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Sample records for amnesia delayed neuronal

  1. Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... permanent amnesia. Another rare type of amnesia, called dissociative (psychogenic) amnesia, stems from emotional shock or trauma, such as being the victim of a violent crime. In this disorder, a person may lose personal memories and autobiographical ...

  2. Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to thiamin (vitamin B-1) deficiency (Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome) Tumors in areas of the brain that control ... most types of amnesia. Amnesia caused by Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome involves a lack of thiamin. Treatment includes replacing ...

  3. Anterograde Amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Erdogan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Memory can be divided into two categories (i.e. short term memory and long term memory according to time span. Information at our long term memory that can be remembered with conscious effort are placed in declarative memory. Information that can not be remembered conciously are placed in nondeclarative memory. The definition of anterograde amnesia is inability to generate new memories after the event causing amnesia. Episodic and semantic memories are usually unaffected among patients’ who had such amnesia. Anterograde amnesia could mostly result from head trauma but in some cases the cause could be serebrovascular events, Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, santral nervous system enfections, anoxia or various substances. Medial temporal lobe and medial diencephalon are two brain regions mainly related with this condition. Medial temporal lobe is consisted of hippocampus, amygdala, parahippocampal cortex, perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Hypothalamus, thalamus, mamillary bodies and several thalamic nucleases compose medial diencephalon. Fornix and rarely serebellum damage may also play role in the development of anterograde amnesia. After the famous H.M case, who had anterograde amnesia after an epileptic surgery operation, hippocampus has been placed in the focus of memory researches. In the literature there are several reports evaluating brain tissues of amnesic patients at postmortem stage. Postmortem histological evaluations consistently revealed hippocampal neuronal loss among these patients’ brain tissues. Benzodiazepines usually cause short term anterograde amnesia. Benzodiazepine receptors are allosteric modulatory sites on gamma-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-A receptors. GABA-A receptors composed of five subunits and anterograde amnesia emerges by means of alfa 1 subunit. Anterograde amnesia has been suggested to occur by the blocking of long term potentiation in hippocampus and piriform cortex. For the treatment of the anterograde

  4. Dissociative amnesia.

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    Staniloiu, Angelica; Markowitsch, Hans J

    2014-08-01

    Dissociative amnesia is one of the most enigmatic and controversial psychiatric disorders. In the past two decades, interest in the understanding of its pathophysiology has surged. In this report, we review new data about the epidemiology, neurobiology, and neuroimaging of dissociative amnesia and show how advances in memory research and neurobiology of dissociation inform proposed pathogenetic models of the disorder. Dissociative amnesia is characterised by functional impairment. Additionally, preliminary data suggest that affected people have an increased and possibly underestimated suicide risk. The prevalence of dissociative amnesia differs substantially across countries and populations. Symptoms and disease course also vary, indicating a possibly heterogeneous disorder. The accompanying clinical features differ across cultural groups. Most dissociative amnesias are retrograde, with memory impairments mainly involving the episodic-autobiographical memory domain. Anterograde dissociative amnesia occurring without significant retrograde memory impairments is rare. Functional neuroimaging studies of dissociative amnesia with prevailing retrograde memory impairments show changes in the network that subserves autobiographical memory. At present, no evidence-based treatments are available for dissociative amnesia and no broad framework exists for its rehabilitation. Further research is needed into its neurobiology, course, treatment options, and strategies to improve differential diagnoses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Stimulus-dependent synchronization in delayed-coupled neuronal networks.

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    Esfahani, Zahra G; Gollo, Leonardo L; Valizadeh, Alireza

    2016-03-22

    Time delay is a general feature of all interactions. Although the effects of delayed interaction are often neglected when the intrinsic dynamics is much slower than the coupling delay, they can be crucial otherwise. We show that delayed coupled neuronal networks support transitions between synchronous and asynchronous states when the level of input to the network changes. The level of input determines the oscillation period of neurons and hence whether time-delayed connections are synchronizing or desynchronizing. We find that synchronizing connections lead to synchronous dynamics, whereas desynchronizing connections lead to out-of-phase oscillations in network motifs and to frustrated states with asynchronous dynamics in large networks. Since the impact of a neuronal network to downstream neurons increases when spikes are synchronous, networks with delayed connections can serve as gatekeeper layers mediating the firing transfer to other regions. This mechanism can regulate the opening and closing of communicating channels between cortical layers on demand.

  6. Transient brain ischemia: NMDA receptor modulation and delayed neuronal death

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    Benquet, Pascal; Gee, Christine E.; Gerber, Urs

    2008-01-01

    Transient global ischemia induces delayed neuronal death in certain cell types and brain regions while sparing cells in other areas. A key process through which oxygen-glucose deprivation triggers cell death is the excessive accumulation of the neurotransmitter glutamate leading to over excitation of neurons. In certain neurons this increase in glutamate will potentiate the NMDA type of glutamate receptor, which can then initiate cell death. This review provides an update of the neurophysiolo...

  7. Effect of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of scale-free neuronal networks. For this purpose, we introduce the heterogeneity to the specified neuron with the highest degree. It is shown that in the absence of delay, an intermediate noise level can optimally assist spike firings of collective neurons so as to achieve stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks for small and intermediate αh, which plays a heterogeneous role. Maxima of stochastic resonance measure are enhanced as αh increases, which implies that the heterogeneity can improve stochastic resonance. However, as αh is beyond a certain large value, no obvious stochastic resonance can be observed. If the information transmission delay is introduced to neuronal networks, stochastic resonance is dramatically affected. In particular, the tuned information transmission delay can induce multiple stochastic resonance, which can be manifested as well-expressed maximum in the measure for stochastic resonance, appearing every multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. Furthermore, we can observe that stochastic resonance at odd multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period is subharmonic, as opposed to the case of even multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. More interestingly, multiple stochastic resonance can also be improved by the suitable heterogeneous neuron. Presented results can provide good insights into the understanding of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  8. Effect of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of scale-free neuronal networks. For this purpose, we introduce the heterogeneity to the specified neuron with the highest degree. It is shown that in the absence of delay, an intermediate noise level can optimally assist spike firings of collective neurons so as to achieve stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks for small and intermediate α(h), which plays a heterogeneous role. Maxima of stochastic resonance measure are enhanced as α(h) increases, which implies that the heterogeneity can improve stochastic resonance. However, as α(h) is beyond a certain large value, no obvious stochastic resonance can be observed. If the information transmission delay is introduced to neuronal networks, stochastic resonance is dramatically affected. In particular, the tuned information transmission delay can induce multiple stochastic resonance, which can be manifested as well-expressed maximum in the measure for stochastic resonance, appearing every multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. Furthermore, we can observe that stochastic resonance at odd multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period is subharmonic, as opposed to the case of even multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. More interestingly, multiple stochastic resonance can also be improved by the suitable heterogeneous neuron. Presented results can provide good insights into the understanding of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  9. Transient global amnesia mimics: Transient epileptic amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Nicastro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 79-year-old patient referred for suspected transient global amnesia, after an episode of anterograde amnesia which lasted 90 min. An EEG, performed after the episode, showed bilateral temporal electrographic seizures, orienting the diagnosis toward a transient epileptic amnesia. Transient epileptic amnesia is defined by temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by recurrent transient amnestic episodes of 30–90 min in duration, sometimes associated with olfactory hallucinations or oral automatisms. Response to antiepileptic drugs is excellent. We would like to raise awareness toward this epileptic amnesia when facing atypical or recurrent transient amnestic episodes.

  10. [Transient brain ischemia: NMDA receptor modulation and delayed neuronal death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benquet, Pascal; Gee, Christine E; Gerber, Urs

    2008-02-01

    Transient global ischemia induces delayed neuronal death in certain cell types and brain regions while sparing cells in other areas. A key process through which oxygen-glucose deprivation triggers cell death is the excessive accumulation of the neurotransmitter glutamate leading to over excitation of neurons. In certain neurons this increase in glutamate will potentiate the NMDA type of glutamate receptor, which can then initiate cell death. This review provides an update of the neurophysiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms inducing post-ischemic plasticity of NMDA receptors, focusing on the sensitive CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus as compared to the relatively resistant neighboring CA3 neurons. Both a change in the equilibrium between protein tyrosine kinases/phosphatases and an increased density of surface NMDA receptors in response to ischemia may explain the selective vulnerability of specific cell types. Implications for the treatment of stroke and reasons for the failures of human clinical trials utilizing NMDA receptor antagonists are also discussed.

  11. Long-Term Recency in Anterograde Amnesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Talmi

    Full Text Available Amnesia is usually described as an impairment of a long-term memory (LTM despite an intact short-term memory (STM. The intact recency effect in amnesia had supported this view. Although dual-store models of memory have been challenged by single-store models based on interference theory, this had relatively little influence on our understanding and treatment of amnesia, perhaps because the debate has centred on experiments in the neurologically intact population. Here we tested a key prediction of single-store models for free recall in amnesia: that people with amnesia will exhibit a memory advantage for the most recent items even when all items are stored in and retrieved from LTM, an effect called long-term recency. People with amnesia and matched controls studied, and then free-recalled, word lists with a distractor task following each word, including the last (continual distractor task, CDFR. This condition was compared to an Immediate Free Recall (IFR, no distractors and a Delayed Free Recall (DFR, end-of-list distractor only condition. People with amnesia demonstrated the full long-term recency pattern: the recency effect was attenuated in DFR and returned in CDFR. The advantage of recency over midlist items in CDFR was comparable to that of controls, confirming a key prediction of single-store models. Memory deficits appeared only after the first word recalled in each list, suggesting the impairment in amnesia may emerge only as the participant's recall sequence develops, perhaps due to increased susceptibility to output interference. Our findings suggest that interference mechanisms are preserved in amnesia despite the overall impairment to LTM, and challenge strict dual-store models of memory and their dominance in explaining amnesia. We discuss the implication of our findings for rehabilitation.

  12. Long-Term Recency in Anterograde Amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Deborah; Caplan, Jeremy B; Richards, Brian; Moscovitch, Morris

    2015-01-01

    Amnesia is usually described as an impairment of a long-term memory (LTM) despite an intact short-term memory (STM). The intact recency effect in amnesia had supported this view. Although dual-store models of memory have been challenged by single-store models based on interference theory, this had relatively little influence on our understanding and treatment of amnesia, perhaps because the debate has centred on experiments in the neurologically intact population. Here we tested a key prediction of single-store models for free recall in amnesia: that people with amnesia will exhibit a memory advantage for the most recent items even when all items are stored in and retrieved from LTM, an effect called long-term recency. People with amnesia and matched controls studied, and then free-recalled, word lists with a distractor task following each word, including the last (continual distractor task, CDFR). This condition was compared to an Immediate Free Recall (IFR, no distractors) and a Delayed Free Recall (DFR, end-of-list distractor only) condition. People with amnesia demonstrated the full long-term recency pattern: the recency effect was attenuated in DFR and returned in CDFR. The advantage of recency over midlist items in CDFR was comparable to that of controls, confirming a key prediction of single-store models. Memory deficits appeared only after the first word recalled in each list, suggesting the impairment in amnesia may emerge only as the participant's recall sequence develops, perhaps due to increased susceptibility to output interference. Our findings suggest that interference mechanisms are preserved in amnesia despite the overall impairment to LTM, and challenge strict dual-store models of memory and their dominance in explaining amnesia. We discuss the implication of our findings for rehabilitation.

  13. Delayed neuronal recovery and neuronal death in rat hippocampus following severe cerebral ischemia: possible relationship to abnormalities in neuronal processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, C K; Pulsinelli, W A

    1984-06-01

    Mechanisms involved in the postischemic delay in neuronal recovery or death in rat hippocampus were evaluated by light and electron microscopy at 3, 15, 30, and 120 min and 24, 36, 48, and 72 h following severe cerebral ischemia that was produced by permanent occlusion of the vertebral arteries and 30-min occlusion of the common carotid arteries. During the early postischemic period, neurons in the Ca1 and Ca3 regions both showed transient mitochondrial swelling followed by the disaggregation of polyribosomes, decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), loss of Golgi apparatus (GA) cisterns, and decrease in GA vesicles . Recovery of these organelles in Ca3 neurons was first noted between 24 and 36 h and was accompanied by a marked proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER). Many Ca1 neurons initially recovered between 24 and 36 h, but subsequent cell death at 48-72 h was often preceded by peripheral chromatolysis, constriction and shrinkage of the proximal dendrites, and cytoplasmic dilatation that was continuous with focal expansion of RER cisterns. Because SER accumulates in resistant Ca3 neurons and proximal neuronal processes are damaged in vulnerable Ca1 neurons, we hypothesize that delayed cell recovery or death in vulnerable and resistant postischemic hippocampal neurons is related to abnormalities in neuronal processes.

  14. The adaptation of spike backpropagation delays in cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi eBuskila

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We measured the action potential backpropagation delays in apical dendrites of layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex under different stimulation regimes that exclude synaptic involvement. These delays showed robust features and did not correlate to either transient change in the stimulus strength or low frequency stimulation of suprathreshold membrane oscillations. However, our results indicate that backpropagation delays correlate with high frequency (>10 Hz stimulation of membrane oscillations, and that persistent suprathreshold sinusoidal stimulation injected directly into the soma results in an increase of the backpropagation delay, suggesting an intrinsic adaptation of the bAP, which does not involve any synaptic modifications. Moreover, the calcium chelator BAPTA eliminated the alterations in the backpropagation delays, strengthening the hypothesis that increased calcium concentration in the dendrites modulates dendritic excitability and can impact the backpropagation velocity. These results emphasize the impact of dendritic excitability on bAP velocity along the dendritic tree, which affects the precision of the bAP arrival at the synapse during specific stimulus regimes, and is capable of shifting the extent and polarity of synaptic strength during suprathreshold synaptic processes such as STDP.

  15. Modularity Induced Gating and Delays in Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein-Idelson, Mark; Cohen, Gilad; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Hanein, Yael

    2016-04-01

    Neural networks, despite their highly interconnected nature, exhibit distinctly localized and gated activation. Modularity, a distinctive feature of neural networks, has been recently proposed as an important parameter determining the manner by which networks support activity propagation. Here we use an engineered biological model, consisting of engineered rat cortical neurons, to study the role of modular topology in gating the activity between cell populations. We show that pairs of connected modules support conditional propagation (transmitting stronger bursts with higher probability), long delays and propagation asymmetry. Moreover, large modular networks manifest diverse patterns of both local and global activation. Blocking inhibition decreased activity diversity and replaced it with highly consistent transmission patterns. By independently controlling modularity and disinhibition, experimentally and in a model, we pose that modular topology is an important parameter affecting activation localization and is instrumental for population-level gating by disinhibition.

  16. Autaptic self-feedback-induced synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts neuronal network with time delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gong, Yubing; Wu, Yanan

    2015-04-01

    Autapse is a special synapse that connects a neuron to itself. In this work, we numerically study the effect of chemical autapse on the synchronization of Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron network with time delays. It is found that the neurons exhibit synchronization transitions as autaptic self-feedback delay is varied, and the phenomenon enhances when autaptic self-feedback strength increases. Moreover, this phenomenon becomes strongest when network time delay or coupling strength is optimal. It is also found that the synchronization transitions by network time delay can be enhanced by autaptic activity and become strongest when autaptic delay is optimal. These results show that autaptic delayed self-feedback activity can intermittently enhance and reduce the synchronization of the neuronal network and hence plays an important role in regulating the synchronization of the neurons. These findings could find potential implications for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  17. Protein aggregation in association with delayed neuronal death in rat model of brain ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei GE; Tianfei LUG; Shuanglin FU; Wenchen LI; Chonghao WANG; Chuibing ZHOU; Yinan LUO

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between protein aggregation and delayed neuronal death, we adopted rat models of 20 min ischemia. Brain ischemia was produced using the 2-vessel occlusion (2VO) model in rats Light microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy and Western blot analysis were performed for morphological analysis of neurons, and protein detection. The results showed delayed neuronal death took place at 72 h after ischemia-reperfusion, protein aggregates formed at 4 h after reperfusion and reached the peak at 24 h after reper-fusion, and Western blot analysis was consistent with transmission electronic microscopy. We conclude that protein aggregation is one of the important factors leading to delayed neuronal death.

  18. Delay-enhanced coherence of spiral waves in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qingyun [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) and School of Statistics and Mathematics, Inner Mongolia Finance and Economics College, Huhhot 010051 (China)], E-mail: nmqingyun@163.com; Perc, Matjaz [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, University of Maribor, Koroska cesta 160, SI-2000 Maribor (Slovenia); Duan Zhisheng [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Chen Guanrong [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex Systems, Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-08-25

    We study the spatial dynamics of spiral waves in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal ensembles evoked by different information transmission delays and network topologies. In classical settings of coherence resonance the intensity of noise is fine-tuned so as to optimize the system's response. Here, we keep the noise intensity constant, and instead, vary the length of information transmission delay amongst coupled neurons. We show that there exists an intermediate transmission delay by which the spiral waves are optimally ordered, hence indicating the existence of delay-enhanced coherence of spatial dynamics in the examined system. Additionally, we examine the robustness of this phenomenon as the diffusive interaction topology changes towards the small-world type, and discover that shortcut links amongst distant neurons hinder the emergence of coherent spiral waves irrespective of transmission delay length. Presented results thus provide insights that could facilitate the understanding of information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  19. Delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances on scale-free neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matjaz; Duan, Zhisheng; Chen, Guanrong

    2009-06-01

    We study the effects of periodic subthreshold pacemaker activity and time-delayed coupling on stochastic resonance over scale-free neuronal networks. As the two extreme options, we introduce the pacemaker, respectively, to the neuron with the highest degree and to one of the neurons with the lowest degree within the network, but we also consider the case when all neurons are exposed to the periodic forcing. In the absence of delay, we show that an intermediate intensity of noise is able to optimally assist the pacemaker in imposing its rhythm on the whole ensemble, irrespective to its placing, thus providing evidences for stochastic resonance on the scale-free neuronal networks. Interestingly thereby, if the forcing in form of a periodic pulse train is introduced to all neurons forming the network, the stochastic resonance decreases as compared to the case when only a single neuron is paced. Moreover, we show that finite delays in coupling can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances independently of the placing of the pacemaker, but they can also altogether destroy stochastic resonance. Delay-induced multiple stochastic resonances manifest as well-expressed maxima of the correlation measure, appearing at every multiple of the pacemaker period. We argue that fine-tuned delays and locally active pacemakers are vital for assuring optimal conditions for stochastic resonance on complex neuronal networks.

  20. The effect of distributed time-delays on the synchronization of neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhvah, Ajay Deep

    2017-01-01

    Here we investigate the synchronization of networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons coupled in scale-free, small-world and random topologies, in the presence of distributed time delays in the coupling of neurons. We explore how the synchronization transition is affected when the time delays in the interactions between pairs of interacting neurons are non-uniform. We find that the presence of distributed time-delays does not change the behavior of the synchronization transition significantly, vis-a-vis networks with constant time-delay, where the value of the constant time-delay is the mean of the distributed delays. We also notice that a normal distribution of delays gives rise to a transition at marginally lower coupling strengths, vis-a-vis uniformly distributed delays. These trends hold across classes of networks and for varying standard deviations of the delay distribution, indicating the generality of these results. So we conclude that distributed delays, which may be typically expected in real-world situations, do not have a notable effect on synchronization. This allows results obtained with constant delays to remain relevant even in the case of randomly distributed delays.

  1. Effects of distance-dependent delay on small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jinjie; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-04-01

    We study firing behaviors and the transitions among them in small-world noisy neuronal networks with electrical synapses and information transmission delay. Each neuron is modeled by a two-dimensional Rulkov map neuron. The distance between neurons, which is a main source of the time delay, is taken into consideration. Through spatiotemporal patterns and interspike intervals as well as the interburst intervals, the collective behaviors are revealed. It is found that the networks switch from resting state into intermittent firing state under Gaussian noise excitation. Initially, noise-induced firing behaviors are disturbed by small time delays. Periodic firing behaviors with irregular zigzag patterns emerge with an increase of the delay and become progressively regular after a critical value is exceeded. More interestingly, in accordance with regular patterns, the spiking frequency doubles compared with the former stage for the spiking neuronal network. A growth of frequency persists for a larger delay and a transition to antiphase synchronization is observed. Furthermore, it is proved that these transitions are generic also for the bursting neuronal network and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuronal network. We show these transitions due to the increase of time delay are robust to the noise strength, coupling strength, network size, and rewiring probability.

  2. Ordering chaos and synchronization transitions by chemical delay and coupling on scale-free neuronal networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Yubing, E-mail: gongyubing09@hotmail.co [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Xie Yanhang; Lin Xiu; Hao Yinghang; Ma Xiaoguang [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Research highlights: Chemical delay and chemical coupling can tame chaotic bursting. Chemical delay-induced transitions from bursting synchronization to intermittent multiple spiking synchronizations. Chemical coupling-induced different types of delay-dependent firing transitions. - Abstract: Chemical synaptic connections are more common than electric ones in neurons, and information transmission delay is especially significant for the synapses of chemical type. In this paper, we report a phenomenon of ordering spatiotemporal chaos and synchronization transitions by the delays and coupling through chemical synapses of modified Hodgkin-Huxley (MHH) neurons on scale-free networks. As the delay {tau} is increased, the neurons exhibit transitions from bursting synchronization (BS) to intermittent multiple spiking synchronizations (SS). As the coupling g{sub syn} is increased, the neurons exhibit different types of firing transitions, depending on the values of {tau}. For a smaller {tau}, there are transitions from spatiotemporal chaotic bursting (SCB) to BS or SS; while for a larger {tau}, there are transitions from SCB to intermittent multiple SS. These findings show that the delays and coupling through chemical synapses can tame the chaotic firings and repeatedly enhance the firing synchronization of neurons, and hence could play important roles in the firing activity of the neurons on scale-free networks.

  3. Synchronization and associative memory of FitzHugh-Nagumo neuronal networks with randomly distributed time delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, J H; Wu, Y J [School of Information Science and Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Yu, H J [Department of Mechanics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: jhpeng@ecust.edu.cn

    2008-02-15

    Synchronization and associative memory in a neural network composed of the widely discussed FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons is investigated in this paper. Based on the reality of the microscopic biological structure in the neural system, the couplings among those neurons are accompanied with randomly distributed time delays which models the times needed for pulses propagating on the axons from the presynaptic neurons to the postsynaptic neurons. The memory is represented in the spatiotemporal firing pattern of the neurons, and the memory retrieval is accomplished with the fluctuations of the noise in the system.

  4. Synchronization of map-based neurons with memory and synaptic delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sausedo-Solorio, J.M. [Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, 42074 Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); Pisarchik, A.N., E-mail: apisarch@cio.mx [Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Loma del Bosque 115, Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Centre for Biomedical Technology, Technical University of Madrid, Campus Montegancedo, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcon, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-13

    Synchronization of two synaptically coupled neurons with memory and synaptic delay is studied using the Rulkov map, one of the simplest neuron models which displays specific features inherent to bursting dynamics. We demonstrate a transition from lag to anticipated synchronization as the relationship between the memory duration and the synaptic delay time changes. The neuron maps synchronize either with anticipation, if the memory is longer than the synaptic delay time, or with lag otherwise. The mean anticipation time is equal to the difference between the memory and synaptic delay independently of the coupling strength. Frequency entrainment and phase-locking phenomena as well as a transition from regular spikes to chaos are demonstrated with respect to the coupling strength. - Highlights: • We study synchronization of neurons with memory and synaptic delay in the map model. • Neurons synchronize either with anticipation or with lag depending on delay time. • Mean anticipation time is equal to the difference between memory and synaptic delay. • Frequency entrainment and phase locking are studied with respect to the coupling.

  5. Dynamics of Time Delay-Induced Multiple Synchronous Behaviors in Inhibitory Coupled Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huaguang; Zhao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory synapse can induce synchronous behaviors different from the anti-phase synchronous behaviors, which have been reported in recent studies. In the present paper, synchronous behaviors are investigated in the motif model composed of reciprocal inhibitory coupled neurons with endogenous bursting and time delay. When coupling strength is weak, synchronous behavior appears at a single interval of time delay within a bursting period. When coupling strength is strong, multiple synchronous behaviors appear at different intervals of time delay within a bursting period. The different bursting patterns of synchronous behaviors, and time delays and coupling strengths that can induce the synchronous bursting patterns can be well interpreted by the dynamics of the endogenous bursting pattern of isolated neuron, which is acquired by the fast-slow dissection method, combined with the inhibitory coupling current. For an isolated neuron, when a negative impulsive current with suitable strength is applied at different phases of the bursting, multiple different bursting patterns can be induced. For a neuron in the motif, the inhibitory coupling current, of which the application time and strength is modulated by time delay and coupling strength, can cause single or multiple synchronous firing patterns like the negative impulsive current when time delay and coupling strength is suitable. The difference compared to the previously reported multiple synchronous behaviors that appear at time delays wider than a period of the endogenous firing is discussed. The results present novel examples of synchronous behaviors in the neuronal network with inhibitory synapses and provide a reasonable explanation. PMID:26394224

  6. The effect of distributed time-delays on the synchronization of neuronal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kachhvah, Ajay Deep

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigate the synchronization of networks of FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons coupled in scale-free, small-world and random topologies, in the presence of distributed time delays in the coupling of neurons. We explore how the synchronization transition is affected when the time delays in the interactions between pairs of interacting neurons are non-uniform. We find that the presence of distributed time-delays does not change the behavior of the synchronization transition significantly, vis-a-vis networks with constant time-delay, where the value of the constant time-delay is the mean of the distributed delays. We also notice that a normal distribution of delays gives rise to a transition at marginally lower coupling strengths, vis-a-vis uniformly distributed delays. These trends hold across classes of networks and for varying standard deviations of the delay distribution, indicating the generality of these results. So we conclude that distributed delays, which may be typically expected in real-world situatio...

  7. Synchronization transitions on small-world neuronal networks: Effects of information transmission delay and rewiring probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Duan, Zhisheng; Perc, Matjaž; Chen, Guanrong

    2008-09-01

    Synchronization transitions are investigated in small-world neuronal networks that are locally modeled by the Rulkov map with additive spatiotemporal noise. In particular, we investigate the impact of different information transmission delays and rewiring probability. We show that short delays induce zigzag fronts of excitations, whereas intermediate delays can further detriment synchrony in the network due to a dynamic clustering anti-phase synchronization transition. Detailed investigations reveal, however, that for longer delay lengths the synchrony of excitations in the network can again be enhanced due to the emergence of in-phase synchronization. In addition, we show that an appropriate small-world topology can restore synchronized behavior provided information transmission delays are either short or long. On the other hand, within the intermediate delay region, which is characterized by anti-phase synchronization and clustering, differences in the network topology do not notably affect the synchrony of neuronal activity.

  8. Delayed death of identified reticulospinal neurons after spinal cord injury in lampreys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifman, M I; Zhang, G; Selzer, M E

    2008-09-20

    There is controversy about whether axotomized neurons undergo death or only severe atrophy after spinal cord injury (SCI) in mammals. Lampreys recover from complete spinal transection, but only about half of the severed spinal-projecting axons regenerate through the site of injury. The fates of the unregenerated neurons remain unknown, and until now death of axotomized spinal-projecting neurons has not been described in the lamprey brain. We now report that in animals allowed to survive for 12 or more weeks after spinal cord transection, several identified reticulospinal (RS) neurons were missing in Nissl-stained or neurofilament-immunostained brain whole mounts. At earlier times, these neurons were swollen and pale in Nissl-stained preparations. Retrograde fluorescent labeling from the site of transection combined with TUNEL histochemistry suggested that neuronal death, including that of the identified RS neurons, began in animals 4 weeks posttransection, reaching a peak at 12-16 weeks. This was not seen in untransected animals. The TUNEL positivity suggests that some cells were dying by apoptosis. Of special interest, among the identified neurons, this delayed cell death was restricted to neurons that at earlier posttransection times have a low probability of regeneration. These data show that SCI induces delayed cell death in lamprey spinal-projecting neurons and suggest that the reason why some neurons are "bad regenerators" is that they are already undergoing apoptotic cell death. Thus protection from apoptosis may be necessary in order to enhance axonal regeneration after SCI. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Firing statistics of inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback. I. Output ISI probability density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidybida, A K; Kravchuk, K G

    2013-06-01

    Activity of inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback is considered in the framework of point stochastic processes. The neuron receives excitatory input impulses from a Poisson stream, and inhibitory impulses from the feedback line with a delay. We investigate here, how does the presence of inhibitory feedback affect the output firing statistics. Using binding neuron (BN) as a model, we derive analytically the exact expressions for the output interspike intervals (ISI) probability density, mean output ISI and coefficient of variation as functions of model's parameters for the case of threshold 2. Using the leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) model, as well as the BN model with higher thresholds, these statistical quantities are found numerically. In contrast to the previously studied situation of no feedback, the ISI probability densities found here both for BN and LIF neuron become bimodal and have discontinuity of jump type. Nevertheless, the presence of inhibitory delayed feedback was not found to affect substantially the output ISI coefficient of variation. The ISI coefficient of variation found ranges between 0.5 and 1. It is concluded that introduction of delayed inhibitory feedback can radically change neuronal output firing statistics. This statistics is as well distinct from what was found previously (Vidybida and Kravchuk, 2009) by a similar method for excitatory neuron with delayed feedback.

