼1%. Also, unlike the externally (Au) irradiated monazite these 238Pu doped samples remained crystalline up to 7.5 × 1018 α g-1 (0.8 dpa). XRD, TEM and swelling measurements were used to fully characterize and interpret this behavior. The low swelling and the conservation of the crystalline state of 238Pu doped monazite samples indicates that alpha annealing took place within this material.

  9. Electron transfer from electronic excited states to sub-vacuum electron traps in amorphous ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vichnevetski, E.; Bass, A.D.; Sanche, L.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the electron stimulated yield of electronically excited argon atoms (Ar * ) from monolayer quantities of Ar deposited onto thin films of amorphous ice. Two peaks of narrow width ( - electron-exciton complex into exciton states, by the transfer of an electron into a sub-vacuum electron state within the ice film. However, the 10.7 eV feature is shifted to lower energy since electron attachment to Ar occurs within small pores of amorphous ice. In this case, the excess electron is transferred into an electron trap below the conduction band of the ice layer

  10. Deconvolution of ferromagnetic resonance in devitrification process of Co-based amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montiel, H.; Alvarez, G.; Betancourt, I.; Zamorano, R.; Valenzuela, R.

    2006-01-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were carried out on soft magnetic amorphous ribbons of composition Co 66 Fe 4 B 12 Si 13 Nb 4 Cu prepared by melt spinning. In the as-cast sample, a simple FMR spectrum was apparent. For treatment times of 5-20 min a complex resonant absorption at lower fields was detected; deconvolution calculations were carried out on the FMR spectra and it was possible to separate two contributions. These results can be interpreted as the combination of two different magnetic phases, corresponding to the amorphous matrix and nanocrystallites. The parameters of resonant absorptions can be associated with the evolution of nanocrystallization during the annealing

  11. Maxwell rigidity and topological constraints in amorphous phase-change networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micoulaut, M.; Otjacques, C.; Raty, J.-Y.; Bichara, C.

    2011-01-01

    By analyzing first-principles molecular-dynamics simulations of different telluride amorphous networks, we develop a method for the enumeration of radial and angular topological constraints, and show that the phase diagram of the most popular system Ge-Sb-Te can be split into two compositional elastic phases: a tellurium rich flexible phase and a stressed rigid phase that contains most of the materials used in phase-change applications. This sound atomic scale insight should open new avenues for the understanding of phase-change materials and other complex amorphous materials from the viewpoint of rigidity.

  12. Non-stoichiometric mullites from Al2O3-SiO2-ZrO2 amorphous materials by rapid quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, M.; Hanaue, Y.; Somiya, S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to study the formation of zirconia dispersed mullite ceramics from homogeneous starting materials hot-pressing and heat-treatments have been carried out for rapidly quenched amorphous materials with 0 to 20 wt% ZrO 2 mullite compositions. These amorphous materials crystallized directly to mullite for 0-10 wt% ZrO 2 samples or mullite + t-ZrO 2 for 20 wt% ZrO 2 at about 970 degrees C. An A1 2 O 3 - rich composition (82 wt% A1 2 O 3 ) and also a significant solid solubility of ZrO 2 (>10 wt%) were estimated for these mullites by XRD studies. Amorphous speres of 10 nm which were considered to be SiO 2 - rich phase were produced by a phase separation in mullite grains

  13. Deodorant ceramic catalyst. Dasshu ceramics shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, K. (Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)); Naka, R. (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-07-01

    Concerning debromination to be used for the filter of deodorizing device, those of long life and high deodorizing performance are demanded a great deal. As one of this kind of debromination, a deodorant ceramic catalyst (mangantid) has been developed and put for practical use as deodorant for refrigerator. In this article, the information and knowledge obtained by the development of mangantid, the features as well as several properties of the product are stated. The deodorizing methods currently used practically are roughly divided into 6 kinds such as the adsorption method, the direct combustion method, the catalytic method and the oxidation method, but each of them has its own merit and demerit, hence it is necessary to select the method in accordance with the kind of odor and its generating condition. Mangantid is a compound body of high deodorant material in a honeycomb configuration, and has the features that in comparison with the existing deordorants, its pressure loss is smaller, its deodorizing rate is bigger, and acidic, neutral and basic gaseous components can be removed in a well-balanced manner. Deodorization with mangantid has the mechanism to let the odorous component contact and react with the catalyst and change the component to the non-odorous component in the temperature range from room temperature to the low temperature region. 5 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. The Structure of Liquid and Amorphous Hafnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leighanne C. Gallington

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the atomic structure of amorphous solids is important in predicting and tuning their macroscopic behavior. Here, we use a combination of high-energy X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, and molecular dynamics simulations to benchmark the atomic interactions in the high temperature stable liquid and low-density amorphous solid states of hafnia. The diffraction results reveal an average Hf–O coordination number of ~7 exists in both the liquid and amorphous nanoparticle forms studied. The measured pair distribution functions are compared to those generated from several simulation models in the literature. We have also performed ab initio and classical molecular dynamics simulations that show density has a strong effect on the polyhedral connectivity. The liquid shows a broad distribution of Hf–Hf interactions, while the formation of low-density amorphous nanoclusters can reproduce the sharp split peak in the Hf–Hf partial pair distribution function observed in experiment. The agglomeration of amorphous nanoparticles condensed from the gas phase is associated with the formation of both edge-sharing and corner-sharing HfO6,7 polyhedra resembling that observed in the monoclinic phase.

  15. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, M. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Perez-Mendez, V. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  16. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, M.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters ε 2 τ's are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs

  17. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater

  18. Study of aluminium oxide from high-alumina refractory ceramics by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Keywords. Ceramics; aluminium oxide; X-ray diffraction; scanning electron microscopy; thermolumi- nescence. ... and ruby, consists of a slightly distorted hexagonal O. 2– .... a very complex structure consisting of a broad distribu- .... Imax (a.u.).

  19. Polishing of silicon based advanced ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Fritz; Dambon, Olaf; Zunke, Richard; Waechter, D.

    2009-05-01

    Silicon based advanced ceramics show advantages in comparison to other materials due to their extreme hardness, wear and creep resistance, low density and low coefficient of thermal expansion. As a matter of course, machining requires high efforts. In order to reach demanded low roughness for optical or tribological applications a defect free surface is indispensable. In this paper, polishing of silicon nitride and silicon carbide is investigated. The objective is to elaborate scientific understanding of the process interactions. Based on this knowledge, the optimization of removal rate, surface quality and form accuracy can be realized. For this purpose, fundamental investigations of polishing silicon based ceramics are undertaken and evaluated. Former scientific publications discuss removal mechanisms and wear behavior, but the scientific insight is mainly based on investigations in grinding and lapping. The removal mechanisms in polishing are not fully understood due to complexity of interactions. The role of, e.g., process parameters, slurry and abrasives, and their influence on the output parameters is still uncertain. Extensive technological investigations demonstrate the influence of the polishing system and the machining parameters on the stability and the reproducibility. It is shown that the interactions between the advanced ceramics and the polishing systems is of great relevance. Depending on the kind of slurry and polishing agent the material removal mechanisms differ. The observed effects can be explained by dominating mechanical or chemo-mechanical removal mechanisms. Therefore, hypotheses to state adequate explanations are presented and validated by advanced metrology devices, such as SEM, AFM and TEM.

  20. Studies of electrical conductivity and complex initial permeability of multiferroic xBa{sub 0.95}Sr{sub 0.05}TiO{sub 3}-(1-x)BiFe{sub 0.90}Gd{sub 0.10}O{sub 3} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, Mohammad J., E-mail: mmjulhash@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Department of Physics, Comilla University, Comilla (Bangladesh); Khan, M. N. I. [Materials Science Division, Atomic Energy Center, Dhaka (Bangladesh); Hossain, A. K. M. Akther [Department of Physics, Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2016-07-12

    Multiferroic xBa{sub 0.95}Sr{sub 0.05}TiO{sub 3}-(1-x)BiFe{sub 0.90}Gd{sub 0.10}O{sub 3} [xBST-(1-x)BFGO] (x = 0.00, 0.10 and 0.20) ceramics were prepared by the standard solid-state reaction technique. Crystal structure of the ceramics was determined by X-ray diffraction pattern. All the compositions exhibited rhombohedral crystal structure. The tolerance factor ‘t’ varied from 0.847 to 0.864. The AC conductivity spectrum followed the Jonscher’s power law. The Nyquist plots indicated that only grains have the contribution to the resistance in this material and the values of grain resistance (R{sub g}) increased with BST content. The real part of complex initial permeability decreased with the increase in frequency and increased with increasing BST content. Magnetoelectric coefficient was determined for all compositions. The maximum value of magnetoelectric coefficient was found to be 1.467 mV.cm{sup −1}.Oe{sup −1} for x = 0.20.

  1. Integration Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics for Energy and Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of new and innovative materials has been known to culminate in major turning points in human history. The transformative impact and functional manifestation of new materials have been demonstrated in every historical era by their integration into new products, systems, assemblies, and devices. In modern times, the integration of new materials into usable products has a special relevance for the technological development and economic competitiveness of industrial societies. Advanced ceramic technologies dramatically impact the energy and environmental landscape due to potential wide scale applications in all aspects of energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include gas turbine propulsion systems, fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation, and waste disposal. Robust ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic components starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance under different operating conditions, the detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different approaches are required for the integration of ceramic-metal and ceramic-ceramic systems across length scales (macro to nano). In this presentation, a few examples of integration of ceramic to metals and ceramic to ceramic systems will be presented. Various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and

  2. Micromolding for ceramic microneedle arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwkasteele-Bystrova, Svetlana Nikolajevna; Lüttge, Regina

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication process of ceramic microneedle arrays (MNAs) is presented. This includes the manufacturing of an SU-8/Si-master, its double replication resulting in a PDMS mold for production by micromolding and ceramic sintering. The robustness of the replicated structures was tested by means of

  3. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  4. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 12. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Functional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 12 December 1999 pp 21-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  5. Science and Technology of Ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Science and Technology of Ceramics - Traditional Ceramics. Sheela K Ramasesha. Series Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp 16-24. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. ION EXCHANGE IN GLASS-CERAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Halsey Beall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years ion-exchange in glasses has found a renewed interest with a lot of new development and research in industrial and academic labs and the commercialization of materials with outstanding mechanical properties. These glasses are now widely used in many electronic devices including hand-held displays and tablets. The exchange is generally conducted in a bath of molten salt below the transition temperature of the glass. The exchange at the surface of an alkali ion by a bigger one brings compressive stress at the surface. The mechanical properties are dependent on the stress level at the surface and the depth of penetration of the bigger ion. As compared to glasses, glass-ceramics have the interest to display a wide range of aspects (transparent to opaque and different mechanical properties (especially higher modulus and toughness. There has been little research on ion-exchange in glass-ceramics. In these materials the mechanisms are much more complex than in glasses because of their polyphasic nature: ion-exchange generally takes place mostly in one phase (crystalline phase or residual glass. The mechanism can be similar to what is observed in glasses with the replacement of an ion by another in the structure. But in some cases this ion-exchange leads to microstructural modifications (for example amorphisation or phase change.This article reviews these ion-exchange mechanisms using several transparent and opaque alumino-silicate glass-ceramics as examples. The effect of the ion exchange in the various glass-ceramics will be described, with particular emphasis on flexural strength.

  7. Fabrication and application of amorphous semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumurdjian, Pierre.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns the design and manufacture of elecric switching or memorisation components with amorphous semiconductors. As is known some compounds, particularly the chalcogenides, have a resistivity of the semiconductor type in the amorphous solid state. These materials are obtained by the high temperature homogeneisation of several single elements such as tellurium, arsenic, germanium and sulphur, followed by water or air quenching. In particular these compounds have useful switching and memorisation properties. In particular they have the characteristic of not suffering deterioration when placed in an environment subjected to nuclear radiations. In order to know more about the nature and properties of these amorphous semiconductors the French patent No. 71 28048 of 30 June 1971 may be consulted with advantage [fr

  8. Relaxation processes during amorphous metal alloys heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinochka, E.Ya.; Durachenko, A.M.; Borisov, V.T.

    1982-01-01

    Behaviour of Te+15 at.%Ge and Fe+13 at.%P+7 at.%C amorphous metal alloys during heating has been studied using the method of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the most convenient one for determination of the value of heat effects, activation energies, temperature ranges of relaxation processes. Thermal effects corresponding to high-temperature relaxation processes taking place during amorphous metal alloys (AMA) heating are detected. The change of ratio of relaxation peaks values on DSC curves as a result of AMA heat treatment can be explained by the presence of a number of levels of inner energy in amorphous system, separated with potential barriers, the heights of which correspond to certain activation energies of relaxation processes

  9. Heavy ions amorphous semiconductors irradiation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benmalek, M.

    1978-01-01

    The behavior of amorphous semiconductors (germanium and germanium and arsenic tellurides) under ion bombardment at energies up to 2 MeV was studied. The irradiation induced modifications were followed using electrical parameter changes (resistivity and activation energy) and by means of the transmission electron microscopy observations. The electrical conductivity enhancement of the irradiated samples was interpreted using the late conduction theories in amorphous compounds. In amorphous germanium, Electron Microscopy showed the formations of 'globules', these defects are similar to voids observed in irradiated metals. The displacement cascade theory was used for the interpretation of the irradiation induced defects formation and a coalescence mechanism of growth was pointed out for the vacancy agglomeration [fr

  10. Formation of amorphous layers by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgoin, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    When an ordered solid is irradiated with heavy energy particles, disorder is produced. When the irradiation dose exceeds a so-called critical dose, the irradiated area of the solid becomes uniformly disordered. Mention is first made of the nature, concentration and distribution of the defects created by a heavy energy particle. The description is then given -solely with respect to semiconductors- of the effect of the various parameters on the critical dose energy and nature of the ion, nature and temperature of the solid, irradiation flux. The physical properties (electronic and thermodynamic types) and the uniformly disordered areas are briefly discussed and these properties are compared with those of amorphous semiconductor layers fabricated by evaporation. It is concluded that the evaporated and irradiated layers are similar in nature. It is suggested that the transformation of an irradiated crystalline area into an amorphous one occurs when the Gibbs energy of the crystal become greater than the Gibbs energy of the amorphous one [fr

  11. Preparation of a ceramic superconductor from ultrafine particles by freeze-dry process in Ba-Y-Cu-O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zuyao; Qian Yitai; Wan Yanjian; Rong Jingfang; Zhang Han; Pan Guoqiang; Zhao Yong; Zhang Qirui

    1989-01-01

    Freeze-dry technique is first reported for preparing ceramic ultrafines. The single-phase complex oxide Ba 2 YCu 3 O/sub 9-δ/, a poly-crystallized compound, and ceramic superconductor have been synthesized successfully. The experimental results show that not only is the ceramic superconductor obtained uniform with fine particles and excellent superconductivity, but the conditions for solid reactions are relatively limited

  12. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  13. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi, E-mail: kinsakai@ngk.co.jp [Corporate R and D, NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya 467-8530 (Japan)

    2011-05-15

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R and D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  14. Ceramic membrane development in NGK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Hitoshi

    2011-05-01

    NGK Insulators, Ltd. was established in 1919 to manufacture the electric porcelain insulators for power transmission lines. Since then, our business has grown as one of the world-leading ceramics manufacturing companies and currently supply with the various environmentally-benign ceramic products to worldwide. In this paper, ceramic membrane development in NGK is described in detail. We have been selling ceramic microfiltration (MF) membranes and ultra-filtration (UF) membranes for many years to be used for solid/liquid separation in various fields such as pharmaceutical, chemical, food and semiconductor industries. In Corporate R&D, new ceramic membranes with sub-nanometer sized pores, which are fabricated on top of the membrane filters as support, are under development for gas and liquid/liquid separation processes.

