WorldWideScience

Sample records for amoeba osmotic shock

  1. Collective osmotic shock in ordered materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Rivera, Paul; Channon, Kevin; Nguyen, Vincent; Sivaniah, Easan; Kabra, Dinesh; Friend, Richard H; Nataraj, S K; Al-Muhtaseb, Shaheen A; Hexemer, Alexander; Calvo, Mauricio E; Miguez, Hernan

    2012-01-01

    Osmotic shock in a vesicle or cell is the stress build-up and subsequent rupture of the phospholipid membrane that occurs when a relatively high concentration of salt is unable to cross the membrane and instead an inflow of water alleviates the salt concentration gradient. This is a well-known failure mechanism for cells and vesicles (for example, hypotonic shock) and metal alloys (for example, hydrogen embrittlement). We propose the concept of collective osmotic shock, whereby a coordinated explosive fracture resulting from multiplexing the singular effects of osmotic shock at discrete sites within an ordered material results in regular bicontinuous structures. The concept is demonstrated here using self-assembled block copolymer micelles, yet it is applicable to organized heterogeneous materials where a minority component can be selectively degraded and solvated whilst ensconced in a matrix capable of plastic deformation. We discuss the application of these self-supported, perforated multilayer materials in photonics, nanofiltration and optoelectronics. PMID:22120413

  2. Physics of Bacteria During Osmotic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jordan; Klug, William

    Bacteria combat hypoosmotic shocks by opening mechanosensitive ion channels located within the inner membrane. These channels are believed to act as ``emergency release valves,'' reducing transient pressure during the shock by regulating solute and water flux. Recent experiments have shown that cell survivability depends strongly on channel populations and the rate of osmotic shock. However, the understanding of the physical mechanisms behind osmotic protection remains unclear. We investigate how channel deletions, variations in shock rate, and cell envelope mechanics affect survivability by constructing theoretical elasticity and transport models. We find that reducing the number of channels and applying faster shocks significantly increases the time-dependent stress of the cell membrane and wall. This result provides insight into physical mechanisms that govern cell failure, including membrane rupture and wall fracture.

  3. Identification of calmodulin released by osmotic shock of maize roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exogenously applied calcium at low concentrations (10 mM and less) stimulates, while higher concentrations (greater than 20 mM) inhibit maize root growth. The phenothiazine calmodulin inhibitors chlorpromazine and trifluoperzine inhibit maize root growth and are reversible by calcium. The loss of acid-inducible growth after osmotic shock indicates that at least part of the complex associated the acid-induced growth is released. Since calmodulin (CaM) is a small protein (mol wt about 17 kD) found to play a pivotal role in Ca+2 regulated mechanisms, the material released from maize roots by osmotic shock was examined for the presence of CaM

  4. Osmotic shock as alternative method to control Acanthaster planci

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jairo Rivera-Posada; Leigh Owens

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To test six osmotic stressors as alternative methods to control Acanthaster planci (A. planci) outbreaks by exploiting their incapacity to tolerate drastic changes in osmolarity. Finding more effective ways to control A. planci outbreaks is one of the most immediate and effective ways by which to reverse rapid declines in the abundance of live coral cover in the Indo-Pacific. Methods: A total of 10 mL of each of the following chemicals: sodium chloride, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, sodium carbonate, sodium cholate, sodium deoxycholate, urea and mannitol were injected into individual healthy sea stars to examine which chemicals induced disease and death. Results:Four out of six chemicals used in this study induced disease. Sodium chloride, sodium cholate, sodium deoxycholate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid are capable of inducing death in injected sea stars offering an alternative option to control A. planci outbreaks. Conclusions: Hyperosmotic stress is a viable alternative to control A. planci outbreaks as massive cell death results when acute hypertonicity exceeds a certain level.

  5. Response of photosynthesis, Translocation and 14C partitioning in sugarbeet plants exposed to osmotic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The immediate response of sugarbeet plants to an osmotic shock caused by plant exposure to salinity was investigated. CO2 fixation was remarkably inhibited within one hour after application. Translocation patterns of control and treated plants and the partitioning of 14C among photosynthates are also presented. It is suggested that the differences obtained are results of solution concentration following a severe water loss. (author)

  6. Osmotic stress stimulates phosphorylation and cellular expression of heat shock proteins in rhesus macaque sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Julie A; Meyers, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The cryosurvival of sperm requires cell signaling mechanisms to adapt to anisotonic conditions during the freezing and thawing process. Chaperone proteins heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) and heat shock protein 90 (HSP 90; recently renamed HSPA and HSPC, respectively) facilitate some of these cell signaling events in somatic cells. Sperm were evaluated for their cellular expression and levels of phosphorylation of both HSP 70 and HSP 90 under anisotonic conditions as a potential model for cell signaling during the cryopreservation of macaque spermatozoa. In order to monitor the level of stress, the motility and viability parameters were evaluated at various time points. Cells were then either prepared for phosphoprotein enrichment or indirect immunocytochemistry. As controls, the phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, and phosphotyrosine levels were measured under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions and were compared with the phosphoprotein levels expressed under osmotic conditions. As expected, there was an increase in the level of tyrosine phosphorylation under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions. There was also a significant increase in the level of all phosphoproteins under hyperosmotic conditions. There was no change in the level of expression of HSP 70 or 90 under osmotic stress conditions as measured by Western blot. The enrichment of phosphoproteins followed by Western immunoblotting revealed an increase in the phosphorylation of HSP 70 but not HSP 90 under osmotic stress conditions. Indirect immunofluorescence localized HSP 70 to the postacrosomal region of sperm, and the level of membrane expression of HSP 70 was significantly affected by anisotonic conditions, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results suggest a differential role for HSP 70 and HSP 90 during osmotic stress conditions in rhesus macaque sperm. PMID:21088232

  7. Role of Cold Shock Proteins in Growth of Listeria monocytogenes under Cold and Osmotic Stress Conditions▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Barbara; Klumpp, Jochen; Raimann, Eveline; Loessner, Martin J; Stephan, Roger; Tasara, Taurai

    2009-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of both public health and food safety significance. It possesses three small, highly homologous protein members of the cold shock protein (Csp) family. We used gene expression analysis and a set of mutants with single, double, and triple deletions of the csp genes to evaluate the roles of CspA, CspB, and CspD in the cold and osmotic (NaCl) stress adaptation responses of L. monocytogenes. All three Csps are dispensable...

  8. Role of cold shock proteins (Csp) for growth of Listeria monocytogenes under cold and osmotic stress conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Barbara Christiane Helene

    2009-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen of both public health and food safety significance. It possesses three small, highly homologous protein members of the cold shock protein (Csp) protein family. We used gene expression analysis and a set of mutants with single, double and triple deletion of the csp genes to evaluate roles of CspA, CspB and CspD in cold and osmotic (NaCl) stress adaptation responses of L. monocytogenes. All three Csps are dispensable fo...

  9. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced subclinical inflammation of skin in a rat model of disrupted skin barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Chihiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Huang, Lijuan; Mugita, Yuko; Kitamura, Aya; Nakagami, Gojiro; Yamane, Takumi; Yoshida, Mikako; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Funakubo, Megumi; Mori, Taketoshi; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-03-01

    Aging disrupts skin barrier function and induces xerosis accompanied by pruritus. In many cases, elderly patients complain of pruritus during skin hygiene care, a condition called aquagenic pruritus of the elderly (APE). To date, the pathophysiology and mechanism of action of APE have not been elucidated. We conducted the present study to test the hypothesis that hypo-osmotic shock of epidermal cells induces skin inflammation and elongation of C-fibers by nerve growth factor β (NGFβ) as a basic mechanism of APE. The dorsal skin of HWY rats, which are a model for disrupted skin barrier function, was treated with distilled water (hypotonic treatment [Hypo] group) or normal saline (isotonic treatment [Iso] group) by applying soaked gauze for 7 days. Untreated rats were used as a control (no-treatment [NT] group). Histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses revealed inflammatory responses in the epidermis and the dermal papillary layer in the Hypo group, while no alterations were observed in the Iso or NT groups. Induction of expression and secretion of NGFβ and elongation of C-fibers into the epidermis were found in the Hypo group. In contrast, secretion of NGFβ was significantly lower and elongation of C-fibers was not observed in the Iso group. These results suggest that hypo-osmotic shock-induced inflammatory reactions promote hypersensitivity to pruritus in skin with disrupted barrier function. PMID:25681269

  10. Spreading of porous vesicles subjected to osmotic shocks: the role of aquaporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaud, Alice; Quemeneur, François; Deforet, Maxime; Bassereau, Patricia; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise; Mangenot, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) is a transmembrane protein specific to the eye lens, involved as a water carrier across the lipid membranes. During eye lens maturation, AQP0s are truncated by proteolytic cleavage. We investigate in this work the capability of truncated AQP0 to conduct water across membranes. We developed a method to accurately determine water permeability across lipid membranes and across proteins from the deflation under osmotic pressure of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) deposited on an adhesive substrate. Using reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM), we measure the spreading area of GUVs during deswelling. We interpret these results using a model based on hydrodynamic, binder diffusion towards the contact zone, and Helfrich's law for the membrane tension, which allows us to relate the spread area to the vesicle internal volume. We first study the specific adhesion of vesicles coated with biotin spreading on a streptavidin substrate. We then determine the permeability of a single functional AQP0 and demonstrate that truncated AQP0 is no more a water channel. PMID:26662491

  11. Osmotic stress-dependent serine phosphorylation of the histidine kinase homologue DokA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oehme Felix

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-component systems consisting of histidine kinases and their corresponding receivers are widespread in bacterial signal transduction. In the past few years, genes coding for homologues of two-component systems were also discovered in eukaryotic organisms. DokA, a homologue of bacterial histidine kinases, is an element of the osmoregulatory pathway in the amoeba Dictyostelium. The work described here addresses the question whether DokA is phosphorylated in vivo in response to osmotic stress. Results We have endogenously overexpressed individual domains of DokA to investigate post-translational modification of the protein in response to osmotic shock in vivo. Dictyostelium cells were labeled with [32P]-orthophosphate, exposed to osmotic stress and DokA fragments were subsequently isolated by immunoprecipitation. Thus, a stress-dependent phosphorylation could be demonstrated, with the site of phosphorylation being located in the kinase domain. We demonstrate biochemically that the phosphorylated amino acid is serine, and by mutational analysis that the phosphorylation reaction is not due to an autophosphorylation of DokA. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved histidine did not affect the osmostress-dependent phosphorylation reaction. Conclusions A stimulus-dependent serine phosphorylation of a eukaryotic histidine kinase homologue was demonstrated for the first time in vivo. That implies that DokA, although showing typical structural features of a bacterial two-component system, might be part of a eukaryotic signal transduction pathway that involves serine/threonine kinases.

  12. Plasma membrane protein OsMCA1 is involved in regulation of hypo-osmotic shock-induced Ca2+ influx and modulates generation of reactive oxygen species in cultured rice cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurusu Takamitsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanosensing and its downstream responses are speculated to involve sensory complexes containing Ca2+-permeable mechanosensitive channels. On recognizing osmotic signals, plant cells initiate activation of a widespread signal transduction network that induces second messengers and triggers inducible defense responses. Characteristic early signaling events include Ca2+ influx, protein phosphorylation and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Pharmacological analyses show Ca2+ influx mediated by mechanosensitive Ca2+ channels to influence induction of osmotic signals, including ROS generation. However, molecular bases and regulatory mechanisms for early osmotic signaling events remain poorly elucidated. Results We here identified and investigated OsMCA1, the sole rice homolog of putative Ca2+-permeable mechanosensitive channels in Arabidopsis (MCAs. OsMCA1 was specifically localized at the plasma membrane. A promoter-reporter assay suggested that OsMCA1 mRNA is widely expressed in seed embryos, proximal and apical regions of shoots, and mesophyll cells of leaves and roots in rice. Ca2+ uptake was enhanced in OsMCA1-overexpressing suspension-cultured cells, suggesting that OsMCA1 is involved in Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Hypo-osmotic shock-induced ROS generation mediated by NADPH oxidases was also enhanced in OsMCA1-overexpressing cells. We also generated and characterized OsMCA1-RNAi transgenic plants and cultured cells; OsMCA1-suppressed plants showed retarded growth and shortened rachises, while OsMCA1-suppressed cells carrying Ca2+-sensitive photoprotein aequorin showed partially impaired changes in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt induced by hypo-osmotic shock and trinitrophenol, an activator of mechanosensitive channels. Conclusions We have identified a sole MCA ortholog in the rice genome and developed both overexpression and suppression lines. Analyses of cultured cells with altered

  13. [Testate amoebas of pine forests in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, A A; Krasil'nikov, P A

    2011-01-01

    The population of testate amoebas in the soils of pine forests in Mexico has been studied. In total, 68 species, varieties, and types of testate amoebas with cosmopolite distribution were found. The species diversity of the testate population includes hygrophilous species that differ from hygrophilous species with luvisols in higher andosols. Comparative analysis using the results of one available study of soil testate amoebas from Mexico has been carried out [Bonnet, 1977]. PMID:21870497

  14. Recovery from heat, salt and osmotic stress in Physcomitrella patens requires a functional small heat shock protein PpHsp16.4

    OpenAIRE

    Ruibal, Cecilia; Castro, Alexandra; Carballo, Valentina; Szabados, László; Vidal, Sabina

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant small heat shock proteins (sHsps) accumulate in response to various environmental stresses, including heat, drought, salt and oxidative stress. Numerous studies suggest a role for these proteins in stress tolerance by preventing stress-induced protein aggregation as well as by facilitating protein refolding by other chaperones. However, in vivo evidence for the involvement of sHsps in tolerance to different stress factors is still missing, mainly due to the lack of appropriat...

  15. Role of the alternative sigma factors sigmaE and sigmaS in survival of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium during starvation, refrigeration and osmotic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeechan, Alisdair; Roberts, Mark; Cogan, Tristan A; Jørgensen, Frieda; Stevenson, Andrew; Lewis, Claire; Rowley, Gary; Humphrey, Tom J

    2007-01-01

    The ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to survive environmental stress requires specific, coordinated, responses, which induce resistance to the stress condition. This study investigated the relative contribution of sigmaE and sigmaS, the sigma factors regulating extracytoplasmic and general stress response functions, respectively, to survival at low temperature and also in media of differing osmotic strength, conditions relevant to food preservation. To determine if low-temperature storage is a signal for sigmaE- and sigmaS-mediated survival, the ability of S. Typhimurium rpoE, rpoS and rpoE/rpoS mutants to survive in a saline starvation-survival model at a refrigeration temperature (4.5 degrees C) was examined. Under these conditions, the rpoE mutant was significantly (Psigma factors were important for maximum survival but sigmaS played the dominant role. Analysis of the metabolic activity of starved populations at 4.5 and 37 degrees C revealed significantly (PsigmaE- and sigmaS-regulated genes in maintaining energy homeostasis. Together these data demonstrate that sigmaE and sigmaS are important for survival of S. Typhimurium in conditions encountered during food processing and that the relative contribution of sigmaE and sigmaS is critically dependent on the precise nature of the stress. PMID:17185555

  16. Amoebae and Legionella pneumophila in saline environments

    OpenAIRE

    Gast, Rebecca J.; Moran, Dawn M.; Dennett, Mark R.; Wurtsbaugh, Wayne A.; Amaral- Zettler, Linda A.

    2011-01-01

    Amoeboid protists that harbor bacterial pathogens are of significant interest as potential reservoirs of disease-causing organisms in the environment, but little is known about them in marine and other saline environments. We enriched amoeba cultures from sediments from four sites in the New England estuarine system of Mt. Hope Bay, Massachusetts and from sediments from six sites in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Cultures of amoebae were enriched using both minimal- and non-nutrient agar plates, ...

  17. Osmotic Dehydration of Fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Guiné, Raquel; Barroca, Maria João

    2009-01-01

    The need for increasing improvements in the quality of food products conducted to an increased interest in osmotic treatment. This technology involves the partial dehydration of a water-rich solid foodstuff, either whole or in pieces, through immersion in an osmotic solution. In fact, osmotic treatment is applied with the goal of modifying the composition of food material through partial water removal and impregnation of solutes, without affecting the structural integrity of products. Three k...

  18. Saltstone Osmotic Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Ralph L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, Kenneth L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRN

    2013-09-23

    Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004.

  19. Amoebas of Complex Hypersurfaces in Statistical Thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passare, Mikael [Stockholm University, Department of Mathematics (Sweden); Pochekutov, Dmitry, E-mail: potchekutov@gmail.com [Siberian Federal University, Institute of Core Undergraduate Programmes (Russian Federation); Tsikh, August, E-mail: atsikh@sfu-kras.ru [Siberian Federal University, Institute of Mathematics (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15

    The amoeba of a complex hypersurface is its image under the logarithmic projection. A number of properties of algebraic hypersurface amoebas are carried over to the case of transcendental hypersurfaces. We demonstrate the potential that amoebas can bring into statistical physics by considering the problem of energy distribution in a quantum thermodynamic ensemble. The spectrum {l_brace}{epsilon}{sub k}{r_brace} Subset-Of Z{sup n} of the ensemble is assumed to be multidimensional; this leads us to the notions of multidimensional temperature and a vector of differential thermodynamic forms. Strictly speaking, in the paper we develop the multidimensional Darwin-Fowler method and give the description of the domain of admissible average values of energy for which the thermodynamic limit exists.

  20. Saltstone Osmotic Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR-2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency 3, KNO3, Na3PO4x12H 2O, and K3PO4 when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater

  1. Experiences with the Amoeba distributed operating system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, Andrew S.; Renesse, van Robbert; Staveren, van Hans; Sharp, Gregory J.; Mullender, Sape J.; Jansen, Jack; Rossum, van Guido

    1990-01-01

    The Amoeba project is a research effort aimed at understanding how to connect multiple computers in a seamless way [16, 17, 26, 27, 31]. The basic idea is to provide the users with the illusion of a single powerful timesharing system, when, in fact, the system is implemented on a collection of machi

  2. Streaming instability of aggregating slime mold amoebae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Herbert; Reynolds, William

    1991-05-01

    We propose a new model of aggregation in the cellular slime mold D. Discoideum. Our approach couples the excitable signaling system to amoeba chemotaxis; the resultant system of equations is tractable to analytical and numerical approaches. Using our model, we derive the existence of a streaming instability for the concentric target aggregation pattern.

  3. Intersecting Solitons, Amoeba and Tropical Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimori, Toshiaki; Ohta, Kazutoshi; Sakai, Norisuke; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2008-01-01

    We study generic intersection (or web) of vortices with instantons inside, which is a 1/4 BPS state in the Higgs phase of five-dimensional N=1 supersymmetric U(Nc) gauge theory on R_t \\times (C^\\ast)^2 \\simeq R^{2,1} \\times T^2 with Nf=Nc Higgs scalars in the fundamental representation. In the case of the Abelian-Higgs model (Nf=Nc=1), the intersecting vortex sheets can be beautifully understood in a mathematical framework of amoeba and tropical geometry, and we propose a dictionary relating solitons and gauge theory to amoeba and tropical geometry. A projective shape of vortex sheets is described by the amoeba. Vortex charge density is uniformly distributed among vortex sheets, and negative contribution to instanton charge density is understood as the complex Monge-Ampere measure with respect to a plurisubharmonic function on (C^\\ast)^2. The Wilson loops in T^2 are related with derivatives of the Ronkin function. The general form of the Kahler potential and the asymptotic metric of the moduli space of a vort...

  4. Combinatorial Optimization by Amoeba-Based Neurocomputer with Chaotic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Masashi; Hirata, Yoshito; Hara, Masahiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    We demonstrate a computing system based on an amoeba of a true slime mold Physarum capable of producing rich spatiotemporal oscillatory behavior. Our system operates as a neurocomputer because an optical feedback control in accordance with a recurrent neural network algorithm leads the amoeba's photosensitive branches to search for a stable configuration concurrently. We show our system's capability of solving the traveling salesman problem. Furthermore, we apply various types of nonlinear time series analysis to the amoeba's oscillatory behavior in the problem-solving process. The results suggest that an individual amoeba might be characterized as a set of coupled chaotic oscillators.

  5. Sucker-like structures on the pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    OpenAIRE

    John, D T; Cole, T B; Marciano-Cabral, F M

    1984-01-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed sucker-like structures on amoebae of 13 human isolates of Naegleria fowleri. The number of suckers per amoeba seemed to vary according to the virulence of the strain. We propose the term amoebastome to describe this unique sucker-like structure of N. fowleri.

  6. Sucker-like structures on the pathogenic amoeba Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, D T; Cole, T B; Marciano-Cabral, F M

    1984-01-01

    Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed sucker-like structures on amoebae of 13 human isolates of Naegleria fowleri. The number of suckers per amoeba seemed to vary according to the virulence of the strain. We propose the term amoebastome to describe this unique sucker-like structure of N. fowleri. Images PMID:6696410

  7. Anticipation of periodic environmental changes in an amoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigusa, Tetsu; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    The amoeboid organism of true slime mold, the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum, had capacity of memorizing a periodic event. The organism showed vigorous locomotion in the favorite conditions. When stimulation of the unfavorable conditions was given in a pulse-like regime and was repeated three times at interval of 60 minutes, the amoeba reduced the locomotion speed in response to each pulse. Even though the favorite conditions were kept to be constant after the periodic pulses, the amoeba spontaneously reduced the locomotion speed at the timing of next pulse (after 60 minutes). This means that the amoeba anticipated the next environmental change.

  8. Endocannabinoids inhibit the growth of free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rafik; Pernin, Pierre; Bodennec, Jacques

    2010-07-01

    The cannabinoid Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits the growth of some pathogenic amoebae in vitro and exacerbates amoebic encephalitis in animal models. However, the effects of endogenous cannabinoids on amoebae remain unknown. Therefore, we tested several endocannabinoids (N-acyl ethanolamines and 2-O-acyl glycerol) on different genera of amoebae. The results showed that all of the endocannabinoids tested inhibit amoebic growth at subpharmacological doses, with 50% inhibitory concentrations ranging from 15 to 20 microM. A nonhydrolyzable endocannabinoid had similar effects, showing that the inhibition seen results from endocannabinoids per se rather than from a catabolic product. PMID:20479202

  9. A REVIEW ON OSMOTIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnish Patel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional oral drug delivery systems supply an instantaneous release of drug, which cannot control the release of the drug and effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the process of osmosis. Osmotic devices are the most promising strategy based systems for controlled drug delivery. They are the most reliable controlled drug delivery systems and could be employed as oral drug delivery systems. Various patents available for osmotic drug delivery system like Rose-Nelson pump, Higuchi leeper pump, Higuchi Theeuwes pump, Elementary Osmotic pump etc. ODDS are useful for poorly soluble drug, for pulsatile drug release, zero order release. Various techniques available for preparation of ODDS include push pull osmotic Pump, osmotic Brusting osmotic pump, liquid oral osmotic system, sandwiched osmotic tablets , delayed delivery osmotic device, monolithic osmotic System and controlled porosity osmotic Pump. Osmotically controlled oral drug delivery systems utilize osmotic pressure for controlled delivery of active agents. These systems can be utilized for systemic as well as targeted delivery of drugs. The release of drugs from osmotic systems is governed by various formulation factors such as solubility and osmotic pressure of the core components, size of the delivery orifice, and nature of the rate-controlling membrane. In this Paper mainly focused on the Osmotic System with example, the basic component of osmotic system and evaluation parameter of the osmotic drug delivery system.

  10. Elemental maps of Amoeba proteus by a scanning proton microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental maps for P, S, Cl, K, Ca and Zn of individual Amoeba proteus were obtained with the Melbourne scanning proton microprobe. The emphasis was put on the relationship of both distribution and concentration of Zn within the cell and the growth inhibitory effect of higher Zn concentrations in the culture medium. At a concentration of 0.04 mmol ZnCl2. Amoeba growth was inhibited. But at a concentration of 0.0016 mmol, the Amoeba grew as well as a control grown without addition of Zn. We found that in the former (0.04 mmol) Zn concentrated three times more than in the latter (0.0016 mmol), and also that Zn was enriched much more in the nucleus and endoplasm (five to six times) than in other parts of the cell (two times). Future work along these lines may provide insight into the mechanism by which Zn affects the growth of Amoeba proteus and other cells. (orig.)

  11. [Non-pathogenic intestinal amoebae: a clinical-analytical overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sard, Bárbara Gomila; Navarro, Rafael Toledo; Esteban Sanchis, J Guillermo

    2011-03-01

    Human beings can be parasitized by various species of intestinal amoebae. Entamoeba histolytica is the only intestinal amoeba recognized to be pathogenic, while other amoeba species, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, E. hartmanni, E. coli, E. polecki, Endolimax nana and Iodamoeba buetschlii are considered to be non-pathogenic. The aim of this review is to synthesize the main morphological characteristics of the trophozoite and cyst stages of each amoeba as the basis for precise microscopical diagnosis. The difficulty of morphological differentiation among species included in the so-called "Entamoeba complex" entails the use of immunological and molecular diagnoses. In addition, a summary of basic epidemiological, therapeutic and prophylactic aspects of these non-pathogenic amoebae is provided. All of these aspects are crucial since these amoebae are usually found to be present in human coproparasitological analyses and must be differentiated from the pathogenic species E. histolytica. Furthermore, they can be used as suitable biological tags of the hygienic state of the environment and the health and hygiene measures of the population. PMID:21458707

  12. Equilibrium Electro-osmotic Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Isaak

    2014-01-01

    Since its prediction fifteen years ago, electro-osmotic instability has been attributed to non-equilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current in the course of concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface. This attribution had a double basis. Firstly, it has been recognized that equilibrium electro-osmosis cannot yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. Secondly, it has been shown that non-equilibrium electro-osmosis can. First theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent numerical studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential in the solid) allows for equilibrium electro-osmotic instability. Moreover, we s...

  13. Osmotic water transport in aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuthen, Thomas; Alsterfjord, Magnus; Beitz, Eric;

    2013-01-01

    molecules give rise to no water transport. Accordingly, the rate of water transport is proportional to the reflection coefficient σ, while the solute permeability, P(S), is proportional to 1 - σ. The model was tested in aquaporins heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. A variety of aquaporin channel...... sizes and geometries were obtained with the two aquaporins AQP1 and AQP9 and mutant versions of these. Osmotic water transport was generated by adding 20 mM of a range of different-sized osmolytes to the outer solution. The osmotic water permeability and the reflection coefficient were measured......Abstract  We test a novel, stochastic model of osmotic water transport in aquaporins. A solute molecule present at the pore mouth can either be reflected or permeate the pore. We assume that only reflected solute molecules induce osmotic transport of water through the pore, while permeating solute...

  14. Significance testing testate amoeba water table reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Richard J.; Babeshko, Kirill V.; van Bellen, Simon; Blackford, Jeffrey J.; Booth, Robert K.; Charman, Dan J.; Ellershaw, Megan R.; Gilbert, Daniel; Hughes, Paul D. M.; Jassey, Vincent E. J.; Lamentowicz, Łukasz; Lamentowicz, Mariusz; Malysheva, Elena A.; Mauquoy, Dmitri; Mazei, Yuri; Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Swindles, Graeme T.; Tsyganov, Andrey N.; Turner, T. Edward; Telford, Richard J.

    2016-04-01

    Transfer functions are valuable tools in palaeoecology, but their output may not always be meaningful. A recently-developed statistical test ('randomTF') offers the potential to distinguish among reconstructions which are more likely to be useful, and those less so. We applied this test to a large number of reconstructions of peatland water table depth based on testate amoebae. Contrary to our expectations, a substantial majority (25 of 30) of these reconstructions gave non-significant results (P > 0.05). The underlying reasons for this outcome are unclear. We found no significant correlation between randomTF P-value and transfer function performance, the properties of the training set and reconstruction, or measures of transfer function fit. These results give cause for concern but we believe it would be extremely premature to discount the results of non-significant reconstructions. We stress the need for more critical assessment of transfer function output, replication of results and ecologically-informed interpretation of palaeoecological data.

  15. Shedding light on vampires: the phylogeny of vampyrellid amoebae revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Hess

    Full Text Available With the advent of molecular phylogenetic techniques the polyphyly of naked filose amoebae has been proven. They are interspersed in several supergroups of eukaryotes and most of them already found their place within the tree of life. Although the 'vampire amoebae' have attracted interest since the middle of the 19th century, the phylogenetic position and even the monophyly of this traditional group are still uncertain. In this study clonal co-cultures of eight algivorous vampyrellid amoebae and the respective food algae were established. Culture material was characterized morphologically and a molecular phylogeny was inferred using SSU rDNA sequence comparisons. We found that the limnetic, algivorous vampyrellid amoebae investigated in this study belong to a major clade within the Endomyxa Cavalier-Smith, 2002 (Cercozoa, grouping together with a few soil-dwelling taxa. They split into two robust clades, one containing species of the genus Vampyrella Cienkowski, 1865, the other containing the genus Leptophrys Hertwig & Lesser, 1874, together with terrestrial members. Supported by morphological data these clades are designated as the two families Vampyrellidae Zopf, 1885, and Leptophryidae fam. nov. Furthermore the order Vampyrellida West, 1901 was revised and now corresponds to the major vampyrellid clade within the Endomyxa, comprising the Vampyrellidae and Leptophryidae as well as several environmental sequences. In the light of the presented phylogenetic analyses morphological and ecological aspects, the feeding strategy and nutritional specialization within the vampyrellid amoebae are discussed.

  16. Cellular Response of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii to Chlorine, Chlorine Dioxide, and Monochloramine Treatments ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoa, Emerancienne; Bodet, Charles; Morel, Franck; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Legube, Bernard; Héchard, Yann

    2011-01-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoebae commonly found in water systems. Free-living amoebae might be pathogenic but are also known to bear phagocytosis-resistant bacteria, protecting these bacteria from water treatments. The mode of action of these treatments is poorly understood, particularly on amoebae. It is important to examine the action of these treatments on amoebae in order to improve them. The cellular response to chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine was tested o...

  17. Amoeba-resisting bacteria found in multilamellar bodies secreted by Dictyostelium discoideum: social amoebae can also package bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquet, Valérie E; Charette, Steve J

    2016-03-01

    Many bacteria can resist phagocytic digestion by various protozoa. Some of these bacteria (all human pathogens) are known to be packaged in multilamellar bodies produced in the phagocytic pathway of the protozoa and that are secreted into the extracellular milieu. Packaged bacteria are protected from harsh conditions, and the packaging process is suspected to promote bacterial persistence in the environment. To date, only a limited number of protozoa, belonging to free-living amoebae and ciliates, have been shown to perform bacteria packaging. It is still unknown if social amoebae can do bacteria packaging. The link between the capacity of 136 bacterial isolates to resist the grazing of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and to be packaged by this amoeba was investigated in the present study. The 45 bacterial isolates displaying a resisting phenotype were tested for their capacity to be packaged. A total of seven isolates from Cupriavidus, Micrococcus, Microbacterium and Rathayibacter genera seemed to be packaged and secreted by D. discoideum based on immunofluorescence results. Electron microscopy confirmed that the Cupriavidus and Rathayibacter isolates were formally packaged. These results show that social amoebae can package some bacteria from the environment revealing a new aspect of microbial ecology. PMID:26862140

  18. Role of Osmotic Adjustment in Plant Productivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebre, G.M.

    2001-01-11

    Successful implementation of short rotation woody crops requires that the selected species and clones be productive, drought tolerant, and pest resistant. Since water is one of the major limiting factors in poplar (Populus sp.) growth, there is little debate for the need of drought tolerant clones, except on the wettest of sites (e.g., lower Columbia River delta). Whether drought tolerance is compatible with productivity remains a debatable issue. Among the many mechanisms of drought tolerance, dehydration postponement involves the maintenance of high leaf water potential due to, for example, an adequate root system. This trait is compatible with productivity, but requires available soil moisture. When the plant leaf water potential and soil water content decline, the plant must be able to survive drought through dehydration tolerance mechanisms, such as low osmotic potential or osmotic adjustment. Osmotic adjustment and low osmotic potential are considered compatible with growth and yield because they aid in the maintenance of leaf turgor. However, it has been shown that turgor alone does not regulate cell expansion or stomatal conductance and, therefore, the role of osmotic adjustment is debated. Despite this finding, osmotic adjustment has been correlated with grain yield in agronomic crop species, and gene markers responsible for osmotic adjustment are being investigated to improve drought tolerance in productive progenies. Although osmotic adjustment and low osmotic potentials have been investigated in several forest tree species, few studies have investigated the relationship between osmotic adjustment and growth. Most of these studies have been limited to greenhouse or container-grown plants. Osmotic adjustment and rapid growth have been specifically associated in Populus and black spruce (Picea mariuna (Mill.) B.S.P.) progenies. We tested whether these relationships held under field conditions using several poplar clones. In a study of two hybrid poplar

  19. Advances in the knowledge of amphizoic amoebae infecting fish

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyková, Iva; Lom, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 51, 2/3 (2004), s. 81-97. ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : amphizoic amoebae * fish hosts * review Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.837, year: 2004

  20. The genome of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichinger, L; Pachebat, J A; Glöckner, G; Rajandream, M-A; Sucgang, R; Berriman, M; Song, J; Olsen, R; Szafranski, K; Xu, Q; Tunggal, B; Kummerfeld, S; Madera, M; Konfortov, B A; Rivero, F; Bankier, A T; Lehmann, R; Hamlin, N; Davies, R; Gaudet, P; Fey, P; Pilcher, K; Chen, G; Saunders, D; Sodergren, E; Davis, P; Kerhornou, A; Nie, X; Hall, N; Anjard, C; Hemphill, L; Bason, N; Farbrother, P; Desany, B; Just, E; Morio, T; Rost, R; Churcher, C; Cooper, J; Haydock, S; van Driessche, N; Cronin, A; Goodhead, I; Muzny, D; Mourier, T; Pain, A; Lu, M; Harper, D; Lindsay, R; Hauser, H; James, K; Quiles, M; Madan Babu, M; Saito, T; Buchrieser, C; Wardroper, A; Felder, M; Thangavelu, M; Johnson, D; Knights, A; Loulseged, H; Mungall, K; Oliver, K; Price, C; Quail, M A; Urushihara, H; Hernandez, J; Rabbinowitsch, E; Steffen, D; Sanders, M; Ma, J; Kohara, Y; Sharp, S; Simmonds, M; Spiegler, S; Tivey, A; Sugano, S; White, B; Walker, D; Woodward, J; Winckler, T; Tanaka, Y; Shaulsky, G; Schleicher, M; Weinstock, G; Rosenthal, A; Cox, E C; Chisholm, R L; Gibbs, R; Loomis, W F; Platzer, M; Kay, R R; Williams, J; Dear, P H; Noegel, A A; Barrell, B; Kuspa, A

    2005-01-01

    The social amoebae are exceptional in their ability to alternate between unicellular and multicellular forms. Here we describe the genome of the best-studied member of this group, Dictyostelium discoideum. The gene-dense chromosomes of this organism encode approximately 12,500 predicted proteins, a...

  1. Checklist, diversity and distribution of testate amoebae in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Leonardo D; Lara, Enrique; Mitchell, Edward A D

    2015-10-01

    Bringing together more than 170 years of data, this study represents the first attempt to construct a species checklist and analyze the diversity and distribution of testate amoebae in Chile, a country that encompasses the southwestern region of South America, countless islands and part of the Antarctic. In Chile, known diversity includes 416 testate amoeba taxa (64 genera, 352 infrageneric taxa), 24 of which are here reported for the first time. Species-accumulation plots show that in Chile, the number of testate amoeba species reported has been continually increasing since the mid-19th century without leveling off. Testate amoebae have been recorded in 37 different habitats, though they are more diverse in peatlands and rainforest soils. Only 11% of species are widespread in continental Chile, while the remaining 89% of the species exhibit medium or short latitudinal distribution ranges. Also, species composition of insular Chile and the Chilean Antarctic territory is a depauperated subset of that found in continental Chile. Nearly, the 10% of the species reported here are endemic to Chile and many of them are distributed only within the so-called Chilean biodiversity hotspot (ca. 25° S-47° S). These findings are here thoroughly discussed in a biogeographical and evolutionary context. PMID:26340665

  2. Current status of the AMOEBA polarizable force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Jay W; Wu, Chuanjie; Ren, Pengyu; Pande, Vijay S; Chodera, John D; Schnieders, Michael J; Haque, Imran; Mobley, David L; Lambrecht, Daniel S; DiStasio, Robert A; Head-Gordon, Martin; Clark, Gary N I; Johnson, Margaret E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2010-03-01

    Molecular force fields have been approaching a generational transition over the past several years, moving away from well-established and well-tuned, but intrinsically limited, fixed point charge models toward more intricate and expensive polarizable models that should allow more accurate description of molecular properties. The recently introduced AMOEBA force field is a leading publicly available example of this next generation of theoretical model, but to date, it has only received relatively limited validation, which we address here. We show that the AMOEBA force field is in fact a significant improvement over fixed charge models for small molecule structural and thermodynamic observables in particular, although further fine-tuning is necessary to describe solvation free energies of drug-like small molecules, dynamical properties away from ambient conditions, and possible improvements in aromatic interactions. State of the art electronic structure calculations reveal generally very good agreement with AMOEBA for demanding problems such as relative conformational energies of the alanine tetrapeptide and isomers of water sulfate complexes. AMOEBA is shown to be especially successful on protein-ligand binding and computational X-ray crystallography where polarization and accurate electrostatics are critical. PMID:20136072

  3. Diagnosis of Infections Caused by Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno da Rocha-Azevedo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris, and Sappinia sp. are pathogenic free-living amoebae. N. fowleri causes Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis, a rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system, while Acanthamoeba spp. and B. mandrillaris cause chronic granulomatous encephalitis. Acanthamoeba spp. also can cause cutaneous lesions and Amoebic Keratitis, a sight-threatening infection of the cornea that is associated with contact lens use or corneal trauma. Sappinia pedata has been identified as the cause of a nonlethal case of amoebic encephalitis. In view of the potential health consequences due to infection with these amoebae, rapid diagnosis is critical for early treatment. Microscopic examination and culture of biopsy specimens, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF, and corneal scrapings have been used in the clinical laboratory. For amoebic keratitis, confocal microscopy has been used to successfully identify amoebae in corneal tissue. More recently, conventional and real-time PCR assays have been developed that are sensitive and specific for the amoebae. In addition, multiplex PCR assays are available for the rapid identification of these pathogens in biopsy tissue, CSF, and corneal specimens.

  4. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify L. pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoebae hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 134...

  5. Methodology to Implement an Amoeba Complex Object Server

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teeuw, Wouter B.; Blanken, Henk M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the methodology used in the design of a complex object server application for the Amoeba distributed operating system. It uses the top-down design that was suggested by Parnas, in which a model is turned into an implementation by gradually adding details. The paper also describes

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Intestinal Amoebas in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaian

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Many microscopic-based epidemiological surveys on the prevalence of human intestinal pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoa including intestinal amoeba performed in Iran show a high prevalence of human intestinal amoeba in different parts of Iran. Such epidemiological studies on amoebiasis are confusing, mainly due to recently appreciated distinction between the Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii. Differential diagnosis can be done by some methods such as PCR-based methods, monoclonal antibodies and the analysis of isoenzyme typing, however the molecular study of these protozoa in Iran is low. Based on molecular studies, it seems that E. dispar is predominant species especially in the central and northern areas of Iran and amoebiasis due to E. histolytica is a rare infection in the country. It is suggested that infection with E. moshkovskii may be common among Iranians. Considering the importance of molecular epidemiology of amoeba in Iran and also the current data, the present study reviews the data currently available on the molecular distribution of intestinal human amoeba in Iran.

  7. Efficiency of osmotic pipe flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaning, Louise Sejling; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Helix Nielsen, Claus;

    2013-01-01

    We present experiments and theory for flows of sugar or salt solutions in cylindrical tubes with semipermeable walls (hollow fiber membranes) immersed in water, quantifying the strength of the osmotic driving force in relation to the dimensionless parameters that specify the system. The pumping e...

  8. Osmotic Effects in Sludge Dewatering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Kristian; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    A model of filtration dewatering is presented. The model is based on the d’Arcy flow equation in which the resistance to filtration is described by the Corzeny–Carman equation and the driving force is the difference between the external pressure and the osmotic pressure of the filter cake. It has...

  9. Extra pontine osmotic demyelination syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zunga, Pervaiz M.; Farooq, Omar; Dar, Mohd I.; Dar, Ishrat H; Rashid, Samia; Rather, Abdul Q.; Basu, Javid A; Ashraf, Mohammed; Jahangeer A. Bhat

    2015-01-01

    The osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) has been identified as a complication of the rapid correction of hyponatremia for decades. However, in recent years, a variety of other medical conditions have been associated with the development of ODS, independent of changes in serum sodium which cause a rapid changes in osmolality of the interstitial (extracellular) compartment of the brain leading to dehydration of energy-depleted cells with subsequent axonal damage that occurs in characteristic a...

  10. Equilibrium Electro-osmotic Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinstein, Isaak; Zaltzman, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Since its prediction fifteen years ago, electro-osmotic instability has been attributed to non-equilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current in the course of concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface. This attribution had a double basis. Firstly, it has been recognized that equilibrium electro-osmosis cannot yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. Secondly, it has been shown that non-equilibrium elect...

  11. Auxin response under osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser, Victoria; Shani, Eilon

    2016-08-01

    The phytohormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA) is a small organic molecule that coordinates many of the key processes in plant development and adaptive growth. Plants regulate the auxin response pathways at multiple levels including biosynthesis, metabolism, transport and perception. One of the most striking aspects of plant plasticity is the modulation of development in response to changing growth environments. In this review, we explore recent findings correlating auxin response-dependent growth and development with osmotic stresses. Studies of water deficit, dehydration, salt, and other osmotic stresses point towards direct and indirect molecular perturbations in the auxin pathway. Osmotic stress stimuli modulate auxin responses by affecting auxin biosynthesis (YUC, TAA1), transport (PIN), perception (TIR/AFB, Aux/IAA), and inactivation/conjugation (GH3, miR167, IAR3) to coordinate growth and patterning. In turn, stress-modulated auxin gradients drive physiological and developmental mechanisms such as stomata aperture, aquaporin and lateral root positioning. We conclude by arguing that auxin-mediated growth inhibition under abiotic stress conditions is one of the developmental and physiological strategies to acclimate to the changing environment. PMID:27052306

  12. Complement sensitivity of Entamoeba histolytica and various nonpathogenic amoeba species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, B; Ebert, F; Horstmann, R D

    1994-12-01

    Culture forms of the potentially pathogenic Entamoeba histolytica were compared to those of the nonpathogenic species of E. dispar, E. hartmanni, E. coli, Endolimax nana, and E. moshkovskii regarding the sensitivity to lysis by human complement activated through the alternative pathway. E. dispar was found unique in its complement resistance; all other nonpathogenic isolates resembled E. histolytica in that they were complement sensitive. Thus, a state of complement sensitivity is not a particular property of potentially pathogenic amoebae. PMID:7716404

  13. Genetic Variation in the Free-Living Amoeba Naegleria fowleri

    OpenAIRE

    Pélandakis, Michel; De Jonckheere, Johan F; Pernin, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    In this study, 30 strains of the pathogenic free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri were investigated by using the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. The present study confirmed our previous finding that RAPD variation is not correlated with geographical origin. In particular, Mexican strains belong to the variant previously detected in Asia, Europe, and the United States. In France, surprisingly, strains from Cattenom gave RAPD patterns identical to those of the Japanese strains....

  14. Current Status of the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Ponder, Jay W.; Wu, Chuanjie; Ren, Pengyu; Pande, Vijay S.; Chodera, John D.; Schnieders, Michael J; Haque, Imran; Mobley, David L.; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; DiStasio, Robert A.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Clark, Gary N. I.; Johnson, Margaret E.; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Molecular force fields have been approaching a generational transition over the past several years, moving away from well-established and well-tuned, but intrinsically limited, fixed point charge models towards more intricate and expensive polarizable models that should allow more accurate description of molecular properties. The recently introduced AMOEBA force field is a leading publicly available example of this next generation of theoretical model, but to date has only received relatively...

  15. Automation of AMOEBA polarizable force field parameterization for small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Johnny C.; Chattree, Gaurav; Ren, Pengyu

    2012-01-01

    A protocol to generate parameters for the AMOEBA polarizable force field for small organic molecules has been established, and polarizable atomic typing utility, Poltype, which fully automates this process, has been implemented. For validation, we have compared with quantum mechanical calculations of molecular dipole moments, optimized geometry, electrostatic potential, and conformational energy for a variety of neutral and charged organic molecules, as well as dimer interaction energies of a...

  16. Methodology to Implement an Amoeba Complex Object Server

    OpenAIRE

    Teeuw, Wouter B.; Blanken, Henk M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the methodology used in the design of a complex object server application for the Amoeba distributed operating system. It uses the top-down design that was suggested by Parnas, in which a model is turned into an implementation by gradually adding details. The paper also describes the abstraction levels that show up if going from a specification of the behaviour towards an implementation, and shows the methodology in which performance will be measured (instead of estimated)...

  17. The chastity of amoebae: re-evaluating evidence for sex in amoeboid organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Lahr, Daniel J.G; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Katz, Laura A.; Lara, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Amoebae are generally assumed to be asexual. We argue that this view is a relict of early classification schemes that lumped all amoebae together inside the ‘lower’ protozoa, separated from the ‘higher’ plants, animals and fungi. This artificial classification allowed microbial eukaryotes, including amoebae, to be dismissed as primitive, and implied that the biological rules and theories developed for macro-organisms need not apply to microbes. Eukaryotic diversity is made up of 70+ lineages,...

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Erythritol-Producing Yarrowia lipolytica from Glycerol in Response to Osmotic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Bo; Dai, Xiao-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Yong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiao-Bei; Lin, Chi-Chung

    2015-07-01

    Osmotic pressure is a critical factor for erythritol production with osmophilic yeast. Protein expression patterns of an erythritol-producing yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica, were analyzed to identify differentially-expressed proteins in response to osmotic pressure. In order to analyze intracellular protein levels quantitatively, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed to separate and visualize the differential expression of the intracellular proteins extracted from Y. lipolytica cultured under low (3.17 osmol/kg) and high (4.21 osmol/kg) osmotic pressures. Proteomic analyses allowed identification of 54 differentially-expressed proteins among the proteins distributed in the range of pI 3-10 and 14.4-97.4 kDa molecular mass between the osmotic stress conditions. Remarkably, the main proteins were involved in the pathway of energy, metabolism, cell rescue, and stress response. The expression of such enzymes related to protein and nucleotide biosynthesis was inhibited drastically, reflecting the growth arrest of Y. lipolytica under hyperosmotic stress. The improvement of erythritol production under high osmotic stress was due to the significant induction of a range of crucial enzymes related to polyols biosynthesis, such as transketolase and triosephosphate isomerase, and the osmotic stress responsive proteins like pyridoxine-4-dehydrogenase and the AKRs family. The polyols biosynthesis was really related to an osmotic response and a protection mechanism against hyperosmotic stress in Y. lipolytica. Additionally, the high osmotic stress could also induce other cell stress responses as with heat shock and oxidation stress responses, and these responsive proteins, such as the HSPs family, catalase T, and superoxide dismutase, also had drastically increased expression levels under hyperosmotic pressure. PMID:25737116

  19. Casein Micelle Dispersions under Osmotic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchoux, Antoine; Cayemitte, Pierre-Emerson; Jardin, Julien; Gésan-Guiziou, Geneviève; Cabane, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Casein micelles dispersions have been concentrated and equilibrated at different osmotic pressures using equilibrium dialysis. This technique measured an equation of state of the dispersions over a wide range of pressures and concentrations and at different ionic strengths. Three regimes were found. i), A dilute regime in which the osmotic pressure is proportional to the casein concentration. In this regime, the casein micelles are well separated and rarely interact, whereas the osmotic press...

  20. [Effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ping; Wu, Ming-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    The effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification was investigated in the internal-loop air-lift nitrifying reactor. When influent ammonia concentration is kept at 420mg x L(-1) and influent osmotic pressure is increased from 4.3 to 18.8 x 10(5) Pa, the ammonia conversion of the nitrifying bioreactor is maintained between 93% and 100%. After influent osmotic pressure is further increased to 19.2 x 10(5)Pa, the ammonia conversion goes down to 69.2%. The influence of osmotic pressure on nitrification takes place without any alarm and the critical osmotic pressure is between 18.8 x 10(5) and 19.2 x 10(5) Pa. During osmotic stress, the nitrifying bacterial populations in the activated sludge become simplified, the cell size becomes smaller, the inner membrane becomes less and some unknown inclusion particles are formed. The cell structure is restored as soon as the osmotic pressure is removed. Addition of potassium is able to relieve the effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification. The nitrifying activity of the activated sludge is stimulated by the osmotic stress, and the specific ammonia conversion is increased from 0.083 kg x kg(-1) x d(-1) to 0.509 kg x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 2.569 kg x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively. PMID:16572857

  1. 感染性休克后期患者血管加压素水平对渗透压反应异常的规律探讨%Investigation of vasopressin response to increasing osmotic pressure in the late-phase of septic shock patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周庆明; 李栋梁; 张征; 王春玲; 杨秀芬

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the vasopressin (VP) response to increasing osmotic pressure in the late-phase of septic shock patients.Methods Thirty-seven septic shock patients hospitalized in intensive care unit (ICU) of the First Hospital of Hebei Medical Unive~ity from January 2012 to September 2013 were enrolled.All patients received 3% hypertonic saline solution infusion.Serum concentrations of VP and sodium were measured before and after hypertonic saline solution infusion.Patients with ratio of difference in VP and sodium before and after infusion of 3% hypertonic saline (△VP/△Na) ≤0.5 pg/mmol were defined as nonresponders,and who >0.5 pg/mmol defined as responders.The age,acute physiological and chronic health evaluation Ⅱ (APACHE Ⅱ) score,blood pressure,albumin level,vasoactive drug between the two groups were also analyzed.Results VP level in the nonresponsive group (n=20,54.05%) was markedly lowered before (ng/L:10.41 ± 1.70 vs.18.25 ± 5.90,t=5.29,P<0.01) and after (ng/L:11.36 ± 1.90 vs.24.33 ± 5.46,t=9.33,P<0.01) 3% hypertonic saline solution infusion,compared with that in the responsive group (n =17,45.95%).All patients in the two groups were given dopamine (DA) or norepinephrine (NE) for maintaining blood pressure,and the dose in the nonresponsive group were higher than those in the responsive group [DA (μg· kg-1· min-1):14.91 ± 3.78 vs.8.64 ± 1.69,t =-5.02,P< 0.01 ; NE (μg· kg-1· min-1):1.03 ± 0.48 vs.0.38 ± 0.12,t=-3.12,P<0.01].Three patients were given DA plus NE in the nonresponsive group while patients in the responsive group received only single drug therapy.The age,APACHE Ⅱ score,blood pressure,albumin level,sodium level before and after hypertonic saline solution infusion between the two groups were not statistically different.Conclusion VP secretion to osmotic challenge was impaired and decreased in the late-phase of septic shock,prompting dysfunction in VP synthesis.%目的 探讨感染性休克后

  2. Pathogenic Free-Living Amoebae Isolated From Contact Lenses of Keratitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham HAJIALILO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free-living amoeba (FLA-related keratitis is a progressive infection of the cornea with poor prognosis. The present study aimed to investigates the con­tact lenses of patients with keratitis for pathogenic free-living amoebae.Methods: Overall, 62 contact lenses and their paraphernalia of patients with kerati­tis cultured and tested for the presence of free-living amoebae using morphological criteria. Unusual plates including plates containing mix amoebae and Vermamoeba were submitted to molecular analysis. Results: Out of 62 plates, 11 revealed the outgrowth of free living amoeba of which 9 were Acanthamoeba, one plates contained mix amoebae including Acan­thamoeba and Vermamoeba and one showed the presence of Vermamoeba. These two latter plates belonged to patients suffered from unilateral keratitis due to the mis­used of soft contact lenses. One of the patients had mix infection of Acanthamoeba (T4 and V. vermiformis meanwhile the other patient was infected with the V. vermiformis. Conclusion: Amoebic keratitis continues to rise in Iran and worldwide. To date, various genera of free-living amoebae such as Vermamoeba could be the causative agent of keratitis. Soft contact lens wearers are the most affected patients in the country, thus awareness of high-risk people for preventing free-living amoebae re­lated keratitis is of utmost importance.

  3. IDENTIFICATION OF Pseudomonas spp. AS AMOEBA-RESISTANT MICROORGANISMS IN ISOLATES OF Acanthamoeba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius José Maschio

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Acanthamoeba is a “Trojan horse” of the microbial world. The aim of this study was to identify the presence of Pseudomonas as an amoeba-resistant microorganism in 12 isolates of Acanthamoeba. All isolates showed the genus Pseudomonas spp. as amoeba-resistant microorganisms. Thus, one can see that the Acanthamoeba isolates studied are hosts of Pseudomonas.

  4. AMOEBA: Designing for Collaboration in Computer Science Classrooms through Live Learning Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, Matthew; Davis, Don; Smith, Carmen Petrick

    2015-01-01

    AMOEBA is a unique tool to support teachers' orchestration of collaboration among novice programmers in a non-traditional programming environment. The AMOEBA tool was designed and utilized to facilitate collaboration in a classroom setting in real time among novice middle school and high school programmers utilizing the IPRO programming…

  5. Desalination shocks in microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Mani, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Salt transport in bulk electrolytes is limited by diffusion and convection, but in microstructures with charged surfaces (e.g. microfluidic devices, porous media, soils, or biological tissues) surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. For small applied voltages, these effects lead to well known linear electrokinetic phenomena. In this paper, we predict some surprising nonlinear dynamics that can result from the competition between bulk and interfacial transport at higher voltages. When counter-ions are selectively removed by a membrane or electrode, a "desalination shock" can propagate through the microstructure, leaving in its wake an ultrapure solution, nearly devoid of co-ions and colloidal impurities. We elucidate the basic physics of desalination shocks and develop a mathematical theory of their existence, structure, and stability, allowing for slow variations in surface charge or channel geometry. Via asymptotic approximations and similarity solutions, we show that des...

  6. Pack hunting by a common soil amoeba on nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisen, Stefan; Rosengarten, Jamila; Koller, Robert; Mulder, Christian; Urich, Tim; Bonkowski, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Soils host the most complex communities on Earth, including the most diverse and abundant eukaryotes, i.e. heterotrophic protists. Protists are generally considered as bacterivores, but evidence for negative interactions with nematodes both from laboratory and field studies exist. However, direct impacts of protists on nematodes remain unknown. We isolated the soil-borne testate amoeba Cryptodifflugia operculata and found a highly specialized and effective pack-hunting strategy to prey on bacterivorous nematodes. Enhanced reproduction in presence of prey nematodes suggests a beneficial predatory life history of these omnivorous soil amoebae. Cryptodifflugia operculata appears to selectively impact the nematode community composition as reductions of nematode numbers were species specific. Furthermore, we investigated 12 soil metatranscriptomes from five distinct locations throughout Europe for 18S ribosomal RNA transcripts of C. operculata. The presence of C. operculata transcripts in all samples, representing up to 4% of the active protist community, indicates a potential ecological importance of nematophagy performed by C. operculata in soil food webs. The unique pack-hunting strategy on nematodes that was previously unknown from protists, together with molecular evidence that these pack hunters are likely to be abundant and widespread in soils, imply a considerable importance of the hitherto neglected trophic link 'nematophagous protists' in soil food webs. PMID:26079718

  7. Amoebae as Potential Environmental Hosts for Mycobacterium ulcerans and Other Mycobacteria, but Doubtful Actos in Buruli Ulcer Epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryseels, Sophie; Amissah, Diana; Durnez, Lies; Vandelannoote, Koen; Leirs, Herwig; De Jonckheere, Johan; Silva, Manuel T.; Portaels, Francoise; Ablordey, Anthony; Eddyani, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Ghana, from which we cultivated amoeboid protozoa and mycobacteria. M. ulcerans was not isolated, but other mycobacteria were as frequently isolated from intracellular as from extracellular sources, suggesting that they commonly infect amoebae in nature. We screened the samples as well as the amoeba...... cultures for the M. ulcerans markers IS2404, IS2606 and KR-B. IS2404 was detected in 2% of the environmental samples and in 4% of the amoeba cultures. The IS2404 positive amoeba cultures included up to 5 different protozoan species, and originated both from Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities....... Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of experimental infection of amoebae with M. ulcerans and of the detection of the marker IS2404 in amoeba cultures isolated from the environment. We conclude that amoeba are potential natural hosts for M. ulcerans, yet remain sceptical about their implication...