  10. Delay-induced coherence bi-resonance-like behavior in stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we study how information transmission delays affect the spiking behavior of electrically coupled stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons on Newman-Watts networks.It is found that the spiking behavior becomes the most regular at an optimal time delay,indicating the occurrence of delay-induced coherence resonance-like (CR-like) behavior.Interestingly,there are different CR-like types,depending on the membrane patch size of the neuron.For a smaller patch size,only single CR-like behavior occurs;while for a larger patch size,coherence bi-resonance-like (CBR) behavior appears.These findings show that the delay-induced CR-like behavior is closely related to the channel noise strength,and the coupled neurons may exhibit different spiking behaviors under the interplay of the channel noise and time delay.Therefore,the channel noise should be taken into account in the study of time delay-related spiking activity in stochastic HH neurons.This work provides new insight into the role of channel noise and information transmission delays in realistic neural systems.

  11. Three dimensions of dissociative amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Paul F

    2013-01-01

    Principal axis factor analysis with promax rotation extracted 3 factors from the 42 memory and amnesia items of the Multidimensional Inventory of Dissociation (MID) database (N = 2,569): Discovering Dissociated Actions, Lapses of Recent Memory and Skills, and Gaps in Remote Memory. The 3 factors' shared variance ranged from 36% to 64%. Construed as scales, the 3 factor scales had Cronbach's alpha coefficients of .96, .94, and .93, respectively. The scales correlated strongly with mean Dissociative Experiences Scale scores, mean MID scores, and total scores on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders-Revised (SCID-D-R). What is interesting is that the 3 amnesia factors exhibited a range of correlations with SCID-D-R Amnesia scores (.52, .63, and .70, respectively), suggesting that the SCID-D-R Amnesia score emphasizes gaps in remote memory over amnesias related to dissociative identity disorder. The 3 amnesia factor scales exhibited a clinically meaningful pattern of significant differences among dissociative identity disorder, dissociative disorder not otherwise specified-1, dissociative amnesia, depersonalization disorder, and nonclinical participants. The 3 amnesia factors may have greater clinical utility for frontline clinicians than (a) amnesia as discussed in the context of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, nosology of the dissociative disorders or (b) P. Janet's (1893/1977 ) 4-fold classification of dissociative amnesia. The author recommends systematic study of the phenomenological differences within specific dissociative symptoms and their differential relationship to specific dissociative disorders.

  12. Synchronization transitions on scale-free neuronal networks due to finite information transmission delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matjaž; Duan, Zhisheng; Chen, Guanrong

    2009-08-01

    We investigate front propagation and synchronization transitions in dependence on the information transmission delay and coupling strength over scale-free neuronal networks with different average degrees and scaling exponents. As the underlying model of neuronal dynamics, we use the efficient Rulkov map with additive noise. We show that increasing the coupling strength enhances synchronization monotonously, whereas delay plays a more subtle role. In particular, we found that depending on the inherent oscillation frequency of individual neurons, regions of irregular and regular propagating excitatory fronts appear intermittently as the delay increases. These delay-induced synchronization transitions manifest as well-expressed minima in the measure for spatial synchrony, appearing at every multiple of the oscillation frequency. Larger coupling strengths or average degrees can broaden the region of regular propagating fronts by a given information transmission delay and further improve synchronization. These results are robust against variations in system size, intensity of additive noise, and the scaling exponent of the underlying scale-free topology. We argue that fine-tuned information transmission delays are vital for assuring optimally synchronized excitatory fronts on complex neuronal networks and, indeed, they should be seen as important as the coupling strength or the overall density of interneuronal connections. We finally discuss some biological implications of the presented results.

  13. Synchronization and array-enhanced resonances in delayed coupled neuronal network with channel noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianchun; Ding, Shaojie; Li, Hui; He, Guolong; Zhang, Xuejuan

    2014-09-01

    This paper studies the combined effect of transmission delay and channel fluctuations on population behaviors of an excitatory Erdös-Rényi neuronal network. First, it is found that the network reaches a perfect spatial temporal coherence at a suitable membrane size. Such a coherence resonance is stimulus-free and is array-enhanced. Second, the presence of transmission delay can induce intermittent changes of the population dynamics. Besides, two resonant peaks of the population firing rate are observed as delay changes: one is at τd≈7ms for all membrane areas, which reflects the resonance between the delayed interaction and the intrinsic period of channel kinetics; the other occurs when the transmission delay equals to the mean inter-spike intervals of the population firings in the absence of delay, which reflects the resonance between the delayed interaction and the firing period of the non-delayed system. Third, concerning the impact of network topology and population size, it is found that decreasing the connection probability does not change the range of transmission delay but broadens the range of synaptic coupling that supports population neurons to generate action potentials synchronously and temporally coherently. Furthermore, there exists a critical connection probability that distinguishes the population dynamics into an asynchronous and synchronous state. All the results we obtained are based on networks of size N = 500, which are shown to be robust to further increasing the population size.

  14. Impact of Partial Time Delay on Temporal Dynamics of Watts-Strogatz Small-World Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hao; Sun, Xiaojuan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we mainly discuss effects of partial time delay on temporal dynamics of Watts-Strogatz (WS) small-world neuronal networks by controlling two parameters. One is the time delay τ and the other is the probability of partial time delay pdelay. Temporal dynamics of WS small-world neuronal networks are discussed with the aid of temporal coherence and mean firing rate. With the obtained simulation results, it is revealed that for small time delay τ, the probability pdelay could weaken temporal coherence and increase mean firing rate of neuronal networks, which indicates that it could improve neuronal firings of the neuronal networks while destroying firing regularity. For large time delay τ, temporal coherence and mean firing rate do not have great changes with respect to pdelay. Time delay τ always has great influence on both temporal coherence and mean firing rate no matter what is the value of pdelay. Moreover, with the analysis of spike trains and histograms of interspike intervals of neurons inside neuronal networks, it is found that the effects of partial time delays on temporal coherence and mean firing rate could be the result of locking between the period of neuronal firing activities and the value of time delay τ. In brief, partial time delay could have great influence on temporal dynamics of the neuronal networks.

  15. DNA fragmentation follows delayed neuronal death in CA1 neurons exposed to transient global ischemia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, C K; Torres-Munoz, J; Roberts, B; Olarte, J P; Nowak, T S; Pulsinelli, W A

    1997-09-01

    Apoptosis is an active, gene-directed process of cell death in which early fragmentation of nuclear DNA precedes morphological changes in the nucleus and, later, in the cytoplasm. In ischemia, biochemical studies have detected oligonucleosomes of apoptosis whereas sequential morphological studies show changes consistent with necrosis rather than apoptosis. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, we subjected rats to 10 minutes of transient forebrain ischemia followed by 1 to 14 days of reperfusion. Parameters evaluated in the CA1 region of the hippocampus included morphology, in situ end labeling (ISEL) of fragmented DNA, and expression of p53. Neurons were indistinguishable from controls at postischemic day 1 but displayed cytoplasmic basophilia or focal condensations at day 2; some neurons were slightly swollen and a few appeared normal. In situ end labeling was absent. At days 3 and 5, approximately 40 to 60% of CA1 neurons had shrunken eosinophilic cytoplasm and pyknotic nuclei, but only half of these were ISEL. By day 14, many of the necrotic neurons had been removed by phagocytes; those remaining retained mild ISEL. Neither p53 protein nor mRNA were identified in control or postischemic brain by in situ hybridization with riboprobes or by northern blot analysis. These results show that DNA fragmentation occurs after the development of delayed neuronal death in CA1 neurons subjected to 10 minutes of global ischemia. They suggest that mechanisms other than apoptosis may mediate the irreversible changes in the CA1 neurons in this model.

  16. Can scale-freeness offset delayed signal detection in neuronal networks?

    CERN Document Server

    Uzun, Rukiye; Perc, Matjaz

    2014-01-01

    First spike latency following stimulus onset is of significant physiological relevance. Neurons transmit information about their inputs by transforming them into spike trains, and the timing of these spike trains is in turn crucial for effectively encoding that information. Random processes and uncertainty that underly neuronal dynamics have been shown to prolong the time towards the first response in a phenomenon dubbed noise-delayed decay. Here we study whether Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with a tunable intensity of intrinsic noise might have shorter response times to external stimuli just above threshold if placed on a scale-free network. We show that the heterogeneity of the interaction network may indeed eradicate slow responsiveness, but only if the coupling between individual neurons is sufficiently strong. Increasing the average degree also favors a fast response, but it is less effective than increasing the coupling strength. We also show that noise-delayed decay can be offset further by adjusting the fre...

  17. On learning time delays between the spikes from different input neurons in a biophysical model of a pyramidal neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsou, Achilleas; Bugmann, Guido; Christodoulou, Chris

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems are able to recognise temporal sequences of stimuli or compute in the temporal domain. In this paper we are exploring whether a biophysical model of a pyramidal neuron can detect and learn systematic time delays between the spikes from different input neurons. In particular, we investigate whether it is possible to reinforce pairs of synapses separated by a dendritic propagation time delay corresponding to the arrival time difference of two spikes from two different input neurons. We examine two subthreshold learning approaches where the first relies on the backpropagation of EPSPs (excitatory postsynaptic potentials) and the second on the backpropagation of a somatic action potential, whose production is supported by a learning-enabling background current. The first approach does not provide a learning signal that sufficiently differentiates between synapses at different locations, while in the second approach, somatic spikes do not provide a reliable signal distinguishing arrival time differences of the order of the dendritic propagation time. It appears that the firing of pyramidal neurons shows little sensitivity to heterosynaptic spike arrival time differences of several milliseconds. This neuron is therefore unlikely to be able to learn to detect such differences.

  18. Non-Markovian spiking statistics of a neuron with delayed feedback in presence of refractoriness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Kseniia; Vidybida, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Spiking statistics of a self-inhibitory neuron is considered. The neuron receives excitatory input from a Poisson stream and inhibitory impulses through a feedback line with a delay. After triggering, the neuron is in the refractory state for a positive period of time. Recently, [35,6], it was proven for a neuron with delayed feedback and without the refractory state, that the output stream of interspike intervals (ISI) cannot be represented as a Markov process. The refractory state presence, in a sense limits the memory range in the spiking process, which might restore Markov property to the ISI stream. Here we check such a possibility. For this purpose, we calculate the conditional probability density P (tn+1 l tn,...,t1,t0), and prove exactly that it does not reduce to P (tn+1 l tn,...,t1) for any n ⋝0. That means, that activity of the system with refractory state as well cannot be represented as a Markov process of any order. We conclude that it is namely the delayed feedback presence which results in non-Markovian statistics of neuronal firing. As delayed feedback lines are common for any realistic neural network, the non-Markovian statistics of the network activity should be taken into account in processing of experimental data.

  19. Hopf bifurcation of an (n + 1) -neuron bidirectional associative memory neural network model with delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Min; Zheng, Wei Xing; Cao, Jinde

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on Hopf bifurcations of neural networks with delays are confined to simplified neural network models consisting of only two, three, four, five, or six neurons. It is well known that neural networks are complex and large-scale nonlinear dynamical systems, so the dynamics of the delayed neural networks are very rich and complicated. Although discussing the dynamics of networks with a few neurons may help us to understand large-scale networks, there are inevitably some complicated problems that may be overlooked if simplified networks are carried over to large-scale networks. In this paper, a general delayed bidirectional associative memory neural network model with n + 1 neurons is considered. By analyzing the associated characteristic equation, the local stability of the trivial steady state is examined, and then the existence of the Hopf bifurcation at the trivial steady state is established. By applying the normal form theory and the center manifold reduction, explicit formulae are derived to determine the direction and stability of the bifurcating periodic solution. Furthermore, the paper highlights situations where the Hopf bifurcations are particularly critical, in the sense that the amplitude and the period of oscillations are very sensitive to errors due to tolerances in the implementation of neuron interconnections. It is shown that the sensitivity is crucially dependent on the delay and also significantly influenced by the feature of the number of neurons. Numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the main results.

  20. Hypnosis, memory and amnesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Kihlstrom, J F

    1997-01-01

    Hypnotized subjects respond to suggestions from the hypnotist for imaginative experiences involving alterations in perception and memory. Individual differences in hypnotizability are only weakly related to other forms of suggestibility. Neuropsychological speculations about hypnosis focus on the right hemisphere and/or the frontal lobes. Posthypnotic amnesia refers to subjects' difficulty in remembering, after hypnosis, the events and experiences that transpired while they were hypnotized. P...

  1. Delayed focal involvement of upper motor neurons in the Madras pattern of motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, R; Scalise, A; Iani, C; Palmieri, M G; Bernardi, G

    1998-12-01

    We report the case of a young man from the south of India, initially presenting the typical signs of benign monomelic amyotrophy (BMA) in the left upper limb. After several years, the involvement of other limbs and the appearance of bulbar signs suggested the possible diagnosis of the Madras pattern of motor neuron disease (MMND). Serial motor evoked potential (MEP) recordings allowed detection of the onset of a focal involvement of upper motor neurons (UMN) controlling innervation in the originally amyotrophic limb. Therefore, serial MEP recordings can be useful for the early detection of sub-clinical UMN damage in motor neuron disease presenting with pure lower motor neuron (LMN) signs.

  2. Functional ("psychogenic") amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jason; Van Gorp, Wilfred G

    2006-07-01

    Patients who present with severely impaired memory functioning without a discernable neurological cause typically have experienced one or more severely stressful life events. These patients, who are described as having "psychogenic" or "dissociative" amnesia, typically differ from patients with the neurologic amnestic syndrome in that memory for their personal life histories is much more severely affected than is their ability to learn and retain new information; that is, they have isolated retrograde amnesia. Recent cognitive and brain imaging research has begun to reveal some of the cerebral mechanisms underlying functional amnesia, but this disorder remains best conceptualized as a relatively rare form of illness-simulating behavior rather than a disease. Neuropsychological assessment is often useful in revealing the circumscribed nature of the patient's performance deficits, the spared functions that can be brought to bear in rehabilitation, and the emotional disorders requiring psychiatric treatment. Controlled treatment trials are nonexistent, but case reports suggest that supportive psychotherapy, systematic relaxation training, hypnosis, and sedative/anxiolytic medications are useful in facilitating recovery. These treatments are often combined with a psychoeducational approach that essentially reteaches the patient his or her life story.

  3. Phase-coherence transitions and communication in the gamma range between delay-coupled neuronal populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Barardi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization between neuronal populations plays an important role in information transmission between brain areas. In particular, collective oscillations emerging from the synchronized activity of thousands of neurons can increase the functional connectivity between neural assemblies by coherently coordinating their phases. This synchrony of neuronal activity can take place within a cortical patch or between different cortical regions. While short-range interactions between neurons involve just a few milliseconds, communication through long-range projections between different regions could take up to tens of milliseconds. How these heterogeneous transmission delays affect communication between neuronal populations is not well known. To address this question, we have studied the dynamics of two bidirectionally delayed-coupled neuronal populations using conductance-based spiking models, examining how different synaptic delays give rise to in-phase/anti-phase transitions at particular frequencies within the gamma range, and how this behavior is related to the phase coherence between the two populations at different frequencies. We have used spectral analysis and information theory to quantify the information exchanged between the two networks. For different transmission delays between the two coupled populations, we analyze how the local field potential and multi-unit activity calculated from one population convey information in response to a set of external inputs applied to the other population. The results confirm that zero-lag synchronization maximizes information transmission, although out-of-phase synchronization allows for efficient communication provided the coupling delay, the phase lag between the populations, and the frequency of the oscillations are properly matched.

  4. Neuregulin-1 is neuroprotective in a rat model of organophosphate-induced delayed neuronal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yonggang [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Lein, Pamela J. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Liu, Cuimei [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Bruun, Donald A.; Giulivi, Cecilia [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Ford, Gregory D. [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Department of Biology, Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Tewolde, Teclemichael [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Ross-Inta, Catherine [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Ford, Byron D., E-mail: bford@msm.edu [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Current medical countermeasures against organophosphate (OP) nerve agents are effective in reducing mortality, but do not sufficiently protect the CNS from delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. In this study, we examined the efficacy of neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) in protecting against delayed neuronal cell death following acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylflurophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg BW, i.m.) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg BW, i.m.) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg BW, i.p.) intoxication to increase survival and reduce peripheral signs of cholinergic toxicity but not prevent DFP-induced seizures or delayed neuronal injury. Pretreatment with NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. However, neuronal injury was significantly reduced in most brain regions by pretreatment with NRG-1 isoforms NRG-EGF (3.2 μg/kg BW, i.a) or NRG-GGF2 (48 μg/kg BW, i.a.) as determined by FluroJade-B labeling in multiple brain regions at 24 h post-DFP injection. NRG-1 also blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress-mediated protein damage in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection similarly provided significant neuroprotection against delayed neuronal injury. These findings identify NRG-1 as a promising adjuvant therapy to current medical countermeasures for enhancing neuroprotection against acute OP intoxication. -- Highlights: ► NRG-1 blocked DFP induced neuronal injury. ► NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. ► NRG-1 blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. ► Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection prevented delayed neuronal injury.

  5. Stimulus-induced transition of clustering firings in neuronal networks with information transmission delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2013-07-01

    We study the evolution of spatiotemporal dynamics and transition of clustering firing synchronization on spiking Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks as information transmission delay and the periodic stimulus are varied. In particular, it is shown that the tuned information transmission delay can induce a clustering anti-phase synchronization transition with the pacemaker, where two equal clusters can alternatively synchronize in anti-phase firing. More interestingly, we show that the periodic stimulus can drive the delay-induced clustering anti-phase firing synchronization bifurcate to the collective perfect synchronization, which is routed by the complex process including collective chaotic firings and clustering out-of-phase synchronization of the neuronal networks. In addition, the periodic stimulus induced clustering firings of the spiking neuronal networks are robust to the connectivity probability of small world networks. Furthermore, the different stimulus frequency induced complexity is also investigated. We hope that the results of this paper can provide insights that could facilitate the understanding of the joint impact of information transmission delays and periodic stimulus on controlling dynamical behaviors of realistic neuronal networks.

  6. Hopf Bifurcation and Chaos in a Single Inertial Neuron Model with Time Delay

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chunguang; Chen, Guanrong; Liao, Xiaofeng; Yu, Juebang

    2004-01-01

    A delayed differential equation modelling a single neuron with inertial term is considered in this paper. Hopf bifurcation is studied by using the normal form theory of retarded functional differential equations. When adopting a nonmonotonic activation function, chaotic behavior is observed. Phase plots, waveform plots, and power spectra are presented to confirm the chaoticity.

  7. Average Synchronization and Temporal Order in a Noisy Neuronal Network with Coupling Delay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-Yun; DUAN Zhi-Sheng; LU Qi-Shao

    2007-01-01

    Average synchronization and temporal order characterized by the rate of firing are studied in a spatially extended network system with the coupling time delay, which is locally modelled by a two-dimensional Rulkov map neuron.It is shown that there exists an optimal noise level, where average synchronization and temporal order are maximum irrespective of the coupling time delay. Furthermore, it is found that temporal order is weakened when the coupling time delay appears. However, the coupling time delay has a twofold effect on average synchronization,one associated with its increase, the other with its decrease. This clearly manifests that random perturbations and time delay play a complementary role in synchronization and temporal order.

  8. Robust Synchronization of Delayed Chaotic FitzHugh-Nagumo Neurons under External Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rehan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization of chaotic neurons under external electrical stimulation (EES is studied in order to understand information processing in the brain and to improve the methodologies employed in the treatment of cognitive diseases. This paper investigates the dynamics of uncertain coupled chaotic delayed FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN neurons under EES for incorporated parametric variations. A global nonlinear control law for synchronization of delayed neurons with known parameters is developed. Based on local and global Lipschitz conditions, knowledge of the bounds on the neuronal states, the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, and the L2 gain reduction, a less conservative local robust nonlinear control law is formulated to address the problem of robust asymptotic synchronization of delayed FHN neurons under parametric uncertainties. The proposed local control law guarantees both robust stability and robust performance and provides the L2 bound for uncertainty rejection in the synchronization error dynamics. Separate conditions for single-input and multiple-input control schemes for synchronization of a wide class of FHN systems are provided. The results of the proposed techniques are verified through numerical simulations.

  9. Dynamical Analysis of the Hindmarsh-Rose Neuron With Time Delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, S; Lim, C P; Nahavandi, S; Prakash, M; Balasubramaniam, P

    2016-05-25

    This brief is mainly concerned with a series of dynamical analyses of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neuron with state-dependent time delays. The dynamical analyses focus on stability, Hopf bifurcation, as well as chaos and chaos control. Through the stability and bifurcation analysis, we determine that increasing the external current causes the excitable HR neuron to exhibit periodic or chaotic bursting/spiking behaviors and emit subcritical Hopf bifurcation. Furthermore, by choosing a fixed external current and varying the time delay, the stability of the HR neuron is affected. We analyze the chaotic behaviors of the HR neuron under a fixed external current through time series, bifurcation diagram, Lyapunov exponents, and Lyapunov dimension. We also analyze the synchronization of the chaotic time-delayed HR neuron through nonlinear control. Based on an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional with triple integral terms, a nonlinear feedback control scheme is designed to achieve synchronization between the uncontrolled and controlled models. The proposed synchronization criteria are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities to achieve the global asymptotical stability of the considered error model under the designed control scheme. Finally, numerical simulations pertaining to stability, Hopf bifurcation, periodic, chaotic, and synchronized models are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the derived theoretical results.

  10. The Many Faces of Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    Results from studies of retrograde amnesia provide much of the evidence for theories of memory consolidation. Retrograde amnesia gradients are often interpreted as revealing the time needed for the formation of long-term memories. The rapid forgetting observed after many amnestic treatments, including protein synthesis inhibitors, and the parallel…

  11. Bifurcation analysis of delay-induced patterns in a ring of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, Markus; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2013-09-28

    Rings of delay-coupled neurons possess a striking capability to produce various stable spiking patterns. In order to reveal the mechanisms of their appearance, we present a bifurcation analysis of the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) system with delayed feedback as well as a closed loop of HH neurons. We consider mainly the effects of external currents and communication delays. It is shown that typically periodic patterns of different spatial form (wavenumber) appear via Hopf bifurcations as the external current or time delay changes. The Hopf bifurcations are shown to occur in relatively narrow regions of the external current values, which are independent of the delays. Additional patterns, which have the same wavenumbers as the existing ones, appear via saddle-node bifurcations of limit cycles. The obtained bifurcation diagrams are evidence for the important role of communication delays for the emergence of multiple coexistent spiking patterns. The effects of a short-cut, which destroys the rotational symmetry of the ring, are also briefly discussed.

  12. Robustness of Diversity Induced Synchronization Transition in a Delayed Small-World Neuronal Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Jun; QU Li-Cheng; LUO Jin-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In a diverse and delayed small-world neuronal network, we have identified the oscillatory-like synchronization transition between anti-phase and complete synchronization [Phys. Rev. E 83(2011)046207]. Here we study the influence of the network topology and noise on the synchronization transition. The robustness of this transition is investigated. The results show that: (I) the synchronization transition is robust to the neuron number N in the network; (ii) only when the coupled neighbor number k is in the region [4,10], does the synchronization transition exist; (iii) to some extent, the synchronization is destroyed by noise and the oscillatory-like synchronization transition exists for relatively weak noise (D <0.003).%In a diverse and delayed small-world neuronal network,we have identified the oscillatory-like synchronization transition between anti-phase and complete synchronization [Phys.Rev.E 83 (2011) 046207].Here we study the influence of the network topology and noise on the synchronization transition.The robustness of this transition is investigated.The results show that:(i) the synchronization transition is robust to the neuron number N in the network;(ii) only when the coupled neighbor number k is in the region [4,10],does the synchronization transition exist;(iii) to some extent,the synchronization is destroyed by noise and the oscillatory-like synchronization transition exists for relatively weak noise (D <0.003).In the theoretical study of neuron systems,the synchronized behavior of a population of interacting neurons,namely,a neuronal network,is a hot issue due to its importance to the processing and transmission of information.[1] Many types of synchronization are identified in neuronal networks,such as complete synchronization,phase synchronization,anti-phase synchronization,phase-lock synchronization,cluster synchronization and lag synchronization.[2

  13. Activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for delayed rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kayoko W; Miyazaki, Katsuhiko; Doya, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    The forebrain serotonergic system is a crucial component in the control of impulsive behaviors. We previously reported that the activity of serotonin neurons in the midbrain dorsal raphe nucleus increased when rats performed a task that required them to wait for delayed rewards. However, the causal relationship between serotonin neural activity and the tolerance for the delayed reward remained unclear. Here, we test whether the inhibition of serotonin neural activity by the local application of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin in the dorsal raphe nucleus impairs rats' tolerance for delayed rewards. Rats performed a sequential food-water navigation task that required them to visit food and water sites alternately via a tone site to get rewards at both sites after delays. During the short (2 s) delayed reward condition, the inhibition of serotonin neural activity did not significantly influence the numbers of reward choice errors (nosepoke at an incorrect reward site following a conditioned reinforcer tone), reward wait errors (failure to wait for the delayed rewards), or total trials (sum of reward choice errors, reward wait errors, and acquired rewards). By contrast, during the long (7-11 s) delayed reward condition, the number of wait errors significantly increased while the numbers of total trials and choice errors did not significantly change. These results indicate that the activation of dorsal raphe serotonin neurons is necessary for waiting for long delayed rewards and suggest that elevated serotonin activity facilitates waiting behavior when there is the prospect of forthcoming rewards.

  14. Role of tissue plasminogen activator/plasmin cascade in delayed neuronal death after transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nagai, Nobuo; Urano, Tetsumei

    We studied the possible involvement of the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)/plasmin system on both delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus and the associated enhancement of locomotor activity in rats, after transient forebrain ischemia induced by a four-vessel occlusion (FVO). Seven days after FVO, locomotor activity was abnormally increased and, after 10 days, pyramidal cells were degraded in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. FVO increased the t-PA antigen level and its activity in the hippocampus, which peaked at 4 h. Both the enhanced locomotor activity and the degradation of pyramidal cells were significantly suppressed by intracerebroventricular injection of aprotinin, a plasmin inhibitor, at 4 h but not during FVO. These results suggest the importance of the t-PA/plasmin cascade during the early pathological stages of delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia.

  15. Desynchronization in an ensemble of globally coupled chaotic bursting neuronal oscillators by dynamic delayed feedback control

    CERN Document Server

    Che, Yanqiu; Li, Ruixue; Li, Huiyan; Han, Chunxiao; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xile

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic delayed feedback control approach for desynchronization of chaotic-bursting synchronous activities in an ensemble of globally coupled neuronal oscillators. We demonstrate that the difference signal between an ensemble's mean field and its time delayed state, filtered and fed back to the ensemble, can suppress the self-synchronization in the ensemble. These individual units are decoupled and stabilized at the desired desynchronized states while the stimulation signal reduces to the noise level. The effectiveness of the method is illustrated by examples of two different populations of globally coupled chaotic-bursting neurons. The proposed method has potential for mild, effective and demand-controlled therapy of neurological diseases characterized by pathological synchronization.

  16. DL-ReSuMe: A Delay Learning-Based Remote Supervised Method for Spiking Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Aboozar; Belatreche, Ammar; Li, Yuhua; Maguire, Liam P

    2015-12-01

    Recent research has shown the potential capability of spiking neural networks (SNNs) to model complex information processing in the brain. There is biological evidence to prove the use of the precise timing of spikes for information coding. However, the exact learning mechanism in which the neuron is trained to fire at precise times remains an open problem. The majority of the existing learning methods for SNNs are based on weight adjustment. However, there is also biological evidence that the synaptic delay is not constant. In this paper, a learning method for spiking neurons, called delay learning remote supervised method (DL-ReSuMe), is proposed to merge the delay shift approach and ReSuMe-based weight adjustment to enhance the learning performance. DL-ReSuMe uses more biologically plausible properties, such as delay learning, and needs less weight adjustment than ReSuMe. Simulation results have shown that the proposed DL-ReSuMe approach achieves learning accuracy and learning speed improvements compared with ReSuMe.