  15. Analysis of an ideal amorphous solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To, L.T.; Stachurski, Z.H.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In geometrical terms, amorphous solids are fundamentally different from crystalline solids in that they can not be constructed by the crystallographic method of translation of the basis along a lattice. Therefore, to study amorphous structures we must invoke concepts and use measures different to those used for ordered structures. Nevertheless, an ideal amorphous solid must share together with the ideal crystalline solid in the same definition of the term 'ideal'. In both cases it must be a perfect body, in which perfection is carried through in every detail to an unlimited (infinite) size without fault or defect. The latest results on this research will be presented. To qualify for a solid, rigid body, close packing of the spheres is required. For an ideal amorphous solids composed of hard spheres of identical size, we impose a stricter condition for the packing, namely, to be such that all spheres are in fixed positions (no loose spheres). To define the ideal solid, we must define what we mean by a perfect amorphous structure. Here, perfection is defined by, first the definition of imperfections, and next by the requirement of absence of imperfections of any kind. We envisage two types of defects: (i) geometrical, and (ii) statistical. Geometrical defects are: a sphere of different size, a loose sphere, and a vacancy. A statistical defect is defined with respect to two statistical functions: Ψ(N C ), and Φ(S β ). The former describes the probability of a given sphere having nc number of touching contacts, and the latter describes the disposition of the contacts on the surface of the sphere. Defects relating to the two functions will be described. The results for the functions, Ψ(N C ), and Φ(S β ), for the corresponding radial distribution function, and so called blocking number will be presented from simulations of an ideal amorphous solid

  16. Definition and properties of ideal amorphous structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachurski, Z.H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Amorphous structure is usually defined by what it is not (ie, no crystalline peaks in XRS, no bond correlation in NMR), rather than by what it is. The interest in defining the structure of non-crystalline materials is long standing; packing geometry of spheres, molecular structure of glassy SiO 2 , or the structure of atactic polymers are prime examples. The earliest definitions of amorphous structure were in terms of a microcrystallite model of Valenkov, or continuous random network by Zachariasen. The random close packing of spheres of equal size, and an amorphous structure, composed of freely jointed linear chains of hard spheres, has been described mathematically in terms of a linear homogeneous Poisson process. This paper aims to describe some geometrical, kinematic, and topological properties of these two ideal amorphous structures, which belong to the same amorphous class. The geometry of packing is elucidated, and the use of Voronoi tessellation method for measuring the structures is described. The ideal amorphous solid has no symmetry elements; its volume can not be divided into identical unit cells. However, there is a volume element small enough to allow the distinction of its nanoscopic inhomogeneities, and sufficiently large enough to represent, accurately the overall behaviour. We define this volume element, the representative volume element. Suitable boundary conditions must be prescribed for a choice of RVE, and satisfy certain requirements. Topologically, a catchment region on the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface over nuclear configuration space, is defined by Mezey and Bader as an energetically stable geometry of the open region of R 3 traversed by all the trajectories which terminate at a local maximum. Two topological properties will be described: (i) the boundaries of the catchment region as a direct geometrical correspondence to the Voronoi polyhedron for a given atom in a given structure, and (ii) the constriction points

  17. Method of forming a ceramic matrix composite and a ceramic matrix component

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, Peter; Zhang, James

    2017-05-30

    A method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component includes providing a formed ceramic member having a cavity, filling at least a portion of the cavity with a ceramic foam. The ceramic foam is deposited on a barrier layer covering at least one internal passage of the cavity. The method includes processing the formed ceramic member and ceramic foam to obtain a ceramic matrix composite component. Also provided is a method of forming a ceramic matrix composite blade and a ceramic matrix composite component.

  18. Zirconia based ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressiani, J.C.; Bressiani, A.H.A.

    1989-05-01

    Within the new generation of ceramic materials, zirconia continues to attract ever increasing attention of scients, technologists and users by virtue of its singular combination of properties and being able to perform thermo-mechanical, electroeletronic, chemico-biological functions. Nevertheless, in order to obtain these properties, a through understanding of the phase transformation mechanisms and microstructural changes is necessary. This paper discusses the main parameters that require control during fabrication of these materials to obtain desired properties for a specific application. (author) [pt

  19. Directionally Solidified Multifunctional Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    Vidrio , Vol. 44 [5] (2005) pp 347 - 352. 9. F. W. Dynys and A. Sayir, "Self Assemble Silicide Architectures by Directional Solidification," Journal...Sociedad Espanola de Ceramica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [4] (2004) pp 753 - 758. 21. A. Sayir and F. S. Lowery, "Combustion-Resistance of Silicon-Based Ceramics...Espafiola de Cerdmica y Vidrio , Vol. 43 [3], 2004. ISSN-0366-3175-BSCVB9. 14 37. P. Berger, A. Sayir and M. H. Berger, "Nuclear Microprobe using Elastic

  20. Microstructure and thermochromic properties of VOX-WOX-VOX ceramic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamseh, S.; Ghahari, M.; Araghi, H.; Faghihi Sani, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    W-doped VO 2 films have been synthesized via oxygen annealing of V-W-V (vanadium-tungsten-vanadium) multilayered films. The effects of middle layer's thickness of V-W-V multilayered film on structure and properties of VO X -WO X -VO X ceramic thin films were investigated. The as-deposited V-W-V multilayered film showed amorphous-like structure when mixed structure of VO 2 (M) and VO 2 (B) was formed in VO X -WO X -VO X ceramic thin films. Tungsten content of VO X -WO X -VO X ceramic thin films increased with increasing middle layer's thickness. With increasing middle layer's thickness, room temperature square resistance (R sq ) of VO X -WO X -VO X ceramic thin films increased from 65 to 86 kΩ/sq. The VO X -WO X -VO X ceramic thin film with the thinnest middle layer showed significant SMT (semiconductor-metal transition) when SMT became negligible on increasing middle layer's thickness. (orig.)

  1. Amorphous ice. A microporous solid: astrophysical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, E.; Pletzer, R.

    1987-01-01

    Vapour deposited amorphous ice, investigated by N 2 -adsorption at 77 K, was found to be a microporous solid. Micropore volumes between 0.21 and 0.12 cm 3 /g were determined by comparison plots and Dubinin-Radushkevich plots. Warming of the adsorbent to 113 K caused sintering and reduction of apparent surface area by about an order of magnitude; in the presence of adsorbed gas, large amounts of gas were enclosed in the solid. The influence of micropores on the H 2 recombination rate on amorphous ice in interstellar dust and on adsorption of volatile gases in comets is discussed briefly

  2. Amorphous Alloy: Promising Precursor to Form Nanoflowerpot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Lan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous copper is fabricated by dealloying the amorphous Ti2Cu alloy in 0.03 M HF electrolyte. The pore and ligament sizes of the nanoporous copper can be readily tailored by controlling the dealloying time. The as-prepared nanoporous copper provides fine and uniform nanoflowerpots to grow highly dispersed Au nanoflowers. The blooming Au nanoflowers in the nanoporous copper flowerpots exhibit both high catalytic activity and stability towards the oxidation of glucose, indicating that the amorphous alloys are ideal precursors to form nanoflowerpot which can grow functional nanoflowers.

  3. Short range order in amorphous polycondensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamers, C.; Richter, D.; Schweika, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Festkoerperforschung; Batoulis, J.; Sommer, K. [Bayer AG, Leverkusen (Germany); Cable, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shapiro, S.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-01

    The static coherent structure factors S(Q) of the polymer glass Bisphenol-A-Polycarbonate and its chemical variation Bisphenol-A- Polyctherkctone- both in differently deuterated versions- have been measured by spin polarized neutron scattering. The method of spin polarization analysis provided an experimental separation of coherent and incoherent scattering and a reliable intensity calibration. Results are compared to structure factors calculated for model structures which were obtained by ``amorphous cell`` computer simulations. In general reasonable agreement is found between experiment and simulation; however, certain discrepancies hint at an insufficient structural relaxation in the amorphous cell method. 15 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab.

  4. Phonon excitations in multicomponent amorphous solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakarchuk, I.A.; Migal', V.M.; Tkachuk, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    The method of two-time temperature-dependent Green's functions is used to investigate phonon excitations in multicomponent amorphous solids. The equation obtained for the energy spectrum of the phonon excitations takes into account the damping associated with scattering of phonons by structure fluctuations. The quasicrystal approximation is considered, and as an example explicit expressions are obtained for the case of a two-component amorphous solid for the frequencies of the acoustical and optical modes and for the longitudinal and transverse velocities of sound. The damping is investigated

  5. Paramagnetic defects in hydrogenated amorphous carbon powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeble, D J; Robb, K M; Smith, G M; Mkami, H El; Rodil, S E; Robertson, J

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon materials typically contain high concentrations of paramagnetic defects, the density of which can be quantified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). In this work EPR measurements near 9.5, 94, and 189 GHz have been performed on polymeric and diamond-like hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) powder samples. A similar single resonance line was observed at all frequencies for the two forms of a-C:H studied. No contributions to the spectrum from centres with resolved anisotropic g-values as reported earlier were detected. An increase in linewidth with microwave frequency was observed. Possible contributions to this frequency dependence are discussed

  6. Porosity and mechanical properties of amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betekhtin, V.I.; Kadomtsev, A.G.; Amosova, O.V.

    2003-01-01

    The obtained experimental data on the effect of the inherent submicroporosity and its change under impact of high hydrostatic pressure or annealing on the strength, microdestruction, embrittlement temperature, the first crystallization stage and peculiarities of the surface crystallization of the amorphous alloys are analyzed. The conclusion is made on the basis of the studies on the peculiarities of the voluminous and surface crystallization of the Fe 56 Co 24 Si 5 B 15 , Fe 78 Ni 2 Si 8 B 12 , Fe 85 B 15 , Fe 58 Ni 20 Si 9 B 13 amorphous alloys that the increase in the inherent submicroporosity is one of the essential factors facilitating crystallization [ru

  7. Amorphous Phase Mediated Crystallization: Fundamentals of Biomineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Jin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many biomineralization systems start from transient amorphous precursor phases, but the exact crystallization pathways and mechanisms remain largely unknown. The study of a well-defined biomimetic crystallization system is key for elucidating the possible mechanisms of biomineralization and monitoring the detailed crystallization pathways. In this review, we focus on amorphous phase mediated crystallization (APMC pathways and their crystallization mechanisms in bio- and biomimetic-mineralization systems. The fundamental questions of biomineralization as well as the advantages and limitations of biomimetic model systems are discussed. This review could provide a full landscape of APMC systems for biomineralization and inspire new experiments aimed at some unresolved issues for understanding biomineralization.

  8. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects

  9. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids

  10. Irradiation induced crystalline to amorphous transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgoin, J.

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of a crystalline solid with energetic heavy particles results in cascades of defects which, with increasing dose, overlap and form a continuous disordered layer. In semiconductors the physical properties of such disordered layers are found to be similar to those of amorphous layers produced by evaporation. It is shown in the case of silicon, that the transition from a disordered crystalline (X) layer to an amorphous (α) layer occurs when the Gibbs energy of the X phase and of the defects it contains becomes larger than the Gibbs energy of the α phase. (author)

  11. Formulation and synthesis by melting process of titanate enriched glass-ceramics and ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, T.; Fillet, C.; Lacombe, J.; Bonnetier, A.; McGlinn, P.

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to provide containment for the separated radionuclides in stable oxide phases with proven resistance to leaching and irradiation damage and in consequence to obtain a glass ceramic or a ceramic material using a vitrification process. Sphene glass ceramic, zirconolite glass ceramic and zirconolite enriched ceramic have been fabricated and characterized by XRD, SEM/EDX and DTA

  12. Evolution of microstructure and performance in magnesium potassium phosphate ceramics: role of sintering temperature of MgO powder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viani, Alberto; Sotiriadis, Konstantinos; Šašek, Petr; Appavou, M.-S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 14 (2016), s. 16310-16316 ISSN 0272-8842 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : chemically-bonded ceramics * X-ray diffraction (XRD) * small angle neutron scattering (SANS) * microstructure * amorphous materials Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering Impact factor: 2.986, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S027288421631255X

  13. Nano-ceramics and its molding technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jian; Xu Yunshu

    2007-01-01

    Nano-ceramics and its related knowledge were introduced. Fabrication of nano-ceramic powder, as well as the molding and sintering technologies of nano-ceramics were reviewed. Features of the present molding technologies were analyzed. The applications of nano-ceramics were prospected. (authors)

  14. Preparation of 147Pm ceramic source core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielcarski, M.

    1989-01-01

    Preparation of ceramic pellets containing fixed promethium-147 is described. Incorporation rate of 147 Pm into the ceramic material was determined. The leachability and vaporization of promethium from the obtained ceramics was investigated. The ceramic pellets prepared by the described procedure, mounted in special holders, can be applied as point sources in beta backscatter thickness gauges. (author)

  15. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  16. The use of ceramic membranes for radioactive solutions purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewska-Trznadel, G.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane permeation combined with complexation was tested for radioactive wastes processing purpose. The results of experiments with MEMBRALOX and CeRAM INSIDE filtering elements are presented in the paper. The pore size of ceramic membranes was in 1kD-100 nm range. The experiments were performed with non-active and with radioactive model solutions and original radioactive waste samples. To achieve high decontamination factors the process was enhanced by chemical complexation. Such complexants as poly(acrylic) acid and polyacrylic)acid salts of different crosslinking, polyethylenimine and cyanoferrates were tested. The experiments showed the significant increase of retention and decontamination factors while before ultrafiltration macromolecular ligands were added. The effectiveness of complexation by each ligand is strongly dependent on pH and alkali metals concentration. (author)

  17. Fibrous monolithic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, D.; King, B.H.; Trice, R.W.; Halloran, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Fibrous monolithic ceramics are an example of a laminate in which a controlled, three-dimensional structure has been introduced on a submillimeter scale. This unique structure allows this all-ceramic material to fail in a nonbrittle manner. Materials have been fabricated and tested with a variety of architectures. The influence on mechanical properties at room temperature and at high temperature of the structure of the constituent phases and the architecture in which they are arranged are discussed. The elastic properties of these materials can be effectively predicted using existing models. These models also can be extended to predict the strength of fibrous monoliths with an arbitrary orientation and architecture. However, the mechanisms that govern the energy absorption capacity of fibrous monoliths are unique, and experimental results do not follow existing models. Energy dissipation occurs through two dominant mechanisms--delamination of the weak interphases and then frictional sliding after cracking occurs. The properties of the constituent phases that maximize energy absorption are discussed. In this article, the authors examine the structure of Si 3 N 4 -BN fibrous monoliths from the submillimeter scale of the crack-deflecting cell-cell boundary features to the nanometer scale of the BN cell boundaries

  18. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of a polyborosilazane/Cp2ZrCl2 hybrid precursor for the Si-B-C-N-Zr multinary ceramic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xin; Shao, Changwei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jun

    2015-09-21

    A novel zirconium-contained polyborosilazane (PBSZ-Zr) was synthesized by chemical modification of a liquid polyborosilazane (LPBSZ) with Cp2ZrCl2. A Si-B-C-N-Zr multinary ceramic was prepared via pyrolysis of PBSZ-Zr. The properties and the ceramization process of PBSZ-Zr, as well as the microstructural development and properties of the derived SiBCN-Zr ceramic, were well studied. The active Si-H and N-H groups in LPBSZ react with Zr-Cl in Cp2ZrCl2 to form PBSZ-Zr polymers. The Zr content of the SiBCN-Zr ceramic was 3.39 wt% when the weight ratio of Cp2ZrCl2 to LPBSZ was 20 : 100. The SiBCN-Zr ceramic remains amorphous when pyrolyzed below 1600 °C, but the crystal phases of Zr2CN, ZrC, BN, SiC, and Si3N4 were detected from a 1600 °C treated sample. Due to the low activity of free carbon at the interface of the SiBCN-Zr ceramic, the oxidation resistance of the SiBCN-Zr ceramic under air was improved compared with the SiBCN ceramic.