  8. SPATIAL-VARIANT MORPHOLOGICAL FILTERS WITH NONLOCAL-PATCH-DISTANCE-BASED AMOEBA KERNEL FOR IMAGE DENOISING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filters of the Spatial-Variant amoeba morphology can preserve edges better, but with too much noise being left. For better denoising, this paper presents a new method to generate structuring elements for Spatially-Variant amoeba morphology.  The amoeba kernel in the proposed strategy is divided into two parts: one is the patch distance based amoeba center, and another is the geodesic distance based amoeba boundary, by which the nonlocal patch distance and local geodesic distance are both taken into consideration. Compared to traditional amoeba kernel, the new one has more stable center and its shape can be less influenced by noise in pilot image. What’s more important is that the nonlocal processing approach can induce a couple of adjoint dilation and erosion, and combinations of them can construct adaptive opening, closing, alternating sequential filters, etc. By designing the new amoeba kernel, a family of morphological filters therefore is derived. Finally, this paper presents a series of results on both synthetic and real images along with comparisons with current state-of-the-art techniques, including novel applications to medical image processing and noisy SAR image restoration.

  9. Osmotic water transport through carbon nanotube membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Amrit; Garde, Shekhar; Hummer, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study osmotically driven transport of water molecules through hexagonally packed carbon nanotube membranes. Our simulation setup comprises two such semipermeable membranes separating compartments of pure water and salt solution. The osmotic force drives water flow from the pure-water to the salt-solution compartment. Monitoring the flow at molecular resolution reveals several distinct features of nanoscale flows. In particular, thermal fluctuatio...

  10. Osmotic dehydration of fish: principal component analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lončar Biljana Lj.; Pezo Lato L.; Lević Ljubinko B.; Filipović Vladimir S.; Nićetin Milica R.; Knežević Violeta M.; Kuljanin Tatjana A.

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic treatment of the fish Carassius gibelio was studied in two osmotic solutions: ternary aqueous solution - S1, and sugar beet molasses - S2, at three solution temperatures of 10, 20 and 30oC, at atmospheric pressure. The aim was to examine the influence of type and concentration of the used hypertonic agent, temperature and immersion time on the water loss, solid gain, dry mater content, aw and content of minerals (Na, K, Ca and Mg). S2 solution has p...

  11. Extra pontine osmotic demyelination syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunga, Pervaiz M; Farooq, Omar; Dar, Mohd I; Dar, Ishrat H; Rashid, Samia; Rather, Abdul Q; Basu, Javid A; Ashraf, Mohammed; Bhat, Jahangeer A

    2015-01-01

    The osmotic demyelination syndrome (ODS) has been identified as a complication of the rapid correction of hyponatremia for decades. However, in recent years, a variety of other medical conditions have been associated with the development of ODS, independent of changes in serum sodium which cause a rapid changes in osmolality of the interstitial (extracellular) compartment of the brain leading to dehydration of energy-depleted cells with subsequent axonal damage that occurs in characteristic areas. Slow correction of the serum sodium concentration and additional administration of corticosteroids seems to be a major prevention step in ODS patients. In the current report we aimed to share a rare case which we observed in our hospital. A 65 year old female admitted as altered sensorium with history of vomiting, diarrhea was managed with intravenous fluids for 2 days at a peripheral health centre. Patient was referred to our centre with encephalopathy, evaluated and found to have hyponatremia and hypokalemia rest of biochemical parameters and septic profile were normal. Patient's electrolyte disturbances were managed as per guidelines but encephalopathy persisted. Supportive treatment was continued and patient was discharged after 2 wks of stay in hospital after gaining full sensorium and neurological functions. PMID:26124552

  12. Endosymbiotic bacteria associated with nematodes, ticks and amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark; Mediannikov, Oleg; Raoult, Didier; Greub, Gilbert

    2012-02-01

    Endosymbiosis is a mutualistic, parasitic or commensal symbiosis in which one symbiont is living within the body of another organism. Such symbiotic relationship with free-living amoebae and arthropods has been reported with a large biodiversity of microorganisms, encompassing various bacterial clades and to a lesser extent some fungi and viruses. By contrast, current knowledge on symbionts of nematodes is still mainly restricted to Wolbachia and its interaction with filarial worms that lead to increased pathogenicity of the infected nematode. In this review article, we aim to highlight the main characteristics of symbionts in term of their ecology, host cell interactions, parasitism and co-evolution, in order to stimulate future research in a field that remains largely unexplored despite the availability of modern tools. PMID:22126456

  13. Streaming instability of slime mold amoebae: An analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfer, Thomas; Maini, Philip K.

    1997-08-01

    During the aggregation of amoebae of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium, the interaction of chemical waves of the signaling molecule cAMP with cAMP-directed cell movement causes the breakup of a uniform cell layer into branching patterns of cell streams. Recent numerical and experimental investigations emphasize the pivotal role of the cell-density dependence of the chemical wave speed for the occurrence of the streaming instability. A simple, analytically tractable, model of Dictyostelium aggregation is developed to test this idea. The interaction of cAMP waves with cAMP-directed cell movement is studied in the form of coupled dynamics of wave front geometries and cell density. Comparing the resulting explicit instability criterion and dispersion relation for cell streaming with the previous findings of model simulations and numerical stability analyses, a unifying interpretation of the streaming instability as a cAMP wave-driven chemotactic instability is proposed.

  14. Large scale spontaneous synchronization of cell cycles in amoebae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, Carl

    2014-03-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. We show that substrate-growtn cell populations spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state and provide opportunities for synchronization theories beyond classic Kuramoto models.

  15. Genetic Variation in the Free-Living Amoeba Naegleria fowleri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélandakis, Michel; De Jonckheere, Johan F.; Pernin, Pierre

    1998-01-01

    In this study, 30 strains of the pathogenic free-living amoeba Naegleria fowleri were investigated by using the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) method. The present study confirmed our previous finding that RAPD variation is not correlated with geographical origin. In particular, Mexican strains belong to the variant previously detected in Asia, Europe, and the United States. In France, surprisingly, strains from Cattenom gave RAPD patterns identical to those of the Japanese strains. In addition, all of these strains, together with an additional French strain from Chooz, exhibited similarities to South Pacific strains. The results also confirmed the presence of numerous variants in Europe, whereas only two variants were detected in the United States. The two variants found in the United States were different from the South Pacific variants. These findings do not support the previous hypothesis concerning the origin and modes of dispersal of N. fowleri. PMID:9687460

  16. Water from ambient to supercritical conditions with the AMOEBA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, Daniel M

    2013-05-01

    The flexible polarizable AMOEBA force field for water is tested with classical molecular dynamics simulations from ambient up to supercritical conditions. Good results are obtained for the heat of vaporization, dielectric constant, self-diffusion constant, and radial distribution functions provided densities are fixed at the experimental values. If instead the densities are allowed to relax to those characteristic of the liquid-gas equilibrium for the model, then satisfactory results are obtained near ambient conditions, whereas at high temperatures the liquid densities are generally underestimated and the gas densities overestimated. As a consequence, the critical point of the model is reached at significantly too low temperature, although it occurs at approximately the correct density. PMID:23593996

  17. Mechanics and control of the cytoskeleton in Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembo, M

    1989-06-01

    Many models of the cytoskeletal motility of Amoeba proteus can be formulated in terms of the theory of reactive interpenetrating flow (Dembo and Harlow, 1986). We have devised numerical methodology for testing such models against the phenomenon of steady axisymmetric fountain flow. The simplest workable scheme revealed by such tests (the minimal model) is the main preoccupation of this study. All parameters of the minimal model are determined from available data. Using these parameters the model quantitatively accounts for the self assembly of the cytoskeleton of A. proteus: for the formation and detailed morphology of the endoplasmic channel, the ectoplasmic tube, the uropod, the plasma gel sheet, and the hyaline cap. The model accounts for the kinematics of the cytoskeleton: the detailed velocity field of the forward flow of the endoplasm, the contraction of the ectoplasmic tube, and the inversion of the flow in the fountain zone. The model also gives a satisfactory account of measurements of pressure gradients, measurements of heat dissipation, and measurements of the output of useful work by amoeba. Finally, the model suggests a very promising (but still hypothetical) continuum formulation of the free boundary problem of amoeboid motion. by balancing normal forces on the plasma membrane as closely as possible, the minimal model is able to predict the turgor pressure and surface tension of A. proteus. Several dynamical factors are crucial to the success of the minimal model and are likely to be general features of cytoskeletal mechanics and control in amoeboid cells. These are: a constitutive law for the viscosity of the contractile network that includes an automatic process of gelation as the network density gets large; a very vigorous cycle of network polymerization and depolymerization (in the case of A. proteus, the time constant for this reaction is approximately 12 s); control of network contractility by a diffusible factor (probably calcium ion); and

  18. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaud Bigot

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent.

  19. Intra-amoeba multiplication induces chemotaxis and biofilm colonization and formation for Legionella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Renaud; Bertaux, Joanne; Frere, Jacques; Berjeaud, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular bacterium, is the causative agent of legionellosis. In the environment this pathogenic bacterium colonizes the biofilms as well as amoebae, which provide a rich environment for the replication of Legionella. When seeded on pre-formed biofilms, L. pneumophila was able to establish and survive and was only found at the surface of the biofilms. Different phenotypes were observed when the L. pneumophila, used to implement pre-formed biofilms or to form mono-species biofilms, were cultivated in a laboratory culture broth or had grown intracellulary within the amoeba. Indeed, the bacteria, which developed within the amoeba, formed clusters when deposited on a solid surface. Moreover, our results demonstrate that multiplication inside the amoeba increased the capacity of L. pneumophila to produce polysaccharides and therefore enhanced its capacity to establish biofilms. Finally, it was shown that the clusters formed by L. pneumophila were probably related to the secretion of a chemotaxis molecular agent. PMID:24205008

  20. Seasonal changes in Sphagnum peatland testate amoeba communities along a hydrological gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Marcisz; Łukasz Lamentowicz; Sandra Slowińska; Michal Slowinski; Witold Muszak; Mariusz Lamentowicz

    2014-01-01

    Testate amoebae are an abundant and functionally important group of protists in peatlands, but little is known about the seasonal patterns of their communities. We investigated the relationships between testate amoeba diversity and community structure and water table depth and light conditions (shading vs. insolation) in a Sphagnum peatland in Northern Poland (Linje mire) in spring and summer 2010. We monitored the water table at five sites across the peatland and collected Sphagnum samples i...

  1. TESTATE AMOEBAE COMMUNITIES FROM CAVES OF SOME TERRITORIES IN EUROPEAN RUSSIA AND NORTH-EASTERN ITALY

    OpenAIRE

    Mazei, Yuri; Belyakova, Olga; Trulova, Alisa; Guidolin, Laura; Coppellotti, Olimpia

    2012-01-01

    The species composition of testate amoebae in caves from European Russia and North-East Italy was studied. Twenty-seven species were identified from various habitats inside caves (moist substratum on floor, guano, sediments of cave streams and pools, water droplets and bacterial mats on rocky surfaces). In caves of simple structure (without differing types of habitats), the species richness of testate amoebae was far lower than in that from habitats outside the caves. In heterogeneous caves, ...

  2. The Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based AMOEBA Force Field for Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Yue; Xia, Zhen; Zhang, Jiajing; Best, Robert; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W.; Ren, Pengyu

    2013-01-01

    Development of the AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Simulation) force field for proteins is presented. The current version (AMOEBA-2013) utilizes permanent electrostatic multipole moments through the quadrupole at each atom, and explicitly treats polarization effects in various chemical and physical environments. The atomic multipole electrostatic parameters for each amino acid residue type are derived from high-level gas phase quantum mechanical calculations via...

  3. Dynamics of hybrid amoeba proteus containing zoochlorellae studied using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.-H.; Fong, B. A.; Alfano, S. A., Jr.; Rakhlin, I.; Wang, W. B.; Ni, X. H.; Yang, Y. L.; Zhou, F.; Zuzolo, R. C.; Alfano, R. R.

    2011-03-01

    The microinjection of organelles, plants, particles or chemical solutions into Amoeba proteus coupled with spectroscopic analysis and observed for a period of time provides a unique new model for cancer treatment and studies. The amoeba is a eukaryote having many similar features of mammalian cells. The amoeba biochemical functions monitored spectroscopically can provide time sequence in vivo information about many metabolic transitions and metabolic exchanges between cellar organelles and substances microinjected into the amoeba. It is possible to microinject algae, plant mitochondria, drugs or carcinogenic solutions followed by recording the native fluorescence spectra of these composites. This model can be used to spectroscopically monitor the pre-metabolic transitions in developing diseased cells such as a cancer. Knowing specific metabolic transitions could offer solutions to inhibit cancer or reverse it as well as many other diseases. In the present study a simple experiment was designed to test the feasibility of this unique new model by injecting algae and chloroplasts into amoeba. The nonradiative dynamics found from these composites are evidence in terms of the emission ratios between the intensities at 337nm and 419nm; and 684nm bands. There were reductions in the metabolic and photosynthetic processes in amoebae that were microinjected with chloroplasts and zoochlorellae as well of those amoebae that ingested the algae and chloroplasts. The changes in the intensity of the emissions of the peaks indicate that the zoochlorellae lived in the amoebae for ten days. Spectral changes in intensity under the UV and 633nm wavelength excitation are from the energy transfer of DNA and RNA, protein-bound chromophores and chlorophylls present in zoochlorellae undergoing photosynthesis. The fluorescence spectroscopic probes established the biochemical interplay between the cell organelles and the algae present in the cell cytoplasm. This hybrid state is indicative

  4. Amoeba-Inspired Heuristic Search Dynamics for Exploring Chemical Reaction Paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Masashi; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu

    2015-09-01

    We propose a nature-inspired model for simulating chemical reactions in a computationally resource-saving manner. The model was developed by extending our previously proposed heuristic search algorithm, called "AmoebaSAT [Aono et al. 2013]," which was inspired by the spatiotemporal dynamics of a single-celled amoeboid organism that exhibits sophisticated computing capabilities in adapting to its environment efficiently [Zhu et al. 2013]. AmoebaSAT is used for solving an NP-complete combinatorial optimization problem [Garey and Johnson 1979], "the satisfiability problem," and finds a constraint-satisfying solution at a speed that is dramatically faster than one of the conventionally known fastest stochastic local search methods [Iwama and Tamaki 2004] for a class of randomly generated problem instances [ http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~hoos/5/benchm.html ]. In cases where the problem has more than one solution, AmoebaSAT exhibits dynamic transition behavior among a variety of the solutions. Inheriting these features of AmoebaSAT, we formulate "AmoebaChem," which explores a variety of metastable molecules in which several constraints determined by input atoms are satisfied and generates dynamic transition processes among the metastable molecules. AmoebaChem and its developed forms will be applied to the study of the origins of life, to discover reaction paths for which expected or unexpected organic compounds may be formed via unknown unstable intermediates and to estimate the likelihood of each of the discovered paths. PMID:26129639

  5. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations with the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field on Graphics Processing Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindert, Steffen; Bucher, Denis; Eastman, Peter; Pande, Vijay; McCammon, J Andrew

    2013-11-12

    The accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) method has recently been shown to enhance the sampling of biomolecules in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, often by several orders of magnitude. Here, we describe an implementation of the aMD method for the OpenMM application layer that takes full advantage of graphics processing units (GPUs) computing. The aMD method is shown to work in combination with the AMOEBA polarizable force field (AMOEBA-aMD), allowing the simulation of long time-scale events with a polarizable force field. Benchmarks are provided to show that the AMOEBA-aMD method is efficiently implemented and produces accurate results in its standard parametrization. For the BPTI protein, we demonstrate that the protein structure described with AMOEBA remains stable even on the extended time scales accessed at high levels of accelerations. For the DNA repair metalloenzyme endonuclease IV, we show that the use of the AMOEBA force field is a significant improvement over fixed charged models for describing the enzyme active-site. The new AMOEBA-aMD method is publicly available (http://wiki.simtk.org/openmm/VirtualRepository) and promises to be interesting for studying complex systems that can benefit from both the use of a polarizable force field and enhanced sampling. PMID:24634618

  6. Potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae in contact lenses of the asymptomatic contact lens wearers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Niyyati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Free-living amoebae (FLA including Acanthamoeba spp. and Hartmannella spp. are the causative agents of serious corneal infection especially within contact lens wearers. Thus contact lenses and their storage case could be a suitable niche for potentially pathogenic amoebae. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the contamination of contact lenses to free living amoebae using morphological and sequencing based methods.Overall, 90 volunteers provided their contact lenses. All volunteers wore soft contact lenses. Both lenses were cultured in the same plate. Forty-eight of the volunteers were medical and dentistry student and 42 were ophthalmology attendees of hospitals in Tehran, Iran. All of the samples were inoculated to non-nutrient medium and monitored daily for the outgrowth of the amoebae. PCR and sequencing were performed using various primer pairs.Of the 90 volunteers, 9 (10% were positive for free-living amoebae outgrowth. Morphological analysis revealed that 3 isolates were belonged to Hartmannella genus according to small round cysts and 6 isolates were belonged to Acanthamoeba genus based on the star shape of endocysts. Sequencing revealed that Acanthamoeba belonged to T4, T3 and T5 genotype. Hartmannella were also belonged to vermiformis species.The presence of potentially pathogenic free living amoebae including Acanthamoeba and Hartmannella could be a high risk for people using soft contact lenses. These results revealed that improved clarification and professional recommendations for contact lens wearers is of utmost importance.

  7. Permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae for growth of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Binet, Marie; Bouteleux, Celine; Herbelin, Pascaline; Soreau, Sylvie; Héchard, Yann

    2016-03-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a pathogenic bacterium commonly found in water and responsible for severe pneumonia. Free-living amoebae are protozoa also found in water, which feed on bacteria by phagocytosis. Under favorable conditions, some L. pneumophila are able to resist phagocytic digestion and even multiply within amoebae. However, it is not clear whether L. pneumophila could infect at a same rate a large range of amoebae or if there is some selectivity towards specific amoebal genera or strains. Also, most studies have been performed using collection strains and not with freshly isolated strains. In our study, we assess the permissiveness of freshly isolated environmental strains of amoebae, belonging to three common genera (i.e. Acanthamoeba, Naegleria and Vermamoeba), for growth of L. pneumophila at three different temperatures. Our results indicated that all the tested strains of amoebae were permissive to L. pneumophila Lens and that there was no significant difference between the strains. Intracellular proliferation was more efficient at a temperature of 40°C. In conclusion, our work suggests that, under favorable conditions, virulent strains of L. pneumophila could equally infect a large number of isolates of common freshwater amoeba genera. PMID:26832643

  8. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. II. Improvement of oat protoplasts by an inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    We have attempted to improve the viability of cereal mesophyll protoplasts by pretreatment of leaves with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), a specific 'suicide' inhibitor of the enzyme (arginine decarboxylase) responsible for their osmotically induced putrescine accumulation. Leaf pretreatment with DFMA before a 6 hour osmotic shock caused a 45% decrease of putrescine and a 2-fold increase of spermine titer. After 136 hours of osmotic stress, putrescine titer in DFMA-pretreated leaves increased by only 50%, but spermidine and spermine titers increased dramatically by 3.2- and 6-fold, respectively. These increases in higher polyamines could account for the reduced chlorophyll loss and enhanced ability of pretreated leaves to incorporate tritiated thymidine, uridine, and leucine into macromolecules. Pretreatment with DFMA significantly improved the overall viability of the protoplasts isolated from these leaves. The results support the view that the osmotically induced rise in putrescine and blockage of its conversion to higher polyamines may contribute to the lack of sustained cell division in cereal mesophyll protoplasts, although other undefined factors must also play a major role.

  9. A study of nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses: detection and characterization of viruses in environmental amoeba

    OpenAIRE

    Fugas, Mariana Costa

    2012-01-01

    Tese de mestrado. Biologia (Biologia Molecular e Genética). Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2012 Amoeba associated microorganisms (ARMs) are bacteria or viruses that share a symbiotic relationship with amoebas. Many ARMs are associated with human diseases and it has been reported the acquisition of resistance inside their host. These facts highlight the importance of finding and characterizing ARMs in a public health’s perspective. In the present work, amoebas from environme...

  10. Inverse osmotic process for radioactive laundry waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To effectively recover the processing amount reduced in a continuous treatment. Method: Laundry waste containing radioactive substances discharged from a nuclear power plant is processed in an inverse osmotic process while adding starch digesting enzymes such as amylase and takadiastase, as well as soft spherical bodies such as sponge balls of a particle diameter capable of flowing in the flow of the liquid wastes along the inverse osmotic membrane pipe and having such a softness and roundness as not to damage the inverse osmotic membrane. This process can remove the floating materials such as thread dusts or hairs deposited on the membrane surface by the action of the soft elastic balls and remove paste or the like through decomposition by the digesting enzymes. Consequently, effective recovery can be attained for the reduced processing amount. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Dependence of osmotic pressure on solution properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrostatic pressure, temperature, salt concentration, and the chemical composition of the salt are parameters affecting solution properties. Pressure and temperature have little effect on osmosis, but osmotic pressure variations due to type of dissolved salt may be significant, especially at high concentrations. For a given salt solution, concentration variations cause large differences in osmotic pressure. A representative difference in concentration across a clay layer in a relatively shallow groundwater system might be 100 to 1,000 ppm. When expressed as ppm NaCl, this difference could cause a head difference of 0.8 to 8 meters of water if one of the rock bodies were closed to fluid escape

  12. Osmotic dehydration of fish: principal component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Biljana Lj.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic treatment of the fish Carassius gibelio was studied in two osmotic solutions: ternary aqueous solution - S1, and sugar beet molasses - S2, at three solution temperatures of 10, 20 and 30oC, at atmospheric pressure. The aim was to examine the influence of type and concentration of the used hypertonic agent, temperature and immersion time on the water loss, solid gain, dry mater content, aw and content of minerals (Na, K, Ca and Mg. S2 solution has proven to be the best option according to all output variables.[ Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31055

  13. Prevalence of Acanthamoeba and other naked amoebae in South Florida domestic water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoff, M E; Rogerson, A; Kessler, K; Schatz, S; Seal, D V

    2008-03-01

    The purpose was to identify the prevalence of naked amoebae in tap water in south Florida to ascertain the risk of amoebal infections of the cornea in contact lens wearers. Over the course of a 2-year period, water samples were collected from sites throughout Broward, Palm Beach, and Dade counties, Florida. The presence of amoebae in samples was based on an enrichment cultivation method appropriate for Acanthamoeba. Amoebae were identified using diagnostic features discernable by light microscopy. A total of 283 water samples were processed and amoebae were noted in 80 of these. Acanthamoeba were found on 8 occasions (2.8%). The genera Hartmannella and Vahlkampfia, rarely involved in keratitis cases, were found in 3.5% and 2.8% of samples, respectively. A total of 19 different naked amoebae were recorded and amoebae (regardless of genus) were present in 19.4% of all samples. Previous surveys in England and Korea have shown that acanthamoebae are found in 15 to 30% of tap water samples in the home and have been associated with corneal infection in contact lens wearers. The incidence of acanthamoebae infection in the USA (2.8%) has been found to be lower than that in the UK and it has been postulated that this is related to the lack of a storage water tank in the roof loft space. However, the level of treatment of municipal water is clearly not effective at killing amoebal cysts (or trophozoites) as evidenced by the high occurrence of amoebae (19.4%) in this study. PMID:17998610

  14. Automation of AMOEBA polarizable force field parameterization for small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Johnny C; Chattree, Gaurav; Ren, Pengyu

    2012-02-26

    A protocol to generate parameters for the AMOEBA polarizable force field for small organic molecules has been established, and polarizable atomic typing utility, Poltype, which fully automates this process, has been implemented. For validation, we have compared with quantum mechanical calculations of molecular dipole moments, optimized geometry, electrostatic potential, and conformational energy for a variety of neutral and charged organic molecules, as well as dimer interaction energies of a set of amino acid side chain model compounds. Furthermore, parameters obtained in gas phase are substantiated in liquid-phase simulations. The hydration free energy (HFE) of neutral and charged molecules have been calculated and compared with experimental values. The RMS error for the HFE of neutral molecules is less than 1 kcal/mol. Meanwhile, the relative error in the predicted HFE of salts (cations and anions) is less than 3% with a correlation coefficient of 0.95. Overall, the performance of Poltype is satisfactory and provides a convenient utility for applications such as drug discovery. Further improvement can be achieved by the systematic study of various organic compounds, particularly ionic molecules, and refinement and expansion of the parameter database. PMID:22505837

  15. Diverse sensitivity thresholds in dynamic signaling responses by social amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C Joanne; Bergmann, Adriel; Lin, Benjamin; Kim, Kyuri; Levchenko, Andre

    2012-02-28

    The complex transition from a single-cell to a multicellular life form during the formation of a fruiting body by the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is accompanied by a pulsatile collective signaling process that instigates chemotaxis of the constituent cells. Although the cells used for the analysis of this phenomenon are normally genetically identical (isogenic), it is not clear whether they are equally responsive to the waves of the signaling stimulus, nor is it clear how responses across the population influence collective cell behavior. Here, we found that isogenic Dictyostelium cells displayed differing sensitivities to the chemoattractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Furthermore, the resulting signaling responses could be explained by a model in which cells are refractory to further stimulation for 5 to 6 min after the initial input and the signaling output is amplified, with the amplification threshold varying across the cells in the population. This pathway structure could explain intracellular amplification of the chemoattractant gradient during cell migration. The new model predicts that diverse cell responsiveness can facilitate collective cell behavior, specifically due to the presence of a small number of cells in the population with increased responsiveness that aid in propagating the initial cAMP signaling wave across the cell population. PMID:22375055

  16. Strange Attractors Characterizing the Osmotic Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Tzenov, Stephan I

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper a simple dynamical model for computing the osmotically driven fluid flow in a variety of complex, non equilibrium situations is derived from first principles. Using the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation, the basic equations describing the process of forward osmosis have been obtained. It has been shown that these equations are very similar to the ones used to model the free Rayleigh-Benard convection. The difference is that while in the case of thermal convection the volume expansion is driven by the coefficient of thermal expansion, the key role for the osmotic instability is played by the coefficient of isothermal compressibility. In addition, it has been shown that the osmotic process represents a propagation of standing waves with time-dependent amplitudes and phase velocity, which equals the current velocity of the solvent passing through the semi-permeable membrane. The evolution of the amplitudes of the osmotic waves is exactly following the dynamics of a strange attractor of Loren...

  17. Magnetically Guided Propulsion of Osmotic Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Glenn; Rinaldi, Carlos; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo

    2010-11-01

    Propulsion of artificial nano- and micro-scale objects induced by chemical reactions is one of the most exciting challenges in colloidal physics. Recent experiments have shown that directed motion of catalytic motors is hindered by their rotary Brownian motion, preventing its potential to be fully realized. The present work investigates the magnetically guided propulsion of a colloidal particle--the osmotic motor-- immersed in a dispersion of colloidal `bath' particles subject to an unidirectional magnetic field using Brownian dynamics simulation. The osmotic motor is propelled by a chemical reaction that consumes bath particles over a portion of its surface. The non-equilibrium microstructure of bath particles induced by the surface reaction creates an `osmotic pressure' imbalance on the motor's surface causing it to move to regions of lower bath particle concentration. The strength of the magnetic field is controlled by the Langevin parameter, which physically measures the relative importance of magnetic to Brownian torques, and dictates the directionality of the osmotic motor. The translational self-diffusivity is measured for different reaction speeds, particle sizes, bath particle concentrations, and magnetic dipole orientations. Finally, a theory to determine the long-time self-diffusivity and time-averaged particle velocity is developed and compared to the simulation results.

  18. Sensitivity of free-living amoeba trophozoites and cysts to water disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Mathieu; Berne, Florence; Herbelin, Pascaline; Binet, Marie; Berthelot, Nelsie; Rodier, Marie-Hélène; Soreau, Sylvie; Héchard, Yann

    2014-03-01

    Free-living amoebae are naturally present in water. These protozoa could be pathogenic and could also shelter pathogenic bacteria. Thus, they are described as a potential hazard for health. Also, free-living amoebae have been described to be resistant to biocides, especially under their cyst resistant form. There are several studies on amoeba treatments but none of them compare sensitivity of trophozoites and cysts from different genus to various water disinfectants. In our study, we tested chlorine, monochloramine and chlorine dioxide on both cysts and trophozoites from three strains, belonging to the three main genera of free-living amoebae. The results show that, comparing cysts to trophozoites inactivation, only the Acanthamoeba cysts were highly more resistant to treatment than trophozoites. Comparison of the disinfectant efficiency led to conclude that chlorine dioxide was the most efficient treatment in our conditions and was particularly efficient against cysts. In conclusion, our results would help to adapt water treatments in order to target free-living amoebae in water networks. PMID:23932411

  19. Amoeba-inspired nanoarchitectonic computing: solving intractable computational problems using nanoscale photoexcitation transfer dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Masashi; Naruse, Makoto; Kim, Song-Ju; Wakabayashi, Masamitsu; Hori, Hirokazu; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-06-18

    Biologically inspired computing devices and architectures are expected to overcome the limitations of conventional technologies in terms of solving computationally demanding problems, adapting to complex environments, reducing energy consumption, and so on. We previously demonstrated that a primitive single-celled amoeba (a plasmodial slime mold), which exhibits complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics and sophisticated computing capabilities, can be used to search for a solution to a very hard combinatorial optimization problem. We successfully extracted the essential spatiotemporal dynamics by which the amoeba solves the problem. This amoeba-inspired computing paradigm can be implemented by various physical systems that exhibit suitable spatiotemporal dynamics resembling the amoeba's problem-solving process. In this Article, we demonstrate that photoexcitation transfer phenomena in certain quantum nanostructures mediated by optical near-field interactions generate the amoebalike spatiotemporal dynamics and can be used to solve the satisfiability problem (SAT), which is the problem of judging whether a given logical proposition (a Boolean formula) is self-consistent. SAT is related to diverse application problems in artificial intelligence, information security, and bioinformatics and is a crucially important nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete problem, which is believed to become intractable for conventional digital computers when the problem size increases. We show that our amoeba-inspired computing paradigm dramatically outperforms a conventional stochastic search method. These results indicate the potential for developing highly versatile nanoarchitectonic computers that realize powerful solution searching with low energy consumption. PMID:23565603

  20. Free-living freshwater amoebae differ in their susceptibility to the pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Rafik; Bodennec, Jacques; Mameri, Mouh Oulhadj; Pernin, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is known as a facultative intracellular parasite of free-living soil and freshwater amoebae, of which several species have been shown to support the growth of the pathogenic bacteria. We report for the first time the behaviour of two strains (c2c and Z503) of the amoeba Willaertia magna towards different strains of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 and compared it with Acanthamoeba castellanii and Hartmannella vermiformis, known to be L. pneumophila permissive. In contrast to the results seen with other amoebae, W. magna c2c inhibited the growth of one strain of Legionella (L. pneumophila, Paris), but not of others belonging to the same serogroup (L. pneumophila, Philadelphia and L. pneumophila, Lens). Also, the different L. pneumophila inhibited cell growth and induced cell death in A. castellanii, H. vermiformis and W. magna Z503 within 3-4 days while W. magna c2c strain remained unaffected even up to 7 days. Electron microscopy demonstrated that the formation of numerous replicative phagosomes observed within Acanthamoeba and Hartmannella is rarely seen in W. magna c2c cocultured with L. pneumophila. Moreover, the morphological differences were observed between L. pneumophila cultured either with Willaertia or other amoebae. These observations show that amoebae are not all equally permissive to L. pneumophila and highlight W. magna c2c as particularly resistant towards some strains of this bacterium. PMID:19016880

  1. Micro PIV Measurements of the Internal Flow of an Amoeba proteus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resagk, Christian; Lobutova, Elka; Li, Ling; Voges, Danja

    2011-11-01

    We report about micro PIV measurements of the internal flow in the protoplasm of an amoeba. The velocity data shall give information about the mechanism of the change of amoeba's contour during its locomotion in water. The experimental data is used for an analytical modeling of the locomotion mechanism with the help of a variable contour and finally for the development of locomotion principles for micro robots. The experimental set-up consists of a microscope and a CCD camera with 12 frames per second and image analysis software. The illumination of the amoeba was done by the built-in microscope halogen lamp. We use the phase contrast configuration to capture images of the amoeba moving in water. We applied an electrical field to the water channel in order to control the movement of the amoeba in one direction. During this motion we measured time dependent velocity vector fields of the protoplasm flow, estimated velocity profiles and analyzed time series of the maximum velocity. The velocity vector plots are calculated from the images by using cross correlation and naturally occurring particles in the protoplasm. Beside the analyses of the internal flow we recorded the motion of the center of gravity and the variation of the sectional area.

  2. Vampires in the oceans: predatory cercozoan amoebae in marine habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Cédric; Romac, Sarah; Mahé, Frédéric; Santini, Sébastien; Siano, Raffaele; Bass, David

    2013-12-01

    Vampire amoebae (vampyrellids) are predators of algae, fungi, protozoa and small metazoans known primarily from soils and in freshwater habitats. They are among the very few heterotrophic naked, filose and reticulose protists that have received some attention from a morphological and ecological point of view over the last few decades, because of the peculiar mode of feeding of known species. Yet, the true extent of their biodiversity remains largely unknown. Here we use a complementary approach of culturing and sequence database mining to address this issue, focusing our efforts on marine environments, where vampyrellids are very poorly known. We present 10 new vampyrellid isolates, 8 from marine or brackish sediments, and 2 from soil or freshwater sediment. Two of the former correspond to the genera Thalassomyxa Grell and Penardia Cash for which sequence data were previously unavailable. Small-subunit ribosomal DNA analysis confirms they are all related to previously sequenced vampyrellids. An exhaustive screening of the NCBI GenBank database and of 454 sequence data generated by the European BioMarKs consortium revealed hundreds of distinct environmental vampyrellid sequences. We show that vampyrellids are much more diverse than previously thought, especially in marine habitats. Our new isolates, which cover almost the full phylogenetic range of vampyrellid sequences revealed in this study, offer a rare opportunity to integrate data from environmental DNA surveys with phenotypic information. However, the very large genetic diversity we highlight within vampyrellids (especially in marine sediments and soils) contrasts with the paradoxically low morphological distinctiveness we observed across our isolates. PMID:23864128

  3. [Phosphatase activity in Amoeba proteus at pH 9.0].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopina, V A

    2007-01-01

    In the free-living amoeba Amoeba proteus (strain B), after PAAG disk-electrophoresis of the homogenate supernatant, at using 1-naphthyl phosphate as a substrate and pH 9.0, three forms of phosphatase activity were revealed; they were arbitrarily called "fast", "intermediate", and "slow" phosphatases. The fast phosphatase has been established to be a fraction of lysosomal acid phosphatase that preserves some low activity at alkaline pH. The question as to which particular class the intermediate phosphatase belongs to has remained unanswered: it can be both acid phosphatase and protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP). Based on data of inhibitor analysis, large substrate specificity, results of experiments with reactivation by Zn ions after inactivation with EDTA, other than in the fast and intermediate phosphatases localization in the amoeba cell, it is concluded that only slow phosphatase can be classified as alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1). PMID:17933343

  4. Foraging Behaviors and Potential Computational Ability of Problem-Solving in an Amoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    We study cell behaviors in the complex situations: multiple locations of food were simultaneously given. An amoeba-like organism of true slime mold gathered at the multiple food locations while body shape made of tubular network was totally changed. Then only a few tubes connected all of food locations through a network shape. By taking the network shape of body, the plasmodium could meet its own physiological requirements: as fast absorption of nutrient as possible and sufficient circulation of chemical signals and nutrients through a whole body. Optimality of network shape was evaluated in relation to a combinatorial optimization problem. Here we reviewed the potential computational ability of problem-solving in the amoeba, which was much higher than we'd though. The main message of this article is that we had better to change our stupid opinion that an amoeba is stupid.

  5. Free energy simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field and metadynamics on GPU platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiangda; Zhang, Yuebin; Chu, Huiying; Li, Guohui

    2016-03-01

    The free energy calculation library PLUMED has been incorporated into the OpenMM simulation toolkit, with the purpose to perform enhanced sampling MD simulations using the AMOEBA polarizable force field on GPU platform. Two examples, (I) the free energy profile of water pair separation (II) alanine dipeptide dihedral angle free energy surface in explicit solvent, are provided here to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of our implementation. The converged free energy profiles could be obtained within an affordable MD simulation time when the AMOEBA polarizable force field is employed. Moreover, the free energy surfaces estimated using the AMOEBA polarizable force field are in agreement with those calculated from experimental data and ab initio methods. Hence, the implementation in this work is reliable and would be utilized to study more complicated biological phenomena in both an accurate and efficient way. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26493154

  6. Late Holocene palaeohydrological changes in a Sphagnum peat bog from NW Romania based on testate amoebae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei-Cosmin Diaconu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the possibility of reconstructing the palaeohydrological changes in an active Sphagnum peat bog from north-western Romania using testate amoebae fauna and organic matter content determined by loss on ignition (LOI. In total 28 taxa of testate amoebae were identified of which 11 were frequent enough to present a remarkable ecological significance. Based on the relative abundance of these taxa nine zones were identified, crossing from very wet to dry climate conditions. The wet periods identified are characterized by taxa like Centropyxis cassis, Amphitrema flavum and Hyalosphenia papilio, while in the dry periods Difflugia pulex and Nebela militaris thrive. We showed that combining qualitative information regarding hydrological preferences with the quantitative percentage data from the fossil record it is possible to obtain information regarding major surface moisture changes from the peat bog surface. Furthermore we identified a link between distribution of testate amoebae assemblages, organic matter variation and minerogenic material.

  7. Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Simulations with the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field on Graphics Processing Units

    OpenAIRE

    Lindert, Steffen; Bucher, Denis; Eastman, Peter; Pande, Vijay; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) method has recently been shown to enhance the sampling of biomolecules in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, often by several orders of magnitude. Here, we describe an implementation of the aMD method for the OpenMM application layer that takes full advantage of graphics processing units (GPUs) computing. The aMD method is shown to work in combination with the AMOEBA polarizable force field (AMOEBA-aMD), allowing the simulation of long time-scale eve...

  8. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations with the AMOEBA polarizable force field on graphics processing units

    OpenAIRE

    Lindert, S; Bucher, D; Eastman, P; Pande, V.; McCammon, JA

    2013-01-01

    The accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) method has recently been shown to enhance the sampling of biomolecules in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, often by several orders of magnitude. Here, we describe an implementation of the aMD method for the OpenMM application layer that takes full advantage of graphics processing units (GPUs) computing. The aMD method is shown to work in combination with the AMOEBA polarizable force field (AMOEBA-aMD), allowing the simulation of long time-scale eve...

  9. Mitochondrial alterations produced by misonidazole: a study using Amoeba proteus as a single cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misonidazole (MISO) is undergoing clinical trials because of its radiosensitizing and cytotoxic effects. Amoeba proteus was used as a single-cell model to study the mechanism of the action of MISO on aerobic and hypoxic cells. Preliminary ultrastructural findings with MISO treatment of aerobic amoebae are reported. Morphological changes to the mitochondria were noted, which included the generation of matrical inclusions. In earlier investigations similar changes of form have been correlated with a disruption of mitochondrial functioning, and the possible significance of the present results is discussed in the light of these. (author)

  10. [The role of the floodplain gradient in structuring of testate amoebae communities in the Ilych River].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeĭ, Iu A; Malysheva, E A; Lapteva, E M; Komarov, A A; Taskaeva, A A

    2012-01-01

    Forty-two testate amoebae taxa were identified in alluvial soils of floodplain islands in the Ilych River. Among the pedo- and eurybionts, there were aquatic rhizopods. Along the floodplain transect (willow --> meadow --> deciduous forest --> coniferous forest), the testate amoebae community changed directly. There are spatially homogeneous (low beta-diversity) testacean communities but species rich on the local level (high alpha-diversity) within forests. Within willows and meadows, communities are characterized by low alpha-diversity and high heterogeneity that leads to high gamma-diversity. PMID:22988761

  11. Pulsatile lipid vesicles under osmotic stress

    CERN Document Server

    Chabanon, Morgan; Liedberg, Bo; Parikh, Atul N; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    The response of lipid bilayers to osmotic stress is an important part of cellular function. Previously, in [Oglecka et al. 2014], we reported that cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) exposed to hypotonic media, respond to the osmotic assault by undergoing a cyclical sequence of swelling and bursting events, coupled to the membrane's compositional degrees of freedom. Here, we seek to deepen our quantitative understanding of the essential pulsatile behavior of GUVs under hypotonic conditions, by advancing a comprehensive theoretical model for vesicle dynamics. The model quantitatively captures our experimentally measured swell-burst parameters for single-component GUVs, and reveals that thermal fluctuations enable rate dependent pore nucleation, driving the dynamics of the swell-burst cycles. We further identify new scaling relationships between the pulsatile dynamics and GUV properties. Our findings provide a fundamental framework that has the potential to guide future investigations on the non-equili...

  12. Thermo-Osmotic Flow in Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregulla, Andreas P.; Würger, Alois; Günther, Katrin; Mertig, Michael; Cichos, Frank

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first microscale observation of the velocity field imposed by a nonuniform heat content along the solid-liquid boundary. We determine both radial and vertical velocity components of this thermo-osmotic flow field by tracking single tracer nanoparticles. The measured flow profiles are compared to an approximate analytical theory and to numerical calculations. From the measured slip velocity we deduce the thermo-osmotic coefficient for both bare glass and Pluronic F-127 covered surfaces. The value for Pluronic F-127 agrees well with Soret data for polyethylene glycol, whereas that for glass differs from literature values and indicates the complex boundary layer thermodynamics of glass-water interfaces.

  13. Thermo-osmotic flow in thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Bregulla, Andreas; Günther, Katrin; Mertig, Michael; Cichos, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first micro-scale observation of the velocity field imposed by a non-uniform heat content along the solid/liquid boundary. We determine both radial and vertical velocity components of this thermo-osmotic flow field by tracking single tracer nanoparticles. The measured flow profiles are compared to an approximate analytical theory and to numerical calculations. From the measured slip velocity we deduce the thermo-osmotic coefficient for both bare glass and Pluronic F-127 covered surfaces. The value for Pluronic F-127 agrees well with Soret data for polyethylene glycol, whereas that for glass differs from literature values and indicates the complex boundary layer thermodynamics of glass-water interfaces.

  14. Osmotically-assisted desalination method and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilli, Andrea; Childress, Amy E.; Cath, Tzahi Y.

    2014-08-12

    Systems and methods for osmotically assisted desalination include using a pressurized concentrate from a pressure desalination process to pressurize a feed to the desalination process. The depressurized concentrate thereby produced is used as a draw solution for a pressure-retarded osmosis process. The pressure-retarded osmosis unit produces a pressurized draw solution stream that is used to pressurize another feed to the desalination process. In one example, the feed to the pressure-retarded osmosis process is impaired water.

  15. A REVIEW ON OSMOTIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Harnish Patel; Upendra Patel; Hiren Kadikar; Bhavin Bhimani; Dhiren Daslaniya; Ghanshyam Patel

    2012-01-01

    Conventional oral drug delivery systems supply an instantaneous release of drug, which cannot control the release of the drug and effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the process of osmosis. Osmotic devices are the most promising strategy based systems for controlled drug delivery. They are the most reliable con...

  16. Asymmetric Membrane Osmotic Capsules for Terbutaline Sulphate

    OpenAIRE

    Gobade, N. G.; Marina Koland; K H Harish

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist...

  17. Hydrothermal Carbonization of Spent Osmotic Solution (SOS Generated from Osmotic Dehydration of Blueberries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushlendra Singh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal carbonization of spent osmotic solution (SOS, a waste generated from osmotic dehydration of fruits, has the potential of transformation into hydrochars, a value-added product, while reducing cost and overall greenhouse gas emissions associated with waste disposal. Osmotic solution (OS and spent osmotic solution (SOS generated from the osmotic dehydration of blueberries were compared for their thermo-chemical decomposition behavior and hydrothermal carbonization. OS and SOS samples were characterized for total solids, elemental composition, and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA. In addition, hydrothermal carbonization was performed at 250 °C and for 30 min to produce hydrochars. The hydrochars were characterized for elemental composition, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET surface area, particle shape and surface morphology. TGA results show that the SOS sample loses more weight in the lower temperature range than the OS sample. Both samples produced, approximately, 40%–42% (wet-feed basis hydrochar during hydrothermal carbonization but with different properties. The OS sample produced hydrochar, which had spherical particles of 1.79 ± 1.30 μm diameter with a very smooth surface. In contrast, the SOS sample produced hydrochar with no definite particle shape but with a raspberry-like surface.

  18. Osmotic pressure of matter and vacuum energy

    CERN Document Server

    Volovik, G E

    2009-01-01

    The walls of the box which contains matter represent a membrane that allows the relativistic quantum vacuum to pass but not matter. That is why the pressure of matter in the box may be considered as the analog of the osmotic pressure. However, we demonstrate that the osmotic pressure of matter is modified due to interaction of matter with vacuum. This interaction induces the nonzero negative vacuum pressure inside the box, as a result the measured osmotic pressure becomes smaller than the matter pressure. As distinct from the Casimir effect, this induced vacuum pressure is the bulk effect and does not depend on the size of the box. This effect dominates in the thermodynamic limit of the infinite volume of the box. Analog of this effect has been observed in the dilute solution of 3He in liquid 4He, where the superfluid 4He plays the role of the non-relativistic quantum vacuum, and 3He atoms play the role of matter.

  19. Osmotic Pressure in Ionic Microgel Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Alan R.; Tang, Qiyun

    2015-03-01

    Microgels are microscopic gel particles, typically 10-1000 nm in size, that are swollen by a solvent. Hollow microgels (microcapsules) can encapsulate cargo, such as dye molecules or drugs, in their solvent-filled cavities. Their sensitive response to environmental conditions (e.g., temperature, pH) and influence on flow properties suit microgels to widespread applications in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, and consumer care industries. When dispersed in water, polyelectrolyte gels become charged through dissociation of counterions. The electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure inside and outside of ionic microgels influences particle swelling and bulk materials properties, including thermodynamic, structural, optical, and rheological properties. Within the primitive and cell models of polyelectrolyte solutions, we derive an exact statistical mechanical formula for the contribution of mobile microions to the osmotic pressure within ionic microgels. Using Poisson-Boltzmann theory, we validate this result by explicitly calculating ion distributions across the surface of an ionic microgel and the electrostatic contribution to the osmotic pressure. Within a coarse-grained one-component model, we further chart the limits of the cell model for salty dispersions. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1106331.

  20. Electro-osmotic flows inside triangular microchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents a numerical investigation of both pure electro-osmotic and combined electro-osmotic/pressure-driven flows inside triangular microchannels. A finite element analysis has been adopted to solve the governing equations for the electric potential and the velocity field, accounting for a finite thickness of the electric double layer. The influence of non-dimensional parameters such as the aspect ratio of the cross-section, the electrokinetic diameter and the ratio of the pressure force to the electric force on the flow behavior has been investigated. Numerical results point out that the velocity field is significantly influenced by the aspect ratio of the cross section and the electrokinetic diameter. More specifically, the aspect ratio plays an important role in determining the maximum volumetric flow rate, while the electrokinetic diameter is crucial to establishing the range of pressures that may be sustained by the electro-osmotic flow. Numerical results are also compared with two correlations available in the literature which enable to assess the volumetric flow rate and the pressure head for microchannels featuring a rectangular, a trapezoidal or an elliptical cross-section.

  1. Control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. in cultures of Arthrospira sp. Control de Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. en cultivos de Arthrospira sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Méndez; Eduardo Uribe

    2012-01-01

    Cultivation of cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. has been developed in many countries for the production of proteins, pigments and other compounds. Outdoor mass cultures are often affected by biological contamination, drastically reducing productivity as far as bringing death. This study evaluates the control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. with two chemical compounds: urea (U) and ammonium bicarbonate (AB), in laboratory conditions and outdoor mass culture of Arthrospira sp. The lethal concen...

  2. OSMOTIC PUMP DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A NOVAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashmir Singh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conventional drug delivery systems have little control over their drug release and almost no control over the effective concentration at the target site. The major problem associated with conventional drug delivery system is unpredictable plasma concentrations. Controlled drug delivery systems offer spatial control over the drug release. Osmotic pumps are most promising systems for controlled drug delivery. These systems are used for both oral administration and implantation. The present review is concerned with the study of drug release systems which are tablets coated with walls of controlled porosity. . Osmotic pump uses the basic principle of osmosis for release of drug(s. Osmotic pumps consist of an inner core containing drug and osmogens, coated with a semi permeable membrane. As the core absorbs water, it expands in volume, which pushes the drug solution out through the delivery ports. Osmotic pumps release drug at a rate that is independent of the pH and hydrodynamics of the dissolution medium. Various patents available for osmotic drug delivery system like Rose-Nelson pump, Higuchi-leeper pump, higuchi-theeuwes pump and elementary osmotic pump. In this paper, various types of osmotic pump and the basic components of  osmotic system tablets have been discussed briefly. Keywords: Osmosis, component of osmotic system, Osmotic pump

  3. First Report of Vannellidae Amoebae (Vannella Spp. Isolated From Biofilm Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Zaeri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Members of the Vannellidae family are free-living amoebae (FLA distributed mainly in water and soil sources. The present study reports the first isolation of this genus in the biofilm source from hospital environment in Tehran, Iran.Methods: Biofilm samples were collected from hospital environment. Cultivation was performed in non-nutrient agar covered with a heat-killed Escherichia coli. Cloning of the suspected amoe­bae was done. PCR amplification and Homology analysis using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLASTn was performed to search for the most similar reference sequences.Results: Microscopic examination showed numerous fan-shaped amoebae and peculiar cysts differ­ent to the usual shape of typical FLA. Sequence analysis of the PCR- product revealed that the suspected amoebae are highly homologous with Vannella spp. gene (99% identity and 100% query coverage available in the gene bank database.Conclusion: Although Vannella spp. is not proved to be pathogenic itself, but they are capable of har­boring pathogenic intracellular organisms such as Microsporidian parasites. Thus, identifica­tion of such amoebae can be of clinical importance, as they could lead to transmission of other pathogens to human.

  4. Seasonal changes in Sphagnum peatland testate amoeba communities along a hydrological gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcisz, Katarzyna; Lamentowicz, Lukasz; Słowińska, Sandra; Słowiński, Michał; Muszak, Witold; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2014-10-01

    Testate amoebae are an abundant and functionally important group of protists in peatlands, but little is known about the seasonal patterns of their communities. We investigated the relationships between testate amoeba diversity and community structure and water table depth and light conditions (shading vs. insolation) in a Sphagnum peatland in Northern Poland (Linje mire) in spring and summer 2010. We monitored the water table at five sites across the peatland and collected Sphagnum samples in lawn and hummock micro-sites around each piezometer, in spring (3 May) and mid-summer (6 August) 2010. Water table differed significantly between micro-sites and seasons (Kruskal-Wallis test, p=0.001). The community structure of testate amoebae differed significantly between spring and summer in both hummock and lawn micro-sites. We recorded a small, but significant drop in Shannon diversity, between spring and summer (1.76 vs. 1.72). Strongest correlations were found between testate amoeba communities and water table lowering and light conditions. The relative abundance of mixotrophic species Hyalosphenia papilio, Archerella flavum and of Euglypha ciliata was higher in the summer. PMID:25176338

  5. Evaluating the use of testate amoebae for palaeohydrological reconstruction in permafrost peatlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swindles, Graeme T.; Amesbury, Matthew J.; Turner, T. Edward;

    2015-01-01

    The melting of high-latitude permafrost peatlands is a major concern due to a potential positive feedback on global climate change. We examine the ecology of testate amoebae in permafrost peatlands, based on sites in Sweden (similar to 200 km north of the Arctic Circle). Multivariate statistical ...

  6. Application of Gaussian Electrostatic Model (GEM) Distributed Multipoles in the AMOEBA Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, G Andrés

    2012-12-11

    We present the inclusion of distributed multipoles obtained from the Gaussian Electrostatic Model (GEM) into the AMOEBA force field. As a proof of principle, we have reparametrized water and alanine di-peptide. The GEM distributed multipoles (GEM-DM) have been obtained at the same levels of theory as those used for the original AMOEBA parametrization. The use of GEM allows the derivation of the distributed multipoles from the analytical fit to the molecular density or the numerical fit to the molecular electrostatic potential (mESP). In addition, GEM-DM are intrinsically finite of the highest order of the auxiliary basis used for the GEM fit. We also present the fitting of multipoles for the di-methyl imidazolium/chloride (DMIM(+)-Cl(-)) ionic liquid pair. Results for intermolecular Coulomb for all test systems show very good agreement. MD simulations for a reparametrized AMOEBA water model with GEM-DM provide results on par with the original AMOEBA force field for a series of bulk properties including liquid density and enthalpy of vaporization. A package for the calculation of GEM Hermite coefficients and derived distributed multipoles using the numerical procedure is also presented and released under the GNU public license. PMID:26593198

  7. Genome sequence of Rickettsia bellii illuminates the role of amoebae in gene exchanges between intracellular pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently sequenced Rickettsia felis genome revealed an unexpected plasmid carrying several genes usually associated with DNA transfer, suggesting that ancestral rickettsiae might have been endowed with a conjugation apparatus. Here we present the genome sequence of Rickettsia bellii, the earliest diverging species of known rickettsiae. The 1,552,076 base pair-long chromosome does not exhibit the colinearity observed between other rickettsia genomes, and encodes a complete set of putative conjugal DNA transfer genes most similar to homologues found in Protochlamydia amoebophila UWE25, an obligate symbiont of amoebae. The genome exhibits many other genes highly similar to homologues in intracellular bacteria of amoebae. We sought and observed sex pili-like cell surface appendages for R. bellii. We also found that R. bellii very efficiently multiplies in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and survives in the phagocytic amoeba, Acanthamoeba polyphaga. These results suggest that amoeba-like ancestral protozoa could have served as a genetic "melting pot" where the ancestors of rickettsiae and other bacteria promiscuously exchanged genes, eventually leading to their adaptation to the intracellular lifestyle within eukaryotic cells.