  17. Stability Analysis of a Class of Three-Neuron Delayed Cellular Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulami D. Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study linear stability of a class of three neuron cellular network with transmission delay had been studied. Approach: The model for the problem was first presented. The problem is then formulated analytically and numerical simulations pertaining to the model are carried out. Results: A necessary and sufficient condition for asymptotic stability of trivial steady state in the absence of delay is derived. Then a delay dependent sufficient condition for local asymptotic stability of trivial, steady state and sufficient condition for no stability switching of trivial steady for such a network are derived. Numerical simulation results of the model were presented. Conclusion/Recommendations: From numerical simulation, it appears that there may be a possibility of multiple steady states of the model. It may be possible to investigate the condition for the existence of periodic solutions of the non-linear model analytically.

  18. Synchronization transitions induced by the fluctuation of adaptive coupling strength in delayed Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Gong, Yubing; Wu, Yanan

    2015-11-01

    Introducing adaptive coupling in delayed neuronal networks and regulating the dissipative parameter (DP) of adaptive coupling by noise, we study the effect of fluctuations of the changing rate of adaptive coupling on the synchronization of the neuronal networks. It is found that time delay can induce synchronization transitions for intermediate DP values, and the synchronization transitions become strongest when DP is optimal. As the intensity of DP noise is varied, the neurons can also exhibit synchronization transitions, and the phenomenon is delay-dependent and is enhanced for certain time delays. Moreover, the synchronization transitions change with the change of DP and become strongest when DP is optimal. These results show that randomly changing adaptive coupling can considerably change the synchronization of the neuronal networks, and hence could play a crucial role in the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  19. Firing statistics of inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback. II: Non-Markovian behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, K G; Vidybida, A K

    2013-06-01

    The instantaneous state of a neural network consists of both the degree of excitation of each neuron the network is composed of and positions of impulses in communication lines between the neurons. In neurophysiological experiments, the neuronal firing moments are registered, but not the state of communication lines. But future spiking moments depend essentially on the past positions of impulses in the lines. This suggests, that the sequence of intervals between firing moments (inter-spike intervals, ISIs) in the network could be non-Markovian. In this paper, we address this question for a simplest possible neural "net", namely, a single inhibitory neuron with delayed feedback. The neuron receives excitatory input from the driving Poisson stream and inhibitory impulses from its own output through the feedback line. We obtain analytic expressions for conditional probability density P(tn+1|tn, …, t1, t0), which gives the probability to get an output ISI of duration tn+1 provided the previous (n+1) output ISIs had durations tn, …, t1, t0. It is proven exactly, that P(tn+1|tn, …, t1, t0) does not reduce to P(tn+1|tn, …, t1) for any n≥0. This means that the output ISIs stream cannot be represented as a Markov chain of any finite order.

  20. Apoptosis of motor neurons in the spinal cord after ischemia reperfusion injury delayed paraplegia in rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Bibo; Liu Miao; Ma Wei; Wang Duoning

    2007-01-01

    Objective To clarify the pathologic change of the motor neuron on spinal cord ischemia reperfusion injury delayed paraplegia. Methods The infrarenal aorta of White New Zealand rabbits (n=24) was occluded for 26 minutes using two bulldog clamps. Rabbits were killed after 8, 24, 72, or 168 hours (n=6 per group), respectively. The clamps was placed but never clamped in sham-operated rabbits (n=24). The lumbar segment of the spinal cord (L5 to L7) was used for morphological studies, including hematoxylin and eosin staining, the expression of bcl-2 and bax proteins in spinal cord was detected with immunohistochemistry. The apoptotic neurons in spinal cord were measured with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling of DNA fragments (TUNEL) staining. Results Delayed paraplegia occurred in all rabbits of ischemia reperfusion group at 16-24 hours, but not in sham groups. Motor neurons were selectively lost at 7 days after transient ischemia. After ischemia, the positive expression of bcl-2 protein were in the sham controls but decreased significantly as compared with that of the IR group (P<0.01), especially in 72 hours reperfusion. The positive expression of bax protein were also in the sham controls, but increased in the IR group, especially in 72 hours reperfusion; In addition, TUNEL study demonstrated that no cells were positively labeled until 24 hours after ischemia, but nuclei of some motor neurons were positively labeled at peak after ischemia reperfusion at 72 hours. Conclusion Spinal cord ischemia in rabbits induces morphological and biochemical changes suggestive of apoptosis. These data raise the possibility that apoptosis contributes to neuronal cell death after spinal cord ischemia reperfusion.

  1. Local and global synchronization transitions induced by time delays in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-02-01

    Effects of time delay on the local and global synchronization in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses are investigated in this paper. Numerical results show that, for both excitatory and inhibitory coupling types, the information transmission delay can always induce synchronization transitions of spiking neurons in small-world networks. In particular, regions of in-phase and out-of-phase synchronization of connected neurons emerge intermittently as the synaptic delay increases. For excitatory coupling, all transitions to spiking synchronization occur approximately at integer multiples of the firing period of individual neurons; while for inhibitory coupling, these transitions appear at the odd multiples of the half of the firing period of neurons. More importantly, the local synchronization transition is more profound than the global synchronization transition, depending on the type of coupling synapse. For excitatory synapses, the local in-phase synchronization observed for some values of the delay also occur at a global scale; while for inhibitory ones, this synchronization, observed at the local scale, disappears at a global scale. Furthermore, the small-world structure can also affect the phase synchronization of neuronal networks. It is demonstrated that increasing the rewiring probability can always improve the global synchronization of neuronal activity, but has little effect on the local synchronization of neighboring neurons.

  2. Deletion of the Kv2.1 delayed rectifier potassium channel leads to neuronal and behavioral hyperexcitability

    OpenAIRE

    Speca, DJ; Ogata, G; Mandikian, D; Bishop, HI; Wiler, SW; Eum, K; Wenzel, HJ; Doisy, ET; Matt, L; Campi, KL; Golub, MS; Nerbonne, JM; Hell, JW; Trainor, BC; Sack, JT

    2014-01-01

    The Kv2.1 delayed rectifier potassium channel exhibits high-level expression in both principal and inhibitory neurons throughout the central nervous system, including prominent expression in hippocampal neurons. Studies of in vitro preparations suggest that Kv2.1 is a key yet conditional regulator of intrinsic neuronal excitability, mediated by changes in Kv2.1 expression, localization and function via activity-dependent regulation of Kv2.1 phosphorylation. Here we identify neurological and b...

  3. Empathy in hippocampal amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadle, J N; Tranel, D; Cohen, N J; Duff, M C

    2013-01-01

    Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. The scientific investigation of empathy has focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, and has pointed to the importance of a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate). While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy research, the hallmark properties of the hippocampal declarative memory system (e.g., representational flexibility, relational binding, on-line processing capacity) make it well-suited to meet some of the crucial demands of empathy, and a careful investigation of this possibility could make a significant contribution to the neuroscientific understanding of empathy. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the role of the hippocampal declarative memory system in empathy. Participants were three patients (1 female) with focal, bilateral hippocampal (HC) damage and severe declarative memory impairments and three healthy demographically matched comparison participants. Empathy was measured as a trait through a battery of gold standard questionnaires and through on-line ratings and prosocial behavior in response to a series of empathy inductions. Patients with hippocampal amnesia reported lower cognitive and emotional trait empathy than healthy comparison participants. Unlike healthy comparison participants, in response to the empathy inductions hippocampal patients reported no increase in empathy ratings or prosocial behavior. The results provide preliminary evidence for a role for hippocampal declarative memory in empathy.

  4. Role of delayed nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity in long-term associative memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemenes, Ildikó; Straub, Volko A; Nikitin, Eugeny S; Staras, Kevin; O'Shea, Michael; Kemenes, György; Benjamin, Paul R

    2006-07-11

    It is now well established that persistent nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity occurs after learning and, like synaptic plasticity, it can be the substrate for long-term memory. What still remains unclear, though, is how nonsynaptic plasticity contributes to the altered neural network properties on which memory depends. Understanding how nonsynaptic plasticity is translated into modified network and behavioral output therefore represents an important objective of current learning and memory research. By using behavioral single-trial classical conditioning together with electrophysiological analysis and calcium imaging, we have explored the cellular mechanisms by which experience-induced nonsynaptic electrical changes in a neuronal soma remote from the synaptic region are translated into synaptic and circuit level effects. We show that after single-trial food-reward conditioning in the snail Lymnaea stagnalis, identified modulatory neurons that are extrinsic to the feeding network become persistently depolarized between 16 and 24 hr after training. This is delayed with respect to early memory formation but concomitant with the establishment and duration of long-term memory. The persistent nonsynaptic change is extrinsic to and maintained independently of synaptic effects occurring within the network directly responsible for the generation of feeding. Artificial membrane potential manipulation and calcium-imaging experiments suggest a novel mechanism whereby the somal depolarization of an extrinsic neuron recruits command-like intrinsic neurons of the circuit underlying the learned behavior. We show that nonsynaptic plasticity in an extrinsic modulatory neuron encodes information that enables the expression of long-term associative memory, and we describe how this information can be translated into modified network and behavioral output.

  5. Responses of CDKs and p53 in Delayed Ischemic Neuronal Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伏虎

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is a debilitating disease that affects millions each year. While in many cases cerebral ischemic injury can be limited by effective resuscitation or throrrdoolytic treatment, the injured neurons wirher in a process known as delayed neuronal death ( DND ). Mounting evidence indicates that DND is not simply necrosis played out in slow motion but apoptosis istriggered. Of particular interest are two qroups of signal proteins that participate in apoptosis-cyelin dependent kinases (CDKs) and p53-among a myriad of signaling events after an ischemic insult. Recent investigations have shown that CDKs, a family of enzymes initially known for their role in cell cycle regulation, are activated in injured neurons in DND. As for p53, new reports suggest that its up-regulation may represent a failed attempt to rescne injured neurons, although its up-regulation was previously considered an indication of apoptosis. These observations thus rekindle an old quest to identify new neuroprotective targets to minimize the stroke damage. In this review, the authzor will examine the evidence that indicates the participation of CDKs and p53 in DND and then introduce pre-clinical data to explore CDK inhibition as a potential neuroprotective target. Finally, using CDK inhibition as an example, this paper will discuss the pertinent criteria for a viable neuroprotective strategy for ischemic injury.

  6. Synchronization of Coupled Chaotic Neurons with Unknown Time Delays via Adaptive Backstepping Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an adaptive Neural Network (NN based backstepping controller is proposed to realize chaos synchronization of two gap junction coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN neurons with uncertain time delays. In the designed backstepping controller, a simple Radial Basis Function (RBF NN is used to approximate the uncertain nonlinear part of the error dynamical system. The weights of the NN are tuned on-line. A Lyapunov-Krasovskii function is designed to overcome the difficulties from the unknown time delays. Moreover, to relax the requirement for boundness of disturbance, an adaptive law to adapt the disturbance in real time is given. According to the Lyapunov stability theory, the stability of the closed error system is guaranteed. The control scheme is robust to the uncertainties such as approximate error, ionic channel noise and external disturbances. Chaos synchronization is obtained by proper choice of the control parameters. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  7. Detection and assessment of near-zero delays in neuronal spiking activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, G; Nikolić, D

    2006-04-15

    Cross-correlation histograms (CCHs) have been widely used to study the temporal relationship between pairwise recordings of neuronal signals. One interesting parameter of a CCH is the time position of the central peak which indicates delays between signals. In order to study the potential relevance of these delays which can be as small as 1 ms, it is necessary to measure them with high precision. We present a method for the estimation of the central peak's position that is based on fitting a cosine function to the CCH and show that the precision of this estimate can be tracked analytically. We validate the resulting formula by simulations and by the analysis of a sample dataset obtained from cat visual cortex. The results indicate that the time position of the center peak can be estimated with submillisecond precision. The formula allows one also to develop a test of statistical significance for differences between two sets of measurements.

  8. Effects of information transmission delay and channel blocking on synchronization in scale-free Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing-Yun; Zheng, Yan-Hong

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the evolution of spatiotemporal patterns and synchronization transitions in dependence on the information transmission delay and ion channel blocking in scale-free neuronal networks. As the underlying model of neuronal dynamics, we use the Hodgkin-Huxley equations incorporating channel blocking and intrinsic noise. It is shown that delays play a significant yet subtle role in shaping the dynamics of neuronal networks. In particular, regions of irregular and regular propagating excitatory fronts related to the synchronization transitions appear intermittently as the delay increases. Moreover, the fraction of working sodium and potassium ion channels can also have a significant impact on the spatiotemporal dynamics of neuronal networks. As the fraction of blocked sodium channels increases, the frequency of excitatory events decreases, which in turn manifests as an increase in the neuronal synchrony that, however, is dysfunctional due to the virtual absence of large-amplitude excitations. Expectedly, we also show that larger coupling strengths improve synchronization irrespective of the information transmission delay and channel blocking. The presented results are also robust against the variation of the network size, thus providing insights that could facilitate understanding of the joint impact of ion channel blocking and information transmission delay on the spatiotemporal dynamics of neuronal networks.

  9. Effects of information transmission delay and channel blocking on synchronization in scale-free Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Yun Wang; Yan-Hong Zheng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,we investigate the evolution of spatiotemporal patterns and synchronization transitions in dependence on the information transmission delay and ion channel blocking in scale-free neuronal networks.As the underlying model of neuronal dynamics,we use the HodgkinHuxley equations incorporating channel blocking and intrinsic noise.It is shown that delays play a significant yet subtle role in shaping the dynamics of neuronal networks.In particular,regions of irregular and regular propagating excitatory fronts related to the synchronization transitions appear intermittently as the delay increases.Moreover,the fraction of working sodium and potassium ion channels can also have a significant impact on the spatiotemporal dynamics of neuronal networks.As the fraction of blocked sodium channels increases,the frequency of excitatory events decreases,which in turn manifests as an increase in the neuronal synchrony that,however,is dysfunctional due to the virtual absence of large-amplitude excitations.Expectedly,we also show that larger coupling strengths improve synchronization irrespective of the information transmission delay and channel blocking.The presented results are also robust against the variation of the network size,thus providing insights that could facilitate understanding of the joint impact of ion channel blocking and information transmission delay on the spatiotemporal dynamics of neuronal networks.

  10. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  11. Reactive changes in astrocytes, and delayed neuronal death, in the rat hippocampal CA1 region following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqing Zhang; Xiang Luo; Zhiyuan Yu; Chao Ma; Shabei Xu; Wei Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood supply to the hippocampus is not provided by the middle cerebral artery. However, previous studies have shown that delayed neuronal death in the hippocampus may occur following focal cerebral ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. OBJECTIVE: To observe the relationship between reactive changes in hippocampal astrocytes and delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region following middle cerebral artery occlusion. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The immunohistochemical, randomized, controlled animal study was performed at the Laboratory of Department of Neurology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, from July to November 2007. MATERIALS: Rabbit anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) (Neomarkers, USA), goat anti-rabbit IgG (Sigma, USA) and ApoAlert apoptosis detection kit (Biosciences Clontech, USA) were used in this study. METHODS: A total of 42 healthy adult male Wistar rats, aged 3-5 months, were randomly divided into a sham operation group (n = 6) and a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion group (n = 36). In the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion group, cerebral ischemia/reperfusion models were created by middle cerebral artery occlusion. In the sham operation group, the thread was only inserted into the initial region of the internal carotid artery, and middle cerebral artery occlusion was not induced. Rats in the cerebral ischemia/reperfusion group were assigned to a delayed neuronal death (+) subgroup and a delayed neuronal death (-) subgroup, according to the occurrence of delayed neuronal death in the ischemic side of the hippocampal CA1 region following cerebral ischemia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region was measured by Nissl staining. GFAP expression and delayed neuronal death changes were measured in the rat hippocampal CA1 region at the ischemic hemisphere by double staining for GFAP and TUNEL. RESULTS: After 3 days of ischemia

  12. Empathy in hippocampal amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle N Beadle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The scientific investigation of empathy has become a cornerstone in the field of social cognition. Empathy is critical to the quality of our relationships with others and plays an important role in life satisfaction and well-being. Scientific investigations of empathy have focused on characterizing its cognitive and neural substrates, pointing to a network of brain regions involved in emotional experience and perspective taking (e.g., ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, anterior insula, cingulate. While the hippocampus has rarely been the focus of empathy research, we propose that there are compelling reasons to inquire about the contribution of the hippocampus to social cognition. We propose that the hallmark properties of the hippocampal declarative memory system (e.g., representational flexibility, relational binding, on-line processing capacity make it well-suited to meet the demands of empathy. The present study is a preliminary investigation of the role of the hippocampal declarative memory system in empathy. Participants were three patients (1 female with focal, bilateral hippocampal (HC damage and severe declarative memory impairments and three healthy demographically matched comparison participants. Empathy was measured as a trait through a battery of gold standard questionnaires and through on-line ratings and prosocial behavior in response to a series of empathy inductions. Patients with hippocampal amnesia reported lower cognitive and emotional trait empathy than healthy comparison participants. In response to the empathy inductions, unlike healthy comparison participants, hippocampal patients reported no increase in empathy ratings or prosocial behavior from the control condition. Taken together, these results provide preliminary evidence for a role of hippocampal declarative memory in empathy.

  13. Effect of spike-timing-dependent plasticity on coherence resonance and synchronization transitions by time delay in adaptive neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huijuan; Gong, Yubing; Wang, Qi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically study how time delay induces multiple coherence resonance (MCR) and synchronization transitions (ST) in adaptive Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). It is found that MCR induced by time delay STDP can be either enhanced or suppressed as the adjusting rate Ap of STDP changes, and ST by time delay varies with the increase of Ap, and there is optimal Ap by which the ST becomes strongest. It is also found that there are optimal network randomness and network size by which ST by time delay becomes strongest, and when Ap increases, the optimal network randomness and optimal network size increase and related ST is enhanced. These results show that STDP can either enhance or suppress MCR and optimal STDP can enhance ST induced by time delay in the adaptive neuronal networks. These findings provide a new insight into STDP's role for the information processing and transmission in neural systems.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics on small-world neuronal networks: The roles of two types of time-delayed coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hao; Jiang Huijun [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou Zhonghuai, E-mail: hzhlj@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > We compare neuronal dynamics in dependence on two types of delayed coupling. > Distinct results induced by different delayed coupling can be achieved. > Time delays in type 1 coupling can induce a most spatiotemporal ordered state. > For type 2 coupling, the systems exhibit synchronization transitions with delay. - Abstract: We investigate temporal coherence and spatial synchronization on small-world networks consisting of noisy Terman-Wang (TW) excitable neurons in dependence on two types of time-delayed coupling: {l_brace}x{sub j}(t - {tau}) - x{sub i}(t){r_brace} and {l_brace}x{sub j}(t - {tau}) - x{sub i}(t - {tau}){r_brace}. For the former case, we show that time delay in the coupling can dramatically enhance temporal coherence and spatial synchrony of the noise-induced spike trains. In addition, if the delay time {tau} is tuned to nearly match the intrinsic spike period of the neuronal network, the system dynamics reaches a most ordered state, which is both periodic in time and nearly synchronized in space, demonstrating an interesting resonance phenomenon with delay. For the latter case, however, we cannot achieve a similar spatiotemporal ordered state, but the neuronal dynamics exhibits interesting synchronization transitions with time delay from zigzag fronts of excitations to dynamic clustering anti-phase synchronization (APS), and further to clustered chimera states which have spatially distributed anti-phase coherence separated by incoherence. Furthermore, we also show how these findings are influenced by the change of the noise intensity and the rewiring probability of the small-world networks. Finally, qualitative analysis is given to illustrate the numerical results.

  15. Failure of delayed nonsynaptic neuronal plasticity underlies age-associated long-term associative memory impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Shawn N

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive impairment associated with subtle changes in neuron and neuronal network function rather than widespread neuron death is a feature of the normal aging process in humans and animals. Despite its broad evolutionary conservation, the etiology of this aging process is not well understood. However, recent evidence suggests the existence of a link between oxidative stress in the form of progressive membrane lipid peroxidation, declining neuronal electrical excitability and functional decline of the normal aging brain. The current study applies a combination of behavioural and electrophysiological techniques and pharmacological interventions to explore this hypothesis in a gastropod model (Lymnaea stagnalis feeding system that allows pinpointing the molecular and neurobiological foundations of age-associated long-term memory (LTM failure at the level of individual identified neurons and synapses. Results Classical appetitive reward-conditioning induced robust LTM in mature animals in the first quartile of their lifespan but failed to do so in animals in the last quartile of their lifespan. LTM failure correlated with reduced electrical excitability of two identified serotonergic modulatory interneurons (CGCs critical in chemosensory integration by the neural network controlling feeding behaviour. Moreover, while behavioural conditioning induced delayed-onset persistent depolarization of the CGCs known to underlie appetitive LTM formation in this model in the younger animals, it failed to do so in LTM-deficient senescent animals. Dietary supplementation of the lipophilic anti-oxidant α-tocopherol reversed the effect of age on CGCs electrophysiological characteristics but failed to restore appetitive LTM function. Treatment with the SSRI fluoxetine reversed both the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of age in senior animals. Conclusions The results identify the CGCs as cellular loci of age-associated appetitive

  16. Enhancement of delayed-rectifier potassium conductance by low concentrations of local anaesthetics in spinal sensory neurones

    OpenAIRE

    Olschewski, Andrea; Wolff, Matthias; Bräu, Michael E; Hempelmann, Gunter; Vogel, Werner; Safronov, Boris V.

    2002-01-01

    Combining the patch-clamp recordings in slice preparation with the ‘entire soma isolation' method we studied action of several local anaesthetics on delayed-rectifier K+ currents in spinal dorsal horn neurones.Bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine at low concentrations (1–100 μM) enhanced delayed-rectifier K+ current in intact neurones within the spinal cord slice, while exhibiting a partial blocking effect at higher concentrations (>100 μM). In isolated somata 0.1–10 μM bupivacaine enhanced...

  17. A purified Palythoa venom fraction delays sodium current inactivation in sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Vivas, Oscar; Román-González, Sergio A; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Castro, Héctor; Arenas, Isabel; García, David E; Sánchez-Puig, Nuria; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    Palythoa caribaeorum is a zoanthid (Phylum Cnidaria, class Anthozoa) commonly found in shallow waters of coral reefs along the Mexican Atlantic coast. Little is known on the pharmacological and biochemical properties of the venom components of this animal group. Toxin peptides from other cnidarian venoms, like sea anemones, target sodium and potassium voltage-gated channels. In this study, we tested the activity of a low molecular weight fraction from the venom of P. caribaeorum on voltage-gated sodium channels of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons of the rat. Our results showed that this fraction delays tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive sodium channel inactivation indicated by a reversible 2-fold increase of the current at the decay. A peptide responsible for this activity was isolated and characterized. Its sequence showed that it does not resemble any previously reported toxin. Together, these results evidence the presence of neurotoxins in P. caribaeorum that act on sodium channels.

  18. Convergence and periodicity in a delayed network of neurons with threshold nonlinearity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangjiang Guo

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider an artificial neural network where the signal transmission is of a digital (McCulloch-Pitts nature and is delayed due to the finite switching speed of neurons (amplifiers. The discontinuity of the signal transmission functions, however, makes it difficult to apply the existing dynamical systems theory which usually requires continuity and smoothness. Moreover, observe that the dynamics of the network completely depends on the connection weights, we distinguish several cases to discuss the behaviors of their solutions. We show that the dynamics of the model can be understood in terms of the iterations of a one-dimensional map. As, a result, we present a detailed analysis of the dynamics of the network starting from non-oscillatory states and show how the connection topology and synaptic weights determine the rich dynamics.

  19. EFFECT OF VASOPRESSIN ON DELAYED NEURONAL DAMAGE IN HIPPOCAMPUS FOLLOWING CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA AND REPERFUSION IN GERBILS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘新峰; 金泳清; 陈光辉

    1996-01-01

    Mongolian gerbils were used as delayed neuronal damage (DND) animal models.At the end of 15 minute cerebral ischermia and at various reperfusion time ranging from 1 to 96 hours,the content of water and arginine vasopressin (AVP) in the CA1 sector of hippocampus were measured by the specific gravity method and radioimmunoassy.Furthermore,we also examined the effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of AVP,AVP antiserum on calcium,Na+,K+-ATP ase activity in the CA1 sector after ischemia and 96 hour reperfusion.The results showed that AVP Contents of CA1 sector of hippocampus during 6 to 96 hour recirculation,and the water content of CA1 sector during 24 to 96 hour were significantly and continuously increased.After ICV injection of AVP,the water content and calcium in CA1 sector of hippocampus at cerebral ischemia and 96 hour recirculation further increased,and the Na+,K+-AT-tion of AVP antiserum,the water contenr and calcium in CA1 sector were significantly decreased as compared with that of control.These suggested that AVP was involved in the pathopysiologic process of DND in hippocampus following cerbral ischemia and reprfusion.Its mechanism might be through the change of intracellular action mediated by specific AVP receptor to lead to Ca inos over-load of neuron and inhibit the Na+,K+-ATPase activity,thereby to exacerbate the DND in hippocampus.

  20. On resolving the enigma of infantile amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, M L; Courage, M L

    1993-03-01

    Historical and current theories of infantile amnesia are examined. To evaluate the viability of these theories, as well as the phenomenon of infantile amnesia itself, a review of memory development from birth through the preschool years is provided, including an overview of relevant perceptual and neurological maturation. In the context of this review, extant theories of infantile amnesia are shown to falter, and it is concluded that infantile amnesia is a chimera of a previously unexplored relationship between the development of a cognitive sense of self and the personalization of event memory. This hypothesis is examined in detail and discussed in the context of related developments in language and social cognition.

  1. Time Delay and Long-Range Connection Induced Synchronization Transitions in Newman-Watts Small-World Neuronal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks (SWNNs) induced by time delay and long-range connection (LRC) probability have been investigated by synchronization parameter and space-time plots. Four distinct parameter regions, that is, asynchronous region, transition region, synchronous region, and oscillatory region have been discovered at certain LRC probability as time delay is increased. Interestingly, desynchronization is observed in oscillatory region. More importantly, we consider the spatiotemporal patterns obtained in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs are the competition results between long-range drivings (LRDs) and neighboring interactions. In addition, for moderate time delay, the synchronization of neuronal network can be enhanced remarkably by increasing LRC probability. Furthermore, lag synchronization has been found between weak synchronization and complete synchronization as LRC probability is a little less than 1.0. Finally, the two necessary conditions, moderate time delay and large numbers of LRCs, are exposed explicitly for synchronization in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs. PMID:24810595

  2. Time delay and long-range connection induced synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The synchronization transitions in Newman-Watts small-world neuronal networks (SWNNs) induced by time delay τ and long-range connection (LRC) probability P have been investigated by synchronization parameter and space-time plots. Four distinct parameter regions, that is, asynchronous region, transition region, synchronous region, and oscillatory region have been discovered at certain LRC probability P = 1.0 as time delay is increased. Interestingly, desynchronization is observed in oscillatory region. More importantly, we consider the spatiotemporal patterns obtained in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs are the competition results between long-range drivings (LRDs) and neighboring interactions. In addition, for moderate time delay, the synchronization of neuronal network can be enhanced remarkably by increasing LRC probability. Furthermore, lag synchronization has been found between weak synchronization and complete synchronization as LRC probability P is a little less than 1.0. Finally, the two necessary conditions, moderate time delay and large numbers of LRCs, are exposed explicitly for synchronization in delayed Newman-Watts SWNNs.

  3. Pattern of hair cell loss and delayed peripheral neuron degeneration in inner ear by a high-dose intratympanic gentamicin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jintao Yu; Dalian Ding; Fengjun Wang; Haiyan Jiang; Hong Sun; Richard Salvi

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights into the ototoxic effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics (AmAn) and delayed peripheral ganglion neuron death in the inner ear, experimental animal models were widely used with several different approaches including AmAn systemic injections, combination treat-ment of AmAn and diuretics, or local application of AmAn. In these approaches, systemic AmAn treatment alone usually causes incomplete damage to hair cells in the inner ear. Co-administration of diuretic and AmAn can completely destroy the cochlear hair cells, but it is impossible to damage the vestibular system. Only the approach of AmAn local application can selectively eliminate most sensory hair cells in the inner ear. Therefore, AmAn local application is more suitable for studies for complete hair cell destructions in cochlear and vestibular system and the following delayed peripheral ganglion neuron death. In current studies, guinea pigs were unilaterally treated with a high concentration of gentamicin (GM, 40 mg/ml) through the tympanic membrane into the middle ear cavity. Auditory functions and vestibular functions were measured before and after GM treatment. The loss of hair cells and delayed degeneration of ganglion neurons in both cochlear and vestibular system were quantified 30 days or 60 days after treatment. The results showed that both auditory and vestibular functions were completely abolished after GM treatment. The sensory hair cells were totally missing in the cochlea, and severely destroyed in vestibular end-organs. The delayed spiral ganglion neuron death 60 days after the deafening procedure was over 50%. However, no obvious pathological changes were observed in vestibular ganglion neurons 60 days post-treatment. These results indicated that a high concentration of gentamycin delivered to the middle ear cavity can destroy most sensory hair cells in the inner ear that subsequently causes the delayed spiral ganglion neuron degeneration. This model might be useful for studies

  4. Resolution of disorientation and amnesia during post-traumatic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, R L; Pfaff, A; Jurjevic, L

    2000-02-01

    Despite the growing number of instruments for the prospective measurement of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) after traumatic brain injury, fundamental issues about the natural history of its resolution and methods of examination remain unresolved. The aims of the present study were to: (1) examine the sequence of resolution of disorientation and amnesia, and (2) determine if the method of measuring the memory component affected the duration of PTA. The sample comprised 31 severely injured patients admitted to a brain injury rehabilitation unit who were examined daily until they emerged from PTA. They were administered a composite PTA scale, covering orientation and memory items from standard PTA scales. Patients were consecutively allocated to one of two groups according to the method of measuring the memory component. Each group was administered identical materials with a different procedure. The most common sequence for resolution of disorientation in both groups was person, followed by place, then time. Overall, amnesia resolved before disorientation in 94% of cases. Correlation coefficients between return of components of orientation and memory were all highly significant, ranging from r=0. 81 to 0.93. Significant variability occurred in the number of days to emerge from PTA according to the scale used. There was evidence that the method of measuring memory influenced the patient's capacity to consistently sustain criterion scores on the scale. These results are contrary to findings in mildly injured patients, in whom orientation usually returns before memory. They also demonstrate that the duration of PTA will be dictated by the method used. These findings raise validity issues with respect to the prospective measurement of PTA, and in particular determining when an individual patient has emerged from PTA, which require further investigation.