  20. Preparation, characterization and application of novel proton conducting ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siwei

    Due to the immediate energy shortage and the requirement of environment protection nowadays, the efficient, effective and environmental friendly use of current energy sources is urgent. Energy conversion and storage is thus an important focus both for industry and academia. As one of the hydrogen energy related materials, proton conducting ceramics can be applied in solid oxide fuel cells and steam electrolysers, as well as high temperature hydrogen separation membranes and hydrogen sensors. For most of the practical applications, both high proton conductivity and chemical stability are desirable. However, the state-of-the-art proton conducting ceramics are facing great challenges in simultaneously fulfilling conductivity and stability requirements for practical applications. Consequently, understanding the properties for the proton conducting ceramics and developing novel materials that possess both high proton conductivity and enhanced chemical stability have both scientific and practical significances. The objective of this study is to develop novel proton conducting ceramics, either by evaluating the doping effects on the state-of-the-art simple perovskite structured barium cerates, or by investigating novel complex perovskite structured Ba3Ca1.18Nb1.82O 9-delta based proton conductors as potential proton conducting ceramics with improved proton conductivity and enhanced chemical stability. Different preparation methods were compared, and their influence on the structure, including the bulk and grain boundary environment has been investigated. In addition, the effects of microstructure on the electrical properties of the proton conducting ceramics have also been characterized. The solid oxide fuel cell application for the proton conducting ceramics performed as electrolyte membranes has been demonstrated.

  1. Bioactive glass–ceramic coating for enhancing the in vitro corrosion resistance of biodegradable Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Xinyu; Cai Shu; Dou Ying; Xu Guohua; Huang Kai; Ren Mengguo; Wang Xuexin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sol–gel derived 45S5 glass–ceramic coating was prepared on Mg alloy substrate. ► The corrosion resistance of glass–ceramic coated Mg alloy was markedly improved. ► The corrosion behavior of the coated sample varied due to the cracking of coating. - Abstract: In this work, a bioactive 45S5 glass–ceramic coating was synthesized on magnesium (Mg) alloy substrate by using a sol–gel dip-coating method, to improve the initial corrosion resistance of AZ31 Mg alloy. The surface morphology and phase composition of the glass–ceramic coating were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The coating composed of amorphous phase and crystalline phase Na 2 Ca 2 Si 3 O 9 , with the thickness of ∼1.0 μm, exhibited a uniform and crack-free surface morphology. The corrosion behavior of the uncoated and coated Mg alloy substrates was investigated by the electrochemical measurements and immersion tests in simulated body fluid (SBF). Potentiodynamic polarization tests recorded an increase of potential (E corr ) form −1.60 V to −1.48 V, and a reduction of corrosion current density (i corr ) from 4.48 μA cm −2 to 0.16 μA cm −2 , due to the protection provided by the glass–ceramic coating. Immersion tests also showed the markedly improved corrosion resistance of the coated sample over the immersion period of 7 days. Moreover, after 14 days of immersion in SBF, the corrosion resistance of the coated sample declined due to the cracking of the glass–ceramic coating, which was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis. The results suggested that the 45S5 glass–ceramic coated Mg alloy could provide a suitable corrosion behavior for use as degradable implants.

  2. Amorphization of metals by ion implantation and ion beam mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschenbach, B.; Heera, V.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic systems can be formed either by high-fluence ion implantation of glassforming species or by irradiation of layered metal systems with inert gas ions. Both techniques and experimental examples are presented. Empirical rules are discussed which predict whether a given system can be transformed into an amorphous phase. Influence of temperature, implantation dose and pre-existing crystalline metal composition on amorphization is considered. Examples are given of the implantation induced amorphous structure, recrystallization and formation of quasicrystalline structures. (author)

  3. Preparation and Characterization of SiO2/SiCN Core-shell Ceramic Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Hai-yuan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The SiO2/PSN core-shell microspheres were prepared via an emulsion reaction combined with the polymer-derived ceramics (PDCs method using polysilazane (PSN in situ polymerization on the surface of SiO2 modified by silane coupling agents MPS, followed by pyrolysis process to obtain SiO2/SiCN core-shell ceramic microspheres. The effects of raw mass ratio, curing time and pyrolysis temperature on the formation and the morphology of core-shell microspheres were studied. The morphology, chemical composition and phase transformation were characterized by SEM, EDS, TEM, FT-IR and XRD. The results show that after reaction for 4h at 200℃, SiO2 completely coated PSN forms a core-shell microsphere with rough surface when the mass ratio of SiO2 and PSN is 1:4; when pyrolysis temperature is at 800-1200℃, amorphous SiO2/SiCN core-shell ceramic microspheres are prepared; at 1400℃, the amorphous phase partially crystallizes to produce SiO2, SiC and Si3N4 phase.

  4. Short range ordering and microstructure property relationship in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shariq, A.

    2006-07-01

    A novel algorithm, ''Next Neighbourhood Evaluation (NNE)'', is enunciated during the course of this work, to elucidate the next neighbourhood atomic vicinity from the data, analysed using tomographic atom probe (TAP) that allows specifying atom positions and chemical identities of the next neighbouring atoms for multicomponent amorphous materials in real space. The NNE of the Pd{sub 55}Cu{sub 23}P{sub 22} bulk amorphous alloy reveals that the Pd atoms have the highest probability to be the next neighbours to each other. Moreover, P-P correlation corroborates earlier investigations with scattering techniques that P is not a direct next neighbour to another P atom. Analogous investigations on the Fe{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}B{sub 20} metallic glass ribbons, in the as quenched state and for a state heat treated at 350 C for 1 hour insinuate a pronounced elemental inhomogeneity for the annealed state, though, it also depicts glimpse of a slight inhomogeneity for B distribution even for the as quenched sample. Moreover, a comprehensive microstructural investigation has been carried out on the Zr{sub 53}Co{sub 23.5}Al{sub 23.5} glassy system. TEM and TAP investigations evince that the as cast bulk samples constitutes a composite structure of an amorphous phase and crystalline phase(s). The crystallization is essentially triggered at the mould walls due to heterogeneous nucleation. The three dimensional atomic reconstruction maps of the volume analysed by TAP reveal a complex stereological interconnected network of two phases. The phase that is rich in Zr and Al concentration is depleted in Co concentration while the phase that is rich in Co concentration is depleted both in Zr and Al. Zr{sub 53}Co{sub 23.5}Al{sub 23.5} glassy splat samples exhibit a single exothermic crystallization peak contrary to the as cast bulk sample with a different T{sub g} temperature. A single homogeneous amorphous phase revealed by TEM investigations depicts that the faster cooling

  5. Vibrational spectra for hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitakahara, W.A.; Bouchard, A.M.; Biswas, R.; Gompf, F.; Suck, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogen vibration spectra have been measured by neutron scattering for several amorphous semiconductor materials, including a-Ge:H and a-SiC:H samples containing about 10 at. % H. The data for a-Ge:H are compared in detail with the results of realistic computer simulations

  6. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells. A R M YUSOFF*, M N SYAHRUL and K HENKEL. Malaysia Energy Centre, 8th Floor, North Wing, Sapura @ Mines, 7, Jalan Tasik, The Mines Resort City,. 43300 Seri Kembangan, Selangor Darul Ehsan. MS received 11 April 2007. Abstract. A major issue encountered ...

  7. Characterization of amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Paul K.; Li Liuhe

    2006-01-01

    Amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon films possess special chemical and physical properties such as high chemical inertness, diamond-like properties, and favorable tribological proprieties. The materials usually consist of graphite and diamond microstructures and thus possess properties that lie between the two. Amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon films can exist in different kinds of matrices and are usually doped with a large amount of hydrogen. Thus, carbon films can be classified as polymer-like, diamond-like, or graphite-like based on the main binding framework. In order to characterize the structure, either direct bonding characterization methods or the indirect bonding characterization methods are employed. Examples of techniques utilized to identify the chemical bonds and microstructure of amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon films include optical characterization methods such as Raman spectroscopy, Ultra-violet (UV) Raman spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy, electron spectroscopic and microscopic methods such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, surface morphology characterization techniques such as scanning probe microscopy (SPM) as well as other characterization methods such as X-ray reflectivity and nuclear magnetic resonance. In this review, the structures of various types of amorphous carbon films and common characterization techniques are described

  8. Amorphous calcium carbonate particles form coral skeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Tali; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Stifler, Cayla A.; Frazier, Matthew J.; Neder, Maayan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Stan, Camelia V.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.

    2017-09-01

    Do corals form their skeletons by precipitation from solution or by attachment of amorphous precursor particles as observed in other minerals and biominerals? The classical model assumes precipitation in contrast with observed “vital effects,” that is, deviations from elemental and isotopic compositions at thermodynamic equilibrium. Here, we show direct spectromicroscopy evidence in Stylophora pistillata corals that two amorphous precursors exist, one hydrated and one anhydrous amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC); that these are formed in the tissue as 400-nm particles; and that they attach to the surface of coral skeletons, remain amorphous for hours, and finally, crystallize into aragonite (CaCO3). We show in both coral and synthetic aragonite spherulites that crystal growth by attachment of ACC particles is more than 100 times faster than ion-by-ion growth from solution. Fast growth provides a distinct physiological advantage to corals in the rigors of the reef, a crowded and fiercely competitive ecosystem. Corals are affected by warming-induced bleaching and postmortem dissolution, but the finding here that ACC particles are formed inside tissue may make coral skeleton formation less susceptible to ocean acidification than previously assumed. If this is how other corals form their skeletons, perhaps this is how a few corals survived past CO2 increases, such as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum that occurred 56 Mya.

  9. Noise and degradation of amorphous silicon devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical noise measurements are reported on two devices of the disordered semiconductor hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The material is applied in sandwich structures and in thin-film transistors (TFTs). In a sandwich configuration of an intrinsic layer and two thin doped layers, the

  10. Radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and Logistics, Faculty Technology, B-41, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)]. E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au

    2005-04-15

    A theory for calculating the radiative lifetime of excitons in amorphous semiconductors is presented. Four possibilities of excitonic radiative recombination are considered and the corresponding rates are derived at thermal equilibrium. The radiative lifetime is calculated from the inverse of the maximum rate for all the four possibilities. Results agree very well with experiments.

  11. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    are discussed in this paper. On the basis of these measurements phase diagrams of the different systems were constructed. Finally, it is demonstrated that when pressing the bulk amorphous alloy onto a metallic dies at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region, the alloy faithfully replicates the surface...

  12. Anodic electrochemical treatment of amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, N.I.; Yakovlev, V.B.; Osipov, Eh.K.; Isaev, A.V.; Trofimova, E.A.; Vasil'ev, V.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the investigation is to reveal peculiarities of the process of anodic oxidation and properties of anode oxide films, formed on the surface of amorphous alloys. Amorphous alloys on the base of rectifying metals of Zr-Ni, Zr-Cu-Ni, Zr-Al-Ni, Zr-Cu-Sn, Zr-Al, Zr-Mo systems are studied. Electrolytes which do not dissolve or weakly dissolve oxide film, such as boric acid electrolyte (40-45 g/l H 3 BO 3 and 18 cm 3 /l of the 25% aqueous NH 4 OH solution) and 20% H 2 SO 4 solution, are used for oxidation. Results of investigations, carried out on amorphous alloys, contaning noticeable quantities of non-rectifying components - Cu, Ni, Sn, Fe, Mo etc - have shown that non-rectifying components harden a process of anodic oxidation and decrease the current efficiency. Amorphous alloys, containing only rectifying components are oxidated in anodic way, the regularities of film growth being similar to those obtained for crystalline materials

  13. Amorphous bimetallic alloys prepared by steam condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drago, V.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous alloys of MnSn are prepared by steam condensation, in a substratum with a temperature near of the liquid helium. The magnetic and paramagnetic hyperfine spectrum and the ordination temperature by Moessbauer effect 119Sn are measured. A diagram of magnetic phase is proposed, basing on the measures of Moessbauer effect. (C.G.C.) [pt

  14. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    moves from low preparation temperature to high preparation temperature. The amorphous .... nm and the interac- tion between the pi-electron clouds of the two layers re- .... sp2 configuration forms to minimize stress and making. C900 films ...

  15. Trap level spectroscopy in amorphous semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor V

    2010-01-01

    Although amorphous semiconductors have been studied for over four decades, many of their properties are not fully understood. This book discusses not only the most common spectroscopic techniques but also describes their advantages and disadvantages.Provides information on the most used spectroscopic techniquesDiscusses the advantages and disadvantages of each technique

  16. Radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Jai

    2005-01-01

    A theory for calculating the radiative lifetime of excitons in amorphous semiconductors is presented. Four possibilities of excitonic radiative recombination are considered and the corresponding rates are derived at thermal equilibrium. The radiative lifetime is calculated from the inverse of the maximum rate for all the four possibilities. Results agree very well with experiments

  17. Challenges in Modeling the Degradation of Ceramic Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2011-09-01

    We identify the state of the art, gaps in current understanding, and key research needs in the area of modeling the long-term degradation of ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste disposition. The directed purpose of this report is to define a roadmap for Waste IPSC needs to extend capabilities of waste degradation to ceramic waste forms, which overlaps with the needs of the subconsinuum scale of FMM interests. The key knowledge gaps are in the areas of (i) methodology for developing reliable interatomic potentials to model the complex atomic-level interactions in waste forms; (ii) characterization of water interactions at ceramic surfaces and interfaces; and (iii) extension of atomic-level insights to the long time and distance scales relevant to the problem of actinide and fission product immobilization.

  18. Challenges in Modeling the Degradation of Ceramic Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, Ramaswami; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2011-01-01

    We identify the state of the art, gaps in current understanding, and key research needs in the area of modeling the long-term degradation of ceramic waste forms for nuclear waste disposition. The directed purpose of this report is to define a roadmap for Waste IPSC needs to extend capabilities of waste degradation to ceramic waste forms, which overlaps with the needs of the subconsinuum scale of FMM interests. The key knowledge gaps are in the areas of (i) methodology for developing reliable interatomic potentials to model the complex atomic-level interactions in waste forms; (ii) characterization of water interactions at ceramic surfaces and interfaces; and (iii) extension of atomic-level insights to the long time and distance scales relevant to the problem of actinide and fission product immobilization.

  19. Temperature Measurement of Ceramic Materials Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel; Fralick, Gustave

    1999-01-01

    The surface temperatures of several pure ceramic materials (alumina, beryllia, magnesia, yittria and spinel) in the shape of pellets were measured using a multiwavelength pyrometer. In one of the measurements, radiation signal collection is provided simply by an optical fiber. In the other experiments, a 4.75 inch (12 cm) parabolic mirror collects the signal for the spectrometer. Temperature measurement using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer for these ceramic materials is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which varies with both temperature and wavelength. In at least one of the materials, yittria, the detected optical emission increased as the temperature was decreased due to such emissivity variation. The reasons for such changes are not known. The multiwavelength pyrometer has demonstrated its ability to measure surface temperatures under such conditions. Platinum electrodes were embedded in the ceramic pellets for resistance measurements as the temperature changed.

  20. Electron structure of amorphous semi-conductor states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiid, D.H.; Lemmer, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    The electrical properties of amorphous materials are determined by their electron states. Since the electrons are much lighter than the massive ions, the energy levels of the electrons are extremely sensitive to changes in the states of the ions, e.g. a change in their positions. A method has been developed to approximate the positional disorder inthe crystal by a compositional disorder, i.e. the substitution, in a pure crystal, of ions by impurities. The advantage of this lies in the retention of the periodicity of the lattice. This model is linked with an investigation at present under way, in which the mobility, electrical resistance, etc. of a silicon crystal is determined as a function of its amorphous state. It is for instance possible to control the degree of disorder in the crystal, and the problem is to characterise the disorder by a specific parameter. For theoretical calculations such a parameter is essential and it is therefore also the biggest shortcoming in all the theories that, as far as is known, have been developed. It is possible to set up a general phenomenological theory for, for example, electrical resistance, but in view of its complex nature only rough approximations can be made [af

  1. Resistivity changes of some amorphous alloys undergoing nanocrystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandiarán, J. M.; Fernández Barquín, L.; Sal, J. C. Gómez; Gorría, P.; Hernando, A.