  8. Amoebae as Potential Environmental Hosts for Mycobacterium ulcerans and Other Mycobacteria, but Doubtful Actors in Buruli Ulcer Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryseels, Sophie; Amissah, Diana; Durnez, Lies; Vandelannoote, Koen; Leirs, Herwig; De Jonckheere, Johan; Portaels, Françoise; Ablordey, Anthony; Eddyani, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Background The reservoir and mode of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, remain unknown. Ecological, genetic and epidemiological information nonetheless suggests that M. ulcerans may reside in aquatic protozoa. Methodology/Principal Findings We experimentally infected Acanthamoeba polyphaga with M. ulcerans and found that the bacilli were phagocytised, not digested and remained viable for the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, we collected 13 water, 90 biofilm and 45 detritus samples in both Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities in Ghana, from which we cultivated amoeboid protozoa and mycobacteria. M. ulcerans was not isolated, but other mycobacteria were as frequently isolated from intracellular as from extracellular sources, suggesting that they commonly infect amoebae in nature. We screened the samples as well as the amoeba cultures for the M. ulcerans markers IS2404, IS2606 and KR-B. IS2404 was detected in 2% of the environmental samples and in 4% of the amoeba cultures. The IS2404 positive amoeba cultures included up to 5 different protozoan species, and originated both from Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of experimental infection of amoebae with M. ulcerans and of the detection of the marker IS2404 in amoeba cultures isolated from the environment. We conclude that amoeba are potential natural hosts for M. ulcerans, yet remain sceptical about their implication in the transmission of M. ulcerans to humans and their importance in the epidemiology of Buruli ulcer. PMID:22880141

  9. Amoebae as potential environmental hosts for Mycobacterium ulcerans and other mycobacteria, but doubtful actors in Buruli ulcer epidemiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Gryseels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The reservoir and mode of transmission of Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, remain unknown. Ecological, genetic and epidemiological information nonetheless suggests that M. ulcerans may reside in aquatic protozoa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We experimentally infected Acanthamoeba polyphaga with M. ulcerans and found that the bacilli were phagocytised, not digested and remained viable for the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, we collected 13 water, 90 biofilm and 45 detritus samples in both Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities in Ghana, from which we cultivated amoeboid protozoa and mycobacteria. M. ulcerans was not isolated, but other mycobacteria were as frequently isolated from intracellular as from extracellular sources, suggesting that they commonly infect amoebae in nature. We screened the samples as well as the amoeba cultures for the M. ulcerans markers IS2404, IS2606 and KR-B. IS2404 was detected in 2% of the environmental samples and in 4% of the amoeba cultures. The IS2404 positive amoeba cultures included up to 5 different protozoan species, and originated both from Buruli ulcer endemic and non-endemic communities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of experimental infection of amoebae with M. ulcerans and of the detection of the marker IS2404 in amoeba cultures isolated from the environment. We conclude that amoeba are potential natural hosts for M. ulcerans, yet remain sceptical about their implication in the transmission of M. ulcerans to humans and their importance in the epidemiology of Buruli ulcer.

  10. Theoretical analysis of osmotic agents in peritoneal dialysis. What size is an ideal osmotic agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippe, B; Zakaria el-R; Carlsson, O

    1996-01-01

    In this article the difference between osmotic fluid flow (ultrafiltration) as driven by osmotic pressure and diffusion through thin leaky membranes is discussed. It is pointed out that water transport induced by osmosis is fundamentally different from the process of water diffusion. Applying modern hydrodynamic pore theory, the molar solute concentration and the solute concentration in grams per 100 mL, exerting the same initial transmembrane osmotic pressure as a 1% glucose solution, was investigated as a function of solute molecular weight (MW). It was then assumed, base on experimental data, that the major pathway responsible for the peritoneal osmotic barrier characteristics is represented by pores of radius approximately 47 A. With increasing solute radius, the osmotic reflection coefficient (sigma) and, hence, the osmotic efficiency per mole of solute will increase. However, simultaneously, the molar concentration per unit solute weight will decrease. The balance point between these two events apparently occurs at a solute MW of approximately 1 kDa. An additional advantage of using solutes of high MW as osmotic agents during peritoneal dialysis (PD), rather than increased osmotic efficiency per se, lies in the fact that large solutes, due to their low peritoneal diffusion capacity, will maintain a sustained rate of ultrafiltration (osmosis) over a prolonged period. To illustrate this, we have performed computer simulations of peritoneal fluid transport according to the three-pore model of peritoneal permselectivity. According to these simulations, 4% of an 800 Da polymer solution (+50 mmol/L above isotonicity) will produce the same cumulative amount of intraperitoneal fluid volume ultrafiltered (UF) during 360-400 minutes as 4% of a 2 kDa polymer solution (+20 mmol/L) or 6.5% of a 10 kDa polymer solution (+6.5 mmol/L) having the same electrolyte concentration as dialysis solutions conventionally used for PD. Similar cumulative UF volumes (during 400 minutes

  11. Reentry Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dorine; Houston

    1998-01-01

    Dear Xiao Lan, You remember the pain of culture and reentry shock; humor me please; let mereview the facts for the sake of the students you are sending here in greater numbers.Culture shock is the emotional pain that people experience when they visit a newcountry and find customs, experiences, smells, and non-verbal communication stylesto be different from their own country.

  12. Astrocytes Are an Early Target in Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gankam Kengne, Fabrice; Nicaise, Charles; Soupart, Alain; Boom, Alain; Schiettecatte, Johan; Pochet, Roland; Brion, Jean Pierre; Decaux, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Abrupt osmotic changes during rapid correction of chronic hyponatremia result in demyelinative brain lesions, but the sequence of events linking rapid osmotic changes to myelin loss is not yet understood. Here, in a rat model of osmotic demyelination syndrome, we found that massive astrocyte death occurred after rapid correction of hyponatremia, delineating the regions of future myelin loss. Astrocyte death caused a disruption of the astrocyte-oligodendrocyte network, rapidly upregulated infl...

  13. Fast, multiphase volume adaptation to hyperosmotic shock by Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teuta Pilizota

    Full Text Available All living cells employ an array of different mechanisms to help them survive changes in extra cellular osmotic pressure. The difference in the concentration of chemicals in a bacterium's cytoplasm and the external environment generates an osmotic pressure that inflates the cell. It is thought that the bacterium Escherichia coli use a number of interconnected systems to adapt to changes in external pressure, allowing them to maintain turgor and live in surroundings that range more than two-hundred-fold in external osmolality. Here, we use fluorescence imaging to make the first measurements of cell volume changes over time during hyperosmotic shock and subsequent adaptation on a single cell level in vivo with a time resolution on the order of seconds. We directly observe two previously unseen phases of the cytoplasmic water efflux upon hyperosmotic shock. Furthermore, we monitor cell volume changes during the post-shock recovery and observe a two-phase response that depends on the shock magnitude. The initial phase of recovery is fast, on the order of 15-20 min and shows little cell-to-cell variation. For large sucrose shocks, a secondary phase that lasts several hours adds to the recovery. We find that cells are able to recover fully from shocks as high as 1 Osmol/kg using existing systems, but that for larger shocks, protein synthesis is required for full recovery.

  14. A Simple Student Laboratory on Osmotic Flow, Osmotic Pressure, and the Reflection Coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, Joseph J.; Ford, George D.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise containing a practical series of experiments that novice students can perform within two hours. The exercise provides a confirmation of van't Hoff's law while placing more emphasis on osmotic flow than pressure. Students can determine parameters such as the reflection coefficient which stress the interaction of both…

  15. The plant cuticle is required for osmotic stress regulation of abscisic acid biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenyu

    2011-05-01

    Osmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA). One major step in ABA biosynthesis is the carotenoid cleavage catalyzed by a 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the mechanism for osmotic stress activation of ABA biosynthesis, we screened for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants that failed to induce the NCED3 genee xpression in response to osmotic stress treatments. The ced1 (for 9-cis epoxycarotenoid dioxy genase defective 1) mutant isolated in this study showed markedly reduced expression of NCED3 in response to osmotic stress (polyethylene glycol)treatments compared with the wild type. Other ABA biosynthesis genes are also greatly reduced in ced1 under osmotic stress. ced1 mutant plants are very sensitive to even mild osmotic stress. Map-based cloning revealed unexpectedly thatCED1 encodes a putative a/b hydrolase domain-containing protein and is allelic to the BODYGUARD gene that was recently shown to be essential for cuticle biogenesis. Further studies discovered that other cut in biosynthesis mutants are also impaired in osmotic stress induction of ABA biosynthesis genes and are sensitive to osmotic stress. Our work demonstrates that the cuticle functions not merely as a physical barrier to minimize water loss but also mediates osmotic stress signaling and tolerance by regulating ABA biosynthesis and signaling. © 2011 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. Osmotic stress on nitrification in an airlift bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Rencun [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zheng Ping [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Mahmood, Qaisar [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Hu Baolan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)]. E-mail: blhu@zju.edu.cn

    2007-07-19

    The effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification was studied in a lab-scale internal-loop airlift-nitrifying reactor. The reactor slowly adapted to the escalating osmotic pressure during 270 days operation. The conditions were reversed to the initial stage upon full inhibition of the process. Keeping influent ammonium concentration constant at 420 mg N L{sup -1} and hydraulic retention time at 20.7 h, with gradual increase in osmotic pressure from 4.3 to 18.8 x 10{sup 5} Pa by adding sodium sulphate, the ammonium removal efficiencies of the nitrifying bioreactor were maintained at 93-100%. Further increase in osmotic pressure up to 19.2 x 10{sup 5} Pa resulted in drop of the ammonium conversion to 69.2%. The osmotic pressure caused abrupt inhibition of nitrification without any alarm and the critical osmotic pressure value causing inhibition remained between 18.8 and 19.2 x 10{sup 5} Pa. Nitrite oxidizers were found more sensitive to osmotic stress as compared with ammonia oxidizers, leading to nitrite accumulation up to 61.7% in the reactor. The performance of bioreactor recovered gradually upon lowering the osmotic pressure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy indicated that osmotic stress resulted in simplification of the nitrifying bacterial populations in the activated sludge as the cellular size reduced; the inner membrane became thinner and some unknown inclusions appeared within the cells. The microbial morphology and cellular structure restored upon relieving the osmotic pressure. Addition of potassium relieved the effect of osmotic pressure upon nitrification. Results demonstrate that the nitrifying reactor possesses the potential to treat ammonium-rich brines after acclimatization.

  17. Osmotic stress on nitrification in an airlift bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of osmotic pressure on nitrification was studied in a lab-scale internal-loop airlift-nitrifying reactor. The reactor slowly adapted to the escalating osmotic pressure during 270 days operation. The conditions were reversed to the initial stage upon full inhibition of the process. Keeping influent ammonium concentration constant at 420 mg N L-1 and hydraulic retention time at 20.7 h, with gradual increase in osmotic pressure from 4.3 to 18.8 x 105 Pa by adding sodium sulphate, the ammonium removal efficiencies of the nitrifying bioreactor were maintained at 93-100%. Further increase in osmotic pressure up to 19.2 x 105 Pa resulted in drop of the ammonium conversion to 69.2%. The osmotic pressure caused abrupt inhibition of nitrification without any alarm and the critical osmotic pressure value causing inhibition remained between 18.8 and 19.2 x 105 Pa. Nitrite oxidizers were found more sensitive to osmotic stress as compared with ammonia oxidizers, leading to nitrite accumulation up to 61.7% in the reactor. The performance of bioreactor recovered gradually upon lowering the osmotic pressure. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy indicated that osmotic stress resulted in simplification of the nitrifying bacterial populations in the activated sludge as the cellular size reduced; the inner membrane became thinner and some unknown inclusions appeared within the cells. The microbial morphology and cellular structure restored upon relieving the osmotic pressure. Addition of potassium relieved the effect of osmotic pressure upon nitrification. Results demonstrate that the nitrifying reactor possesses the potential to treat ammonium-rich brines after acclimatization

  18. Osmotic barrier of the parietal peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessner, M F

    1994-11-01

    Fluid movement into the peritoneal cavity results after instillation of a hypertonic solution. Some investigators have assumed that the peritoneum is a significant barrier to small solutes and have predicted that fluid would be drawn by an osmotic gradient into the cavity from the tissue surrounding the peritoneal cavity, resulting in tissue hydrostatic pressures well below atmospheric pressure. Contrary to this, we have previously shown that protein and fluid cross the peritoneum and enter the tissue at the same rate during either isotonic or hypertonic dialysis. To investigate the nature of the osmotic barrier of the peritoneum, the hydrostatic pressure profiles were measured in the abdominal wall of the rat during conditions of either isotonicity or hypertonicity in the peritoneal cavity and constant intraperitoneal hydrostatic pressure (Pip). Measurements were made with a micropipette mounted on a micromanipulator and connected to a servo-null pressure measurement system. No interstitial pressures below atmospheric pressure were observed with either type of solution in the peritoneal cavity. For the three Pip values tested, there were few significant differences between the corresponding pressure profiles of isotonic or hypertonic solutions. It is concluded that the parietal peritoneum is not a functional barrier to small solutes, which are often used to raise the osmolality of intraperitoneal solutions. This finding also implies that the tissue interstitium underlying the parietal peritoneum is not the source of water flow into the cavity, which is observed during hypertonic dialysis. PMID:7977791

  19. Detection and identification of free-living amoeba from aquatic environment in different seasons in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, K.; Hsu, B.; Tsai, H.; Huang, P.; Tsai, J.; Kao, P.; Huang, K.; Chen, J.

    2013-12-01

    Free-living amoeba includes Acanthamoeba and Naegleria, which are widely distributed in water and soil. Human infection with free-living amoeba leads to serious illness, even lethal. For example, central nervous system infection will cause amoebic meningoencephalitis, and infections will cause amoebic keratitis. The presence of free-living amoeba in environment water can be used as a water quality indicator in ecosystem assessment. In Taiwan, reservoirs are indispensable because of the water source are limited by the steep terrain and the short river flow. Therefore, we need to pay more attention in the quality control of reservoirs water. The aims of this study are to investigate the presence of free-living amoeba in Taiwan reservoirs, and to compare the differences among seasons. At last, the identification and genotyping of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria are investigated. In this study, we use polymerase chain reaction with specific primers to analyze the presence of free-living amoeba in aquatic environment. We collected total 60 samples from reservoirs in Taiwan. The water samples are divided into two parts for both direct concentration method and culture method. The results show the different detection rates among seasons. For Acanthamoeba, the detection rates were 28.3% (17 of 60 water samples), 21.7% (13 of 60 water samples) and 8.3% (5 of 60 water samples) in autumn, winter and spring, respectively. For Naegleria, the detection rates were 6.7% (4 of 60 water samples), 0% (0 of 60 water samples) and 0% (0 of 60 water samples) were detected positive in autumn, winter and spring, respectively. Sequence analysis showed that the major genotypes in Acanthamoeba were T3, T4, T10 and T11 in autumn, T2, T4 and T10 in winter, T4 in spring. Due to the presences of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria in reservoirs, we should pay more attention in water quality monitoring to prevent the potential risks of diseases. Keywords: free-living amoeba, Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, polymerase

  20. A Valence Bond Model for Aqueous Cu(II) and Zn(II) Ions in the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Jin Yu; Ponder, Jay W.

    2012-01-01

    A general molecular mechanics (MM) model for treating aqueous Cu2+ and Zn2+ ions was developed based on valence bond (VB) theory and incorporated into the AMOEBA polarizable force field. Parameters were obtained by fitting molecular mechanics energies to that computed by ab initio methods for gas phase tetra- and hexa-aqua metal complexes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the proposed AMOEBA-VB model were performed for each transition metal ion in aqueous solution and solvent coordin...

  1. Osmotic Power: A Fresh Look at an Old Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugdale, Pam

    2014-01-01

    Electricity from osmotic pressure might seem a far-fetched idea but this article describes a prototype in Norway where the osmotic pressure generated between salt and fresh water drives a turbine. This idea was applied in a student investigation, where they were tasked with researching which alternative materials could be used for the…

  2. Testate amoebae (Protista) communities in Hylocomium splendens (Hedw.) B.S.G. (Bryophyta): relationships with altitude, and moss elemental chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Edward A D; Bragazza, Luca; Gerdol, Renato

    2004-12-01

    We studied the testate amoebae in the moss Hylocomium splendens along an altitudinal gradient from 1000 to 2200 m asl. in the south-eastern Alps of Italy in relation to micro- and macro-nutrient content of moss plants. Three mountainous areas were chosen, two of them characterised by calcareous bedrock, the third by siliceous bedrock. A total of 25 testate amoebae taxa were recorded, with a mean species richness of 9.3 per sampling plot. In a canonical correspondence analysis, 63.1% of the variation in the amoebae data was explained by moss tissue chemistry, namely by C, P, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and Na content and a binary site variable. We interpreted this result as an indirect effect of moss chemistry on testate amoebae through an influence on prey organisms. Although two species responded to altitude, there was no overall significant relationship between testate amoebae diversity or community structure and altitude, presumably because our sampling protocol aimed at minimizing the variability due to vegetation types and soil heterogeneity. This suggests that previous evidence of altitudinal or latitudinal effects on testate amoebae diversity may at least in part be due to a sampling bias, namely differences in soil type or moss species sampled. PMID:15648722

  3. Osmotic origin of over pressures in shale formations: impact of osmotic efficiency models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ongoing research on the construction of a possible geological nuclear waste repository in shale formations raises the issue of the electrochemical interactions extensively studied in soil science between pore waters, solutes and clay mineral surfaces. These interactions are related to the negatively charged surfaces of clay platelets which generate the presence of the so-called electric double layer and the occurrence of anion exclusion. This feature suggests that clay formations may have a membrane behaviour. The assumption is supported by extended experimental works on samples in the 1970 and 1980 and more recently by field experiments proving the existence of osmotic behaviour in shales at the field scale i.e. in geological media. The osmotic theory developed in biophysics has been extended to geological situations through the observation that shales can behave as semi-permeable membranes. If the geological membrane is perfect, only water can flow in response to salinity gradients. In most case studies, the semi-permeable layer is not an ideal membrane and some solute transport takes place. Osmotic flow occurs when there is a concentration gradient within the geological medium which causes solute transport dominated by diffusion. The chemical potential drives the fluid flow from the low-concentration zones to the high-concentration ones. In order to account for this chemical potential driving force, an osmotic pressure term π (Pa) has to be added to the hydraulic potential h to describe fluid flow. Darcy law in one dimension is then modified. Osmotic effects are sometimes proposed to explain abnormal pressures in shales. The values of excess pressures that can be obtained by such processes are highly dependent on the a value. This efficiency coefficient is determined from electrochemical or mechanical analyses of the interaction between solutes and clay platelets. Different theories predicting the possible values of these coupling parameters are available

  4. Engineering an artificial amoeba propelled by nanoparticle-triggered actin polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi Jinsoo; Schmidt, Jacob; Chien Aichi; Montemagno, Carlo D [Department of Bioengineering, University of California Los Angeles, 420 Westwood Plaza, 7523 Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1600 (United States)], E-mail: montemcd@ucmail.uc.edu

    2009-02-25

    We have engineered an amoeba system combining nanofabricated inorganic materials with biological components, capable of propelling itself via actin polymerization. The nanofabricated materials have a mechanism similar to the locomotion of the Listeria monocytogenes, food poisoning bacteria. The propulsive force generation utilizes nanoparticles made from nickel and gold functionalized with the Listeria monocytogenes transmembrane protein, ActA. These Listeria-mimic nanoparticles were in concert with actin, actin binding proteins, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and encapsulated within a lipid vesicle. This system is an artificial cell, such as a vesicle, where artificial nanobacteria and actin polymerization machinery are used in driving force generators inside the cell. The assembled structure was observed to crawl on a glass surface analogously to an amoeba, with the speed of the movement dependent on the amount of actin monomers and ATP present.

  5. Engineering an artificial amoeba propelled by nanoparticle-triggered actin polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have engineered an amoeba system combining nanofabricated inorganic materials with biological components, capable of propelling itself via actin polymerization. The nanofabricated materials have a mechanism similar to the locomotion of the Listeria monocytogenes, food poisoning bacteria. The propulsive force generation utilizes nanoparticles made from nickel and gold functionalized with the Listeria monocytogenes transmembrane protein, ActA. These Listeria-mimic nanoparticles were in concert with actin, actin binding proteins, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and encapsulated within a lipid vesicle. This system is an artificial cell, such as a vesicle, where artificial nanobacteria and actin polymerization machinery are used in driving force generators inside the cell. The assembled structure was observed to crawl on a glass surface analogously to an amoeba, with the speed of the movement dependent on the amount of actin monomers and ATP present.

  6. Osmotic and motional properties of intracellular water as influenced by osmotic swelling and shrinkage of Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, I L; Merta, P; Fullerton, G D

    1990-03-01

    Experiments were done on fully grown Xenopus oocytes to determine the extent and the properties of cellular water of hydration. The studies involved the osmotic shrinking and swelling of the oocytes under known osmotic pressure as well as proton NMR spectral, titration, and free induction decay analyses. Studies were done both on whole oocytes and on subcellular fractions. The results show that little if any of the oocyte water in situ has the motional or osmotic properties expected of pure "bulk" water. Four distinct water of hydration compartments were found and defined on the basis of distinct hydrogen bounding mechanisms. Some of the water in yolk platelets was found not to be in fast exchange with other water compartments. Osmotic shrinkage of oocytes caused an adaptive decrease in the bound water of hydration compartments. This osmotically induced decrease is attributed to decreased surface area available for the hydrogen bounding of water molecules on cellular proteins. PMID:2312616

  7. Ecology of Testate Amoebae in the Komořany Ponds in the Vltava Basin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burdíková, Zuzana; Čapek, Martin; Švindrych, Zdeněk; Gryndler, M.; Kubínová, Lucie; Holcová, K.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 1 (2012), s. 117-130. ISSN 0095-3628 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0794 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : ecology * freshwater ecosystem * testate amoeba e * seasonal variability Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.277, year: 2012

  8. Comparative Recoveries of Naegleria fowleri Amoebae from Seeded River Water by Filtration and Centrifugation

    OpenAIRE

    Pernin, P.; Pélandakis, M; Rouby, Y.; Faure, A.; Siclet, F.

    1998-01-01

    Detection of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in environmental water samples, which is necessary for the prevention of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, generally requires concentrating the samples. Two concentration techniques, filtration and centrifugation, were used to study the recovery of N. fowleri, in vegetative or cystic form, that had been mixed with the two other thermotolerant Naegleria species, N. lovaniensis and N. australiensis. Counting of amoebae was performed by the most proba...

  9. An Angular Overlap Model for Cu(II) Ion in the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Jin Yu; Ponder, Jay W.

    2013-01-01

    An extensible polarizable force field for transition metal ion was developed based on AMOEBA and the angular overlap model (AOM) with consistent treatment of electrostatics for all atoms. Parameters were obtained by fitting molecular mechanics (MM) energies to various ab initio gas-phase calculations. The results of parameterization were presented for copper (II) ion ligated to water and model fragments of amino acid residues involved in the copper binding sites of type 1 copper proteins. Mol...

  10. The Polarizable Atomic Multipole-based AMOEBA Force Field for Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yue; Xia, Zhen; Zhang, Jiajing; Best, Robert; Wu, Chuanjie; Ponder, Jay W; Ren, Pengyu

    2013-01-01

    Development of the AMOEBA (Atomic Multipole Optimized Energetics for Biomolecular Simulation) force field for proteins is presented. The current version (AMOEBA-2013) utilizes permanent electrostatic multipole moments through the quadrupole at each atom, and explicitly treats polarization effects in various chemical and physical environments. The atomic multipole electrostatic parameters for each amino acid residue type are derived from high-level gas phase quantum mechanical calculations via a consistent and extensible protocol. Molecular polarizability is modeled via a Thole-style damped interactive induction model based upon distributed atomic polarizabilities. Inter- and intramolecular polarization is treated in a consistent fashion via the Thole model. The intramolecular polarization model ensures transferability of electrostatic parameters among different conformations, as demonstrated by the agreement between QM and AMOEBA electrostatic potentials, and dipole moments of dipeptides. The backbone and side chain torsional parameters were determined by comparing to gas-phase QM (RI-TRIM MP2/CBS) conformational energies of dipeptides and to statistical distributions from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular dynamics simulations are reported for short peptides in explicit water to examine their conformational properties in solution. Overall the calculated conformational free energies and J-coupling constants are consistent with PDB statistics and experimental NMR results, respectively. In addition, the experimental crystal structures of a number of proteins are well maintained during molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. While further calculations are necessary to fully validate the force field, initial results suggest the AMOEBA polarizable multipole force field is able to describe the structure and energetics of peptides and proteins, in both gas-phase and solution environments. PMID:24163642

  11. Free living amoebae in water sources of critical units in a tertiary care hospital in India

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, S; Biswal, M; Kaur, H.; Malhotra, P.; Arora, P.; K Megha; N Taneja; Sehgal, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Isolation of free-living amoebae (FLA) is reported sparsely from water taps, ventilators, air conditioners, haemodialysis units and dental irrigation systems of hospitals worldwide. Their prevalence in hospital environment especially in wards having immunocompromised patients may pose a risk to this group of susceptible population as they may cause disease themselves or may carry pathogens inside them. No study from India has performed such surveillance. Objective: To evaluate ext...

  12. Phospholipids trigger Cryptococcus neoformans capsular enlargement during interactions with amoebae and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara J Chrisman

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable aspect of the interaction of Cryptococcus neoformans with mammalian hosts is a consistent increase in capsule volume. Given that many aspects of the interaction of C. neoformans with macrophages are also observed with amoebae, we hypothesized that the capsule enlargement phenomenon also had a protozoan parallel. Incubation of C. neoformans with Acanthamoeba castellanii resulted in C. neoformans capsular enlargement. The phenomenon required contact between fungal and protozoan cells but did not require amoeba viability. Analysis of amoebae extracts showed that the likely stimuli for capsule enlargement were protozoan polar lipids. Extracts from macrophages and mammalian serum also triggered cryptococcal capsular enlargement. C. neoformans capsule enlargement required expression of fungal phospholipase B, but not phospholipase C. Purified phospholipids, in particular, phosphatidylcholine, and derived molecules triggered capsular enlargement with the subsequent formation of giant cells. These results implicate phospholipids as a trigger for both C. neoformans capsule enlargement in vivo and exopolysaccharide production. The observation that the incubation of C. neoformans with phospholipids led to the formation of giant cells provides the means to generate these enigmatic cells in vitro. Protozoan- or mammalian-derived polar lipids could represent a danger signal for C. neoformans that triggers capsular enlargement as a non-specific defense mechanism against potential predatory cells. Hence, phospholipids are the first host-derived molecules identified to trigger capsular enlargement. The parallels apparent in the capsular response of C. neoformans to both amoebae and macrophages provide additional support for the notion that certain aspects of cryptococcal virulence emerged as a consequence of environmental interactions with other microorganisms such as protists.

  13. Toward the use of testate amoeba functional traits as indicator of floodplain restoration success

    OpenAIRE

    Fournier, Bertrand; Malysheva, Elena; Mazei, Yuri; Moretti, Marco; Mitchell, Edward A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Functional traits (FT) offer a new framework to understand the ecology of organisms and overcome taxonomic difficulties that currently limit the study of minute soil taxa. FT are likely to be selected by environmental filters and hence they may provide more direct information on ecosystem characteristics than the species composition of a community. We tested the potential of testate amoeba (TA) functional traits as bioindicators of selected ecosystem processes in the context of a restored fl...

  14. Interactions Between Testate Amoebae and Saprotrophic Microfungi in a Scots Pine Litter Microcosm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohník, Martin; Burdíková, Zuzana; Vyhnal, Aleš; Koukol, O.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2011), s. 660-668. ISSN 0095-3628 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/09/P340; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/09/H084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : testate amoebae * saprotrophic fungi * litter Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.912, year: 2011

  15. Analysing transfer phenomena in osmotic evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy Forero Longas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic evaporation is a modification of traditional processes using membranes; by means of a vapour pressure differential, produced by a highly concentrated extraction solution, water is transferred through a hydrophobic membrane as vapour. This technique has many advantages over traditional processes, allowing work at atmospheric pressure and low temperatures, this being ideal for heatsensitive products. This paper presents and synthetically analyses the phenomena of heat and mass transfer which occurs in the process and describes the models used for estimating the parameters of interest, such as flow, temperature, heat transfer rate and the relationships that exist amongst them when hollow fibre modules are used, providing a quick reference tool and specific information about this process.

  16. Diversity and community structure of testate amoebae (protista) in tropical montane rain forests of southern Ecuador: altitudinal gradient, aboveground habitats and nutrient limitation.

    OpenAIRE

    Krashevs'ka, Valentyna

    2009-01-01

    The tropical Andes in southern Ecuador constitute a hotspot of plant (especially trees and bryophytes) and animal (especially birds, bats, arctiid and geometrid mothes) diversity. However, data on small animals such as testate amoebae as an important component of the soil and aboveground community are lacking. Variations in density, diversity and community structure of testate amoebae along altitudinal transects in tropical regions are largely unknown. Testate amoebae colonize almost any habi...

  17. Free-living Amoebae (FLA: morphological and molecular identification of Acanthamoeba in dental unit water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trabelsi H.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to detect free-living Amoebae (FLA by morphological methods and to identify Acanthamoeba spp. by PCR in the dental unit water lines (DUWL. Materials and methods: it was a prospective study dealing with 196 water samples collected from DUWL (94 samples taken in the early morning before materials flush and patient consultations and 102 samples taken after consultations. At the same time, 39 samples from tap water were realized. Results: 135 (69 % samples were positives by the morphological study with morphotypical diversity. The predominant morphotype was the monopodial (39.2 %. 18 strains of Acanthamoeba spp. were detected in DUW (13.3 % and three strains in tap water (10 %. The amplification of 18S rDNA gene of these strains of Acanthamoeba spp. was positive for all samples. Conclusion: the FLA and Acanthamoeba were isolated both in tap water and in dental unit. The amoeba pathogenicity has not been demonstrated after oral or dental contamination; but the presence of intracellular and pathogenic bacteria in the amoeba could be a source of microbiological risks for patients in case of deep dental care or immunodepression. The improvement of this dental unit was necessary by putting a filter of 0.2 microns porosity before the arrival of the water in hand-pieces allowing the limitation of FLA passage.

  18. Fine-scale spatial ecology drives kin selection relatedness among cooperating amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeff; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2016-04-01

    Cooperation among microbes is important for traits as diverse as antibiotic resistance, pathogen virulence, and sporulation. The evolutionary stability of cooperation against "cheater" mutants depends critically on the extent to which microbes interact with genetically similar individuals. The causes of this genetic social structure in natural microbial systems, however, are unknown. Here, we show that social structure among cooperative Dictyostelium amoebae is driven by the population ecology of colonization, growth, and dispersal acting at spatial scales as small as fruiting bodies themselves. Despite the fact that amoebae disperse while grazing, all it takes to create substantial genetic clonality within multicellular fruiting bodies is a few millimeters distance between the cells colonizing a feeding site. Even adjacent fruiting bodies can consist of different genotypes. Soil populations of amoebae are sparse and patchily distributed at millimeter scales. The fine-scale spatial structure of cells and genotypes can thus account for the otherwise unexplained high genetic uniformity of spores in fruiting bodies from natural substrates. These results show how a full understanding of microbial cooperation requires understanding ecology and social structure at the small spatial scales microbes themselves experience. PMID:26931797

  19. Development of AMOEBA force field for 1,3-dimethylimidazolium based ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starovoytov, Oleg N; Torabifard, Hedieh; Cisneros, G Andrés

    2014-06-26

    The development of AMOEBA (a multipolar polarizable force field) for imidazolium based ionic liquids is presented. Our parametrization method follows the AMOEBA procedure and introduces the use of QM intermolecular total interactions as well as QM energy decomposition analysis (EDA) to fit individual interaction energy components. The distributed multipoles for the cation and anions have been derived using both the Gaussian distributed multipole analysis (GDMA) and Gaussian electrostatic model-distributed multipole (GEM-DM) methods.1 The intermolecular interactions of a 1,3-dimethylimidazolium [dmim(+)] cation with various anions, including fluoride [F(-)], chloride [Cl(-)], nitrate [NO(3)(-)], and tetraflorouborate [BF(4)(-)], were studied using quantum chemistry calculations at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. Energy decomposition analysis was performed for each pair using the restricted variational space decomposition approach (RVS) at the HF/6-311G(d,p) level. The new force field was validated by running a series of molecular dynamic (MD) simulations and by analyzing thermodynamic and structural properties of these systems. A number of thermodynamic properties obtained from MD simulations were compared with available experimental data. The ionic liquid structure reproduced using the AMOEBA force field is also compared with the data from neutron diffraction experiment and other MD simulations. Employing GEM-DM force fields resulted in a good agreement on liquid densities ρ, enthalpies of vaporization ΔH(vap), and diffusion coefficients D(±) in comparison with conventional force fields. PMID:24901255

  20. Elimination of free-living amoebae in fresh water with pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernhes, M C; Benichou, A; Pernin, P; Cabanes, P A; Teissié, J

    2002-08-01

    This study investigates the effects of pulsed electric fields on the inactivation of trophozoite form of Naegleria lovaniensis Ar9M-1 in batch and flow processes, systematically examining the lethal effect of field strength, pulse duration, number of pulses, and pulse frequency. Our results show that amoebae eradication is modulated by pulse parameters, composition of the pulsing medium, and physiological state of the cells. Cell survival is not related to the energy delivered to the cell suspension during the electrical treatment. For a given energy a strong field applied for a short cumulative pulse duration affects viability more than a weak field with a long cumulative pulsation. We also determine the optimal electrical conditions to obtain an inactivation rate higher than 95% while using the least energy. Flow processes allow to treat large-scale volumes. Our results show that the most efficient flow process for amoeba eradication requires a field parallel to the flow. Pulsed electric fields are a new and attractive method for inactivating amoebae in large volumes of fresh water. PMID:12230188

  1. Calcium and initial surface binding phase of pinocytosis in Amoeba proteus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of membrane-bound solute and external medium by bulk-phase pinocytosis in Amoeba proteus is influenced by the level of Ca2+ in the external medium. Increasing external Ca2+ to ∼10-4 M increases pinocytotic intensity, while increases in Ca2+ above this level decrease the intensity of pinocytosis. The initial interaction of pinocytotic inducers and Ca+2 at the surface of A moeba proteus was therefore examined. Alcain blue and Na+, both inducers of pinocytosis, differ in the manner with which they associate with the amoeba surface, suggesting the possibility of different pinocytosis-inducing sites on the amoeba surface. Low levels of external Ca2+ in the range of 3 x 10-5 to 4.5 x 10-4 M increase the amount of cationic inducer associated with the cell surface while, at the same time, decreasing anion association with the cell surface. It is suggested that Ca2+ influences ion association with the cell surface by controlling the availability of negative surface sites, which in turn influences pinocytotic intensity. Surface binding of Na+, Ca2+ and Cl- was determined by adding 22Na, 45Ca or 36Cl

  2. Isolation of Free-Living Amoebae from Sarein Hot Springs in Ardebil Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Badirzadeh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Free-living amoebae (FLA are a group of ubiquitous protozoan, which are distrib­uted in the natural and artificial environment sources. The main aim of the current study was to identify the presence of FLA in the recreational hot springs of Sarein in Ardebil Province of Iran.Methods: Seven recreational hot springs were selected in Sarein City and 28 water samples (four from each hot spring were collected using 500 ml sterile plastic bottles during three month. Filtra­tion of water samples was performed, and culture was done in non-nutrient agar medium enriched with Escherichia coli. Identification of the FLA was based on morphological criteria of cysts and trophozoites. Genotype identification of Acanthamoeba positive samples were also per­formed using sequencing based method.Results: Overall, 12 out of 28 (42.9% samples were positive for FLA which Acanthamoeba and Vahlkampfiid amoebae were found in one (3.6% and 11 (39.3% samples, respectively. Se­quence analysis of the single isolate of Acanthamoeba revealed potentially pathogenic T4 geno­type corresponding to A. castellanii.Conclusion: Contamination of hot springs to FLA, such as Acanthamoeba T4 genotype (A. castel­lanii and Vahlkampfiid amoebae, could present a sanitary risk for high risk people, and health authorities must be aware of FLA presence.

  3. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N G Gobade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate.

  4. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobade, N G; Koland, Marina; Harish, K H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  5. Optimisation of mass transfer kinetics during osmotic dehydration of pork meat cubes in complex osmotic solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of different process temperature (20, 35 and 50 °C, immersion time (1, 3 and 5 hours and the concentration of sugar beet molasses + NaCl + sucrose water solution on osmotic dehydration of pork meat (M. triceps brachii cubes, shaped 1 x 1 x 1 cm, at atmospheric pressure. The main objective was to examine the influence of different parameters on the mass transfer kinetics during osmotic treatment. The observed system’s responses were: water loss, solid gain, and water activity. The optimum osmotic conditions (temperature of 40 °C, treatment time of 4.1 h and concentration 67 %, were determined using response surface method, by superimposing the contour plots of each process variable, and the responses were: water loss=0.46, solid gain=0.15, and water activity=0.79. Transport coefficients, for both solids and water transfer and energy of activation for all samples were also determined. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-31055

  6. Osmotic stress confers enhanced cell integrity to hydrostatic pressure but impairs growth in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eScoma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alcanivorax is a hydrocarbonoclastic genus dominating oil spills worldwide. While its presence has been detected in oil-polluted seawaters, marine sediment and salt marshes under ambient pressure, its presence in deep-sea contaminated environments is negligible. Recent laboratory evidences highlighted the piezosensitive nature of some Alcanivorax species, whose growth yields are highly impacted by mild hydrostatic pressures (HPs. In the present study, osmotic stress was used as a tool to increase HP resistance in the type strain A. borkumensis SK2. Control cultures grown under standard conditions of salinity and osmotic pressure with respect to seawater (35.6 ppt or 1136 mOsm kg-1, respectively were compared with cultures subjected to hypo- and hyperosmosis (330 and 1720 mOsm kg-1, or 18 and 62 ppt in salinity, equivalent to brackish and brine waters, respectively, under atmospheric or increased HP (0.1 and 10MPa. Osmotic stress had a remarkably positive impact on cell metabolic activity in terms of CO2 production (thus, oil bioremediation and O2 respiration under hyperosmosis, as acclimation to high salinity enhanced cell activity under 10MPa by a factor of 10. Both osmotic shocks significantly enhanced cell protection by reducing membrane damage under HP, with cell integrities close to 100% under hyposmosis. The latter was likely due to intracellular water-reclamation as no trace of the piezolyte ectoine was found, contrary to hyperosmosis. Notably, ectoine production was equivalent at 0.1MPa in hyperosmosis-acclimated cells and at 10MPa under isosmotic conditions, supporting the hypothesis that ectoine synthesis may be primarily triggered by HP rather than osmotic stress. While stimulating cell metabolism and enhancing cell integrity, osmotic stress had always a negative impact on culture growth and performance. No net growth was observed during 4-day incubation tests, and CO2:O2 ratios and pH values indicated that culture performance in

  7. Salt Effect on Osmotic Pressure of Polyelectrolyte Solutions: Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Michael Y. Carrillo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present results of the hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics simulations of the osmotic pressure of salt solutions of polyelectrolytes. In our simulations, we used a coarse-grained representation of polyelectrolyte chains, counterions and salt ions. During simulation runs, we alternate Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation steps. Monte Carlo steps were used to perform small ion exchange between simulation box containing salt ions (salt reservoir and simulation box with polyelectrolyte chains, counterions and salt ions (polyelectrolyte solution. This allowed us to model Donnan equilibrium and partitioning of salt and counterions across membrane impermeable to polyelectrolyte chains. Our simulations have shown that the main contribution to the system osmotic pressure is due to salt ions and osmotically active counterions. The fraction of the condensed (osmotically inactive counterions first increases with decreases in the solution ionic strength then it saturates. The reduced value of the system osmotic coefficient is a universal function of the ratio of the concentration of osmotically active counterions and salt concentration in salt reservoir. Simulation results are in a very good agreement with osmotic pressure measurements in sodium polystyrene sulfonate, DNA, polyacrylic acid, sodium polyanetholesulfonic acid, polyvinylbenzoic acid, and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride solutions.

  8. Osmotically regulated transport of proline by Lactobacillus acidophilus IFO 3532.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, J B; Kashket, E R

    1991-10-01

    We reported previously that, when exposed to high osmotic pressure, Lactobacillus acidophilus IFO 3532 cells accumulated N,N,N-trimethylglycine (glycine betaine), which serves as a compatible intracellular solute. When grown in medium with high osmotic pressure, these cells also accumulated one amino acid, proline. The uptake of [3H]proline by resting, glucose-energized cells was stimulated by increasing the osmotic pressure of the assay medium with 0.5 to 1.0 M KCl, 1.0 M NaCl, or 0.5 M sucrose. The accumulated [3H]proline was not metabolized further. In contrast, there was no osmotic stimulation of [3H]leucine uptake. The uptake of proline was activated rather than induced by exposure of the cells to high osmotic pressure. Only one proline transport system could be discerned from kinetics plots. The affinity of the carrier for proline remained constant over a range of osmotic pressures from 650 to 1,910 mosM (Kt, 7.8 to 15.5 mM). The Vmax, however, increased from 15 nmol/min/mg of dry weight in 0.5 M sucrose to 27 and 40 nmol/min/mg of dry weight in 0.5 M KCl and in 1.0 M KCl or NaCl, respectively. The efflux of proline from preloaded cells occurred rapidly when the osmotic pressure of the suspending buffer was lowered. PMID:1786048

  9. Development and optimization of buspirone oral osmotic pump tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshandeh, K; Berenji, M Ghasemnejad

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to design a porous osmotic pump-based drug delivery system for controlling the release of buspirone from the delivery system. The osmotic pump was successfully developed using symmetric membrane coating. The core of the tablets was prepared by direct compression technique and coated using dip-coating technique. Drug release from the osmotic system was studied using USP paddle type apparatus. The effect of various processing variables such as the amount of osmotic agent, the amount of swellable polymer, concentration of the core former, concentration of the plasticizer, membrane thickness, quantum of orifice on drug release from osmotic pump were evaluated. Different kinetic models (zero order, first order and Higuchi model) were applied to drug release data in order to establish the kinetics of drug release. It was found that the drug release was mostly affected by the amount of NaCl as osmotic agent, the swellable polymer; hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), the amount of PEG-400 and cellulose acetate in the coating solution and thickness of the semipermeable membrane. The optimized formulation released buspirone independent of pH and orifice quantum at the osmogen amount of 42%, hydrophilic polymer of 13% and pore size of 0.8 mm on the tablet surface. The drug release of osmotic formulation during 24 h showed zero order kinetics and could be suggested that this formulation as a once-daily regimen improves pharmacokinetic parameters of the drug and enhances patient compliance. PMID:25657794

  10. The HOG pathway controls osmotic regulation of transcription via the stress response element (STRE) of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTT1 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Schüller, C; Brewster, J L; M. R. Alexander; Gustin, M C; Ruis, H

    1994-01-01

    The HOG signal pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is defined by the PBS2 and HOG1 genes encoding members of the MAP kinase kinase and of the MAP kinase family, respectively. Mutations in this pathway (deletions of PBS2 or HOG1, or point mutations in HOG1) almost completely abolish the induction of transcription by osmotic stress that is mediated by stress response elements (STREs). We have demonstrated previously that STREs also mediate induction of transcription by heat shock, nit...

  11. Culture shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Furham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the popular concept of culture shock. From the academic perspective co-researchers from different disciplines (anthropology, education, psychiatry, psychology, sociology have attempted to operationalise the concept and understand the process behind it. It represents fifty years of research using different methodologies and trying to answer different questions about the experience of travel for many reasons. This paper also considers issues concerned with the “overseas” student, of which there are ever more, travelling abroad to study. They can have serious culture shock difficulties. Implications of this research are considered

  12. Osmotic regulation of seamless tube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Ghabrial, Amin S

    2013-02-01

    Most organs are composed of tubes of differing cellular architectures, including intracellular 'seamless' tubes. Two studies examining the morphogenesis of the seamless tubes formed by the excretory canal cell in Caenorhabditis elegans reveal a previously unappreciated role for osmoregulation of tubulogenesis: hyperosmotic shock recruits canalicular vesicles to the lumenal membrane to promote seamless tube growth. PMID:23377027

  13. Osmotic regulation of seamless tube growth

    OpenAIRE

    Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Ghabrial, Amin S.

    2013-01-01

    Most organs are composed of tubes of differing cellular architectures, including intracellular, “seamless” tubes. Two studies examining the morphogenesis of the C. elegans excretory canal cell seamless tubes reveal a previously unappreciated role for osmoregulation of tubulogenesis: hyperosmotic shock recruits canalicular vesicles to the lumenal membrane to promote seamless tube growth.

  14. Global analysis of the yeast osmotic stress response by quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufi, Boumediene; Kelstrup, Christian D; Stoehr, Gabriele; Fröhlich, Florian; Walther, Tobias C; Olsen, Jesper V

    2009-11-01

    Information on extracellular signals and conditions is often transduced by biological systems using cascades of protein phosphorylation that affect the activity of enzymes, the localization of proteins and gene expression. A model to study signal transduction is the response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to osmotic changes as it shares many central themes with information processing modules in higher eukaryotes. Despite considerable progress in our understanding of this pathway, the scale and dynamics of this system have not been addressed systematically yet. Here, we report a comprehensive, quantitative, and time-resolved analysis using high-resolution mass spectrometry of phospho-proteome and proteome changes in response to osmotic stress in yeast. We identified 5534 unique phosphopeptide variants and 3383 yeast proteins. More than 15% of the detected phosphorylation site status changed more than two-fold within 5 minutes of treatment. Many of the corresponding phosphoproteins are involved in the early response to environmental stress. Surprisingly, we find that 158 regulated phosphorylation sites are potential substrates of basophilic kinases as opposed to the classical proline-directed MAP kinase network implicated in stress response mechanisms such as p38 and HOG pathways. Proteome changes reveal an increase in abundance of more than one hundred proteins after 20 min of salt stress. Many of these are involved in the cellular response to increased osmolarity, which include proteins used for glycerol production that is up-regulated to counterbalance the increased osmolarity of the salt containing growth medium. Although the overall relationship between our proteome and published mRNA changes is poor we find an excellent correlation between the subset of osmotic shock up-regulated proteins and their corresponding mRNA changes. PMID:19823750

  15. Self-assembly of silk fibroin under osmotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sungkyun

    The supramolecular self-assembly behavior of silk fibroin was investigated using osmotic stress technique. In Chapter 2, a ternary phase diagram of water-silk-LiBr was constructed based on X-ray results on the osmotically stressed regenerated silk fibroin of Bombyx mori silkworm. Microscopic data indicated that silk I is a hydrated structure and a rough estimate of the number of water molecules lost by the structure upon converting from silk I to silk II has been made, and found to be about 2.2 per [GAGAGS] hexapeptide. In Chapter 3, wet-spinning of osmotically stressed, regenerated silk fibroin was performed, based on the prediction that the enhanced control over structure and phase behavior using osmotic stress method helps improve the physical properties of wet-spun regenerated silk fibroin fibers. The osmotic stress was applied in order to pre-structure the regenerated silk fibroin molecule from its original random coil state to more oriented state, manipulating the phase of the silk solution in the phase diagram before the start of spinning. Monofilament fiber with a diameter of 20 microm was produced. In Chapter 4, we investigated if there is a noticeable synergistic osmotic pressure increase between co-existing polymeric osmolyte and salt when extremely highly concentrated salt molecules are present both at sample subphase and stressing subphase, as is the case of silk fibroin self-assembly. The equilibration method that measures osmotic pressure relative to a reference with known osmotic pressure was introduced. Osmotic pressure of aqueous LiBr solution up to 2.75M was measured and it was found that the synergistic effect was insignificant up to this salt concentration. Solution parameters of stressing solutions and Arrhenius kinetics based on time-temperature relationship for the equilibration process were derived as well. In Chapter 5, self-assembly behavior of natural silk fibroin within the gland of Bombyx mori silkworm was investigated using osmotic

  16. Osmotically Regulated Transport of Proline by Lactobacillus acidophilus IFO 3532

    OpenAIRE

    Jewell, J. B.; Kashket, E R

    1991-01-01

    We reported previously that, when exposed to high osmotic pressure, Lactobacillus acidophilus IFO 3532 cells accumulated N,N,N-trimethylglycine (glycine betaine), which serves as a compatible intracellular solute. When grown in medium with high osmotic pressure, these cells also accumulated one amino acid, proline. The uptake of [3H]proline by resting, glucose-energized cells was stimulated by increasing the osmotic pressure of the assay medium with 0.5 to 1.0 M KCl, 1.0 M NaCl, or 0.5 M sucr...

  17. Mechanism of actuation in conducting polymers: Osmotic expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; Jacobsen, Torben; West, Keld;

    2001-01-01

    Conducting polymers expand or contract when their redox state is changed. This expansion/contraction effect can be separated in an intrinsic part because of changes of the polymer backbone on reduction/oxidation and a part depending on the surrounding electrolyte phase, because of osmotic expansi...... and designing actuator experiments and when comparing experimental results from different sources.......Conducting polymers expand or contract when their redox state is changed. This expansion/contraction effect can be separated in an intrinsic part because of changes of the polymer backbone on reduction/oxidation and a part depending on the surrounding electrolyte phase, because of osmotic expansion...... of the polymer phase. The osmotic effect causes solvent molecules to move into the polymer in a number far in excess of those bound strongly in the solvation shell of the mobile ion, resulting in large volume changes. In this paper, a thermodynamic description of the osmotic expansion is worked out. The model...

  18. An evaluation of the osmotic method of controlling suction

    CERN Document Server

    Delage, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Experimental techniques of testing the mechanical properties of unsaturated soils are complex and difficult to conduct. As a consequence, complete sets of parameters that characterise the behaviour of unsaturated soils remain scarce and necessary. In this context, it has been found useful to gather the information obtained after some years of practice of the osmotic technique of controlling suction. As compared to the more documented axis-translation technique, the osmotic technique has its own advantages and drawbacks that are discussed in this paper, together with some potential future developments. The osmotic method has been developed by soil scientists in the 1960s and adapted to geotechnical testing in the early 1970s. This paper presents the osmotic technique and comments on its advantages (including suction condition close to reality and higher suctions easily attained) and drawbacks (including some concern with the membrane resistance and some membrane effects in the suction/concentration calibration...

  19. Plant response to sunflower seeds to osmotic conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Santos Barros de Morais

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of seeds osmotic conditioning in seedlings emergence and plants performance of sunflower. Three lots of seeds sunflower (Catissol, was submited to osmotic conditioning with polyethylene glycol solution, –2,0 MPa in aerated system, under 15 ºC for 8 hour and then was evaluated for germination tests and vigour. Under filed conditions was conducted emergency evaluations of seedling, plants development as well as the productivity and seeds quality, and the accumulation of nutrients in the seeds. The osmotic conditioning improve the survival of seedling, the dry matter mass to aerial part of plants from 60 days after sowing and oil content, in lots with low seeds physiological quality. The osmotic conditioning not increase the seeds yield but promotes the vigour of seeds produced, regardless of the lot used for sowing seeds.

  20. Osmotic pressure: resisting or promoting DNA ejection from phage

    CERN Document Server

    Jeembaeva, Meerim; Larsson, Frida; Evilevitch, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Recent in vitro experiments have shown that DNA ejection from bacteriophage can be partially stopped by surrounding osmotic pressure when ejected DNA is digested by DNase I on the course of ejection. We argue in this work by combination of experimental techniques (osmotic suppression without DNaseI monitored by UV absorbance, pulse-field electrophoresis, and cryo-EM visualization) and simple scaling modeling that intact genome (i.e. undigested) ejection in a crowded environment is, on the contrary, enhanced or eventually complete with the help of a pulling force resulting from DNA condensation induced by the osmotic stress itself. This demonstrates that in vivo, the osmotically stressed cell cytoplasm will promote phage DNA ejection rather than resisting it. The further addition of DNA-binding proteins under crowding conditions is shown to enhance the extent of ejection. We also found some optimal crowding conditions for which DNA content remaining in the capsid upon ejection is maximum, which correlates well...

  1. Shock Electrodeposition in Charged Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Ji-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that surface conduction in porous media can drastically alter the stability and morphology of electrodeposition at high rates, above the diffusion-limited current. Copper electrodeposits are visualized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy in cellulose nitrate membranes, whose pores are coated with positive or negative charged polymers. Above the limiting current, surface conduction inhibits growth in the positive membrane and produces irregular dendrites, while it enhances growth and suppresses dendrites behind a deionization shock in the negative membrane. The discovery of uniform growth contradicts quasi-steady leaky membrane models, which are in the same universality class as unstable Laplacian growth, and indicates the importance of transient electro-diffusion or electro-osmotic dispersion. Shock electrodeposition could be exploited for high-rate recharging of metal batteries or manufacturing of metal matrix composite coatings.

  2. Biocide efficiency against Legionellae and amoebae in cooling towers - the necessity to control the risk of Legionnaires' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guhl, W.; Hater, W.; Stumpe, S. [Henkel KGaA, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    Legionella, known to be the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is a wide-spread bacteria occurring naturally in water. Favorable growing conditions in man-made systems can lead to massive growth and thus to a considerable risk for human beings. Evaporative cooling towers provide good living conditions due to their operational conditions. As a consequence, the growth of Legionella in these systems has to be controlled. Amongst other measures biocides are dosed to control the growth of the microbiological population and thus the possible risk of an infection by Legionellae. However, Legionella preferably lives in biofilms and/or amoebae, which strongly shelter this microbe. Furthermore, amoebae by themselves can be harmful to humans as well. Therefore, a biocide treatment should control Legionella (planktonic in water and in biofilms/amoebae) as well as the amoebae. This paper shows that an adapted biocide treatment can increase the efficiency of a biocide against Legionellae and amoebae und therefore minimize the risk of an infection by Legionella. (orig.)

  3. A valence bond model for aqueous Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in the AMOEBA polarizable force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jin Yu; Ponder, Jay W

    2013-04-01

    A general molecular mechanics (MM) model for treating aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions was developed based on valence bond (VB) theory and incorporated into the atomic multipole optimized energetics for biomolecular applications (AMOEBA) polarizable force field. Parameters were obtained by fitting MM energies to that computed by ab initio methods for gas-phase tetra- and hexa-aqua metal complexes. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the proposed AMOEBA-VB model were performed for each transition metal ion in aqueous solution, and solvent coordination was evaluated. Results show that the AMOEBA-VB model generates the correct square-planar geometry for gas-phase tetra-aqua Cu(2+) complex and improves the accuracy of MM model energetics for a number of ligation geometries when compared to quantum mechanical (QM) computations. On the other hand, both AMOEBA and AMOEBA-VB generate results for Zn(2+)-water complexes in good agreement with QM calculations. Analyses of the MD trajectories revealed a six-coordination first solvation shell for both Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions in aqueous solution, with ligation geometries falling in the range reported by previous studies. PMID:23212979

  4. Experimental Support for a Predictive Osmotic Model of Clay Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmosis has been cited as a mechanism for explaining anomalously high fluid pressures in the subsurface. Clays and shales act as membranes, and osmotic flux across these units may result in pressures sufficiently high to explain these anomalies. The theoretical osmotic pressures as calculated solely from solution properties can be quite large; however, it is not yet resolved whether these geologic membranes are sufficiently ideal to generate such pressures

  5. Osmotic fragility test in heterozygotes for alpha and beta thalassaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Maccioni, L; Cao, A

    1985-01-01

    This study shows that the combination of heterozygous beta thalassaemia and deletion heterozygous (-alpha/alpha alpha) or homozygous (-alpha/-alpha) alpha+ thalassaemia may result in the production of erythrocytes which have normal mean volume and haemoglobinisation but decreased osmotic fragility. Based on this finding and previous studies, which have shown that beta thalassaemia screening by the osmotic fragility test may miss a significant proportion of beta thalassaemia heterozygotes, we ...

  6. Osmotic Pressure and Packaging Structure of Caged DNA☆

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhidong; Wu, Jianzhong; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2008-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for aqueous solutions of double-stranded (ds) DNA with explicit consideration of electrostatic interactions, excluded-volume effects, van der Waals attractions, and salt ions. With reasonable parameters estimated from the DNA structure and experimental data for electrolytes, we are able to reproduce the DNA osmotic pressure in the bulk in good agreement with experiment. The predicted DNA osmotic pressure in λ-bacteriophages is found to coincide with that of the ...

  7. Physiological and genetic responses of bacteria to osmotic stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Csonka, L N

    1989-01-01

    The capacity of organisms to respond to fluctuations in their osmotic environments is an important physiological process that determines their abilities to thrive in a variety of habitats. The primary response of bacteria to exposure to a high osmotic environment is the accumulation of certain solutes, K+, glutamate, trehalose, proline, and glycinebetaine, at concentrations that are proportional to the osmolarity of the medium. The supposed function of these solutes is to maintain the osmolar...