  5. Periodic coupling strength-dependent multiple coherence resonance by time delay in Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanan; Gong, Yubing; Xu, Bo

    2013-12-01

    Recently, multiple coherence resonance induced by time delay has been observed in neuronal networks with constant coupling strength. In this paper, by employing Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks with time-periodic coupling strength, we study how the temporal coherence of spiking behavior and coherence resonance by time delay change when the frequency of periodic coupling strength is varied. It is found that delay induced coherence resonance is dependent on periodic coupling strength and increases when the frequency of periodic coupling strength increases. Periodic coupling strength can also induce multiple coherence resonance, and the coherence resonance occurs when the frequency of periodic coupling strength is approximately multiple of the spiking frequency. These results show that for periodic coupling strength time delay can more frequently optimize the temporal coherence of spiking activity, and periodic coupling strength can repetitively optimize the temporal coherence of spiking activity as well. Frequency locking may be the mechanism for multiple coherence resonance induced by periodic coupling strength. These findings imply that periodic coupling strength is more efficient for enhancing the temporal coherence of spiking activity of neuronal networks, and thus it could play a more important role in improving the time precision of information processing and transmission in neural networks.

  6. Taurine activates delayed rectifier KV channels via a metabotropic pathway in retinal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulley, Simon; Liu, Yufei; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2013-01-01

    Taurine is one of the most abundant amino acids in the retina, throughout the CNS, and in heart and muscle cells. In keeping with its broad tissue distribution, taurine serves as a modulator of numerous basic processes, such as enzyme activity, cell development, myocardial function and cytoprotection. Despite this multitude of functional roles, the precise mechanism underlying taurine's actions has not yet been identified. In this study we report findings that indicate a novel role for taurine in the regulation of voltage-gated delayed rectifier potassium (KV) channels in retinal neurons by means of a metabotropic receptor pathway. The metabotropic taurine response was insensitive to the Cl− channel blockers, picrotoxin and strychnine, but it was inhibited by a specific serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, MDL11939. Moreover, we found that taurine enhanced KV channels via intracellular protein kinase C-mediated pathways. When 5-HT2A receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney cells, taurine and AL34662, a non-specific 5-HT2 receptor activator, produced a similar regulation of KIR channels. In sum, this study provides new evidence that taurine activates a serotonin system, apparently via 5-HT2A receptors and related intracellular pathways. PMID:23045337

  7. Effects of channel noise on synchronization transitions in delayed scale-free network of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宝英; 龚玉兵

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the effect of the channel noise on the spiking synchronization of a scale-free Hodgkin–Huxley neuron network with time delays. It is found that the time delay can induce synchronization transitions at an intermediate and proper channel noise intensity, and the synchronization transitions become strongest when the channel noise intensity is optimal. The neurons can also exhibit synchronization transitions as the channel noise intensity is varied, and this phenomenon is enhanced at around the time delays that can induce the synchronization transitions. It is also found that the synchronization transitions induced by the channel noise are dependent on the coupling strength and the network average degree, and there is an optimal coupling strength or network average degree with which the synchronization transitions become strongest. These results show that by inducing synchronization transitions, the channel noise has a big regulation effect on the synchronization of the neuronal network. These findings could find potential implications for the information transmission in neural systems.

  8. Effects of channel noise on synchronization transitions in delayed scale-free network of stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Ying; Gong, Yu-Bing

    2015-11-01

    We numerically study the effect of the channel noise on the spiking synchronization of a scale-free Hodgkin-Huxley neuron network with time delays. It is found that the time delay can induce synchronization transitions at an intermediate and proper channel noise intensity, and the synchronization transitions become strongest when the channel noise intensity is optimal. The neurons can also exhibit synchronization transitions as the channel noise intensity is varied, and this phenomenon is enhanced at around the time delays that can induce the synchronization transitions. It is also found that the synchronization transitions induced by the channel noise are dependent on the coupling strength and the network average degree, and there is an optimal coupling strength or network average degree with which the synchronization transitions become strongest. These results show that by inducing synchronization transitions, the channel noise has a big regulation effect on the synchronization of the neuronal network. These findings could find potential implications for the information transmission in neural systems. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province of China (Grant No. ZR2012AM013).

  9. The contribution of low affinity NGF receptor (p75NGFR to delayed neuronal death after ischemia in the gerbil hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagum MA

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The implication of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor (p75NGFR, which is believed to play a pro-apoptotic role, in delayed neuronal death (DND after ischemia in the gerbil hippocampus was investigated. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis revealed that the presence of p75 NGFR immunoreactivity (IR was negligible in the hippocampus of the sham control gerbil but appeared clearly in CA1 neurons 3 and 4 days after 5-min transient ischemia. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL positive nuclei appeared when the level of p75NGFR IR increased. Furthermore, almost all TUNEL-positive CA1 neurons also costained for p75NGFR. These results suggest that p75NGFR contributes to DND after ischemia by an apoptotic mechanism.

  10. Posthypnotic amnesia for material learned before hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, R A; Barnier, A J; Mallard, D; Tibbits, R

    1999-01-01

    The impact of a suggestion for posthypnotic amnesia on material learned either before or during hypnosis was investigated across 2 experiments. In Experiment 1, very high, high, and low hypnotizable participants learned a word list either before or immediately after a hypnotic induction. During hypnosis, participants were given a suggestion for posthypnotic amnesia for the word list. After hypnosis, they were tested on recall, word-fragment, and word-recognition tasks. Experiment 2 replicated and extended Experiment 1 through application of the real-simulating paradigm. Across the 2 experiments, there was no difference in the performance of participants who learned the word list either before or during hypnosis. Although amnesia on direct memory measures was associated with high hypnotizability (Experiment 1), an explanation based on demand characteristics could not be excluded (Experiment 2). The implications of these findings for the use of post-hypnotic amnesia as a laboratory analog of disorders of autobiographical memory are discussed.

  11. Stranger than fiction: literary and clinical amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian; Annoni, Jean-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This chapter broadly covers literary uses of amnesia and memory disorders. Amnesia in fiction offers authors an efficient and dramatic device to tackle themes such as identity, personal liberty, or guilt. We argue against the common complaint that fictional amnesia is scientifically inaccurate, pointing out that the goals of literature are different from those of science, that amnesia is still poorly understood, and that real-life cases can sometimes be stranger than fiction. The chapter provides examples from the neuropsychological literature, media reports, mythology, historical cases, detective stories, war stories, theatrical plays, and other genres. Special attention is given to retrograde and dissociative amnesia, as these are the most frequent types of amnesia portrayed in fiction, while other types of memory disorders are more shortly treated. We argue that the predominance of disorders affecting autobiographical memory in fiction is in itself a revealing fact about the mechanisms of human memory, illustrating how fictional treatments of pathology can inform back neurological and psychological research.

  12. Effect of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin on delayed rectifier potassium currents in rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu-Tao; Liu, Zhao-Wei; Yao, Yang; Yang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao

    2009-03-01

    Cypermethrin is a photostable synthetic pyrethroid and the most widely used Type II pyrethroid pesticide. The effects of two different stereoisomers of cypermethrin insecticides, alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin, on the delayed rectifier potassium current (IK) in hippocampal neurons of rat, were studied using whole-cell patch clamp technique. Alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin decreased the amplitude value of IK, and shifted the steady state activation curve of IK towards negative potential at any concentrations (10(-9) M, 10(-8) M, 10(-7) M). Furthermore, at higher concentration, alpha-cypermethrin (10(-7) M) and theta-cypermethrin (10(-8) M, 10(-7) M) had observable effects of the steady state inactivation of IK. The results suggest that IK is the target of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin, which may explain the mechanism of toxic effects of both steroeisomers of cypermethrin on mammalian neurons. Cypermethrin-altered properties of voltage gated delayed rectifier K+ channels may contribute to neurotoxicity by eliciting abnormal electrical discharges in hippocampal CA3 neurons.

  13. Neuron volumes in hippocampal subfields in delayed poststroke and aging-related dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Elizabeth; Tam, Edward; Allan, Louise; Hall, Roslyn; Khundakar, Ahmad; Oakley, Arthur E; Thomas, Alan; Deramecourt, Vincent; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-04-01

    Hippocampal atrophy is widely recognized in Alzheimer disease (AD). Whether neurons within hippocampal subfields are similarly affected in other aging-related dementias, particularly after stroke, remains an open question. We investigated hippocampal CA3 and CA4 pyramidal neuron volumes and densities using 3-dimensional stereologic techniques in postmortem samples from a total of 67 subjects: poststoke demented (PSD; n = 11), nondemented stroke survivors (PSND) and PSD patients from the CogFAST (Cognitive Function After Stroke) cohort (n = 13), elderly controls (n = 12), and subjects diagnosed as having vascular dementia (n = 11), AD (n = 10), and mixed AD and vascular dementia (n = 10). We found that CA3 and CA4 neuron volumes were reduced in PSD samples compared with those in PSND samples. The CA3 and CA4 neuron volumes were positively correlated with poststroke global cognitive function but were not associated with the burden of AD pathology. There were no differences in total neuron densities in either subfield in any of the groups studied. Our results indicate that selective reductions in CA4 and to a lesser extent CA3 neuron volumes may be related to post stroke cognitive impairment and aging-related dementias. These data suggest that CA4 neurons are vulnerable to disease processes and support our previous finding that a reduction in hippocampal neuron volume predominantly reflects vascular mechanisms as contributing to dementia after stroke.

  14. Proteasome alteration and delayed neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus regions following transient cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei Ge; Tianfei Luo; Jizhou Zhang; Haifeng Wang; Wenchen Li; Yongxin Luan; Feng Ling; Yi'nan Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Proteasome dysfunction has been reported to induce abnormal protein aggregation and cell death.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of proteasome changes on delayed neuronal death in CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the rat hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A randomized,controlled animal experiment.The study was performed at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Norman Bethune Medical College of Jilin University,from September 2006 to May 2008.MATERIALS:Rabbit anti-19S S10B polyclonal antibody was purchased from Bioreagents,USA;propidium iodide and fluorescently-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG were purchased from Jackson Immunoresearch,USA;hematoxylin and eosin staining solution was purchased from Sigma,USA;LSM 510 confocal microscope was purchased from Zeiss,Germany.METHODS:A total of 40 healthy Wistar rats,male,4 months old,were randomly divided into sham surgery group (n=8) and model group (n=32).Ischemic models were established in the model group by transient clamping of the bilateral carotid arteries and decreased blood pressure.After 20 minutes of global ischemia,the clamp was removed to allow blood flow for 30 minutes,4,24,and 72 hours,respectively,with 8 rats at each time point.The bilateral carotid arteries were not ligated in the sham surgery group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Neuronal death in the CA1 and DG regions was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining.Proteasome expression in CA1 and DG region neurons was detected by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS:Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed neuronal death in the CA1 region alone at 72 hours of reperfusion following ischemia.In comparison to the sham surgery group,a significant decrease in proteasome expression was observed,by immunohistochemistry,in the CA1 and DG regions in the model group,following 30 minutes,4,24,and 72 hours of reperfusion (P<0.01).After 72 hours of reperfusion following ischemia,proteasome expression had almost completely

  15. Delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR in glutamate stimulated neurons allows late protection by 9-cis retinoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, Gro H.; Fallgren, Asa B.; Strom, Bjorn O.; Boldingh Debernard, Karen A.; Mohebi, Beata U. [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Paulsen, Ragnhild E., E-mail: r.e.paulsen@farmasi.uio.no [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} NGFI-B and RXR translocate out of the nucleus after glutamate treatment. {yields} Arresting NGFI-B/RXR in the nucleus protects neurons from excitotoxicity. {yields} Late protection by 9-cis RA is possible due to a delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR. -- Abstract: Nuclear receptor and apoptosis inducer NGFI-B translocates out of the nucleus as a heterodimer with RXR in response to different apoptosis stimuli, and therefore represents a potential pharmacological target. We found that the cytosolic levels of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha} were increased in cultures of cerebellar granule neurons 2 h after treatment with glutamate (excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, involved in stroke). To find a time-window for potential intervention the neurons were transfected with gfp-tagged expressor plasmids for NGFI-B and RXR. The default localization of NGFI-Bgfp and RXRgfp was nuclear, however, translocation out of the nucleus was observed 2-3 h after glutamate treatment. We therefore hypothesized that the time-window between treatment and translocation would allow late protection against neuronal death. The RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid was used to arrest NGFI-B and RXR in the nucleus. Addition of 9-cis retinoic acid 1 h after treatment with glutamate reduced the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha}, the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-Bgfp observed in live neurons, as well as the neuronal death. However, the reduced translocation and the reduced cell death were not observed when 9-cis retinoic acid was added after 3 h. Thus, late protection from glutamate induced death by addition of 9-cis retinoic acid is possible in a time-window after apoptosis induction.

  16. Fold-Hopf bifurcation in a simplified four-neuron BAM (bidirectional associative memory) neural network with two delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural network with four neurons and two delays is considered in the present paper.A linear stability analysis for the trivial equilibrium is firstly employed to provide a possible critical point at which a zero and a pair of pure imaginary eigenvalues occur in the corresponding characteristic equation.A fold-Hopf bifurcation is proved to happen at this critical point by the nonlinear analysis.The coupling strength and the delay are considered as bifurcation parameters to investigate the dynamical behaviors derived from the fold-Hopf bifurcation.Various dynamical behaviours are qualitatively classified in the neighbourhood of the fold-Hopf bifurcation point by using the center manifold reduction (CMR) together with the normal form.The bifurcating periodic solutions are expressed analytically in an approximate form.The validity of the results is shown by their consistency with the numerical simulation.

  17. Novelty preference in patients with developmental amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, M; Chadwick, M; Perez-Hernandez, E; Vargha-Khadem, F; Mishkin, M

    2011-12-01

    To re-examine whether or not selective hippocampal damage reduces novelty preference in visual paired comparison (VPC), we presented two different versions of the task to a group of patients with developmental amnesia (DA), each of whom sustained this form of pathology early in life. Compared with normal control participants, the DA group showed a delay-dependent reduction in novelty preference on one version of the task and an overall reduction on both versions combined. Because VPC is widely considered to be a measure of incidental recognition, the results appear to support the view that the hippocampus contributes to recognition memory. A difficulty for this conclusion, however, is that according to one current view the hippocampal contribution to recognition is limited to task conditions that encourage recollection of an item in some associated context, and according to another current view, to recognition of an item with the high confidence judgment that reflects a strong memory. By contrast, VPC, throughout which the participant remains entirely uninstructed other than to view the stimuli, would seem to lack such task conditions and so would likely lead to recognition based on familiarity rather than recollection or, alternatively, weak memories rather than strong. However, before concluding that the VPC impairment therefore contradicts both current views regarding the role of the hippocampus in recognition memory, two possibilities that would resolve this issue need to be investigated. One is that some variable in VPC, such as the extended period of stimulus encoding during familiarization, overrides its incidental nature, and, because this condition promotes either recollection- or strength-based recognition, renders the task hippocampal-dependent. The other possibility is that VPC, rather than providing a measure of incidental recognition, actually assesses an implicit, information-gathering process modulated by habituation, for which the hippocampus is

  18. Transient Global Amnesia After Cerebral Angiography With Iomeprol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiu, Cristina; Terecoasă, Elena Oana; Grecu, Nicolae; Dorobăţ, Bogdan; Marinescu, Andreea Nicoleta; Băjenaru, Ovidiu Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transient global amnesia is now considered a very rare complication of cerebral angiography. Various etiological mechanisms have been suggested to account for this complication, but no consensus has been reached yet. This case report documents one of the few reported cases of cerebral angiography-related transient global amnesia associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of unilateral hippocampal ischemia, most probably as a consequence of a transient reduction in regional hippocampal blood flow. However, the possibility of a direct neurotoxic effect of the nonionic contrast media Iomeprol on the Cornu ammonis – field 1 neurons cannot be firmly ruled out. We describe the case of a 54-year-old woman admitted to our department for left upper limb weakness with acute onset 8 days before. The brain computed tomography (CT) scan performed at admission revealed subacute ischemic lesions in the right watershed superficial territories and a right thalamic lacunar infarct. Diagnostic digital subtraction cerebral angiography was performed 4 days after admission with the nonionic contrast media Iomeprol. A few minutes after completion of the procedure, the patient developed symptoms suggestive for transient global amnesia. The brain MRI performed 22 hours after the onset of symptoms demonstrated increased signal within the lateral part of the right hippocampus on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences, associated with a corresponding reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and increased signal on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences, consistent with acute hippocampal ischemia and several T2/FLAIR hyperintensities in the right watershed superficial territories and in the right thalamus, corresponding to the lesions already identified on the CT scan performed at admission. A follow-up MRI, performed 2 months later, demonstrated the disappearance of the increased signal within the right hippocampus on the DWI

  19. A mathematical model of forgetting and amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap M. J. Murre

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a mathematical model of learning and memory and apply it to the dynamics of forgetting and amnesia. The model is based on the hypothesis that the neural systems involved in memory at different time-scales share two fundamental properties: (1 representations in a store decline in strength (2 while trying to induce new representations in higher-level more permanent stores. This paper addresses several types of experimental and clinical phenomena: (i the temporal gradient of retrograde amnesia (Ribot's Law, (ii forgetting curves with and without anterograde amnesia, and (iii learning and forgetting curves with impaired cortical plasticity. Results are in the form of closed-form expressions that are applied to studies with mice, rats, and monkeys. In order to analyze human data in a quantitative manner, we also derive a relative measure of retrograde amnesia that removes the effects of non-equal item difficulty for different time periods commonly found with clinical retrograde amnesia tests. Using these analytical tools, we review studies of temporal gradients in the memory of patients with Korsakoff's Disease, Alzheimer's Dementia, Huntington's Disease, and other disorders.

  20. Nicotine acts on growth plate chondrocytes to delay skeletal growth through the alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Kawakita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking adversely affects endochondral ossification during the course of skeletal growth. Among a plethora of cigarette chemicals, nicotine is one of the primary candidate compounds responsible for the cause of smoking-induced delayed skeletal growth. However, the possible mechanism of delayed skeletal growth caused by nicotine remains unclarified. In the last decade, localization of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, a specific receptor of nicotine, has been widely detected in non-excitable cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine affect growth plate chondrocytes directly and specifically through nAChR to delay skeletal growth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effect of nicotine on human growth plate chondrocytes, a major component of endochondral ossification. The chondrocytes were derived from extra human fingers. Nicotine inhibited matrix synthesis and hypertrophic differentiation in human growth plate chondrocytes in suspension culture in a concentration-dependent manner. Both human and murine growth plate chondrocytes expressed alpha7 nAChR, which constitutes functional homopentameric receptors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA, a specific antagonist of alpha7 nAChR, reversed the inhibition of matrix synthesis and functional calcium signal by nicotine in human growth plate chondrocytes in vitro. To study the effect of nicotine on growth plate in vivo, ovulation-controlled pregnant alpha7 nAChR +/- mice were given drinking water with or without nicotine during pregnancy, and skeletal growth of their fetuses was observed. Maternal nicotine exposure resulted in delayed skeletal growth of alpha7 nAChR +/+ fetuses but not in alpha7 nAChR -/- fetuses, implying that skeletal growth retardation by nicotine is specifically mediated via fetal alpha7 nAChR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that nicotine, from cigarette smoking, acts directly on growth plate chondrocytes to decrease

  1. Modulation of the delayed rectifier K+ current in neurons by an angiotensin II type 2 receptor fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Richards, E M; Posner, P; Sumners, C

    1995-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulates the delayed rectifier K+ current (IK) in neurons cultured from rat hypothalamus and brain stem via AT2 receptors, and this effect involves activation of a Gi protein and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). However, there was no evidence that the AT2 receptor involved in this response was the same as the recently cloned AT2 receptor. In the present study, intracellular injection of a 22-amino acid peptide (PEP-22) corresponding to the putative third intracellular loop of the cloned AT2 receptor elicited an increase in IK in cultured neurons that was similar to the effect produced by ANG II. Furthermore, this effect of PEP-22 was abolished by pertussis toxin (200 ng/ml, 24 h) pretreatment and also by superfusion of the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid (10 nM), suggesting the involvement of Gi protein and PP2A, respectively. Intracellular injection of a random peptide or normal pipette solution did not affect neuronal IK. This is direct evidence to link the cloned AT2 receptor to a defined response elicited by ANG II.

  2. Stability and attractive basins of multiple equilibria in delayed two-neuron networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Yu-Jiao; Zhang Hua-Guang; Wang Zhan-Shan

    2012-01-01

    Multiple stability for two-dimensional delayed recurrent neural networks with piecewise linear activation functions of 2r (r ≥ 1) corner points is studied.Sufficient conditions are established for checking the existence of (2r + 1)2 equilibria in delayed recurrent neural networks.Under these conditions,(r + 1)2 equilibria are locally exponentially stable,and (2r + 1)2 - (r + 1)2 - r2 equilibria are unstable.Attractive basins of stable equilibria are estimated,which are larger than invariant sets derived by decomposing state space.One example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of our results.

  3. Retrograde amnesia for semantic information in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeter, Martijn; Kollen, Ariane; Scheltens, Philip

    2005-01-01

    Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal controls were tested on a retrograde amnesia test with semantic content (Neologism and Vocabulary Test, or NVT), consisting of neologisms to be defined. Patients showed a decrement as compared to normal controls, pointing to retrograde amnesia within semantic memory. No evidence for a gradient within this amnesia was found, although one was present on an autobiographic test of retrograde amnesia that had a wider time scale. Several explanations for these results are presented, including one that suggests that extended retrograde amnesia and semantic memory deficits are in fact one and the same deficit.

  4. Delayed effects of corticosterone on slow after-hyperpolarization potentials in mouse hippocampal versus prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup G Pillai

    Full Text Available The rodent stress hormone corticosterone changes neuronal activity in a slow and persistent manner through transcriptional regulation. In the rat dorsal hippocampus, corticosterone enhances the amplitude of calcium-dependent potassium currents that cause a lingering slow after-hyperpolarization (sAHP at the end of depolarizing events. In this study we compared the putative region-dependency of the delayed effects of corticosterone (approximately 5 hrs after treatment on sAHP as well as other active and passive properties of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from three prefrontal areas, i.e. the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortex, with the hippocampus of adult mice. In agreement with previous studies, corticosterone increased sAHP amplitude in the dorsal hippocampus with depolarizing steps of increasing amplitude. However, in the lateral orbitofrontal, prelimbic and infralimbic cortices we did not observe any modifications of sAHP amplitude after corticosterone treatment. Properties of single action potentials or % ratio of the last spike interval with respect to the first spike interval, an indicator of accommodation in an action potential train, were not significantly affected by corticosterone in all brain regions examined. Lastly, corticosterone treatment did not induce any lasting changes in passive membrane properties of hippocampal or cortical neurons. Overall, the data indicate that corticosterone slowly and very persistently increases the sAHP amplitude in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, while this is not the case in the cortical regions examined. This implies that changes in excitability across brain regions reached by corticosterone may vary over a prolonged period of time after stress.

  5. Morphine enhances HIV-1SF162-mediated neuron death and delays recovery of injured neurites.

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    Ruturaj R Masvekar

    Full Text Available HIV-1 enters the CNS soon after initial systemic infection; within the CNS parenchyma infected and/or activated perivascular macrophages, microglia and astrocytes release viral and cellular toxins that drive secondary toxicity in neurons and other cell types. Our previous work has largely modeled HIV-neuropathology using the individual viral proteins Tat or gp120, with murine striatal neurons as targets. To model disease processes more closely, the current study uses supernatant from HIV-1-infected cells. Supernatant from HIV-1SF162-infected differentiated-U937 cells (HIV+sup was collected and p24 level was measured by ELISA to assess the infection. Injection drug abuse is a significant risk factor for HIV-infection, and opiate drug abusers show increased HIV-neuropathology, even with anti-retroviral treatments. We therefore assessed HIV+sup effects on neuronal survival and neurite growth/pruning with or without concurrent exposure to morphine, an opiate that preferentially acts through µ-opioid receptors. Effects of HIV+sup ± morphine were assessed on neuronal populations, and also by time-lapse imaging of individual cells. HIV+sup caused dose-dependent toxicity over a range of p24 levels (10-500 pg/ml. Significant interactions occurred with morphine at lower p24 levels (10 and 25 pg/ml, and GSK3β was implicated as a point of convergence. In the presence of glia, selective neurotoxic measures were significantly enhanced and interactions with morphine were also augmented, perhaps related to a decreased level of BDNF. Importantly, the arrest of neurite growth that occurred with exposure to HIV+sup was reversible unless neurons were continuously exposed to morphine. Thus, while reducing HIV-infection levels may be protective, ongoing exposure to opiates may limit recovery. Opiate interactions observed in this HIV-infective environment were similar, though not entirely concordant, with Tat/gp120 interactions reported previously, suggesting

  6. Benjamin Franklin and Shock-Induced Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Stanley; Zaromb, Franklin

    2006-01-01

    Shock-induced amnesia received considerable attention after Cerletti popularized electroconvulsive shock therapy in the late 1930s. Yet, often overlooked is the fact that Benjamin Franklin recognized that passing electricity through the head could affect memory for the traumatic event. Franklin described his findings on himself and others in…

  7. Infantile Amnesia: Forgotten but Not Gone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Stella; Callaghan, Bridget L.; Richardson, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Unlike adult memories that can be remembered for many years, memories that are formed early in life are more fragile and susceptible to being forgotten (a phenomenon known as "infantile" or "childhood" amnesia). Nonetheless, decades of research in both humans and nonhuman animals demonstrate the importance of early life…

  8. Recovery from retrograde amnesia: a learning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A M; Tyler, J; Jinich, D

    1974-04-01

    Retrograde amnesia was produced in rats by electroconvulsive shock. Memory recovered if the animals were given repeated test trials. Memory did not recover if steps were taken to reduce the conditioning properties of the test trials; the manipulations included eliminating the response, altering the apparatus cues, or extinguishing conditioned "fear" by confining animals to the apparatus during the first test trial.