    1993-10-01

    The electrical resistivity of amorphous alloys with compositions: Fe 73.5Nb 3Cu 1Si 13.5B 9, Fe 86Zr 7Cu 1B 6 and Co 80Nb 8B 12 has been studied in the temperature range from 300 to 1100 K, where crystallization occurs. The products of crystallization and the grain size have been studied by X-ray diffraction. In a first step, all the alloys crystallize with small grains of a few nanometers in diameter (nanocrystalline state), and the resistivity behavior at this process accounts for the difference between the amorphous and nanocrystalline phases. The nanocrystalline phases are: α-Fe-Si, α-Fe and fcc Co for the three compounds studied respectively. A second process, at which grain growth and precipitation of intermetallic compounds and borides takes place, has been found for all the alloys. The resistivity is sensitive, not only to the total transformed sample amount, but to the topological distribution of the crystalline phases, and therefore shows a more complex behavior than other well established techniques, as differential scanning calorimetry. This supplementary information given by the resistivity is also discussed.

  2. Density of states in Mo-Ru amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakawa, W.

    1985-01-01

    The density of states is calculated for several compositions of amorphous Mo 1-x Ru x . In order to simulate amorphous clusters, the structures (atomic positions) utilized in the calculations were built from a small dense randomly packed unit of hard spheres with periodic boundary conditions. The density of states is calculated from a tight-binding Hamiltonian with hopping integrals parametrized in terms of the ddσ, ddΠ and ddδ molecular integrals. The results for pure Mo and pure Ru, compared in the canonical band aproximation, agree well with the literature. For binary alloys, the comparison of the calculated density of states with the rigid band aproximation results indicates that a more complex approach than the rigid band model must be used, even when the two atoms have similar bands, with band centers at nearly the same energy. The results also indicate that there is no relation between the peak in the superconducting critical temperature as a function of the number of valence eletrons per atom (e/a) in the region near Mo(e/a=6) and the peak of the density of states at the Fermi level in the same region, as has been sugested by some authors. (Author) [pt

  3. In situ formation of low friction ceramic coatings on carbon steel by plasma electrolytic oxidation in two types of electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunlong; Jiang Zhaohua

    2009-01-01

    In situ formation of ceramic coatings on Q235 carbon steel was achieved by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in carbonate electrolyte and silicate electrolyte, respectively. The surface and cross-section morphology, phase and elemental composition of PEO coatings were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The bond strength of the coating was determined using a direct pull-off test. The hardness as well as tribological properties of the ceramic coating was primarily studied. The results indicated that the coating obtained in carbonate electrolyte was Fe 3 O 4 , while the coating achieved from silicate electrolyte was proved to be amorphous. Both kinds of coatings showed coarse and porous surface. The Fe 3 O 4 coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte showed a high bonding strength to the substrate up to 20 ± 2 MPa and the value was 15 ± 2 MPa for the amorphous coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte. The micro hardness of the amorphous coating and the Fe 3 O 4 coating was 1001 Hv and 1413 Hv, respectively, which was more than two and three times as that of the Q235 alloy substrate (415 Hv). The friction coefficient exhibited by amorphous coating and Fe 3 O 4 coating was 0.13 and 0.11, respectively, both lower than the uncoated Q235 substrate which ranged from 0.17 to 0.35.

  4. Ceramic drug-delivery devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, A; Bajpai, P K

    1998-01-01

    A variety of ceramics and delivery systems have been used to deliver chemicals, biologicals, and drugs at various rates for desired periods of time from different sites of implantation. In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that ceramics can successfully be used as drug-delivery devices. Matrices, inserts, reservoirs, cements, and particles have been used to deliver a large variety of therapeutic agents such as antibiotics, anticancer drugs, anticoagulants, analgesics, growth factors, hormones, steroids, and vaccines. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of conventional drug-delivery systems and the different approaches used to deliver chemical and biological agents by means of ceramic systems will be reviewed.

  5. High flow ceramic pot filters

    OpenAIRE

    van Halem, D.; van der Laan, H.; Soppe, A. I.A.; Heijman, S.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6–19 L h−1), but initial LRVs for E. coli o...

  6. Porous ceramics out of oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakunov, V.S.; Balkevich, V.L.; Vlasov, A.S.; Guzman, I.Ya.; Lukin, E.S.; Poluboyarinov, D.N.; Poliskij, R.Ya.

    1977-01-01

    A review is made of manufacturing procedures and properties of oxide ceramics intended for high-temperature thermal insulation and thermal protection applications. Presented are structural characteristics of porous oxide refractories and their properties. Strength and thermal conductivity was shown to depend upon porosity. Described is a procedure for manufacturing porous ceramic materials from aluminium oxide, zirconium dioxide, magnesium oxide, beryllium oxide. The thermal resistance of porous ceramics from BeO is considerably greater than that of other high-refractoriness oxides. Listed are areas of application for porous materials based on oxides

  7. Crystallization of biogenic hydrous amorphous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyono, A.; Yokooji, M.; Chiba, T.; Tamura, T.; Tuji, A.

    2017-12-01

    Diatom, Nitzschia cf. frustulum, collected from Lake Yogo, Siga prefecture, Japan was cultured in laboratory. Organic components of the diatom cell were removed by washing with acetone and sodium hypochlorite. The remaining frustules were studied by SEM-EDX, FTIR spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the spindle-shaped morphology of diatom frustule was composed of hydrous amorphous silica. Pressure induced phase transformation of the diatom frustule was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopic analysis. With exposure to 0.3 GPa at 100 oC, Raman band corresponding to quartz occurred at ν = 465 cm-1. In addition, Raman bands known as a characteristic Raman pattern of moganite was also observed at 501 cm-1. From the integral ratio of Raman bands, the moganite content in the probed area was estimated to be approximately 50 wt%. With the pressure and temperature effect, the initial morphology of diatom frustule was completely lost and totally changed to a characteristic spherical particle with a diameter of about 2 mm. With keeping the compression of 5.7 GPa at 100 oC, a Raman band assignable to coesite appeared at 538 cm-1. That is, with the compression and heating, the hydrous amorphous silica can be readily crystallized into quartz, moganite, and coesite. The first-principles calculations revealed that a disiloxane molecule stabilized in a trans configuration is twisted 60o and changed into the cis configuration with a close approach of water molecule. It is therefore a reasonable assumption that during crystallization of hydrous amorphous silica, the Si-O-Si bridging unit with the cis configuration would survive as a structural defect and then crystallized into moganite by keeping the geometry. This hypothesis is adaptable to the phase transformation from hydrous amorphous silica to coesite as well, because coesite has the four-membered rings and easily formed from the hydrous amorphous silica under high pressure and high

  8. Development of crystalline ceramic for immobilization of TRU wastes in V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burakov, B.E.; Anderson, E.B.

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the Radium Institute's experience in the synthesis of crystalline ceramics based on two groups of actinide host-phases: 1) Zircon/zirconia-(Zn, Ac)SiO 4 /(Zr, Ac)O 2 , where Ac=Pu, Np, Am, Cm; 2) Garnet/perovskite-(Y, Gd, Ac) 3 (Al, Ga, Ac,..) 5 O 12 /(Y, Gd, Ac)(Al, Ga)O 3 . The zircon/zirconia ceramic was suggested as an universal waste form for the immobilization of TRU as well as weapon-grade Pu. Because the position of the Russian Ministry of Atomic Energy (Minatom) does not consider weapons Pu as a waste', the Radium Institute proposed the use of the same ceramic (mainly monophase zirconia ) as a Pu-fuel. The garnet/perovskite ceramic was suggested for the immobilization of military TRU wastes of complex chemical composition. The advantage of this ceramic is that Garnet and Perovskite host-phases can incorporate in their lattices not only actinides, but also other elements including neutron absorbers in a broad range of concentration and in different valence state. Sample of zircon/zirconia ceramic were prepared by hot uniaxial pressing (at temperature T=1300, 1400, 1500degC and pressure P=25 MPa) and sintering (at T=1450, 1490, 1500, 1600degC) methods using different types of initial precursor. Samples of garnet/perovskite ceramic were synthesized by melting method at T=2000degC. Ce, U, Gd were used as TRU stimulants for both types of ceramic. One sample of zircon/zirconia ceramic was doped with 10 wt.% of Pu 239 . Physico-chemical features of these ceramics are described. In conclusion we propose that the pressureless technology based on sintering or melting methods be used for the synthesis of ceramics for the immobilization of all types of TRU wastes. (author)

  9. Microstructure and texture dependence of the dielectric anomalies and dc conductivity of Bi3TiNbO9 ferroelectric ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moure, A.; Pardo, L.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramics of composition Bi 3 TiNbO 9 (BTN) and perovskite-layered structure (Aurivillius type) [B. Aurivillius, Ark. Kemi 1, 463 (1949)] were processed by natural sintering and hot pressing from amorphous precursors. Precursors were obtained by mechanochemical activation of stoichiometric mixtures of oxides. These materials are in general interesting for their use as high-temperature piezoelectrics. Among them, BTN possesses the highest ferroparaelectric phase-transition temperature (>900 deg. C). The transition temperature establishes the working limit of the ceramic and the electric properties, especially the dc conductivity, affect on its polarizability. In this work, dielectric studies of BTN ceramics with controlled texture and microstructure have been made at 1, 100 KHz, and 1 MHZ and in the temperature range from 200 deg. C up to the ferroparaelectric transition temperature. Values of ε ' ∼250 at 200 deg. C are achieved in ceramics hot pressed at temperatures as low as 700 deg. C for 1 h

  10. Bioactive glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Aza, P. N.

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the late 1960´s, a great interest in the use of bioceramic materials for biomedical applications has been developed. In a previous paper, the authors reviewed crystalline bioceramic materials “sensus stricto”, it is to say, those ceramic materials, constituted for non-metallic inorganic compounds, crystallines and consolidates by thermal treatment of powders at high temperature. In the present review, the authors deal with those called bioactive glasses and glassceramics. Although all of them are also obtained by thermal treatment at high temperature, the first are amorphous and the second are obtained by devitrification of a glass, although the vitreous phase normally prevails on the crystalline phases. After an introduction to the concept of bioactive materials, a short historical review of the bioactive glasses development is made. Its preparation, reactivity in physiological media, mechanism of bonding to living tissues and mechanical strength of the bone-implant interface is also reported. Next, the concept of glass-ceramic and the way of its preparation are exposed. The composition, physicochemical properties and biological behaviour of the principal types of bioactive glasses and glass-ceramic materials: Bioglass®, Ceravital®, Cerabone®, Ilmaplant® and Bioverit® are also reviewed. Finally, a short review on the bioactive-glass coatings and bioactive-composites and most common uses of bioactive-glasses and glass-ceramics are carried out too.

    Desde finales de los años sesenta, se ha despertado un gran interés por el uso de los materiales biocerámicos para aplicaciones biomédicas. En un trabajo previo, los autores hicieron una revisión de los denominados materiales biocerámicos cristalinos en sentido estricto, es decir, de aquellos materiales, constituidos por compuestos inorgánicos no metálicos, cristalinos y consolidados mediante tratamientos térmicos a altas temperaturas. En el presente trabajo, los autores

  11. Microstructure and physical properties of laser Zn modified amorphous-nanocrystalline coating on a titanium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Ning; Gong, Shui-Li; Shi, Yi-Ning; Suo, Hong-Bo; Wang, Xi-Chang; Deng, Yun-Hua; Shan, Fei-Hu; Li, Jian-Quan

    2014-02-01

    A Zn modified amorphous-nanocrystalline coating was fabricated on a Ti-6Al-4V alloy by laser cladding of the Co-Ti-B4C-Zn-Y2O3 mixed powders. Such coating was researched by means of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), etc. Experimental results indicated that the Co5Zn21 and TiB2 nanocrystalline phases were produced through in situ metallurgical reactions, which blocked the motion of dislocation, and TiB2 grew along (010), (111) and (024). The Co5Zn21 nanocrystals were produced attached to the ceramics, which mainly consisted of the Co nanoparticles embedded in a heterogeneous zinc, and had varied crystalline orientations.

  12. High Mobility Thin Film Transistors Based on Amorphous Indium Zinc Tin Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imas Noviyana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Top-contact bottom-gate thin film transistors (TFTs with zinc-rich indium zinc tin oxide (IZTO active layer were prepared at room temperature by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Sintered ceramic target was prepared and used for deposition from oxide powder mixture having the molar ratio of In2O3:ZnO:SnO2 = 2:5:1. Annealing treatment was carried out for as-deposited films at various temperatures to investigate its effect on TFT performances. It was found that annealing treatment at 350 °C for 30 min in air atmosphere yielded the best result, with the high field effect mobility value of 34 cm2/Vs and the minimum subthreshold swing value of 0.12 V/dec. All IZTO thin films were amorphous, even after annealing treatment of up to 350 °C.

  13. Development of ultrafine and pure amorphous and crystalline new materials and their fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Myung Seung; Kim, Y. E.; Kim, J. G.; Gu, J. H.; Yoon, N. K.; Seong, S. Y.; Ryu, S. E.; Lee, J. C.

    1996-07-01

    Based on an estimation of annual rice production of 5.2 Million tons, rice husks by-production reaches to 1.17 Million tons per year in Korea. distinguished to other corns, rice contains a lot of Si; 10 ∼ 20 % by weight in rice husks calculated as silica. The aim of this research project is to develop technologies for ceramic powders and materials utilizing the silica in rice husks called phytoliths. In this researches of the following subjects were performed; decomposition of the organic components, acid treatments, extraction of the organic matter, effect of gamma-ray irradiation on the acid treatment, plasma treatment, crystallization of silica powder, dispersion of amorphous silica powder, fabrication of ultrafine crystalline fibrous materials.. (author). 18 refs., 5 tabs., 55 figs

  14. Modeling amorphous Si3B3N7: Structure and elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannemann, A.; Schoen, J.C.; Jansen, M.; Putz, H.; Lengauer, T.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the structure and elastic properties of the amorphous high-temperature ceramic a-Si 3 B 3 N 7 . Several different structural models are generated and their properties such as the radial and angular distribution functions, the degree of local order, the density, the bulk modulus and the phonon spectrum, are calculated and compared with the experiment. The best structural agreement between model and experimental observations is found for models exhibiting a certain degree of local ( 3 B 3 N 7 has not been synthesized by cooling from the melt but via the polymerization and subsequent pyrolysis of molecular precursors. Furthermore, we suggest that, due to the synthesis process, stable nanoscale cavities (diameter 3 )

  15. Study of parameters of heat treatment in obtaining glass ceramic materials with addition of the industrial waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Martins, G.J.M.; Riella, H.G.; Matsinhe, Jonas; Kuhnen, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    The production of materials from crystallization of glass, called glass ceramic, have proved interesting by the possibility of development of different microstructures, with reduced grain size and the presence of residual amorphous phase in different quantities. The method that uses the differential thermal analysis (DTA) provides research on the material properties over a wide temperature range, it's widely applied to crystallization processes of glass ceramic materials. Within this context, this paper aims to study the kinetics of nucleation and crystal growth in glass ceramic materials in the system SiO 2 - Al 2 O 3 -Li 2 O, obtained with the addition of mineral coal bottom ash as source of aluminosilicates, through the technique of differential thermal analysis. (author)

  16. Agglomeration of ceramic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James D.; Larosa, Judith; Dirkse, Fredrick

    1989-01-01

    A research program directed at a critical comparison of numerical models for power agglomeration with experimental observations is currently underway. Central to this program is the quantitative characterization of the distribution of mass within an agglomerate as a function of time. Current experiments are designed to restrict agglomeration to a surface, which is oriented perpendicular to the force of gravity. These experiments are discussed with reference to: their significance to ceramic processing; artifacts which may be avoided in microgravity experiments; and the comparison of information available in real space (from optical microscopy) to that in reciprocal space (from light scattering). The principle machine requirement appears to be a need to obtain information at small scattering angles.