  8. Control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. in cultures of Arthrospira sp. Control de Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. en cultivos de Arthrospira sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Méndez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. has been developed in many countries for the production of proteins, pigments and other compounds. Outdoor mass cultures are often affected by biological contamination, drastically reducing productivity as far as bringing death. This study evaluates the control of Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. with two chemical compounds: urea (U and ammonium bicarbonate (AB, in laboratory conditions and outdoor mass culture of Arthrospira sp. The lethal concentration 100 (LC100 at 24 h for Branchionus sp. and Amoeba sp. determined was of 60-80 mg L-1 (U and 100-150 mg L-1 (AB. The average effective inhibition concentration for 50% of the population (IC50 in Arthrospira sp., after 72 h, was 80 mg L-1 (U and 150 mg L-1 (AB. The application of doses of 60 mg L-1 (U or 100 mg L-1 (AB in the outdoor mass culture of this contaminated microalga, completely inhibited grazing and did not affect the growth of Arthrospira sp. but rather promoted rapid recovery of algal density at levels prior to infestation. These compounds provided an economical and effective control of predators in cultures of Arthrospira sp.El cultivo de la cianobacteria Arthrospira sp. ha sido desarrollado en muchos países para la obtención de proteínas, pigmentos y otros compuestos. Cultivo que a nivel industrial se ve afectado frecuentemente por contaminación biológica, reduciendo drásticamente la productividad hasta causar la muerte. Este estudio evalúa el control de Branchionus sp. y de Amoeba sp. con dos compuestos químicos, la urea (U y bicarbonato de amonio (AB en cultivos de Arthrospira sp. La concentración letal 100 (LC100 determinada a las 24 h para Branchionus sp. y Amoeba sp. fue de 60-80 mg L-1 (U y 100-150 mg L-1 (AB. La concentración media de inhibición efectiva, después de 72 h, para el 50% de la población (IC50 en Arthrospira fue de 80 mg L-1 (U y 150 mg L-1 (AB. La aplicación de dosis de 60 mg L-1 (U ó 100 mg L-1 (AB en

  9. Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW) is a well established series of conferences held every two years in a different location. A unique feature of the ISSW is the emphasis on bridging the gap between physicists and engineers working in fields as different as gas dynamics, fluid mechanics and materials sciences. The main results presented at these meetings constitute valuable proceedings that offer anyone working in this field an authoritative and comprehensive source of reference.

  10. Septic Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Achong, Michael R.

    1980-01-01

    Septic shock is a dynamic syndrome of inadequate tissue perfusion caused by invasion of the blood by micro-organisms. Gram-negative rod bacteremia accounts for about two-thirds of patients with this syndrome. The fully developed syndrome of high fever, chills, cold, moist extremities, hypotension and oliguria is easy to recognize. However, the initial features of the syndrome may be quite non-specific and subtle, particularly in elderly patients. Treatment is aimed at eliminating the infectio...

  11. Culture Shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋文玲

    2004-01-01

    Specialists say that it is not easy to get used to life in a new culture.“Culture shock”is the term these specialists use when talking about the feelings that people have in a new environment.There are three stages of culture shock,say the specialists.In the first stage,the newcomers like their new environment,Then when the fresh experience

  12. Kin discrimination and possible cryptic species in the social amoeba Polysphondylium violaceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasagni Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic diversity of many protists is unknown. The differences that result from this diversity can be important in interactions among individuals. The social amoeba Polysphondylium violaceum, which is a member of the Dictyostelia, has a social stage where individual amoebae aggregate together to form a multicellular fruiting body with dead stalk cells and live spores. Individuals can either cooperate with amoebae from the same clone, or sort to form clonal fruiting bodies. In this study we look at genetic diversity in P. violaceum and at how this diversity impacts social behavior. Results The phylogeny of the ribosomal DNA sequence (17S to 5.8S region shows that P. violaceum is made up of at least two groups. Mating compatibility is more common between clones from the same phylogenetic group, though matings between clones from different phylogenetic groups sometimes occurred. P. violaceum clones are more likely to form clonal fruiting bodies when they are mixed with clones from a different group than when they are mixed with a clone of the same group. Conclusion Both the phylogenetic and mating analyses suggest the possibility of cryptic species in P. violaceum. The level of divergence found within P. violaceum is comparable to the divergence between sibling species in other dictyostelids. Both major groups A/B and C/D/E/F show kin discrimination, which elevates relatedness within fruiting bodies but not to the level of clonality. The diminished cooperation in mixes between groups suggests that the level of genetic variation between individuals influences the extent of their cooperation.

  13. Osmotic Stress Confers Enhanced Cell Integrity to Hydrostatic Pressure but Impairs Growth in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, Alberto; Boon, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Alcanivorax is a hydrocarbonoclastic genus dominating oil spills worldwide. While its presence has been detected in oil-polluted seawaters, marine sediment and salt marshes under ambient pressure, its presence in deep-sea oil-contaminated environments is negligible. Recent laboratory studies highlighted the piezosensitive nature of some Alcanivorax species, whose growth yields are highly impacted by mild hydrostatic pressures (HPs). In the present study, osmotic stress was used as a tool to increase HP resistance in the type strain Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2. Control cultures grown under standard conditions of salinity and osmotic pressure with respect to seawater (35.6 ppt or 1136 mOsm kg-1, respectively) were compared with cultures subjected to hypo- and hyperosmosis (330 and 1720 mOsm kg-1, or 18 and 62 ppt in salinity, equivalent to brackish and brine waters, respectively), under atmospheric or increased HP (0.1 and 10 MPa). Osmotic stress had a remarkably positive impact on cell metabolic activity in terms of CO2 production (thus, oil bioremediation) and O2 respiration under hyperosmosis, as acclimation to high salinity enhanced cell activity under 10 MPa by a factor of 10. Both osmotic shocks significantly enhanced cell protection by reducing membrane damage under HP, with cell integrities close to 100% under hyposmosis. The latter was likely due to intracellular water-reclamation as no trace of the piezolyte ectoine was found, contrary to hyperosmosis. Notably, ectoine production was equivalent at 0.1 MPa in hyperosmosis-acclimated cells and at 10 MPa under isosmotic conditions. While stimulating cell metabolism and enhancing cell integrity, osmotic stress had always a negative impact on culture growth and performance. No net growth was observed during 4-days incubation tests, and CO2:O2 ratios and pH values indicated that culture performance in terms of hydrocarbon degradation was lowered by the effects of osmotic stress alone or combined with increased HP

  14. Enteric bacteria and osmotic stress: intracellular potassium glutamate as a secondary signal of osmotic stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, I R; Higgins, C F

    1990-06-01

    Enteric bacteria have evolved an impressive array of mechanisms that allow the cell to grow at widely different external osmotic pressures. These serve two linked functions; firstly, they allow the cell to maintain a relatively constant turgor pressure which is essential for cell growth; and secondly they permit changes in cytoplasmic composition such that the accumulation of intracellular osmolytes required to restore turgor pressure does not impair enzyme function. The primary event in turgor regulation is the controlled accumulation of potassium and its counterion glutamate. At high external osmolarities the cytoplasmic levels of potassium glutamate can impair enzyme function. Rapid growth is therefore dependent upon secondary responses, principally the accumulation of compatible solutes, betaine (N-trimethylglycine), proline and trehalose. The accumulation of these solutes is achieved by the controlled activity of transport systems and enzymes in response to changes in external osmotic pressure. It has been proposed that the accumulation of potassium glutamate during turgor regulation acts as a signal for the activation of these systems [1,2]. This brief review will examine the evidence that control over the balance of cytoplasmic osmolytes is achieved by sensing of the intracellular potassium (and glutamate) concentration. PMID:1974769

  15. Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy and Two Photon Excitation Microscopy as Tools to Study Testate Amoebae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burdíková, Zuzana; Čapek, Martin; Ostašov, Pavel; Mitchell, E.A.D.; Machač, Jiří; Kubínová, Lucie

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, Suppl.2 (2010), s. 1142-1143. ISSN 1431-9276. [Microscopy and Microanalysis 2010. Portland, 01.08.2010-05.08.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA ČR(CZ) GA102/08/0691; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/09/0733 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : testate amoeba e * confocal microscopy * two-photon microscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.179, year: 2010

  16. Propensity of heavier halides for the water/vapor interface revisited using the Amoeba force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůma, Lukáš; Jeníček, Dominik; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2005-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous sodium halide solutions in slab geometry were performed using the state-of-the-art polarizable Amoeba force field. The present calculations reveal a propensity of halide anions for the water/vapor interface, which correlates with the ionic size and polarizability and, therefore, increases in the series Cl - < Br - < I -. These results are in a quantitative agreement with previous calculations employing much simpler polarizable potentials and are supported by a mounting experimental evidence from photoelectron and non-linear optical and vibrational spectroscopies.

  17. Isolation of Free-Living Amoebae from Sarein Hot Springs in Ardebil Province, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Badirzadeh, A; Niyyati, M; Babaei, Z; Amini, H.; H Badirzadeh; Rezaeian, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Free-living amoebae (FLA) are a group of ubiquitous protozoan, which are distrib­uted in the natural and artificial environment sources. The main aim of the current study was to identify the presence of FLA in the recreational hot springs of Sarein in Ardebil Province of Iran.Methods: Seven recreational hot springs were selected in Sarein City and 28 water samples (four from each hot spring) were collected using 500 ml sterile plastic bottles during three month. Filtra­tion of wat...

  18. SSU rRNA reveals a sequential increase in shell complexity among the euglyphid testate amoebae (Rhizaria: Euglyphida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lara, Enrique; Heger, Thierry J; Mitchell, Edward A D; Meisterfeld, Ralf; Ekelund, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    The existing data on the molecular phylogeny of filose testate amoebae from order Euglyphida has revealed contradictions between traditional morphological classification and SSU rRNA phylogeny and, moreover, the position of several important genera remained unknown. We therefore carried out a study...... aiming to fill several important gaps and better understand the relationships among the main euglyphid testate amoebae and the evolutionary steps that led to the present diversity at a higher level. We obtained new SSU rRNA sequences from five genera and seven species. This new phylogeny obtained shows...

  19. Structure and osmotic pressure of ionic microgel dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Mary M.; Chung, Jun Kyung; Denton, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels—soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model's limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions.

  20. Structure and osmotic pressure of ionic microgel dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels—soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model’s limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions

  1. Structure and osmotic pressure of ionic microgel dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedrick, Mary M. [Department of Physics, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108-6050 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108-6050 (United States); Chung, Jun Kyung; Denton, Alan R., E-mail: alan.denton@ndsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Dakota State University, Fargo, North Dakota 58108-6050 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    We investigate structural and thermodynamic properties of aqueous dispersions of ionic microgels—soft colloidal gel particles that exhibit unusual phase behavior. Starting from a coarse-grained model of microgel macroions as charged spheres that are permeable to microions, we perform simulations and theoretical calculations using two complementary implementations of Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory. Within a one-component model, based on a linear-screening approximation for effective electrostatic pair interactions, we perform molecular dynamics simulations to compute macroion-macroion radial distribution functions, static structure factors, and macroion contributions to the osmotic pressure. For the same model, using a variational approximation for the free energy, we compute both macroion and microion contributions to the osmotic pressure. Within a spherical cell model, which neglects macroion correlations, we solve the nonlinear PB equation to compute microion distributions and osmotic pressures. By comparing the one-component and cell model implementations of PB theory, we demonstrate that the linear-screening approximation is valid for moderately charged microgels. By further comparing cell model predictions with simulation data for osmotic pressure, we chart the cell model’s limits in predicting osmotic pressures of salty dispersions.

  2. Ionic Origin of Electro-osmotic Flow Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun Yee; Lim, An Eng; Lam, Yee Cheong

    2016-02-01

    Electro-osmotic flow, the driving of fluid at nano- or micro- scales with electric field, has found numerous applications, ranging from pumping to chemical and biomedical analyses in micro-devices. Electro-osmotic flow exhibits a puzzling hysteretic behavior when two fluids with different concentrations displace one another. The flow rate is faster when a higher concentration solution displaces a lower concentration one as compared to the flow in the reverse direction. Although electro-osmotic flow is a surface phenomenon, rather counter intuitively we demonstrate that electro-osmotic flow hysteresis originates from the accumulation or depletion of pH-governing minority ions in the bulk of the fluid, due to the imbalance of electric-field-induced ion flux. The pH and flow velocity are changed, depending on the flow direction. The understanding of electro-osmotic flow hysteresis is critical for accurate fluid flow control in microfluidic devices, and maintaining of constant pH in chemical and biological systems under an electric field.

  3. Old lineages in a new ecosystem: diversification of arcellinid amoebae (Amoebozoa and peatland mosses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Fiz-Palacios

    Full Text Available Arcellinid testate amoebae (Amoebozoa form a group of free-living microbial eukaryotes with one of the oldest fossil records known, yet several aspects of their evolutionary history remain poorly understood. Arcellinids occur in a range of terrestrial, freshwater and even brackish habitats; however, many arcellinid morphospecies such as Hyalosphenia papilio are particularly abundant in Sphagnum-dominated peatlands, a relatively new ecosystem that appeared during the diversification of Sphagnum species in the Miocene (5-20 Myr ago. Here, we reconstruct divergence times in arcellinid testate amoebae after selecting several fossils for clock calibrations and then infer whether or not arcellinids followed a pattern of diversification that parallels the pattern described for Sphagnum. We found that the diversification of core arcellinids occurred during the Phanerozoic, which is congruent with most arcellinid fossils but not with the oldest known amoebozoan fossil (i.e. at ca. 662 or ca. 750 Myr. Overall, Sphagnum and the Hyalospheniidae exhibit different patterns of diversification. However, an extensive molecular phylogenetic analysis of distinct clades within H. papilio species complex demonstrated a correlation between the recent diversification of H. papilio, the recent diversification of Sphagnum mosses, and the establishment of peatlands.

  4. Testate amoebae communities from some freshwater and soil habitats in China (Hubei and Shandong Provinces)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anatoly BOBROV; Yuri MAZEI; Viktor CHERNYSHOV; Yingchun GONG; Weisong FENG

    2012-01-01

    Seventy-eight species and forms of testate amoebae were identified from 29 freshwater and soil habitats in three territories of China (Shandong and Hubei Provinces).Most abundant species from the genera Plagiopyxis,Centropyxis and Trinema represent the globally-distributed and eurybiont group of testate amoebae.The species richness was observed to be the lowest (7-12 species per biotope) in sandy sediments of the Yangtze River,but considerably higher (20-30 taxa) in soil environment.In the range of terrestrial habitats,the most remote communities from Laoshan Mountain in Shandong Province,China manifested the highest difference from others.On the other hand,communities originated in the most distant from industrial center places (Guifeng Mountain in Hubei Province,China) possess the most peculiar species composition including specific Gondwanian taxa (e.g.Nebela bigibbosa).In sum,the results obtained provide the evidence that the community complexity and specificity reduce in the places located within areas that are highly populated and intensively visited by humans.

  5. Acanthamoeba and other free-living amoebae in bat guano, an extreme habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulec, Janez; Dietersdorfer, Elisabeth; Üstüntürk-Onan, Miray; Walochnik, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Several representatives of the so-called free-living amoebae (FLA) are of medical relevance, not only as facultative pathogens but also as vehicles for pathogenic bacteria. Some FLA can survive and even grow under extreme environmental conditions. Bat guano is an exceptional habitat, the conditions becoming gradually more extreme with aging. In the current study, samples of bat guano of different ages from five caves in Slovenia were screened for the presence of FLA. FLA were isolated from almost all guano samples, including guano with a pH of 3.5. Only the two samples that had been drawn from >20-year-old guano were negative for FLA. Generally, FLA diversity correlated to high concentrations of cultivable bacteria (∼10(8) CFU/g) and fungi (∼10(5) CFU/g). Interestingly, the absence of FLA in seasoned guanos was mirrored by the presence of dictyostelid slime moulds. The isolated amoebae were identified as belonging to the genera Acanthamoeba, Copromyxa, Naegleria, Sappinia, Tetramitus, Thecamoeba, Vahlkampfia, Vannella and Vermamoeba. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the diversity of FLA in guano. PMID:26678653

  6. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Free-Living Amoebae from Different Water Sources in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Montalbano Di Filippo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Free-living amoebae (FLA are protozoa ubiquitous in Nature, isolated from a variety of environments worldwide. In addition to their natural distribution, some species have been found to be pathogenic to humans. In the present study a survey was conducted in order to evaluate the presence and to characterize at molecular level the isolates of amoebic organisms collected from different water sources in Italy. A total of 160 water samples were analyzed by culture and microscopic examination. FLA were found in 46 (28.7% of the investigated water samples. Groundwater, well waters, and ornamental fountain waters were the sources with higher prevalence rates (85.7%, 50.0%, and 45.9%, respectively. Identification of FLA species/genotypes, based on the 18S rDNA regions, allowed to identify 18 (39.1% Acanthamoeba isolates (genotypes T4 and T15 and 21 (45.6% Vermamoeba vermiformis isolates. Other FLA species, including Vahlkampfia sp. and Naegleria spp., previously reported in Italy, were not recovered. The occurrence of potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae in habitats related to human population, as reported in the present study, supports the relevance of FLA as a potential health threat to humans.

  7. An Angular Overlap Model for Cu(II) Ion in the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jin Yu; Ponder, Jay W

    2014-01-01

    An extensible polarizable force field for transition metal ion was developed based on AMOEBA and the angular overlap model (AOM) with consistent treatment of electrostatics for all atoms. Parameters were obtained by fitting molecular mechanics (MM) energies to various ab initio gas-phase calculations. The results of parameterization were presented for copper (II) ion ligated to water and model fragments of amino acid residues involved in the copper binding sites of type 1 copper proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on aqueous copper (II) ion at various temperatures, as well as plastocyanin (1AG6) and azurin (1DYZ). Results demonstrated that the AMOEBA-AOM significantly improves the accuracy of classical MM in a number of test cases when compared to ab initio calculations. The Jahn-Teller distortion for hexa-aqua copper (II) complex was handled automatically without specifically designating axial and in-plane ligands. Analyses of MD trajectories resulted in a 6-coordination first solvation shell for aqueous copper (II) ion and a 1.8ns average residence time of water molecules. The ensemble average geometries of 1AG6 and 1DYZ copper binding sites were in general agreement with X-ray and previous computational studies. PMID:25045338

  8. Does buckling instability of the pseudopodium limit how well an amoeba can climb?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sandip; Fukui, Yoshio

    2011-02-21

    The maximum force that a crawling cell can exert on a substrate is a quantity of interest in cell biomechanics. One way of quantifying this force is to allow the cell to crawl against a measurable and adjustable restraining force until the cell is no longer able to move in a direction opposite to the applied force. Fukui et al. (2000) reported on an experiment where amoeboid cells were imaged while they crawled against an artificial gravity field created by a centrifuge. An unexpected observation was that the net applied force on the amoeba did not seem to be the primary factor that limited its ability to climb. Instead, it appeared that the amoeba stalled when it was no longer able to support a pseudopodium against the applied gravity field. The high g-load bend the pseudopodium thereby preventing its attachment to the target point directly ahead of the cell. In this paper we further refine this idea by identifying the bending of the pseudopodium with the onset of elastic instability of a beam under its own weight. It is shown that the principal features of the experiment may be understood through this model and an estimate for the limiting g-load in reasonable accord with the experimental measurements is recovered. PMID:21130098

  9. Free living amoebae in water sources of critical units in a tertiary care hospital in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khurana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isolation of free-living amoebae (FLA is reported sparsely from water taps, ventilators, air conditioners, haemodialysis units and dental irrigation systems of hospitals worldwide. Their prevalence in hospital environment especially in wards having immunocompromised patients may pose a risk to this group of susceptible population as they may cause disease themselves or may carry pathogens inside them. No study from India has performed such surveillance. Objective: To evaluate extent of FLA contamination in water sources of bone marrow transplant (BMT intensive care unit (ICU, transplant ICU, haemodialysis unit and high dependency unit in a tertiary care hospital in India. Materials and Methods: A total of hundred samples including fifty each of tap water samples and swabs from mouth of taps used for drinking, bathing and hand washing purposes in these units were collected according to standard procedure. Samples were inoculated onto non-nutrient agar plates at room temperature followed by morphological confirmation. Molecular identification including polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing was performed in culture positive samples. Results: Four tap water samples and ten swab samples showed growth of trophozoites and cyst formation. Morphologically, four amoebae resembled Acanthamoeba spp. which was further confirmed by PCR and sequencing showed them to be of T3 and T4 genotypes. Conclusion: The presence of these FLA in hospital water sources emphasises the urgent need of implementing effective preventive measures. Further studies are required to estimate the true prevalence of FLA in Indian hospitals by taking larger number of samples.

  10. Archaeological occurrences and historical review of the human amoeba, Entamoeba histolytica, over the past 6000years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bailly, Matthieu; Maicher, Céline; Dufour, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    Understanding parasite history and the evolution of host/parasite relationships is one of the most important aspects of paleoparasitology. Within the framework of this research topic, this paper focuses on the human pathogenic amoeba, Entamoeba histolytica. The compilation of all the available archaeological data concerning this parasite leads to a first glimpse of the history of this parasite of current medical importance. Paleoparasitological investigation into this parasite uses immunological techniques and shows that the modern strain of E. histolytica has been present in Western Europe since at least the Neolithic period (3700yearsBCE), and could have originated in the Old World. The appearance of the modern amoeba strain in the pre-Columbian Americas and the Middle East around the 12th century CE gives rise to hypotheses as to how human migrations (Atlantic or Pacific routes) contributed to the diffusion of this pathogen, resulting in its current distribution. This compilation proves that parasites are valuable proxies for studying past human and animal migrations, and should be given more consideration in the future. PMID:27130884

  11. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock? Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the heart suddenly can' ... reason why emergency treatment is so important. Underlying Causes The underlying causes of cardiogenic shock are conditions ...

  12. Studies of Protein Solution Properties Using Osmotic Pressure Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, S.; Bogle, David; Pusey, Marc; Agena, S.

    1998-01-01

    Examination of the protein crystallization process involves investigation of the liquid and solid state and a protein's properties in these states. Liquid state studies such as protein self association in solution by light scattering methods or other methods have been used to examine a protein Is properties and therefore its crystallization process and conditions. Likewise can osmotic pressure data be used to examine protein properties and various published osmotic pressure studies were examined by us to correlate osmotic pressure to protein solution properties. The solution behavior of serum albumin, alpha - chymotrypsin, beta - lactoglobulin and ovalbumin was examined over a range of temperatures, pH values and different salt types and concentrations. Using virial expansion and a local composition model the non ideal solution behavior in form of the activity coefficients (thermodynamic) was described for the systems. This protein activity coefficient data was related to a protein's solubility behavior and this process and the results will be presented.

  13. Determination of colloidal osmotic equation of state by dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Jacob; Huang, Hao; Ou-Yang, H. Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Osmotic equation of state [P(N,T)] describes both the mechanical properties and phase behavior of a colloidal suspension. As an alternative to sedimentation, we propose a new approach to determine P(N,T) by dielectrophoresis (DEP). Using fluorescence confocal microscopy, we obtain particle density profiles in order to determine the DEP force distribution when the particle concentration is low and the inter-particle interactions are negligible. From the known force distribution and Einstein's osmotic equilibrium equation, we can calculate P(N,T) from the particle density profile of interacting, charge-stabilized polystyrene latex particles under different salt concentrations and added neutral polymers. The osmotic equation of state for colloidal suspensions can then be crosschecked by sedimentation equilibrium.

  14. Testate amoebae (Protozoa) from especially protected spruce forests in the Šumava National Park (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balík, Vladimír

    České Budějovice : Institute of Soil Biology AS CR, 2003. s. 12. [Central European Workshop on Soil Zoology /7./. 14.04.2003-16.04.2003, České Budějovice] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : testate amoebae * spruce forests * Šumava National Park Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  15. A New Species Of Testate Amoebae Of The Genus Difflugia From The Freshwaters Of Azerbaijan (Rhizopoda, Testacea, Difflugiidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snegovaya N. Yu.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new testate amoebae species Difflugia alekperovi sp. n. was found during a faunistic study of inland waters of Lenkoran Region, South-Eastern Azerbaijan. The morphology and biometry of this species was described by LM and SEM investigations.

  16. A free-living amoeba with unusual pattern of mitochondrial structure isolated from Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyková, Iva; Veverková, Marie; Fiala, Ivan; Macháčková, Blanka

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, - (2002), s. 415-419. ISSN 0065-1583 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6022202 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : free-living amoeba * mitochondrial cristae * Salmo salar Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.446, year: 2002

  17. First evidence of testate amoebae in Lago Fagnano (54° S), Tierra del Fuego (Argentina): Proxies to reconstruct environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffau, Mauro; Lenaz, Davide; Lodolo, Emanuele; Zecchin, Massimo; Comici, Cinzia; Tassone, Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    We report here the first findings of testate amoebae at high southern latitudes (54° S) from four gravity cores recovered in the Lago Fagnano (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina), where twelve taxa have been recognized. Among them, Centropyxis constricta "constricta", Centropyxis elongata, Difflugia globulus, Difflugia oblonga "oblonga", and Difflugia protaeiformis "amphoralis" are always present, while other taxa are randomly distributed. According to the sand/silt ratio in the different cores, the Total Organic Carbon content and the Carbon/Nitrogen ratio, as well as the presence/disappearance and abundance of testate amoebae from cluster analysis, we infer a correlation between major textural/granulometrical changes found in the cores and environmental changes. A seismic event occurred on 1949, which substantially modified the morphology of the eastern Lago Fagnano shoreline and the supply pattern from two main eastern tributaries of the lake, is recorded in the studied cores. This event has in part modified the distribution of testate amoebae taxa within the studied cores. Present results show that testate amoebae represent important indicators to detect changes occurring in the environment in which they live.

  18. Testate Amoebae Communities in the Rhizosphere of Rhododendron ponticum (Ericaceae) in an Evergreen Broadleaf Forest in Southern Spain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohník, Martin; Burdíková, Zuzana; Wilkinson, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 51, Sp. iss.3 (2012), s. 259-269. ISSN 0065-1583 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:67985823 Keywords : testate amoebae * Ericaceae * rhizosphere Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; ED - Physiology (FGU-C) Impact factor: 0.984, year: 2012

  19. Effect of Common Drinking Water Disinfectants, Chlorine and Heat, on Free Legionella and Amoebae-Associated Legionella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Cervero-Aragó

    Full Text Available Chlorine and thermal treatments are the most commonly used procedures to control and prevent Legionella proliferation in drinking water systems of large buildings. However, cases of legionellosis still occur in facilities with treated water. The purpose of this work was to model the effect of temperature and free chlorine applied in similar exposure conditions as in drinking water systems on five Legionella spp. strains and two amoebal strains of the genera Acanthamoeba. Inactivation models obtained were used to determine the effectiveness of the treatments applied which resulted more effective against Legionella than Acanthamoeba, especially those in cystic stages. Furthermore, to determine the influence of the relationship between L. pneumophila and Acanthamoeba spp. on the treatment effectiveness, inactivation models of the bacteria-associated amoeba were also constructed and compared to the models obtained for the free living bacteria state. The Legionella-amoeba association did not change the inactivation models, but it reduced the effectiveness of the treatments applied. Remarkably, at the lowest free chlorine concentration, 0.5 mg L-1, as well as at the lowest temperatures, 50°C and 55°C, the influence of the Legionella-amoeba associate state was the strongest in reducing the effectiveness of the treatments compared to the free Legionella state. Therefore, the association established between L. pneumophila and amoebae in the water systems indicate an increased health risk in proximal areas of the system (close to the tap where lower free chlorine concentrations and lower temperatures are commonly observed.

  20. Shedding light on microbial dark matter: a TM6 bacterium as natural endosymbiont of a free-living amoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafont, Vincent; Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Bouchon, Didier; Moulin, Laurent; Héchard, Yann

    2015-12-01

    The TM6 phylum belongs to the so-called microbial dark matter that gathers uncultivated bacteria detected only via DNA sequencing. Recently, the genome sequence of a TM6 bacterium (TM6SC1) has led to suggest that this bacterium would adopt an endosymbiotic life. In the present paper, free-living amoebae bearing a TM6 strain were isolated from a water network. The amoebae were identified as Vermamoeba vermiformis and the presence of a TM6 strain was detected by polymerase chain reaction and microscopy. The partial sequence of its 16S rRNA gene showed this strain to be closely related to the sequenced TM6SC1 strain. These bacteria displayed a pyriform shape and were found within V. vermiformis. Therefore, these bacteria were named Vermiphilus pyriformis. Interactions studies showed that V. pyriformis was highly infectious and that its relation with V. vermiformis was specific and highly stable. Finally, it was found that V. pyriformis inhibited the encystment of V. vermiformis. Overall, this study describes for the first time an endosymbiotic relationship between a TM6 bacterium and a free-living amoeba in the environment. It suggests that other bacteria of the TM6 phylum might also be endosymbiotic bacteria and may be found in other free-living amoebae or other organisms. PMID:26471960

  1. Effect of Common Drinking Water Disinfectants, Chlorine and Heat, on Free Legionella and Amoebae-Associated Legionella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero-Aragó, Sílvia; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sarah; Puertas-Bennasar, Antoni; Araujo, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine and thermal treatments are the most commonly used procedures to control and prevent Legionella proliferation in drinking water systems of large buildings. However, cases of legionellosis still occur in facilities with treated water. The purpose of this work was to model the effect of temperature and free chlorine applied in similar exposure conditions as in drinking water systems on five Legionella spp. strains and two amoebal strains of the genera Acanthamoeba. Inactivation models obtained were used to determine the effectiveness of the treatments applied which resulted more effective against Legionella than Acanthamoeba, especially those in cystic stages. Furthermore, to determine the influence of the relationship between L. pneumophila and Acanthamoeba spp. on the treatment effectiveness, inactivation models of the bacteria-associated amoeba were also constructed and compared to the models obtained for the free living bacteria state. The Legionella-amoeba association did not change the inactivation models, but it reduced the effectiveness of the treatments applied. Remarkably, at the lowest free chlorine concentration, 0.5 mg L-1, as well as at the lowest temperatures, 50°C and 55°C, the influence of the Legionella-amoeba associate state was the strongest in reducing the effectiveness of the treatments compared to the free Legionella state. Therefore, the association established between L. pneumophila and amoebae in the water systems indicate an increased health risk in proximal areas of the system (close to the tap) where lower free chlorine concentrations and lower temperatures are commonly observed. PMID:26241039

  2. Cosmological shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M; Durret, F

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale structure formation, accretion and merging processes, AGN activity produce cosmological gas shocks. The shocks convert a fraction of the energy of gravitationally accelerated flows to internal energy of the gas. Being the main gas-heating agent, cosmological shocks could amplify magnetic fields and accelerate energetic particles via the multi-fluid plasma relaxation processes. We first discuss the basic properties of standard single-fluid shocks. Cosmological plasma shocks are expected to be collisionless. We then review the plasma processes responsible for the microscopic structure of collisionless shocks. A tiny fraction of the particles crossing the shock is injected into the non-thermal energetic component that could get a substantial part of the ram pressure power dissipated at the shock. The energetic particles penetrate deep into the shock upstream producing an extended shock precursor. Scaling relations for postshock ion temperature and entropy as functions of shock velocity in strong coll...

  3. Pathogenesis of amoebic encephalitis: Are the amoebae being credited to an 'inside job' done by the host immune response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Abdul Mannan

    2015-08-01

    Pathogenic free living amoeba like Naegleria fowleri, Acanthamoeba spp., and Balamuthia mandrillaris are known to cause fatal "amoebic meningoencephalitis" by acquiring different route of entries to the brain. The host immune response to these protist pathogens differs from each another, as evidenced by the postmortem gross and microscopic findings from the brains of the affected patients. Cited with the expression of 'brain eating amoeba' when the infection is caused by N. fowleri, this expression is making its way into parasitology journals and books. The impression that it imparts is, as if the brain damage is substantially due to the enzymes and toxins produced by this amoeba. A detailed review of the literature, analysis of archived specimens and with our experimental assays, here we establish that with N. fowleri, Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia spp., the infections result in an extensive brain damage that in fact is substantially caused by the host immune response rather than the amoeba. Due to the comparatively larger sizes of these pathogens and the prior exposure of the amoebal antigen to the human body, the host immune system launches an amplified response that not only breaches the blood brain barrier (BBB), but also becomes the major cause of brain damage in Amoebic meningoencephalitis. It is our understanding that for N. fowleri the host immune response is dominated by acute inflammatory cytokines and that, in cases of Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia spp., it is the type IV hypersensitivity reaction that fundamentally not only contributes to disruption and leakiness of the blood brain barrier (BBB) but also causes the neuronal damage. The further intensification of brain damage is done by toxins and enzymes secreted by the amoeba, which causes the irreversible brain damage. PMID:25930186

  4. Effect of UV irradiation (253.7 nm) on free Legionella and Legionella associated with its amoebae hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero-Aragó, Sílvia; Sommer, Regina; Araujo, Rosa M

    2014-12-15

    Water systems are the primary reservoir for Legionella spp., where the bacteria live in association with other microorganisms, such as free-living amoebae. A wide range of disinfection treatments have been studied to control and prevent Legionella colonization but few of them were performed considering its relation with protozoa. In this study, the effectiveness of UV irradiation (253.7 nm) using low-pressure lamps was investigated as a disinfection method for Legionella and amoebae under controlled laboratory conditions. UV treatments were applied to 5 strains of Legionella spp., 4 strains of free-living amoeba of the genera Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba, treating separately trophozoites and cysts, and to two different co-cultures of Legionella pneumophila with the Acanthamoeba strains. No significant differences in the UV inactivation behavior were observed among Legionella strains tested which were 3 logs reduced for fluences around 45 J/m(2). UV irradiation was less effective against free-living amoebae; which in some cases required up to 990 J/m(2) to obtain the same population reduction. UV treatment was more effective against trophozoites compared to cysts; moreover, inactivation patterns were clearly different between the genus Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba. For the first time data about Vermamoeba vermiformis UV inactivation has been reported in a study. Finally, the results showed that the association of L. pneumophila with free-living amoebae decreases the effectiveness of UV irradiation against the bacteria in a range of 1.5-2 fold. That fact demonstrates that the relations established between different microorganisms in the water systems can modify the effectiveness of the UV treatments applied. PMID:25306486

  5. Acidic pH shock induces the expressions of a wide range of stress-response genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Soon-Kwang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental signals usually enhance secondary metabolite production in Streptomycetes by initiating complex signal transduction system. It is known that different sigma factors respond to different types of stresses, respectively in Streptomyces strains, which have a number of unique signal transduction mechanisms depending on the types of environmental shock. In this study, we wanted to know how a pH shock would affect the expression of various sigma factors and shock-related proteins in S. coelicolor A3(2. Results According to the results of transcriptional and proteomic analyses, the major number of sigma factor genes were upregulated by an acidic pH shock. Well-studied sigma factor genes of sigH (heat shock, sigR (oxidative stress, sigB (osmotic shock, and hrdD that play a major role in the secondary metabolism, were all strongly upregulated by the pH shock. A number of heat shock proteins including the DnaK family and chaperones such as GroEL2 were also observed to be upregulated by the pH shock, while their repressor of hspR was strongly downregulated. Oxidative stress-related proteins such as thioredoxin, catalase, superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and osmotic shock-related protein such as vesicle synthases were also upregulated in overall. Conclusion From these observations, an acidic pH shock was considered to be one of the strongest stresses to influence a wide range of sigma factors and shock-related proteins including general stress response proteins. The upregulation of the sigma factors and shock proteins already found to be related to actinorhodin biosynthesis was considered to have contributed to enhanced actinorhodin productivity by mediating the pH shock signal to regulators or biosynthesis genes for actinorhodin production.

  6. Drying of red beetroot after osmotic pretreatment: Kinetics and quality considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski Stefan J.; Łechtańska Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents experimental studies on drying kinetics and quality effects of red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) after convective drying with a preliminary osmotic pretreatment. The effects of the osmotic agent (NaCl) concentration and the osmotic bath time on the product colour and nutrient content preservation, the water activity, and rehydration ability after drying were analysed. Osmotic dehydration curves and Solid Gain (SG), Water Loss (WL), Weight Reduction (WR) were determined. It...

  7. Osmotic dehydration of mandarins: Influence of reutilized osmotic agent on behaviour and product quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lobo Sapata

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background. Osmotic dehydration (OD is a technology that allows the concentration mainly of fruits and vegetables, without change of phase, through partial water removal, when immersed in a hypertonic solution of sugar, salt or others. It can be successfully applied to some products whose production is not fully marketed in fresh form. However, an additional process is necessary to stabilize the product. The process leads to the achievement of high quality alternative products, with an extended shelf-life, economy in storage and transport. The aim of this work was to study, at a pilot scale, the behaviour evaluation of a sucrose dehydration solution, during twelve OD reuses, and the quality of processed mandarins. Material and methods. The process was carried out using mandarins (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv Clementina Nova, from Algarve, Portugal, manually peeled and segments chemically skinned. In assays a 60°Brix sucrose solution was used, conducted in thermo- -stabilized baths, at 45°C, 16 h, 40 oscillations per minute and a fruit:solution ratio of 1:2 (m/m. After each OD cycle, the solution was filtered and reconcentred to 60°Brix by sucrose addition, and adjusted to original volume. The osmodehydrated mandarins were stabilized by pasteurization. The drying solution behaviour and mandarins’ quality were assessed through different physical, chemical and microbiological analysis. Results. The factorial discriminate analysis allowed to distinguish a different behaviour between the original and final dehydration sucrose solution during OD processes, but did not affect its desiccant power, only a high pollutant load development explained by BOD5 values. The results of osmodehydrated mandarins showed that stability was achieved by “combined process” with pasteurization. Conclusions. The resultslead to concludethat osmotic dehydration process is a good option to improve mandarin’s stabilization, after pasteurization

  8. A Simple Membrane Osmometer System & Experiments that Quantitatively Measure Osmotic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Stephen C.; Kepler, Megan V.

    2009-01-01

    It is important for students to be exposed to the concept of osmotic pressure. Understanding this concept lays the foundation for deeper discussions that lead to more theoretical aspects of water movement associated with the concepts of free energy, water potential, osmotic potential, pressure potential, and osmotic adjustment. The concept of…

  9. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla;

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  10. Osmotic generation of 'anomalous' fluid pressures in geological environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzii, C.E.

    2000-01-01

    Osmotic pressures are generated by differences in chemical potential of a solution across a membrane. But whether osmosis can have a significant effect on the pressure of fluids in geological environments has been controversial, because the membrane properties of geological media are poorly understood. 'Anomalous' pressures - large departures from hydrostatic pressure that are not explicable in terms of topographic or fluid-density effects are widely found in geological settings, and are commonly considered to result from processes that alter the pore or fluid volume, which in turn implies crustal changes happening at a rate too slow to observe directly. Yet if osmosis can explain some anomalies, there is no need to invoke such dynamic geological processes in those cases. Here I report results of a nine- year in situ measurement of fluid pressures and solute concentrations in shale that are consistent with the generation of large (up to 20 MPa) osmotic-pressure anomalies which could persist for tens of millions of years. Osmotic pressures of this magnitude and duration can explain many of the pressure anomalies observed in geological settings. The require, however, small shale porosity and large contrasts in the amount of dissolved solids in the pore waters - criteria that may help to distinguish between osmotic and crystal-dynamic origins of anomalous pressures.

  11. An analysis of electro-osmotic and magnetohydrodynamic heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanically simple methods of improving heat transport in heat pipes are investigated. These methods are electro-osmotic and magnetohydrodynamic augmentation. For the electro-osmotic case, a detailed electrokinetic model is used. The electrokinetic model used includes the effects of pore surface curvature and multiple ion diffusivities. The electrokinetic model is extended to approximate the effects of elevated temperature. When the electro-osmotic model is combined with a suitable heat-pipe model, it is found that the electro-osmotic pump should be a thin membrane. Arguments are provided that support the use of a volatile electrolyte. For the magnetohydrodynamic case, a brief investigation is provided. A quasi-one-dimensional hydromagnetic duct flow model is used. This hydromagnetic model is extended to approximate flow effects unique to heat pipes. When combined with a suitable heat pipe model, it is found that there is no performance gain for the case considered. In fact, there are serious pressure-distribution problems that have not been previously recognized. Potential solutions to these pressure-distribution problems are suggested

  12. Osmotic pressure of the cutaneous surface fluid of Rana esculenta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid Larsen, Erik; Ramløv, Hans

    /Kg, n = 16. Osmolality of lymph was, 239 ± 4 mosmol/Kg, n = 8. Thus the flow of water across the epidermis would be in the direction from CSF to the interstitial fluid driven by the above osmotic gradients and/or coupled to the inward active Na+ flux via the slightly hyperosmotic paracellular...

  13. Mass Transfer During Osmotic Dehydration Using Acoustic Cavitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宝芝; 淮秀兰; 姜任秋; 刘登瀛

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study on intensifying osmotic dehydration was carried out in a state of nature and with acoustic cavitation of different cavitating intensity (0.5A, 0.TA and 0.9A) respectively, in which the material is apple slice of 5 mm thickness. The result showed that acoustic cavitation remarkably enhanced the osmotic dehydration, and the water loss was accelerated with the increase of cavitating intensity. The water diffusivity coefficients ranged from 1.8 × 10-10 m2.s-1 at 0.5A to 2.6 × 10-10 m2.s-1 at 0.9A, and solute diffusivity coefficients ranged from 3.5×10-11 m2.s-1 at 0.5A to 4.6×10-11 m2.s-1 at 0.9A. On the basis of experiments, a mathematical model was established about mass transfer during osmotic dehydration, and the numerical simulation was carried out. The calculated results agree well with experimental data, and represent the rule of mass transfer during osmotic dehydration intensified by acoustic cavitation.

  14. An Overview on Osmotic Controlled Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thummar A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews constructed drug delivery systems applying osmotic principles for controlled drugrelease from the formulation. Osmotic devices which are tablets coated with walls of controlled porosityare the most promising strategy based systems for controlled drug delivery. In contrast to commontablets, these pumps provide constant (zero order drug release rate. When these systems are exposed towater, low levels of water soluble additive is leached from polymeric material i.e. semipermeablemembrane and drug releases in a controlled manner over an extended period of time. The main clinicalbenefits of oral osmotic drug delivery system are their ability to improve treatment tolerability andpatient compliance. These advantages are mainly driven by the capacity to deliver drugs in a sustainedmanner, independent of the drug chemical properties, of the patient’s physiological factors or followingfood intake. This review brings out the theoretical concept of drug delivery, history, advantages anddisadvantages of the delivery systems, types of oral osmotic drug delivery systems, factors affecting thedrug delivery system and marketed products.

  15. Root water extraction under combined water and osmotic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong van Lier, de Q.; Dam, van J.C.; Metselaar, K.

    2009-01-01

    Using a numerical implicit model for root water extraction by a single root in a symmetric radial flow problem, based on the Richards equation and the combined convection-dispersion equation, we investigated some aspects of the response of root water uptake to combined water and osmotic stress. The

  16. Vocal Fold Epithelial Response to Luminal Osmotic Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Mahalakshmi; Fisher, Kimberly V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Dry-air challenges increase the osmolarity of fluid lining the luminal surface of the proximal airway. The homeostasis of surface fluid is thought to be essential for voice production and laryngeal defense. Therefore, the authors hypothesized that viable vocal fold epithelium would generate a water flux to reduce an osmotic challenge (150…

  17. Osmotic Stressing, Membrane Leakage, and Fluorescence: An Introductory Biochemistry Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, Kalani J.

    2015-01-01

    A fluorescence demonstration is described that incorporates several fundamental aspects of an introductory biochemistry course. A variation of a known leakage assay is utilized to prepare vesicles containing a quenched fluorophore. The vesicles are exposed to several osmotic environments ranging from isotonic to hypotonic. The degree of vesicle…

  18. A semi-automatic device for measuring osmotic pressures (1962)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cryoscopic apparatus for measuring osmotic pressure in small samples (0.1 ml) is described. The sample is frozen by air cooled dry ice or liquid nitrogen; the temperature is measured by a thermistor resistance and a recording millivoltmeter. (author)

  19. Self-consistent unstirred layers in osmotically driven flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Bohr, Tomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    on both sides of the membrane remain well mixed due to an external stirring mechanism. We investigate the effects of concentration boundary layers on the efficiency of osmotic pumping processes in the absence of external stirring, i.e. when all advection is provided by the osmosis itself. This case...

  20. Controlled porosity solubility modulated osmotic pump tablets of gliclazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arti; Verma, P R P; Gore, Subhash

    2015-06-01

    A system that can deliver drug at a controlled rate is very important for the treatment of various chronic diseases such as diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Poorly water-soluble drug with pH-dependent solubility such as gliclazide (GLZ) offers challenges in the controlled-release formulation because of low dissolution rate and poor bioavailability. Solid dispersion (SD) of GLZ consisted of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC-SSL) as a polymeric solubilizer was manufactured by hot melt extrusion (HME) technology. Then, controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP) tablet of gliclazide was designed to deliver drug in a controlled manner up to 16 h. The developed formulation was optimized for type and level of pore former and coating weight gain. The optimized formulation was found to exhibit zero order kinetics independent of pH and agitation speed but depends on osmotic pressure of dissolution media indicated that mechanism of drug release was osmotic pressure. The in vivo performance prediction of developed formulation using convolution approach revealed that the developed formulation was superior to the existing marketed extended-release formulation in terms of attaining steady state plasma levels and indicated adequate exposure in translating hypoglycemic response. The prototype solubilization method combined with controlled porosity osmotic pump based technique could provide a unique way to increase dissolution rate and bioavailability of many poorly water-soluble, narrow therapeutic index drugs used in diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, etc. PMID:25378281

  1. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, David; Franck, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state.

  2. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state. (paper)

  3. Ab Initio Extension of the AMOEBA Polarizable Force Field to Fe(2.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrouni, David; Isley, William C; Clavaguéra, Carine; Dognon, Jean-Pierre; Cramer, Christopher J; Gagliardi, Laura

    2013-07-01

    We extend the AMOEBA polarizable molecular mechanics force field to the Fe(2+) cation in its singlet, triplet, and quintet spin states. Required parameters are obtained either directly from first principles calculations or optimized so as to reproduce corresponding interaction energy components in a hexaaquo environment derived from quantum mechanical energy decomposition analyses. We assess the importance of the damping of point-dipole polarization at short distance as well as the influence of charge-transfer for metal-water interactions in hydrated Fe(2+); this analysis informs the selection of model systems employed for parametrization. We validate our final Fe(2+) model through comparison of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to available experimental data for aqueous ferrous ion in its quintet electronic ground state. PMID:26583987

  4. Bitter tastant responses in the amoeba Dictyostelium correlate with rat and human taste assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocorocchio, Marco; Ives, Robert; Clapham, David; Andrews, Paul L R; Williams, Robin S B

    2016-01-01

    Treatment compliance is reduced when pharmaceutical compounds have a bitter taste and this is particularly marked for paediatric medications. Identification of bitter taste liability during drug discovery utilises the rat in vivo brief access taste aversion (BATA) test which apart from animal use is time consuming with limited throughput. We investigated the suitability of using a simple, non-animal model, the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum to investigate taste-related responses and particularly identification of compounds with a bitter taste liability. The effect of taste-related compounds on Dictyostelium behaviour following acute exposure (15 minutes) was monitored. Dictyostelium did not respond to salty, sour, umami or sweet tasting compounds, however, cells rapidly responded to bitter tastants. Using time-lapse photography and computer-generated quantification to monitor changes in cell membrane movement, we developed an assay to assess the response of Dictyostelium to a wide range of structurally diverse known bitter compounds and blinded compounds. Dictyostelium showed varying responses to the bitter tastants, with IC50 values providing a rank order of potency. Comparison of Dictyostelium IC50 values to those observed in response to a similar range of compounds in the rat in vivo brief access taste aversion test showed a significant (p = 0.0172) positive correlation between the two models, and additionally a similar response to that provided by a human sensory panel assessment test. These experiments demonstrate that Dictyostelium may provide a suitable model for early prediction of bitterness for novel tastants and drugs. Interestingly, a response to bitter tastants appears conserved from single-celled amoebae to humans. PMID:26708104

  5. Evolutionary diversity of social amoebae N-glycomes may support interspecific autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasley, Christa L; van der Wel, Hanke; West, Christopher M

    2015-08-01

    Multiple species of cellular slime mold (CSM) amoebae share overlapping subterranean environments near the soil surface. Despite similar life-styles, individual species form independent starvation-induced fruiting bodies whose spores can renew the life cycle. N-glycans associated with the cell surface glycocalyx have been predicted to contribute to interspecific avoidance, resistance to pathogens, and prey preference. N-glycans from five CSM species that diverged 300-600 million years ago and whose genomes have been sequenced were fractionated into neutral and acidic pools and profiled by MALDI-TOF-MS. Glycan structure models were refined using linkage specific antibodies, exoglycosidase digestions, MALDI-MS/MS, and chromatographic studies. Amoebae of the type species Dictyostelium discoideum express modestly trimmed high mannose N-glycans variably modified with core α3-linked Fuc and peripherally decorated with 0-2 residues each of β-GlcNAc, Fuc, methylphosphate and/or sulfate, as reported previously. Comparative analyses of D. purpureum, D. fasciculatum, Polysphondylium pallidum, and Actyostelium subglobosum revealed that each displays a distinctive spectrum of high-mannose species with quantitative variations in the extent of these modifications, and qualitative differences including retention of Glc, mannose methylation, and absence of a peripheral GlcNAc, fucosylation, or sulfation. Starvation-induced development modifies the pattern in all species but, except for universally observed increased mannose-trimming, the N-glycans do not converge to a common profile. Correlations with glycogene repertoires will enable future reverse genetic studies to eliminate N-glycomic differences to test their functions in interspecific relations and pathogen evasion. PMID:25987342

  6. Drying of red beetroot after osmotic pretreatment: Kinetics and quality considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Stefan J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents experimental studies on drying kinetics and quality effects of red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L. after convective drying with a preliminary osmotic pretreatment. The effects of the osmotic agent (NaCl concentration and the osmotic bath time on the product colour and nutrient content preservation, the water activity, and rehydration ability after drying were analysed. Osmotic dehydration curves and Solid Gain (SG, Water Loss (WL, Weight Reduction (WR were determined. It was proved that drying of beetroot with osmotic pretreatment contributes to shorter drying time, smaller water activity, higher retention of betanin, better colour preservation, and a greater degree of water resorption.

  7. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  8. Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Cosmological Shock Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2012-01-01

    We reexamine nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at cosmological shocks in the large scale structure of the Universe, incorporating wave-particle interactions that are expected to operate in collisionless shocks. Adopting simple phenomenological models for magnetic field amplification (MFA) by cosmic-ray (CR) streaming instabilities and Alfv'enic drift, we perform kinetic DSA simulations for a wide range of sonic and Alfv'enic Mach numbers and evaluate the CR injection fraction and a...

  9. Design of an osmotic pressure sensor for sensing an osmotically active substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ch, Nagesh; Paily, Roy P.

    2015-04-01

    A pressure sensor based on the osmosis principle has been designed and demonstrated successfully for the sensing of the concentration levels of an osmotically active substance. The device is fabricated using the bulk micro-machining technique on a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate. The substrate has a square cavity on the bottom side to fill with the reference glucose solution and a silicon (Si) membrane on the top side for the actuation. Two sets of devices, having membrane thicknesses of 10 µm and 25 µm, but the same area of 3 mm ×3 mm, are fabricated. The cavity is filled with a glucose solution of 100 mg dL-1 and it is sealed with a semi-permeable membrane made up of cellulose acetate material. The glucose solution is employed to prove the functionality of the device and it is tested for different glucose concentration levels, ranging from 50 mg dL-1 to 450 mg dL-1. The output voltage obtained for the corresponding glucose concentration levels ranges from -6.7 mV to 22.7 mV for the 10 µm device and from -1.7 mV to 4 mV for the 25 µm device. The device operation was simulated using the finite element method (FEM) and the finite volume method (FVM), and the simulation and experimental results match closely. A response time of 40 min is obtained in the case of the 10 µm device compared to one of 30 min for the 25 µm device. The response times obtained for these devices are found to be small compared to those in similar works based on the osmosis principle. This pressure sensor has the potential to provide controlled drug delivery if it can be integrated with other microfluidic devices.

  10. Overlimiting Current and Shock Electrodialysis in Porous Media

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Daosheng; Dydek, E. Victoria; Han, Ji-Hyung; Schlumpberger, Sven; Mani, Ali; Zaltzman, Boris; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2013-01-01

    Most electrochemical processes, such as electrodialysis, are limited by diffusion, but in porous media, surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. In this paper, we report experimental evidence for surface-driven over-limiting current (faster than diffusion) and deionization shocks (propagating salt removal) in a porous medium. The apparatus consists of a silica glass frit (1 mm thick with 500 nm mean pore size) in an aqueous electrolyte (CuSO$_4$ or AgNO$_3$...

  11. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni in co-culture with Acanthamoeba castellanii: role of amoeba-mediated depletion of dissolved oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Winding, Anne; Qvortrup, Klaus;

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of infectious diarrhoea worldwide but relatively little is known about its ecology. In this study, we examined its interactions with Acanthamoeba castellanii, a protozoan suspected to serve as a reservoir for bacterial pathogens. We observed rapid degradation...... of intracellular C. jejuni in A. castellanii 5 h post gentamicin treatment at 25°C. Conversely, we found that A. castellanii promoted the extracellular growth of C. jejuni in co-cultures at 37°C in aerobic conditions. This growth-promoting effect did not require amoebae – bacteria contact. The growth....... Interestingly, the dissolved oxygen levels of co-cultures with or without amoebae – bacteria contact were much lower than those observed with culture media or with C. jejuni alone incubated in aerobic conditions, and were comparable with levels obtained after 24 h of growth of C. jejuni under microaerophilic...

  12. Towards accurate solvation dynamics of divalent cations in water using the polarizable amoeba force field: From energetics to structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Perera, Lalith; Cisneros, G. Andrés; Ren, Pengyu; Pedersen, Lee G.; Darden, Thomas A.

    2006-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed using a modified amoeba force field to determine hydration and dynamical properties of the divalent cations Ca2+ and Mg2+. The extension of amoeba to divalent cations required the introduction of a cation specific parametrization. To accomplish this, the Tholé polarization damping model parametrization was modified based on the ab initio polarization energy computed by a constrained space orbital variation energy decomposition scheme. Excellent agreement has been found with condensed phase experimental results using parameters derived from gas phase ab initio calculations. Additionally, we have observed that the coordination of the calcium cation is influenced by the size of the periodic water box, a recurrent issue in first principles molecular dynamics studies.

  13. A QM/MM Approach Using the AMOEBA Polarizable Embedding: From Ground State Energies to Electronic Excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loco, Daniele; Polack, Étienne; Caprasecca, Stefano; Lagardère, Louis; Lipparini, Filippo; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2016-08-01

    A fully polarizable implementation of the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach is presented, where the classical environment is described through the AMOEBA polarizable force field. A variational formalism, offering a self-consistent relaxation of both the MM induced dipoles and the QM electronic density, is used for ground state energies and extended to electronic excitations in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory combined with a state specific response of the classical part. An application to the calculation of the solvatochromism of the pyridinium N-phenolate betaine dye used to define the solvent ET(30) scale is presented. The results show that the QM/AMOEBA model not only properly describes specific and bulk effects in the ground state but it also correctly responds to the large change in the solute electronic charge distribution upon excitation. PMID:27340904

  14. Growth regulation of Legionella Pneumophila in biofilms and amoebae; Wachstumsregulation von Legionella Pneumophila in Biofilmen und Amoeben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilbi, H.

    2006-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of studies made on the regulation of the growth of Legionella Pneumophila bacteria in biofilms and amoebae. In a first project, the formation of biofilms by Legionella Pneumophila bacteria was analysed in static and dynamic systems using a complex growth medium. Under static and dynamic clinical and environmental conditions, the adherence of the biofilms on polystyrene tissue was studied. This was also examined under dynamic flow conditions. In a second part of the project, the regulation of growth of Legionella Pneumophila in amoebae was examined in that changes were made to the genome of the bacteria. The importance of the work for the de-activation of Legionella Pneumophila bacteria in biofilms is noted in the conclusions of the report.