  9. A mathematical model of forgetting and amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murre, J.M.J.; Chessa, A.G.; Meeter, M.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a mathematical model of learning and memory and apply it to the dynamics of forgetting and amnesia. The model is based on the hypothesis that the neural systems involved in memory at different time scales share two fundamental properties: (1) representations in a store decline in strengt

  10. The learned reinterpretation of fluency in amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurten, Marie; Willems, Sylvie

    2017-07-01

    Fluency is one of many cues that are involved in memory decisions. To date, however, the extent to which fluency-based decisions are preserved in amnesia is not yet clear. In this study, we tested and found differences in how patients with amnesia (n=8) and control participants (n=16) use fluency when making recognition decisions (Experiment 1). Our results suggested that these differences could be due to changes in the readiness with which patients attribute the subjective feeling of fluency to pre-exposure when an alternative explanation is available (i.e., the perceptual quality of the item). Secondly, we explored the hypothesis that changes in attribution processes in patients with amnesia are explained by a decrease in contingency between processing fluency and previous occurrence of stimuli in patients' daily lives, leading them to consider that fluency is not a relevant cue for memory (Experiment 2). Specifically, 42 healthy participants were put either in a condition where the positive contingency between fluent processing and previous encounters with an item was systematically confirmed (classic condition) or in a condition where the classical association between fluency and prior exposure was systematically reversed (reversed condition). Results indicated that participants more readily attribute fluency to the alternative external source than to past experience in the reversed condition than in the classic condition, mimicking the pattern of results shown by participants with amnesia in Experiment 1. Implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Forskolin suppresses delayed-rectifier K+ currents and enhances spike frequency-dependent adaptation of sympathetic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis I Angel-Chavez

    Full Text Available In signal transduction research natural or synthetic molecules are commonly used to target a great variety of signaling proteins. For instance, forskolin, a diterpene activator of adenylate cyclase, has been widely used in cellular preparations to increase the intracellular cAMP level. However, it has been shown that forskolin directly inhibits some cloned K+ channels, which in excitable cells set up the resting membrane potential, the shape of action potential and regulate repetitive firing. Despite the growing evidence indicating that K+ channels are blocked by forskolin, there are no studies yet assessing the impact of this mechanism of action on neuron excitability and firing patterns. In sympathetic neurons, we find that forskolin and its derivative 1,9-Dideoxyforskolin, reversibly suppress the delayed rectifier K+ current (IKV. Besides, forskolin reduced the spike afterhyperpolarization and enhanced the spike frequency-dependent adaptation. Given that IKV is mostly generated by Kv2.1 channels, HEK-293 cells were transfected with cDNA encoding for the Kv2.1 α subunit, to characterize the mechanism of forskolin action. Both drugs reversible suppressed the Kv2.1-mediated K+ currents. Forskolin inhibited Kv2.1 currents and IKV with an IC50 of ~32 μM and ~24 µM, respectively. Besides, the drug induced an apparent current inactivation and slowed-down current deactivation. We suggest that forskolin reduces the excitability of sympathetic neurons by enhancing the spike frequency-dependent adaptation, partially through a direct block of their native Kv2.1 channels.

  12. Contribution of downregulation of L-type calcium currents to delayed neuronal death in rat hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Jian-Ming; Hu, De-Hui; Hou, Feng-Qing; Zhao, Miao; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Wang, Ying; Li, Jian-Guo; Hu, Ping; Chen, Liang; Qin, Lu-Ning; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2007-05-09

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed, selective neuronal death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms are as yet unclear, but it is known that activation of L-type Ca2+ channels specifically increases the expression of a group of genes required for neuronal survival. Accordingly, we examined temporal changes in L-type calcium-channel activity in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampus after transient forebrain ischemia by patch-clamp techniques. In vulnerable CA1 neurons, L-type Ca2+-channel activity was persistently downregulated after ischemic insult, whereas in invulnerable CA3 neurons, no change occurred. Downregulation of L-type calcium channels was partially caused by oxidation modulation in postischemic channels. Furthermore, L-type but neither N-type nor P/Q-type Ca2+-channel antagonists alone significantly inhibited the survival of cultured hippocampal neurons. In contrast, specific L-type calcium-channel agonist remarkably reduced neuronal cell death and restored the inhibited channels induced by nitric oxide donor. More importantly, L-type calcium-channel agonist applied after reoxygenation or reperfusion significantly decreased neuronal injury in in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation ischemic model and in animals subjected to forebrain ischemia-reperfusion. Together, the present results suggest that ischemia-induced inhibition of L-type calcium currents may give rise to delayed death of neurons in the CA1 region, possibly via oxidation mechanisms. Our findings may lead to a new perspective on neuronal death after ischemic insult and suggest that a novel therapeutic approach, activation of L-type calcium channels, could be tested at late stages of reperfusion for stroke treatment.

  13. Cholinergic dysfunction and amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: a transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; Bergmann, Jürgen; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Kronbichler, Martin; Kraus, Jörg; Caleri, Francesca; Tezzon, Frediano; Ladurner, Gunther; Golaszewski, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    The specific neurochemical substrate underlying the amnesia in patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is still poorly defined. Memory impairment has been linked to dysfunction of neurons in the cholinergic system. A transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol, the short latency afferent inhibition (SAI), may give direct information about the function of some cholinergic pathways in the human motor cortex. In the present study, we measured SAI in eight alcoholics with WKS and compared the data with those from a group of age-matched healthy individuals; furthermore, we correlated the individual SAI values of the WKS patients with memory and other cognitive functions. Mean SAI was significantly reduced in WKS patients when compared with the controls. SAI was increased after administration of a single dose of donezepil in a subgroup of four patients. The low score obtained in the Rey Complex Figure delayed recall test, the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) and the Corsi's Block Span subtest of the WAIS-R documented a severe impairment in the anterograde memory and short-term memory. None of the correlations between SAI values and these neuropsychological tests reached significance. We provide physiological evidence of cholinergic involvement in WKS. However, this putative marker of central cholinergic activity did not significantly correlate with the memory deficit in our patients. These findings suggest that the cholinergic dysfunction does not account for the memory disorder and that damage to the cholinergic system is not sufficient to cause a persisting amnesic syndrome in WKS.

  14. Seasonal Changes in the Incidence of Transient Global Amnesia

    OpenAIRE

    Keret, Ophir; Lev, Nirit; Shochat, Tzippy; Steiner, Israel

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a stereotypic condition characterized by anterograde and retrograde amnesia that typically resolves within 24 hours. The pathophysiology of TGA is still unclear. We noted that patients hospitalized with TGA tend to appear in seasonal clusters, and decided to investigate this phenomenon. Methods Every patient with acute presentation of amnesia at our medical center is hospitalized for observation and evaluation. We reviewed the monthly o...

  15. Focal cerebral hyperemia in postconcussive amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariai, T; Suzuki, R; Ohta, Y; Ohno, K; Hirakawa, K

    2001-12-01

    Transient amnesia caused by minor head injury is commonly encountered in daily neurosurgical practice, but the mechanism of such amnesia has not been extensively studied. We measured the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of patients with postconcussive amnesia with Xe/CT CBF to examine whether a focal disturbance of CBF exists. The Xe/CT CBF study was performed in eight patients with closed head injury without organic cerebral lesion while they were suffering from posttraumatic amnesia (concussion group). The time interval between accident and CBF measurement was less than 2 h in three patients, 5-6 h in two, 8-9 h in two, and 18 in one. The results were compared with those of nine normal volunteers and eight other age-matched patients who recovered without any neurological deficit despite the presence of hemorrhagic regions (mild hemorrhage group). The rCBF of the concussion group was significantly elevated in the bilateral mesial temporal cortex in comparison to the normal group. The rCBF in the mild hemorrhage group was lower than that of normal controls in all regions. The analysis of right-left difference in CBF indicated that there was significant asymmetry (right > left) in the frontal and temporal cortex in the concussion group, but not in the normal and mild hemorrhage group. This Xe/CT CBF study in acute stages of cerebral concussion, in which patients were amnestic, detected focal cerebral hyperemia. Such hyperemia in regions closely related to human memory function may be the result of vasoparalysis or the compensatory activation of memory circuits after denervation injury.

  16. Persistent Autobiographical Amnesia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Repetto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 47-year-old man who referred to the Emergency Department for sudden global amnesia and left mild motor impairment in the setting of increased arterial blood pressure. The acute episode resolved within 24 hours. Despite general recovery and the apparent transitory nature of the event, a persistent selective impairment in recollecting events from some specific topics of his personal life became apparent. Complete neuropsychological tests one week after the acute onset and 2 months later demonstrated a clear retrograde memory deficit contrasting with the preservation of anterograde memory and learning abilities. One year later, the autobiographic memory deficit was unmodified, except for what had been re-learnt. Brain MRI was normal while H20 brain PET scans demonstrated hypometabolism in the right globus pallidus and putamen after 2 weeks from onset, which was no longer present one year later. The absence of a clear pathomechanism underlying focal amnesia lead us to consider this case as an example of functional retrograde amnesia.

  17. Transient Global Amnesia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Alan Rison

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transient global amnesia is a syndrome of temporary and reversible disruption of short-term memory accompanied by repetitive questioning. Although the etiology is unknown, the prognosis usually benign, and no particular treatment is required, it is important for all involved clinicians to recognize the diagnosis and possess knowledge about the evaluation of these affected patients. Case Presentation: A middle-aged Caucasian woman presented for neurologic evaluation for acute forgetfulness. Neurologic examination disclosed repetitive questioning with preserved orientation and no focal motor, speech, sensory, coordination, or cranial nerve deficits. Neurologic investigations did not reveal any pathologic findings. Her memory improved and reverted to normal baseline over the course of a 24-hour hospital stay. Conclusion: Transient global amnesia is an interesting syndrome of reversible anterograde amnesia associated with repetitive questioning that occurs with an unclear etiology in middle-aged and elderly individuals. Due clinical diligence is required in the investigation of these patients. Treatment is generally not required, and the condition usually does not recur. Clinicians, including neurologists, internists, family practice physicians, and psychiatrists, need awareness of this condition.

  18. Noninvasive blood glucose sensing using near infra-red spectroscopy and artificial neural networks based on inverse delayed function model of neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasahayam, Swathi; Koppuravuri, Sri Haindavi; Arora, Lavanya; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a non-invasive blood glucose sensing system is presented using near infra-red(NIR) spectroscopy. The signal from the NIR optodes is processed using artificial neural networks (ANN) to estimate the glucose level in blood. In order to obtain accurate values of the synaptic weights of the ANN, inverse delayed (ID) function model of neuron has been used. The ANN model has been implemented on field programmable gate array (FPGA). Error in estimating glucose levels using ANN based on ID function model of neuron implemented on FPGA, came out to be 1.02 mg/dl using 15 hidden neurons in the hidden layer as against 5.48 mg/dl using ANN based on conventional neuron model.

  19. Electroshocks delay seizures and subsequent epileptogenesis but do not prevent neuronal damage in the lithium-pilocarpine model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, V; Ferrandon, A; Marescaux, C; Nehlig, A

    2000-11-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy, which is used to treat refractory major depression in humans increases seizure threshold and decreases seizure duration. Moreover, the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor induced by electroshocks (ECS) might protect hippocampal cells from death in patients suffering from depression. As temporal lobe epilepsy is linked to neuronal damage in the hippocampus, we tested the effect of repeated ECS on subsequent status epilepticus (SE) induced by lithium-pilocarpine and leading to cell death and temporal epilepsy in the rat. Eleven maximal ECS were applied via ear-clips to adult rats. The last one was applied 2 days before the induction of SE by lithium-pilocarpine. The rats were electroencephalographically recorded to study the SE characteristics. The rats treated with ECS before pilocarpine (ECS-pilo) developed partial limbic (score 2) and propagated seizures (score 5) with a longer latency than the rats that underwent SE alone (sham-pilo). Despite this delay in the initiation and propagation of the seizures, the same number of ECS- and sham-pilo rats developed SE with a similar characteristic pattern. The expression of c-Fos protein was down-regulated by repeated ECS in the amygdala and the cortex. In ECS-pilo rats, c-Fos expression was decreased in the piriform and entorhinal cortex and increased in the hilus of the dentate gyrus. Neuronal damage was identical in the forebrain areas of both groups, while it was worsened by ECS treatment in the substantia nigra pars reticulata, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices compared to sham-pilo rats. Finally, while 11 out of the 12 sham-pilo rats developed spontaneous recurrent seizures after a silent period of 40+/-27 days, only two out of the 10 ECS-pilo rats became epileptic, but after a prolonged latency of 106 and 151 days. One ECS-pilo rat developed electrographic infraclinical seizures and seven did not exhibit any seizures. Thus, the extensive neuronal damage occurring in the

  20. 离散时延双神经元网络的渐近稳定性%Asymptotic Stability Criteria for a Two-Neuron Network with Different Time Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李绍文; 李绍荣; 廖晓峰

    2003-01-01

    New sufficient conditions for the asymptotic stability of a two-neuron network with different time delays are derived. These conditions lead to delay-dependent and delay-independent asymptotic stability. Our results are shown to be less conservative and restrictive than those reported in the literature. Some examples are given to illustrate the correctness of our results.

  1. Ablation of the 14-3-3gamma Protein Results in Neuronal Migration Delay and Morphological Defects in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachi, Tomoka; Cornell, Brett; Marshall, Courtney; Zhukarev, Vladimir; Baas, Peter W; Toyo-oka, Kazuhito

    2016-06-01

    14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitously-expressed and multifunctional proteins. There are seven isoforms in mammals with a high level of homology, suggesting potential functional redundancy. We previously found that two of seven isoforms, 14-3-3epsilon and 14-3-3zeta, are important for brain development, in particular, radial migration of pyramidal neurons in the developing cerebral cortex. In this work, we analyzed the function of another isoform, the protein 14-3-3gamma, with respect to neuronal migration in the developing cortex. We found that in utero 14-3-3gamma-deficiency resulted in delays in neuronal migration as well as morphological defects. Migrating neurons deficient in 14-3-3gamma displayed a thicker leading process stem, and the basal ends of neurons were not able to reach the boundary between the cortical plate and the marginal zone. Consistent with the results obtained from in utero electroporation, time-lapse live imaging of brain slices revealed that the ablation of the 14-3-3gamma proteins in pyramidal neurons slowed down their migration. In addition, the 14-3-3gamma deficient neurons showed morphological abnormalities, including increased multipolar neurons with a thicker leading processes stem during migration. These results indicate that the 14-3-3gamma proteins play an important role in radial migration by regulating the morphology of migrating neurons in the cerebral cortex. The findings underscore the pathological phenotypes of brain development associated with the disruption of different 14-3-3 proteins and will advance the preclinical data regarding disorders caused by neuronal migration defects.

  2. Information in small neuronal ensemble activity in the hippocampal CA1 during delayed non-matching to sample performance in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Susumu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The matrix-like organization of the hippocampus, with its several inputs and outputs, has given rise to several theories related to hippocampal information processing. Single-cell electrophysiological studies and studies of lesions or genetically altered animals using recognition memory tasks such as delayed non-matching-to-sample (DNMS tasks support the theories. However, a complete understanding of hippocampal function necessitates knowledge of the encoding of information by multiple neurons in a single trial. The role of neuronal ensembles in the hippocampal CA1 for a DNMS task was assessed quantitatively in this study using multi-neuronal recordings and an artificial neural network classifier as a decoder. Results The activity of small neuronal ensembles (6-18 cells over brief time intervals (2-50 ms contains accurate information specifically related to the matching/non-matching of continuously presented stimuli (stimulus comparison. The accuracy of the combination of neurons pooled over all the ensembles was markedly lower than those of the ensembles over all examined time intervals. Conclusion The results show that the spatiotemporal patterns of spiking activity among cells in the small neuronal ensemble contain much information that is specifically useful for the stimulus comparison. Small neuronal networks in the hippocampal CA1 might therefore act as a comparator during recognition memory tasks.

  3. Evidence for Inhibitory Effects of Flupirtine, a Centrally Acting Analgesic, on Delayed Rectifier K+ Currents in Motor Neuron-Like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng-Nan Wu; Ming-Chun Hsu; Yu-Kai Liao; Fang-Tzu Wu; Yuh-Jyh Jong; Yi-Ching Lo

    2012-01-01

    Flupirtine (Flu), a triaminopyridine derivative, is a centrally acting, non-opiate analgesic agent. In this study, effects of Flu on K+ currents were explored in two types of motor neuron-like cells. Cell exposure to Flu decreased the amplitude of delayed rectifier K+ current (I K(DR)) with a concomitant raise in current inactivation in NSC-34 neuronal cells. The dissociation constant for Flu-mediated increase of I K(DR) inactivation rate was about 9.8  μ M. Neither linopirdine (10  μ M), NMD...

  4. GABA, glutamate, dopamine and serotonin transporters expression on memory formation and amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Ruth; Gómez-Víquez, Leticia; Meneses, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Notwithstanding several neurotransmission systems are frequently related to memory formation, amnesia and/or therapeutic targets for memory alterations, the role of transporters γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA, GAT1), glutamate (neuronal glutamate transporter excitatory amino acid carrier; EACC1), dopamine (DAT) and serotonin (SERT) is poorly understood. Hence, in this paper Western-blot analysis was used to evaluate expression changes on them during memory formation in trained and untrained rats treated with the selective serotonin transporter inhibitor fluoxetine, the amnesic drug d-methamphetamine (METH) and fluoxetine plus METH. Transporters expression was evaluated in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and striatum. Data indicated that in addition of memory performance other behavioral parameters (e.g., explorative behavior, food-intake, etc.) that memory formation was recorded. Thus, memory formation in a Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping was associated to up-regulation of prefrontal cortex GAT1 and EAAC1, striatal SERT, DAT and EACC1; while, hippocampal EACC1, GAT1 and SERT were down-regulated. METH impaired short (STM) and long-term memory (LTM), at 24 or 48h. The METH-induced amnesia down-regulated SERT, DAT, EACC1 and GAT1 in hippocampus and the GAT1 in striatum; no-changes were observed in prefrontal cortex. Post-training administration of fluoxetine improved LTM (48h), which was associated to DAT, GAT1 (prefrontal cortex) up-regulation, but GAT1 (striatum) and SERT (hippocampus) down-regulation. Fluoxetine plus METH administration was able to prevent amnesia, which was associated to DAT, EACC1 and GAT1 (prefrontal cortex), SERT and DAT (hippocampus) and EACC1 or DAT (striatal) up-regulation. Together these data show that memory formation, amnesia and anti-amnesic effects are associated to specific patters of transporters expression.

  5. The relationship between psychopathy and crime-related amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cima, M.; Oorsouw, K. van

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether levels of psychopathy predicted claims of crime-related amnesia. Different characteristics of psychopathy were based on the factor structure of the self-report questionnaire Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI). Crime-related amnesia claims

  6. Disrupting circadian rhythms in rats induces retrograde amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, Mátyás; Ree, J.M. van; Niesink, Raymond J.M.; Wied, D. de

    1985-01-01

    Disrupting circadian organization in rats by phase-shifting the illumination cycle or by exposure to a reversed day/night cycle or to continuous light, resulted in retrograde amnesia for passive avoidance behavior. This retrograde amnesia induced by phase-shifting lasted at least 2 days, and

  7. Disrupting circadian rhythms in rats induces retrograde amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, Mátyás; Ree, J.M. van; Niesink, Raymond J.M.; Wied, D. de

    1985-01-01

    Disrupting circadian organization in rats by phase-shifting the illumination cycle or by exposure to a reversed day/night cycle or to continuous light, resulted in retrograde amnesia for passive avoidance behavior. This retrograde amnesia induced by phase-shifting lasted at least 2 days, and gradual

  8. The relationship between psychopathy and crime-related amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cima, M.; Oorsouw, K. van

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether levels of psychopathy predicted claims of crime-related amnesia. Different characteristics of psychopathy were based on the factor structure of the self-report questionnaire Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI). Crime-related amnesia claims

  9. Memory formation, amnesia, improved memory and reversed amnesia: 5-HT role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, G; Meneses, A

    2008-12-16

    Traditionally, the search for memory circuits has been focused on examinations of amnesic and AD patients, cerebral lesions and neuroimaging. A complementary alternative has become the use of autoradiography with radioligands, aiming to identify neurobiological markers associated with memory formation, amnesia states and (more recently) recovery from memory deficits. Indeed, ex vivo autoradiographic studies offer the advantage of detecting functionally active receptors altered by pharmacological tools during memory formation, amnesia states and memory recovery. Moreover, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) systems have become a pharmacological and genetic target in the treatment of memory disorders. Herein evidence from studies involving expression of 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(4), and 5-HT(6) receptors in memory formation, amnesia conditions (e.g., pharmacological models or aging) and recovery of memory is reviewed. Thus, specific 5-HT receptors were expressed in trained animals relative to untrained in brain areas such as cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. However, relative to the control group, rats showing amnesia or recovered memory, showed in the hippocampus, region where explicit memory is formed, a complex pattern of 5-HT receptor expression. An intermediate expression occurred in amygdala, septum and some cortical areas in charge of explicit memory storage. Even in brain areas thought to be in charge of procedural memory such as basal ganglia, animals showing recovered memory displayed an intermediate expression, while amnesic groups, depending on the pharmacological amnesia model, showed up- or down-regulation. In conclusion, evidence indicates that autoradiography, by using specific radioligands, offers excellent opportunities to map dynamic changes in brain areas engaged in these cognitive processes. The 5-HT modulatory role strengthens or suppresses memory is critically depend on the timing of the memory formation.

  10. Block of P2X7 receptors could partly reverse the delayed neuronal death in area CA1 of the hippocampus after transient global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiang; Guo, Zhili; Liu, Xiaofeng; Ouyang, Qing; He, Cheng; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Yuan, Hongbin; Xiang, Zhenghua

    2013-12-01

    Transient global ischemia (which closely resembles clinical situations such as cardiac arrest, near drowning or severe systemic hypotension during surgical procedures), often induces delayed neuronal death in the brain, especially in the hippocampal CA1 region. The mechanism of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is not fully understood. In this study, we have shown that the P2X7 receptor antagonist, BBG, reduced delayed neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region after I/R injury; P2X7 receptor expression levels increased before delayed neuronal death after I/R injury; inhibition of the P2X7 receptor reduced I/R-induced microglial microvesicle-like components, IL-1β expression, P38 phosphorylation, and glial activation in hippocampal CA1 region after I/R injury. These results indicate that antagonism of the P2X7 receptor and signaling pathways of microglial MV shedding, such as src-protein tyrosine kinase, P38 MAP kinase and A-SMase, might be a promising therapeutic strategy for clinical treatment of transient global cerebral I/R injury.

  11. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia following Bitemporal Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schnider

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient suffered very severe anterograde and retrograde amnesia following infarction of both medial temporal lobes (hippocampus and adjacent cortex and the left inferior temporo-occipital area. The temporal stem and the amygdala were intact; these structures do not appear to be critical for new learning in humans. Extension of the left-sided infarct into the inferior temporo-occipital lobe, an area critically involved in visual processing, appears to be responsible for our patient's loss of remote memories.

  12. Preserved cumulative semantic interference despite amnesia

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    Gary Michael Oppenheim

    2015-05-01

    As predicted by Oppenheim et al’s (2010 implicit incremental learning account, WRP’s BCN RTs demonstrated strong (and significant repetition priming and semantic blocking effects (Figure 1. Similar to typical results from neurally intact undergraduates, WRP took longer to name pictures presented in semantically homogeneous blocks than in heterogeneous blocks, an effect that increased with each cycle. This result challenges accounts that ascribe cumulative semantic interference in this task to explicit memory mechanisms, instead suggesting that the effect has the sort of implicit learning bases that are typically spared in hippocampal amnesia.

  13. Delayed hippocampal neuronal death in young gerbil following transient global cerebral ischemia is related to higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the ischemic hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Joo Bae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p63 is one of p53 family members and plays a vital role as a regulator of neuronal apoptosis in the development of the nervous system. However, the role of p63 in mature neuronal death has not been addressed yet. In this study, we first compared ischemia-induced effects on p63 expression in the hippocampal regions (CA1- 3 between the young and adult gerbils subjected to 5 minutes of transient global cerebral ischemia. Neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region of young gerbils was significantly slow compared with that in the adult gerbils after transient global cerebral ischemia. p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the sham-operated young group was significantly low compared with that in the sham-operated adult group. p63 immunoreactivity was apparently changed in ischemic hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. In the ischemia-operated adult groups, p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was significantly decreased at 4 days post-ischemia; however, p63 immunoreactivity in the ischemia-operated young group was significantly higher than that in the ischemia-operated adult group. At 7 days post-ischemia, p63 immunoreactivity was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. Change patterns of p63 level in the hippocampal CA1 region of adult and young gerbils after ischemic damage were similar to those observed in the immunohistochemical results. These findings indicate that higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the hippocampal CA1 region of the young gerbils after ischemia/reperfusion may be related to more delayed neuronal death compared to that in the adults.

  14. Delayed hippocampal neuronal death in young gerbil following transient global cerebral ischemia is related to higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the ischemic hippocampus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun Joo Bae; Seongkweon Hong; Dong Won Kim; Jun Hwi Cho; Yun Lyul Lee; Moo-Ho Won; Joon Ha Park; Bai Hui Chen; Bing Chun Yan; Bich Na Shin; Jeong Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Jae Chul Lee; Hyun-Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p63 is one of p53 family members and plays a vital role as a regulator of neuronal apoptosis in the development of the nervous system. However, the role of p63 in mature neuronal death has not been addressed yet. In this study, we ifrst compared ischemia-in-duced effects on p63 expression in the hippocampal regions (CA1–3) between the young and adult gerbils subjected to 5 minutes of transient global cerebral ischemia. Neuronal death in the hippocampal CA1 region of young gerbils was signiifcantly slow compared with that in the adult gerbils after transient global cerebral ischemia. p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the sham-operated young group was signiifcantly low compared with that in the sham-operated adult group. p63 immunoreactivity was apparently changed in ischemic hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. In the ischemia-operated adult groups, p63 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was signiifcantly decreased at 4 days post-ischemia;however, p63 immunoreactivity in the ischemia-operated young group was signiifcantly higher than that in the ischemia-operated adult group. At 7 days post-ischemia, p63 immunoreactivity was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in both ischemia-operated young and adult groups. Change patterns of p63 level in the hippocampal CA1 region of adult and young gerbils after ischemic damage were similar to those observed in the immunohistochemical results. These ifndings indicate that higher and longer-term expression of p63 in the hippocampal CA1 region of the young gerbils after ischemia/reperfusion may be related to more delayed neuronal death compared to that in the adults.

  15. [Developmental amnesia in the premature infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouron, V; Hays, S; Gonzalez-Monge, S

    2010-02-01

    All types of memory disorders have been observed in children, although these reports are rare. Developmental amnesia selectively involves episodic daily life memory while semantic learning is respected and general intelligence is not affected. Daily life is severely disturbed by this cognitive disorder usually occurring after hypoxic ischemic injury with bilateral hippocampal atrophy on MRI. Memory disorders are underdiagnosed in at-risk patients and rarely reported. We report on a former small-for-gestational-age preterm infant with no obvious hypoxic event during perinatal life. The follow-up was normal until elementary school. He had to spend 2 years in 1st grade and exhibited some behavioral troubles. At the age of 9, he was suspected of suffering from dyspraxia and was referred to a pediatrics rehabilitation center. IQ and neuropsychological tests were administered and showed selective autobiographical memory impairment defining developmental amnesia. Despite a typical clinical presentation, brain MRI was normal, including the hippocampal area. This observation underlines the need for a prolonged follow-up until school age to assess the outcome of preterm infants. Otherwise, the evaluation will be limited to motor impairment. Particular attention should be paid to memory during the follow-up to avoid misdiagnoses and to plan and adapt these children's educational strategies. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Counterfactual thinking in patients with amnesia.

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    Mullally, Sinéad L; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2014-11-01

    We often engage in counterfactual (CF) thinking, which involves reflecting on "what might have been." Creating alternative versions of reality seems to have parallels with recollecting the past and imagining the future in requiring the simulation of internally generated models of complex events. Given that episodic memory and imagining the future are impaired in patients with hippocampal damage and amnesia, we wondered whether successful CF thinking also depends upon the integrity of the hippocampus. Here using two nonepisodic CF thinking tasks, we found that patients with bilateral hippocampal damage and amnesia performed comparably with matched controls. They could deconstruct reality, add in and recombine elements, change relations between temporal sequences of events, enabling them to determine plausible alternatives of complex episodes. A difference between the patients and control participants was evident, however, in the patients' subtle avoidance of CF simulations that required the construction of an internal spatial representation. Overall, our findings suggest that mental simulation in the form of nonepisodic CF thinking does not seem to depend upon the hippocampus unless there is the added requirement for construction of a coherent spatial scene within which to play out scenarios.

  17. CX3 chemokine receptor 1 defciency leads to reduced dendritic complexity and delayed maturation of newborn neurons in the adult mouse hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that microglia impact the proliferation and differentiation of neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis via the fractalkine/CX3 chemokine receptor 1 (CX3CR1 signaling pathway. However, whether microglia can influence the maturation and dendritic growth of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the hippocampus was decreased, and the dendritic length and number of intersections in newborn neurons in the hippocampus were reduced in transgenic adult mice with CX3CR1 deficiency (CX3CR1GFP/GFP. Furthermore, after experimental seizures were induced with kainic acid in these CX3CR1-deficient mice, the expression of c-fos, a marker of neuronal activity, was reduced compared with wild-type mice. Collectively, the experimental findings indicate that the functional maturation of newborn neurons during hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice is delayed by CX3CR1 deficiency.