  17. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  18. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, F.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  19. CAD/CAM glass ceramics for single-tooth implant crowns: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akça, Kvanç; Cavusoglu, Yeliz; Sagirkaya, Elcin; Aybar, Buket; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate the load distribution of CAD/CAM mono-ceramic crowns supported with single-tooth implants in functional area. A 3-dimensional numerical model of a soft tissue-level implant was constructed with cement-retained abutment to support glass ceramic machinable crown. Implant-abutment complex and the retained crown were embedded in a Ø 1.5 × 1.5 cm geometric matrix for evaluation of mechanical behavior of mono-ceramic CAD/CAM aluminosilicate and leucite glass crown materials. Laterally positioned axial load of 300 N was applied on the crowns. Resulting principal stresses in the mono-ceramic crowns were evaluated in relation to different glass ceramic materials. The highest compressive stresses were observed at the cervical region of the buccal aspect of the crowns and were 89.98 and 89.99 MPa, for aluminosilicate and leucite glass ceramics, respectively. The highest tensile stresses were observed at the collar of the lingual part of the crowns and were 24.54 and 25.39 MPa, respectively. Stresses induced upon 300 N static loading of CAD/CAM aluminosalicate and leucite glass ceramics are below the compressive strength of the materials. Impact loads may actuate the progress to end failure of mono-ceramic crowns supported by metallic implant abutments.

  20. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Chang-Zhong [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Tang, Yuanyuan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Lee, Po-Heng [Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Liu, Chengshuai, E-mail: csliu@soil.gd.cn [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); State Key Laboratory of Environmental Geochemistry, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang 550009 (China); Shih, Kaimin, E-mail: kshih@hku.hk [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Li, Fangbai [Guangdong Key Laboratory of Agricultural Environment Pollution Integrated Control, Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China)

    2017-01-05

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. All Cr(VI) species is reduced to Cr(III) and most chromium contents are incorporated into spinel structure where the residual chromium are resided in the glass networks. - Highlights: • COPR was detoxified and immobilized in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. • Cr-rich crystalline phase was determined to be MgCr{sub 1.32}Fe{sub 0.19}Al{sub 0.49}O{sub 4} spinel. • The partitioning ratio of Cr into spinel in the glass-ceramic can be up to 77%. • No Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic. • TCLP results demonstrate the superiority of the final product in immobilizing Cr. - Abstract: A promising strategy for the detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix is reported in this study. In the search for a more chemically durable matrix for COPR, the most critical crystalline phase for Cr immobilization was found to be a spinel solid solution with a chemical composition of MgCr{sub 1.32}Fe{sub 0.19}Al{sub 0.49}O{sub 4}. Using Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, we identified this final product is with the phases of spinel (3.5 wt.%), diopside (5.2 wt.%), and some amorphous contents (91.2 wt.%). The partitioning ratio of Cr reveals that about 77% of the Cr was incorporated into the more chemically durable spinel phase. The results of Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy show that no Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic, which indicates successful detoxification of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic. The leaching performances of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic were compared with a prolonged acid-leaching test, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic matrix in the

  1. Detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Chang-Zhong; Tang, Yuanyuan; Lee, Po-Heng; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin; Li, Fangbai

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue in spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. All Cr(VI) species is reduced to Cr(III) and most chromium contents are incorporated into spinel structure where the residual chromium are resided in the glass networks. - Highlights: • COPR was detoxified and immobilized in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix. • Cr-rich crystalline phase was determined to be MgCr 1.32 Fe 0.19 Al 0.49 O 4 spinel. • The partitioning ratio of Cr into spinel in the glass-ceramic can be up to 77%. • No Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic. • TCLP results demonstrate the superiority of the final product in immobilizing Cr. - Abstract: A promising strategy for the detoxification and immobilization of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) in a spinel-based glass-ceramic matrix is reported in this study. In the search for a more chemically durable matrix for COPR, the most critical crystalline phase for Cr immobilization was found to be a spinel solid solution with a chemical composition of MgCr 1.32 Fe 0.19 Al 0.49 O 4 . Using Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis, we identified this final product is with the phases of spinel (3.5 wt.%), diopside (5.2 wt.%), and some amorphous contents (91.2 wt.%). The partitioning ratio of Cr reveals that about 77% of the Cr was incorporated into the more chemically durable spinel phase. The results of Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy show that no Cr(VI) was observed after conversion of COPR into a glass-ceramic, which indicates successful detoxification of Cr(VI) into Cr(III) in the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic. The leaching performances of Cr 2 O 3 and COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic were compared with a prolonged acid-leaching test, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the COPR-incorporated glass-ceramic matrix in the immobilization of Cr. The overall results suggest that

  2. Moessbauer studies of Inca ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, U.; Wagner, F.E.; Marticorena, B.; Salazar, R.; Schwabe, R.; Riederer, J.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain information on the firing of Inca ceramics, 7 samples from different locations were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy including a detailed laboratory refiring procedure. The glaze typical for the surface of this ware was studied by Moessbauer scattering. (Auth.)

  3. Non destructive evaluation of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, R.E. Jr

    1992-01-01

    While monolithic and composite ceramics have been successfully manufactured, inconsistencies in processing and the unpredictable nature of their failure have limited their use as engineering materials. The optimization of the processing and properties of ceramics and the structures, devices and systems made from them demand the innovative application of modern nondestructive materials characterization techniques to monitor and control as many stages of the production process as possible. This paper will describe the state-of-the-art of nondestructive evaluation techniques for characterization of monolithic ceramics and ceramic composites. Among the techniques to be discussed are laser ultrasonics, acoustic microscopy, thermography, microfocus and x-ray tomography, and micro-photoelasticity. Application of these and other nondestructive evaluation techniques for more effective and efficient real-time process control will result in improved product quality and reliability. 27 refs

  4. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  5. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  6. Metal-ceramic joint assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian

    2002-01-01

    A metal-ceramic joint assembly in which a brazing alloy is situated between metallic and ceramic members. The metallic member is either an aluminum-containing stainless steel, a high chromium-content ferritic stainless steel or an iron nickel alloy with a corrosion protection coating. The brazing alloy, in turn, is either an Au-based or Ni-based alloy with a brazing temperature in the range of 9500 to 1200.degree. C.

  7. Multiphase-Multifunctional Ceramic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-30

    systems for high temperatura applications” “ Estudios de Ferroelasticidad en Sistemas Cerámicos Multifásicos para Aplicaciones en Alta Temperatura ...Ceramic Coatings Performing Organization names: Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional – Unidad Queretaro...materials, Cinvestav. Thesis: “Ferroelasticity studies in multiphase ceramic systems for high temperatura applications”. Her work mainly focused in the

  8. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  9. Method for preparing ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, K.B.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.

    1996-01-09

    A process is disclosed for preparing ceramic composite comprising blending TiC particulates, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulates and nickel aluminide and consolidating the mixture at a temperature and pressure sufficient to produce a densified ceramic composite having fracture toughness equal to or greater than 7 MPa m{sup 1/2}, a hardness equal to or greater than 18 GPa. 5 figs.

  10. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    -GeTe is shown to consist of a shallow and deep defect band in addition to the band tail states. Furthermore, this study on a-GeTe has shown that the data analysis within MPC experiments can be drastically improved. This thesis illustrates on the example of a-GeTe and a-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, that the problem of unphysical low values for the attempt-to-escape frequency of the order 10{sup 8}s{sup -1} can be resolved by taking the temperature dependence of the band gap into account. In this work the defect state density of three different electrical switching alloys a-GeTe, a-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and a-Ge{sub 15}Te{sub 85} has been investigated. In a generation-recombination model the threshold field is expected to increase with increasing optical band gap and increasing mid gap-state density. However, a-GeTe, a-Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} and a-Ge{sub 15}Te{sub 85} show a large variation in their corresponding electrical threshold fields, which can be not understood by their change in optical band gap value alone. This observation raises the question of the role of localized defect states. MPC experiments reveal that the measured density of mid gap states is observed to decrease with decreasing threshold field known from literature. This result favors a generationrecombination model behind electrical switching in amorphous chalcogenides as originally proposed by Adler. To get a better understanding of resistance drift phenomena this study focuses on the evolution of resistivity on heating and ageing, activation energy of electronic conduction, optical band gap, defect state density, mechanical stress and nearest neighbor ordering in a-GeTe thin films. After heating the samples one hour at 140 C the activation energy for electric conduction increases by 30 meV, while the optical band gap increases by 60 meV. In addition to band gap opening MPC experiments on the same a-GeTe thin film at different sample ages have revealed complex trap kinetics. Ageing results

  11. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-01-01

    -GeTe is shown to consist of a shallow and deep defect band in addition to the band tail states. Furthermore, this study on a-GeTe has shown that the data analysis within MPC experiments can be drastically improved. This thesis illustrates on the example of a-GeTe and a-Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 , that the problem of unphysical low values for the attempt-to-escape frequency of the order 10 8 s -1 can be resolved by taking the temperature dependence of the band gap into account. In this work the defect state density of three different electrical switching alloys a-GeTe, a-Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 and a-Ge 15 Te 85 has been investigated. In a generation-recombination model the threshold field is expected to increase with increasing optical band gap and increasing mid gap-state density. However, a-GeTe, a-Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 and a-Ge 15 Te 85 show a large variation in their corresponding electrical threshold fields, which can be not understood by their change in optical band gap value alone. This observation raises the question of the role of localized defect states. MPC experiments reveal that the measured density of mid gap states is observed to decrease with decreasing threshold field known from literature. This result favors a generationrecombination model behind electrical switching in amorphous chalcogenides as originally proposed by Adler. To get a better understanding of resistance drift phenomena this study focuses on the evolution of resistivity on heating and ageing, activation energy of electronic conduction, optical band gap, defect state density, mechanical stress and nearest neighbor ordering in a-GeTe thin films. After heating the samples one hour at 140 C the activation energy for electric conduction increases by 30 meV, while the optical band gap increases by 60 meV. In addition to band gap opening MPC experiments on the same a-GeTe thin film at different sample ages have revealed complex trap kinetics. Ageing results in an increasing concentration of shallow defect states, whereas

  12. Fracture-dissociation of ceramic liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sung Kwan; Oh, Jin-Rok; Her, Man Seung; Shim, Young Jun; Cho, Tae Yeun; Kwon, Sung Min

    2008-08-01

    The use of BIOLOX delta ceramic (CeramTec AG, Plochingen, Germany) has been increasing. This ceramic prevents cracking by restraining the phase transformation due to the insertion of nano-sized, yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia into the alumina matrix. This restrains the progress of cracking through the formation of platelet-like crystal or whiskers due to the addition of an oxide additive. We observed a case of BIOLOX delta ceramic liner (CeramTec AG) rim fracture 4 months postoperatively. Radiographs showed that the ceramic liner was subluxated from the acetabular cup. Scratches on the acetabular cup and femoral neck were seen, and the fracture was visible on the rim of the liner. Under electron microscope, metal particle coatings from the ceramic liner were identified. The ceramic liner, fracture fragments, and adjacent tissues were removed and replaced with a ceramic liner and femoral head of the same size and design. We believe the mechanism of the fracture-dissociation of the ceramic liner in this case is similar to a case of separation of the ceramic liner from the polyethylene shell in a sandwich-type ceramic-ceramic joint. To prevent ceramic liner fracture-dissociation, the diameter of the femoral neck needs to be decreased in a new design, while the diameter of the femoral head needs to be increased to ensure an increase in range of motion.

  13. Amorphous-crystalline transition in thermoelectric NbO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, Denis; Chen, Yen-Ting; Bliem, Pascal; Geyer, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Density functional theory was employed to design enhanced amorphous NbO 2 thermoelectrics. The covalent-ionic nature of Nb–O bonding is identical in amorphous NbO 2 and its crystalline counterpart. However, the Anderson localisation occurs in amorphous NbO 2 , which may affect the transport properties. We calculate a multifold increase in the absolute Seebeck coefficient for the amorphous state. These predictions were critically appraised by measuring the Seebeck coefficient of sputtered amorphous and crystalline NbO 2 thin films with the identical short-range order. The first-order phase transition occurs at approximately 550 °C, but amorphous NbO 2 possesses enhanced transport properties at all temperatures. Amorphous NbO 2 , reaching  −173 μV K −1 , exhibits up to a 29% larger absolute Seebeck coefficient value, thereby validating the predictions. (paper)

  14. Emerging trends in the stabilization of amorphous drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Löbmann, Korbinian; Strachan, Clare J; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas

    2013-08-30

    The number of active pharmaceutical substances having high therapeutic potential but low water solubility is constantly increasing, making it difficult to formulate these compounds as oral dosage forms. The solubility and dissolution rate, and thus potentially the bioavailability, of these poorly water-soluble drugs can be increased by the formation of stabilized amorphous forms. Currently, formulation as solid polymer dispersions is the preferred method to enhance drug dissolution and to stabilize the amorphous form of a drug. The purpose of this review is to highlight emerging alternative methods to amorphous polymer dispersions for stabilizing the amorphous form of drugs. First, an overview of the properties and stabilization mechanisms of amorphous forms is provided. Subsequently, formulation approaches such as the preparation of co-amorphous small-molecule mixtures and the use of mesoporous silicon and silica-based carriers are presented as potential means to increase the stability of amorphous pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Research Progress on Fe-based Amorphous Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Xiu-bing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The latest research progresses on Fe-based amorphous coatings were reviewed. The typical alloy system and the classification of Fe-based amorphous coatings were clarified. The status, progress and development of the Fe-based amorphous coatings prepared by thermal spray processing and laser cladding process were discussed. The main mechanical properties and potential applications of the Fe-based amorphous coatings were also described. Furthermore, based on the main problems mentioned above, the future development of the Fe-based amorphous coatings was discussed, including the exploitation preparation technologies of high amorphous content of the Fe-based coatings, the development of the low cost and high performance Fe-based coating alloys system, the broadening application of Fe-based amorphous coatings, and so on.

  16. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  17. Microwave sintering of ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, the potential of microwave irradiation as an innovative energy- efficient alternative to conventional heating technologies in ceramic manufacturing is reviewed, addressing the advantages/disadvantages, while also commenting on future applications of possible commercial interest. Ceramic materials have been extensively studied and used due to several advantages they exhibit. Sintering ceramics using microwave radiation, a novel technology widely employed in various fields, can be an efficient, economic and environmentally-friendlier approach, to improve the consolidation efficiency and reduce the processing cycle-time, in order to attain substantial energy and cost savings. Microwave sintering provides efficient internal heating, as energy is supplied directly and penetrates the material. Since energy transfer occurs at a molecular level, heat is generated throughout the material, thus avoiding significant temperature gradients between the surface and the interior, which are frequently encountered at high heating rates upon conventional sintering. Thus, rapid, volumetric and uniform heating of various raw materials and secondary resources for ceramic production is possible, with limited grain coarsening, leading to accelerated densification, and uniform and fine-grained microstructures, with enhanced mechanical performance. This is particularly important for manufacturing large-size ceramic products of quality, and also for specialty ceramic materials such as bioceramics and electroceramics. Critical parameters for the process optimization, including the electromagnetic field distribution, microwave-material interaction, heat transfer mechanisms and material transformations, should be taken into consideration.

  18. Method for Waterproofing Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Hygroscopic ceramic materials which are difficult to waterproof with a silane, substituted silane or silazane waterproofing agent, such as an alumina containing fibrous, flexible and porous, fibrous ceramic insulation used on a reentry space vehicle, are rendered easy to waterproof if the interior porous surface of the ceramic is first coated with a thin coating of silica. The silica coating is achieved by coating the interior surface of the ceramic with a silica precursor converting the precursor to silica either in-situ or by oxidative pyrolysis and then applying the waterproofing agent to the silica coated ceramic. The silica precursor comprises almost any suitable silicon containing material such as a silane, silicone, siloxane, silazane and the like applied by solution, vapor deposition and the like. If the waterproofing is removed by e.g., burning, the silica remains and the ceramic is easily rewaterproofed. An alumina containing TABI insulation which absorbs more that five times its weight of water, absorbs less than 10 wt. % water after being waterproofed according to the method of the invention.

  19. Wastes based glasses and glass-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri, L.

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Actually, the inertization, recovery and valorisation of the wastes coming from municipal and industrial processes are the most important goals from the environmental and economical point of view. An alternative technology capable to overcome the problem of the dishomogeneity of the raw material chemical composition is the vitrification process that is able to increase the homogeneity and the constancy of the chemical composition of the system and to modulate the properties in order to address the reutilization of the waste. Moreover, the glasses obtained subjected to different controlled thermal treatments, can be transformed in semy-cristalline material (named glass-ceramics with improved properties with respect to the parent amorphous materials. In this review the tailoring, preparation and characterization of glasses and glass-ceramics obtained starting from municipal incinerator grate ash, coal and steel fly ashes and glass cullet are described.