  15. Testate amoebae (Protozoa) in soils of restored flowery meadows in the Bílé Karpaty Mts. (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balík, Vladimír

    České Budějovice : Institute of Soil Biology AS CR, 2002, s. 1-5. ISBN 80-86525-00-7. [Central European Workshop on Soil Zoology /6./. České Budějovice (CZ), 23.04.2001-25.04.2001] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : testate amoebae * flowery meadows * restoration Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  16. A Novel Glycolipid Biosurfactant Confers Grazing Resistance upon Pantoea ananatis BRT175 against the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek D N; Nickzad, Arvin; Déziel, Eric; Stavrinides, John

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea is a versatile genus of bacteria with both plant- and animal-pathogenic strains, some of which have been suggested to cause human infections. There is, however, limited knowledge on the potential determinants used for host association and pathogenesis in animal systems. In this study, we used the model host Dictyostelium discoideum to show that isolates of Pantoea ananatis exhibit differential grazing susceptibility, with some being resistant to grazing by the amoebae. We carried out a high-throughput genetic screen of one grazing-resistant isolate, P. ananatis BRT175, using the D. discoideum pathosystem to identify genes responsible for the resistance phenotype. Among the 26 candidate genes involved in grazing resistance, we identified rhlA and rhlB, which we show are involved in the biosynthesis of a biosurfactant that enables swarming motility in P. ananatis BRT175. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), the biosurfactant was shown to be a glycolipid with monohexose-C10-C10 as the primary congener. We show that this novel glycolipid biosurfactant is cytotoxic to the amoebae and is capable of compromising cellular integrity, leading to cell lysis. The production of this biosurfactant may be important for bacterial survival in the environment and could contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. IMPORTANCE The genetic factors used for host interaction by the opportunistic human pathogen Pantoea ananatis are largely unknown. We identified two genes that are important for the production of a biosurfactant that confers grazing resistance against the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. We show that the biosurfactant, which exhibits cytotoxicity toward the amoebae, is a glycolipid that incorporates a hexose rather than rhamnose. The production of this biosurfactant may confer a competitive advantage in the environment and could potentially contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. PMID:27303689

  17. The safety of osmotically acting cathartics in colonic cleansing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Caroline; Hendel, J.; Nielsen, O.H.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient cleansing of the colon before a colonoscopy or a radiological examination is essential. The osmotically acting cathartics (those given the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code A06AD) currently used for this purpose comprise products based on three main substances: sodium phosphate......, combinations of polyethylene glycol and electrolyte lavage solutions (PEG-ELS), and magnesium citrate. All these preparations give adequate cleansing results and have similar profiles in terms of the frequency and type of mild to moderate adverse effects. However, serious adverse events, such as severe...... hyperphosphatemia and irreversible kidney damage owing to acute phosphate nephropathy, have been reported after use of sodium-phosphate-based products. The aim of this Review is to provide an update on the potential safety issues related to the use of osmotically acting cathartics, especially disturbances of renal...

  18. Giant Osmotic Pressure in the Forced Wetting of Hydrophobic Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelin-Jamois, Millan; Picard, Cyril; Vigier, Gérard; Charlaix, Elisabeth

    2015-07-01

    The forced intrusion of water in hydrophobic nanoporous pulverulent material is of interest for quick storage of energy. With nanometric pores the energy storage capacity is controlled by interfacial phenomena. With subnanometric pores, we demonstrate that a breakdown occurs with the emergence of molecular exclusion as a leading contribution. This bulk exclusion effect leads to an osmotic contribution to the pressure that can reach levels never previously sustained. We illustrate, on various electrolytes and different microporous materials, that a simple osmotic pressure law accounts quantitatively for the enhancement of the intrusion and extrusion pressures governing the forced wetting and spontaneous drying of the nanopores. Using electrolyte solutions, energy storage and power capacities can be widely enhanced.

  19. Swelling and osmotic flow in a potential host rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of osmotic and hydraulic permeability are reported for a series of tests conducted on Opalinus Clay samples from the Mont Terri underground research laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NE Switzerland. Osmotic flow was observed across discs of this clay-shale separating 0,245 M NaCl solution from distilled water. Pressure transients monitored during constant flow rate testing were analysed to give permeability and specific storage values. The mean permeability normal to bedding of the two Opalinus Clay specimens was 7,9 x 10-21 m2. The mean specific storage based on all reliable determinations was 4,1 x 10-4 m-1. Values calculated from the steady-state pressure gradients established during constant flow rate testing were very close to those obtained by mathematical analysis of pressure transients. The calculation of the transients was carried out using a new model of flow and solute transport which included terms for the osmotic coupling. The form of the pressure transients and the magnitude of the strain seen during the tests lead to a revision to the definition of solid phase compressibility to incorporate a term dependent upon the osmotic coupling coefficient. Steady-state osmotic flow rates were in the range 0,1 to 0,6 μL.hr-1 when the specimens were placed between a sodium chloride solution with a theoretical osmotic pressure of 1,19 MPa and distilled water. Transient flow rates were substantially larger. Membrane efficiencies were found to be relatively low, ranging from 1% to 6% (mean around 4%). The mean osmotic permeability normal to bedding was 3,5 x 10-22 m2. Specific storage and pore compressibility values were substantially larger than anticipated, suggesting that the volumetric strain of the clay-shale under the conditions of laboratory testing must be largely determined by quasi-elastic deformation processes such as swelling and crack dilation. To test this hypothesis, a 3D swelling test was performed on a cubic specimen of the same

  20. Osmotic demyelination syndrome with a dysequilibrium syndrome: reversible MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurological disorders may be seen in end-stage renal disease patients due to uraemia or to complications of dialysis. A dysequilibrium syndrome may be seen, usually soon after or towards the end of haemodialysis. This group of patients has no particular findings on MRI. On the other hand, the osmotic demyelination syndrome has definitive MRI findings, not to date reported with the dysequilibrium syndrome. We report a patient with end-stage renal disease and the dysequilibrium syndrome who showed findings of osmotic demyelination on MRI. The patient had a convulsion after a first haemodialysis, with quadriparesis and hyperactive deep tendon reflexes and bilateral Babinski signs. The upper motor neurone signs lasted for a week. Meanwhile, he was also dysarthric and had dysphagia. He recovered neurologically without any residuum following appropriate treatment and there was improvement on MRI. (orig.)

  1. Osmotic stress affects functional properties of human melanoma cell lines

    CERN Document Server

    La Porta, Caterina A M; Pasini, Maria; Laurson, Lasse; Alava, Mikko J; Zapperi, Stefano; Amar, Martine Ben

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of microenvironment in cancer growth and metastasis is a key issue for cancer research. Here, we study the effect of osmotic pressure on the functional properties of primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. In particular, we experimentally quantify individual cell motility and transmigration capability. We then perform a circular scratch assay to study how a cancer cell front invades an empty space. Our results show that primary melanoma cells are sensitive to a low osmotic pressure, while metastatic cells are less. To better understand the experimental results, we introduce and study a continuous model for the dynamics of a cell layer and a stochastic discrete model for cell proliferation and diffusion. The two models capture essential features of the experimental results and allow to make predictions for a wide range of experimentally measurable parameters.

  2. Osmotically driven flows in microchannels separated by a semipermeable membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruus, Henrik; Hartvig Jensen, Kaare; Bohr, Tomas

    2008-11-01

    Osmotically driven flows in microchannels are studied experimentally and theoretically. The propagation of the front of sugar solutions has been measured using dye and particle tracking in 200 μm wide and 50, 100, and 200 μm high polymer-based microchannels. Each of these microchannels was separated by a semipermeable membrane from a reservoir containing pure water. We have also established a theoretical model of this system. In the limit of low axial flow resistance, our model predicts the propagation speed of the sugar front as a function of sugar concentration and channel geometry. The theoretical predictions agree well with the measurements. Our motivations for studying osmotically driven flows are that they are believed to be responsible for the translocation of sugar in plants and that they can be used as the driving mechanism in micropumps with no moveable parts.[5mm] This work was supported by the Danish National Research Foundation, Grant No. 74.

  3. Quorum sensing regulates the osmotic stress response in Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Julia C; Rutherford, Steven T; Cong, Jian-Ping; Quinodoz, Sofia; Healy, James; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing to monitor cell density and to alter behavior in response to fluctuations in population numbers. Previous studies with Vibrio harveyi have shown that LuxR, the master quorum-sensing regulator, activates and represses >600 genes. These include six genes that encode homologs of the Escherichia coli Bet and ProU systems for synthesis and transport, respectively, of glycine betaine, an osmoprotectant used during osmotic stress. Here we show that LuxR activates expression of the glycine betaine operon betIBA-proXWV, which enhances growth recovery under osmotic stress conditions. BetI, an autorepressor of the V. harveyi betIBA-proXWV operon, activates the expression of genes encoding regulatory small RNAs that control quorum-sensing transitions. Connecting quorum-sensing and glycine betaine pathways presumably enables V. harveyi to tune its execution of collective behaviors to its tolerance to stress. PMID:25313392

  4. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Serge G.; Panja, Debabrata; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-02-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly in vitro, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution or culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection in vivo; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection in vitro.

  5. Role of osmotic and hydrostatic pressures in bacteriophage genome ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Lemay, Serge G; Molineux, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    A critical step in the bacteriophage life cycle is genome ejection into host bacteria. The ejection process for double-stranded DNA phages has been studied thoroughly \\textit{in vitro}, where after triggering with the cellular receptor the genome ejects into a buffer. The experimental data have been interpreted in terms of the decrease in free energy of the densely packed DNA associated with genome ejection. Here we detail a simple model of genome ejection in terms of the hydrostatic and osmotic pressures inside the phage, a bacterium, and a buffer solution/culture medium. We argue that the hydrodynamic flow associated with the water movement from the buffer solution into the phage capsid and further drainage into the bacterial cytoplasm, driven by the osmotic gradient between the bacterial cytoplasm and culture medium, provides an alternative mechanism for phage genome ejection \\textit{in vivo}; the mechanism is perfectly consistent with phage genome ejection \\textit{in vitro}.

  6. Pathogenic free-living amoebae in a closed-loop power plant; risk assessment and risk management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabanes, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Service Etudes Medicales; Pringuez, E.; Siclet, F.; Khalanski, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 75 - Paris (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Bard, D. [CEA/Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), 92 (France); Pernin, P. [Faculte de Pharmacie de Lyon, 69 (France)

    1998-07-01

    Since 1980, the water used for cooling in French power plants has been tested for pathogenic amoebae, especially Naegleria fowleri, the causative agent of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapid fatal disease of the central nervous system. The replacement of brass condensers by stainless steel condensers resulted in increased Naegleria fowleri development, to a density of as much as 3000 l{sup -1} in the Dampierre power plant cooling water. Downstream from Dampierre, the maximum detected density of this amoeba during the summer of 1995 was 80 l{sup -1}, at low river flow. The replacement of a second condenser in 1996 at the same power plant was expected to double the amoebae concentration in the river. The hypothetical PAM risk for swimmers was then predicted to be 10{sup -4} per swim. To reduce the risk continuous chlorination of the closed-loop cooling system was implemented at a free residual chlorine level in the range of 0.3-0.5 mg.l{sup -1}. Naegleria fowleri concentrations decreased immediately and thereafter remained under 4 l{sup -1}. Total residual chlorine and chlorinated organic compounds were also monitored in the evaluation of the environmental impact of this preventive action. (authors)

  7. Different growth rates in amoeba of genotypically related environmental and clinical Legionella pneumophila strains isolated from a thermal spa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmeret, M; Jarraud, S; Mori, J P; Pernin, P; Forey, F; Reyrolle, M; Vandenesch, F; Etienne, J; Farge, P

    2001-04-01

    Two cases of legionellosis occurring 3 years apart were acquired in the same French thermal spa and were apparently due to the same strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, as shown by genomic macrorestriction analysis. Minor differences between the two isolates were found by random amplification PCR profiling which showed an additional band with one of the isolates. Analysis of 107 L. pneumophila strains isolated from the spa waters by genome macrorestriction failed to identify the infective strain, but a closely related L. pneumophila serogroup 3 strain differing from the clinical isolates by only one band was found. To determine if the clinical L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolates was better adapted for intracellular multiplication than related serogroup 3 environmental isolates, the growth kinetics of six isolates were determined in co-culture with Acanthamoeba lenticulata. One clinical isolate failed to grow within amoeba, while the other clinical isolate yielded the highest increase in bacterial cell count per amoeba (1,200%) and the environmental isolates gave intermediate values. Genetic analysis of L. pneumophila isolates by DNA macrorestriction does not therefore appear to reflect their growth kinetics within amoeba, and is not sufficiently discriminatory to identify potentially virulent strains. PMID:11349974

  8. Pathogenic free-living amoebae in a closed-loop power plant; risk assessment and risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1980, the water used for cooling in French power plants has been tested for pathogenic amoebae, especially Naegleria fowleri, the causative agent of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM), a rapid fatal disease of the central nervous system. The replacement of brass condensers by stainless steel condensers resulted in increased Naegleria fowleri development, to a density of as much as 3000 l-1 in the Dampierre power plant cooling water. Downstream from Dampierre, the maximum detected density of this amoeba during the summer of 1995 was 80 l-1, at low river flow. The replacement of a second condenser in 1996 at the same power plant was expected to double the amoebae concentration in the river. The hypothetical PAM risk for swimmers was then predicted to be 10-4 per swim. To reduce the risk continuous chlorination of the closed-loop cooling system was implemented at a free residual chlorine level in the range of 0.3-0.5 mg.l-1. Naegleria fowleri concentrations decreased immediately and thereafter remained under 4 l-1. Total residual chlorine and chlorinated organic compounds were also monitored in the evaluation of the environmental impact of this preventive action. (authors)

  9. OPTIMIZATION OF OSMOTIC DEHYDRATION PROCESS OF PUMPKIN IN TERNARY SOLUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth R. Bambicha; Miriam E. Agnelli; Rodolfo H. Mascheroni

    2012-01-01

    By applying the methodology of response surface analysis (RSM) optimum conditions were determined for maximum WL (water loss) and WR (weight reduction), and minimal SG (solute gain), NMC (normalized moisture content) and change of color (CC) for the osmotic dehydration (OD) of pumpkin (Cucurbita Moschata) in ternary solutions (water/sucrose/sodium chloride) carried out in 32 executions (n) by application of a Face-Centered Central Composite Design (CCF) that evaluated the effect of experiment...

  10. CONTROLLED-POROSITY OSMOTIC PUMP TABLETS-AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    AJAY BABU,PRASADA RAO. VIJAYA RATNA

    2013-01-01

    Conventional drug delivery systems have little control over their drug release and almost no control over the effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the process of osmosis. Osmotic devices are the most promising strategy based systems for controlled drug delivery. They are the most reliable controlled drug deliver...

  11. A Case of Osmotic Demyelination Presenting with Severe Hypernatremia

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Min Jee; Kim, Do Hyoung; Kim, Young Hwa; Yang, In Mo; Park, Joon Hyung; Hong, Moon Ki

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome is a demyelinating disorder associated with rapid correction of hyponatremia. But, it rarely occurs in acute hypernatremia, and it leads to permanent neurologic symptoms and is associated with high mortality. A 44-year-old woman treated with alternative medicine was admitted with a history of drowsy mental status. Severe hypernatremia (197mEq/L) with hyperosmolality (415mOsm/kgH2O) was evident initially and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a high signal inten...

  12. Anisotropic electro-osmotic flow over super-hydrophobic surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bahga, Supreet S.; Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2009-01-01

    Patterned surfaces with large effective slip lengths, such as super-hydrophobic surfaces containing trapped gas bubbles, have the potential to greatly enhance electrokinetic phenomena. Existing theories assume either homogeneous flat surfaces or patterned surfaces with thin double layers (compared to the texture correlation length) and thus predict simple surface-averaged, isotropic flows (independent of orientation). By analyzing electro-osmotic flows over striped slip-stick surfaces with ar...

  13. Thirst perception and osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion are altered during recovery from septic shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shidasp Siami

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Vasopressin (AVP secretion during an osmotic challenge is frequently altered in the immediate post-acute phase of septic shock. We sought to determine if this response is still altered in patients recovering from septic shock. DESIGN: Prospective interventional study. SETTING: Intensive care unit (ICU at Raymond Poincaré and Etampes Hospitals. PATIENTS: Normonatremic patients at least 5 days post discontinuation of catecholamines given for a septic shock. INTERVENTION: Osmotic challenge involved infusing 500 mL of hypertonic saline solution (with cumulative amount of sodium not exceeding 24 g over 120 minutes. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Plasma AVP levels were measured 15 minutes before the infusion and then every 30 minutes for two hours. Non-responders were defined as those with a slope of the relation between AVP and plasma sodium levels less than < 0.5 ng/mEq. Among the 30 included patients, 18 (60% were non-responders. Blood pressure and plasma sodium and brain natriuretic peptide levels were similar in both responders and non-responders during the course of the test. Critical illness severity, hemodynamic alteration, electrolyte disturbances, treatment and outcome did not differ between the two groups. Responders had more severe gas exchange abnormality. Thirst perception was significantly diminished in non-responders. The osmotic challenge was repeated in 4 non-responders several months after discharge and the abnormal response persisted. CONCLUSION: More than half of patients recovering from septic shock have an alteration of osmoregulation characterised by a dramatic decrease in vasopressin secretion and thirst perception during osmotic challenge. The mechanisms of this alteration but also of the relationship between haematosis and normal response remain to be elucidated.

  14. Are Credit Shocks Supply or Demand Shocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Bijapur, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the relationship between the supply of credit and the macroeconomy. We present evidence that credit shocks constitute shocks to aggregate supply in that they have a permanent effect on output and cause inflation to rise in the short term. Our results also suggest that the effects on aggregate supply have grown stronger in recent decades.

  15. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLLED POROSITY OSMOTIC TABLETS OF LORNOXICAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Uma Maheswari*, K. Elango, Daisy Chellakumari, K. Saravanan and Anglina Jeniffer Samy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to formulate and evaluate controlled release formulation of lornoxicam based on osmotic technology. Lornoxicam, a potent non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID with shorter half life, makes the development of sustained release (SR dosage forms extremely advantageous. However, due to its weak acidic nature, its release from SR delivery system is limited to the lower GIT which consequently leads to a delayed onset of its analgesic action. Basic pH modifier tromethamine and wicking agent SLS were incorporated into the core tablet to create basic environmental pH inside the tablets, which provide complete drug release that starts in the stomach to rapidly alleviate the painful symptoms and continue in the intestine to maintain protracted analgesic effect. The effect of different formulation variables namely level of osmogen (mannitol in the core tablet and level of pore former (sorbitol in the coating membrane on in-vitro release was studied. Lornoxicam release from controlled porosity osmotic pump was directly proportional to the pore former (sorbitol and level of osmogen (mannitol. Drug release from the developed formulations was independent of pH and agitational intensity and was dependent on osmotic pressure of the release media. Results of SEM studies showed the formation of pores in the membrane from where the drug release occurred. The optimized formulation was found to release the drug in zero order and found to be stable upon stability studies.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of peritoneal glucose and free water osmotic conductances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Milia, V; Limardo, M; Virga, G; Crepaldi, M; Locatelli, F

    2007-09-01

    Ultrafiltration (UF) failure is one of the most important causes of long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) failure in patients. Osmotic forces acting across small and ultra-small pores generate a UF with solutes through the small pore and free water transport (FWT) through the ultra-small pore. The ability of glucose to exert an osmotic pressure sufficient to cause UF is the so-called 'osmotic conductance to glucose' (OCG) of the peritoneal membrane. Our study proposes a simple method to determine both the OCG and FWT. In 50 patients on PD, a Double Mini-Peritoneal Equilibration Test (Double Mini-PET), consisting of two Mini-PET, was performed consecutively. A solution of 1.36% glucose was used for the first test, whereas a solution of 3.86% glucose was used for the second test. The sodium removal values and the differences in UF between the two tests were used to calculate FWT and the OCG. Patients with UF failure showed significant reductions not only in the OCG and the FWT but also of UF of small pores. The Double Mini-PET is simple, fast, and could become useful to evaluate patients on PD in everyday clinical practice. PMID:17609692

  17. Osmotically controlled drug delivery system with associated drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Brahma Prakash; Thakur, Navneet; Jain, Nishi P; Banweer, Jitendra; Jain, Surendra

    2010-01-01

    Conventional drug delivery systems have slight control over their drug release and almost no control over the effective concentration at the target site. This kind of dosing pattern may result in constantly changing, unpredictable plasma concentrations. Drugs can be delivered in a controlled pattern over a long period of time by the controlled or modified release drug delivery systems. They include dosage forms for oral and transdermal administration as well as injectable and implantable systems. For most of drugs, oral route remains as the most acceptable route of administration. Certain molecules may have low oral bioavailability because of solubility or permeability limitations. Development of an extended release dosage form also requires reasonable absorption throughout the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). Among the available techniques to improve the bioavailability of these drugs fabrication of osmotic drug delivery system is the most appropriate one. Osmotic drug delivery systems release the drug with the zero order kinetics which does not depend on the initial concentration and the physiological factors of GIT. This review brings out new technologies, fabrication and recent clinical research in osmotic drug delivery. PMID:21486532

  18. Active osmotic exchanger for advanced filtration at the nano scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lyderic

    2015-11-01

    One of the main functions of the kidney is to remove the waste products of an organism, mostly by excreting concentrated urea while reabsorbing water and other molecules. The human kidney is capable of recycling about 200 liters of water per day, at the relatively low cost of 0.5 kJ/L (standard dialysis requiring at least 150 kJ/L). Kidneys are constituted of millions of parallel filtration networks called nephrons. The nephrons of all mammalian kidneys present a specific loop geometry, the Loop of Henle, that is believed to play a key role in the urinary concentrating mechanism. One limb of the loop is permeable to water and the other contains sodium pumps that exchange with a common interstitium. In this work, we take inspiration from this osmotic exchanger design to propose new nanofiltration principles. We first establish simple analytical results to derive general operating principles, based on coupled water permeable pores and osmotic pumps. The best filtration geometry, in terms of power required for a given water recycling ratio, is comparable in many ways to the mammalian nephron. It is not only more efficient than traditional reverse osmosis systems, but can also work at much smaller pressures (of the order of the blood pressure, 0.13 bar, as compared to more than 30 bars for pressure-retarded osmosis systems). We anticipate that our proof of principle will be a starting point for the development of new filtration systems relying on the active osmotic exchanger principle.

  19. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF BACLOFEN CONTROLLED POROSITY OSMOTIC PUMP TABLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indarapu Rajendra Prasad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, attempts were made to develop and evaluate the controlled porosity osmotic pump (CPOP based drug delivery system of sparingly water soluble drug Baclofen. Formulation variables, such as, levels of solubility enhancer, ratio of drug to osmogents, coat thickness of semi permeable membrane (SPM and level of pore former were found to affect the drug release from the developed formulations. Cellulose acetate was used as the semi permeable membrane. Drug release was directly proportional to the level of the solubility enhancer, osmotic pressure generated by osmotic agent and level of pore former; however, was inversely proportional to the coat thickness of SPM. Drug release from developed formulations was independent of pH and agitation intensities of release media. Burst strength of the exhausted shells decreased with increase in the level of pore former. This system was found to deliver Baclofen at a zero-order rate. The optimized formulations were subjected to stability studies as per ICH guidelines, and formulations were found to be stable after 45days study.

  20. Osmotically driven flows in microchannels separated by a semipermeable membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Lee, Jinkee; Bohr, Tomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-07-21

    We have fabricated lab-on-a-chip systems with microchannels separated by integrated membranes allowing for osmotically driven microflows. We have investigated these flows experimentally by studying the dynamics and structure of the front of a sugar solution travelling in 200 microm wide and 50-200 microm deep microchannels. We find that the sugar front travels at a constant speed, and that this speed is proportional to the concentration of the sugar solution and inversely proportional to the depth of the channel. We propose a theoretical model, which, in the limit of low axial flow resistance, predicts that the sugar front should indeed travel with a constant velocity. The model also predicts an inverse relationship between the depth of the channel and the speed, and a linear relation between the sugar concentration and the speed. We thus find good qualitative agreement between the experimental results and the predictions of the model. Our motivation for studying osmotically driven microflows is that they are believed to be responsible for the translocation of sugar in plants through the phloem sieve element cells. Also, we suggest that osmotic elements can act as on-chip integrated pumps with no movable parts in lab-on-a-chip systems. PMID:19568680

  1. Development and Optimization of Cefaclor Gastroretentive Osmotic control release Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Garrepally

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this present research work was to development and optimization of different formulations of osmotic control gastroretentive tablets containing Cefaclor. The cefaclor osmotic control gastroretentive tablets was formulated by 3 step process involve core tablet, coating and pore forming. Core tablets were formulated by using different polymers HPMC, polyox and sodium CMC alone and in combination. Initially drug excipients interactions were carried by using FTIR spectra; results showed that there was no interaction. Twelve different formulations of cefaclor osmotic control gastroretentive were prepared and characterized for flow properties and physical properties. Results of these parameters were within the Pharmacopoeial limits. Floating behaviour of all formulations was reported to be less than 100sec of floating lag time and greater than 12hr of duration of floating. F 7 formulation was selected as a optimised based on in vitro drug release studies. It showed the drug release patters similar to that of theoretical release. In vitro dissolution data of all formulation were fit into different kinetic models to know the mechanism of drug release; results revealed that the optimised F 7 formulation gave perfect zero order type of drug transport. Finally, stability studies were performed for optimised formulation and result revealed no significant difference between before and after storage for selected formula.

  2. Development and evaluation of microporous osmotic tablets of diltiazem hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afifa Bathool

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microporous osmotic tablet of diltiazem hydrochloride was developed for colon targeting. These prepared microporous osmotic pump tablet did not require laser drilling to deliver the drug to the specific site of action. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method. The prepared tablets were coated with microporous semipermeable membrane and enteric polymer using conventional pan coating process. The incorporation of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS, a leachable pore-forming agent, could form in situ delivery pores while coming in contact with gastrointestinal medium. The effect of formulation variables was studied by changing the amounts of sodium alginate and NaCMC in the tablet core, osmogen, and that of pore-forming agent (SLS used in the semipermeable coating. As the amount of hydrophilic polymers increased, drug release rate prolonged. It was found that drug release was increased as the concentration of osmogen and pore-former was increased. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Differential scanning calorimetry results showed that there was no interaction between drug and polymers. Scanning electron microscopic studies showed the formation of pores after predetermined time of coming in contact with dissolution medium. The formation of pores was dependent on the amount of pore former used in the semipermeable membrane. in vitro results showed acid-resistant, timed release at an almost zero order up to 24 hours. The developed osmotic tablets could be effectively used for prolonged delivery of Diltiazem HCl.

  3. Polyamine metabolism and osmotic stress. I. Relation to protoplast viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Masdeu, M. A.; Dumortier, F. M.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    Cereal leaves subjected to the osmotica routinely used for protoplast isolation show a rapid increase in arginine decarboxylase activity, a massive accumulation of putrescine, and slow conversion of putrescine to the higher polyamines, spermidine and spermine (HE Flores, AW Galston 1984 Plant Physiol 75: 102). Mesophyll protoplasts from these leaves, which have a high putrescine:polyamine ratio, do not undergo sustained division. By contrast, in Nicotiana, Capsicum, Datura, Trigonella, and Vigna, dicot genera that readily regenerate plants from mesophyll protoplasts, the response of leaves to osmotic stress is opposite to that in cereals. Putrescine titer as well as arginine and ornithine decarboxylase activities decline in these osmotically stressed dicot leaves, while spermidine and spermine titers increase. Thus, the putrescine:polyamine ratio in Vigna protoplasts, which divide readily, is 4-fold lower than in oat protoplasts, which divide poorly. We suggest that this differing response of polyamine metabolism to osmotic stress may account in part for the failure of cereal mesophyll protoplasts to develop readily in vitro.

  4. Maximum efficiency of the electro-osmotic pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zuli; Miao, Jianying; Wang, Ning; Wen, Weijia; Sheng, Ping

    2011-06-01

    Electro-osmotic effect in a porous medium arises from the electrically charged double layer at the fluid-solid interface, whereby an externally applied electric field can give rise to fluid flow. The electro-osmotic pump (EOP) is potentially useful for a variety of engineering and biorelated applications, but its generally low efficiency is a negative factor in this regard. A study to determine the optimal efficiency of the EOP and the condition(s) under which it can be realized is therefore of scientific interest and practical importance. We present the results of a theoretical and experimental study on the maximum efficiency optimization of the electrokinetic effect in artificially fabricated porous media with controlled pore diameters. It is shown that whereas the EOP efficiency increases with decreasing channel diameter, from 4.5 to 2.5 μm for samples fabricated on oxidized silicon wafers as expected for the interfacial nature of the electro-osmotic effect, the opposite trend was observed for samples with much smaller channel diameters fabricated on anodized aluminum oxide films, with the pore surface coated with silica. These results are in agreement with the theoretical prediction, based on the competition between interfacial area and the no-slip flow boundary condition, that an optimal efficiency of ˜1% is attained at a microchannel diameter that is five times the Debye length, with a zeta potential of ˜100 mV.

  5. Effect of betaine on HSP70 expression and cell survival during adaptation to osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronini, P G; De Angelis, E M; Borghetti, A F; Wheeler, K P

    1993-07-15

    Induced expression of the HSP70 gene in 3T3 and SV-3T3 cells was monitored by measurements of the synthesis of HSP70 and of the cellular contents of both HSP70 and its mRNA. The presence of betaine (N-trimethylglycine) at concentrations of 2.5-25 mM decreased the induction of HSP70 gene expression caused by incubation of 3T3 and SV-3T3 cells in hypertonic (0.5 osM) medium. This effect was accompanied by an enhancement of SV-3T3 cell adaptation, assayed by colony formation, to the hyperosmotic conditions. In contrast, the presence of betaine did not affect HSP70 gene expression induced in these cells by heat shock. After 6 h incubation with 25 mM betaine under hypertonic (0.5 osM) conditions the intracellular concentration of betaine in SV-3T3 cells was about 195 mM, compared with about 70 mM under isotonic (0.3 osM) conditions. Hence, with this concentration of extracellular betaine, the marked increase in the accumulation of betaine within the cells presumably counteracts the imposed osmotic pressure and eliminates the signal that otherwise initiates increased expression of the HSP70 gene. PMID:8343134

  6. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  7. Recent experimental data may point to a greater role for osmotic pressures in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.; Provost, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Uncertainty about the origin of anomalous fluid pressures in certain geologic settings has caused researchers to take a second look at osmosis, or flow driven by chemical potential differences, as a pressure-generating process in the subsurface. Interest in geological osmosis has also increased because of an in situ experiment by Neuzil (2000) suggesting that Pierre Shale could generate large osmotic pressures when highly compacted. In the last few years, additional laboratory and in situ experiments have greatly increased the number of data on osmotic properties of argillaceous formations, but they have not been systematically examined. In this paper we compile these data and explore their implications for osmotic pressure generation in subsurface systems. Rather than base our analysis on osmotic efficiencies, which depend strongly on concentration, we calculated values of a quantity we term osmotic specific surface area (Aso) that, in principle, is a property of the porous medium only. The Aso values are consistent with a surprisingly broad spectrum of osmotic behavior in argillaceous formations, and all the formations tested exhibited at least a modest ability to generate osmotic pressure. It appears possible that under appropriate conditions some formations can be highly effective osmotic membranes able to generate osmotic pressures exceeding 30 MPa (3 km of head) at porosities as high as ??0.1 and pressures exceeding 10 MPa at porosities as high as ??0.2. These findings are difficult to reconcile with the lack of compelling field evidence for osmotic pressures, and we propose three explanations for the disparity: (1) Our analysis is flawed and argillaceous formations are less effective osmotic membranes than it suggests; (2) the necessary subsurface conditions, significant salinity differences within intact argillaceous formations, are rare; or (3) osmotic pressures are unlikely to be detected and are not recognized when encountered. The last possibility, that

  8. Storage of osmotically treated entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema carpocapsae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI-PENG FENG; RI-CHOU HAN; XUE-HONG QIU; LI CAO; JING-HUA CHEN; GUO-HONG WANG

    2006-01-01

    The infective juveniles (IJs) of Steinernema carpocapsae 'All' were osmotically stressed by a mixture of ionic (fortified artificial seawater) and non-ionic (3.2 mol/Lglycerol) solutions to establish a method for osmotic storage of entomopathogenic nematodes.Seven combinations (termed solution A to G) with different proportions of these two solutions were tested, with sterile extra pure water (sepH2O, termed solution H) as a control. The mortality of the IJs at a concentration of 5 × 105 IJ/mL in the solutions A to G, and H were 13.2%,16.2%, 16.7%, 13.5%, 25.2%, 31.6%, 44.6%, and 1.0%, respectively, after 21 days storage at 25℃. Most of the IJs shrunk and stopped motility after 6-9 hours incubation at 25℃ in solutions A to D. Based on the results, solutions A to D and H were chosen to further test the osmotic survival of the IJs at different IJ concentrations (5×105, 2.5 × 105, 2000 IJ/mL) and incubation temperature (30℃, 25℃, 10℃). The resulting IJs were exposed to a high temperature assay (45℃ for 4 h, HTA). Osmotically stressed IJs showed improved heat tolerance. The mortality of the IJs increased with the increasing concentrations of the test IJs and the storage temperatures after exposing to the HTA. More than 88.4%, 62.3% or 2.4% of the treated IJs died at the above three IJ concentrations, respectively. At the three IJ concentrations (2 000 IJs/mL, 2.5 × 105 IJs/mL or 5 × 105 IJs/mL), the highest mortality was recorded in solution D (11.6%, 85.9% or 98.0%, respectively), and the lowest mortality in solution B (2.4%, 62.3% or 86.6%, respectively). No untreated IJs survived after the heat treatment. During 42 days storage at 10℃, the IJs mortality in the solutions A to D and H were 7.19%, 5.97%,4.41%, 4.34%, and 4.34% respectively, and showed no significant differences. In conclusion,solutions enhances the heat tolerance. The mortality of the IJs after HTA increased with the increasing concentrations of the test IJs and the storage

  9. SAXS investigations on lipid membranes under osmotic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In this work we, experimentally, investigate the interactions between lipid bilayers. A structural characterization is performed by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) on multilamellar systems under known osmotic pressure. Changes in the composition of membranes can modify their mechanical properties and structural parameters, like the flexibility of these membranes, which plays a key role on the determination of the tridimensional organization of bilayers. The membranes are composed of soya lecithin, where the major component is DPPC (Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine), and fatty acids are incorporated to the membrane in different concentrations, in order to turn the membrane more fluid. The membranes are inserted in a solution of PVP [poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) - 40000] and the polymer will apply an osmotic pressure on them. The osmotic pressure is controlled by preparing PVP solutions of desired composition and, as we know the concentration of polymer in solution, we can obtain the intensity of the osmotic pressure. SAXS experiments were done in order to determine the distance between the bilayer. From the position of the Bragg peaks, the lamellar periodicity (the thickness of the membranes plus their distance of separation) was determined. Using theoretical model for the form and structure factors we fitted those experimental data and determined the thickness of the membranes. The distance between the membranes was controlled by the osmotic pressure (P) applied to the membranes and, for a given pressure, we determine the distance between the bilayers (a) on equilibrium. The experimental curve P(a) is theoretically described by the different contributions from van der Waals, hydration and fluctuation forces. From the fitting of experimental curves, relevant parameters characterizing the strength of the different interactions are obtained, such as Hamaker and rigidity constant [2, 3]. We observe that the separation between the bilayers on equilibrium is

  10. Comparative Recoveries of Naegleria fowleri Amoebae from Seeded River Water by Filtration and Centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernin, P.; Pélandakis, M.; Rouby, Y.; Faure, A.; Siclet, F.

    1998-01-01

    Detection of pathogenic Naegleria fowleri in environmental water samples, which is necessary for the prevention of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, generally requires concentrating the samples. Two concentration techniques, filtration and centrifugation, were used to study the recovery of N. fowleri, in vegetative or cystic form, that had been mixed with the two other thermotolerant Naegleria species, N. lovaniensis and N. australiensis. Counting of amoebae was performed by the most probable number method on 10 water replicates of 100 ml and 10 ml each. With both concentration methods, recovery was better for cysts than for trophozoites (53% ± 21% versus 5% ± 5% by filtration and 57% ± 25% versus 22% ± 5% by centrifugation). The recovery of Naegleria trophozoites by filtration was very low, and centrifugation was significantly better than filtration in recovery of Naegleria trophozoites (22% ± 5% versus 5% ± 5%; P 0.7). Although the recovery of cysts of N. fowleri obtained by filtration (51% ± 24%) appeared higher than that by centrifugation (36% ± 23%), the difference was not significant (P > 0.1). Both concentration methods have highly variable recovery rates, making accurate quantification of low concentrations (<100/liter) of N. fowleri in the environment difficult. PMID:9501435

  11. Simulating radiative shocks in nozzle shock tubes

    CERN Document Server

    van der Holst, B; Sokolov, I V; Daldorff, L K S; Powell, K G; Drake, R P

    2011-01-01

    We use the recently developed Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) code to numerically simulate laser-driven radiative shock experiments. These shocks are launched by an ablated beryllium disk and are driven down xenon-filled plastic tubes. The simulations are initialized by the two-dimensional version of the Lagrangian Hyades code which is used to evaluate the laser energy deposition during the first 1.1ns. The later times are calculated with the CRASH code. This code solves for the multi-material hydrodynamics with separate electron and ion temperatures on an Eulerian block-adaptive-mesh and includes a multi-group flux-limited radiation diffusion and electron thermal heat conduction. The goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the capability to simulate radiative shocks of essentially three-dimensional experimental configurations, such as circular and elliptical nozzles. We show that the compound shock structure of the primary and wall shock is captured and verify that the shock properties a...

  12. When Shock Waves Collide

    CERN Document Server

    Hartigan, P; Frank, A; Hansen, E; Yirak, K; Liao, A S; Graham, P; Wilde, B; Blue, B; Martinez, D; Rosen, P; Farley, D; Paguio, R

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than an oblique one does. In this paper we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and ...

  13. Osmotic Properties of Charged Cylinders: Critical Evaluation of Counterion Condensation Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Per Lyngs; Podgornik, Rudi; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2000-01-01

    The osmotic coefficient of B-DNA in water may, in moderately dilute solutions, deviate as much as 100 % from predictions based on a simple 'counterion condensation' theory. We determine the results for osmotic properties via a cell model description of the ionic atmosphere near a cylindrical polyelectrolyte. The cell model predictions for the osmotic properties disagree with predictions based on simple condensation theory, but are in surprisingly good harmony with experimental findings. We ar...

  14. Advances in understanding of osmotic dehydration and vacuum impregnation of fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Tylewicz, Urszula

    2011-01-01

    Osmotic Dehydration and Vacuum Impregnation are interesting operations in the food industry with applications in minimal fruit processing and/or freezing, allowing to develop new products with specific innovative characteristics. Osmotic dehydration is widely used for the partial removal of water from cellular tissue by immersion in hypertonic (osmotic) solution. The driving force for the diffusion of water from the tissue is provided by the differences in water chemical potential between ...

  15. Formulation and evaluation of verapamil hydrochloride osmotic controlled release matrix tablets

    OpenAIRE

    Vidyadhara, S.; R. L. C. Sasidhar; V Uma Maheswara Rao; C. H. Showri Babu; D. Lakshmi Harika

    2014-01-01

    Osmotically controlled oral drug delivery systems utilize osmotic pressure as energy source for the controlled delivery of drugs, independent of pH and hydrodynamic conditions of gastrointestinal tract (GIT). The present study was aimed to develop osmotic controlled extended release formulations of verapamil hydrochloride an angiotensin II receptor antagonist with anti-hypertensive activity. Verapamil hydrochloride matrix tablets were prepared by direct compression process using hydroxypropyl...

  16. Development and Evaluation of Swellable Elementary Osmotic Pump Tablet of Glipizide

    OpenAIRE

    Preethi N; Sujatha S

    2013-01-01

    A novel type of elementary osmotic pump [EOP] tablet for efficient delivery of poorly water-soluble drug, glipizide has been designed. Drug release from the system, called Swellable Elementary Osmotic Pump [SEOP], is through a delivery orifice in the form of a very fine dispersion, ready for dissolution and absorption. SEOP tablets were prepared by compressing the mixture of micronized drug and excipients into convex tablet. The effect of wetting agent, swelling agent, osmotic agent and hydro...

  17. Overlimiting Current and Shock Electrodialysis in Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Daosheng; Han, Ji-Hyung; Schlumpberger, Sven; Mani, Ali; Zaltzman, Boris; Bazant, Martin Z

    2013-01-01

    Most electrochemical processes, such as electrodialysis, are limited by diffusion, but in porous media, surface conduction and electro-osmotic flow also contribute to ionic fluxes. In this paper, we report experimental evidence for surface-driven over-limiting current (faster than diffusion) and deionization shocks (propagating salt removal) in a porous medium. The apparatus consists of a silica glass frit (1 mm thick with 500 nm mean pore size) in an aqueous electrolyte (CuSO$_4$ or AgNO$_3$) passing ionic current from a reservoir to a cation-selective membrane (Nafion). The current-voltage relation of the whole system is consistent with a proposed theory based on the electro-osmotic flow mechanism over a broad range of reservoir salt concentrations (0.1 mM - 1.0 M), after accounting for (Cu) electrode polarization and pH-regulated silica charge. Above the limiting current, deionized water ($\\approx 10 \\mu$ $M$) can be continuously extracted from the frit, which implies the existence of a stable shock propag...

  18. Swelling, mechanical and friction properties of PVA/PVP hydrogels after swelling in osmotic pressure solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Xiong, Dangsheng; Liu, Yuntong; Wang, Nan; Zhao, Xiaoduo

    2016-08-01

    The potential of polyvinyl alcohol/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVA/PVP) hydrogels as articular cartilage replacements was in vitro evaluated by using a macromolecule-based solution to mimic the osmotic environment of cartilage tissue. The effects of osmotic pressure solution on the morphology, crystallinity, swelling, mechanical and friction properties of PVA/PVP hydrogels were investigated by swelling them in non-osmotic and osmotic pressure solutions. The results demonstrated that swelling ratio and equilibrium water content were greatly reduced by swelling in osmotic solution, and the swelling process was found to present pseudo-Fickian diffusion character. The crystallization degree of hydrogels after swelling in osmotic solution increased more significantly when it compared with that in non-osmotic solution. After swelling in osmotic solution for 28days, the compressive tangent modulus and storage modulus of hydrogels were significantly increased, and the low friction coefficient was reduced. However, after swelling in the non-osmotic solution, the compressive tangent modulus and friction coefficient of hydrogels were comparable with those of as-prepared hydrogels. The better material properties of hydrogels in vivo than in vitro evaluation demonstrated their potential application in cartilage replacement. PMID:27157740

  19. An osmotic model of the growing pollen tube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian E Hill

    Full Text Available Pollen tube growth is central to the sexual reproduction of plants and is a longstanding model for cellular tip growth. For rapid tip growth, cell wall deposition and hardening must balance the rate of osmotic water uptake, and this involves the control of turgor pressure. Pressure contributes directly to both the driving force for water entry and tip expansion causing thinning of wall material. Understanding tip growth requires an analysis of the coordination of these processes and their regulation. Here we develop a quantitative physiological model which includes water entry by osmosis, the incorporation of cell wall material and the spreading of that material as a film at the tip. Parameters of the model have been determined from the literature and from measurements, by light, confocal and electron microscopy, together with results from experiments made on dye entry and plasmolysis in Lilium longiflorum. The model yields values of variables such as osmotic and turgor pressure, growth rates and wall thickness. The model and its predictive capacity were tested by comparing programmed simulations with experimental observations following perturbations of the growth medium. The model explains the role of turgor pressure and its observed constancy during oscillations; the stability of wall thickness under different conditions, without which the cell would burst; and some surprising properties such as the need for restricting osmotic permeability to a constant area near the tip, which was experimentally confirmed. To achieve both constancy of pressure and wall thickness under the range of conditions observed in steady-state growth the model reveals the need for a sensor that detects the driving potential for water entry and controls the deposition rate of wall material at the tip.

  20. Sporadic hypokalemic paralysis caused by osmotic diuresis in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnu, Venugopalan Y; Kattadimmal, Anoop; Rao, Suparna A; Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu

    2014-07-01

    A wide variety of neurological manifestations are known in patients with diabetes mellitus. We describe a 40-year-old man who presented with hypokalemic paralysis. On evaluation, we found that the cause of the hypokalemia was osmotic diuresis induced by marked hyperglycemia due to undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. The patient had an uneventful recovery with potassium replacement, followed by glycemic control with insulin. Barring a few instances of symptomatic hypokalemia in the setting of diabetic emergencies, to our knowledge uncomplicated hyperglycemia has not been reported to result in hypokalemic paralysis. PMID:24472241

  1. The osmotic tissue expander: a three-year clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, Miryam C; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A; Werker, Paul M N

    2009-09-01

    Closure of defects after trauma or excision of neoplasms is a basic skill in plastic surgery. Local, regional and distant flaps lead to additional scars. Skin recruitment by serial excision or skin expansion is a less damaging option for defects that must be closed. Advantages of tissue expansion include good colour and texture match. Disadvantages are the need for a second operation, use of an implant with the attendant risk of infection, time needed for inflation of the device, repeat visits to the clinic, and punctures to inflate the expander. To overcome the last disadvantage, an osmotic expander was developed in Germany in 1999 by OSMED GmbH (Ilmenau). PMID:18755643

  2. Optimization of process parameters for osmotic dehydration of papaya cubes

    OpenAIRE

    S.K. Jain; R. C. Verma; Murdia, L. K.; Jain, H. K.; Sharma, G. P.

    2010-01-01

    Process temperature (30, 40 and 50 °C), syrup concentration (50, 60 and 70o Brix) and process time (4, 5 and 6 h) for osmotic dehydration of papaya (Carica papaya) cubes were optimized for the maximum water loss and optimum sugar gain by using response surface methodology. The peeled and pre-processed papaya cubes of 1 cm size were immersed in sugar syrup at constant temperature water bath having syrup to papaya cubes ratio of 4:1 (w/w). The cubes were removed from bath at pre-decided time, r...

  3. An expanded phylogeny of social amoebas (Dictyostelia shows increasing diversity and new morphological patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephenson Steven L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Social Amoebae or Dictyostelia are eukaryotic microbes with a unique life cycle consisting of both uni- and multicellular stages. They have long fascinated molecular, developmental and evolutionary biologists, and Dictyostelium discoideum is now one of the most widely studied eukaryotic microbial models. The first molecular phylogeny of Dictyostelia included most of the species known at the time and suggested an extremely deep taxon with a molecular depth roughly equivalent to Metazoa. The group was also shown to consist of four major clades, none of which correspond to traditional genera. Potential morphological justification was identified for three of the four major groups, on the basis of which tentative names were assigned. Results Over the past four years, the Mycetozoan Global Biodiversity Survey has identified many new isolates that appear to be new species of Dictyostelia, along with numerous isolates of previously described species. We have determined 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences for all of these new isolates. Phylogenetic analyses of these data show at least 50 new species, and these arise from throughout the dictyostelid tree breaking up many previously isolated long branches. The resulting tree now shows eight well-supported major groups instead of the original four. The new species also expand the known morphological diversity of the previously established four major groups, violating nearly all previously suggested deep morphological patterns. Conclusions A greatly expanded phylogeny of Dictyostelia now shows even greater morphological plasticity at deep taxonomic levels. In fact, there now seem to be no obvious deep evolutionary trends across the group. However at a finer level, patterns in morphological character evolution are beginning to emerge. These results also suggest that there is a far greater diversity of Dictyostelia yet to be discovered, including novel morphologies.

  4. A Novel Lineage of 'Naked Filose Amoebae'; Kraken carinae gen. nov. sp. nov. (Cercozoa) with a Remarkable Locomotion by Disassembly of its Cell Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumack, Kenneth; Schuster, Julia; Bass, David; Bonkowski, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The term 'filose amoebae' describes a highly polyphyletic assemblage of protists whose phylogenetic placement can be unpredictable based on gross morphology alone. We isolated six filose amoebae from soils of two European countries and describe a new genus and species of naked filose amoebae, Kraken carinae gen. nov. sp. nov. We provide a morphological description based on light microscopy and small subunit rRNA gene sequences (SSU rDNA). In culture, Kraken carinae strains were very slow-moving and preyed on bacteria using a network of filopodia. Phylogenetic analyses of SSU sequences reveal that Kraken are core (filosan) Cercozoa, branching weakly at the base of the cercomonad radiation, most closely related to Paracercomonas, Metabolomonas, and Brevimastigomonas. Some Kraken sequences are >99% similar to an environmental sequence obtained from a freshwater lake in Antarctica, indicating that Kraken is not exclusively soil dwelling, but also inhabits freshwater habitats. PMID:27236418

  5. Evidence of transfer by conjugation of type IV secretion system genes between Bartonella species and Rhizobium radiobacter in amoeba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watcharee Saisongkorh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bartonella species cospeciate with mammals and live within erythrocytes. Even in these specific niches, it has been recently suggested by bioinformatic analysis of full genome sequences that Lateral Gene Transfer (LGT may occur but this has never been demonstrated biologically. Here we describe the sequence of the B. rattaustraliani (AUST/NH4(T circular plasmid (pNH4 that encodes the tra cluster of the Type IV secretion system (T4SS and we eventually provide evidence that Bartonella species may conjugate and exchange this plasmid inside amoeba. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The T4SS of pNH4 is critical for intracellular viability of bacterial pathogens, exhibits bioinformatic evidence of LGT among bacteria living in phagocytic protists. For instance, 3 out of 4 T4SS encoding genes from pNH4 appear to be closely related to Rhizobiales, suggesting that gene exchange occurs between intracellular bacteria from mammals (bartonellae and plants (Rhizobiales. We show that B. rattaustraliani and Rhizobium radiobacter both survived within the amoeba Acanthamoeba polyphaga and can conjugate together. Our findings further support the hypothesis that tra genes might also move into and out of bacterial communities by conjugation, which might be the primary means of genomic evolution for intracellular adaptation by cross-talk of interchangeable genes between Bartonella species and plant pathogens. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this, we speculate that amoeba favor the transfer of genes as phagocytic protists, which allows for intraphagocytic survival and, as a consequence, promotes the creation of potential pathogenic organisms.

  6. Vasogenic shock physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sotiria Gkisioti; Spyros D Mentzelopoulos

    2011-01-01

    Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can un...

  7. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdenović Ljiljana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome is now recognized as a toxin-mediated, multisystem illness. It is characterized by an early onset of shock with multiorgan failure and continues to be associated with high morbidity and mortality, caused by group A Streptococcus pyogenes. The symptoms for staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome are similar. Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome was not well described until 1993, when children who had suffered from varicella presented roughly 2-4 weeks later with a clinical syndrome highly suggestive of toxic shock syndrome. Characteristics, complications and therapy. It is characterized by a sudden onset of fever, chills, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches and rash. It can rapidly progress to severe and intractable hypotension and multisystem dysfunction. Almost every organ system can be involved. Complications of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome may include kidney failure, liver failure and even death. Crystalloids and inotropic agents are used to treat the hypovolemic shock aggressively, with close monitoring of the patient’s mean arterial pressure and central venous pressure. An immediate and aggressive management of hypovolemic shock is essential in streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Targeted antibiotics are indicated; penicillin or a betalactam antibiotic is used for treating group A streptococci, and clindamycin has emerged as a key portion of the standard treatment.

  8. When Shock Waves Collide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  9. Augmentation of peristaltic microflows through electro-osmotic mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims to theoretically establish that the employment of an axial electric field can substantially augment the rate of microfluidic transport occurring in peristaltic microtubes. For theoretical analysis, shape evolution of the tube is taken to be arbitrary, except for the fact that the characteristic wavelength is assumed to be significantly greater than the average radius of cross section. First, expressions for the velocity profile within the tube are derived and are subsequently utilized to obtain variations in the net flow rate across the same, as a function of the pertinent system parameters. Subsequently, the modes of interaction between the electro-osmotic and peristaltic mechanisms are established through the variations in the time-averaged flow rates for zero pressure rise and the pressure rise for zero time-averaged flow rates, as expressed in terms of the occlusion number, characteristic electro-osmotic velocity and the peristaltic wave speed. From the simulation predictions, it is suggested that a judicious combination of peristalsis and an axial electrokinetic body force can drastically enhance the time-averaged flow rate, provided that the occlusion number is relatively small

  10. Thermal and Osmotic Tolerance of 'Irukandji' Polyps: Cubozoa; Carukia barnesi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Courtney

    Full Text Available This research explores the thermal and osmotic tolerance of the polyp stage of the Irukandji jellyfish Carukia barnesi, which provides new insights into potential polyp habitat suitability. The research also targets temperature, salinity, feeding frequency, and combinations thereof, as cues for synchronous medusae production. Primary findings revealed 100% survivorship in osmotic treatments between 19 and 46‰, with the highest proliferation at 26‰. As salinity levels of 26‰ do not occur within the waters of the Great Barrier Reef or Coral Sea, we conclude that the polyp stage of C. barnesi is probably found in estuarine environments, where these lower salinity conditions commonly occur, in comparison to the medusa stage, which is oceanic. Population stability was achieved at temperatures between 18 and 31°C, with an optimum temperature of 22.9°C. We surmise that C. barnesi polyps may be restricted to warmer estuarine areas where water temperatures do not drop below 18°C. Asexual reproduction was also positively correlated with feeding frequency. Temperature, salinity, feeding frequency, and combinations thereof did not induce medusae production, suggesting that this species may use a different cue, possibly photoperiod, to initiate medusae production.

  11. Osmotic concentration of polypeptides from hemofiltrate of uremic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, K; Holland, F; Turnham, T; Klein, E

    1980-07-01

    Hemofiltrate from uremic patients was concentrated 15- to 40-fold by osmotic removal of water across a reverse osmosis membrane which retains salts and proteins. Salts and low molecular weight components were removed from the concentrate by partial dialysis using a highly impermeable cellulose membrane. Following this desalting step, 100- to 500-fold concentration could be achieved by evaporation at low pressure. The concentrate was fractionated on Sephadex G15 columns. Fractions were tested for their toxicity to human cells in culture. Fractions containing components with molecular weights greater than 700 daltons inhibited 3H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of HeLa and skin fibroblast cells more than did low molecular weight peptides and an iso-osmolar control. Components eluting in the molecular weight range of angiotensin I and vitamin B-12 were most inhibitory. These studies show that hemofiltrate from uremic patients is a readily available source of toxic polypeptides. The osmotic concentration and gel chromatographic procedures described should make available large amounts of these molecules for further studies. PMID:7408253

  12. Electro-osmotic flow enhancement in carbon nanotube membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Davide; Leese, Hannah; Calabrò, Francesco

    2016-02-13

    In this work, experimental evidence of the presence of electro-osmotic flow (EOF) in carbon nanotube membranes with diameters close to or in the region of electrical double layer overlap is presented for two different electrolytes for the first time. No EOF in this region should be present according to the simplified theoretical framework commonly used for EOF in micrometre-sized channels. The simplifying assumptions concern primarily the electrolyte charge density structure, based on the Poisson-Boltzmann (P-B) equation. Here, a numerical analysis of the solutions for the simplified case and for the nonlinear and the linearized P-B equations is compared with experimental data. Results show that the simplified solution produces a significant deviation from experimental data, whereas the linearized solution of the P-B equation can be adopted with little error compared with the full P-B case. This work opens the way to using electro-osmotic pumping in a wide range of applications, from membrane-based ultrafiltration and nanofiltration (as a more efficient alternative to mechanical pumping at the nanoscale) to further miniaturization of lab-on-a-chip devices at the nanoscale for in vivo implantation. PMID:26712647

  13. Does osmotic distillation change the isotopic relation of wines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitt Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently partial alcohol reduction of wine is in the focus of research worldwide. There are several technologies available to achieve this target. These techniques are either based on distilling or membrane processes. Osmotic distillation, one of the possibilities, is a quite modern membrane process that can be used. During that process, wine is pumped in counter flow to water along a micro porous, hydrophobic membrane. The volatile components of the wine can permeate that membrane and are dissolved in water. The driving force of that process is the vapor pressure difference between the volatiles on the wine and water side of the membrane. The aim of this work was to determine if the alcohol reduction by osmotic distillation can change the isotopic relation in a wine. Can this enological practice change the composition of a wine in a way that an illegal water addition is simulated? Different wines were reduced by 2% alcohol v/v with varying process parameters. The isotopic analysis of the O 16/18 ratio in the wine were performed according to the OIV methods (353/2009 These analyses showed that the isotopic ratio is modified by an alcohol reduction of 2% v/v in a way that corresponds to an addition of 4–5% of external water.