  18. Sub-millisecond firing synchrony of closely neighboring pyramidal neurons in hippocampal CA1 of rats during delayed non-matching to sample task

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    Susumu Takahashi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Firing synchrony among neurons is thought to play functional roles in several brain regions. In theoretical analyses, firing synchrony among neurons within sub-millisecond precision is feasible to convey information. However, little is known about the occurrence and the functional significance of the sub-millisecond synchrony among closely neighboring neurons in the brain of behaving animals because of a technical issue: spikes simultaneously generated from closely neighboring neurons are overlapped in the extracellular space and are not easily separated. As described herein, using a unique spike sorting technique based on independent component analysis together with extracellular 12-channel multi-electrodes (dodecatrodes, we separated such overlapping spikes and investigated the firing synchrony among closely neighboring pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 of rats during a delayed non-matching to sample task. Results showed that closely neighboring pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 can co-fire with sub-millisecond precision. The synchrony generally co-occurred with the firing rate modulation in relation to both internal (retention and comparison and external (stimulus input and motor output events during the task. However, the synchrony occasionally occurred in relation to stimulus inputs even when rate modulation was clearly absent, suggesting that the synchrony is not simply accompanied with firing rate modulation and that the synchrony and the rate modulation might code similar information independently. We therefore conclude that the sub-millisecond firing synchrony in the hippocampus is an effective carrier for propagating information—as represented by the firing rate modulations—to downstream neurons.

  19. Long-term actions of interleukin-1β on delay and tonic firing neurons in rat superficial dorsal horn and their relevance to central sensitization

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    Ballanyi Klaus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β have been implicated in the development of central sensitization that is characteristic of neuropathic pain. To examine its long-term effect on nociceptive processing, defined medium organotypic cultures of rat spinal cord were exposed to 100 pM IL-1β for 6–8 d. Interleukin effects in the dorsal horn were examined by whole-cell patch-clamp recording and Ca2+ imaging techniques. Results Examination of the cultures with confocal Fluo-4 AM imaging showed that IL-1β increased the change in intracellular Ca2+ produced by exposure to 35–50 mM K+. This is consistent with a modest increase in overall dorsal horn excitability. Despite this, IL-1β did not have a direct effect on rheobase or resting membrane potential nor did it selectively destroy any specific neuronal population. All effects were instead confined to changes in synaptic transmission. A variety of pre- and postsynaptic actions of IL-1β were seen in five different electrophysiologically-defined neuronal phenotypes. In putative excitatory 'delay' neurons, cytokine treatment increased the amplitude of spontaneous EPSC's (sEPSC and decreased the frequency of spontaneous IPSC's (sIPSC. These effects would be expected to increase dorsal horn excitability and to facilitate the transfer of nociceptive information. However, other actions of IL-1β included disinhibition of putative inhibitory 'tonic' neurons and an increase in the amplitude of sIPSC's in 'delay' neurons. Conclusion Since spinal microglial activation peaks between 3 and 7 days after the initiation of chronic peripheral nerve injury and these cells release IL-1β at this time, our findings define some of the neurophysiological mechanisms whereby nerve-injury induced release of IL-1β may contribute to the central sensitization associated with chronic neuropathic pain.

  20. Transient Global Amnesia: Emergency Department Evaluation And Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Jeremy Samuel; Nemes, Andreea

    2016-08-01

    Transient global amnesia is a clinically distinct syndrome characterized by the acute inability to form new memories. It can last up to 24 hours. The diagnosis is dependent on eliminating other more serious etiologies including toxic ingestions, acute strokes, complex partial seizures, and central nervous system infections. Transient global amnesia confers no known long-term risks; however, when abnormal signs or symptoms are present, they take precedence and guide the formulation of a differential diagnosis and investigation. In witnessed transient global amnesia with classic features, a minimalist approach is reasonable, avoiding overtesting, inappropriate medication, and medical interventions in favor of observation, ensuring patient safety, and reassuring patients and their families. This review provides a detailed framework for distinguishing transient global amnesia from its dangerous mimics and managing its course in the emergency department.

  1. 部分时滞诱发Watts-Strogatz小世界神经元网络产生随机多共振∗%Sto chastic multi-resonance induced by partial time delay in a Watts-Strogatz small-world neuronal network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓娟; 李国芳

    2016-01-01

    In a neuronal system, propagation speed of neuronal information is mainly determined by the length, the diameter, and the kind of the axons between the neurons. Thus, some communications between neurons are not instantaneous, and others are instantaneous or with some negligible delay. In the past years, effects of time delay on neuronal dynamics, such as synchronization, stochastic resonance, firing regularity, etc., have been investigated. For stochastic resonance, it has been reported recently that stochastic multi-resonance in a neuronal system can be induced by time delay. However, in these studies, time delay has been introduced to every connection of the neuronal system. As mentioned in the beginning, in a real neuronal system, communication between some neurons can be instantaneous or with some negligible delays. Thus, considering the effect of partial time delay (time delay is called as partial time delay if only part of connections are delayed) on neuronal dynamics could be more meaningful. In this paper, we focus on discussing effect of partial time delay on response amplitude of a Watts-Strogatz neuronal network which is locally modeled by Rulkov map. With the numerically obtained results, we can see that partial time delay can induce a stochastic multi-resonance which is indicated by the multi-peak characteristics in the variation of response amplitude with partial time delay. Namely, partial time delay could also induce stochastic multi-resonance in a neuronal system. Moreover, we also find that optimal response amplitude can be reached in much wider range of the partial time delay value when delayed connections are less (i.e., the partial time delay probability is small). This is different from the case in which all connections are delayed, where response amplitude become optimal only when time delay is nearly the multiples of external signal’s period. But the range of the partial time delay value becomes narrower and narrower with the increasing of

  2. Functional connectivity between Layer 2/3 and Layer 5 neurons in prefrontal cortex of nonhuman primates during a delayed match-to-sample task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dong; Opris, Ioan; Chan, Rosa H M; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z; Hampson, Robert E; Deadwyler, Sam A; Berger, Theodore W

    2012-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been postulated to play critical roles in cognitive control and the formation of long-term memories. To gain insights into the neurobiological mechanism of such high-order cognitive functions, it is important to understand the input-output transformational properties of the PFC micro-circuitry. In this study, we identify the functional connectivity between the Layer 2/3 (input) neurons and the Layer 5 (output) neurons using a previously developed generalized Volterra model (GVM). Input-output spike trains are recorded from the PFCs of nonhuman primates performing a memory-dependent delayed match-to-sample task with a customized conformal ceramic multi-electrode array. The GVM describes how the input spike trains are transformed into the output spike trains by the PFC micro-circuitry and represents the transformation in the form of Volterra kernels. Results show that Layer 2/3 neurons have strong and transient facilitatory effects on the firings of Layer 5 neurons. The magnitude and temporal range of the input-output nonlinear dynamics are strikingly different from those of the hippocampal CA3-CA1. This form of functional connectivity may have important implications to understanding the computational principle of the PFC.

  3. Inflammatory responses are not sufficient to cause delayed neuronal death in ATP-induced acute brain injury.

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    Hey-Kyeong Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain inflammation is accompanied by brain injury. However, it is controversial whether inflammatory responses are harmful or beneficial to neurons. Because many studies have been performed using cultured microglia and neurons, it has not been possible to assess the influence of multiple cell types and diverse factors that dynamically and continuously change in vivo. Furthermore, behavior of microglia and other inflammatory cells could have been overlooked since most studies have focused on neuronal death. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the precise roles of microglia and brain inflammation in the injured brain, and determine their contribution to neuronal damage in vivo from the onset of injury. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acute neuronal damage was induced by stereotaxic injection of ATP into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and the cortex of the rat brain. Inflammatory responses and their effects on neuronal damage were investigated by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and stereological counting, etc. ATP acutely caused death of microglia as well as neurons in a similar area within 3 h. We defined as the core region the area where both TH(+ and Iba-1(+ cells acutely died, and as the penumbra the area surrounding the core where Iba-1(+ cells showed activated morphology. In the penumbra region, morphologically activated microglia arranged around the injury sites. Monocytes filled the damaged core after neurons and microglia died. Interestingly, neither activated microglia nor monocytes expressed iNOS, a major neurotoxic inflammatory mediator. Monocytes rather expressed CD68, a marker of phagocytic activity. Importantly, the total number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 3 h (∼80% of that in the contralateral side did not decrease further at 7 d. Similarly, in the cortex, ATP-induced neuron-damage area detected at 3 h did not increase for up to 7 d. CONCLUSIONS: Different cellular

  4. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning.

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    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine's effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance task. A step-through type passive avoidance task was used for the assessment of memory retention. To identify the complex pattern of protein expression induced by morphine, we compared rat hippocampal proteome either in morphine-induced amnesia or in state-dependent learning by two-dimensional gel electerophoresis and combined mass spectrometry (MS and MS/MS). Post-training administration of morphine decreased step-through latency. Pre-test administration of morphine induced state-dependent retrieval of the memory acquired under post-training morphine influence. In the hippocampus, a total of 18 proteins were identified whose MASCOT (Modular Approach to Software Construction Operation and Test) scores were inside 95% confidence level. Of these, five hippocampal proteins altered in morphine-induced amnesia and ten proteins were found to change in the hippocampus of animals that had received post-training and pre-test morphine. These proteins show known functions in cytoskeletal architecture, cell metabolism, neurotransmitter secretion and neuroprotection. The findings indicate that the effect of morphine on memory formation in passive avoidance learning has a morphological correlate on the hippocampal proteome level. In addition, our proteomicscreensuggests that morphine induces memory impairment and state-dependent learning through modulating neuronal plasticity.

  5. Atoh1-dependent rhombic lip neurons are required for temporal delay between independent respiratory oscillators in embryonic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Huang, Wei-Hsiang; Picardo, Maria Cristina D; Ling, Guang-Yi; Del Negro, Christopher A; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Gray, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    All motor behaviors require precise temporal coordination of different muscle groups. Breathing, for example, involves the sequential activation of numerous muscles hypothesized to be driven by a primary respiratory oscillator, the preBötzinger Complex, and at least one other as-yet unidentified rhythmogenic population. We tested the roles of Atoh1-, Phox2b-, and Dbx1-derived neurons (three groups that have known roles in respiration) in the generation and coordination of respiratory output. We found that Dbx1-derived neurons are necessary for all respiratory behaviors, whereas independent but coupled respiratory rhythms persist from at least three different motor pools after eliminating or silencing Phox2b- or Atoh1-expressing hindbrain neurons. Without Atoh1 neurons, however, the motor pools become temporally disorganized and coupling between independent respiratory oscillators decreases. We propose Atoh1 neurons tune the sequential activation of independent oscillators essential for the fine control of different muscles during breathing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02265.001 PMID:24842997

  6. Dissociations in future thinking following hippocampal damage: evidence from discounting and time perspective in episodic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Donna; Craver, Carl F; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2013-11-01

    Recollecting past experiences and imagining future experiences activate a common set of brain regions that includes the hippocampus (Schacter, Addis, & Buckner, 2007), and both functions are impaired in people with compromised hippocampal function (Klein, Loftus, & Kihlstrom, 2002; Tulving, 1985). These findings indicate a role for the hippocampus that extends beyond declarative memory. However, a case study revealed that a person with extensive medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage and episodic amnesia was able to forgo smaller, immediate rewards for a larger future payoff to a degree similar to control participants (Kwan et al., 2012). This finding suggests that typical regard for the future does not depend on hippocampal integrity. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the nature and limits of the role of the hippocampus in future thinking and decision making in amnesic individuals with hippocampal damage and associated impairments in episodic memory and future imagining. The amnesic individuals were administered a delay discounting task to assess valuation of future rewards, a probability discounting task to assess risk taking, and the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory to assess personal orientation toward the past, present, and future. Comparisons with demographically matched controls indicated that aspects of temporal thought and future-oriented decision making are preserved in individuals with hippocampal amnesia despite their inability to imagine themselves in detailed future events. Thus, even extensive MTL damage and the resulting episodic amnesia do not preclude prudent decision making, including consideration of future financial outcomes and personal identification with the past and future. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Ciguatoxin reduces regenerative capacity of axotomized peripheral neurons and delays functional recovery in pre-exposed mice after peripheral nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Kumar, Gajendra; Asthana, Pallavi; Tin, Chung; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-01-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) results from consumption of tropical reef fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). Pacific (P)-CTX-1 is among the most potent known CTXs and the predominant source of CFP in the endemic region responsible for the majority of neurological symptoms in patients. Chronic and persistent neurological symptoms occur in some CFP patients, which often result in incomplete functional recovery for years. However, the direct effects of exposure to CTXs remain largely unknown. In present study, we exposed mice to CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced from the Pacific region. P-CTX-1 was detected in peripheral nerves within hours and persisted for two months after exposure. P-CTX-1 inhibited axonal regrowth from axotomized peripheral neurons in culture. P-CTX-1 exposure reduced motor function in mice within the first two weeks of exposure before returning to baseline levels. These pre-exposed animals exhibited delayed sensory and motor functional recovery, and irreversible motor deficits after peripheral nerve injury in which formation of functional synapses was impaired. These findings are consistent with reduced muscle function, as assessed by electromyography recordings. Our study provides strong evidence that the persistence of P-CTX-1 in peripheral nerves reduces the intrinsic growth capacity of peripheral neurons, resulting in delayed functional recovery after injury. PMID:27229176

  8. Ciguatoxin reduces regenerative capacity of axotomized peripheral neurons and delays functional recovery in pre-exposed mice after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Ngan Pan Bennett; Kumar, Gajendra; Asthana, Pallavi; Tin, Chung; Mak, Yim Ling; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Ma, Chi Him Eddie

    2016-05-27

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) results from consumption of tropical reef fish containing ciguatoxins (CTXs). Pacific (P)-CTX-1 is among the most potent known CTXs and the predominant source of CFP in the endemic region responsible for the majority of neurological symptoms in patients. Chronic and persistent neurological symptoms occur in some CFP patients, which often result in incomplete functional recovery for years. However, the direct effects of exposure to CTXs remain largely unknown. In present study, we exposed mice to CTX purified from ciguatera fish sourced from the Pacific region. P-CTX-1 was detected in peripheral nerves within hours and persisted for two months after exposure. P-CTX-1 inhibited axonal regrowth from axotomized peripheral neurons in culture. P-CTX-1 exposure reduced motor function in mice within the first two weeks of exposure before returning to baseline levels. These pre-exposed animals exhibited delayed sensory and motor functional recovery, and irreversible motor deficits after peripheral nerve injury in which formation of functional synapses was impaired. These findings are consistent with reduced muscle function, as assessed by electromyography recordings. Our study provides strong evidence that the persistence of P-CTX-1 in peripheral nerves reduces the intrinsic growth capacity of peripheral neurons, resulting in delayed functional recovery after injury.

  9. Destruction of central noradrenergic neurones with DSP4 impairs the acquisition of temporal discrimination but does not affect memory for duration in a delayed conditional discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Zahrani, S S; al-Ruwaitea, A S; Ho, M Y; Bradshaw, C M; Szabadi, E

    1997-03-01

    This experiment examined the effect of destroying central noradrenergic neurones using the selective neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-n-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) on the acquisition of a temporal discrimination and on memory for duration, using a delayed conditional discrimination task. In phase I, rats that had received systemic treatment with DSP4 and vehicle-treated control rats were trained in a series of discrete trials to press lever A following a 2-s presentation of a light stimulus, and lever B following an 8-s presentation of the same stimulus. Following stimulus offset, a response on a panel placed midway between the two levers was required to initiate lever presentation; a single response on either lever resulted in withdrawal of both levers and, in the case of a "correct" response, reinforcer delivery. Both groups acquired accurate discrimination, achieving 90% correct choices within 50 sessions; the DSP4-treated group acquired accurate performance more slowly than the control group. In phase II, delays were interposed between stimulus offset and lever presentation in 50% of the trials. In the absence of a delay, discriminative accuracy was lower in the DSP4-treated group than in the control group. Accuracy declined as a function of post-stimulus delay in both groups; both groups showed a delay-dependent bias towards responding on lever A ("choose-short" bias). Neither of these effects differed significantly between the two groups. The concentrations of noradrenaline in the parietal cortex and hippocampus were reduced by 90% and 89% in the DSP4-treated group, compared to the levels in the control group, but the levels of dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid did not differ significantly between the groups. The results confirm the deleterious effect of DSP4 on the acquisition of temporal discrimination, but do not provide evidence for a role of the noradrenergic innervation of the hippocampus and neocortex in temporal working

  10. Transient Global Amnesia After Cerebral Angiography With Iomeprol: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiu, Cristina; Terecoasă, Elena Oana; Grecu, Nicolae; Dorobăţ, Bogdan; Marinescu, Andreea Nicoleta; Băjenaru, Ovidiu Alexandru

    2016-05-01

    Transient global amnesia is now considered a very rare complication of cerebral angiography. Various etiological mechanisms have been suggested to account for this complication, but no consensus has been reached yet. This case report documents one of the few reported cases of cerebral angiography-related transient global amnesia associated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) evidence of unilateral hippocampal ischemia, most probably as a consequence of a transient reduction in regional hippocampal blood flow. However, the possibility of a direct neurotoxic effect of the nonionic contrast media Iomeprol on the Cornu ammonis - field 1 neurons cannot be firmly ruled out.We describe the case of a 54-year-old woman admitted to our department for left upper limb weakness with acute onset 8 days before. The brain computed tomography (CT) scan performed at admission revealed subacute ischemic lesions in the right watershed superficial territories and a right thalamic lacunar infarct. Diagnostic digital subtraction cerebral angiography was performed 4 days after admission with the nonionic contrast media Iomeprol. A few minutes after completion of the procedure, the patient developed symptoms suggestive for transient global amnesia. The brain MRI performed 22 hours after the onset of symptoms demonstrated increased signal within the lateral part of the right hippocampus on the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences, associated with a corresponding reduction in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and increased signal on the fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences, consistent with acute hippocampal ischemia and several T2/FLAIR hyperintensities in the right watershed superficial territories and in the right thalamus, corresponding to the lesions already identified on the CT scan performed at admission. A follow-up MRI, performed 2 months later, demonstrated the disappearance of the increased signal within the right hippocampus on the DWI, T2/FLAIR

  11. Narrative construction is intact in episodic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keven, Nazim; Kurczek, Jake; Rosenbaum, R Shayna; Craver, Carl F

    2017-07-28

    Autobiographical remembering and future imagining overlap in their underlying psychological and neurological mechanisms. The hippocampus and surrounding regions within the medial temporal lobes (MTL), known for their role in forming and maintaining autobiographical episodic memories, are also thought to play an essential role in fictitious and future constructions. Amnesic individuals with bilateral hippocampal damage cannot reconstruct their past personal experiences and also have severe deficits in the ability to construct coherent fictitious or future narratives. However, it is not known whether this impairment reflects a failure to generate details from autobiographical episodic memory to populate personal narratives or an inability to bind such details into coherent narratives. We show that four individuals with hippocampal damage and episodic amnesia can construct narratives when the relevant details of the story are provided in a picture book and that their narratives maintain overall coherence on several measures. These findings indicate that individuals with hippocampal damage can bind details into coherent narratives when details are available to them. We conclude that the hippocampal system instead likely plays a role in the generation of details from which narratives are constructed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Individuals with episodic amnesia are not stuck in time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Carl F; Kwan, Donna; Steindam, Chloe; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2014-05-01

    The metaphor that individuals with episodic amnesia due to hippocampal damage are "stuck in time" persists in science, philosophy, and everyday life despite mounting evidence that episodic amnesia can spare many central aspects of temporal consciousness. Here we describe some of this evidence, focusing specifically on KC, one of the most thoroughly documented and severe cases of episodic amnesia on record. KC understands the concept of time, knows that it passes, and can orient himself with respect to his personal past and future. He expresses typical attitudes toward his past and future, and he is able to make future-regarding decisions. Theories claiming that the hippocampus plays an essential role in temporal consciousness need to be revised in light of these findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dense amnesia in a professional musician following herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B A; Baddeley, A D; Kapur, N

    1995-10-01

    We describe the memory functioning of C, a professional musician who became amnesic following herpes simplex encephalitis in 1985. Although transient amnesia in a professional musician has previously been described, this is the first reported case of chronic amnesia in a highly talented professional musician. C is unusual in three respects. First, his amnesia is particularly severe. Second, his amnesia includes semantic as well as episodic memory deficits. Third, he believes he has just woken up and his preoccupation with this state of 'just wakening' has persisted for over 9 years. This appears to be the result of a delusion rather than the consequence of his amnesia.

  14. Edaravone, a Free Radical Scavenger, Delayed Symptomatic and Pathological Progression of Motor Neuron Disease in the Wobbler Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ikeda

    Full Text Available Edaravone, a free radical scavenger is used widely in Japanese patients with acute cerebral infarction. This antioxidant could have therapeutic potentials for other neurological diseases. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that affects the upper and the lower motor neuron, leading to death within 3-5 years after onset. A phase III clinical trial of edaravone suggested no significant effects in ALS patients. However, recent 2nd double-blind trial has demonstrated therapeutic benefits of edaravone in definite patients diagnosed by revised El Escorial diagnostic criteria of ALS. Two previous studies showed that edaravone attenuated motor symptoms or motor neuron degeneration in mutant superoxide dismutase 1-transgenic mice or rats, animal models of familial ALS. Herein we examined whether this radical scavenger can retard progression of motor dysfunction and neuropathological changes in wobbler mice, sporadic ALS-like model. After diagnosis of the disease onset at the postnatal age of 3-4 weeks, wobbler mice received edaravone (1 or 10 mg/kg, n = 10/group or vehicle (n = 10, daily for 4 weeks by intraperitoneal administration. Motor symptoms and neuropathological changes were compared among three groups. Higher dose (10 mg/kg of edaravone treatment significantly attenuated muscle weakness and contracture in the forelimbs, and suppressed denervation atrophy in the biceps muscle and degeneration in the cervical motor neurons compared to vehicle. Previous and the present studies indicated neuroprotective effects of edaravone in three rodent ALS-like models. This drug seems to be worth performing the clinical trial in ALS patients in the United States of American and Europe, in addition to Japan.

  15. The Right Delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datadien, A.H.R.; Haselager, W.F.G.; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.

    2011-01-01

    Axonal conduction delays should not be ignored in simulations of spiking neural networks. Here it is shown that by using axonal conduction delays, neurons can display sensitivity to a specific spatio-temporal spike pattern. By using delays that complement the firing times in a pattern, spikes can ar

  16. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor ameliorates delayed neuronal death in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus after transient global ischemia in gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, T; Sawa, H; Shiokawa, Y; Saito, I; Ishii, H; Nakamura, Z; Sankawa, H

    1996-07-01

    Thromboxane A2 accumulates in the hippocampus after global ischemia and may play a key role in postischemic hypoperfusion. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor (OKY-046) inhibits the accumulation of thromboxane A2 and promotes prostacycline production. Therefore, we set out to determine whether the inhibition of thromboxane synthesis would ameriolate postischemic neuronal death. Three groups of six Mongolian gerbils were subjected to different treatments: untreated control, untreated ischemia, and treated ischemia. Immediately after forebrain ischemia, OKY-046 (10 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into the treated group. After 7 days of survival, the histopathology of the brain was examined. Pyramidal cell density in the CA1 sector in the treated group was 147 +/- 70 nuclei/mm (mean +/- SD), which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than than in the untreated group (33 +/- 10 (nuclei/mm). The findings were 231 +/- 7 nuclei/mm for the control group. No significant difference was seen in the profile of temporal muscle temperature before and after ischemia between the groups. Ultrastructurally, the vessels in the CAI sector showed lumen patency in the treated group, whereas occluded vessels with an extended perivascular space were observed in the untreated group. Thromboxane synthetase inhibitor thus partly ameliorates the selective vulnerability of the hippocampus after forebrain ischemia, suggesting that thromboxane A2 is involved in the development of delayed neuronal death, independently of any thermal effect.

  17. Inhibition of BCL-2 leads to increased apoptosis and delayed neuronal differentiation in human ReNcell VM cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Michael; Jaeger, Alexandra; Weiss, Dieter G; Kriehuber, Ralf

    2016-02-01

    BCL-2 is a multifunctional protein involved in the regulation of apoptosis, cell cycle progression and neural developmental processes. Its function in the latter process is not well understood and needs further elucidation. Therefore, we characterized the protein expression kinetics of BCL-2 and associated regulatory proteins of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway during the process of neuronal differentiation in ReNcell VM cells with and without functional inhibition of BCL-2 by its competitive ligand HA14-1. Inhibition of BCL-2 caused a diminished BCL-2 expression and higher levels of cleaved BAX, activated Caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, all pro-apoptotic markers, when compared with untreated differentiating cells. In parallel, flow cytometric analysis of HA14-1-treated cells revealed a delayed differentiation into HuC/D+ neuronal cells when compared to untreated differentiating cells. In conclusion, BCL-2 possess a protective function in fully differentiated ReNcell VM cells. We propose that the pro-survival signaling of BCL-2 is closely connected with its stimulatory effects on neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

  18. ApoE4 delays dendritic spine formation during neuron development and accelerates loss of mature spines in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Nwabuisi‑Heath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ε4 allele of the gene that encodes apolipoprotein E (APOE4 is the greatest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, while APOE2 reduces AD risk, compared to APOE3. The mechanism(s underlying the effects of APOE on AD pathology remains unclear. In vivo, dendritic spine density is lower in APOE4-targeted replacement (APOE-TR mice compared with APOE2- and APOE3-TR mice. To investigate whether this apoE4-induced decrease in spine density results from alterations in the formation or the loss of dendritic spines, the effects of neuron age and apoE isoform on the total number and subclasses of spines were examined in long-term wild-type neurons co-cultured with glia from APOE2-, APOE3- and APOE4-TR mice. Dendritic spine density and maturation were evaluated by immunocytochemistry via the presence of drebrin (an actin-binding protein with GluN1 (NMDA receptor subunit and GluA2 (AMPA receptor subunit clusters. ApoE isoform effects were analyzed via a method previously established that identifies phases of spine formation (day-in-vitro, DIV10–18, maintenance (DIV18–21 and loss (DIV21–26. In the formation phase, apoE4 delayed total spine formation. During the maintenance phase, the density of GluN1+GluA2 spines did not change with apoE2, while the density of these spines decreased with apoE4 compared to apoE3, primarily due to the loss of GluA2 in spines. During the loss phase, total spine density was lower in neurons with apoE4 compared to apoE3. Thus, apoE4 delays total spine formation and may induce early synaptic dysfunction via impaired regulation of GluA2 in spines.

  19. Reactivation-Dependent Amnesia in Pavlovian Approach and Instrumental Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan L. C.; Everitt, Barry J.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of memory reconsolidation relates to the hypothesized restabilisation process that occurs following the reactivation of a memory through retrieval. Thus, the demonstration of reactivation-dependent amnesia for a previously acquired memory is a prerequisite for showing that such a memory undergoes reconsolidation. Here, we show that the…

  20. Validation of Malingered Amnesia Measures with a Large Clinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiffenstein, Manfred F.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A sample of chronic postconcussive patients with and without overt malingering signs was compared with objectively brain-injured patients (total sample=106) on common episodic memory and malingered amnesia measures. Findings validate commonly cited malingering measures and new methods of classifying malingering in real-world clinical samples. (SLD)

  1. Retrograde amnesia for semantic information in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeter, M.; Kollen, A.; Scheltens, P.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and normal controls were tested on a retrograde amnesia test with semantic content (Neologism and Vocabulary Test, or NVT), consisting of neologisms to be defined. Patients showed a decrement as compared to normal controls, pointing to retrograde am

  2. Transient global amnesia: a complication of incremental exercise testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R S; Leek, B T; Wagner, P D; Kritchevsky, M

    1998-10-01

    Incremental exercise testing is routinely used for diagnosis, rehabilitation, health screening, and research. We report the case of a 71-yr-old patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who suffered an episode of transient global amnesia (TGA) several minutes after successfully completing an incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer. TGA, which is known to be precipitated by physical or emotional stress in about one-third of cases, is a transient neurological disorder in which memory impairment is the prominent deficit. TGA has a benign course and requires no treatment although 24-h observation is recommended. Recognition of TGA as a potential complication of incremental graded exercise testing is important to both aid diagnosis of the amnesia and to spare a patient unnecessary evaluation.

  3. Supporting the self-concept with memory: insight from amnesia

    OpenAIRE

    Grilli, Matthew D.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which personal semantic memory supports the self-concept in individuals with medial temporal lobe amnesia and healthy adults. Participants completed eight ‘I Am’ self-statements. For each of the four highest ranked self-statements, participants completed an open-ended narrative task, during which they provided supporting information indicating why the I Am statement was considered self-descriptive. Participants then completed an episodic probe task, during which ...

  4. Prose recall and amnesia: more implications for the episodic buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, P A; Isaac, C L; Mayes, A R

    2005-01-01

    Baddeley and Wilson [Baddeley, A. D., & Wilson, F. B. (2002). Prose recall and amnesia: implications for the structure of working memory. Neuropsychologia 40, 1737-1743.] have argued that their finding of a positive association between amnesics' immediate prose recall scores and their scores on measures of executive function and fluid intelligence supports the view that an episodic buffer exists. However, the pattern of data from amnesics tested in our laboratory presented some problems for this conceptualisation of the episodic buffer.