    Realmente la inertización, recuperación y valorización de residuos que proceden de los procesos de incineración de residuos municipales y de residuos industriales son metas importantes desde el punto de vista ambiental y económico. Una tecnología alternativa capaz de superar el problema de la heterogeneidad de la composición química de los materiales de partida es el proceso de la vitrificación que es capaz de aumentar la homogeneidad y la constancia de la composición química del sistema y modular las propiedades a fin de la reutilización del residuo. En este artículo se presentan los resultados de vitrificación en que los vidrios fueron sometidos a tratamientos térmicos controlados diferentes, de manera que se transforman en materiales semicristalinos (también denominados vitrocerámicos con mejores propiedades respecto a los materiales amorfos originales. En esta revisión se muestra el diseño, preparación y caracterización de vidrios y vitrocerámicos partiendo de

  20. Supramolecular curcumin-barium prodrugs for formulating with ceramic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalasanan, Kaladhar; Anupriya; Deepa, M K; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-10-01

    A simple and stable curcumin-ceramic combined formulation was developed with an aim to improve curcumin stability and release profile in the presence of reactive ceramic particles for potential dental and orthopedic applications. For that, curcumin was complexed with barium (Ba(2+)) to prepare curcumin-barium (BaCur) complex. Upon removal of the unbound curcumin and Ba(2+) by dialysis, a water-soluble BaCur complex was obtained. The complex was showing [M+1](+) peak at 10,000-20,000 with multiple fractionation peaks of MALDI-TOF-MS studies, showed that the complex was a supramolecular multimer. The (1)H NMR and FTIR studies revealed that, divalent Ba(2+) interacted predominantly through di-phenolic groups of curcumin to form an end-to-end complex resulted in supramolecular multimer. The overall crystallinity of the BaCur was lower than curcumin as per XRD analysis. The complexation of Ba(2+) to curcumin did not degrade curcumin as per HPLC studies. The fluorescence spectrum was blue shifted upon Ba(2+) complexation with curcumin. Monodisperse nanoparticles with size less than 200dnm was formed, out of the supramolecular complex upon dialysis, as per DLS, and upon loading into pluronic micelles the size was remaining in similar order of magnitude as per DLS and AFM studies. Stability of the curcumin was improved greater than 50% after complexation with Ba(2+) as per UV/Vis spectroscopy. Loading of the supramloecular nanoparticles into pluronic micelles had further improved the stability of curcumin to approx. 70% in water. These BaCur supramolecule nanoparticles can be considered as a new class of prodrugs with improved solubility and stability. Subsequently, ceramic nanoparticles with varying chemical composition were prepared for changing the material surface reactivity in terms of the increase in, degradability, surface pH and protein adsorption. Further, these ceramic particles were combined with curcumin prodrug formulations and optimized the curcumin release

  1. Advanced ceramics for nuclear heat utilization and energy harvesting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Deep; Purohit, R.D.; Sinha, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years concerns related to global warming and green house gas emissions have focused the attention towards lowering the carbon foot print of energy generation. In this scenario, nuclear energy is considered as one of the strongest options to take on the challenges. Further, the nuclear heat, originated from the fission of nuclear fuels may be utilized not only by conversion to electricity using conventional techniques, but also may be used for production of hydrogen by splitting water. In the endeavor of realizing sustainable energy generation technologies, ceramic materials find key role as critical components. This paper covers an overview of various ceramic materials which are potential candidates for energy and hydrogen generation devices. These include solid oxide fuel cells, thermoelectric oxides and sodium conducting beta-alumina for alkali metal thermoelectric converters (AMTEC). The materials, which are generally complex oxides often need to be synthesized using chemical methods for purity and compositional control. Further, ceramic materials offer advantages in terms of doping different cations to engineer defects and maneuver properties. Nonetheless, shaping of ceramics to complex components is a challenging task, due to which various techniques such as isopressing, tape-casting, extrusion, slurry coating, spray deposition etc. are employed. The paper also provides a highlight of fabrication techniques and demonstration of miniature devices which are at various stages of development. (author)

  2. Design and In-Situ Processing of Metal-Ceramic and Ceramic-Ceramic Microstructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sass, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    .... Metal-ceramic microstructures have been synthesized in situ by a variety of novel processing techniques, including the partial reduction of oxide compounds and displacement reactions and sol-gel...

  3. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and

  4. Development of refractory ceramic using waste of petrochemical catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedroso, M.A.; Mymrine, V.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing of catalytic catalysts by the company FCC SA. for the Brazilian petrochemical industry is 25,000 tons per annum, which after going through the cracking process cannot undergo regeneration any longer, being wasted with humidity near 70%. To increase the economical and environmental efficiency of the use of this rejected catalyst, without preliminary drying, a method of using it as main raw material in composition like kaolin was developed, as well as in ash and glass for the manufacturing of common (regular) and refractory ceramic. The mixture of these components were burnt at temperatures of 1100 deg C, 1200°C, 1250°C and 1300°C. The ceramics with 30% and 40% in weight of wasted catalyst, sintered in 1250 deg C or 1300 deg C have flexion of 10,8 - 12,9 MPa. After burning the mixtures, the chemical interaction of the initial components was determined by the methods of RXD, MEV and EDS, synthesizing new minerals like Diopside Ca(Mg,Al)(Si,Al) 2 O 6 , Nepheline (K,Na)AlSiO 4 , Lazurite Na 8 [Al 2 SiO 4 ] 6 [SO 4 ,S] 2 , Magnetite Fe 3 O 4 , Albite Na Al Si 3 O 8 and high content of vitreous amorphous phase. (author)

  5. Long-term behavior of glass-ceramic zirconolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Ch.

    2003-01-01

    This work is a part of the investigation of new containment matrices considered for specific conditioning of radionuclides after separation. The aim was to demonstrate the long-term aqueous corrosion resistance of the glass-ceramic zirconolite considered for the conditioning of plutonium and the minor actinides. This material is composed of crystals of zirconolite (CaZrTi 2 O 7 ) dispersed in a residual vitreous phase. It appears that glass-ceramic zirconolite presents a better kinetic behavior than the nuclear glass R 7T7. This is mainly due to a more important rate decrease that occurs more rapidly, that induces a quantity of glass altered at least 10 times as small as for R 7T7 glass. This high slowdown of the alteration rate is attributed to the formation of an alteration film that has been the subject of a specific study. We have demonstrated that the rate decrease was controlled as for the R7T7 glass by the amorphous phase of the alteration film forming a diffusion barrier for reactive species. It seems that the porosity is not the single parameter that explains the protective effect of the gel. The main differences compared with R7T7 glass are that silicon does not control the alteration of the material and that the gel is composed of two distinct phases. We have in particular identified a dense phase enriched in titanium and neodymium that probably influences deeply the kinetics. (author)

  6. Understanding and control of optical performance from ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbour, J.C.; Knapp, J.A.; Potter, B.G.; Jennison, D.R.; Verdozzi, C.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.; Bendale, R.D.; Simmons, J.H.

    1998-06-01

    This report summarizes a two-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to gain understanding and control of the important parameters which govern the optical performance of rare-earth (RE) doped ceramics. This LDRD developed the capability to determine stable atomic arrangements in RE doped alumina using local density functional theory, and to model the luminescence from RE-doped alumina using molecular dynamic simulations combined with crystal-field calculations. Local structural features for different phases of alumina were examined experimentally by comparing their photoluminescence spectra and the atomic arrangement of the amorphous phase was determined to be similar to that of the gamma phase. The luminescence lifetimes were correlated to these differences in the local structure. The design of both high and low-phonon energy host materials was demonstrated through the growth of Er-doped aluminum oxide and lanthanum oxide. Multicomponent structures of rare-earth doped telluride glass in an alumina and silica matrix were also prepared. Finally, the optical performance of Er-doped alumina was determined as a function of hydrogen content in the host matrix. This LDRD is the groundwork for future experimentation to understand the effects of ionizing radiation on the optical properties of RE-doped ceramic materials used in space and other radiation environments

  7. All-ceramic crowns: bonding or cementing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospiech, Peter

    2002-12-01

    Despite the wide variety of all-ceramic systems available today, the majority of dental practitioners hesitate to recommend and insert all-ceramic crowns. This article regards the nature of the ceramic materials, the principles of bonding and adhesion, and the clinical problems of the acid-etch technique for crowns. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed, and the influences of different factors on the strength of all-ceramic crowns are presented. Finally, the conclusion is drawn that conventional cementing of all-ceramic crowns is possible when the specific properties of the ceramics are taken into consideration.

  8. Exoelectron emission from magnesium borate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Takamichi; Yanagisawa, Hideo; Nakamichi, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Riichi; Kawanishi, Masaharu.

    1986-01-01

    Thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE) of a magnesium borate glass ceramics was investigated for its application to dosemetric use. It has been found that the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics as well as a Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics depend on the kind of the radiation used and that the heat resistance of the magnesium borate glass ceramics is higher than that of the Li 2 B 4 O 7 glass ceramics. Therefore, the TSEE glow patterns of the magnesium borate glass ceramics indicate a possibility to be used as the dose measurement for each kind of radiation in the mixed radiation field. (author)

  9. Producing ceramic laminate composites by EPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, P.S.; Sarkar, P.; Datta, S.

    1996-01-01

    The search for tough structural ceramics to operate at high temperatures in hostile environments has led to the development of ceramic composites. This class of material includes laminar ceramic-ceramic composites, continuous-fiber-reinforced ceramic composites and functionally graded materials. The present authors developed electrophoretic deposition (EPD) to synthesize lamellar, fiber-reinforced and functionally graded composites. This paper briefly describes the synthesis and characterization of these EPD composites and introduces a novel class of lamellar composites with nonplanar layers. The synthesis of the latter demonstrates the facility of the EPD process for the synthesis of ceramic composites. The process is totally controllable via suspension concentration, deposition current, voltage and time

  10. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  11. Compaction of amorphous iron–boron powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mørup, Steen; Koch, Christian

    1993-01-01

    Large scale practical use of bulk amorphous alloys requires the capability of molding the material to a desired design, for instance by compaction of an amorphous powder. This is a difficult task because the sintering temperature is limited by the crystallization temperature of the alloy.1 Here we......, should facilitate a compaction. The passivation layer, however, impedes a compaction. Isostatic pressing at 540 K at a pressure of 200 MPa clearly illustrated this; pellets pressed from passivated powder were much more brittle than pellets pressed from unpassivated powder. The density of the pellets...... was very low ([approximately-equal-to]25% of the density of bulk FeB). We have designed a die for uniaxial pressing in which the compaction can be performed without exposing the powder to air and have obtained densities larger than 60% of that of bulk FeB. We have reported studies of the dependence...

  12. Study of an amorphous alloy core transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafalski, A.; Frost, D. C.

    1994-05-01

    Amorphous core transformers (ACT) have become a technological and commercial reality and there are an estimated 400,000 units installed worldwide [1]. Their applications reflect changes in buying practices, where the efficiency evaluation is an important factor in the purchasing decision for distribution transformers. Use of the total ownership cost (TOC) concept facilities the selection of a transformer on the basis of its performance. This concept is used in this paper to investigate the feasibility of applying a distribution ACT in Western Australian (WA). A 10 kVA ACT, evaluated by the TOC method, was compared with a traditional silicon iron core transformer of the same rating. The cost of amorphous metal (relative to alternative materials), the distribution load profile, and the values of capitalised loss costs are factors which affect the cost effectiveness of ACTs.

  13. Nature of amorphous polymorphism of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koza, M.M.; Schober, H.; Hansen, T.; Geil, B.; Winkel, K.; Koehler, C.; Scheuermann, M.; Czeschka, F.

    2005-01-01

    We report elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments on different amorphous ice modifications. It is shown that an amorphous structure (HDA ' ) indiscernible from the high-density phase (HDA), obtained by compression of crystalline ice, can be formed from the very high-density phase (vHDA) as an intermediate stage of the transition of vHDA into its low-density modification (LDA ' ). Both HDA and HDA ' exhibit comparable small-angle scattering signals characterizing them as structures heterogeneous on a length scale of a few nanometers. The homogeneous structures are the initial and final transition stages vHDA and LDA ' , respectively. Despite their apparent structural identity on a local scale, HDA and HDA ' differ in their transition kinetics explored by in situ experiments. The activation energy of the vHDA-to-LDA ' transition is at least 20 kJ/mol higher than the activation energy of the HDA-to-LDA transition

  14. Determination of boron in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazhulene, S.S.; Grossman, O.V.; Kuntscher, K.K.; Malygina, L.I.; Muller, E.N.; Telegin, G.F.

    1985-10-01

    In the determination of boron in amorphous alloys containingFe, Co, B, Si, Ni, and P having unusal magnetic and electrical properties, precise analysis and rapid analysis are necessary. To improve the metrological properties of the existing procedure, to find a rapid determination of boron in amorphous alloys, and to verify the accuracy of the results, in the present work the optimization of the photometric determination after extraction of the BF/sup -//sub 4/ ion pair with methylene blue has been studied, and a boron determination by flame photometry using selective methylation has been developed. The determination of boron by the flame photometric and spectrophotometric methods is shown. When a highly precise determination is needed, the spectrophotometric procedure can be used. This procedure is distinguished by its labor intensity and duration. When the need for reproducibility is less severe, the rapid flame photometric procedure is best.

  15. Mg amorphous alloys for biodegradable implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danez, G.P.; Koga, G.Y.; Tonucci, S.; Bolfarini, C.; Kiminami, C.S.; Botta Filho, W.J.

    2010-01-01

    The use of implants made from amorphous alloys magnesium-based with additions of zinc and calcium are promising. Properties such as biocompatibility, low density, high mechanical strength, low modulus (as compared to alloys such as stainless steel and titanium), corrosion resistance and wear resistance make it attractive for use in implants. Moreover, the by-products of corrosion and wear are not toxic and may contribute to fixation. Aiming to understand the tendency of this amorphous ternary (Mg-Zn-Ca) and expand the information about this system, this work involved the use of the topological criterion of instability (λ) and the criterion of electronegativity (Δe) to the choice of compositions. The alloys were processed into wedge-shaped and analyzed structurally and in X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. (author)

  16. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co 71 4 Fe 4 6 Si 9 6 B 14 4 were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400 0 C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400 0 C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation

  17. Posterior amorphous corneal dystrophy: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Lauro Augusto de [UNIFESP; Vieira, Luiz Antônio [UNIFESP; Freitas, Denise de [UNIFESP; Sousa, Luciene Barbosa de [UNIFESP

    2006-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho é alertar o oftalmologista da possibilidade de se deparar com casos raros de distrofias corneanas. Neste caso correlacionamos os achados clínicos da distrofia amorfa posterior com refração, topografia e biomicroscopia ultra-sônica.The purpose of this paper is to warn the ophthalmologist about the possibility of facing rare cases of corneal dystrophies. Clinical findings of a case of posterior amorphous dystrophy were correlated with refraction, topography, and ultras...

  18. Metastable states in amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor I

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting and technologically important class of materials, the amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors. Experimental results on the structural and electronic metastable states in Se-rich chalcogenides are presented. Special attention is paid to the states in the mobility gap and their sensitivity to various factors such as irradiation, annealing and composition. Photoinduced changes of structure and physical properties are also considered and structural transformation at photocrystallization is studied in detail. Finally, the authors discuss potential applications of th

  19. Characterization of diamond amorphized by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, W.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1992-01-01

    Single crystal diamond has been implanted at 1 MeV with 2 x 10 20 Ar/m 2 . Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in a channeled geometry revealed a broad amorphized region underlying a thin, partially crystalline layer. Raman spectroscopy disclosed modifications in the bonding characteristic of the appearance of non-diamond carbon. The complementary nature of the two analysis techniques is demonstrated. The Knoop hardness of the implanted diamond was reduced by implantation

  20. Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Krishna, Katla; Pavan Kumar, B. V. V. S.; Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy

    2011-07-01

    Nanopillar arrays of amorphous carbon nitride have been prepared using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane as a template. The amine groups present on the surface of these nanopillars were exploited for functionalization with oleic acid in order to stabilize the nanostructure at the aqueous-organic interface and also for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles and protein. These immobilised nanoparticles were found to have good catalytic activity.