  14. Osmotically driven flows in microchannels separated by a semipermeable membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kaare Hartvig; Bohr, Tomas; Bruus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    We perform experimental investigations of osmotically driven flows in artificial microchannels by studying the dynamics and structure of the front of a sugar solution traveling in 200 um wide and 50-200 um deep microchannels. We find that the sugar front travels with constant speed, and that this speed is proportional to the concentration of the sugar solution and inversely proportional to the depth of the channel. We propose a theoretical model, which, in the limit of low axial flow resistance, predicts that the sugar front indeed should travel with a constant velocity. The model also predicts an inverse relationship between the depth of the channel and the speed and a linear relation between the sugar concentration and the speed. We thus find good agreement between the experimental results and the predictions of the model. Our motivation for studying osmotically driven flows is that they are believed to be responsible for the translocation of sugar in plants through the phloem sieve element cells. Also, we ...

  15. Preparation and In Vitro/In Vivo Evaluation of Vinpocetine Elementary Osmotic Pump System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Ning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of vinpocetine (VIN elementary osmotic pump (EOP formulations were investigated. A method for the preparation of VIN elementary osmotic pump tablet was obtained by adding organic acid additives to increase VIN solubility. VIN was used as the active pharmaceutical ingredient, lactose and mannitol as osmotic agent. Citric acid was used as increasing API solubility and without resulting in the API degradation. It is found that the VIN release rate was increasing with the citric acid amount at a constant range. Cellulose acetate 398-3 was employed as semipermeable membrane containing polyethylene glycol 6000 and diethyl-o-phthalate as pore-forming agent and plasticizer for controlling membrane permeability. In addition, a clear difference between the pharmacokinetic patterns of VIN immediate release and VIN elementary osmotic pump formulations was revealed. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve after oral administration of elementary osmotic pump formulations was equivalent to VIN immediate release formulation. Furthermore, significant differences found for mean residence time, elimination half-life, and elimination rate constant values corroborated prolonged release of VIN from elementary osmotic pump formulations. These results suggest that the VIN osmotic pump controlled release tablets have marked controlled release characters and the VIN osmotic pump controlled release tablets and the normal tablets were bioequivalent.

  16. The osmotic pressure of 3He-4He mixtures along the phase separation curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The osmotic pressure of 3He-4He mixtures was measured along the phase separation curve at temperatures up to 500 mK by balancing it with the fountain pressure of pure 4He. The usefullness of the secondary osmotic pressure thermometer was reinvestigated. (Auth.)

  17. Renal blood flow, early distal sodium, and plasma renin concentrations during osmotic diuresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leyssac, P P; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Skøtt, O

    2000-01-01

    significant inverse relationship between superficial nephron ED(NaCl) and PRC. We conclude that ED(Na) decreases during osmotic diuresis, suggesting that the increase in PRC was mediated by the macula densa. The results suggest that the natriuresis during osmotic diuresis is a result of impaired sodium...

  18. Sedimentation equilibria of ferrofluids: II. Experimental osmotic equations of state of magnetite colloids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luigjes, B.; Thies-Weesie, D.M.E.; Erné, B.H.; Philipse, A.P.

    2012-01-01

    The first experimental osmotic equation of state is reported for well-defined magnetic colloids that interact via a dipolar hard-sphere potential. The osmotic pressures are determined from the sedimentation equilibrium concentration profiles in ultrathin capillaries using a low-velocity analytical c

  19. ‘Wine Glass’ sign in recurrent postpartum hypernatremic osmotic cerebral demyelination

    OpenAIRE

    Saroja, Aralikatte O.; Karkal R Naik; Rajendra V Mali; Sanjeeva R Kunam

    2013-01-01

    Osmotic demyelination syndrome resulting from postpartum hypernatremia is a recently described entity wherein young women present with hypernatremic encephalopathy and white matter hyperintensities along with quadriparesis from rhabdomyolysis. It is an acute monophasic condition with acute hypernatremia occurring during puerperium with good recovery in majority of the patients with treatment. To the best of our knowledge, recurrent postpartum hypernatremia with encephalopathy, osmotic demyeli...

  20. Colloid osmotic pressure in decompensated cirrhosis. A 'mirror image' of portal venous hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H

    1985-01-01

    Colloid osmotic pressure in plasma (IIP) and ascitic fluid (IIA) and hydrostatic pressures in the hepatoportal system were measured simultaneously in 20 patients with decompensated cirrhosis. IIP was significantly decreased (mean, 21 mm Hg, versus normal, 30 mm Hg; P less than 0.01), and IIA was....../IIP (r = -0.77, P less than 0.001). WHV--IVCP was in most patients in the same order as and closely correlated to effective colloid osmotic pressure (IIP--IIA) (r = 0.88, P less than 0.001). No relationship was found between WHV--IVCP and IIP. The results indicate that a fall in colloid osmotic pressure...... in the interstitial space and ascitic fluid is related to and most likely secondary to the elevated portal pressure in decompensated cirrhosis. Effective colloid osmotic pressure may therefore be regarded as a 'mirror image' of transmural portal pressure. The role of colloid osmotic pressure in the...

  1. Design and Development of Osmotic Drug Delivery System for Anti-Hypertensive Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah N

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Controlled porosity osmotic tablet of Atenolol prepared and evaluated in this study. Atenolol is v lowsoluble drug. So it is difficult to formulate osmotic tablet of Atenolol which gives drug release up to 24hr at zero order. To get desired dissolution profile various formulation parameters like osmogenconcentration, level of weight gain and level of pore former concentration were studied. Polysorbate 80was added as solubilizer to increase its dissolution rate and get drug release up to 24 hr at zero order. Asconcentration of solubilizer increases, dissolution rate increases. Final optimized formulation wasstudied for effect of pH of dissolution media, agitation intensity and osmotic pressure of dissolutionmedia. There is no effect of pH of dissolution media and agitation intensity on dissolution. There issignificant effect of osmotic pressure on dissolution confirms that prepared Atenolol tablet gives drugrelease in osmotically control manner.

  2. ENHANCING OSMOTIC DEHYDRATION WITH ACOUSTIC CAVITATION%声空化强化渗透脱水

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宝芝; 姜任秋; 淮秀兰; 李斌; 刘登瀛

    2004-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to enhance osmotic dehydration of fruits--apples using acoustic cavitation. The variation in water losses and dry matter gain rates of materials with solute concentration, cavitation intensity, the thickness of materials and treating time segment during osmotic dehydration was discussed, at the same time, the influence of different materials on mass transfer during osmotic dehydration using acoustic cavitation was investigated. The results showed that water losses rates of materials were remarkably increased during osmotic dehydration using acoustic cavitation, but dry matter gain rates increased very little. Meanwhile the physical mechanism of enhanced mass transfer during osmotic dehydration with acoustic cavitation was clarified on the basis of analyzing the experimental results.

  3. Our Favorite Film Shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Rane; Suhr, Christian

    The modern medium of film has long been hailed for its capacity for producing shocks of an entertaining, thought-provoking, or even politically emancipative nature. But what is a shock, how and when does it occur, how long does it last, and are there particular techniques for producing cinematic...

  4. Climate shocks and conflict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papaioannou, Kostadis J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper offers a historical micro-level analysis of the impact of climate shocks on the incidence of civil conflict in colonial Nigeria (1912-1945). Primary historical sources on court cases, prisoners and homicides are used to capture conflict. To measure climate shocks we use the deviation f

  5. Shock in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davendralingam Sinniah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Shock, a major cause of morbidity andmortality in children, is the the most anxiety-provokingemergency that needs to be addressed urgently andeffectively by the attending paediatrician. It is a statewhere the metabolic demands of the tissue are not met dueto circulatory dysfunction. Unlike adults, hypotension isa very late feature of shock in children. As the child’scondition worsens, the clinical presentation of thedifferent causes of shock become similar, and nullifyany aetiological differences. Regardless of the type ofshock, the final common pathway is inadequate tissueperfusion and oxygen supply to meet cellular demands.Delayed recognition and treatment result in progressionfrom compensated reversible shock to uncompensatedirreversible shock with widespread multiple systemorgan failure to death. This paper reviews thephysiological basis, and pathophysiological classificationof the various types of shock and their respectiveaetiologies. The clinical features of the different typesof shock are described, and current diagnostic andtherapeutic strategies are applied for the most effectiveand appropriate treatment for resuscitating the child inshock. A strong index of suspicion, early recognition,timely intervention and transfer to an intensive care unitare critical for successful outcomes in the managementof paediatric shock.

  6. Sex ratio and gamete size across eastern North America in Dictyostelium discoideum, a social amoeba with three sexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, T E; Strassmann, J E; Queller, D C

    2016-07-01

    Theory indicates that numbers of mating types should tend towards infinity or remain at two. The social amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, however, has three mating types. It is therefore a mystery how this species has broken the threshold of two mating types, but has not increased towards a much higher number. Frequency-dependent selection on rare types in combination with isogamy, a form of reproduction involving gametes similar in size, could explain the evolution of multiple mating types in this system. Other factors, such as drift, may be preventing the evolution of more than three. We first looked for evidence of isogamy by measuring gamete size associated with each type. We found no evidence of size dissimilarities between gametes. We then looked for evidence of balancing selection, by examining mating type distributions in natural populations and comparing genetic differentiation at the mating type locus to that at more neutral loci. We found that mating type frequency varied among the three populations we examined, with only one of the three showing an even sex ratio, which does not support balancing selection. However, we found more population structure at neutral loci than the mating type locus, suggesting that the three mating types are indeed maintained at intermediate frequencies by balancing selection. Overall, the data are consistent with balancing selection acting on D. discoideum mating types, but with a sufficiently weak rare sex advantage to allow for drift, a potential explanation for why these amoebae have only three mating types. PMID:27018644

  7. Shock Demagnetization of Pyrrhotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, K. L.; Stewart, S. T.; Weiss, b. P.

    2005-01-01

    Maps of the remanent magnetic field of Mars show demagnetized zones within and around giant impact basins. It is likely that vast regions of the Martian crust were demagnetized due to a shock-induced phase change or magnetic transition of magnetic minerals in the crust. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that around the Hellas and Argyre basins, the edges of the unmagnetized zones roughly correspond with peak shock pressure contour lines of a few GPa. Although pyrrhotite is not a major carrier of magnetization in the Earth s crust, it is a common phase in Martian meteorites and may be an important carrier in the Martian crust. Understanding the effects of shock waves on magnetic minerals is critical for determining the origin of the demagnetized zones in impact basins and possibly for identifying the major magnetic carrier phases. Here we present the results of the first controlled shock demagnetization measurements on pyrrhotite. Previous experiments: Shock demagnetization

  8. Paulinella longichromatophora sp. nov., a New Marine Photosynthetic Testate Amoeba Containing a Chromatophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunju; Park, Myung Gil

    2016-02-01

    The freshwater testate filose amoeba Paulinella chromatophora is the sole species in the genus to have plastids, usually termed "chromatophores", of a Synechococcus/Prochlorococcus-like cyanobacterial origin. Here, we report a new marine phototrophic species, Paulinella longichromatophora sp. nov., using light and electron microscopy and molecular data. This new species contains two blue-green U-shaped chromatophores reaching up to 40μm in total length. Further, the new Paulinella species is characterized by having five oral scales surrounding the pseudostomal aperture. All trees generated using three nuclear rDNA datasets (18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, and the concatenated 18S + 28S rDNA) demonstrated that three photosynthetic Paulinella species (two freshwater species, P. chromatophora and Paulinella strain FK01, and one marine species, P. longichromatophora) congruently formed a monophyletic group with strong support (≥90% of ML and ≥0.90 of PP), but their relationship to each other within the clade remained unresolved in all trees. P. longichromatophora, nevertheless, clustered consistently together with Paulinella strain FK01 with very low support, but the clade received strong support in plastid phylogenies. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from plastid-encoded 16S rDNA and a concatenated dataset of plastid 16S+23S rDNA demonstrated that chromatophores of all photosynthetic Paulinella species were monophyletic. The monophyletic group fell within a cyanobacteria clade having a close relationship to an α-cyanobacterial clade containing Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus species with very robust support (100% of ML and 1.0 of PP). Additionally, phylogenetic analyses of nuclear 18S rDNA and plastid 16S rDNA suggested divergent evolution within the photosynthetic Paulinella population after a single acquisition of the chromatophore. After the single acquisition of the chromatophore, ancestral photosynthetic Paulinella appears to have diverged into at least two distinct

  9. Polarizable molecular dynamics simulation of Zn(II) in water using the AMOEBA force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Johnny C; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Chaudret, Robin; Reinhardt, Peter; Ren, Pengyu

    2010-07-13

    The hydration free energy, structure, and dynamics of the zinc divalent cation are studied using a polarizable force field in molecular dynamics simulations. Parameters for the Zn(2+) are derived from gas-phase ab initio calculation of Zn(2+)-water dimer. The Thole-based dipole polarization is adjusted based on the Constrained Space Orbital Variations (CSOV) calculation while the Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) approach is also discussed. The vdW parameters of Zn(2+) have been obtained by comparing the AMOEBA Zn(2+)-water dimerization energy with results from several theory levels and basis sets over a range of distances. Molecular dynamics simulations of Zn(2+) solvation in bulk water are subsequently performed with the polarizable force field. The calculated first-shell water coordination number, water residence time and free energy of hydration are consistent with experimental and previous theoretical values. The study is supplemented with extensive Reduced Variational Space (RVS) and Electron Localization Function (ELF) computations in order to unravel the nature of the bonding in Zn(2+)(H(2)O)(n) (n=1,6) complexes and to analyze the charge transfer contribution to the complexes. Results show that the importance of charge transfer decreases as the size of Zn-water cluster grows due to anticooperativity and to changes in the nature of the metal-ligand bonds. Induction could be dominated by polarization when the system approaches condensed-phase and the covelant effects are eliminated from the Zn(II)-water interaction. To construct an "effective" classical polarizable potential for Zn(2+) in bulk water, one should therefore avoid over-fitting to the ab initio charge transfer energy of Zn(2+)-water dimer. Indeed, in order to avoid overestimation of condensed-phase many-body effects, which is crucial to the transferability of polarizable molecular dynamics, charge transfer should not be included within the classical polarization contribution and should

  10. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  11. Effect of osmotic pressure to bioimpedance indexes of erythrocyte suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, A. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Malahov, M. V.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    In the paper we studied effects of osmotic modification of red blood cells on bioimpedance parameters of erythrocyte suspension. The Cole parameters: the extracellular (Re) and intracellular (Ri) fluid resistance, the Alpha parameter, the characteristic frequency (Fchar) and the cell membranes capacitance (Cm) of concentrated erythrocyte suspensions were measured by bioimpedance analyser in the frequency range 5 - 500 kHz. Erythrocytes were incubated in hypo-, hyper- and isoosmotic solutions to achieve changes in cell volume. It was found that Re and Alpha increased in the suspensions with low osmolarity and decreased in the hypertonic suspensions. Ri, Fchar and Cm were higher in the hyperosmotic and were lower in the hypoosmotic suspensions. Correlations of all BIS parameters with MCV were obtained, but multiple regression analysis showed that only Alpha parameter was independently related to MCV (β=0.77, p=0.01). Thus Alpha parameter may be related the mean corpuscular volume of cells.

  12. Effect of osmotic pressure to bioimpedance indexes of erythrocyte suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper we studied effects of osmotic modification of red blood cells on bioimpedance parameters of erythrocyte suspension. The Cole parameters: the extracellular (Re) and intracellular (Ri) fluid resistance, the Alpha parameter, the characteristic frequency (Fchar) and the cell membranes capacitance (Cm) of concentrated erythrocyte suspensions were measured by bioimpedance analyser in the frequency range 5 – 500 kHz. Erythrocytes were incubated in hypo-, hyper- and isoosmotic solutions to achieve changes in cell volume. It was found that Re and Alpha increased in the suspensions with low osmolarity and decreased in the hypertonic suspensions. Ri, Fchar and Cm were higher in the hyperosmotic and were lower in the hypoosmotic suspensions. Correlations of all BIS parameters with MCV were obtained, but multiple regression analysis showed that only Alpha parameter was independently related to MCV (β=0.77, p=0.01). Thus Alpha parameter may be related the mean corpuscular volume of cells.

  13. Osmotically driven flows in microchannels separated by a semipermeable membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kåre Hartvig; Lee, J.; Bohr, Tomas;

    2009-01-01

    We have fabricated lab-on-a-chip systems with microchannels separated by integrated membranes allowing for osmotically driven microflows. We have investigated these flows experimentally by studying the dynamics and structure of the front of a sugar solution travelling in 200 mu m wide and 50-200 mu...... m deep microchannels. We find that the sugar front travels at a constant speed, and that this speed is proportional to the concentration of the sugar solution and inversely proportional to the depth of the channel. We propose a theoretical model, which, in the limit of low axial flow resistance......, predicts that the sugar front should indeed travel with a constant velocity. The model also predicts an inverse relationship between the depth of the channel and the speed, and a linear relation between the sugar concentration and the speed. We thus find good qualitative agreement between the experimental...

  14. GABA not only a neurotransmitter: osmotic regulation by GABAAR signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Cesetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In neurons the anionic channel γ-aminobutyric (GABA A receptor (GABAAR plays a central role in mediating both the neurotrophic and neurotransmitter role of GABA. Activation of this receptor by GABA also affects the function of non-neuronal cells in the central nervous system (CNS, as GABAARs are expressed in mature macroglia and in almost all progenitor types, including neural stem cells. The relevance of GABA signalling in non-neuronal cells has been comparatively less investigated than in neurons. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that these cells are direct targets of GABA regulation. In non-neuronal cells GABAAR activation leads to influx or efflux of chloride (Cl- depending on the electrochemical gradient. Ion transport is indissolubly associated to water fluxes across the plasma membrane and plays a key role in brain physiology. Therefore, GABAAR could affect osmotic tension in the brain by modulating ion gradients. In addition, since water movements also occur through specialized water channels and transporters, GABAAR signalling could affect the movement of water also by regulating the function of the channels and transporters involved, thereby affecting not only the direction of the water fluxes but also their dynamics. This regulation has consequences at the cellular level as it modulates cell volume and activates multiple intracellular signalling mechanisms important for cell proliferation, maturation and survival. It may also have consequences at the systemic level. For example, it may indirectly control neuronal excitability, by regulating the extracellular space and interstitial concentration of Cl-, and contribute to brain water homeostasis. Therefore, GABAergic osmotic regulation should be taken into account during the treatment of pathologies requiring the administration of GABAAR modulators and for the development of therapies for diseases causing water unbalance in the brain.

  15. Atrial natriuretic peptide mediates oxytocin secretion induced by osmotic stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriguer, Rosengela S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Franci, Celso R

    2003-02-15

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), first discovered in the heart, has been also detected in various brain regions involved in the control of cardiovascular function and water and sodium balance. The anteroventral region of the third ventricle (AV3V) and the subfornical organ (SFO) have ANP-immunoreactive projections towards the paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei of the hypothalamus. Extracellular fluid (ECF) hyperosmolality stimulates the secretion of oxytocin (OT) which induces ANP release by the atrium. On the other hand, passive immunoneutralization of ANP reduces OT secretion in response to ECF hypertonicity. Previous studies have shown the co-localization of ANP and OT in PVN and SON neurons and in the periventricular region, as well as the presence of ANPergic and oxytocinergic neurons in the median eminence. The aim of the present study was to investigate the OT and ANP content in the SON and PVN of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary (PP) after an osmotic stimulus that induces OT secretion. The results showed that intracerebroventricular microinjection of normal rabbit serum (NRS) or of ANP antiserum followed or not by an intraperitoneal injection of isotonic saline did not alter OT secretion or OT content in the PVN, SON, and PP; passive ANP immunoneutralization reduced the basal content of ANP in the PVN, SON, and PP of animals in a situation of isotonicity; the ANP antiserum inhibited the increase of OT secretion and content of OT and ANP in the PVN, SON and PP induced by the osmotic stimulus. Thus, the increase in plasma OT and oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamus-posterior pituitary system in response to hypertonicity depends on the action of endogenous ANP, i.e., ECF hypertonicity must activate ANPergic neurons which directly or indirectly stimulate OT release. PMID:12576148

  16. Isolamento de amebas de vida livre a partir de água mineral engarrafada Isolation of free-living amoebae from bottled mineral water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homero Coutinho Salazar

    1982-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram isoladas amebas dos gêneros Vahlkampfia, Glaeseria, Acanthamoeba, Filamoeba, Amoeba, Platyamoeba e Hartmanella de dez diferentes marcas de água mineral engarrafadas, servidas no Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brasil. Somente uma das marcas foi negativa para protozoários, enquanto que de todas as outras foram isoladas amebas de vida livre. O significado desses resultados é discutido como um indicador de qualidade da água mineral usada comercialmente, destacando-se o fato de que alguns desses microorganismos são potencialmente patogênicos.Amoebae of the genera Vahlkampfia, Glaeseria, Acanthamoeba, Filamoeba, Amoeba, Platyamoeba and Hartmanella were isolated from ten different brands of bottled mineral water used in Rio de Janeiro. Of these brands, only one was negative after an incubation period of twenty days, while the others were all positive for free living amoebae. The results are discussed as an indicator of the quality of commercially used mineral water and it is stressed that some of these microorganisms are potentially pathogenic.

  17. Neoparamoeba spp. and their eukaryotic endosymbionts similar to Perkinsela amoebae (Hollande, 1980): Coevolution demonstrated by SSU rRNA gene phylogenies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dyková, Iva; Fiala, Ivan; Pecková, Hana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 4 (2008), s. 269-277. ISSN 0932-4739 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC522; GA ČR GA206/05/2384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Neoparamoeba spp. * Perkinsela amoebae * coevolution Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.000, year: 2008

  18. First Evidence for Diploidy and Genetic Recombination in Free-Living Amoebae of the Genus Naegleria on the Basis of Electrophoretic Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Cariou, Marie Louise; Pernin, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    Electrophoretic variation for 15 enzyme-coding genes was studied in various Naegleria (Rhizopoda, Vahlkampfiidae) species. The occurrence of complex banding patterns provided the first evidence of a diploid structure of the genome of these amoebae. The putative loci identified were found not to be linked and the genotypic distribution suggested chromosomal recombination for one species (Naegleria lovaniensis).

  19. First Evidence for Diploidy and Genetic Recombination in Free-Living Amoebae of the Genus Naegleria on the Basis of Electrophoretic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cariou, Marie Louise; Pernin, Pierre

    1987-01-01

    Electrophoretic variation for 15 enzyme-coding genes was studied in various Naegleria (Rhizopoda, Vahlkampfiidae) species. The occurrence of complex banding patterns provided the first evidence of a diploid structure of the genome of these amoebae. The putative loci identified were found not to be linked and the genotypic distribution suggested chromosomal recombination for one species (Naegleria lovaniensis). PMID:17246363

  20. The performance of single- and multi-proxy transfer functions (testate amoebae, bryophytes, vascular plants) for reconstructing mire surface wetness and pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Edward A. D.; Payne, Richard J.; van der Knaap, Willem O.; Lamentowicz, Łukasz; Gąbka, Maciej; Lamentowicz, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    Peatlands are widely exploited archives of paleoenvironmental change. We developed and compared multiple transfer functions to infer peatland depth to the water table (DWT) and pH based on testate amoeba (percentages, or presence/absence), bryophyte presence/absence, and vascular plant presence/absence data from sub-alpine peatlands in the SE Swiss Alps in order to 1) compare the performance of single-proxy vs. multi-proxy models and 2) assess the performance of presence/absence models. Bootstrapping cross-validation showing the best performing single-proxy transfer functions for both DWT and pH were those based on bryophytes. The best performing transfer functions overall for DWT were those based on combined testate amoebae percentages, bryophytes and vascular plants; and, for pH, those based on testate amoebae and bryophytes. The comparison of DWT and pH inferred from testate amoeba percentages and presence/absence data showed similar general patterns but differences in the magnitude and timing of some shifts. These results show new directions for paleoenvironmental research, 1) suggesting that it is possible to build good-performing transfer functions using presence/absence data, although with some loss of accuracy, and 2) supporting the idea that multi-proxy inference models may improve paleoecological reconstruction. The performance of multi-proxy and single-proxy transfer functions should be further compared in paleoecological data.

  1. Advances in studies on testate amoebae (Arcellinida and Euglyphida: a scientometric approach - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v35i4.18184

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilane Talita Fatoreto Schwind

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Testate amoebae have a great potential for use in scientific researches due to their ecological characteristics such as abundance, wealth, and generation time. In this way, this study aimed to present a scientometric analysis to describe the evolution of the different advances in researches on testate amoebae and identify a temporal pattern in this evolution. The literature review was based on papers indexed by Thomson Reuters (www.isiwebofknowledge.com and SciVerse Scopus (www.scopus.com. In total 562 papers were examined. Results showed a pattern of evolution in scientific studies, most with ecological approach with descriptive and predictive designs. At the global level, researches on testate amoebae progressed in both the number of articles published as well as in the areas studied, especially in Europe and North America. The low number of experimental studies and review articles can characterize the lack of more knowledge to be acquired, both from particular observations (descriptive studies as well as the observations noted sufficiently predictive of work. In Brazil, studies with testate amoebae are still developing, concentrated in only some regions, but the increased number of studies in recent years allows the prediction of the same overall patterns of advance for Brazilian researches. Thus, we conclude that these organisms are being increasingly used as a tool response in ecological studies.

  2. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  3. Collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collisionless shocks cannot occur naturally on the earth, because nearly all matter here consists of electrically neutral atoms and molecules. In space, however, high temperatures and ultraviolet radiation from hot stars decompose atoms into their constituent nuclei and electrons, producing a soup of electrically charged particles known as a plasma. Plasma physicists proposed that the collective electrical and magnetic properties of plasmas could produce interactions that take the place of collisions and permit shocks to form. In 1964 the theoretical work found its first experimental confirmation. Norman F. Ness and his colleagues at the Goddard Space Flight Center, using data collected from the iMP-1 spacecraft, detected clear signs that a collisionless shock exists where the solar wind encounters the earth's magnetic field. More recent research has demonstrated that collisionless shocks appear in a dazzling array of astronomical settings. For example, shocks have been found in the solar wind upstream (sunward) of all the planet and comets that have been visited by spacecraft. Violent flares on the sun generate shocks that propagate to the far reaches of the solar system; tremendous galactic outbursts create disruptions in the intergalactic medium that are trillions of times larger. In addition, many astrophysicists think that shocks from supernova explosions in our galaxy accelerate cosmic rays, a class of extraordinarily energetic elementary particles and atomic nuclei that rain down on the earth from all directions

  4. Osmotic pressure of ionic liquids in an electric double layer: Prediction based on a continuum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Gi Jong; Ahn, Myung Mo; Kang, In Seok

    2015-12-01

    An analysis has been performed for the osmotic pressure of ionic liquids in the electric double layer (EDL). By using the electromechanical approach, we first derive a differential equation that is valid for computing the osmotic pressure in the continuum limit of any incompressible fluid in EDL. Then a specific model for ionic liquids proposed by Bazant et al. [M. Z. Bazant, B. D. Storey, and A. A. Kornyshev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 046102 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.046102] is adopted for more detailed computation of the osmotic pressure. Ionic liquids are characterized by the correlation and the steric effects of ions and their effects are analyzed. In the low voltage cases, the correlation effect is dominant and the problem becomes linear. For this low voltage limit, a closed form formula is derived for predicting the osmotic pressure in EDL with no overlapping. It is found that the osmotic pressure decreases as the correlation effect increases. The osmotic pressures at the nanoslit surface and nanoslit centerline are also obtained for the low voltage limit. For the cases of moderately high voltage with high correlation factor, approximate formulas are derived for estimating osmotic pressure values based on the concept of a condensed layer near the electrode. In order to corroborate the results predicted by analytical studies, the full nonlinear model has been solved numerically.

  5. A high pressure cell for simultaneous osmotic pressure and x-ray diffraction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on a novel osmotic cell, developed to simultaneously subject a sample to osmotic stress and measure structural changes by small angle x-ray diffraction. The osmotic cell offers many advantages over more conventional methods of osmotically stressing soft materials to measure their structural response. In particular, a full osmotic analysis can be performed with a single small sample (25 μl). This reduces sample handling and the associated systematic errors, as well as enabling tight control and monitoring of the thermodynamic environment during osmosis, thereby increasing measurement precision. The cell design enables control of osmotic pressure to ±0.04 bar over a pressure range of 1-100 bar, and temperature control to ±0.05 deg. C. Under these conditions, the lattice spacing in lyotropic structures was resolved to better than ±0.005 A. Using the osmotic cell, we demonstrate good agreement with previous conventional measurements on the energy of dehydrating the fluid lamellar phase of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine in water.

  6. An overview of osmotic power generation and its scope in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need of introducing innovative power generation methods is increasing rapidly. The conventional fuel driven methods not only require heavy financial investments, they have also been held responsible for many natural calamities faced by the human population. While the research on better utilizing the renewable resources such as wind, tidal and wave energy etc is underway, the Osmotic Power has been commercially introduced as a new fuel-free energy resource. The energy in the osmotic power is derived from the difference in salt concentration between the fresh water and the salt water. In an osmotic power plant, the river water is used as the fresh water and the sea water is treated as the salt water for getting electric power through osmosis. While the hydroelectric dams can threat irrigation activities in some areas by blocking the water supply, the osmotic plants are situated at locations where the river water falls into the sea and hence cause no water hold-ups. In this paper, we take an in-depth look into the technical methods and the associated challenges of the osmotic power generation. We highlight the scope of osmotic power in Pakistan. We identify important geographical locations in the country which can be ideal for setting up an osmotic power station. (author)

  7. A cellulose synthase-like protein is required for osmotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jianhua

    2010-04-16

    Osmotic stress imposed by soil salinity and drought stress significantly affects plant growth and development, but osmotic stress sensing and tolerance mechanisms are not well understood. Forward genetic screens using a root-bending assay have previously identified salt overly sensitive (sos) mutants of Arabidopsis that fall into five loci, SOS1 to SOS5. These loci are required for the regulation of ion homeostasis or cell expansion under salt stress, but do not play a major role in plant tolerance to the osmotic stress component of soil salinity or drought. Here we report an additional sos mutant, sos6-1, which defines a locus essential for osmotic stress tolerance. sos6-1 plants are hypersensitive to salt stress and osmotic stress imposed by mannitol or polyethylene glycol in culture media or by water deficit in the soil. SOS6 encodes a cellulose synthase-like protein, AtCSLD5. Only modest differences in cell wall chemical composition could be detected, but we found that sos6-1 mutant plants accumulate high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under osmotic stress and are hypersensitive to the oxidative stress reagent methyl viologen. The results suggest that SOS6/AtCSLD5 is not required for normal plant growth and development but has a critical role in osmotic stress tolerance and this function likely involves its regulation of ROS under stress. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The Arabidopsis Vacuolar Sorting Receptor1 Is Required for Osmotic Stress-Induced Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2014-11-21

    Osmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) through a pathway that is rate limited by the carotenoid cleavage enzyme 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the signal transduction mechanism underlying the activation of ABA biosynthesis, we performed a forward genetic screen to isolate mutants defective in osmotic stress regulation of the NCED3 gene. Here, we identified the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Vacuolar Sorting Receptor1 (VSR1) as a unique regulator of ABA biosynthesis. The vsr1 mutant not only shows increased sensitivity to osmotic stress, but also is defective in the feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis by ABA. Further analysis revealed that vacuolar trafficking mediated by VSR1 is required for osmotic stress-responsive ABA biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance. Moreover, under osmotic stress conditions, the membrane potential, calcium flux, and vacuolar pH changes in the vsr1 mutant differ from those in the wild type. Given that manipulation of the intracellular pH is sufficient to modulate the expression of ABA biosynthesis genes, including NCED3, and ABA accumulation, we propose that intracellular pH changes caused by osmotic stress may play a signaling role in regulating ABA biosynthesis and that this regulation is dependent on functional VSR1.

  9. Proline, glycine betaine, total phenolics and pigment contents in response to osmotic stress in maize seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SAJJAD MOHARRAMNEJAD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the fresh weight, RWC, pigment content, total phenolics, proline and glycine betaine responses of maize inbred lines to osmotic stress, a factorial experiment was carried out under laboratory conditions with two maize inbred lines (B73 and MO17 and two osmotic stress levels induced by PEG (control and -0.6 MPa. Fresh weight significantly decreased under drought stress. On the basis of percent inhibition in fresh weight at the osmotic stress MO17 was ranked as tolerant (inhibition 45.30%, and B73 drought sensitive (inhibition more than 50%. Leaf relative water content (RWC was significantly decreased in both inbred lines under osmotic stress. The pigment concentrations were substantially declined in both maize inbreds under osmotic stressed conditions. However, this reduction was less in B73 than MO17. Osmoitc stress declined the levels of total phenolics in both maize inbreds. On the other hand, the osmotic stress markedly enhanced the levels of proline and glycine betaine in both maize inbreds, but this was more pronounced in MO17. The present results showed that osmotic stress retards the growth and some biochemical attributes of maize inbreds. In conclusion, the level of proline and glycine betaine in maize could improve drought tolerance.

  10. Shock breakout theory

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, Eli; Katz, Boaz

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) e...

  11. Simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks: shock structure and particle acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Spitkovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    We discuss 3D simulations of relativistic collisionless shocks in electron-positron pair plasmas using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. The shock structure is mainly controlled by the shock's magnetization ("sigma" parameter). We demonstrate how the structure of the shock varies as a function of sigma for perpendicular shocks. At low magnetizations the shock is mediated mainly by the Weibel instability which generates transient magnetic fields that can exceed the initial field. At larger magnetizations the shock is dominated by magnetic reflections. We demonstrate where the transition occurs and argue that it is impossible to have very low magnetization collisionless shocks in nature (in more than one spatial dimension). We further discuss the acceleration properties of these shocks, and show that higher magnetization perpendicular shocks do not efficiently accelerate nonthermal particles in 3D. Among other astrophysical applications, this may pose a restriction on the structure and composition of gamma-ray...

  12. Osmotic coefficients of water for thorium nitrate solutions at 25, 37, and 50oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vapor pressure osmometry was used to measure osmotic coefficients of water for thorium nitrate solutions at 25, 37, and 50oC and at molalities up to 0.2 mol·kg-1. The data were fitted to three- and four-parameter equations containing limiting-law terms for a 4:1 electrolyte. The variation of the osmotic coefficients as a function of temperature was found to be small. The results are compared to published values for the osmotic coefficients. (author)

  13. Osmotic stress-regulated the expression of glutathione peroxidase 3 in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO YuChen; GUO JingGong; LIU ErTao; LI Kun; DAI Jie; WANG PengCheng; CHEN Jia; SONG ChunPeng

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression of glutathione peroxidase 3 (ATGPX3) in response to osmotic stress was analyzed in Arabidopsis using ATGPX3 promoter-glucuronidase (GUS) transgenic plants. High levels of GUS expression were detected under osmotic stress in ATGPX3 promoter-GUS transgenic plants. Compared with the wild type, the growth and development of ATGPX3 mutants (atgpx3-1) were more sensitive to mannitol. In addition, the expression of RD29A, ABI1, ABI2 and RbohD in atgpx3-1 was induced by ABA stress. These results suggest that ATGPX3 might be involved in the signal transduction of osmotic stress.

  14. Posttranscriptional osmotic regulation of the sigma(s) subunit of RNA polymerase in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Muffler, A; Traulsen, D D; Lange, R. de; Hengge-Aronis, R

    1996-01-01

    The sigma(s) subunit of RNA polymerase (encoded by the rpoS gene) is a master regulator in a complex regulatory network that governs the expression of many stationary-phase-induced and osmotically regulated genes in Escherichia coli. rpoS expression is itself osmotically regulated by a mechanism that operates at the posttranscriptional level. Cells growing at high osmolarity already exhibit increased levels of sigma(s) during the exponential phase of growth. Osmotic induction of rpoS can be t...

  15. INVESTIGATION OF ULTRASOUND WAVES ON PRETREATMENT OF OSMOTIC DEHYDRATION OF CARROT SLICES

    OpenAIRE

    Tahmasebi, Soheila; Mirzaee, Somaye; Kaviyani, Mehdi; Tabrizi, Mahsa; Shariati, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    In this study, carrot slices were put in glucose osmotic 50% at 1, 2 and 3 hr. Ultrasound waves, frequency 40 kH power 30 w/l, passed through container of osmotic solution and carrot slices. The results revealed that significant increasing of dry matter of sample by using ultrasound waves.pre osmotic time had a significant on dry material by increasing from 1to 3 hr.sample treated by ultrasound waves lost water faster and their final dry solid was significantly more than control (without ultr...

  16. Physicochemical characteristics of guava “Paluma” submitted to osmotic dehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Roselene Ferreira Oliveira; Lia Mara Moterlle; Edmar Clemente

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the conservation post process osmotic of guava stored temperature at 5oC. Guava (Psidium guajava L.), red variety “Paluma” minimally processed by mild osmotic dehydration, were packaged in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and stored temperature at 5ºC. Non-treated guava, packed in PET trays, was used as control. The treatment used was osmotic dehydration in sucrose syrup at 60ºBrix and physicochemical determinations were pH, total soluble solids (TSS), tot...

  17. Supply shocks, demand shocks, and labor market fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Helge Braun; Reinout De Bock; Riccardo DiCecio

    2009-01-01

    We use structural vector autoregressions to analyze the responses of worker flows, job flows, vacancies, and hours to shocks. We identify demand and supply shocks by restricting the short-run responses of output and the price level. On the demand side we disentangle a monetary and non-monetary shock by restricting the response of the interest rate. The responses of labor market variables are similar across shocks: expansionary shocks increase job creation, the hiring rate, vacancies, and hour...

  18. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a toxin produced by some types of Staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock-like syndrome (TSLS), can be caused by Streptococcal bacteria. Not all staph or strep infections cause toxic ...

  19. Shock structures of astrospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Klaus; Kleimann, Jens; Wiengarten, Tobias; Bomans, Dominik J; Weis, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between a supersonic stellar wind and a (super-)sonic interstellar wind has recently been viewed with new interest. We here first give an overview of the modeling, which includes the heliosphere as an example of a special astrosphere. Then we concentrate on the shock structures of fluid models, especially of hydrodynamic (HD) models. More involved models taking into account radiation transfer and magnetic fields are briefly sketched. Even the relatively simple HD models show a rich shock structure, which might be observable in some objects. We employ a single fluid model to study these complex shock structures, and compare the results obtained including heating and cooling with results obtained without these effects. Furthermore, we show that in the hypersonic case valuable information of the shock structure can be obtained from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations. We solved the Euler equations for the single fluid case and also for a case including cooling and heating. We also discuss the analytic...

  20. Life shocks and homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide. PMID:23868747

  1. The Opuntia streptacantha OpsHSP18 Gene Confers Salt and Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Jiménez-Bremont

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress limits seed germination, plant growth, flowering and fruit quality, causing economic decrease. Small Heat Shock Proteins (sHSPs are chaperons with roles in stress tolerance. Herein, we report the functional characterization of a cytosolic class CI sHSP (OpsHSP18 from Opuntia streptacantha during seed germination in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic lines subjected to different stress and hormone treatments. The over-expression of the OpsHSP18 gene in A. thaliana increased the seed germination rate under salt (NaCl and osmotic (glucose and mannitol stress, and in ABA treatments, compared with WT. On the other hand, the over-expression of the OpsHSP18 gene enhanced tolerance to salt (150 mM NaCl and osmotic (274 mM mannitol stress in Arabidopsis seedlings treated during 14 and 21 days, respectively. These plants showed increased survival rates (52.00 and 73.33%, respectively with respect to the WT (18.75 and 53.75%, respectively. Thus, our results show that OpsHSP18 gene might have an important role in abiotic stress tolerance, in particular in seed germination and survival rate of Arabidopsis plants under unfavorable conditions.

  2. Effects of Heat Shock on Photosynthetic Properties, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Downy Mildew of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ting; Jin, Haijun; Zhang, Hongmei; He, Lizhong; Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Danfeng; Hui, Dafeng; Yu, Jizhu

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock is considered an abiotic stress for plant growth, but the effects of heat shock on physiological responses of cucumber plant leaves with and without downy mildew disease are still not clear. In this study, cucumber seedlings were exposed to heat shock in greenhouses, and the responses of photosynthetic properties, carbohydrate metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, osmolytes, and disease severity index of leaves with or without the downy mildew disease were measured. Results showed that heat shock significantly decreased the net photosynthetic rate, actual photochemical efficiency, photochemical quenching coefficient, and starch content. Heat shock caused an increase in the stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble sugar content, sucrose content, soluble protein content and proline content for both healthy leaves and downy mildew infected leaves. These results demonstrate that heat shock activated the transpiration pathway to protect the photosystem from damage due to excess energy in cucumber leaves. Potential resistance mechanisms of plants exposed to heat stress may involve higher osmotic regulation capacity related to an increase of total accumulations of soluble sugar, proline and soluble protein, as well as higher antioxidant enzymes activity in stressed leaves. Heat shock reduced downy mildew disease severity index by more than 50%, and clearly alleviated downy mildew development in the greenhouses. These findings indicate that cucumber may have a complex physiological change to resist short-term heat shock, and suppress the development of the downy mildew disease. PMID:27065102

  3. Effects of Heat Shock on Photosynthetic Properties, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Downy Mildew of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotao Ding

    Full Text Available Heat shock is considered an abiotic stress for plant growth, but the effects of heat shock on physiological responses of cucumber plant leaves with and without downy mildew disease are still not clear. In this study, cucumber seedlings were exposed to heat shock in greenhouses, and the responses of photosynthetic properties, carbohydrate metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, osmolytes, and disease severity index of leaves with or without the downy mildew disease were measured. Results showed that heat shock significantly decreased the net photosynthetic rate, actual photochemical efficiency, photochemical quenching coefficient, and starch content. Heat shock caused an increase in the stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble sugar content, sucrose content, soluble protein content and proline content for both healthy leaves and downy mildew infected leaves. These results demonstrate that heat shock activated the transpiration pathway to protect the photosystem from damage due to excess energy in cucumber leaves. Potential resistance mechanisms of plants exposed to heat stress may involve higher osmotic regulation capacity related to an increase of total accumulations of soluble sugar, proline and soluble protein, as well as higher antioxidant enzymes activity in stressed leaves. Heat shock reduced downy mildew disease severity index by more than 50%, and clearly alleviated downy mildew development in the greenhouses. These findings indicate that cucumber may have a complex physiological change to resist short-term heat shock, and suppress the development of the downy mildew disease.

  4. [Investigation of potentially pathogenic free-living amoebae and their in vivo pathogenicity in water supplies of Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazar, Süleyman; Gürbüz, Esra; Sönmez, Mehmet Fatih; Çetinkaya, Ülfet; Kuk, Salih

    2016-07-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are found widely in soil and water in the nature. Among them in which potentially pathogenic for humans and animals are known as "potential pathogenic free-living amoebae (PPFLA)". PPFLA are characterized as the causes of clinical manifestations leading to death especially in immunosuppressed people. Four genus of PPFLA (Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Balamuthia and Sappinia) are known to be pathogenic to humans. The aims of this study were to investigate the presence of PPFLA in the water supplies in Turkey and to determine their in vivo pathogenicity. A total of 664 water samples were collected from the ponds, rivers, streams and wells found in provinces located at different regions (central, western, eastern and southeastern regions) of Turkey. These samples were initially inoculated in the monoxenic culture media and evaluated by both microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in terms of the presence of FLA. The samples identified as positive were then cultured in axenic media, the growth of amoebae that were confirmed microscopically, were than studied with PCR for molecular characterization. The isolates that were found positive by PCR from axenic cultures were inoculated intranasally to immunocompetent and immunodeficient (athymic) [BALB/c Rag2(-/-) gamma(c)(-/-)] BALB/c mice followed by the evaluation on the 21st day by histopathological and molecular methods to investigate their in vivo pathogenicity. In our study, 143 water samples were detected as positive in monoxenic cultures and 41 of them were detected as positive in axenic cultures. Twenty of 41 samples detected as positive in axenic culture could be continued in culture for three months. As a result of PCR using primers common to SYA, only nine have been identified from 20 samples as positive. According to the result of the PCR with specific primers, all (n= 9) were positive for Acanthamoeba sp., eight for Sappini sp. and five for Balamuthia mandrillaris, while none was

  5. Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Unmodified Relativistic, Oblique Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, D C; Ellison, Donald C.; Double, Glen P.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from a fully relativistic Monte Carlo simulation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in unmodified shocks. The computer code uses a single algorithmic sequence to smoothly span the range from nonrelativistic speeds to fully relativistic shocks of arbitrary obliquity, providing a powerful consistency check. While known results are obtained for nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic parallel shocks, new results are presented for the less explored trans- relativistic regime and for oblique, fully relativistic shocks. We find, for a wide trans-relativistic range extending to shock Lorentz factors >30, that the particle spectrum produced by DSA varies strongly from the canonical f(p) proportional to p^{-4.23} spectrum known to result in ultra-relativistic shocks. Trans- relativistic shocks may play an important role in gamma-ray bursts and other sources and most relativistic shocks will be highly oblique.

  6. Oral push-pull osmotic pumps of pentazocine hydrochloride: Development and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra B

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to formulate and evaluate oral osmotic pumps of pentazocine HCl that are expected to deliver the drug as solution for prolonged period of time with reduced frequency of drug administration and reduced side effects. Push-Pull osmotic pumps of pentazocine HCl were prepared using different formulation variables like diameter of pores, presence of surfactant in formulation core, addition of osmopolymer pectin and presence/absence of water-soluble polymer (carboxymethylcellulose sodium. Fabricated osmotic pumps were evaluated for weight variation, coating thickness, pore diameter, drug content and in vitro release studies. Release rates were found to be independent of size of pores, agitation intensity, and pH of the release medium. The presence of surfactant, water-soluble polymer and osmopolymer (pectin affected the drug release significantly. Almost all the osmotic pumps gave controlled and prolonged drug release profiles beyond 2 h of lag phase.

  7. Selection and characterization of tomato plants for osmotic stress tolerance derived from a gamma ray irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kwon Kyoo; Jung, Yu Jin [Hankyong National University, Anseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The present study has been performed to select the osmotic tolerant lines using polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000)through an in vitro and in vivo mutagensis with a gamma-ray. During the screening, we selected three mutant lines that seemed to confer elevated osmotic tolerance in high concentrations of PEG 6000. Fruits of these mutants (Os-HK101, Os-HK102 and Os-HK103) were those of the wild type. Also the chlorophyll contents were few decreased more in the three mutant lines than the WT plants. Our results suggest that the Os-HK101 is characterized as osmotic stress tolerance considering the sugar concentration and lycopine content. It is expected that the result of this study can be used for breeding more competitive species with respect to contents in sugar or functional chemicals from the selected osmotic resistant lines.

  8. The osmotic second virial coefficient and the Gibbs-McMillan-Mayer framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, J.M.; Breil, Martin Peter

    2009-01-01

    . The independent variables of the solvents are temperature, pressure, and chemical potentials. The derivatives in the Gibbs-McMillan-Mayer framework are transformed into derivatives in the Gibbs framework. This offers the possibility for an interpretation and correlation of the osmotic second virial......The osmotic second virial coefficient is a key parameter in light scattering, protein crystallisation. self-interaction chromatography, and osmometry. The interpretation of the osmotic second virial coefficient depends on the set of independent variables. This commonly includes the independent...... is an independent variable. A Taylor expansion is applied to the osmotic pressure of a solution where one of the solutes is a small molecule, a salt for instance, that equilibrates between the two phases. Other solutes are retained. Solvents are small molecules that equilibrate between the two phases...

  9. Osmotic Pressure of Aqueous Chondroitin Sulfate Solution: A Molecular Modeling Investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Bathe, Mark; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; TIDOR, BRUCE

    2005-01-01

    The osmotic pressure of chondroitin sulfate (CS) solution in contact with an aqueous 1:1 salt reservoir of fixed ionic strength is studied using a recently developed coarse-grained molecular model. The effects of sulfation type (4- vs. 6-sulfation), sulfation pattern (statistical distribution of sulfate groups along a chain), ionic strength, CS intrinsic stiffness, and steric interactions on CS osmotic pressure are investigated. At physiological ionic strength (0.15 M NaCl), the sulfation typ...

  10. The Osmotic Coefficient of Rod-like Polyelectrolytes: Computer Simulation, Analytical Theory, and Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Deserno, M.; Holm, C; Blaul, J.; Ballauff, M.; Rehahn, M.

    2001-01-01

    The osmotic coefficient of solutions of rod-like polyelectrolytes is considered by comparing current theoretical treatments and simulations to recent experimental data. The discussion is restricted to the case of monovalent counterions and dilute, salt-free solutions. The classical Poisson-Boltzmann solution of the cell model correctly predicts a strong decrease in the osmotic coefficient, but upon closer look systematically overestimates its value. The contribution of ion-ion-correlations ar...

  11. Irreversible injury of isolated adult rat myocytes. Osmotic fragility during metabolic inhibition.

    OpenAIRE

    Ganote, C. E.; Vander Heide, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Isolated myocytes can be established as a valid model for studying changes in cytoskeletal proteins during the development of irreversible injury only if isolated cells develop lesions similar to those that occur during irreversible injury to intact hearts, specifically osmotic fragility and subsarcolemmal blebs. In the first experiment, isolated cells were irreversibly injured by metabolic inhibition with 5 mM Iodoacetic acid (IAA) and 6 mM amobarbital (Amy). Osmotic fragility of control and...

  12. Osmotic Stress Induces Oxidative Cell Damage to Rhesus Macaque Spermatozoa1

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Megan J.; Baumber, Julie; Kass, Philip H.; Meyers, Stuart A.

    2009-01-01

    Cryopreservation introduces extreme temperature and osmolality changes that impart lethal and sublethal effects on spermatozoa survival. Additionally, evidence indicates that the osmotic stress induced by cryopreservation causes oxidative stress to spermatozoa as well. Our objective was to determine the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm function and to determine whether osmotic stress elicits the production of ROS. In the first experiment, the xa...

  13. The Na/K pump, Cl ion, and osmotic stabilization of cells

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Clay M.

    2003-01-01

    An equation for membrane voltage is derived that takes into account the electrogenicity of the Na/K pump and is valid dynamically, as well as in the steady state. This equation is incorporated into a model for the osmotic stabilization of cells. The results emphasize the role of the pump and membrane voltage in lowering internal Cl− concentration, thus making osmotic room for vital substances that must be sequestered in the cell.

  14. Effect of process variables on the osmotic dehydration of star-fruit slices

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Dalben Madeira Campos; Ana Carla Kawazoe Sato; Renata Valeriano Tonon; Míriam Dupas Hubinger; Rosiane Lopes da Cunha

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of blanching and the influence of temperature, solution concentration, and the initial fruit:solution ratio on the osmotic dehydration of star-fruit slices. For blanching, different concentrations of citric and ascorbic acids were studied. The samples immersed in 0.75% citric acid presented little variation in color in relation to the fresh star-fruit. Osmotic dehydration was carried out in an incubator with orbital shaking, controlled temper...

  15. The osmotic stress response of split influenza vaccine particles in an acidic environment

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Hyo-Jick; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo; Montemagno, Carlo D.

    2013-01-01

    Oral influenza vaccine provides an efficient means of preventing seasonal and pandemic disease. In this work, the stability of envelope-type split influenza vaccine particles in acidic environments has been investigated. Owing to the fact that hyper-osmotic stress can significantly affect lipid assembly of vaccine, osmotic stress-induced morphological change of split vaccine particles, in conjunction with structural change of antigenic proteins, was investigated by the use of stopped-flow lig...

  16. Osmotic dehydration of red cabbage in sugar beet molasses: Mass transfer kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Filipčev Bojana V.; Lević Ljubinko B.; Koprivica Gordana B.; Mišljenović Nevena M.; Kuljanin Tatjana A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a study of osmotic dehydration of red cabbage in sugar beet molasses of different concentrations (40, 60 and 80%) at 50°C and under atmospheric pressure. The best results were obtained at the sugar beet molasses of 80% as an osmotic medium. The most important kinetic parameters of the process were determined: water loss, solid uptake, weight reduction, normalized solid content and normalized moisture content. The kinetic parameters were determined after 1, 3 and 5 hours. M...

  17. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLLED POROSITY OSMOTIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    OpenAIRE

    Hardik Patel* and M. M. Patel

    2012-01-01

    Controlled porosity osmotic tablet of metoprolol succinate prepared and evaluated in this study. Metoprolol succinate is very high soluble drug, so complete drug release obtained very fast. It is difficult to formulate osmotic tablet of Metoprolol succinate which gives drug release up to 24 hr at zero order. To get desired dissolution profile various formulation parameters like osmogen concentration, level of weight gain and level of pore former concentration were studied. Hypromellose was ad...

  18. Development and Optimization of Osmotically Controlled Asymmetric Membrane Capsules for Delivery of Solid Dispersion of Lycopene

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to develop and statistically optimize the osmotically controlled asymmetric membrane capsules of solid dispersion of lycopene. Solid dispersions of lycopene with β-cyclodextrin in different ratios were prepared using solvent evaporation method. Solubility studies showed that the solid dispersion with 1 : 5 (lycopene : β-cyclodextrin) exhibited optimum solubility (56.25 mg/mL) for osmotic controlled delivery. Asymmetric membrane capsules (AMCs) were prep...

  19. Active Osmotic Exchanger for Efficient Nanofiltration Inspired by the Kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Sophie; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the physical mechanisms underlying one of the most efficient filtration devices: the kidney. Building on a minimal model of the Henle loop—the central part of the kidney filtration—we investigate theoretically the detailed out-of-equilibrium fluxes in this separation process in order to obtain absolute theoretical bounds for its efficiency in terms of separation ability and energy consumption. We demonstrate that this separation process operates at a remarkably small energy cost as compared to traditional sieving processes while working at much smaller pressures. This unique energetic efficiency originates in the double-loop geometry of the nephron, which operates as an active osmotic exchanger. The principles for an artificial-kidney-inspired filtration device could be readily mimicked based on existing soft technologies to build compact and low-energy artificial dialytic devices. Such a "kidney on a chip" also points to new avenues for advanced water recycling, targeting, in particular, sea-water pretreatment for decontamination and hardness reduction.

  20. Rationalization of Sucrose Solution Using During the Fruit Osmotic Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Babić

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The model of sustainable energy production of dried fruit conducted by using combined technology – the model that has been developed at the Faculty of Agriculture in Novi Sad – includes osmotic dehydration of fruit in sucrose solution. During the process of dehydration the moisture content of the solution is increased due to mass transfer of moisture from fruit. This article examines different models of recycling and concentrating of the solution. Thus, the model for concentrating of the solution has been chosen according to this analysis, and it has been applied within its own technology. Evaporators of the low temperature solution have been used and they are based on the solar energy source. Two types of devices have been made on the basis of the heating process of evaporating. One type is filled with the stainless steel shavings, while the other type is based on the fillings by plates. The paper presents the evaluation model of the benefits of this concentrating manner as well as the evaluation criterion of the evaporators’ fillings types. The energy support used here was an original solar air heater of semi-concentrated type.