  5. Comparing Prospectively Recorded Posttraumatic Amnesia Duration With Retrospective Accounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Caroline M; Spitz, Gershon; Ponsford, Jennie L

    2016-01-01

    Limited research has been conducted comparing different methods for determining the duration of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA). This study compared prospectively recorded PTA duration (P-PTA) with retrospective reports of the return of continuous memory (R-PTA). Fifty-nine individuals admitted to a head injury rehabilitation unit with a traumatic brain injury who had their PTA duration recorded using the Westmead Post-Traumatic Amnesia Scale. Participants were between 6 months and 6 years postinjury at the time of study. P-PTA was determined on the basis of Westmead Post-Traumatic Amnesia Scale responses. R-PTA was ascertained using a semistructured telephone interview. Although the PTA measures were significantly positively correlated (r = 0.76), mean R-PTA was significantly longer than mean P-PTA. In 34 cases (57.6%), R-PTA was longer than P-PTA (13 participants moved to a higher injury severity band), and in 22 cases (37.3%), R-PTA was shorter than P-PTA (8 participants moved to a lower injury severity band). The difference between P-PTA and R-PTA was not significantly associated with age, Glasgow Coma Scale score, overall PTA duration, or the number of days postinjury of the retrospective interview. Prospective and retrospective estimates of PTA duration were not comparable within the present sample. Further research comparing the two methods is needed.

  6. Neural Correlate of Anterograde Amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Louis; Pignat, Jean-Michel; Bouzerda-Wahlen, Aurélie; Gabriel, Damien; Liverani, Maria Chiara; Lazeyras, François; Ptak, Radek; Richiardi, Jonas; Haller, Sven; Thorens, Gabriel; Zullino, Daniele F; Guggisberg, Adrian G; Schnider, Armin

    2015-09-01

    The neural correlate of anterograde amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is still debated. While the capacity to learn new information has been associated with integrity of the medial temporal lobe (MTL), previous studies indicated that the WKS is associated with diencephalic lesions, mainly in the mammillary bodies and anterior or dorsomedial thalamic nuclei. The present study tested the hypothesis that amnesia in WKS is associated with a disrupted neural circuit between diencephalic and hippocampal structures. High-density evoked potentials were recorded in four severely amnesic patients with chronic WKS, in five patients with chronic alcoholism without WKS, and in ten age matched controls. Participants performed a continuous recognition task of pictures previously shown to induce a left medial temporal lobe dependent positive potential between 250 and 350 ms. In addition, the integrity of the fornix was assessed using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). WKS, but not alcoholic patients without WKS, showed absence of the early, left MTL dependent positive potential following immediate picture repetitions. DTI indicated disruption of the fornix, which connects diencephalic and hippocampal structures. The findings support an interpretation of anterograde amnesia in WKS as a consequence of a disconnection between diencephalic and MTL structures with deficient contribution of the MTL to rapid consolidation.

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion delays amygdala and perforant path kindling without affecting paired-pulse measures of neuronal inhibition in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osehobo, P; Adams, B; Sazgar, M; Xu, Y; Racine, R J; Fahnestock, M

    1999-01-01

    Kindling is an animal model of human temporal lobe epilepsy in which excitability in limbic structures is permanently enhanced by repeated stimulations. Kindling also increases the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor messenger RNAs in both the hippocampus and cerebral cortex and causes structural changes in the hippocampus including hilar hypertrophy. We have recently shown that intraventricular nerve growth factor infusion enhances the development of kindling, whereas blocking nerve growth factor activity retards amygdaloid kindling. Furthermore, we have shown that nerve growth factor protects against kindling-induced hilar hypertrophy. The physiological role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in kindling is not as clear. Acute injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases neuronal excitability and causes seizures, whereas chronic brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion in rats slows hippocampal kindling. In agreement with the latter, we show here that intrahilar brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion delays amygdala and perforant path kindling. In addition, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, unlike nerve growth factor, does not protect against kindling-induced increases in hilar area. To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor suppresses kindling by increasing inhibition above normal levels, we performed paired-pulse measures in the perforant path-dentate gyrus pathway. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor infused into the hippocampus had no effect on the stimulus intensity function (input/output curves); there was also no significant effect on paired-pulse inhibition. We then kindled the perforant path 10 days after the end of brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment. Once again, kindling was retarded, showing that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor effect is long-lasting. These results indicate that prolonged in vivo infusion

  8. Child Sexual Abuse Survivors with Dissociative Amnesia: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Molly R.; Nochajski, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Although the issue of dissociative amnesia in adult survivors of child sexual abuse has been contentious, many research studies have shown that there is a subset of child sexual abuse survivors who have forgotten their abuse and later remembered it. Child sexual abuse survivors with dissociative amnesia histories have different formative and…

  9. Reexposure to the Amnestic Agent Alleviates Cycloheximide-Induced Retrograde Amnesia for Reactivated and Extinction Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, James F.; Olson, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether reexposure to an amnestic agent would reverse amnesia for extinction of learned fear similar to that of a reactivated memory. When cycloheximide (CHX) was administered immediately after a brief cue-induced memory reactivation (15 sec) and an extended extinction session (12 min) rats showed retrograde amnesia for both…

  10. The effects of ACTH- and vasopressin-analogues on CO2-induced retrograde amnesia in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rigter, H.; Riezen, H. van; Wied, D. de

    1974-01-01

    Amnesia for a one-trial step-through passive avoidance response was induced in rats by application of CO2 until respiratory arrest occurred. The ACTH-analogue ACTH4–10 alleviated the amnesia when administered 1 hr prior to the retrieval test but not when given 1 hr prior to the acquisition trial. Th

  11. Child Sexual Abuse Survivors with Dissociative Amnesia: What's the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Molly R.; Nochajski, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Although the issue of dissociative amnesia in adult survivors of child sexual abuse has been contentious, many research studies have shown that there is a subset of child sexual abuse survivors who have forgotten their abuse and later remembered it. Child sexual abuse survivors with dissociative amnesia histories have different formative and…

  12. Delayed post-treatment with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells is neurorestorative of striatal medium-spiny projection neurons and improves motor function after neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Stella H; Alwakeel, Amr J; Goddard, Liping; Hobbs, Catherine E; Gowing, Emma K; Barnett, Elizabeth R; Kohe, Sarah E; Sizemore, Rachel J; Oorschot, Dorothy E

    2015-09-01

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia is a major cause of striatal injury and may lead to cerebral palsy. This study investigated whether delayed administration of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), at one week after neonatal rat hypoxia-ischemia, was neurorestorative of striatal medium-spiny projection neurons and improved motor function. The effect of a subcutaneous injection of a high-dose, or a low-dose, of MSCs was investigated in stereological studies. Postnatal day (PN) 7 pups were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. At PN14, pups received treatment with either MSCs or diluent. A subset of high-dose pups, and their diluent control pups, were also injected intraperitoneally with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), every 24h, on PN15, PN16 and PN17. This permitted tracking of the migration and survival of neuroblasts originating from the subventricular zone into the adjacent injured striatum. Pups were euthanized on PN21 and the absolute number of striatal medium-spiny projection neurons was measured after immunostaining for DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein-32), double immunostaining for BrdU and DARPP-32, and after cresyl violet staining alone. The absolute number of striatal immunostained calretinin interneurons was also measured. There was a statistically significant increase in the absolute number of DARPP-32-positive, BrdU/DARPP-32-positive, and cresyl violet-stained striatal medium-spiny projection neurons, and fewer striatal calretinin interneurons, in the high-dose mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) group compared to their diluent counterparts. A high-dose of MSCs restored the absolute number of these neurons to normal uninjured levels, when compared with previous stereological data on the absolute number of cresyl violet-stained striatal medium-spiny projection neurons in the normal uninjured brain. For the low-dose experiment, in which cresyl violet-stained striatal medium-spiny neurons alone were measured, there was a lower statistically

  13. A review on citation amnesia in depression and inflammation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Once original scientific results are published the author has the "intellectual property" and may claim ownership. Discovery credit is one of the most important "rewards" for scientists and thus incorrect credits undermine the reward system of science. Scientists who publish should therefore give proper credit and acknowledge the primary sources. Failure to do so is regarded as "citation negligence", "the disregard syndrome", "citation amnesia", "plagiarism by omission", "bibliographic plagiarism" or "citation plagiarism", and may range from an unconscious or conscious "failure to credit a prior discoverer so as to give an improper impression of priority" to "the appropriation of another person's ideas or results without given proper credit". False discovery credit is considered to be "a menace to honest science", "a serious transgression" or "intellectual theft, be it intentional or not". This paper describes some examples of citation amnesia showing that scientists often fail to credit prior sources and give false discovery credit to other scientists. One example is the association between major depression and activated immuno-inflammatory pathways, a discovery by European groups and published in many papers since 1990. Now, 25 years later, it is commonplace that these theories are credited to secondary American sources whose work in "the last decade", did or did not examine these pathways in major depression. This gives an improper impression of priority of American-based scientists. Here it is proposed that this citation amnesia and plagiarism reinforced the wrong science and had negative effects on the development of immune-inflammatory biomarkers and new immune-related treatments for depression. It is concluded that journal editors should improve their citation standards to guarantee correct assignment of discovery credit for example by demanding a signed pledge from the authors that correct citations to the primary sources were made.

  14. The scope of preserved procedural memory in amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Sara; Anderson, Steven W; Allen, John S; Castro-Caldas, Alexandre; Damasio, Hanna

    2004-08-01

    The finding that patients with amnesia retain the ability to learn certain procedural skills has provided compelling evidence of multiple memory systems in the human brain, but the scope, defining features and ecological significance of the preserved mnemonic abilities have not yet been explored. Here, we tested the hypothesis that subjects with amnesia would be able to learn and retain a broad range of procedural skills, by examining their acquisition and retention performance on five novel experimental tasks. The tasks are based on real-world activities and encompass a broad range of perceptual-motor demands: (i) the weaving task involves weaving pieces of fabric from woollen strings, using a manual weaver's loom; (ii) the geometric figures task consists of tracing geometric figures with a stylus as they move horizontally across a touch screen monitor; (iii) the control stick task involves tracking a sequence of visual target locations using a joystick control; (iv) the pouring task consists of pouring 200 ml of water from a watering can into a series of graduated cylinders, from a point 20 cm above the cylinders; and (v) the spatial sequence task involves learning an ordered sequence of pushing five spatially distributed buttons without visual guidance. Ten chronic and stable amnesic subjects (nine with bilateral medial temporal lobe damage due to herpes simplex encephalitis or anoxia, and one with thalamic stroke) and 25 matching normal comparison subjects were tested on three occasions: initial learning at time 1; retention at time 2 (24 h later); and retention at time 3 (2 months later). Despite impaired declarative memory for the tasks, the amnesic subjects demonstrated acquisition and retention of the five skills; their learning slopes over repeated trials were comparable with those of comparison subjects. These findings indicate that preserved learning of complex perceptual-motor skills in patients with amnesia is a robust phenomenon, and that it can be

  15. The impact of fluency on explicit memory tasks in amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Scott M; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Distinguishing implicit and explicit memory and delineating their relationship has haunted memory researchers for decades, and Voss et al. provide an impressive overview of their work examining these issues. We briefly comment on the following: (1) There is evidence indicating that implicit memory impacts cued recall, in addition to recognition; (2) Fluency can manifest as priming in implicit memory or it can be experienced as familiarity (in association with attribution processes) in recognition tasks; and (3) The impact of fluency on accuracy of "guess" responses during recognition memory in normal subjects is reminiscent of similar effects on recognition in amnesia.

  16. Transient global amnesia during a professional cello concert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Kiran; Ropper, Allan

    2011-09-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a great curiosity in medicine, the underlying pathophysiology of which remains under debate. When an episode occurs during the performance of a task requiring refined technical skills and an intense level of concentration such as a musical performance, it draws attention to the relationship between memory and performance. It also raises questions of access to procedural memory and other aspects of stored information. We encountered a renowned and highly proficient musician who was amnestic for a challenging concert. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transient epileptic amnesia: clinical report of a cohort of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Quaranta, Davide; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-07-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia is a seizure disorder, usually with onset in the middle-elderly and good response to low dosages of antiepileptic drugs. We describe the clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), and neuroimaging features of 11 patients with a temporal lobe epilepsy characterized by amnesic seizures as the sole or the main symptom. We outline the relevance of a detailed clinical history to recognize amnesic seizures and to avoid the more frequent misdiagnoses. Moreover, the response to monotherapy was usually good, although the epileptic disorder was symptomatic of acquired lesions in the majority of patients.

  18. Amnesia syndrome following left anterior thalamic infarction; with intrahemispheric and crossed cerebro-cerebellar diaschisis on brain SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. H.; Hong, S. B.; Roh, J. K.

    1994-01-01

    We report a 61-year-old right-handed man developing disturbance of memory after a discrete thalamic infarction. Neuropsychological assessment revealed deficits in memory with retrograde and anterograde components, especially for verbal material. Brain MRI showed a left anterior thalamic infarction with normal angiographic findings. Despite the small lesion in the thalamus, he showed prolonged memory disturbance and a Brain SPECT image revealed decreased uptake in the ipsilateral fronto-temporo-parietal cortex and contralateral cerebellum. This diaschisis, a phenomenon caused by disconnection of the neural pathway helped us to evaluate the functional state of the patient and this imaging technique was valuable for obtaining to get more information for the evaluation of the neurological state and neuronal connections. In conclusion our findings correspond well with the understanding of amnesia as a disconnection syndrome because of the evidence of diaschisis on the Brain SPECT image. PMID:7702792

  19. 具有leakage时滞与传输时滞的神经网络的分支%Bifurcation of a Two-Neuron Network with Time Delay in the Leakage Terms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李哲; 徐瑞

    2014-01-01

    The Hopf bifurcation of a two-neuron network with two time delays in the leakage terms and activation functions is investigated.By choosing the leakage delay and discrete delay as the bifurcation parameter respectively,we prove that the system is locally asymptotically stable in a range of the time delay and Hopf bifurcation occurs as the time delay crosses a critical value.Fi-nally,two examples are given to illustrate the theoretical results.%研究一类具有 leakage时滞与传输时滞的两神经元神经网络的分支,分别以 leakage时滞和传输时滞为分支参数,通过对模型对应的特征方程进行分析,得到出现 Hopf分支的临界性条件,并通过数值例子验证该理论结果。

  20. Nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of phloretin in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghumatkar, Priya J; Patil, Sachin P; Jain, Pankaj D; Tambe, Rufi M; Sathaye, Sadhana

    2015-08-01

    Phloretin (PHL), a dihydrochalcone flavonoid usually present in the roots and leaves of apple tree. In vitro study on GT1-7 immortalized hypothalamic neurons exposed to amyloid beta (25-35), demonstrated that PHL significantly influenced membrane fluidity and potential. PHL also significantly decreased excitotoxicity by restoring the calcium homeostasis in the same. Thus, PHL proves to be a promising therapeutic moiety which should be further screened in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the nootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic roles of PHL in the subacute scopolamine induced amnesia in mice. In this study, mice were pretreated with PHL 2.5mg/kg, 5mg/kg, 10mg/kg and Donepezil (DON) 1mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p) for 14days. The last 7days of treatment regimen included daily injection of SCP 1.5mg/kg to induce cognitive deficits. Mice were subjected to behavioral analysis. Biochemical estimation of the brain homogenates for acetylcholinesterase and oxidative stress biomarkers were conducted. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was carried out particularly in the hippocampus. PHL was found to significantly improve the performance of mice in Morris water maze test (Pnootropic, neuroprotective and neurotrophic activities in SCP induced memory impaired mice and hence, is a promising therapeutic moiety in the treatment of AD.

  1. Contribution of Embodiment to Solving the Riddle of Infantile Amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur M Glenberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At least since the late nineteenth century, researchers have sought an explanation for infantile amnesia (IA—the lack of autobiographical memories dating from early childhood—and childhood amnesia (CA, faster forgetting of events up until the age of about seven. Evidence suggests that IA occurs across altricial species, and a number of studies using animal models have converged on the hypothesis that maturation of the hippocampus is an important factor. But why does the hippocampus mature at one time and not another, and how does that maturation relate to memory? Our hypothesis is rooted in theories of embodied cognition, and it provides an explanation both for hippocampal development and the end of IA. Specifically, the onset of locomotion prompts the alignment of hippocampal place cells and grid cells to the environment, which in turn facilitates the ontogeny of long-term episodic memory and the end of IA. That is, because the animal can now reliably discriminate locations, location becomes a stable cue for memories. Furthermore, as the mode of human locomotion shifts from crawling to walking, there is an additional shift in the alignment of the hippocampus that marks the beginning of adult-like episodic memory and the end of CA. Finally, given a reduction in self-locomotion and exploration with aging, the hypothesis suggests a partial explanation for cognitive decline with aging.

  2. Musical memory in a patient with severe anterograde amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Sara; Feinstein, Justin S; van Twillert, Henk; Tranel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The ability to play a musical instrument represents a unique procedural skill that can be remarkably resilient to disruptions in declarative memory. For example, musicians with severe anterograde amnesia have demonstrated preserved ability to play musical instruments. However, the question of whether amnesic musicians can learn how to play new musical material despite severe memory impairment has not been thoroughly investigated. We capitalized on a rare opportunity to address this question. Patient S.Z., an amateur musician (tenor saxophone), has extensive bilateral damage to his medial temporal lobes following herpes simplex encephalitis, resulting in a severe anterograde amnesia. We tested S.Z.'s capacity to learn new unfamiliar songs by sight-reading following three months of biweekly practices. Performances were recorded and were then evaluated by a professional saxophonist. S.Z. demonstrated significant improvement in his ability to read and play new music, despite his inability to recognize any of the songs at a declarative level. The results suggest that it is possible to learn certain aspects of new music without the assistance of declarative memory.

  3. Visuospatial declarative learning despite profound verbal declarative amnesia in Korsakoff's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudman, Erik; Postma, Albert; Nijboer, Tanja C W; Wijnia, Jan W; Van der Stigchel, Stefan

    2017-03-20

    Korsakoff's syndrome (KS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterised by severe amnesia. Although the presence of impairments in memory has long been acknowledged, there is a lack of knowledge about the precise characteristics of declarative memory capacities in order to implement memory rehabilitation. In this study, we investigated the extent to which patients diagnosed with KS have preserved declarative memory capacities in working memory, long-term memory encoding or long-term memory recall operations, and whether these capacities are most preserved for verbal or visuospatial content. The results of this study demonstrate that patients with KS have compromised declarative memory functioning on all memory indices. Performance was lowest for the encoding operation compared to the working memory and delayed recall operation. With respect to the content, visuospatial memory was relatively better preserved than verbal memory. All memory operations functioned suboptimally, although the most pronounced disturbance was found in verbal memory encoding. Based on the preserved declarative memory capacities in patients, visuospatial memory can form a more promising target for compensatory memory rehabilitation than verbal memory. It is therefore relevant to increase the number of spatial cues in memory rehabilitation for KS patients.

  4. Evolución de la amnesia postraumática en un paciente con ACV

    OpenAIRE

    I. López-García, Sara I.

    2014-01-01

    La amnesia postraumática puede ser evaluada con la “Galveston Orientation Amnesia Test” (GOAT), que nos ayuda tanto a detectarla como a determinar su duración. El problema de esta escala es que tiene algunas limitaciones que hacen que, en ciertos casos, dependiendo de las capacidades cognitivas del paciente tras el accidente, los resultados no sean demasiado fiables. El objetivo de este trabajo fue valorar la amnesia postraumática de un paciente tras sufrir un accidente cerebrovascular a trav...

  5. Delayed onset of changes in soma action potential genesis in nociceptive A-beta DRG neurons in vivo in a rat model of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry James L

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical data on osteoarthritis (OA suggest widespread changes in sensory function that vary during the progression of OA. In previous studies on a surgically-induced animal model of OA we have observed that changes in structure and gene expression follow a variable trajectory over the initial days and weeks. To investigate mechanisms underlying changes in sensory function in this model, the present electrophysiological study compared properties of primary sensory nociceptive neurons at one and two months after model induction with properties in naïve control animals. Pilot data indicated no difference in C- or Aδ-fiber associated neurons and therefore the focus is on Aβ-fiber nociceptive neurons. Results At one month after unilateral derangement of the knee by cutting the anterior cruciate ligament and removing the medial meniscus, the only changes observed in Aβ-fiber dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons were in nociceptor-like unresponsive neurons bearing a hump on the repolarization phase; these changes consisted of longer half width, reflecting slowed dynamics of AP genesis, a depolarized Vm and an increased AP amplitude. At two months, changes observed were in Aβ-fiber high threshold mechanoreceptors, which exhibited shorter AP duration at base and half width, shorter rise time and fall time, and faster maximum rising rate/maximum falling rate, reflecting accelerated dynamics of AP genesis. Conclusion These data indicate that Aβ nociceptive neurons undergo significant changes that vary in time and occur later than changes in structure and in nociceptive scores in this surgically induced OA model. Thus, if changes in Aβ-fiber nociceptive neurons in this model reflect a role in OA pain, they may relate to mechanisms underlying pain associated with advanced OA.

  6. Successful life outcome and management of real-world memory demands despite profound anterograde amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Melissa C; Wszalek, Tracey; Tranel, Daniel; Cohen, Neal J

    2008-11-01

    We describe the case of Angie, a 50-year-old woman with profound amnesia (General Memory Index = 49, Full Scale IQ = 126) following a closed head injury in 1985. This case is unique in comparison to other cases reported in the literature in that, despite the severity of her amnesia, she has developed remarkable real-world life abilities, shows impressive self-awareness and insight into the impairment and sparing of various functional memory abilities, and exhibits ongoing maturation of her identity and sense of self following amnesia. The case provides insights into the interaction of different memory and cognitive systems in handling real-world memory demands and has implications for rehabilitation and for successful life outcome after amnesia.

  7. A review study on medicinal plants affecting amnesia through cholinergic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baradaran Azar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurotransmitter modification is an important method for the treatment of memory loss or amnesia. Cholinomimetic drugs, particularly, acetylcholine esterase inhibitors are the mainstream in pharmacotherapy of amnesia. Donepezil, tacrine, galantamine, and rivastigmine are cholinesterase inhibitors which are widely used in the treatment of amnesia, however, their therapeutic effects are not significant. Therefore, other possibilities including herbal medicine sources have been considered for memory loss therapy. There are some Medicinal plants with cholinomimetic property which mostly possess antioxidant activity, too. These plants may not only ameliorate amnesia but also can be a good source for drug discovery. In this paper other than introducing the medicinal plants and their components affective on cholinergic system and effective on memory loss, their probable advantages over synthetic drugs are discussed.

  8. Inter-identity autobiographical amnesia in patients with dissociative identity disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaële J C Huntjens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major symptom of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID; formerly Multiple Personality Disorder is dissociative amnesia, the inability to recall important personal information. Only two case studies have directly addressed autobiographical memory in DID. Both provided evidence suggestive of dissociative amnesia. The aim of the current study was to objectively assess transfer of autobiographical information between identities in a larger sample of DID patients. METHODS: Using a concealed information task, we assessed recognition of autobiographical details in an amnesic identity. Eleven DID patients, 27 normal controls, and 23 controls simulating DID participated. Controls and simulators were matched to patients on age, education level, and type of autobiographical memory tested. FINDINGS: Although patients subjectively reported amnesia for the autobiographical details included in the task, the results indicated transfer of information between identities. CONCLUSION: The results call for a revision of the DID definition. The amnesia criterion should be modified to emphasize its subjective nature.

  9. Inter-Identity Autobiographical Amnesia in Patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huntjens, R.J.C.; Verschuere, B.; McNally, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A major symptom of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID; formerly Multiple Personality Disorder) is dissociative amnesia, the inability to recall important personal information. Only two case studies have directly addressed autobiographical memory in DID. Both provided evidence suggestive

  10. Inter-Identity Autobiographical Amnesia in Patients with Dissociative Identity Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huntjens, R.J.C.; Verschuere, B.; McNally, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A major symptom of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID; formerly Multiple Personality Disorder) is dissociative amnesia, the inability to recall important personal information. Only two case studies have directly addressed autobiographical memory in DID. Both provided evidence suggestive

  11. Inter-identity autobiographical amnesia in patients with dissociative identity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huntjens, R.J.C.; Verschuere, B.; McNally, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Background A major symptom of Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID; formerly Multiple Personality Disorder) is dissociative amnesia, the inability to recall important personal information. Only two case studies have directly addressed autobiographical memory in DID. Both provided evidence suggestive

  12. Cognitive rehabilitation of amnesia after virus encephalitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Eliane Correa

    2007-01-01

    A number of memory rehabilitation techniques have targeted people with various degrees of memory impairments. However, few studies have shown the contribution of preserved non-declarative memory capacity and errorless learning in the treatment of amnesic patients. The current case report describes the memory rehabilitation of a 44-year-old man with amnesia following viral encephalitis. The patient's procedural memory capacity had an important role in the use of a motor imagery strategy to remember people's names. It was further demonstrated that the application of a verbal learning technique was helpful in recalling new verbal information. These different memory rehabilitation techniques are discussed in terms of alternative possibilities in the rehabilitation of amnesic patients.

  13. Personal semantic memory: insights from neuropsychological research on amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Matthew D; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides insight into the cognitive and neural mechanisms of personal semantic memory, knowledge that is specific and unique to individuals, by reviewing neuropsychological research on stable amnesia secondary to medial temporal lobe damage. The results reveal that personal semantic memory does not depend on a unitary set of cognitive and neural mechanisms. Findings show that autobiographical fact knowledge reflects an experience-near type of personal semantic memory that relies on the medial temporal lobe for retrieval, albeit less so than personal episodic memory. Additional evidence demonstrates that new autobiographical fact learning likely relies on the medial temporal lobe, but the extent to which remains unclear. Other findings show that retrieval of personal traits/roles and new learning of personal traits/roles and thoughts/beliefs are independent of the medial temporal lobe and thus may represent highly conceptual types of personal semantic memory that are stored in the neocortex.

  14. Non-declarative memory in the rehabilitation of amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, S; Malec, J F; Bergquist, T

    2005-09-01

    The ability of amnesic patients to learn and retain non-declarative information has been consistently demonstrated in the literature. This knowledge provided by basic cognitive neuroscience studies has been widely neglected in neuropsychological rehabilitation of memory impaired patients. This study reports the case of a 43 year old man with severe amnesia following an anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm rupture. The patient integrated a comprehensive (holistic) day treatment programme for rehabilitation of brain injury. The programme explored the advantages of using preserved non-declarative memory capacities, in the context of commonly used rehabilitation approaches (i.e. compensation for lost function and domain-specific learning). The patient's ability to learn and retain new cognitive and perceptual-motor skills was found to be critical for the patient's improved independence and successful return to work.

  15. Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging in transient global amnesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godeiro-Junior, Clecio; Miranda-Alves, Maramelia Araujo de [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP-EPM), Sao Paulo SP (Brazil). Dept. of Neurology and Neurosurgery], e-mail: cleciojunior@yahoo.com.br; Massaro, Ayrton Roberto [Fleury Diagnostic Center, Sao Paulo SP (Brazil)

    2009-03-15

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a well known clinical entity characterized by anterograde memory disturbance of sudden onset that lasts 1 to 24 hours. Orientation in space and time is impaired while consciousness remains undisturbed. TGA may refer to a single expression of several physiopathological phenomena. Conceptually, cerebral ischemia, epileptic discharge, and migraine constitute the main pathogenic hypothesis. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) has become a powerful tool in the evaluation of patients with suspected stroke owing to its high sensitivity and specificity, even for small areas of acute ischemia. Consequently, this method has also been applied to TGA to gain further insights into the ischemic hypothesis of this condition. We report a patient with a typical TGA presentation and MRI findings suggestive of an ischemic insult. We further discuss the ischemic hypothesis of TGA. (author)

  16. On remembering and forgetting our autobiographical pasts: retrograde amnesia and Andrew Mayes's contribution to neuropsychological method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, M D; Bright, P

    2012-11-01

    Andrew Mayes's contribution to the neuropsychology of memory has consisted in steadily teasing out the nature of the memory deficit in the amnesic syndrome. This has been done with careful attention to matters of method at all stages. This particularly applies to his investigations of forgetting rates in amnesia and to his studies of retrograde amnesia. Following a brief outline of his work, the main current theories of retrograde amnesia are considered: consolidation theory, episodic-to-semantic shift theory, and multiple trace theory. Findings across the main studies in Alzheimer dementia are reviewed to illustrate what appears to be consistently found, and what is much more inconsistent. A number of problems and issues in current theories are then highlighted--including the nature of the temporal gradient, correlations with the extent of temporal lobe damage, what we would expect 'normal' remote memory curves to look like, how they would appear in focal retrograde amnesia, and whether we can pinpoint retrograde amnesia to hippocampal/medial temporal damage on the basis of existing studies. A recent study of retrograde amnesia is re-analysed to demonstrate temporal gradients on recollected episodic memories in hippocampal/medial temporal patients. It is concluded that there are two requirements for better understanding of the nature of retrograde amnesia: (i) a tighter, Mayesian attention to method in terms of both the neuropsychology and neuroimaging in investigations of retrograde amnesia; and (ii) acknowledging that there may be multiple factors underlying a temporal gradient, and that episodic and semantic memory show important interdependencies at both encoding and retrieval. Such factors may be critical to understanding what is remembered and what is forgotten from our autobiographical pasts.