  1. Why natural monazite never becomes amorphous: Experimental evidence for alpha self-healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seydoux-Guillaume, Anne -Magali [Univ. Clermont Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Univ. Lyon, Saint-Etienne (France); Deschanels, Xavier [Univ. Montpellier, Marcoule (France); Baumier, Cedric [Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Neumeier, Stefan [Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Julich (Germany); Weber, William John [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peuget, Sylvain [CEA, Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

    2018-05-01

    Monazite, a common accessory rare-earth orthophosphate mineral in the continental crust widely used in U-Pb geochronology, holds promise for (U-Th)/He thermochronology and for the immobilization of Pu and minor actinides (MA) coming from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Previous results obtained on natural and plutonium-doped monazite have demonstrated the ability of this structure to maintain a crystalline state despite high radiation damage levels. However, the low critical temperature (180 °C), above which amorphization cannot be achieved in natural monazite under ion irradiation, does not explain this old and unsolved paradox: why do natural monazites, independent of their geological history, remain crystalline even when they did not experience any thermal event that could heal the defects? This is what the present study aims to address. Synthetic polycrystals of LaPO4-monazite were irradiated sequentially and simultaneously with α particles (He) and gold (Au) ions. Here, our results demonstrate experimentally for the first time in monazite, the existence of the defect recovery mechanism, called α-healing, acting in this structure due to electronic energy loss of α particles, which explains the absence of amorphization in natural monazite samples. This mechanism is critically important for monazite geo- and thermochronology and to design and predictively model the long-term behavior of ceramic matrices for nuclear waste conditioning.

  2. The energy landscape of glassy dynamics on the amorphous hafnium diboride surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Mallek, Justin; Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R.; Girolami, Gregory S.; Lyding, Joseph; Gruebele, Martin

    2014-11-01

    Direct visualization of the dynamics of structural glasses and amorphous solids on the sub-nanometer scale provides rich information unavailable from bulk or conventional single molecule techniques. We study the surface of hafnium diboride, a conductive ultrahigh temperature ceramic material that can be grown in amorphous films. Our scanning tunneling movies have a second-to-hour dynamic range and single-point current measurements extend that to the millisecond-to-minute time scale. On the a-HfB2 glass surface, two-state hopping of 1-2 nm diameter cooperatively rearranging regions or "clusters" occurs from sub-milliseconds to hours. We characterize individual clusters in detail through high-resolution (single cluster vertical displacements, we can reconstruct the local free energy landscape of individual clusters, complete with activation barrier height, a reaction coordinate in nanometers, and the shape of the free energy landscape basins between which hopping occurs. The experimental images are consistent with the compact shape of α-relaxors predicted by random first order transition theory, whereas the rapid hopping rate, even taking less confined motion at the surface into account, is consistent with β-relaxations. We make a proposal of how "mixed" features can show up in surface dynamics of glasses.

  3. Thick-film processing of Pb5Ge3O11-based ferroelectric glass-ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo, I.A.; Haun, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Processing techniques were investigated to produce c-axis orientation, or texture, of ferroelectric Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 -based glass-ceramic compositions during crystallization of amorphous thick-film printed samples from the Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 -PbTiO 3 (PG-PT) and Pb 5 Ge 3 O 11 -Pb(Zr 1/2 Ti 1/2 )O 3 (PG-PZT) systems. In these systems the PG crystallized into a ferroelectric phase, producing a multiple ferroelectric phase composite at low temperatures, PG-PT or PG-PZT. In this way the non-ferroelectric component of traditional ferroelectric glass-ceramics was eliminated

  4. Magnetron deposition of metal-ceramic protective coatings on glasses of windows of space vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Sergeev, Viktor Petrovich; Panin, Viktor Evgenyevich; Psakhie, Sergey Grigorievich; Chernyavskii, Alexandr; Svechkin, Valerii; Khristenko, Yurii; Kalashnikov, Mark Petrovich; Voronov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Transparent refractory metal-ceramic nanocomposite coatings with a high coefficient of elasticrecovery and microhardness on the basis of Ni/Si-Al-N are formed on a glass substrate by the pulse magnetron deposition method. The structure-phase states were investigated by TEM, SEM. It was established that the first layer consists of Ni nanograins with a fcc crystalline lattice, the second layer is two-phase: 5-10 nm nanocrystallites of the AlN phase with the hcp crystalline lattice in amorphous ...

  5. Fluctuation microscopy analysis of amorphous silicon models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, J.M., E-mail: jmgibson@fsu.edu [Northeastern University, Department of Physics, Boston MA 02115 (United States); FAMU/FSU Joint College of Engineering, 225 Pottsdamer Street, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Treacy, M.M.J. [Arizona State University, Department of Physics, Tempe AZ 85287 (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Studied competing computer models for amorphous silicon and simulated fluctuation microscopy data. • Show that only paracrystalline/random network composite can fit published data. • Specifically show that pure random network or random network with void models do not fit available data. • Identify a new means to measure volume fraction of ordered material. • Identify unreported limitations of the Debye model for simulating fluctuation microscopy data. - Abstract: Using computer-generated models we discuss the use of fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) to identify the structure of amorphous silicon. We show that a combination of variable resolution FEM to measure the correlation length, with correlograph analysis to obtain the structural motif, can pin down structural correlations. We introduce the method of correlograph variance as a promising means of independently measuring the volume fraction of a paracrystalline composite. From comparisons with published data, we affirm that only a composite material of paracrystalline and continuous random network that is substantially paracrystalline could explain the existing experimental data, and point the way to more precise measurements on amorphous semiconductors. The results are of general interest for other classes of disordered materials.

  6. Amorphous silicon as high index photonic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, T.; Harke, A.; Horn, O.; Amthor, J.; Müller, J.

    2009-05-01

    Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) photonics has become an attractive research topic within the area of integrated optics. This paper aims to fabricate SOI-structures for optical communication applications with lower costs compared to standard fabrication processes as well as to provide a higher flexibility with respect to waveguide and substrate material choice. Amorphous silicon is deposited on thermal oxidized silicon wafers with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The material is optimized in terms of optical light transmission and refractive index. Different a-Si:H waveguides with low propagation losses are presented. The waveguides were processed with CMOS-compatible fabrication technologies and standard DUV-lithography enabling high volume production. To overcome the large mode-field diameter mismatch between incoupling fiber and sub-μm waveguides three dimensional, amorphous silicon tapers were fabricated with a KOH etched shadow mask for patterning. Using ellipsometric and Raman spectroscopic measurements the material properties as refractive index, layer thickness, crystallinity and material composition were analyzed. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments of amorphous thin films and rib waveguides were performed aiming to tune the refractive index of the deposited a-Si:H waveguide core layer after deposition.

  7. Irradiation-induced amorphization process in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1996-04-01

    Effects of the element process of irradiation damage on irradiation-induced amorphization processes of graphite was studied. High orientation thermal decomposed graphite was cut about 100 nm width and used as samples. The irradiation experiments are carried out under the conditions of electronic energy of 100-400 KeV, ion energy of 200-600 KeV, ionic species Xe, Ar, Ne, C and He and the irradiation temperature at from room temperature to 900 K. The critical dose ({phi}a) increases exponentially with increasing irradiation temperature. The displacement threshold energy of graphite on c-axis direction was 27 eV and {phi}a{sup e} = 0.5 dpa. dpa is the average number of displacement to atom. The critical dose of ion irradiation ({phi}a{sup i}) was 0.2 dpa at room temperature, and amorphous graphite was produced by less than half of dose of electronic irradiation. Amorphization of graphite depending upon temperature is discussed. (S.Y.)

  8. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  9. Inelastic neutron scattering of amorphous ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Susumu; Suzuki, Yoshiharu

    2001-01-01

    We measured the inelastic neutron scattering from high-density amorphous (HDA) and low-density amorphous (LDA) ice produced by pressurizing and releasing the pressure. We found a clear difference between the intermolecular vibrations in HDA and those in LDA ice: LDA ice has peaks at 22 and 33 meV, which are also seen in the spectrum of lattice vibrations in ice crystal, but the spectrum of HDA ice does not have these peaks. The excitation energy of librational vibrations in HDA ice is 10 meV lower than that in LDA ice. These results imply that HDA ice includes 2- and 5-coordinated hydrogen bonds that are created by breakage of hydrogen bonds and migration of water molecules into the interstitial site, while LDA ice contains mainly 4-coordinated hydrogen bonds and large cavities. Furthermore, we report the dynamical structure factor in the amorphous ice and show that LDA ice is more closely related to the ice crystal structure than to HDA ice. (author)

  10. Fluctuation microscopy analysis of amorphous silicon models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.M.; Treacy, M.M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Studied competing computer models for amorphous silicon and simulated fluctuation microscopy data. • Show that only paracrystalline/random network composite can fit published data. • Specifically show that pure random network or random network with void models do not fit available data. • Identify a new means to measure volume fraction of ordered material. • Identify unreported limitations of the Debye model for simulating fluctuation microscopy data. - Abstract: Using computer-generated models we discuss the use of fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) to identify the structure of amorphous silicon. We show that a combination of variable resolution FEM to measure the correlation length, with correlograph analysis to obtain the structural motif, can pin down structural correlations. We introduce the method of correlograph variance as a promising means of independently measuring the volume fraction of a paracrystalline composite. From comparisons with published data, we affirm that only a composite material of paracrystalline and continuous random network that is substantially paracrystalline could explain the existing experimental data, and point the way to more precise measurements on amorphous semiconductors. The results are of general interest for other classes of disordered materials.

  11. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goedele Craye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin–lysine (SVS-LYS at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a “spring and parachute” effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS. In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS.

  12. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Laitinen, Riikka

    2015-12-03

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a "spring and parachute" effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS.

  13. Dielectric breakdown in silica-amorphous polymer nanocomposite films: the role of the polymer matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Christopher A; Fillery, Scott P; Westing, Nicholas M; Chi, Changzai; Meth, Jeffrey S; Durstock, Michael F; Vaia, Richard A

    2013-06-26

    The ultimate energy storage performance of an electrostatic capacitor is determined by the dielectric characteristics of the material separating its conductive electrodes. Polymers are commonly employed due to their processability and high breakdown strength; however, demands for higher energy storage have encouraged investigations of ceramic-polymer composites. Maintaining dielectric strength, and thus minimizing flaw size and heterogeneities, has focused development toward nanocomposite (NC) films; but results lack consistency, potentially due to variations in polymer purity, nanoparticle surface treatments, nanoparticle size, and film morphology. To experimentally establish the dominant factors in broad structure-performance relationships, we compare the dielectric properties for four high-purity amorphous polymer films (polymethyl methacrylate, polystyrene, polyimide, and poly-4-vinylpyridine) incorporating uniformly dispersed silica colloids (up to 45% v/v). Factors known to contribute to premature breakdown-field exclusion and agglomeration-have been mitigated in this experiment to focus on what impact the polymer and polymer-nanoparticle interactions have on breakdown. Our findings indicate that adding colloidal silica to higher breakdown strength amorphous polymers (polymethyl methacrylate and polyimide) causes a reduction in dielectric strength as compared to the neat polymer. Alternatively, low breakdown strength amorphous polymers (poly-4-vinylpyridine and especially polystyrene) with comparable silica dispersion show similar or even improved breakdown strength for 7.5-15% v/v silica. At ∼15% v/v or greater silica content, all the polymer NC films exhibit breakdown at similar electric fields, implying that at these loadings failure becomes independent of polymer matrix and is dominated by silica.

  14. Multiferroic properties of Pb2Fe2O5 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Min; Tan, Guolong

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Simultaneous occurrence of ferromagnetism and ferroelectricity in Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramics. → The off-centers of shifted Pb 2+ ions as well as the FeO 6 octahedra in the 'Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ' lead to a ferroelectric polarization. → Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramic demonstrates ferromagnetic order state due to the spin arrangement in the double chains of FeO 5 tetrahedral pyramids. -- Abstract: Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 (PFO) powders in monoclinic structure have been synthesized using lead acetate in glycerin and ferric acetylacetonate as the precursor. The powders were pressed into pellets, which were sintered into ceramics at 800 o C for 1 h. The morphology and structure have been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Polarization was observed in Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramics at room temperature, exhibiting a clear ferroelectric hysteresis loop. The remanent polarization of Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramic is estimated to be Pr ∼ 0.22 μC/cm 2 . The origin of the polarization may be attributed to the off-centers of shifted Pb 2+ ions as well as the FeO 6 octahedra in the perovskite-based structure of Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 . Magnetic hysteresis loop was also observed at room temperature. The Pb 2 Fe 2 O 5 ceramic shows coexistence of ferroelectricity and ferromagnetism. It provides a new field of research for complex oxides with multiferroic properties.

  15. Microbial profile on metallic and ceramic bracket materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhoury, Patrick; Nathanson, Dan; Hughes, Christopher V; Socransky, Sigmund; Feres, Magda; Chou, Laisheng Lee

    2002-08-01

    The placement of orthodontic appliances creates a favorable environment for the accumulation of a microbiota and food residues, which, in time, may cause caries or exacerbate any pre-existing periodontal disease. The purpose of the present study was to compare the total bacterial counts present on metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets in order to clarify which bracket type has a higher plaque retaining capacity and to determine the levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp on both types of brackets. Thirty-two metallic brackets and 24 ceramic brackets were collected from orthodontic patients at the day of debonding. Two brackets were collected from each patient; one from a maxillary central incisor and another from a maxillary second premolar. Sixteen patients who used metallic brackets and 12 patients who used ceramic brackets were sampled. Bacterial populations were studied using "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization, which uses DNA probes to identify species in complex microbial samples. The significance of differences between groups was determined using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results showed no significant differences between metallic and ceramic brackets with respect to the caries-inducing S mutans and L acidophilus spp counts. Mean counts of 8 of 35 additional species differed significantly between metallic and ceramic brackets with no obvious pattern favoring one bracket type over the other. This study showed higher mean counts of Treponema denticola, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii, Streptococcus anginosus, and Eubacterium nodatum on metallic brackets while higher counts of Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter showae, and Selenomonas noxia were found on ceramic brackets.

  16. Application of exopolysaccharides to optimize the performance of ceramic bodies in the unidirectional dry pressing process

    OpenAIRE

    Caneira I.; Machado-Moreira, B.; Dionísio, A.; Godinho, V.; Neves, O.; Dias, Diamantino; Sáiz-Jiménez, Cesáreo; Miller, A. Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ceramic industry represents an important sector of economic activity in the European countries and involves complex and numerous manufacturing processes. The unidirectional dry pressing process includes milling and stirring of raw materials (mainly clay and talc minerals) in aqueous suspensions, followed by spray drying to remove excess water obtaining spray-dried powders further subjected to dry pressing process (conformation). However, spray-dried ceramic powders exhibit an important variab...

  17. Porous ceramic membrane with superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface for reclaiming oil from oily water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Changhong; Xu, Youqian; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Li, Jun

    2012-01-01

    A porous ceramic tube with superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface was fabricated by sol-gel and then surface modification with polyurethane-polydimethysiloxane, and an oil-water separator based on the porous ceramic tube was erected to characterize superhydrophobic and superoleophilic surface's separation efficiency and velocity when being used to reclaim oil from oily water and complex oily water containing clay particle. The separator is fit for reclaiming oil from oily water.