  1. Sandwich-structured hollow fiber membranes for osmotic power generation

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Feng Jiang

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a novel sandwich-structured hollow fiber membrane has been developed via a specially designed spinneret and optimized spinning conditions. With this specially designed spinneret, the outer layer, which is the most crucial part of the sandwich-structured membrane, is maintained the same as the traditional dual-layer membrane. The inner substrate layer is separated into two layers: (1) an ultra-thin middle layer comprising a high molecular weight polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) additive to enhance integration with the outer polybenzimidazole (PBI) selective layer, and (2) an inner-layer to provide strong mechanical strength for the membrane. Experimental results show that a high water permeability and good mechanical strength could be achieved without the expensive post treatment process to remove PVP which was necessary for the dual-layer pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) membranes. By optimizing the composition, the membrane shows a maximum power density of 6.23W/m2 at a hydraulic pressure of 22.0bar when 1M NaCl and 10mM NaCl are used as the draw and feed solutions, respectively. To our best knowledge, this is the best phase inversion hollow fiber membrane with an outer selective PBI layer for osmotic power generation. In addition, this is the first work that shows how to fabricate sandwich-structured hollow fiber membranes for various applications. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Miniature osmotic actuators for controlled maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Hsien; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2010-06-01

    We have successfully demonstrated miniature actuators that are capable of converting chemical potential directly into steady mechanical movements for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis. Pistons and diaphragms powered by osmosis are employed to provide the desired linear and volumetric displacements for bone distraction and potentially the release of bone morphogenetic proteins, respectively. The cylindrical-shaped miniature actuators are composed of polymeric materials and fabricated by molding and assembly processes. In the prototype demonstration, vapor-permeable thermoplastic polyurethane was employed as the semi-permeable material. 3 cm long actuators with piston and diaphragm radii of 1 mm and 500 µm, respectively, were fabricated and characterized. The maximum distraction force from the piston-type actuator is found to be 6 N while the piston travels at a constant velocity of 32 µm h-1 (or 0.77 mm/day) for about 1 week. Meanwhile, the release rate from the diaphragm-type actuator is measured to be constant, 0.15 µl h-1 (or 3.6 µl/day), throughout the experiment. Moreover, the sizes and output characteristics of the self-regulating actuators could readily be tailored to realize optimal distraction rate, rhythm and osteogenic activity. As such, the demonstrated miniature osmotic actuators could potentially serve as versatile apparatuses for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis and fulfill the needs of a variety of implantable and biomedical applications.

  3. Osmotically induced cytosolic free Ca(2+) changes in human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, M R; Doull, I J; Hallett, M B

    2001-02-01

    Cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration in neutrophils was measured by ratiometric fluorometry of intracellular fura2. Increasing the extracellular osmolarity, by either NaCl (300-600 mM) or sucrose (600-1200 mM), caused a rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) (Delta(max) approximately equal to 600 nM). This was not due to cell lysis as the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration was reversed by restoration of isotonicity and a second rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) could be provoked by repeating the change in extracellular osmolarity. Furthermore, the rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), demonstrating that release of intracellular fura2 into the external medium did not occur. The osmotically-induced rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) was not inhibited by either the phospholipase C-inhibitor U73122, or the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B, suggesting that neither signalling via inositol tris-phosphate or the cytoskeletal system were involved. However, the rise in cytosolic free Ca(2+) may have resulted from a reduction in neutrophil water volume in hyperosmotic conditions. As these rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) (Delta(max) approximately equal to 600 nM) were large enough to provoke changes in neutrophil activity, we propose that conditions which removes cell water may similarly elevate cytosolic free Ca(2+) to physiologically important levels. PMID:11341979

  4. The effects of osmotic stress on human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, W J; Parmar, N; Hunt, C J

    1985-05-01

    The effect of osmotic stress on human platelets was investigated at 0, 25, and 37 degrees C. The osmolality of the suspending plasma was decreased by adding water or increased by adding sodium chloride or sucrose. After 5 min, isotonicity was restored by dilution with an excess of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. After centrifugation, the platelets were resuspended in autologous plasma and then incubated for 1 hr at 37 degrees C before assaying the active transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and the hypotonic stress response. Anisosmotic conditions had a greater effect on the extent of volume reversal in the hypotonic stress test than on 5-HT uptake. At 25 degrees C, only moderate degrees of hypotonicity (0.25 osmol/kg) or hypertonicity (0.59 osmol/kg) were sufficient to depress the hypotonic stress response. In general, platelets tolerated departures from isotonic conditions better at 0 degree C than at the higher temperatures. Furthermore, at 0 and 25 degrees C approximately equiosmolal concentrations of sucrose and sodium chloride depressed the hypotonic stress response to similar extents, but at 37 degrees C high osmolalities (greater than 2 osmol/kg) were tolerated better when the additive was sucrose than when it was sodium chloride. Platelets shrank when subjected to hyperosmotic conditions, but their discoid shape and the peripheral band of microtubules were maintained. PMID:3980588

  5. Miniature osmotic actuators for controlled maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have successfully demonstrated miniature actuators that are capable of converting chemical potential directly into steady mechanical movements for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis. Pistons and diaphragms powered by osmosis are employed to provide the desired linear and volumetric displacements for bone distraction and potentially the release of bone morphogenetic proteins, respectively. The cylindrical-shaped miniature actuators are composed of polymeric materials and fabricated by molding and assembly processes. In the prototype demonstration, vapor-permeable thermoplastic polyurethane was employed as the semi-permeable material. 3 cm long actuators with piston and diaphragm radii of 1 mm and 500 µm, respectively, were fabricated and characterized. The maximum distraction force from the piston-type actuator is found to be 6 N while the piston travels at a constant velocity of 32 µm h−1 (or 0.77 mm/day) for about 1 week. Meanwhile, the release rate from the diaphragm-type actuator is measured to be constant, 0.15 µl h−1 (or 3.6 µl/day), throughout the experiment. Moreover, the sizes and output characteristics of the self-regulating actuators could readily be tailored to realize optimal distraction rate, rhythm and osteogenic activity. As such, the demonstrated miniature osmotic actuators could potentially serve as versatile apparatuses for maxillofacial distraction osteogenesis and fulfill the needs of a variety of implantable and biomedical applications.

  6. Pulsatile arginine vasopressin release from the rat hypothalamo neurohypophyseal system during osmotic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohno,Norihito

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Arginine vasopressin (AVP was released in vitro in a pulsatile pattern from the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system (HNS and from the hypothalamus during continuous hyperosmotic stimuli with NaCl or fructose. No significant difference was found in the AVP pulse frequency between the two kinds of hyperosmotic agents. AVP was released from the HNS in a dose-related manner under NaCl stimulation. When the neural lobe was stimulated with NaCl or fructose, a clear AVP pulse pattern was not apparent. Urea failed to evoke a significant AVP release from the neural lobe or HNS. A stepwise increase in NaCl stimulation from 5 to 25 mEq induced a AVP response from the HNS and hypothalamus similar to that under constant stimulation at 25 mEq NaCl. This phenomenon was also found with fructose or sucrose. These results suggest that AVP release from the HNS during continuous osmotic stimulation has a pulsatile pattern regardless of the hyperosmotic substance or osmotic pressure. This AVP release accurately reflects the physiological function of the hypothalamus without modulation in the neural lobe. These results also suggest that the total amount of AVP was related to the osmotic pressure or the osmotic substance but that the frequency of the pulse release was not, moreover, that the AVP release depends not only on the absolute osmotic pressure, but also on the changing rate of osmotic pressure.

  7. Effect on effective diffusion coefficients and investigation of shrinkage during osmotic dehydration of apricot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Togrul, Inci Turk; Ispir, Ayse [Firat University, Engineering Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    This article represents the results of the variation in density and shrinkage of apricots during its osmotic dehydration. Shrinkage was investigated by means of dimensionless volume, diameter and length. Various osmotic agents such as sucrose, glucose, fructose, maltodextrin and sorbitol were used. It was found that the shrinkage of apricots could be well correlated with the moisture content of the sample during osmotic dehydration. The relationship between dimensionless parameters and moisture content was investigated by using eight non-linear models for each osmotic agent. It was find that the following proposed model can be confidently use for explaining the effect of shrinkage during osmotic dehydration of apricots.V/V{sub 0},D/D{sub 0},L/L{sub 0},{rho}/{rho}{sub 0}=a+b. exp (cX)+d. exp (e.X{sup f})In addition, the osmotic dehydration kinetics of apricots with and without shrinkage was studied. The effective diffusivities calculated from the diffusional model with and without shrinkage varied from 10.342 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s to 5.139 x 10{sup -9} and from 1.755 x 10{sup -10} and 0.767 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. (author)

  8. EFFECT OF TABLET FORMULATION VARIABLES ON TRAMADOL HCL ELEMENTARY OSMOTIC PUMP TABLET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basani Gavaskar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic drug delivery system utilize osmotic pressure as a energy source and driving force for delivery of drugs, pH presence of food under physiological factors may affect drug release from conventional controlled release system (Matrices and reservoirs, where as drug release from osmotic system is independent of these factors to a large extent. The aim of the current study was to formulate elementary osmotic pump tablets of water soluble Tramadol HCl. Formulation were prepared based on wet granulation method, coated with cellulose acetate solution containing varying amount of Dibutylphthalate (DBP, and Polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG-400. Drug release from the osmotic drug delivery system was studied using USP Type I Paddle type apparatus. The excipients of physio-chemical property of the drug were determined by DSC (Differential scanning calorimetry. The optimized formulation was subjected to accelerated stability testing as per ICH guidelines. Optimization results indicated that to a certain extent drug release was less effected by the orifice size, concentration of coating solution and coating weight. DSC showed the excipients used in the formulation did not alter physicochemical properties of the drug. The results confirmed that the factors responsible for drug release were osmotic agents (core and orifice size membrane.

  9. Chemically modified konjac glucomannan with high colloid osmotic pressure: physiological evaluation in a rabbit model as a plasma substitute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Suping; Hu, Tao; Chen, Yali; Wang, Xianwei; Liu, Tao; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2010-08-01

    Carboxylmethylated konjac glucomannan (CKGM) is a carboxylmethylated polymer of mannose and glucose that is derived from the plant Amorphophallus konjac cultivated in East Asia. The CKGM solution had a high volume-expanding efficacy and was evaluated as a plasma substitute in the present study. Ameliorative hemorrhagic shock rabbits were used as the model animals. The in vivo hemodynamic and hemorheologic properties, including blood pressure, blood viscosity, hematocrit, erythrocyte deformation index and erythrocyte aggregation index, were measured in animals treated in the CKGM solution. The in vitro colloid osmotic pressure (COP) of the CKGM solution was measured to estimate its plasma-expanding efficacy. These parameters of the CKGM-treated group were compared with groups exposed to four other treatments: human serum albumin (HSA), hydroxyethyl starch (HES), polygeline and normal saline. The CKGM solution showed an exceptionally higher COP than other therapy solutions. For example, the COP of 1% (weight in volume [w/v]) CKGM solution is comparable to those of 6% (w/v) HES solution and 5% (w/v) HSA solution. Accordingly, the CKGM solution can be transfused in a much lower dosage while maintaining its plasma-expanding efficacy. The CKGM-treated group showed an improved intravascular persistence and good hemodynamic and hemorheological properties. Biopsy analysis suggested no organ dysfunction in the group treated in CKGM solution. Moreover, the high plasma-expanding efficacy and inexpensive availability of the CKGM solution may facilitate its clinical application as a potential plasma substitute. PMID:20466646

  10. Shock Detector for SURF model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menikoff, Ralph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-11

    SURF and its extension SURFplus are reactive burn models aimed at shock initiation and propagation of detonation waves in high explosives. A distinctive feature of these models is that the burn rate depends on the lead shock pressure. A key part of the models is an algorithm to detect the lead shock. Typically, shock capturing hydro algorithms have small oscillations behind a shock. Here we investigate how well the shock detection algorithm works for a nearly steady propagating detonation wave in one-dimension using the Eulerian xRage code.

  11. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  12. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  13. Diffusive Shock Acceleration in Unmodified Relativistic, Oblique Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Ellison, Donald C.; Double, Glen P.

    2004-01-01

    We present results from a fully relativistic Monte Carlo simulation of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in unmodified shocks. The computer code uses a single algorithmic sequence to smoothly span the range from nonrelativistic speeds to fully relativistic shocks of arbitrary obliquity, providing a powerful consistency check. While known results are obtained for nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic parallel shocks, new results are presented for the less explored trans- relativistic regime ...

  14. Vasopressin and septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Septic shock continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the Intensive Care Units. When the shock state persists after adequate fluid resuscitation,  vasopressor therapy is required to improve and maintain adequate tissue/organ  perfusion in an attempt to improve survival and prevent the development of multiple organ dysfunction and failure. Various studies have suggested that exogenous administration of arginine vasopressin  may  be  an  effective  adjunctive  therapy  to  traditio...

  15. Sixteen-Day Bedrest Significantly Increases Plasma Colloid Osmotic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Alan R.; Hsieh, S. T.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Convertino, V. A.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Upon exposure to microgravity, astronauts lose up to 10% of their total plasma volume, which may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after space flight. Because plasma colloid osmotic pressure (COP) is a primary factor maintaining plasma volume, our objective was to measure time course changes in COP during microgravity simulated by 6 deg. head-down tilt (HDT). Seven healthy male subjects (30-55 years of age) were placed in HDT for 16 days. For the purpose of another study, three of the seven subjects were chosen to exercise on a cycle ergometer on day 16. Blood samples were drawn immediately before bedrest on day 14 of bedrest, 18-24 hours following exercise while all subjects were still in HDT and 1 hour following bedrest termination. Plasma COP was measured in all 20 microliter EDTA-treated samples using an osmometer fitted with a PM 30 membrane. Data were analyzed with paired and unpaired t-tests. Plasma COP on day 14 of bedrest (29.9 +/- 0.69 mmHg) was significantly higher (p less than 0.005) than the control, pre-bedrest value (23.1 +/- 0.76 mmHg). At one hour of upright recovery after HDT, plasma COP remained significantly elevated (exercise: 26.9 +/- 0.87 mmHg; no exercise: 26.3 +/- 0.85 mmHg). Additionally, exercise had no significant effect on plasma COP 18-24 hours following exercise (exercise: 27.8 +/- 1.09 mmHg; no exercise: 27.1 +/- 0.78 mmHg). Our results demonstrate that plasma COP increases significantly with microgravity simulated by HDT. However, preliminary results indicate exercise during HDT does not significantly affect plasma COP.

  16. Applications of Electro-Osmotic Transport in the Processing of Textiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, J.F.; Krueger, R.; Hopper, R.; Cherepy, N.

    1999-11-29

    We report development of a pilot process for the industrial rinsing of fabrics. This process combines hydraulic (pressure-driven) transport with electro-osmotic transport. It reduces the total amount of water required in certain rinsing operations by a factor of about five. Cotton exhibits an electro-osmotic transport coefficient of about 6 x 10{sup -9} m{sup 2}/s-V resulting from a partial ionization of hydroxyl groups on the cellulose polymer substrate. This process applies a field transverse to the fabric to effect the movement of water in the spaces between the 10 {micro}m cotton fibers which constitute the yam. The field strength is adjusted so that the induced electro-osmotic flux is comparable to a pressure-driven flux, which moves preferentially in the more open channels between the yams. For a fixed current density, solution conductivity and electro-osmotic transport vary inversely. The process is most practical for removal of liquids of relatively low conductivity (<500 {micro}S/cm). For removal of solutions of conductivity greater than 1200 {micro}S/cm, the rate of electro-osmotic flow may be too low to benefit the rinsing process if current densities are restricted to practical levels of about 30 mA/cm{sup 2}. Electra-osmotic transport may have important applications in wet processing of extremely fine textiles, such as micro fiber fabrics. In addition to rinsing, electro-osmotic transport may also be used to speed the penetration of chemicals and dyestuffs that are applied to the surface of wet textiles.

  17. Shock waves data for minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Thomas J.; Johnson, Mary L.

    1994-01-01

    Shock compression of the materials of planetary interiors yields data which upon comparison with density-pressure and density-sound velocity profiles constrain internal composition and temperature. Other important applications of shock wave data and related properties are found in the impact mechanics of terrestrial planets and solid satellites. Shock wave equation of state, shock-induced dynamic yielding and phase transitions, and shock temperature are discussed. In regions where a substantial phase change in the material does not occur, the relationship between the particle velocity, U(sub p), and the shock velocity, U(sub s), is given by U(sub s) = C(sub 0) + S U(sub p), where C(sub 0) is the shock velocity at infinitesimally small particle velocity, or the ambient pressure bulk sound velocity. Numerical values for the shock wave equation of state for minerals and related materials of the solar system are provided.

  18. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the heart’s main pumping chamber, is causing shock. Medical Procedures and Surgery Sometimes medicines and medical devices aren't enough to treat cardiogenic shock. Medical procedures and surgery can restore blood flow to the ...

  19. [i]Legionella spp[/i]., amoebae and not-fermenting Gram negative bacteria in an Italian university hospital water system

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqualina Laganà; Gabriella Caruso; Davide Piccione; Maria Eufemia Gioffrè; Raffaella Pino; Santi Delia

    2014-01-01

    [b]Introduction. [/b]In hospital and other health care facilities, contamination of water systems by potentially infectious microorganisms, such as bacteria, viruses and protozoa, is a source of nosocomial infections, which may originate fromcolonization of water pipes, cooling towers, spa pools, taps, showers and water supplies. [b]Objective. [/b]The study focuses on the occurrence of [i]Legionella spp.[/i], free-living amoebae and non-fermenting Gram-negative microorganisms in a Unive...

  20. PCR Detection and Analysis of the Free-Living Amoeba Naegleria in Hot Springs in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks

    OpenAIRE

    Sheehan, Kathy B.; Fagg, Jennifer A.; Ferris, Michael J.; Henson, Joan M.

    2003-01-01

    Free-living thermotolerant amoebae pose a significant health risk to people who soak and swim in habitats suitable for their growth, such as hot springs. In this survey of 23 different hot springs in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, we used PCR with primer sets specific for Naegleria to detect three sequence types that represent species not previously described, as well as a fourth sequence type identified as the pathogen Naegleria fowleri.

  1. Wheat can acclimate to seawater by pretreatment with kinetin and spermine through osmotic adjustment and solutes allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Heshmat S. Aldesuquy; Baka, Zakaria A; Berdees M. Mickky

    2013-01-01

    A key issue in salt adaptation is the osmotic adjustment, therefore, during ear emergence the effect of exogenous application of kinetin and spermine on osmotic pressure (OP) and solutes allocation (total soluble sugars, total soluble nitrogen, proline, organic acids and inorganic ions (Na +, K +, Ca 2+, Mg 2+ and Cl -) were quantified in flag leaf of wheat plants irrigated by seawater at 25%. Seawater salinity induced significant increase in osmotic pressure. Furthermore, seawater stress ind...

  2. INTERFERENCE OF UNIDIRECTIONAL SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider interference of unidirectional shock waves or, as they are called, catching up shock waves. The scope of work is to give a classification of the shock-wave structures that arise in this type of interaction of shock waves, and the area of their existence. Intersection of unidirectional shock waves results in arising of a shock-wave structure at the intersection point, which contains the main shock wave, tangential discontinuity and one more reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity of unknown beforehand type. The problem of determining the type of reflected discontinuity is the main problem that one has to solve in the study of catching shock waves interference. Main results.The paper presents the pictures of shock-wave structures arising at the interaction of catching up shock waves. The areas with a regular and irregular unidirectional interaction of shocks are described. Characteristic shock-wave structures are of greatest interest, where reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity degenerates into discontinuous characteristics. Such structures have a number of extreme properties. We have found the areas of existence for such shock-wave structures. There are also areas in which the steady-state solution is not available. The latter has determined revival of interest for the theoretical study of the problem, because the facts of sudden shock-wave structure destruction inside the air intake of supersonic aircrafts at high Mach numbers have been discovered. Practical significance.The theory of interference for unidirectional shock waves and design procedure are usable in the design of supersonic air intakes. It is also relevant for application possibility investigation of catching up oblique shock waves to create overcompressed detonation in perspective detonation air-jet and rocket engines.

  3. Instability in Shocked Granular Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmas, Nick; Falle, Sam; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structur...

  4. Teleconnected food supply shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bren d’Amour, Christopher; Wenz, Leonie; Kalkuhl, Matthias; Steckel, Jan Christoph; Creutzig, Felix

    2016-03-01

    The 2008–2010 food crisis might have been a harbinger of fundamental climate-induced food crises with geopolitical implications. Heat-wave-induced yield losses in Russia and resulting export restrictions led to increases in market prices for wheat across the Middle East, likely contributing to the Arab Spring. With ongoing climate change, temperatures and temperature variability will rise, leading to higher uncertainty in yields for major nutritional crops. Here we investigate which countries are most vulnerable to teleconnected supply-shocks, i.e. where diets strongly rely on the import of wheat, maize, or rice, and where a large share of the population is living in poverty. We find that the Middle East is most sensitive to teleconnected supply shocks in wheat, Central America to supply shocks in maize, and Western Africa to supply shocks in rice. Weighing with poverty levels, Sub-Saharan Africa is most affected. Altogether, a simultaneous 10% reduction in exports of wheat, rice, and maize would reduce caloric intake of 55 million people living in poverty by about 5%. Export bans in major producing regions would put up to 200 million people below the poverty line at risk, 90% of which live in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our results suggest that a region-specific combination of national increases in agricultural productivity and diversification of trade partners and diets can effectively decrease future food security risks.

  5. Changes in Structure and Functioning of Protist (Testate Amoebae) Communities Due to Conversion of Lowland Rainforest into Rubber and Oil Palm Plantations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krashevska, Valentyna; Klarner, Bernhard; Widyastuti, Rahayu; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Large areas of tropical rainforest are being converted to agricultural and plantation land uses, but little is known of biodiversity and ecological functioning under these replacement land uses. We investigated the effects of conversion of rainforest into jungle rubber, intensive rubber and oil palm plantations on testate amoebae, diverse and functionally important protists in litter and soil. Living testate amoebae species richness, density and biomass were all lower in replacement land uses than in rainforest, with the impact being more pronounced in litter than in soil. Similar abundances of species of high and low trophic level in rainforest suggest that trophic interactions are more balanced, with a high number of functionally redundant species, than in rubber and oil palm. In contrast, plantations had a low density of high trophic level species indicating losses of functions. This was particularly so in oil palm plantations. In addition, the relative density of species with siliceous shells was >50% lower in the litter layer of oil palm and rubber compared to rainforest and jungle rubber. This difference suggests that rainforest conversion changes biogenic silicon pools and increases silicon losses. Overall, the lower species richness, density and biomass in plantations than in rainforest, and the changes in the functional composition of the testate amoebae community, indicate detrimental effects of rainforest conversion on the structure and functioning of microbial food webs. PMID:27463805

  6. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  7. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  8. Shock Waves in Gas Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Abdolrahman Razani

    2007-01-01

    Shock wave theory was studied in literature by many authors. This article presents a survey with references about various topics related to shock waves: Hyperbolic conservation laws, Well-posedness theory, Compactness theory, Shock and reaction-diffusion wave, The CJ and ZND theory, Existence of detonation in Majda's model, Premixed laminar flame, Multidimensional gas flows, Multidimensional Riemann problem.

  9. Vasopressin and septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mousavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Septic shock continues to be one of the leading causes of death in the Intensive Care Units. When the shock state persists after adequate fluid resuscitation,  vasopressor therapy is required to improve and maintain adequate tissue/organ  perfusion in an attempt to improve survival and prevent the development of multiple organ dysfunction and failure. Various studies have suggested that exogenous administration of arginine vasopressin  may  be  an  effective  adjunctive  therapy  to  traditional  catecholamines for the management of hypotension during septic shock. Vasopressin is both a vasopressor  and  an  antidiuretic  hormone.  It  also  has  hemostatic,  gastrointestinal and thermoregulatory  effects, and is an adrenocorticotropic  hormone secretagogue. Vasopressin  is released from the axonal terminals of magnocellular  neurons in the hypothalamus. Vasopressin mediates vasoconstriction  via V1-receptor activation on vascular smooth muscle and mediates its antidiuretic effect via V2-receptor activation in the renal collecting duct system. Vasopressin  infusion of 0.01 to 0.04 U/min in patients with septic shock increases plasma vasopressin levels. Current guidelines from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign recommend arginine vasopressin 0.03 unit/minute may be added to norepinephrine with the anticipation of an effect equal to higher doses of norepinephrine alone. Clinicians must be knowledgeable about the use of vasopressin in septic shock, including controversial areas where guidelines do not always provide solid recommendations.

  10. In situ local shock speed and transit shock speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watari

    Full Text Available A useful index for estimating the transit speeds was derived by analyzing interplanetary shock observations. This index is the ratio of the in situ local shock speed and the transit speed; it is 0.6–0.9 for most observed shocks. The local shock speed and the transit speed calculated for the results of the magnetohydrodynamic simulation show good agreement with the observations. The relation expressed by the index is well explained by a simplified propagation model assuming a blast wave. For several shocks the ratio is approximately 1.2, implying that these shocks accelerated during propagation in slow-speed solar wind. This ratio is similar to that for the background solar wind acceleration.

    Keywords. Interplanetary physics (Flare and stream dynamics; Interplanetary shocks; Solar wind plasma

  11. Interaction of prechilling, temperature, osmotic stress, and light in Picea abies seed germination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-factor experimental approach and proportional odds model was used to study interactions between five environmental factors significant to Norway spruce seed germination: prechilling (at +4.5 °C), suboptimal temperatures (+12 and +16 °C), osmotically induced water stress (–0.3 Mpa and 0 Mpa), prolonged white light, and short-period far-red light. Temperature and osmotic stress interacted with one another in the germination of seeds: the effect of osmotic stress being stronger at +16 °C than at +12 °C. In natural conditions, this interaction may prevent germination early in the summer when soil dries and temperature increases. Prolonged white light prevented germination at low temperature and low osmotic potential. Inhibitory effect was less at higher temperatures and higher osmotic potential, as well as after prechilling. Short-period far-red light did not prevent germination of unchilled seeds in darkness. Prechilling tended to make seeds sensitive to short pulses of far-red light, an effect which depended on temperature: at +12 °C the effect on germination was promotive, but at +16 °C, inhibitory and partly reversible by white light. It seems that Norway spruce seeds may have adapted to germinate in canopy shade light rich in far-red. The seeds may also have evolved mechanisms to inhibit germination in prolonged light

  12. Early selection of kabuli chickpea genotypes (Cicer arietinum L. tolerant to osmotic water stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Ben Mbarek

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Eight " kabuli " chickpea genotypes Beja1, Amdoun1, Nayer, Kasseb, Bochra, FLP96-114C, FLP88-42C and Chetoui were germinated, in two in vitro culture media, particularly, agar and filter paper Watman n°2 and under tree osmotic water pressures (OWP: -0,33; -4 and -8 bars induced by PEG8000. On filter paper, germination appeared more accelerated with a higher rate compared to the agar media. Osmotic water stress has negatively affected the seeds germination and the seedlings vegetative development parameters. Osmotic water pressure - 8 bars completely inhibited seeds germination on filter paper media. On the other hand, on agar media, it caused a feeble germination rate and a stunting of the seedlings. A broad genotypic variability of the chickpea cultivars was revealed toward the osmotic water stress. Tolerance index to osmotic water stress revealed three groups of cultivars: (1 Nayer and Kasseb are tolerant, (2 Bochra, FLIP88-42C and Chetoui are fairly tolerant and (3 Amdoun1, Beja1 and FLIP96-114C are sensitive to this abiotic stress.

  13. Early osmotic adjustment responses in drought-resistant and drought-sensitive oilseed rape

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah Hatzig; L Irina Zaharia; Suzanne Abrams; Marie Hohmann; Laurie Legoahec; Alain Bouchereau; Nathalie Nesi; Rod J.Snowdon

    2014-01-01

    The impact of osmotic stress on growth, physiolo-gy, and metabolism of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) was investigated by detailed analysis of biomass traits, hormone metabolites and osmolytes in two genetical y unrelated drought-tolerant genotypes and two unrelated drought-sensitive genotypes. Seedlings were grown in vitro under control ed conditions and osmotic stress was simulated by applying a gradual treatment with polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000), fol owed by hypo-osmotic treatment of variants used for metabolite determination. The results provide a basis for the identification of reliable selection criteria for drought resistance in oilseed rape. The in vitro cultivation system established during this study enabled effective discrimination of early osmotic stress responses between drought-resistant and-susceptible oilseed rape genotypes that also show large differences in relative seed yield under drought conditions in the field. Clear physiological and metabolic differences were observed between the drought-resistant and drought-sensitive genotypes, suggesting that osmotic adjustment is a key component of drought response in oilseed rape. Unexpected-ly, however, the drought-resistant genotypes did not show typical hormonal adjustment and osmolyte accumulation, suggesting that they possess alternative physiological mech-anisms enabling avoidance of stress symptoms.

  14. Physicochemical characteristics of guava “Paluma” submitted to osmotic dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roselene Ferreira Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the conservation post process osmotic of guava stored temperature at 5oC. Guava (Psidium guajava L., red variety “Paluma” minimally processed by mild osmotic dehydration, were packaged in polyethylene terephthalate (PET and stored temperature at 5ºC. Non-treated guava, packed in PET trays, was used as control. The treatment used was osmotic dehydration in sucrose syrup at 60ºBrix and physicochemical determinations were pH, total soluble solids (TSS, total titratable acidity (TTA, reducing sugars (RS, total sugars (TS and parameters related to colour read (a*, chroma (c*, yellow (b*, luminosity (L* of the fresh and osmotically dehydrated guava slices. The dehydrated fruits lost about 34.45% of water, concentrating contents of soluble solids, total and reducing sugars, when compared to control samples. The pH value remained around 3.76 for the OD fruits and 3.87 for the fresh fruits. The colour of the dehydrated fruits was more intense than the control samples’. The guava slices osmotic dehydration had 21 days of shelf life, showed physicochemical characteristics significantly superior to the control samples’, having a stable and high quality product as a result.

  15. Changes of DHN1 expression and subcellular distribution in A. delicisoa cells under osmotic stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU; Quansheng; (邱全胜); WANG; Zezhou(王泽宙); CAI; Qigui(蔡起贵); JIANG; Rongxi(姜荣锡)

    2002-01-01

    The changes of DHN1 expression and subcellular distribution in A. delicisoa cells under osmotic stress were studied by using GFP as a reporter molecule. Through creating the Xba I and BamH I restriction sites at the ends of dhn1 by PCR, the expression vector for the fusion protein DHN1-mGFP4 was constructed by cloning dhn1 into plasmid pBIN-35SmGFP4. Then the DHN1-mGFP4 expression vector was transformed into A. delicisoa suspension cells by microprojectile bombardment method. Bright green fluorescence of GFP which shows the high-level expression of DHN1-mGFP4 was visualized after culture for 10 h. However, the green fluorescence was only located within the nucleus. By increasing the culture medium osmotic potential, the green fluorescence was visualized in the cytoplasm (mainly around the plasma membranes). The generation of GFP fluorescence in the cytoplasm was also promoted by increasing the medium osmotic potential. Moreover, GFP green fluorescence was abolished by protein synthesis inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimid, indicating that the cytoplasmic DHN1 was newly synthesized under osmotic stress. Furthermore, ABA promoted the presence of green fluorescence in the cytoplasm, and the GFP fluorescence was visualized within a shorter time under a higher osmotic potential.

  16. Osmotic stress at the barley root affects expression of circadian clock genes in the shoot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habte, Ermias; Müller, Lukas M; Shtaya, Munqez; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2014-06-01

    The circadian clock is an important timing system that controls physiological responses to abiotic stresses in plants. However, there is little information on the effects of the clock on stress adaptation in important crops, like barley. In addition, we do not know how osmotic stress perceived at the roots affect the shoot circadian clock. Barley genotypes, carrying natural variation at the photoperiod response and clock genes Ppd-H1 and HvELF3, were grown under control and osmotic stress conditions to record changes in the diurnal expression of clock and stress-response genes and in physiological traits. Variation at HvELF3 affected the expression phase and shape of clock and stress-response genes, while variation at Ppd-H1 only affected the expression levels of stress genes. Osmotic stress up-regulated expression of clock and stress-response genes and advanced their expression peaks. Clock genes controlled the expression of stress-response genes, but had minor effects on gas exchange and leaf transpiration. This study demonstrated that osmotic stress at the barley root altered clock gene expression in the shoot and acted as a spatial input signal into the clock. Unlike in Arabidopsis, barley primary assimilation was less controlled by the clock and more responsive to environmental perturbations, such as osmotic stress. PMID:24895755

  17. Osmotic coefficients and apparent molar volumes of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ionic liquid in alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Physical and osmotic properties of [HMim][TfO] in alcohols are reported. • Apparent molar properties and osmotic coefficients were obtained. • Apparent molar volumes were fitted using a Redlich–Meyer type equation. • The osmotic coefficients were modeled with the Extended Pitzer and the MNRTL models. -- Abstract: In this work, density for the binary mixtures of 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate in alcohols (1-propanol, or 2-propanol, or 1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or 1-pentanol) was measured at T = 323.15 K and atmospheric pressure. From this property, the corresponding apparent molar volumes were calculated and fitted to a Redlich–Meyer type equation. For these mixtures, the osmotic and activity coefficients, and vapor pressures of these binary systems were also determined at the same temperature using the vapor pressure osmometry technique. The experimental osmotic coefficients were modeled by the Extended Pitzer model of Archer. The parameters obtained in this correlation were used to calculate the mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied mixtures

  18. Osmotic and apparent molar properties of binary mixtures alcohol + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Osmotic and physical properties of binary mixtures {alcohol + [BMim][TfO]} were measured. ► From experimental data, apparent molar properties and osmotic coefficients were calculated. ► The apparent properties were fitted using a Redlich–Meyer type equation. ► The osmotic coefficients were correlated using the Extended Pitzer model. -- Abstract: In this work, physical properties (densities and speeds of sound) for the binary systems {1-propanol, or 2-propanol, or 1-butanol, or 2-butanol, or 1-pentanol + 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate} were experimentally measured from T = (293.15 to 323.15) K and at atmospheric pressure. These data were used to calculate the apparent molar volume and apparent molar isentropic compression which were fitted to a Redlich–Meyer type equation. This fit was used to obtain the corresponding apparent molar properties at infinite dilution. On the other hand, the osmotic and activity coefficients and vapor pressures of these binary mixtures were also determined at T = 323.15 K using the vapor pressure osmometry technique. The Extended Pitzer model of Archer was employed to correlate the experimental osmotic coefficients. From the parameters obtained in the correlation, the mean molal activity coefficients and the excess Gibbs free energy for the studied mixtures were calculated

  19. Development and Optimization of Elementary osmotic pump tablet of Nicardipine Hydrochloride using central composite experimental Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Teja

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Elementary Osmotic Pumps (EOP consists of osmotic core (coated with a semipermeable membrane (SPM and a small orifice is created in the membrane. The objective of the present study was to develop an optimized EOP tablets containing inclusion complex of Nicardipine Hydrochloride (NH using central composite design. Amount of osmotic agent (X1 and size of delivery orifice (X2 were selected as independent variables. Formulations were prepared by direct compression method and evaluated for % Cumulative Drug Release (% CDR at 540min. as dependent variables. Amount of osmotic agent and size of delivery orifice had a significant effect on % CDR. The results of multiple linear regression analysis revealed that EOP tablets should be prepared using an optimum concentration of osmotic agent and size of delivery orifice to achieve a zero order drug release. Contour plots as well as response surface plots were constructed to show the effects of X1 and X2 on % CDR. A model was validated for accurate prediction of % CDR by performing checkpoint analysis. The computer optimization process, contour plots and response surface plots predicted at the concentration of independent variables X1 and X2 (50mg and 0.8mm respectively, for maximized response. The drug release from the developed formulation was found independent of pH and agitational intensity. The above optimized batch was also evaluated by different pharmacokinetic models. Stability study of optimized batch was conducted at accelerated conditions for six month and it was found to be stable.

  20. Osmotic damage as a predictor of motility loss during convective desiccation of bovine sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitaula, Ranjan; Jimenez, Jorge; Bhowmick, Sankha

    2013-12-01

    Current state-of-the art technologies are lagging in the application of desiccation storage to mammalian cells using nonreducing sugars. For bovine sperm, motility is irreversibly lost before reaching a sufficiently low moisture content necessary for preservation. It is hypothesized that much of the damage during drying is related to the osmotic stress encountered due to increased osmolarity of the extracellular environment. To test this hypothesis, we subjected sperm to liquid hyperosmotic environments for varying time-periods and measured their motility. We then extracted parameters for two models for motility loss based on these experiments: a first-order rate injury model (Fast or Slow) and a multi-modal (MM) injury model. The MM injury model incorporated an additional function accounting for damage induced by a time-independent osmotic change. Based on these models, we predicted sperm motility loss measured from natural and forced convective desiccation experiments. The MM injury model was able to closely bracket motility loss for desiccation as an osmotic change event with time-independent and time-dependent components. While the mechanistic basis of osmotic damage requires further exploration, the model can serve as a bracketing tool for predicting motility loss during desiccation based on excipients designed to minimize osmotic damage. PMID:24835367

  1. Flow cytometric determination of osmotic behaviour of animal erythrocytes toward their engineering for drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Ivana T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the methods based on the osmotic properties of the cells are the most widely used for loading of drugs in human and animal erythrocytes, data related to the osmotic properties of erythrocytes derived from animal blood are scarce. This work was performed with an aim to investigate the possibility of use the flow cytometry as a tool for determination the osmotic behaviour of porcine and bovine erythrocytes, and thus facilitate the engineering of erythrocytes from animal blood to be drug carriers. The method of flow cytometry successfully provided the information about bovine and porcine erythrocyte osmotic fragility, and made the initial steps in assessment of erythrocyte shape in a large number of erythrocytes. Although this method is not able to confirm the swelling of pig erythrocytes, it indicated to the differences in pig erythrocytes that had basic hematological parameters inside and outside the reference values. In order to apply/use the porcine and bovine erythrocytes as drug carriers, the method of flow cytometry, confirming the presence of osmotically different fractions of red blood cells, indicated that various amounts of the encapsulated drug in porcine and bovine erythrocytes can be expected.

  2. Isolamento de amebas de vida livre potencialmente patogênicas em poeira de hospitais Isolation of potencially pathogenic free-living amoebas in hospital dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida da Silva

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Observar a ocorrência de amebas de vida livre dos gêneros Acanthamoeba e Naegleria em amostras de poeira coletadas em hospitais. MÉTODOS: Foram coletadas 132 amostras de poeira em dois hospitais do município de Presidente Prudente, São Paulo. Os locais da coleta foram: Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Centro Cirúrgico, Isolamento de Moléstias Infecciosas, Berçário, Emergência e Cozinha. As amostras foram semeadas em três meios de cultura: meio de ágar não nutriente com Escherichia coli, meio de ágar infusão de soja e microcultivo em meio de Pavlova modificado por Giazzi. As amebas isoladas foram identificadas segundo critérios morfológicos. RESULTADOS: O índice geral de positividade para amebas de vida livre, potencialmente patogênicas, dos gêneros Acanthamoeba e Naegleria, foi de 45,5%, sendo positivas 41,6% das amostras de poeira coletadas no hospital universitário e 50% no hospital estadual. Obtiveram-se 45,5% de positividade do gênero Acanthamoeba e 3,8% para amebas do gênero Naegleria. CONCLUSÕES: As amebas de vida livre, potencialmente patogênicas, estavam presentes em todos os ambientes estudados dos dois hospitais, sendo que as espécies do gênero Acanthamoeba foram as isoladas com maior freqüência.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the occurrence of free-living amoebas of the genera Acanthamoeba and Naegleria is dust samples colleted in two hospitals. METHODS: One-hundred and thirty-two dust samples were collected in two hospitals in Brazil. Hospital collection sites were the following: intensive care unit, operation rooms, nursery, kitchen, emergency and infectious diseases isolation room . The isolation of the amoebas was performed in three culture media: non-nutrient agar inoculated with Escherichia coli, soy agar, and microculture in Giazzi-modified Pavlova's medium. The amoebas were identified according to morphological criteria. RESULTS: Amoebas of the genera Acanthamoeba and Naegleria were found in 45.5% of

  3. Kinetic effects in relativistic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and generation of shocks is a topic of wide interest in many fields of physics, but the role of the kinetics effects and the properties of the particle distribution function across the shock front have not been explored in detail. Using particle-in-cell simulations to study electron-positron collisionless shocks we explore the features of the particle distribution in the upstream, downstream, and shock transition region, and the deviations to a Maxwellian distribution. The theoretical model developed to account for these effects shows that a strong tail can change the shock properties (shock velocity, jump conditions) significantly. However, in the standard case, the decrease of the upstream bulk speed has a bigger impact. These effects are illustrated with particle-in-cell simulations. The relevance of these results for astrophysical shocks is also discussed. (author)

  4. Kinetic effects in relativistic shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and generation of shocks is a topic of wide interest in many fields of physics, but the role of the kinetic effects and the properties of the particle distribution function across the shock front have not been explored in detail, Using particle-in-cell simulations to study electron-positron collisionless shocks we explore the features of the particle distribution in the upstream, downstream, and shock transition region, and the deviations to a Maxwellian distribution. The theoretical model developed to account for these effects shows that a strong tail can change the shock properties (shock velocity, jump conditions) significantly. However, in the standard case, the decrease of the upstream bulk speed has a bigger impact. These effects are illustrated with particle-in-cell simulations. The relevance of these results for astrophysical shocks is also discussed. (author)

  5. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  6. Temperature and pressure dependent osmotic pressure in liquid sodium-cesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of the osmotic pressure in terms of the concentration fluctuations of mixtures and the equations of state of the pure liquids is considered. The temperature and pressure dependent experimentally measured concentration-concentration correlations in the long wavelength limit of liquid sodium-cesium alloys are used to demonstrate the appreciable dependence of the temperature and pressure on the osmotic pressure as a function of concentration. Introducing interchange energies as functions of temperature and pressure, our analysis is consistent with the Flory model. Thus, a formalism for evaluating the state dependent osmotic pressure is developed and our numerical work is considered to be an extension of the calculations of Rashid and March in the sense that a temperature and pressure dependent interchange energy parameter that more closely parameterizes the state dependent concentration fluctuations in the liquid alloys, is used. (author)

  7. Development and Evaluation of Extended Release Formulation of Tramadol Hydrochloride Based on Osmotic Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel JB

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Extended release formulation of Tramadol Hydrochloride based on osmotic technology was developedand evaluated. Target release profile was selected and different variables were optimized to achieve it.Formulation variables such as osmotic agent, plasticizer and coating thickness of semi-permeablemembrane were found to markedly affect drug release. Tramadol hydrochloride release was directlyproportional to the level of osmogent and plasticizer but inversely proportional to the level of coatingthickness of semi-permeable membrane. Drug release from developed formulation was independent ofpH and agitation intensity but dependent on osmotic pressure of release media. The optimizedformulation was compared with marketed product CONTRAMAL SR and accelerated stability studywas also carried out for 6 months.

  8. Recommendation to use iso-osmotic contrast medium in interventional treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the rapid development of imaging diagnostic and interventional therapeutic techniques, the contrast medium (CM) has been used more and more common in clinical practice, and meanwhile more and more attention has been paid to the CM-related adverse events. Contrast induced nephropathy (CN) is the most common CM-related adverse event, and CM-related neurotoxicity has already attracted the physicians' attention. The osmotic pressure of the iso-osmotic contrast medium (IOCM) is quite the same as that of the plasma, and therefore its safety is higher than that of low-osmotic contrast medium (LOCM), the patient's tolerance to IOCM is better than that to LOCM. For this reason, the use of IOCM should be strongly recommended in interventional procedures, which is of great significance to the reduction of the occurrence of CM-related adverse events. (authors)

  9. ′Wine Glass′ sign in recurrent postpartum hypernatremic osmotic cerebral demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aralikatte O Saroja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic demyelination syndrome resulting from postpartum hypernatremia is a recently described entity wherein young women present with hypernatremic encephalopathy and white matter hyperintensities along with quadriparesis from rhabdomyolysis. It is an acute monophasic condition with acute hypernatremia occurring during puerperium with good recovery in majority of the patients with treatment. To the best of our knowledge, recurrent postpartum hypernatremia with encephalopathy, osmotic demyelination, and rhabdomyolysis has not been described. We present a young lady who had two episodes of reversible postpartum hypernatremic encephalopathy with rhabdomyolysis. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI before treatment revealed osmotic demyelination on both occasions. During first admission MRI revealed hyperintensities in internal capsule and corpus callosum, and at second admission revealed more extensive white matter hyperintensity, which simulated the ′wine glass′ appearance.

  10. Impact of oxidative and osmotic stresses on Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Padmapriya, Kumar; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    Candida albicans possesses an ability to grow under different host-driven stress conditions by developing robust protective mechanisms. In this investigation the focus was on the impact of osmotic (2M NaCl) and oxidative (5 mM H2O2) stress conditions during C. albicans biofilm formation. Oxidative stress enhanced extracellular DNA secretion into the biofilm matrix, increased the chitin level, and reduced virulence factors, namely phospholipase and proteinase activity, while osmotic stress mainly increased extracellular proteinase and decreased phospholipase activity. Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of mannan isolated from the C. albicans biofilm cell wall revealed a decrease in mannan content and reduced β-linked mannose moieties under stress conditions. The results demonstrate that C. albicans adapts to oxidative and osmotic stress conditions by inducing biofilm formation with a rich exopolymeric matrix, modulating virulence factors as well as the cell wall composition for its survival in different host niches. PMID:27472386

  11. Role of shock-timing in two-shock platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasheninnikova, Natalia; Bradley, Paul; Olson, Rick; Kyrala, George; Peterson, Bob; Devolder, Barbara; Shah, Rahul

    2015-11-01

    In present work we discuss the role of shock-timing and location of shock coalescence in newly developed two-shock platform on NIF. It is generally believed that single-shell capsules perform better when the shocks coalesce in the gas due to lower shell entropy, larger convergence ratio, better hot-spot assembly, and mix. Using HYDRA and RAGE with BHR we investigated this hypothesis for the case of separated reactants capsule and found when shocks coalesced in the gas yield improved by ~ 50% while acceptance energy only increased by ~ 3%. This suggests that improving shock timing can increase the neutron yield without a significant increase in the drive. The picture of how the mix changes with variation in shock timing is not as crisp as the overall performance. In particular, according RAGE with BHR, the mix mass can be higher or lower depending on the strength of the first shock, even when the location of coalescence is the same. However, DT yield, which is a measure of mix, noticeably increases when the shock coalesce in the gas due to prevalence of higher temperatures in the mixed region. So perhaps the mix mass is more sensitive to the strength of the shocks rather than the location of their coalescence.

  12. Environmental factors shaping cultured free-living amoebae and their associated bacterial community within drinking water network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafont, Vincent; Bouchon, Didier; Héchard, Yann; Moulin, Laurent

    2016-09-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) constitute an important part of eukaryotic populations colonising drinking water networks. However, little is known about the factors influencing their ecology in such environments. Because of their status as reservoir of potentially pathogenic bacteria, understanding environmental factors impacting FLA populations and their associated bacterial community is crucial. Through sampling of a large drinking water network, the diversity of cultivable FLA and their bacterial community were investigated by an amplicon sequencing approach, and their correlation with physicochemical parameters was studied. While FLA ubiquitously colonised the water network all year long, significant changes in population composition were observed. These changes were partially explained by several environmental parameters, namely water origin, temperature, pH and chlorine concentration. The characterisation of FLA associated bacterial community reflected a diverse but rather stable consortium composed of nearly 1400 OTUs. The definition of a core community highlighted the predominance of only few genera, majorly dominated by Pseudomonas and Stenotrophomonas. Co-occurrence analysis also showed significant patterns of FLA-bacteria association, and allowed uncovering potentially new FLA - bacteria interactions. From our knowledge, this study is the first that combines a large sampling scheme with high-throughput identification of FLA together with associated bacteria, along with their influencing environmental parameters. Our results demonstrate the importance of physicochemical parameters in the ecology of FLA and their bacterial community in water networks. PMID:27219048

  13. Response of forest soil euglyphid testate amoebae (Rhizaria: Cercozoa) to pig cadavers assessed by high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppey, Christophe V W; Fournier, Bertrand; Szelecz, Ildikò; Singer, David; Mitchell, Edward A D; Lara, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    Decomposing cadavers modify the soil environment, but the effect on soil organisms and especially on soil protists is still poorly documented. We conducted a 35-month experiment in a deciduous forest where soil samples were taken under pig cadavers, control plots and fake pigs (bags of similar volume as the pigs). We extracted total soil DNA, amplified the SSU ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene V9 region and sequenced it by Illumina technology and analysed the data for euglyphid testate amoebae (Rhizaria: Euglyphida), a common group of protozoa known to respond to micro-environmental changes. We found 51 euglyphid operational taxonomic units (OTUs), 45 of which did not match any known sequence. Most OTUs decreased in abundance underneath cadavers between days 0 and 309, but some responded positively after a time lag. We sequenced the full-length SSU rRNA gene of two common OTUs that responded positively to cadavers; a phylogenetic analysis showed that they did not belong to any known euglyphid family. This study confirmed the existence of an unknown diversity of euglyphids and that they react to cadavers. Results suggest that metabarcoding of soil euglyphids could be used as a forensic tool to estimate the post-mortem interval (PMI) particularly for long-term (>2 months) PMI, for which no reliable tool exists. PMID:25874666

  14. A weak pulsed magnetic field affects adenine nucleotide oscillations, and related parameters in aggregating Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, E; Olliff, C; Wright, I; Woodward, A; Kell, D

    1999-02-01

    A model eukaryotic cell system was used to explore the effect of a weak pulsed magnetic field (PMF) on time-varying physiological parameters. Dictyostelium discoideum cells (V12 strain) were exposed to a pulsed magnetic field (PMF) of flux density 0.4 mT, generated via air-cored coils in trains of 2 ms pulses gated at 20 ms. This signal is similar to those used to treat non-uniting fractures. Samples were taken over periods of 20 min from harvested suspensions of amoebae during early aggregation phase, extracted and derivatised for HPLC fluorescent assay of adenine nucleotides. Analysis of variance showed a significant athermal damping effect (P < 0.002, n = 22) of the PMF on natural adenine nucleotide oscillations and some consistent changes in phase relationships. The technique of nonlinear dielectric spectroscopy (NLDS) revealed a distinctive effect of PMF, caffeine and EGTA in modulating the cellular harmonic response to an applied weak signal. Light scattering studies also showed altered frequency response of cells to PMF, EGTA and caffeine. PMF caused a significant reduction of caffeine induced cell contraction (P < 0.0006, n = 19 by paired t-test) as shown by Malvern particle size analyser, suggesting that intracellular calcium may be involved in mediating the effect of the PMF. PMID:10228582

  15. The TOM Complex of Amoebozoans: the Cases of the Amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the Slime Mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkowska, Małgorzata; Buczek, Dorota; Stobienia, Olgierd; Karachitos, Andonis; Antoniewicz, Monika; Slocinska, Małgorzata; Makałowski, Wojciech; Kmita, Hanna

    2015-07-01

    Protein import into mitochondria requires a wide variety of proteins, forming complexes in both mitochondrial membranes. The TOM complex (translocase of the outer membrane) is responsible for decoding of targeting signals, translocation of imported proteins across or into the outer membrane, and their subsequent sorting. Thus the TOM complex is regarded as the main gate into mitochondria for imported proteins. Available data indicate that mitochondria of representative organisms from across the major phylogenetic lineages of eukaryotes differ in subunit organization of the TOM complex. The subunit organization of the TOM complex in the Amoebozoa is still elusive, so we decided to investigate its organization in the soil amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii and the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. They represent two major subclades of the Amoebozoa: the Lobosa and Conosa, respectively. Our results confirm the presence of Tom70, Tom40 and Tom7 in the A. castellanii and D. discoideum TOM complex, while the presence of Tom22 and Tom20 is less supported. Interestingly, the Tom proteins display the highest similarity to Opisthokonta cognate proteins, with the exception of Tom40. Thus representatives of two major subclades of the Amoebozoa appear to be similar in organization of the TOM complex, despite differences in their lifestyle. PMID:26074248

  16. Thecamoebians (Testate Amoebae) Straddling the Permian-Triassic Boundary in the Guryul Ravine Section, India: Evolutionary and Palaeoecological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vartika; Pandita, Sundeep K.; Tewari, Rajni; van Hengstum, Peter J; Pillai, Suresh S. K.; Agnihotri, Deepa; Kumar, Kamlesh; Bhat, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    Exceptionally well-preserved organic remains of thecamoebians (testate amoebae) were preserved in marine sediments that straddle the greatest extinction event in the Phanerozoic: the Permian-Triassic Boundary. Outcrops from the Late Permian Zewan Formation and the Early Triassic Khunamuh Formation are represented by a complete sedimentary sequence at the Guryul Ravine Section in Kashmir, India, which is an archetypal Permian-Triassic boundary sequence [1]. Previous biostratigraphic analysis provides chronological control for the section, and a perspective of faunal turnover in the brachiopods, ammonoids, bivalves, conodonts, gastropods and foraminifera. Thecamoebians were concentrated from bulk sediments using palynological procedures, which isolated the organic constituents of preserved thecamoebian tests. The recovered individuals demonstrate exceptional similarity to the modern thecamoebian families Centropyxidae, Arcellidae, Hyalospheniidae and Trigonopyxidae, however, the vast majority belong to the Centropyxidae. This study further confirms the morphologic stability of the thecamoebian lineages through the Phanerozoic, and most importantly, their apparent little response to an infamous biological crisis in Earth’s history. PMID:26288245

  17. Chondrules and Nebular Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, E I

    2002-01-01

    Beneath the fusion-encrusted surfaces of the most primitive stony meteorites lies not homogeneous rock, but a profusion of millimeter-sized igneous spheres. These chondrules, and their centimeter-sized counterparts, the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, comprise more than half of the volume fraction of chondritic meteorites. They are the oldest creations of the solar system. Their chemical composition matches that of the solar photosphere in all but the most volatile of elements, reflecting their condensation from the same pristine gas that formed the sun. In this invited editorial, we review the nebular shock wave model of Desch and Connolly (Meteoritics and Planetary Science 2002, 37, 183) that seeks to explain their origin. While the model succeeds in reproducing the unique petrological signatures of chondrules, the origin of the required shock waves in protoplanetary disks remains a mystery. Outstanding questions are summarized, with attention paid briefly to competing models.

  18. OSMOTIC DEHYDRATION KINETICS OF GUAVAS IN MALTOSE SOLUTIONS WITH CALCIUM SALT*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. DI S. MASTRANTONIO

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available

    The osmotic dehydration kinetics of guavas in maltose solutions at 40 and 60ºBrix, with addition of 0, 0.6 and 1.2% of calcium lactate was studied in this paper and the final product quality was evaluated. The experiments were carried out up to 60 hours and samples were taken for analysis at different times to evaluate guavas weight reduction, water loss and sugar gain and to characterize the product according to its texture and color. After 24 hours of process the mass transfer of water and sugar between the osmotic solution and the fruit was negligible, showing that process equilibrium was reached. The increase of sugar concentration in the osmotic solution showed strong influence on the dehydration process, increasing the water loss and reducing sugar gain. The presence of calcium ions in the osmotic solution also influenced the kinetics of mass transfer and showed a strong influence on fruit texture. Higher values of stress and strain at failure were obtained when calcium lactate was employed. The effect of the different osmotic treatments on the color parameters was also investigated and significant changes were observed in the values of chroma C* and hue H* due to sugar concentration and calcium addition.

    KEYWORDS: Osmotic dehydration; kinetics; guava; maltose; calcium lactate.

  19. Shocks in supersonic sand

    OpenAIRE

    Rericha, E.; Bizon, C.; Shattuck, M. D.; Swinney, H. L.

    2001-01-01

    We measure time-averaged velocity, density, and temperature fields for steady granular flow past a wedge and calculate a speed of granular pressure disturbances (sound speed) equal to 10% of the flow speed. The flow is supersonic, forming shocks nearly identical to those in a supersonic gas. Molecular dynamics simulations of Newton's laws and Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation yield fields in quantitative agreement with experiment. A numerical solution of Navier-Stokes-like equ...

  20. Shock breakout theory

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2016-01-01

    The earliest supernova (SN) emission is produced when the optical depth of the plasma lying ahead of the shock, which ejects the envelope, drops below c/v, where v is the shock velocity. This "breakout" may occur when the shock reaches the edge of the star, producing a bright X-ray/UV flash on time scales of seconds to a fraction of an hour, followed by UV/optical "cooling" emission from the expanding cooling envelope on a day time-scale. If the optical depth of circumstellar material (CSM) ejected from the progenitor star prior to the explosion is larger than c/v, the breakout will take place at larger radii, within the CSM, extending its duration to days time scale. The properties of the early, breakout and cooling, emission carry unique signatures of the structure of the progenitor star (e.g. its radius and surface composition) and of its mass-loss history. The recent progress of wide-field transient surveys enable SN detections on a day time scale, and are being used to set unique constraints on the proge...

  1. Bow shock: Power aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedykh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    It is clear that the primary energy source for magnetospheric processes is the solar wind, but the process of energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere, or rather, to convecting magnetospheric plasma, appears to be rather complicated. Bow shock is a powerful transformer of the solar wind kinetic energy into the gas dynamic and electromagnetic energy. A jump of the magnetic field tangential component at front crossing means that the front carries an electric current. The solar wind kinetic energy partly transforms to gas kinetic and electromagnetic energy during its passage through the bow shock front. The transition layer (magnetosheath) can use part of this energy for accelerating of plasma, but can conversely spend part its kinetic energy on the electric power generation, which afterwards may be used by the magnetosphere. Thereby, transition layer can be both consumer (sink) and generator (source) of electric power depending upon special conditions. The direction of the current behind the bow shock front depends on the sign of the IMF Bz-component. It is this electric current which sets convection of plasma in motion.

  2. Use of Different Kinds of Solutes Alternative to Sucrose in Osmotic Dehydration of Yacon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethania Brochier

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to evaluate glycerol, maltodextrin, polydextrose and sorbitol for the osmotic dehydration of yacon for diabetics, keeping its properties as prebiotic. Osmotic dehydration was carried out using a yacon to 33% concentrated syrup weight ratio of 1:12, with magnetic stirring at 23ºC and atmospheric pressure. The best results were achieved for glycerol and sorbitol with 80 ± 4% and 81± 1% of water removal and increase of 3.73 ± 0.11 and 4.30 ± 0.16 times in total soluble solids respectively. Maltodextrin did not promote dehydration.

  3. Use of Different Kinds of Solutes Alternative to Sucrose in Osmotic Dehydration of Yacon

    OpenAIRE

    Bethania Brochier; Ligia Damasceno Ferreira Marczak; Caciano Pelayo Zapata Noreña

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to evaluate glycerol, maltodextrin, polydextrose and sorbitol for the osmotic dehydration of yacon for diabetics, keeping its properties as prebiotic. Osmotic dehydration was carried out using a yacon to 33% concentrated syrup weight ratio of 1:12, with magnetic stirring at 23ºC and atmospheric pressure. The best results were achieved for glycerol and sorbitol with 80 ± 4% and 81± 1% of water removal and increase of 3.73 ± 0.11 and 4.30 ± 0.16 times in total soluble sol...

  4. Mathematical modelling of the osmotic dehydration of cherry tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. cerasiforme)

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Moreira AZOUBEL; Murr Fernanda E. Xidieh

    2000-01-01

    Osmotic dehydration of cherry tomato as influenced by osmotic agent (sodium chloride and a mixed sodium chloride and sucrose solutions) and solution concentration (10 and 25% w/w) at room temperature (25°C) was studied. Kinetics of water loss and solids uptake were determined by a two parameter model, based on Fick's second law and applied to spherical geometry. The water apparent diffusivity coefficients obtained ranged from 2.17x10-10 to 11.69x10-10 m²/s.

  5. Influence on concentration of sugar on mass transfer of pineapple slices during osmotic dehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Khanom, S.A.A.; Rahman, M.M.; Uddin, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic drying is a partial dehydration process to give the product a quality improvement over the conventional drying process. The experiment was conducted for studying water loss(WL), sugar gain(SG), weight reduction(WR) and total solid(TS) during osmotic dehydration of pineapple slices (10 mm thick) in different concentration of sugar (40%, 50% and 60%) up to 6 hours at room temperature. It was found that increasing the concentration of the sugar solution used resulted in increased rates o...

  6. Proteomic profiling analysis reveals that glutathione system plays important roles responding to osmotic stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianhui; Dong, Wen; Zhang, Daijing; Gao, Xiaolong; Jiang, Lina; Shao, Yun; Tong, Doudou; Li, Chunxi

    2016-01-01

    Wheat is one of the most important crops in the world, and osmotic stress has become one of the main factors affecting wheat production. Understanding the mechanism of the response of wheat to osmotic stress would be greatly significant. In the present study, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) was used to analyze the changes of protein expression in the wheat roots exposed to different osmotic stresses. A total of 2,228 expressed proteins, including 81 differentially expressed proteins, between osmotic stress and control, were found. The comprehensive analysis of these differentially expressed proteins revealed that osmotic stress increased the variety of expressed proteins and suppressed the quantity of expressed proteins in wheat roots. Furthermore, the proteins for detoxifying and reactive oxygen species scavenging, especially the glutathione system, played important roles in maintaining organism balance in response to osmotic stress in wheat roots. Thus, the present study comprehensively describes the protein expression changes in wheat roots in response to osmotic stress, providing firmer foundation to further study the mechanism of osmotic resistance in wheat. PMID:27602297

  7. Arabidopsis decuple mutant reveals the importance of SnRK2 kinases in osmotic stress responses in vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Fujii, Hiroaki

    2011-01-10

    Osmotic stress associated with drought or salinity is a major factor that limits plant productivity. Protein kinases in the SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) family are activated by osmotic stress, suggesting that the kinases are involved in osmotic stress signaling. However, due to functional redundancy, their contribution to osmotic stress responses remained unclear. In this report, we constructed an Arabidopsis line carrying mutations in all 10 members of the SnRK2 family. The decuple mutant snrk2.1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10 grew poorly under hyperosmotic stress conditions but was similar to the wild type in culture media in the absence of osmotic stress. The mutant was also defective in gene regulation and the accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), proline, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate under osmotic stress. In addition, analysis of mutants defective in the ABA-activated SnRK2s (snrk2.2/3/6) and mutants defective in the rest of the SnRK2s (snrk2.1/4/5/7/8/9/10) revealed that SnRK2s are a merging point of ABA-dependent and -independent pathways for osmotic stress responses. These results demonstrate critical functions of the SnRK2s in mediating osmotic stress signaling and tolerance.

  8. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The same argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions

  9. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Shrivastava; Kailash

    2005-03-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in orthopedics and traumatology is still a young therapy method. Since the last few years the development of shock wave therapy has progressed rapidly. Shock waves have changed the treatment of urolithiasis substantially. Today shock waves are the first choice to treat kidney and urethral stones. Urology has long been the only medical field for shock waves in medicine. Meanwhile shock waves have been used in orthopedics and traumatology to treat insertion tendinitis, avascular necrosis of the head of femur and other necrotic bone alterations. Another field of shock wave application is the treatment of tendons, ligaments and bones on horses in veterinary medicine. In the present paper we discuss the basic theory and application of shock waves and its history in medicine. The idea behind using shock wave therapy for orthopedic diseases is the stimulation of healing in tendons, surrounding tissue and bones. This is a completely different approach compared to urology where shock waves are used for disintegration.

  10. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei;

    2016-01-01

    galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and clusters of galaxies shock waves. Collisionless shock microphysics enters at different stages of shock formation, shock dynamics and particle energization and/or acceleration. It turns out that the shock phenomenon is a multi-scale non-linear problem in time and space...... in the physics of space plasma and astrophysical shock waves. A special section is dedicated to new laser plasma experiments probing shock physics....

  11. Infl uence of thermal treatment on the stability of phenolic compounds and the microbiological quality of sucrose solution following osmotic dehydration of highbush blueberry fruits

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Kucner; Agnieszka Papiewska; Robert Klewicki; Michał Sójka; Elżbieta Klewicka

    2014-01-01

    Background. Osmotic dehydration is a process of the partial removal of water which is based on immersion of material having cellular structure in a hypertonic solution. Osmotic dehydration is used as a pretreatment for the dehydration of foods before they are subjected to further processing such as freezing, freeze drying, vacuum drying. Management of spent syrup is one of the most important problems related to osmotic dewatering. Osmotic solutions are heavily polluted with of carbohydrates, ...

  12. Quasiperpendicular high Mach number Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Sulaiman, A H; Dougherty, M K; Burgess, D; Fujimoto, M; Hospodarsky, G B

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves exist throughout the universe and are fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. Reformation is a process, driven by microphysics, which typically occurs at high Mach number supercritical shocks. While ongoing studies have investigated this process extensively both theoretically and via simulations, their observations remain few and far between. In this letter we present a study of very high Mach number shocks in a parameter space that has been poorly explored and we identify reformation using in situ magnetic field observations from the Cassini spacecraft at 10 AU. This has given us an insight into quasi-perpendicular shocks across two orders of magnitude in Alfven Mach number (MA) which could potentially bridge the gap between modest terrestrial shocks and more exotic astrophysical shocks. For the first time, we show evidence for cyclic reformation controlled by specular ion reflection occurring at the predicted timescale of ~0.3 {\\tau}c, where {\\tau}c is the ion gyroperio...

  13. Nanoindentation of shock deformed alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current study, the experimental results on the nanoindentation response of both as prepared and shock recovered alumina of 10 μm grain size and identical processing history are presented and analyzed. The shock recovery experiments were deliberately conducted with gas gun arrangements at shock pressures much above the Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) of alumina. The nanoindentation experiments were conducted at 10-1000 mN load with a Berkovich indenter. The nanohardness and Young's modulus value of shock recovered alumina were always lower than those of the as prepared alumina samples. Subsequently, the detailed characterizations of the shock recovered alumina samples by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were utilized to understand the reasons behind the drop in nanohardness and Young's modulus of shock recovered alumina samples.

  14. Gene–culture shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hyperbolic model is presented which generalises Aoki's parabolic system for the combined propagation of a mutant gene together with a cultural innovation. It is shown that this model allows for the propagation of a shock wave and the shock amplitude is calculated numerically. Particular attention is paid to the case where the shock moves into a region where the frequencies of the mutant gene and of the individuals adopting the innovation are zero.

  15. Measurement of Strong Shock Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Hajime Takada; Daisuke Fujimaki; Takao Tsuboi

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with measurement of a strong shock pressure like an imploding detonation of over 1 GPa which cannot be measured directly with currently available commercial pressure transducers. After the transfer functions of three kinds of materials were measured using a shock tube, Teflon was selected as a shock absorber. As an example of pressure beyond the limit of the pressure transducer, we tried to measure pressure at the center of an imploding detonation. From this measurement, we c...

  16. Osmotic Gradients Induce Bio-reminiscent Morphological Transformations in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KamilaOglecka

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We report observations of large-scale, in-plane and out-of-plane membrane deformations in giant uni- and multilamellar vesicles composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures in the presence of net transvesicular osmotic gradients. The lipid mixtures we examined consisted of binary mixtures of DOPC and DPPC lipids and ternary mixtures comprising POPC, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol over a range of compositions – both of which produce co-existing phases for selected ranges of compositions at room temperature under thermodynamic equilibrium. In the presence of net osmotic gradient, we find that the in-plane phase separation potential of these mixtures is non-trivially altered and a variety of out-of-plane morphological remodeling occurs. The repertoire of membrane deformations we observe display striking resemblance to their biological counterparts in live cells encompassing vesiculation, membrane fission and fusion, tubulation and pearling, as well as expulsion of entrapped vesicles from multicompartmental GUV architectures through large, self-healing transient pores. These observations suggest that the forces introduced by simple osmotic gradients across membrane boundaries could act as a trigger for shape-dependent membrane and vesicle trafficking activities. We speculate that such coupling of osmotic gradients with membrane properties might have provided lipid-mediated mechanisms during the early evolution of membrane compartmentalization in the absence of osmoregulatory protein machinery.

  17. Osmotic Pressure in the Physics Course for Students of the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbie, Russell K.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of an ideal gas model to explain osmotic equilibrium and nonequilibrium flows through an ideal semipermeable membrane. Included are a justification of the relationship between an ideal gas and a dilute solution, a review of the irreversible thermodynamic flow, and some sample applications to physiology. (CC)

  18. Relationship between osmotic pressure of the blood and secretion of sweat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montuori, A.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments with cats show that the thermic secretion of sweat represents a specific case of a general law: The central nervous apparatus that controls the secretion of sweat begins to function when the osmotic pressure of the blood drops below normal.

  19. Effect of process variables on the osmotic dehydration of star-fruit slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Dalben Madeira Campos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the effect of blanching and the influence of temperature, solution concentration, and the initial fruit:solution ratio on the osmotic dehydration of star-fruit slices. For blanching, different concentrations of citric and ascorbic acids were studied. The samples immersed in 0.75% citric acid presented little variation in color in relation to the fresh star-fruit. Osmotic dehydration was carried out in an incubator with orbital shaking, controlled temperature, and constant shaking at 120 rpm. The influence of process variables was studied in trials defined by a complete 23 central composite design. In general, water loss and solids gain were positively influenced by temperature and by solution concentration. Nevertheless, lower temperatures reduced water loss throughout the osmotic dehydration process. An increase in the amount of dehydrating solution (initial fruit:solution ratio slightly influenced the evaluated responses. The process carried out at 50 ºC with a solution concentration of 50% resulted in a product with lower solids gain and greater water loss. Under these conditions, blanching minimized the effect of the osmotic treatment on star-fruit browning, and therefore the blanched fruits showed little variation in color in relation to the fresh fruit.

  20. Osmotic pressure and aggregate shape in BSA/Poly(Ethylene Glycol)-Lipid/Dextran solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W.; Clifton, Luke. A.; Green, Rebecca J.

    2008-01-01

    Osmotic pressure and aggregate shape in BSA/Poly(Ethylene Glycol)-Lipid/Dextran solutions correspondance: Corresponding author. Tel.: +44 113 343 7595; fax: +44 113 343 6551. (Castelletto, Valeria) (Castelletto, Valeria) School of Chemistry--> , Food Biosciences and Pharmacy--> , The University of Reading--> , P.O. Box 226--> , Whiteknights--> , Reading--> - UNIT...

  1. Effect of Pulsed Electric Field Pre-Treatment on Osmotic Dehydration of Strawberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of pulsed electric fields (PEF) as a pre-treatment on osmotic dehydration characteristics and quality of strawberries. The studied PDF treatment conditions included three strengths of electric field (1.0, 2.0, 3.0 Kw/cm) and three numbers of pu...

  2. Recent development in osmotic dehydration of fruit and vegetables: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Suresh; Kumari, Durvesh

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic dehydration of fruits and vegetables is achieved by placing the solid/semi solid, whole or in pieces, in a hypertonic solution (sugar and/or salt) with a simultaneous counter diffusion of solutes from the osmotic solution into the tissues. Osmotic dehydration is recommended as a processing method to obtain better quality of food products. Partial dehydration allows structural, nutritional, sensory, and other functional properties of the raw material to be modified. However, the food industry uptake of osmotic dehydration of foods has not been extensive as expected due to the poor understanding of the counter current flow phenomena associated with it. However, these flows are in a dynamic equilibrium with each other and significantly influence the final product in terms of preservation, nutrition, and organoleptic properties. The demand of healthy, natural, nutritious, and tasty processed food products continuously increases, not only for finished products, but also for ingredient to be included in complex foods such as ice cream, cereals, dairy, confectionaries, and bakery products. PMID:24915357

  3. Proteomic analysis of rice leaves shows the different regulations to osmotic stress and stress signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Lie-Bo; Ding, Wei; Wu, Jin-Hong; Feng, Fang-Jun; Luo, Li-Jun; Mei, Han-Wei

    2010-11-01

    Following the idea of partial root-zone drying (PRD) in crop cultivation, the morphological and physiological responses to partial root osmotic stress (PROS) and whole root osmotic stress (WROS) were investigated in rice. WROS caused stress symptoms like leaf rolling and membrane leakage. PROS stimulated stress signals, but did not cause severe leaf damage. By proteomic analysis, a total of 58 proteins showed differential expression after one or both treatments, and functional classification of these proteins suggests that stress signals regulate photosynthesis, carbohydrate and energy metabolism. Two other proteins (anthranilate synthase and submergence-induced nickel-binding protein) were upregulated only in the PROS plants, indicating their important roles in stress resistance. Additionally, more enzymes were involved in stress defense, redox homeostasis, lignin and ethylene synthesis in WROS leaves, suggesting a more comprehensive regulatory mechanism induced by osmotic stress. This study provides new insights into the complex molecular networks within plant leaves involved in the adaptation to osmotic stress and stress signals. PMID:20977656

  4. Development and Optimization of Osmotically Controlled Asymmetric Membrane Capsules for Delivery of Solid Dispersion of Lycopene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Jain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation is to develop and statistically optimize the osmotically controlled asymmetric membrane capsules of solid dispersion of lycopene. Solid dispersions of lycopene with β-cyclodextrin in different ratios were prepared using solvent evaporation method. Solubility studies showed that the solid dispersion with 1 : 5 (lycopene : β-cyclodextrin exhibited optimum solubility (56.25 mg/mL for osmotic controlled delivery. Asymmetric membrane capsules (AMCs were prepared on glass mold pins via dip coating method. Membrane characterization by scanning electron microscopy showed inner porous region and outer dense region. Central composite design response surface methodology was applied for the optimization of AMCs. The independent variables were ethyl cellulose (X1, glycerol (X2, and NaCl (X3 which were varied at different levels to analyze the effect on dependent variables (percentage of cumulative drug release (Y1 and correlation coefficient of drug release (Y2. The effect of independent variables on the response was significantly influential. The F18 was selected as optimized formulation based on percentage of CDR (cumulative drug release of 85.63% and correlation coefficient of 0.9994. The optimized formulation was subjected to analyze the effect of osmotic pressure and agitational intensity on percentage of CDR. The drug release was independent of agitational intensity but was dependent on osmotic pressure of dissolution medium.

  5. Salt tolerance of Beta macrocarpa is associated with efficient osmotic adjustment and increased apoplastic water content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, I; Badri, M; Mejri, M; Cruz, C; Siddique, K H M; Hessini, K

    2016-05-01

    The chenopod Beta macrocarpa Guss (wild Swiss chard) is known for its salt tolerance, but the mechanisms involved are still debated. In order to elucidate the processes involved, we grew wild Swiss chard exposed to three salinity levels (0, 100 and 200 mm NaCl) for 45 days, and determined several physiological parameters at the end of this time. All plants survived despite reductions in growth, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in plants exposed to salinity (100 and 200 mm NaCl). As expected, the negative effects of salinity were more pronounced at 200 mm than at 100 mm NaCl: (i) leaf apoplastic water content was maintained or increased despite a significant reduction in leaf water potential, revealing the halophytic character of B. macrocarpa; (ii) osmotic adjustment occurred, which presumably enhanced the driving force for water extraction from soil, and avoided toxic build up of Na(+) and Cl(-) in the mesophyll apoplast of leaves. Osmotic adjustment mainly occurred through accumulation of inorganic ions and to a lesser extent soluble sugars; proline was not implicated in osmotic adjustment. Overall, two important mechanisms of salt tolerance in B. macrocarpa were identified: osmotic and apoplastic water adjustment. PMID:26588061

  6. Low-frequency oscillations of the impedance of electrolyte moving in an electro-osmotic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompan, M. E.; Malyshkin, V. G.; Goffman, V. G.

    2014-07-01

    The impedance of a liquid electrolyte has been studied under the conditions of electro-osmotic flow. It is found that the impedance exhibits oscillations in the region of subhertz frequencies, which are related to resonant mechanical oscillations arising in the flow. Assumptions concerning the type of these resonant oscillations are formulated based on the observed spectrum of impedance oscillations.

  7. Osmotic Effects on the Electrical Properties of Arabidopsis Root Hair Vacuoles in Situ1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Roger R.

    2004-01-01

    To assess the role of the vacuole in responses to hyperosmotic and hypo-osmotic stress, the electrical properties of the vacuole were measured in situ. A double-barrel micropipette was inserted into the vacuole for voltage clamping. A second double-barrel micropipette was inserted into the cytoplasm to provide a virtual ground that separated the electrical properties of the vacuole from those of the plasma membrane. Osmotic stress causes immediate electrical responses at the plasma membrane (Lew RR [1996] Plant Physiol 97: 2002-2005) and ion flux changes and turgor recovery (Shabala SN, Lew RR [2002] 129: 290-299) in Arabidopsis root cells. In situ, the vacuole also responds rapidly to changes in extracellular osmotic potential. Hyperosmotic treatment caused a very large increase in the ionic conductance of the vacuole. Hypo-osmotic treatment did not affect the vacuolar conductance. In either case, the vacuolar electrical potential was unchanged. Taken in concert with previous studies of changes at the plasma membrane, these results demonstrate a highly coordinated system in which the vacuole and plasma membrane are primed to respond immediately to hyperosmotic stress before changes in gene expression. PMID:14730070

  8. The response of foodborne pathogens to osmotic and desiccation stresses in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Catherine M.; Gianotti, Andrea; Gruzdev, Nadia;

    2016-01-01

    human pathogens, encode mechanisms to survive and withstand these stresses. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms employed by Salmonella spp., Shiga toxin producing E. coli, Cronobacter spp., Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter spp. to tolerate osmotic and desiccation stresses and...

  9. A simple relation for the concentration dependence of osmotic pressure and depletion thickness in polymer solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, G.J.; Skvortsov, A.M.; Tuinier, R.

    2007-01-01

    We propose simple expressions II/IIo = 1 + and (omega/omega(ex))(3 alpha-1) and (delta(0)/delta)(2) = 1 + (omega/omega(ex))(2 alpha) for the osmotic pressure II and the depletion thickness 6 as a function of the polymer concentration omega. Here, IIo and delta 0 correspond to the dilute limit, and o

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Rice Leaves Shows the Different Regulations to Osmotic Stress and Stress Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lie-Bo Shu; Wei Ding; Jin-Hong Wu; Fang-Jun Feng; Li-Jun Luo; Han-Wei Mei

    2010-01-01

    Following the idea of partial root-zone drying(PRD)in crop cultivation,the morphological and physiological responses to partial root osmotic stress(PROS)and whole root osmotic stress(WROS)were investigated in rice.WROS caused stress symptoms like leaf rolling and membrane leakage.PROS stimulated stress signals,but did not cause severe leaf damage.By proteomic analysis,a total of 58 proteins showed differential expression after one or both treatments,and functional classification of these proteins suggests that stress signals regulate photosynthesis,carbohydrate and energy metabolism.Two other proteins(anthranilate synthase and submergence-induced nickel-binding protein)were upregulated only in the PROS plants,indicating their important roles in stress resistance.Additionally,more enzymes were involved in stress defense,redox homeostasis,lignin and ethylene synthesis in WROS leaves,suggesting a more comprehensive regulatory mechanism induced by osmotic stress.This study provides new insights into the complex molecular networks within plant leaves involved in the adaptation to osmotic stress and stress signals.

  11. Phenotypic characterization of Corynebacterium glutamicum under osmotic stress conditions using elementary mode analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajvanshi, Meghna; Venkatesh, K V

    2011-09-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a soil bacterium, is used to produce amino acids such as lysine and glutamate. C. glutamicum is often exposed to osmolality changes in its medium, and the bacterium has therefore evolved several adaptive response mechanisms to overcome them. In this study we quantify the metabolic response of C. glutamicum under osmotic stress using elementary mode analysis (EMA). Further, we obtain the optimal phenotypic space for the synthesis of lysine and formation of biomass. The analysis demonstrated that with increasing osmotic stress, the flux towards trehalose formation and energy-generating pathways increased, while the flux of anabolic reactions diminished. Nodal analysis indicated that glucose-6-phosphate, phosphoenol pyruvate, and pyruvate nodes were capable of adapting to osmotic stress, whereas the oxaloacetic acid node was relatively unresponsive. Fewer elementary modes were active under stress indicating the rigid behavior of the metabolism in response to high osmolality. Optimal phenotypic space analysis revealed that under normal conditions the organism optimized growth during the initial log phase and lysine and trehalose formation during the stationary phase. However, under osmotic stress, the analysis demonstrated that the organism operates under suboptimal conditions for growth, and lysine and trehalose formation. PMID:21132515

  12. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF CONTROLLED POROSITY OSMOTIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM OF METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Patel* and M. M. Patel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Controlled porosity osmotic tablet of metoprolol succinate prepared and evaluated in this study. Metoprolol succinate is very high soluble drug, so complete drug release obtained very fast. It is difficult to formulate osmotic tablet of Metoprolol succinate which gives drug release up to 24 hr at zero order. To get desired dissolution profile various formulation parameters like osmogen concentration, level of weight gain and level of pore former concentration were studied. Hypromellose was added as release retardant to reduce its dissolution rate and get drug release up to 24 hr at zero order. As concentration of release retardant increases, dissolution rate decreases. Final optimized formulation with hypromellose was studied for effect of pH of dissolution media, agitation intensity and osmotic pressure of dissolution media. There is no effect of above variables on dissolution confirms that prepared metoprolol succinate tablet gives drug release with osmotic mechanism. Final optimized formulation complies with the USP criteria for the dissolution of metoprolol succinate extended release tablet.

  13. Effects of PEG-induced osmotic stress on growth and dhurrin levels of forage sorghum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Donnell, Natalie H.; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Neale, Alan D.;

    2013-01-01

    . Given that finely regulating soil moisture under controlled conditions is notoriously difficult, we exposed sorghum plants to varying degrees of osmotic stress by growing them for different lengths of time in hydroponic solutions containing polyethylene glycol (PEG). Plants grown in medium containing 20...

  14. TRPV Ion Channels and Sensory Transduction of Osmotic and Mechanical Stimuli in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedtke, Wolfgang

    In signal transduction in metazoan cells, ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family have been identified as responding to diverse external and internal stimuli, amongst them osmotic stimuli. This chapter will highlight findings on the TRP vanilloid (TRPV) subfamily - both vertebrate and invertebrate members. Of the six mammalian TRPV channels, TRPV1, 2 and 4 have been demonstrated to function in transduction of osmotic stimuli. TRPV channels have been found to function in cellular as well as systemic osmotic homeostasis in vertebrates. Invertebrate TRPV channels - five in Caenorhabditis elegans and two in Drosophila - have been shown to play a role in mechanosensation such as hearing and proprioception in Drosophila and nose touch in C. elegans, and in the response to osmotic stimuli in C. elegans. In a striking example of evolutionary conservation of function, mammalian TRPV4 has been found to rescue osmo- and mechano-sensory deficits of the TRPV mutant strain osm-9 in C. elegans, despite the fact that the respective proteins share not more than 26% orthology.

  15. How to deal with visco-elastic properties of cellular tissues during osmotic dehydration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliver, L.; Betoret, N.; Fito, P.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, vacuum impregnated apple discs with different isotonic solutions (sucrose and trehalose) were equilibrated during osmotic dehydration (55°Brix glucose at 40 °C). Changes in sample composition (water and soluble solid contents), weight and volume are analysed. A mathematical model is pr

  16. Differential osmotic behavior of water components in living skeletal muscle resolved by 1H-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masako; Takemori, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Maki; Umazume, Yoshiki

    2005-08-01

    Using frog sartorius muscle, we observed transverse relaxation processes of (1)H-NMR signals from myowater. The process could be well described by four characteristic exponentials: the extremely slow exponential of relaxation time constant T(2) > 0.4 s, the slow one of T(2) approximately 0.15 s, the intermediate one of 0.03 s isotonic extracellular solution affected only the extremely slow exponential, linearly increasing its amplitude and gradually increasing its T(2) toward that of the bulk solution (1.7 s). Therefore, this exponential should represent extracellular surplus solution independently of the other exponentials. At two thirds to three times the isotonicity, the amplitude of the intermediate exponential showed normal osmotic behavior in parallel with the volume change of the myofilament lattice measured with x-ray diffraction. In the same tonicity range, the amplitude of the rapid exponential showed converse osmotic behavior. Lower tonicities increased the amplitude of only the slow exponential. Studied tonicities did not affect the T(2) values. The distinct osmotic behavior indicated that each characteristic exponential could be viewed as a distinct water group. In addition, the converse osmotic behavior suggested that the rapid exponential would not be a static water layer on the macromolecule surface. PMID:15894647

  17. Comparison of the compressive yield response of aggregated suspensions: Pressure filtration, centrifugation, and osmotic consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The compressive rheological responses of suspensions containing flocculated kaolin, alumina (average particle sizes of 0.2 and 0.5 microm), and hydrous zirconia (average particle sizes of 8, 57, and 139 nm) particles have been measured using three different techniques: pressure filtration, volume fraction profile during centrifugation, and sediment height during centrifugation at multiple spinning speeds. While the volume fraction profile technique appears to be experimentally most robust, equivalent responses are found using the different techniques, indicating that the compressive yield stress is a material property of a given suspension. The compressive yield stress of each suspension increases rapidly with volume fraction but cannot be generally described using simple power-law or exponential fits. The compressive yield stress also increases with the inverse square of particle size. The packing behavior of the suspensions undergoing osmotic consolidation is compared with the mechanical compressive yield response. Some suspensions exhibited the same packing behavior as in the mechanical techniques, while others consistently packed to higher densities during osmotic consolidation. Although equivalent osmotic and mechanical loads do not always result in the same volume fractions, the similar increases in volume fraction with applied driving force suggest that both the osmotic and mechanical techniques are controlled by the force needed to rearrange the particle network

  18. Hydration induced material transfer in membranes of osmotic pump tablets measured by synchrotron radiation based FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Yin, Xianzhen; Guo, Zhen; Tong, Yajun; Feng, Jing; York, Peter; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Gu, Jingkai; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-03-10

    Osmotic pump tablets are reliable oral controlled drug delivery systems based on their semipermeable membrane coating. This research used synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy and imaging to investigate the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets. SR-FTIR was applied to record and map the chemical information of a micro-region of the membranes, composed of cellulose acetate (CA, as the water insoluble matrix) and polyethylene glycol (PEG, as the soluble pore forming agent and plasticizing agent). The microstructure and chemical change of membranes hydrated for 0, 5, 10 and 30min were measured using SR-FTIR, combined with scanning electronic microscopy and atom force microscopy. The SR-FTIR microspectroscopy results indicated that there was a major change at the absorption range of 2700-3100cm(-1) in the membranes after different periods of hydration time. The absorption bands at 2870-2880cm(-1) and 2950-2960cm(-1) were assigned to represent CA and PEG, respectively. The chemical group signal distribution illustrated by the ratio of PEG to CA demonstrated that the trigger of drug release in the preliminary stage was due to the rapid transfer of PEG into liquid medium with a sharp decrease of PEG in the membranes. The SR-FTIR mapping results have demonstrated the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets and enabled reassessment of the drug release mechanism of membrane controlled osmotic pump systems. PMID:26802550

  19. Osmotic actuation for microfluidic components in point-of-care applications

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel design of micropumps and valves driven by osmotic force for point-of-care applications. Although there have been significant progresses in microfluidic components and control devices such as fluidic diodes, switches, resonators and digital-to-analog converters, the ultimate power source still depends on bulky off-chip components, which are expensive and cannot be easily miniaturized. For point-of-care applications, it is critical to integrate all the components in a compact size at low cost. In this work, we report two key active components actuated by osmotic mechanism for total integrated microfluidic system. For the proof of concept, we have demonstrated valve actuation, which can maintain stable ON/OFF switching operations under 125 kPa back pressure. We have also implemented an osmotic pump, which can pump a high flow rate over 30 μL/min for longer than 30 minutes. The experimental data demonstrates the possibility and potential of applying osmotic actuation in point-of-care disposable microfluidics. © 2013 IEEE.

  20. Vibration Isolation Review: II. Shock Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    F.C. Nelson

    1996-01-01

    This is the second part of a two part review of shock and vibration isolation. It covers three distinct categories of shock excitation—pulselike shock, velocity shock, and complex shock—and discusses the means that are available in each case to measure the effectiveness of shock mitigation by the imposition of flexible connections between the isolated system and its base.

  1. Historical Oil Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, James D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the history of the oil industry with a particular focus on the events associated with significant changes in the price of oil. Although oil was used much differently and was substantially less important economically in the nineteenth century than it is today, there are interesting parallels between events in that era and more recent developments. Key post-World-War-II oil shocks reviewed include the Suez Crisis of 1956-57, the OPEC oil embargo of 1973-1974, the Iranian revo...

  2. Use of highly sensitive sublethal stress responses in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum for an assessment of freshwater quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, Susanna; Dagnino, Alessandro; Torrielli, Sara; Dondero, Francesco; Fenoglio, Stefano; Negri, Alessandro; Boatti, Lara; Viarengo, Aldo

    2008-06-01

    In this work, the sensitivity of a battery of tests on the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum has been assessed within a freshwater toxicity study. The results obtained from the evaluation of survival and replication rate of D. discoideum were compared to those derived with a series of widely used tests for freshwater toxicity assessment, i. e. bioassays using Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The effects on sublethal endpoints, i.e. lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) and endocytotic rate, were analysed in conjunction with high-level endpoints to verify the potential to make a typical bioassay more sensitive. The field ecotoxicological investigation employing D. discoideum is part of a monitoring study assessing environmental quality of the Bormida River (Italy), subjected until recently to a chronic industrial pollution. The survey was carried out at several stations (upstream and downstream of a chemical factory outlet) in two different periods. In 2002, the results of chemical analyses performed on river water indicated no contamination. The ecotoxicological data obtained in this period showed that no evidence of biological effects was observed using V. fischeri and D. magna bioassays. In spite of the previous classical acute toxicity tests, significant differences in cell viability of D. discoideum were found. By analysing the effects measured on LMS and endocytotic rate, more relevant changes were observed for these sublethal stress biomarkers compared to survival. The chronic toxicity data showed significant changes in cell growth both of P. subcapitata and D. discoideum. Nevertheless, more sensitive and rapid responses were obtained when assessing the effects of exposure on D. discoideum. The chemical and ecotoxicological data obtained in 2006 indicated a full recovery of the quality of the river water (neither contamination nor toxicity found). Altogether, the results reported in this study underline that the use of a

  3. Amoeba-based computing for traveling salesman problem: long-term correlations between spatially separated individual cells of Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liping; Aono, Masashi; Kim, Song-Ju; Hara, Masahiko

    2013-04-01

    A single-celled, multi-nucleated amoeboid organism, a plasmodium of the true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, can perform sophisticated computing by exhibiting complex spatiotemporal oscillatory dynamics while deforming its amorphous body. We previously devised an "amoeba-based computer (ABC)" to quantitatively evaluate the optimization capability of the amoeboid organism in searching for a solution to the traveling salesman problem (TSP) under optical feedback control. In ABC, the organism changes its shape to find a high quality solution (a relatively shorter TSP route) by alternately expanding and contracting its pseudopod-like branches that exhibit local photoavoidance behavior. The quality of the solution serves as a measure of the optimality of which the organism maximizes its global body area (nutrient absorption) while minimizing the risk of being illuminated (exposure to aversive stimuli). ABC found a high quality solution for the 8-city TSP with a high probability. However, it remains unclear whether intracellular communication among the branches of the organism is essential for computing. In this study, we conducted a series of control experiments using two individual cells (two single-celled organisms) to perform parallel searches in the absence of intercellular communication. We found that ABC drastically lost its ability to find a solution when it used two independent individuals. However, interestingly, when two individuals were prepared by dividing one individual, they found a solution for a few tens of minutes. That is, the two divided individuals remained correlated even though they were spatially separated. These results suggest the presence of a long-term memory in the intrinsic dynamics of this organism and its significance in performing sophisticated computing. PMID:23438635

  4. Amoeba-inspired Tug-of-War algorithms for exploration-exploitation dilemma in extended Bandit Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, Masashi; Kim, Song-Ju; Hara, Masahiko; Munakata, Toshinori

    2014-03-01

    The true slime mold Physarum polycephalum, a single-celled amoeboid organism, is capable of efficiently allocating a constant amount of intracellular resource to its pseudopod-like branches that best fit the environment where dynamic light stimuli are applied. Inspired by the resource allocation process, the authors formulated a concurrent search algorithm, called the Tug-of-War (TOW) model, for maximizing the profit in the multi-armed Bandit Problem (BP). A player (gambler) of the BP should decide as quickly and accurately as possible which slot machine to invest in out of the N machines and faces an "exploration-exploitation dilemma." The dilemma is a trade-off between the speed and accuracy of the decision making that are conflicted objectives. The TOW model maintains a constant intracellular resource volume while collecting environmental information by concurrently expanding and shrinking its branches. The conservation law entails a nonlocal correlation among the branches, i.e., volume increment in one branch is immediately compensated by volume decrement(s) in the other branch(es). Owing to this nonlocal correlation, the TOW model can efficiently manage the dilemma. In this study, we extend the TOW model to apply it to a stretched variant of BP, the Extended Bandit Problem (EBP), which is a problem of selecting the best M-tuple of the N machines. We demonstrate that the extended TOW model exhibits better performances for 2-tuple-3-machine and 2-tuple-4-machine instances of EBP compared with the extended versions of well-known algorithms for BP, the ϵ-Greedy and SoftMax algorithms, particularly in terms of its short-term decision-making capability that is essential for the survival of the amoeba in a hostile environment. PMID:24384066

  5. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Saxer

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9, with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9 - 9.5×10(-9, per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11, with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13 to 1.6×10(-10, is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes.

  6. An evolutionarily significant unicellular strategy in response to starvation in Dictyostelium social amoebae [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4kb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Dubravcic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is widely studied for its multicellular development program as a response to starvation. Aggregates of up to 106 cells form fruiting bodies containing (i dormant spores (~80% that can persist for months in the absence of nutrients, and (ii dead stalk cells (~20% that promote the dispersion of the spores towards nutrient-rich areas. It is often overlooked that not all cells aggregate upon starvation. Using a new quantitative approach based on time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and a low ratio of reporting cells, we have quantified this fraction of non-aggregating cells. In realistic starvation conditions, up to 15% of cells do not aggregate, which makes this third cell fate a significant component of the population-level response of social amoebae to starvation. Non-aggregating cells have an advantage over cells in aggregates since they resume growth earlier upon arrival of new nutrients, but have a shorter lifespan under prolonged starvation. We find that phenotypic heterogeneities linked to cell nutritional state bias the representation of cells in the aggregating vs. non-aggregating fractions, and thus affect population partitioning. Next, we report that the fraction of non-aggregating cells depends on genetic factors that regulate the timing of starvation, signal sensing efficiency and aggregation efficiency. In addition, interactions between clones in mixtures of non-isogenic cells affect the partitioning of each clone into both fractions. We further build a numerical model to test the evolutionary significance of the non-aggregating cell fraction. The partitioning of cells into aggregating and non-aggregating fractions is optimal in fluctuating environments with an unpredictable duration of starvation periods. Our study highlights the unicellular component of the response of social amoebae to starvation, and thus extends its evolutionary and ecological framework.

  7. Isolation and identification of pathogenic free-living amoeba from surface and tap water of Shiraz City using morphological and molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, B; Motazedian, M H; Asgari, Q

    2016-01-01

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are the most abundant and widely distributed protozoa in the environment. An investigation was conducted to determine the presence of free-living amoebae (FLA), Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba in waterfronts of parks and squares and tap water of Shiraz City, Iran. FLA are considered pathogenic for human. These ubiquitous organisms have been isolated from different environments such as water, soil, and air. Eighty-two water samples were collected from different places of Shiraz City during the summer of 2013. All samples were processed in Dept. of Parasitology and Mycology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Fars, Iran. Samples were screened for FLA and identified by morphological characters in the cultures, PCR amplification targeting specific genes for each genus and sequencing determined frequent species and genotypes base on NCBI database. Overall, 48 samples were positive for Acanthamoeba and Vermamoeba in non-nutrient agar culture based on morphological characteristics. The PCR examination was done successfully. Sequencing results were revealed T4 (62.96 %) genotypes as the most common genotype of Acanthamoeba in the Shiraz water sources. In addition, T5 (33.33 %) and T15 (3.71 %) were isolated from water supplies. Vermamoeba vermiformis was known the dominant species from this genus. The high frequency of Acanthamoeba spp. and Vermamoeba in different environmental water sources of Shiraz is an alert for the public health related to water sources. The result highlights a need for taking more attention to water supplies in order to prevent illnesses related to free-living amoebae. PMID:26412057

  8. Defects in the synthetic pathway prevent DIF-1 mediated stalk lineage specification cascade in the non-differentiating social amoeba, Acytostelium subglobosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurato Mohri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Separation of somatic cells from germ-line cells is a crucial event for multicellular organisms, but how this step was achieved during evolution remains elusive. In Dictyostelium discoideum and many other dictyostelid species, solitary amoebae gather and form a multicellular fruiting body in which germ-line spores and somatic stalk cells differentiate, whereas in Acytostelium subglobosum, acellular stalks form and all aggregated amoebae become spores. In this study, because most D. discoideum genes known to be required for stalk cell differentiation have homologs in A. subglobosum, we inferred functional variations in these genes and examined conservation of the stalk cell specification cascade of D. discoideum mediated by the polyketide differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1 in A. subglobosum. Through heterologous expression of A. subglobosum orthologs of DIF-1 biosynthesis genes in D. discoideum, we confirmed that two of the three genes were functional equivalents, while DIF-methyltransferase (As-dmtA involved at the final step of DIF-1 synthesis was not. In fact, DIF-1 activity was undetectable in A. subglobosum lysates and amoebae of this species were not responsive to DIF-1, suggesting a lack of DIF-1 production in this species. On the other hand, the molecular function of an A. subglobosum ortholog of DIF-1 responsive transcription factor was equivalent with that of D. discoideum and inhibition of polyketide synthesis caused developmental arrest in A. subglobosum, which could not be rescued by DIF-1 addition. These results suggest that non-DIF-1 polyketide cascades involving downstream transcription factors are required for fruiting body development of A. subglobosum.

  9. Ubiquiter circovirus sequences raise challenges in laboratory diagnosis: the case of honey bee and bee mite, reptiles, and free living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Szilvia; Ihász, Katalin; Lengyel, György; Farkas, Szilvia L; Dán, Ádám; Paulus, Petra; Bányai, Krisztián; Fehér, Enikő

    2015-03-01

    Circoviruses of pigs and birds are established pathogens, however, the exact role of other, recently described circoviruses and circovirus-like viruses remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was the detection of circoviruses in neglected host species, including honey bees, exotic reptiles and free-living amoebae by widely used broad-spectrum polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays specific for the replication initiation protein coding gene of these viruses. The majority of sequences obtained from honey bees were highly similar to canine and porcine circoviruses, or, were distantly related to dragonfly cycloviruses. Other rep sequences detected in some honey bees, reptiles and amoebae showed similarities to various rep sequences deposited in the GenBank. Back-to-back PCR primers designed for the amplification of whole viral genomes failed to work that suggested the existence of integrated rep-like elements in many samples. Rolling circle amplification and exonuclease treatment confirmed the absence of small circular DNA genomes in the specimens analysed. In case of honey bees Varroa mite DNA contamination might be a source of the identified endogenous rep-like elements. The reptile and amoebae rep-like sequences were nearly identical with each other and with sequences detected in chimpanzee feces raising the possibility that detection of novel or unusual rep-like elements in some host species might originate from the microbial community of the host. Our results indicate that attention is needed when broad-spectrum rep gene specific polymerase chain reaction is chosen for laboratory diagnosis of circovirus infections. PMID:25823454

  10. Estimating contribution of anthocyanin pigments to osmotic adjustment during winter leaf reddening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Nicole M; Carpenter, Kaylyn L; Cannon, Jonathan G

    2013-01-15

    The association between plant water stress and synthesis of red, anthocyanin pigments in leaves has led some plant biologists to propose an osmotic function of leaf reddening. According to this hypothesis, anthocyanins function as a solute in osmotic adjustment (OA), contributing to depression of osmotic potential (Ψ(π)) and maintenance of turgor pressure during drought-stressed conditions. Here we calculate the percent contribution of anthocyanin to leaf Ψ(π) during OA in two angiosperm evergreen species, Galax urceolata and Gaultheria procumbens. Both species exhibit dramatic leaf reddening under high light during winter, concomitant with declines in leaf water potential and accumulation of solutes. Data previously published by the authors on osmotic potential at full turgor (Ψ(π,100)) of G. urceolata and G. procumbens leaves before and after leaf reddening were used to estimate OA. In vivo molar concentrations of anthocyanin, glucose, fructose, and sucrose measured from the same individuals were converted to pressure equivalents using the Ideal Gas Law, and percent contribution to OA was estimated. Estimated mean OA during winter was -0.7MPa for G. urceolata and -0.8MPa for G. procumbens. In vivo concentrations of anthocyanin (3-10mM) were estimated to account for ∼2% of OA during winter, and comprised <0.7% of Ψ(π,100) in both species. Glucose, fructose, and sucrose combined accounted for roughly 50 and 80% of OA for G. urceolata and G. procumbens, respectively, and comprised ∼20% of Ψ(π,100). We observed that a co-occurring, acyanic species (Vinca minor) achieved similar OA without synthesizing anthocyanin. We conclude that anthocyanins represent a measurable, albeit meager, component of OA in red-leafed evergreen species during winter. However, due to their low concentrations, metabolic costliness relative to other osmolytes, and striking red color (unnecessary for an osmotic function), it is unlikely that they are synthesized solely for an

  11. Membrane permeability characteristics and osmotic tolerance limits of sea urchin (Evechinus chloroticus) eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Serean L; Kleinhans, F W; Mladenov, Philip V; Hessian, Paul A

    2003-08-01

    Development of effective cryopreservation protocols relies on knowledge of the fundamental cryobiological characteristics for a particular cell type. These characteristics include osmotic behaviour, membrane permeability characteristics, and osmotic tolerance limits. Here, we report on measures of these characteristics for unfertilized and fertilised eggs of the sea urchin (Evechinus chloroticus). In NaCl solutions of varying osmolalities, sea urchin eggs behaved as ideal linear osmometers. The osmotically inactive volume (vb) was similar for unfertilized and fertilised eggs, 0.367+/-0.008 (mean+/-SE) and 0.303+/-0.007, respectively. Estimates of water solubility (Lp) and solute permeability (Ps) and their respective activation energies (Ea) for unfertilized and fertilised eggs were determined following exposure to cryoprotectant (CPA) solutions at different temperatures. Irrespective of treatment, fertilised eggs had higher values of Lp and Ps. The presence of a CPA decreased Lp. Among CPAs, solute permeability was highest for propylene glycol followed by dimethyl sulphoxide and then ethylene glycol. Measures of osmotic tolerance limits of the eggs revealed unfertilized eggs were able to tolerate volumetric changes of -20% and +30% of their equilibrium volume; fertilised eggs were able to tolerate changes +/-30%. Using membrane permeability data and osmotic tolerance limits, we established effective methods for loading and unloading CPAs from the eggs. The results of this study establish cryobiological characteristics for E. chloroticus eggs of use for developing an effective cryopreservation protocol. The approach we outline can be readily adapted for determining cryobiological characteristics of other species and cell types, as an aid to successful cryopreservation. PMID:12963407

  12. FORMULATION, EVALUATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF OSMOTIC DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM FOR A HIGHLY INSOLUBLE DRUG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma anurag R

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the preparation of push pull osmotic drug delivery system for a highlyinsoluble drug, an antipsychotic category. The main aim is to improve the site specification and toprovide the controlled release of drug for once-a-day drug delivery system with zero order drug releaseprofile with applying drug release kinetic modelling. The push pull osmotic tablets were prepared by wetgranulation method; the drug layer consists of the drug, osmotic agent, suspension agent and in pushlayer extender, osmotic agent and pigment to distinguish push layer form drug layer. The coating wascarried out by cellulose acetate (CA and plasticizer was used as propylene glycol. This study evaluatesthat regardless of the drug properties which do not significantly affect the drug delivery, the releasekinetics is mainly controlled by some factors as, the plasticizer proportion in the membrane, the osmoticagent proportion and the drug layer polymer grade. The influence of each factor was investigateddefining their acceptability range. Results shows that tablet made by PEO200K and diluents used in druglayer and PEO7000K and sodium chloride in push layer with 10% of CA coating, the plasticizer contentwas upto 20% to 30% and 0.8mm of orifice diameter. Results, shows that the use of suspension agent indrug layer affects the drug release. The formulation batch F13 was taken as ideal optimized batch and itfollows the zero order drug release. On the basis of results the effect of orifice diameter, polymerconcentration in drug layer, coating composition and plasticizer amount was tested and promising resultswere found. The drug release was independent of pH but dependent on the osmotic pressure of thedissolution medium. The release kinetics followed the Zero order model.

  13. PEG-induced osmotic stress in Mentha x piperita L.: Structural features and metabolic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Búfalo, Jennifer; Rodrigues, Tatiane Maria; de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Tozin, Luiz Ricardo Dos Santos; Marques, Marcia Ortiz Mayo; Boaro, Carmen Silvia Fernandes

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated whether osmotic stress induced by the exposure of peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) to moderate and severe stress for short periods of time changes the plant's physiological parameters, leaf anatomy and ultrastructure and essential oil. Plants were exposed to two levels of polyethyleneglycol (50 g L(-1) and 100 g L(-1) of PEG) in a hydroponic experiment. The plants exposed to 50 g L(-1) maintained metabolic functions similar to those of the control group (0 g L(-1)) without changes in gas exchange or structural characteristics. The increase in antioxidant enzyme activity reduced the presence of free radicals and protected membranes, including chloroplasts and mitochondria. In contrast, the osmotic stress caused by 100 g L(-1) of PEG inhibited leaf gas exchange, reduced the essential oil content and changed the oil composition, including a decrease in menthone and an increase in menthofuran. These plants also showed an increase in peroxidase activity, but this increase was not sufficient to decrease the lipid peroxidation level responsible for damaging the membranes of organelles. Morphological changes were correlated with the evaluated physiological features: plants exposed to 100 g L(-1) of PEG showed areas with collapsed cells, increases in mesophyll thickness and the area of the intercellular space, cuticle shrinkage, morphological changes in plastids, and lysis of mitochondria. In summary, our results revealed that PEG-induced osmotic stress in M. x piperita depends on the intensity level of the osmotic stress applied; severe osmotic stress changed the structural characteristics, caused damage at the cellular level, and reduced the essential oil content and quality. PMID:27107175

  14. Particle Acceleration at Shocks: Insights from Supernova Remnant Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T. W. Jones

    2011-12-01

    I review some basic properties of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in the context of young supernova remnants (SNRs). I also point out some key differences with cosmological, cluster-related shocks. DSA seems to be very efficient in strong, young SNR shocks. Provided the magnetic fields exceed some hundreds of Gauss (possibly amplified by CR related dynamics), these shocks can accelerate cosmic ray hadrons to PeV energies in the time available to them. Electron energies, limited by radiative losses, are likely limited to the TeV range. Injection of fresh particles at these shocks is poorly understood, but hadrons are much more easily injected than the more highly magnetized electrons. That seems supported by observational data, as well. So, while CR protons in young SNRs may play very major roles in the SNR evolution, the CR electron populations have minimal such impact, despite their observational importance.

  15. Plane shock compression generators, utilizing convergence of conical shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experimental testing of shock wave generators, based on irregular Mach reflection of shock waves in a conical geometry, along with the results of numerical simulation is presented. The shock in a layered cylindrical central body was produced by an impact of a converging conical flyer plate. Conical flyer plate was originating from initially cylindrical cavity liner in a cylindrical HE charge that was launched by a sliding detonation. This approach led to device simplification, since manufacturing of conical parts from metal and explosive is not required. The sequential detonation of HE charge by a multi- point distributor was employed to vary the geometry of formed conical flyer. The dependence of parameters of shock wave in cylindrical Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) core on launch angle was investigated. It was found that launch angles below 10° lead to failure of the Mach reflection mode, while larger angles produced flat Mach disks that can be utilized in various shock experiments.

  16. IPShocks: Database of Interplanetary Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isavnin, Alexey; Lumme, Erkka; Kilpua, Emilia; Lotti, Mikko; Andreeova, Katerina; Koskinen, Hannu; Nikbakhsh, Shabnam

    2016-04-01

    Fast collisionless shocks are one of the key interplanetary structures, which have also paramount role for solar-terrestrial physics. In particular, coronal mass ejection driven shocks accelerate particles to high energies and turbulent post-shock flows may drive intense geomagnetic storms. We present comprehensive Heliospheric Shock Database (ipshocks.fi) developed and hosted at University of Helsinki. The database contains currently over 2000 fast forward and fast reverse shocks observed by Wind, ACE, STEREO, Helios, Ulysses and Cluster spacecraft. In addition, the database has search and sort tools based on the spacecraft, time range, and several key shock parameters (e.g., shock type, shock strength, shock angle), data plots for each shock and data download options. These features allow easy access to shocks and quick statistical analyses. All current shocks are identified visually and analysed using the same procedure.

  17. Numerical modeling of slow shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews previous attempt and the present status of efforts to understand the structure of slow shocks by means of time dependent numerical calculations. Studies carried out using MHD or hybrid-kinetic codes have demonstrated qualitative agreement with theory. A number of unresolved issues related to hybrid simulations of the internal shock structure are discussed in some detail. 43 refs., 8 figs

  18. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a 1D shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios $\\epsilon \\gtrsim 0.1$, and possibly even for solar abundances because of "sandblasting" by finer dust. A flow with $\\epsilon \\gtrsim 10$ requires much smaller shock velocities ($\\sim 2$ vs 8 k...

  19. Calculating osmotic pressure of xylitol solutions from molality according to UNIFAC model and measuring it with air humidity osmometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Zhan, Tingting; Zhan, Xiancheng; Wei, Guocui; Tan, Xiaoying; Wang, Xiaolan; Li, Chengrong

    2014-11-01

    The osmotic pressure of xylitol solution at a wide concentration range was calculated according to the UNIFAC model and experimentally determined by our newly reported air humidity osmometry. The measurements from air humidity osmometry were compared with UNIFAC model calculations from dilute to saturated solution. Results indicate that air humidity osmometry measurements are comparable to UNIFAC model calculations at a wide concentration range by two one-sided test and multiple testing corrections. The air humidity osmometry is applicable to measure the osmotic pressure and the osmotic pressure can be calculated from the concentration. PMID:24032449

  20. Joint effects of osmotic and matric suctions on hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. One long-term management option of the Belgian Agency for the Management of Radioactive Waste and Fissile Materials (ONDRAF/NIRAS) is the direct underground disposal of Eurobitum Bituminized radioactive Waste (BW) in Boom Clay. In Geological disposal conditions, contact of the BW which contains large amounts of highly soluble NaNO3 with groundwater will result in water uptake and swelling of the waste and in subsequent diffusion of the dissolved salt through the host clay formation. Within the framework of the compatibility of Boom Clay with large amounts of nitrate-bearing bituminized radioactive waste an experimental research program have been started to investigate the effect of the leaching of large amounts of sodium nitrate on hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom Clay. Change of pore water chemistry can affect clays through a variety of adsorption/desorption phenomena driven by osmotic suction (concentration) effects and cationic exchange mechanisms. For Boom Clay the dominant cation present is sodium ion Na+ at a concentration of about 10-2 mol/l. Therefore, when Boom Clay is exposed to NaNO3, cation exchange effects are expected to be negligible compared to osmotic suction effects. Indeed, two processes are expected to take place, chemical consolidation and chemically induced consolidation. Chemical consolidation occurs due to the transfer of mass of water and salt from the pore space into the inter-lamellar space and/or external surface of clusters and vice versa. Chemically induced consolidation is due to the osmotic flow of water out of the sample that takes place in response to the chemical (concentration) gradient. The relevance of osmotic suction effects has been addressed by Mokni (2011) and a formulation has been proposed for the analysis of deformation induced by osmotic processes in double structure porous media. The formulation is based on the distinction within the material of a microstructural