  18. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Al2O3/Er3Al5O12 Binary Eutectic Ceramic Prepared by Bridgman Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Caiyu; Wang, Shunheng; Liu, Juncheng; Zhai, Shuoyan

    2018-01-01

    Directionally solidified Al2O3/Er3Al5O12 (EAG) eutectic ceramic was prepared via vertical Bridgman method with high-frequency induction heating. The effects of the growth rate on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the solidified ceramic were investigated. The experimental results showed that there were no pores or amorphous phases in the directionally solidified Al2O3/EAG eutectic ceramic. Al2O3 phase was embedded in the EAG matrix phase, and the two phases were intertwined with each other to form a typical binary eutectic “hieroglyphic” structure. With the increase of growth rate, the phase size and spacing of the solidified Al2O3/EAG ceramic both decreased, and the growth rate and phase spacing satisfied the λ2v ≈ 60 formula of Jackson-Hunt theory. The cross section microstructure of the solidified ceramic always exhibited an irregular eutectic growth, while the longitudinal section microstructure presented a directional growth. The mechanical properties of the solidified ceramic gradually increased with the increase of growth rate, and the maximum hardness and fracture toughness could reach 21.57 GPa and 2.98 MPa·m1/2 respectively. It was considered that the crack deflection and branching could enhance the toughness of the solidified ceramic effectively. PMID:29601545

  19. Glass Ceramic Formulation Data Package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Vienna, John D.; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A glass ceramic waste form is being developed for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by aqueous reprocessing of commercial used nuclear fuel (Crum et al. 2012b). The waste stream contains a mixture of transition metals, alkali, alkaline earths, and lanthanides, several of which exceed the solubility limits of a single phase borosilicate glass (Crum et al. 2009; Caurant et al. 2007). A multi-phase glass ceramic waste form allows incorporation of insoluble components of the waste by designed crystallization into durable heat tolerant phases. The glass ceramic formulation and processing targets the formation of the following three stable crystalline phases: (1) powellite (XMoO4) where X can be (Ca, Sr, Ba, and/or Ln), (2) oxyapatite Yx,Z(10-x)Si6O26 where Y is alkaline earth, Z is Ln, and (3) lanthanide borosilicate (Ln5BSi2O13). These three phases incorporate the waste components that are above the solubility limit of a single-phase borosilicate glass. The glass ceramic is designed to be a single phase melt, just like a borosilicate glass, and then crystallize upon slow cooling to form the targeted phases. The slow cooling schedule is based on the centerline cooling profile of a 2 foot diameter canister such as the Hanford High-Level Waste canister. Up to this point, crucible testing has been used for glass ceramic development, with cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) targeted as the ultimate processing technology for the waste form. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will conduct a scaled CCIM test in FY2012 with a glass ceramic to demonstrate the processing behavior. This Data Package documents the laboratory studies of the glass ceramic composition to support the CCIM test. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) measured melt viscosity, electrical conductivity, and crystallization behavior upon cooling to identify a processing window (temperature range) for melter operation and cooling profiles necessary to crystallize the targeted phases in the

  20. Effect of raw material ratios on the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ai-juan; Yuan, Zhi-long; Zhang, Jiao; Liu, Lin-tao; Li, Jun-ming; Liu, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics is important in biomedical field. In this work, the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics was investigated with different liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios. X-ray diffractometer was applied to characterize its phase composition. The microstructure was imaged using a scanning electron microscope. The results showed that the compressive strength of the chemically bonded ceramics increased with the decrease of liquid-to-solid ratio due to the change of the packing density and the crystallinity of hydrated product. However, with the increase of MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 weight ratio, its compressive strength increased firstly and then decreased. The low compressive strength in lower MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratio might be explained by the existence of the weak phase KH 2 PO 4 . However, the low value of compressive strength with the higher MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratio might be caused by lack of the joined phase in the hydrated product. Besides, it has been found that the microstructures were different in these two cases by the scanning electron microscope. Colloidal structure appeared for the samples with lower liquid-to-solid and higher MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios possibly because of the existence of amorphous hydrated products. The optimization of both liquid-to-solid and MgO-to-KH 2 PO 4 ratios was important to improve the compressive strength of magnesium potassium phosphate chemically bonded ceramics. - Highlights: • High packing density and amorphous hydrated phase improved the compressive strength. • Residual KH 2 PO 4 and poor bonding phase lower the compressive strength. • MPCBC fabricated with optimized parameters had the highest compressive strength

  1. Preparation of Biomorphic SiC/C Ceramics from Pine Wood via Supercritical Ethanol Infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Biomorphic (wood derived) carbide ceramics with an overall composition in the SiC/C was produced by supercritical ethanol infiltration of low viscosity tetraethylorthosilicate/supercritical ethanol into biologically derived carbon templates (CB-templates) and in situ hydrolysis into Si(OH)4-gel, the Si(OH)4-gel was calcined at 1400℃ to promote the polycondensation of Si(OH)4-gel into SiO2-phase and then carbonthermal reduction of the SiO2 with the biocarbon template into highly porous, biomorphic SiC/C ceramics. The phases and morphology conversion mechanism of resulting porous SiC/C ceramics have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Experimental results showed that the biomorphic cellular morphology of pinewood charcoal was remained in the porous SiC/C ceramic with high precision that consisted of β-SiC with minority of α-SiC and the remain free carbon existed in amorphous phase.

  2. An investigation of texturing by magnetic and mechanical techniques in high critical temperature superconducting ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deschanels, X.

    1992-11-01

    The principal goal of this work is to quantify the influence of texture of ceramic superconductors ReBaCuO (Re=Dy, Y) on their critical current density (Jc). The magnetic alignment of particles at ambient temperature is the first technique who has allowed us to produce superconducting (Meissner effect) and textured ceramics. However, these materials are very brittle because of their porosity and this makes it impossible to measure their Jc. Press-forging (or creep sintering) is the second technique who has allowed us to prepare highly textured ceramics materials which are also dense. We have studied the influence of various conditions of thermomechanical treatment (sintering time and temperature, applied load, rate of deformation, density of the material at the beginning) on the texture quality. We have shown that at 900 deg, the eutectic liquid formed by BaCuO 2 , CuO and YBa 2 Cu 3 0 7-Y various mechanisms that help explain the formation of observed texture. After the oxidation stage which requires heat treatment under controlled atmospheres, we obtain superconducting ceramics (Tc=85 K). Moreover, this study also shows that the texture can improve the Jc by 400%, to 750 A/cm 2 at 77 K in the best specimens. This low value is explained by the presence of non-superconducting secondary phases and amorphous phases at the grain boundaries. (Author). 120 refs., figs., tabs

  3. IMPLICATIONS OF GLOBAL AND LOCAL MOBILITY IN AMORPHOUS EXCIPIENTS AS DETERMINED BY DSC AND TM DSC

    OpenAIRE

    Ion Dranca; Tudor Lupascu

    2009-01-01

    The paper explores the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TM DSC) to study α- and β- processes in amorphous sucrose and trehalose. The real part of the complex heat capacity is evaluated at the frequencies, f, from 5 to 20mHz. β-relaxations were studied by annealing glassy samples at different temperatures and subsequently heating at different rates in a differential scanning calorimeter.

  4. IMPLICATIONS OF GLOBAL AND LOCAL MOBILITY IN AMORPHOUS EXCIPIENTS AS DETERMINED BY DSC AND TM DSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Dranca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and temperature modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TM DSC to study α- and β- processes in amorphous sucrose and trehalose. The real part of the complex heat capacity is evaluated at the frequencies, f, from 5 to 20mHz. β-relaxations were studied by annealing glassy samples at different temperatures and subsequently heating at different rates in a differential scanning calorimeter.

  5. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  6. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  7. Reliability of ceramics for heat engine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of monolithic ceramics in heat engines are discussed. The principle gaps in the state of understanding of ceramic material, failure origins, nondestructive tests as well as life prediction are included.

  8. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  9. Panel report on high temperature ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolet, T C [ed.

    1979-01-01

    Fundamental research is reported concerning high temperature ceramics for application in turbines, engines, batteries, gasifiers, MHD, fuel cells, heat exchangers, and hot wall combustors. Ceramics microstructure and behavior are included. (FS)

  10. Amorphous surface layer versus transient amorphous precursor phase in bone - A case study investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Euw, Stanislas; Ajili, Widad; Chan-Chang, Tsou-Hsi-Camille; Delices, Annette; Laurent, Guillaume; Babonneau, Florence; Nassif, Nadine; Azaïs, Thierry

    2017-09-01

    The presence of an amorphous surface layer that coats a crystalline core has been proposed for many biominerals, including bone mineral. In parallel, transient amorphous precursor phases have been proposed in various biomineralization processes, including bone biomineralization. Here we propose a methodology to investigate the origin of these amorphous environments taking the bone tissue as a key example. This study relies on the investigation of a bone tissue sample and its comparison with synthetic calcium phosphate samples, including a stoichiometric apatite, an amorphous calcium phosphate sample, and two different biomimetic apatites. To reveal if the amorphous environments in bone originate from an amorphous surface layer or a transient amorphous precursor phase, a combined solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment has been used. The latter consists of a double cross polarization 1 H→ 31 P→ 1 H pulse sequence followed by a 1 H magnetization exchange pulse sequence. The presence of an amorphous surface layer has been investigated through the study of the biomimetic apatites; while the presence of a transient amorphous precursor phase in the form of amorphous calcium phosphate particles has been mimicked with the help of a physical mixture of stoichiometric apatite and amorphous calcium phosphate. The NMR results show that the amorphous and the crystalline environments detected in our bone tissue sample belong to the same particle. The presence of an amorphous surface layer that coats the apatitic core of bone apatite particles has been unambiguously confirmed, and it is certain that this amorphous surface layer has strong implication on bone tissue biogenesis and regeneration. Questions still persist on the structural organization of bone and biomimetic apatites. The existing model proposes a core/shell structure, with an amorphous surface layer coating a crystalline bulk. The accuracy of this model is still debated because amorphous calcium

  11. Characterization of CVI densification of ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starr, T.L.; Stock, S.R.; Lee, S. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Ceramic matrix composites promise higher operating temperature and better thermodynamic efficiency in many enregy conversion systems. In particular, composites fabricated by the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process have excellent mechanical properties and, using the forced flow-thermal gradient variation, good processing economics in small scale demonstrations. Scale-up to larger, more complex shapes requires understanding of gas flow through the fiber preform and of the relationship between fiber architecture and densification behavior. This understanding is needed for design of preforms for optimum infiltration. The objective of this research is to observe the deposition of matrix material in the pores of a ceramic fiber preform at various stages of the CVI process. These observations allow us to relate local deposition rates in various regions of the composite to the connectivity of the surrounding network of porosity and to better model the relationship between gas transport and fiber architecture in CVI preforms. Our observation of the CVI process utilizes high resolution X-ray tomographic microscopy (XTM) in collaboration with Dr. John Kinney at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with repeated imaging of a small preform specimens after various processing times. We use these images to determine geometry and dimensions of channels between and through layers in cloth lay-up preform during CVI densification and relate these to a transport model.

  12. Ceramics: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, J E

    1996-07-01

    The selection and application of synthetic materials for surgical implants has been directly dependent upon the biocompatibility profiles of specific prosthetic devices. The early rationale for ceramic biomaterials was based upon the chemical and biochemical inertness (minimal bioreactivity) of elemental compounds constituted into structural forms (materials). Subsequently, mildly reactive (bioactive), and partially and fully degradable ceramics were identified for clinical uses. Structural forms have included bulk solids or particulates with and without porosities for tissue ingrowth, and more recently, coatings onto other types of biomaterial substrates. The physical shapes selected were application dependent, with advantages and disadvantages determined by: (1) the basic material and design properties of the device construct; and (2) the patient-based functional considerations. Most of the ceramics (bioceramics) selected in the 1960s and 1970s have continued over the long-term, and the science and technology for thick and thin coatings have evolved significantly over the past decade. Applications of ceramic biomaterials range from bulk (100%) ceramic structures as joint and bone replacements to fully or partially biodegradable substrates for the controlled delivery of pharmaceutical drugs, growth factors, and morphogenetically inductive substances. Because of the relatively unique properties of bioceramics, expanded uses as structural composites with other biomaterials and macromolecular biologically-derived substances are anticipated in the future.

  13. Shock compression profiles in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.; Moody, R.L.

    1996-03-01

    An investigation of the shock compression properties of high-strength ceramics has been performed using controlled planar impact techniques. In a typical experimental configuration, a ceramic target disc is held stationary, and it is struck by plates of either a similar ceramic or by plates of a well-characterized metal. All tests were performed using either a single-stage propellant gun or a two-stage light-gas gun. Particle velocity histories were measured with laser velocity interferometry (VISAR) at the interface between the back of the target ceramic and a calibrated VISAR window material. Peak impact stresses achieved in these experiments range from about 3 to 70 GPa. Ceramics tested under shock impact loading include: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, AlN, B{sub 4}C, SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, TiB{sub 2}, WC and ZrO{sub 2}. This report compiles the VISAR wave profiles and experimental impact parameters within a database-useful for response model development, computational model validation studies, and independent assessment of the physics of dynamic deformation on high-strength, brittle solids.

  14. Transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G C [OSRAM SYLVANIA, 71 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    Transparent ceramic materials with optical qualities comparable to single crystals of similar compositions have been developed in recent years, as a result of the improved understanding of powder-processing-fabrication- sintering-property inter-relationships. These high-temperature materials with a range of thermal and mechanical properties are candidate envelopes for focused-beam, short-arc lamps containing various fills operating at temperatures higher than quartz. This paper reviews the composition, structure and properties of transparent ceramic lamp envelope materials including sapphire, small-grained polycrystalline alumina, aluminium oxynitride, yttrium aluminate garnet, magnesium aluminate spinel and yttria-lanthana. A satisfactory thermal shock resistance is required for the ceramic tube to withstand the rapid heating and cooling cycles encountered in lamps. Thermophysical properties, along with the geometry, size and thickness of a transparent ceramic tube, are important parameters in the assessment of its resistance to fracture arising from thermal stresses in lamps during service. The corrosive nature of lamp-fill liquid and vapour at high temperatures requires that all lamp components be carefully chosen to meet the target life. The wide range of new transparent ceramics represents flexibility in pushing the limit of envelope materials for improved beamer lamps.

  15. High flow ceramic pot filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Halem, D; van der Laan, H; Soppe, A I A; Heijman, S G J

    2017-11-01

    Ceramic pot filters are considered safe, robust and appropriate technologies, but there is a general consensus that water revenues are limited due to clogging of the ceramic element. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high flow ceramic pot filters to produce more water without sacrificing their microbial removal efficacy. High flow pot filters, produced by increasing the rice husk content, had a higher initial flow rate (6-19 L h -1 ), but initial LRVs for E. coli of high flow filters was slightly lower than for regular ceramic pot filters. This disadvantage was, however, only temporarily as the clogging in high flow filters had a positive effect on the LRV for E. coli (from below 1 to 2-3 after clogging). Therefore, it can be carefully concluded that regular ceramic pot filters perform better initially, but after clogging, the high flow filters have a higher flow rate as well as a higher LRV for E. coli. To improve the initial performance of new high flow filters, it is recommended to further utilize residence time of the water in the receptacle, since additional E. coli inactivation was observed during overnight storage. Although a relationship was observed between flow rate and LRV of MS2 bacteriophages, both regular and high flow filters were unable to reach over 2 LRV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  17. Ion implantation and fracture toughness of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.; Pollock, J.T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Ceramics generally lack toughness which is largely determined by the ceramic surface where stresses likely to cause failure are usually highest. Ion implantation has the capacity to improve the surface fracture toughness of ceramics. Significantly reduced ion size and reactivity restrictions exist compared with traditional methods of surface toughening. We are studying the effect of ion implantation on ceramic fracture toughness using indentation testing as the principal tool of analysis

  18. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  19. Ferroelastic ceramic-reinforced metal matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials comprising ferroelastic ceramic particulates dispersed in a metal matrix are capable of vibration damping. When the ferroelastic ceramic particulates are subjected to stress, such as the cyclic stress experienced during vibration of the material, internal stresses in the ceramic cause the material to deform via twinning, domain rotation or domain motion thereby dissipating the vibrational energy. The ferroelastic ceramic particulates may also act as reinforcements to impro...

  20. Development of advanced ceramics at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.J.F.; MacEwen, S.R.; Sawicka, B.D.; Hayward, P.J.; Sridhar, S.

    1986-12-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has a long history of developing ceramics for nuclear fission and fusion applications. AECL is now applying its multidisciplinary materials R and D capabilities, including unique capabilities in ceramic processing and nondestructive evaluation, to develop advanced ceramic materials for commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an overview of the facilities and programs associated with the development of advanced ceramics at AECL