  17. Moderately delayed post-insult treatment with normobaric hyperoxia reduces excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration but increases ischemia-induced brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haelewyn Benoit

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use and benefits of normobaric oxygen (NBO in patients suffering acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. Results Here we show for the first time to the best of our knowledge that NBO reduces both NMDA-induced calcium influxes in vitro and NMDA-induced neuronal degeneration in vivo, but increases oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury in vitro and ischemia-induced brain damage produced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in vivo. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that NBO reduces excitotoxin-induced calcium influx and subsequent neuronal degeneration but favors ischemia-induced brain damage and neuronal death. These findings highlight the complexity of the mechanisms involved by the use of NBO in patients suffering acute ischemic stroke.

  18. Disconnection between the default mode network and medial temporal lobes in post-traumatic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simoni, Sara; Grover, Patrick J; Jenkins, Peter O; Honeyfield, Lesley; Quest, Rebecca A; Ross, Ewan; Scott, Gregory; Wilson, Mark H; Majewska, Paulina; Waldman, Adam D; Patel, Maneesh C; Sharp, David J

    2016-12-01

    SEE BIGLER DOI101093/AWW277 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Post-traumatic amnesia is very common immediately after traumatic brain injury. It is characterized by a confused, agitated state and a pronounced inability to encode new memories and sustain attention. Clinically, post-traumatic amnesia is an important predictor of functional outcome. However, despite its prevalence and functional importance, the pathophysiology of post-traumatic amnesia is not understood. Memory processing relies on limbic structures such as the hippocampus, parahippocampus and parts of the cingulate cortex. These structures are connected within an intrinsic connectivity network, the default mode network. Interactions within the default mode network can be assessed using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging, which can be acquired in confused patients unable to perform tasks in the scanner. Here we used this approach to test the hypothesis that the mnemonic symptoms of post-traumatic amnesia are caused by functional disconnection within the default mode network. We assessed whether the hippocampus and parahippocampus showed evidence of transient disconnection from cortical brain regions involved in memory processing. Nineteen patients with traumatic brain injury were classified into post-traumatic amnesia and traumatic brain injury control groups, based on their performance on a paired associates learning task. Cognitive function was also assessed with a detailed neuropsychological test battery. Functional interactions between brain regions were investigated using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Together with impairments in associative memory, patients in post-traumatic amnesia demonstrated impairments in information processing speed and spatial working memory. Patients in post-traumatic amnesia showed abnormal functional connectivity between the parahippocampal gyrus and posterior cingulate cortex. The strength of this functional

  19. Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: applicability and relation with the Glasgow Coma Scale Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidad y relación con la Escala de Coma de Glasgow Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidade e relação com a Escala de Coma de Glasgow

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Cristina Fürbringer e Silva; Regina Marcia Cardoso de Sousa

    2007-01-01

    Restrictions in the application of the Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test and questionings about the relationship between conscience and post-traumatic amnesia motivated this study, which aims to identify, through the Glasgow Coma Scale scores, when to initiate the application of this amnesia test, as well to verify the relationship between the results of these two indicators. The longitudinal prospective study was carried at a referral center for trauma care in São Paulo - Brazil. The sa...

  20. Characterization of the Pathological and Biochemical Markers that Correlate to the Clinical Features of Autism. Subproject 2: Contribution of Significant Delay of Neuronal Development and Metabolic Shift of Neurons to Clinical Phenotype of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-21

    signifi cantly increased level of secreted amy- loid precursor protein alpha ( sAPP -α) in 60% of autistic children (Bailey et al., 2008). Western...blotting analysis confi rmed higher levels of sAPP -α in autistic children. Amino-terminally truncated intraneuronal amyloid (Aβ) is present in the neurons

  1. Delayed functional expression of neuronal chemokine receptors following focal nerve demyelination in the rat: a mechanism for the development of chronic sensitization of peripheral nociceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monahan Patrick E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and clinical studies have revealed that focal peripheral nerve axon demyelination is accompanied by nociceptive pain behavior. C-C and C-X-C chemokines and their receptors have been strongly implicated in demyelinating polyneuropathies and persistent pain syndromes. Herein, we studied the degree to which chronic nociceptive pain behavior is correlated with the neuronal expression of chemokines and their receptors following unilateral lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC-induced focal demyelination of the sciatic nerve in rats. Results Focal nerve demyelination increased behavioral reflex responsiveness to mechanical stimuli between postoperative day (POD 3 and POD28 in both the hindpaw ipsilateral and contralateral to the nerve injury. This behavior was accompanied by a bilateral increase in the numbers of primary sensory neurons expressing the chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4 by POD14, with no change in the pattern of CXCR3 expression. Significant increases in the numbers of neurons expressing the chemokines monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2, Regulated on Activation, Normal T Expressed and Secreted (RANTES/CCL5 and interferon γ-inducing protein-10 (IP-10/CXCL10 were also evident following nerve injury, although neuronal expression pattern of stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1/CXCL12 did not change. Functional studies demonstrated that acutely dissociated sensory neurons derived from LPC-injured animals responded with increased [Ca2+]i following exposure to MCP-1, IP-10, SDF1 and RANTES on POD 14 and 28, but these responses were largely absent by POD35. On days 14 and 28, rats received either saline or a CCR2 receptor antagonist isomer (CCR2 RA-[R] or its inactive enantiomer (CCR2 RA-[S] by intraperitoneal (i.p. injection. CCR2 RA-[R] treatment of nerve-injured rats produced stereospecific bilateral reversal of tactile hyperalgesia. Conclusion These results suggest that the presence of chemokine

  2. A Computational Model of Perceptual and Mnemonic Deficits in Medial Temporal Lobe Amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadil, Patrick S; Cowell, Rosemary A

    2017-02-14

    Damage to the medial temporal lobe (MTL) has long been known to impair declarative memory, and recent evidence suggests that it also impairs visual perception. A theory termed the representational-hierarchical account explains such impairments by assuming that MTL stores conjunctive representations of items and events, and that individuals with MTL damage must rely upon representations of simple visual features in posterior visual cortex, which are inadequate to support memory and perception under certain circumstances. One recent study of visual discrimination behavior revealed a surprising antiperceptual learning effect in MTL-damaged individuals: With exposure to a set of visual stimuli, discrimination performance worsened rather than improved [Barense, M. D., Groen, I. I. A., Lee, A. C. H., Yeung, L. K., Brady, S. M., Gregori, M., et al. Intact memory for irrelevant information impairs perception in amnesia. Neuron, 75, 157-167, 2012]. We extend the representational-hierarchical account to explain this paradox by assuming that difficult visual discriminations are performed by comparing the relative "representational tunedness"-or familiarity-of the to-be-discriminated items. Exposure to a set of highly similar stimuli entails repeated presentation of simple visual features, eventually rendering all feature representations maximally and, thus, equally familiar; hence, they are inutile for solving the task. Discrimination performance in patients with MTL lesions is therefore impaired by stimulus exposure. Because the unique conjunctions represented in MTL do not occur repeatedly, healthy individuals are shielded from this perceptual interference. We simulate this mechanism with a neural network previously used to explain recognition memory, thereby providing a model that accounts for both mnemonic and perceptual deficits caused by MTL damage with a unified architecture and mechanism.

  3. Structural synaptic plasticity has high memory capacity and can explain graded amnesia, catastrophic forgetting, and the spacing effect.

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    Andreas Knoblauch

    Full Text Available Although already William James and, more explicitly, Donald Hebb's theory of cell assemblies have suggested that activity-dependent rewiring of neuronal networks is the substrate of learning and memory, over the last six decades most theoretical work on memory has focused on plasticity of existing synapses in prewired networks. Research in the last decade has emphasized that structural modification of synaptic connectivity is common in the adult brain and tightly correlated with learning and memory. Here we present a parsimonious computational model for learning by structural plasticity. The basic modeling units are "potential synapses" defined as locations in the network where synapses can potentially grow to connect two neurons. This model generalizes well-known previous models for associative learning based on weight plasticity. Therefore, existing theory can be applied to analyze how many memories and how much information structural plasticity can store in a synapse. Surprisingly, we find that structural plasticity largely outperforms weight plasticity and can achieve a much higher storage capacity per synapse. The effect of structural plasticity on the structure of sparsely connected networks is quite intuitive: Structural plasticity increases the "effectual network connectivity", that is, the network wiring that specifically supports storage and recall of the memories. Further, this model of structural plasticity produces gradients of effectual connectivity in the course of learning, thereby explaining various cognitive phenomena including graded amnesia, catastrophic forgetting, and the spacing effect.

  4. Neuromodulatory effects of the dorsal hippocampal endocannabinoid system in dextromethorphan/morphine-induced amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, Zahra; Rezayof, Ameneh

    2017-01-05

    Dextromethorphan which is an active ingredient in many cough medicines has been previously shown to potentiate amnesic effect of morphine in rats. However, the effect of dextromethorphan, that is also a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, in combination with morphine on hippocampus-based long term memory has not been well characterized. The aim of the present study was to assess the possible role of endocannabinoid system of the dorsal hippocampus in dextromethorphan /morphine-induced amnesia. Our results showed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of morphine (5mg/kg) or dextromethorphan (5-15mg/kg) before testing the passive avoidance learning induced amnesia. Combination of ineffective doses of dextromethorphan (7.5mg/kg, i.p.) and morphine (2mg/kg, i.p.) also produced amnesia, suggesting the enhancing effects of the drugs. To assess the effect of the activation or inhibition of the dorsal hippocampal cannabinoid CB1 receptors on this amnesia, ACPA or AM251 as selective receptor agonists or antagonists were respectively injected into the CA1 regions before systemic injection of dextromethorphan and morphine. Interestingly, intra-CA1 microinjection of ACPA (0.5-1ng/rat) improved the amnesic effect of dextromethorphan /morphine combination. The microinjection of AM251 into the CA1 region enhanced the response of the combination of dextromethorphan /morphine in inducing amnesia. Moreover, Intra-CA1 microinjection of AM251 inhibited the improving effect of ACPA on dextromethorphan /morphine-induced amnesia. It is important to note that intra-CA1 microinjection of the same doses of the agonist or antagonist by itself had no effects on memory formation. Thus, it can be concluded that the dorsal hippocampal endocannabinoid system, via CB1 receptor-dependent mechanism, may be involved in morphine/dextromethorphan -induced amnesia.

  5. False recognition in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease – disinhibition or amnesia?

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    Emma C Flanagan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory recall processes in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD can be similarly impaired, whereas recognition performance is more variable. A potential reason for this variability could be false-positive errors made on recognition trials and whether these errors are due to amnesia per se or a general over-endorsement of recognition items regardless of memory. The current study addressed this issue by analysing recognition performance on the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT in 39 bvFTD, 77 AD and 61 control participants from two centres (India, Australia, as well as disinhibition assessed using the Hayling test. Whereas both AD and bvFTD patients were comparably impaired on delayed recall, bvFTD patients showed intact recognition performance in terms of the number of correct hits. However, both patient groups endorsed significantly more false-positives than controls, and bvFTD and AD patients scored equally poorly on a sensitivity index (correct hits - false-positives. Furthermore, measures of disinhibition were significantly associated with false positives in both groups, with a stronger relationship with false-positives in bvFTD. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed similar neural correlates of false positive endorsement across bvFTD and AD, with both patient groups showing involvement of prefrontal and Papez circuitry regions, such as medial temporal and thalamic regions, and a DTI analysis detected an emerging but non-significant trend between false positives and decreased fornix integrity in bvFTD only. These findings suggest that false-positive errors on recognition tests relate to similar mechanisms in bvFTD and AD, reflecting deficits in episodic memory processes and disinhibition. These findings highlight that current memory tests are not sufficient to accurately distinguish between bvFTD and AD patients.

  6. "Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test": tradução e validação "Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test": traducción y validación "Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test": translation and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Fürbringer e Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Traduzir e validar o Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test para uso em nosso meio. MÉTODOS: Esse teste foi traduzido para o português e retro-traduzido para o inglês por diferentes especialistas na língua e por fim, feita a avaliação da equivalência entre o instrumento original e a versão retro-traduzida. Sua aplicação em 73 vítimas de trauma crânio-encefálico contuso e a indicação da gravidade dessa lesão, estabelecida pela Escala de Coma de Glasgow, permitiram verificar as propriedades de medida do instrumento. RESULTADOS: A confiabilidade verificada pelo Alfa de Cronbach resultou em 0,76. Houve indicação de validade convergente e discriminante do instrumento quando os resultados de aplicação do Galveston Orientation and Amnésia Test foram analisados perante a gravidade do trauma crânio-encefálico. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados observados dão suporte para a aplicação do Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test em nosso meio como indicador do término da amnésia pós-traumática.OBJETIVO: Traducir y validar el Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test para su uso en nuestro medio. MÉTODOS: El test fue traducido al portugués retrotraducido al inglés por diferentes especialistas en la lengua y por fin, realizada la evaluación de la equivalencia entre el instrumento original y la versión retrotraducida. Su aplicación en 73 víctimas de traumatismo encéfalo craneano con constusión y la indicación de la gravedad de esa lesión, establecida por la Escala de Coma de Glasgow, permitieron verificar las propiedades de medida del instrumento. RESULTADOS: La confiabilidad verificada por el Alfa de Cronbach fue de 0,76. Hubo indicación de validez convergente y discriminante del instrumento cuando los resultados de aplicación del Galveston Orientation and Amnésia Test fueron analizados frente a la gravedad del traumatismo encéfalo craneano. CONCLUSIÓN: Los resultados observados dan soporte para la aplicación del

  7. Active Queue Management Algorithm Based on single neurons-Smith for networks with big time delay%大延时网络中基于单神经元-Smith的AQM算法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李婷; 苗增强; 周玲; 满高华

    2011-01-01

    本文利用智能控制理论设计了针对大延时网络的单神经元-Smith AQM(Active Queue Management)算法。对算法的设计目标、参数整定规则等问题进行了深入研究,最后的仿真结果验证了该算法在大延时网络主动队列管理中的有效性。%This thesis designs a AQM algorithm based on intelligent control theory,which is single neurons-Smith AQM algorithm for large delay network.The design target and parameter adjusting rule of this algorithm are presented detailed in this thesis.The results

  8. Supporting the self-concept with memory: insight from amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Matthew D; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the extent to which personal semantic memory supports the self-concept in individuals with medial temporal lobe amnesia and healthy adults. Participants completed eight 'I Am' self-statements. For each of the four highest ranked self-statements, participants completed an open-ended narrative task, during which they provided supporting information indicating why the I Am statement was considered self-descriptive. Participants then completed an episodic probe task, during which they attempted to retrieve six episodic memories for each of these self-statements. Supporting information was scored as episodic, personal semantic or general semantic. In the narrative task, personal semantic memory predominated as self-supporting information in both groups. The amnesic participants generated fewer personal semantic memories than controls to support their self-statements, a deficit that was more pronounced for trait relative to role self-statements. In the episodic probe task, the controls primarily generated unique event memories, but the amnesic participants did not. These findings demonstrate that personal semantic memory, in particular autobiographical fact knowledge, plays a critical role in supporting the self-concept, regardless of the accessibility of episodic memories, and they highlight potential differences in the way traits and roles are supported by personal memory.

  9. Transient global amnesia and neurological events: the Framingham Heart Study

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    Jose Rafael Romero

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/ objective: Transient global amnesia (TGA is a temporary amnestic syndrome characterized by lack of other focal neurological deficits. Cerebrovascular disease, migraine and seizures have been suggested as underlying mechanisms. TGA may be a risk factor for cerebrovascular or other neurological events. We studied the relation of TGA, vascular risk factors, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI indices of subclinical ischemia and neurological events in a community-based sample. Design/setting: A total of 12 TGA cases were ascertained using standard criteria by experienced neurologists, and matched to 41 stroke- and seizure-free controls. Vascular risk factors, brain MRI findings, and subsequent cerebrovascular or seizure events were compared in cases and controls. Participants: Framingham Heart Study (FHS original and offspring cohort participants were included.Results: No significant differences between the groups were observed in the prevalence of vascular risk factors, or brain MRI measures. Few incident stroke/transient ischemic attacks (TIA (1 event among the cases and 4 in controls or subsequent seizures occurred in either group. Head CT during the acute event (n=11 and brain MRI (n=7 were negative for acute abnormalities. Electroencephalograms (EEG (n=5 were negative for epileptiform activity. Extracranial vascular studies were negative for significant stenosis in all cases.Conclusions: In our community-based study TGA was not related to traditional vascular risk factors, or cerebrovascular disease. However, our study is limited by small sample size and power, and larger studies are required to exclude an association.

  10. Hippocampal amnesia impairs all manner of relational memory

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    Alex Konkel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Relational memory theory holds that the hippocampus supports, and amnesia following hippocampal damage impairs, memory for all manner of relations. Unfortunately, many studies of hippocampal-dependent memory have either examined only a single type of relational memory or conflated multiple kinds of relations. The experiments reported here employed a procedure in which each of several kinds of relational memory (spatial, associative, and sequential could be tested separately using the same materials. In Experiment 1, performance of amnesic patients with medial temporal lobe damage was assessed on memory for the three types of relations as well as for items. Compared to the performance of matched comparison participants, amnesic patients were impaired on all three relational tasks. But for those patients whose MTL damage was limited to the hippocampus, performance was relatively preserved on item memory as compared to relational memory, although still lower than that of comparison participants. In Experiment 2, study exposure was reduced for comparison participants, matching their item memory to the amnesic patients in Experiment 1. Relational memory performance of comparison subjects was well above amnesic patient levels, showing the disproportionate dependence of all three relational memory performances on the integrity of the hippocampus. Correlational analyses of the various task performances of comparison participants and of college-age participants showed that our measures of item memory were not influenced significantly by memory for associations among the items.

  11. Social Cognition in a Case of Amnesia with Neurodevelopmental Mechanisms

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    Hans J. Markowitsch

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Episodic-autobiographical memory (EAM is considered to emerge gradually in concert with the development of other cognitive abilities. Developmental studies have emphasized socio-cultural-linguistic mechanisms that may be unique to the development of EAM. Furthermore it was hypothesized that one of the main functions of EAM is the social one. In the research field, the link between EAM and social cognition remains however debated. Herein we aim to bring new insights into the relation between EAM and social information processing (including social cognition by describing a young adult patient with amnesia with neurodevelopmental mechanisms due to perinatal complications accompanied by hypoxia. The patient was investigated medically, psychiatrically and with neuropsychological and neuroimaging methods. Structural high resolution MRI revealed significant bilateral hippocampal atrophy as well as indices for degeneration in the amygdalae, basal ganglia and thalamus, when a less conservative threshold was applied. In addition to extensive memory investigations and testing other (non-social cognitive functions, we employed a broad range of tests that assessed social information processing (social perception, social cognition, social regulation. Our results point to both preserved (empathy, core theory of mind functions, visual affect selection and discrimination, affective prosody discrimination and impaired domains of social information processing (incongruent affective prosody processing, complex social judgments. They support proposals for a role of the hippocampal formation in processing more complex social information that likely requires multimodal relational handling.

  12. Impaired inference in a case of developmental amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Maria C; Rosenbaum, R Shayna; Ryan, Jennifer D

    2016-10-01

    Amnesia is associated with impairments in relational memory, which is critically supported by the hippocampus. By adapting the transitivity paradigm, we previously showed that age-related impairments in inference were mitigated when judgments could be predicated on known pairwise relations, however, such advantages were not observed in the adult-onset amnesic case D.A. Here, we replicate and extend this finding in a developmental amnesic case (N.C.), who also shows impaired relational learning and transitive expression. Unlike D.A., N.C.'s damage affected the extended hippocampal system and diencephalic structures, and does not extend to neocortical areas that are affected in D.A. Critically, despite their differences in etiology and affected structures, N.C. and D.A. perform similarly on the task. N.C. showed intact pairwise knowledge, suggesting that he is able to use existing semantic information, but this semantic knowledge was insufficient to support transitive expression. The present results suggest a critical role for regions connected to the hippocampus and/or medial prefrontal cortex in inference beyond learning of pairwise relations. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Dissociations in cognitive memory: the syndrome of developmental amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargha-Khadem, F; Gadian, D G; Mishkin, M

    2001-09-29

    The dearth of studies on amnesia in children has led to the assumption that when damage to the medial temporal lobe system occurs early in life, the compensatory capacity of the immature brain rescues memory functions. An alternative view is that such damage so interferes with the development of learning and memory that it results not in selective cognitive impairments but in general mental retardation. Data will be presented to counter both of these arguments. Results obtained from a series of 11 amnesic patients with a history of hypoxic ischaemic damage sustained perinatally or during childhood indicate that regardless of age at onset of hippocampal pathology, there is a pronounced dissociation between episodic memory, which is severely impaired, and semantic memory, which is relatively preserved. A second dissociation is characterized by markedly impaired recall and relatively spared recognition leading to a distinction between recollection-based versus familiarity-based judgements. These findings are discussed in terms of the locus and extent of neuropathology associated with hypoxic ischaemic damage, the neural basis of 'remembering' versus 'knowing', and a hierarchical model of cognitive memory.

  14. Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: evidence from an amnesic artist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Emma; McCloskey, Michael; Landau, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Studies of retrograde amnesia have focused on autobiographical memory, with fewer studies examining how non-autobiographical memory is affected. Those that have done so have focused primarily on memory for famous people and public events-relatively limited aspects of memory that are tied to learning during specific times of life and do not deeply tap into the rich and extensive knowledge structures that are developed over a lifetime. To assess whether retrograde amnesia can also cause impairments to other forms of general world knowledge, we explored losses across a broad range of knowledge domains in a newly-identified amnesic. LSJ is a professional artist, amateur musician and history buff with extensive bilateral medial temporal and left anterior temporal damage. We examined LSJ's knowledge across a range of everyday domains (e.g., sports) and domains for which she had premorbid expertise (e.g., famous paintings). Across all domains tested, LSJ showed losses of knowledge at a level of breadth and depth never before documented in retrograde amnesia. These results show that retrograde amnesia can involve broad and deep deficits across a range of general world knowledge domains. Thus, losses that have already been well-documented (famous people and public events) may severely underestimate the nature of human knowledge impairment that can occur in retrograde amnesia.

  15. Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: Evidence from an amnesic artist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eGregory

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies of retrograde amnesia have focused on autobiographical memory, with fewer studies examining how non-autobiographical memory is affected. Those that have done so have focused primarily on memory for famous people and public events—relatively limited aspects of memory that are tied to learning during specific times of life and do not deeply tap into the rich and extensive knowledge structures that are developed over a lifetime. To assess whether retrograde amnesia can also cause impairments to other forms of general world knowledge, we explored losses across a broad range of knowledge domains in a newly-identified amnesic. LSJ is a professional artist, amateur musician and history buff with extensive bilateral medial temporal and left anterior temporal damage. We examined LSJ's knowledge across a range of everyday domains (e.g., sports and domains for which she had premorbid expertise (e.g., famous paintings. Across all domains tested, LSJ showed losses of knowledge at a level of breadth and depth never before documented in retrograde amnesia. These results show that retrograde amnesia can involve broad and deep deficits across a range of general world knowledge domains. Thus, losses that have already been well-documented (famous people and public events may severely underestimate the nature of human knowledge impairment that can occur in retrograde amnesia.

  16. Profound loss of general knowledge in retrograde amnesia: evidence from an amnesic artist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Emma; McCloskey, Michael; Landau, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Studies of retrograde amnesia have focused on autobiographical memory, with fewer studies examining how non-autobiographical memory is affected. Those that have done so have focused primarily on memory for famous people and public events—relatively limited aspects of memory that are tied to learning during specific times of life and do not deeply tap into the rich and extensive knowledge structures that are developed over a lifetime. To assess whether retrograde amnesia can also cause impairments to other forms of general world knowledge, we explored losses across a broad range of knowledge domains in a newly-identified amnesic. LSJ is a professional artist, amateur musician and history buff with extensive bilateral medial temporal and left anterior temporal damage. We examined LSJ's knowledge across a range of everyday domains (e.g., sports) and domains for which she had premorbid expertise (e.g., famous paintings). Across all domains tested, LSJ showed losses of knowledge at a level of breadth and depth never before documented in retrograde amnesia. These results show that retrograde amnesia can involve broad and deep deficits across a range of general world knowledge domains. Thus, losses that have already been well-documented (famous people and public events) may severely underestimate the nature of human knowledge impairment that can occur in retrograde amnesia. PMID:24834048

  17. An individual patient comparison of response to a memory training program--psychogenic V organic amnesia: brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, S I; Yasueda, M; Hihara, N; Yamamoto, E; Sawatari, M; Ishida, A

    1998-01-01

    Psychogenic amnesia ("dissociative amnesia" in DSM-IV) has received relatively little attention in the literature. We compared neuropsychological and behavioral findings between a patient with psychogenic amnesia and one with organic amnesia from their early stages in a rehabilitation program. A 52-yr-old man developed anterograde and retrograde amnesia and short-term memory disturbance 1 mo after an operation for esophageal carcinoma, with no loss of personal identity and information. No apparent organic causes were identified, but because the patient and his wife rejected psychiatric treatment and memory deficit characteristics were compatible with that of an organic origin, the patient was referred to a physiatrist. A 46-yr-old man with anterograde amnesia was diagnosed with limbic encephalitis based on findings of magnetic resonance imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography, which showed lesions in both medial temporal lobes. Both patients underwent "memory book" training because they showed preserved performance in motor learning tasks. The first patient's responses to training contrasted with the other's and were indicative of psychogenic amnesia, with cancer representing a precipitating stress. Counseled by the physiatrist, the patient and his wife accepted suggestions to undergo psychiatric treatment. We propose that it is important to consider behavioral responses to memory rehabilitation as well as neuropsychological findings in differentiating psychogenic amnesia from an organic one and that physiatrists may be pivotal in diagnosing and initiating treatment in such psychiatric disorders.

  18. The GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, contributes to three distinct varieties of amnesia in the human brain - A detailed case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Adam; Hoefeijzers, Serge; Milton, Fraser; Dewar, Michaela; Carr, Melanie; Streatfield, Claire

    2016-01-01

    We describe a patient in whom long-term, therapeutic infusion of the selective gamma-amino-butyric acid type B (GABAB) receptor agonist, baclofen, into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) gave rise to three distinct varieties of memory impairment: i) repeated, short periods of severe global amnesia, ii) accelerated long-term forgetting (ALF), evident over intervals of days and iii) a loss of established autobiographical memories. This pattern of impairment has been reported in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), in particular the subtype of Transient Epileptic Amnesia (TEA). The amnesic episodes and accelerated forgetting remitted on withdrawal of baclofen, while the autobiographical amnesia (AbA) persisted. This exceptional case highlights the occurrence of 'non-standard' forms of human amnesia, reflecting the biological complexity of memory processes. It suggests a role for GABAB signalling in the modulation of human memory over multiple time-scales and hints at its involvement in 'epileptic amnesia'.

  19. Pure retrograde amnesia following a mild head trauma: a neuropsychological and metabolic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellal, François; Manning, Lilianne; Seegmuller, Caroline; Scheiber, Christian; Schoenfelder, Francis

    2002-09-01

    After a minor closed head injury, a 33-year-old man acquired extensive retrograde amnesia (RA) covering the previous ten years and concerning autobiographical, semantic and procedural memories. The patient's learning abilities remained excellent and he recovered considerable information from his wife, the media and personal documents. This relearned information did not, however, provide a sense of personal experience in the first weeks. CT and MRI failed to show brain damage, but EEG and SPECT examination showed a marked right temporal dysfunction. After three months the patient had almost completely recovered from RA. Interestingly, a parallel recovery was observed in the second SPECT obtained at this period. There was clearly a blockade of retrieval, while the stored engrams were probably intact. The mechanisms underlying such a functional amnesia are discussed in the light of previous reports of amnesia without brain lesions.

  20. Autobiogutobiographical amnesia and cognltive disorder resulgting from bilateral severe thalamic infarction Two cases reports

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ytt Kai; Yu Feng Qi; Lei Zheng Lin; Zhang Jun

    2000-01-01

    Objective To report two cases of patients with bilateral severe thalamic infarction.which showed autobiographical amnesia and cognitive disorders and to shed light on the mechanisms underlying thc retrograde amenesia. Method The two cases were studied clinically, CT and MRI were performed also, Language and neuropsychological tests were evaluated. Results Two patients with a chronic amnesia and cogntive disorders resulting from bilateral paramedian thalamic infarction showed a pattern of retrograde amnesia personally relevent autobiographical memory were prefoundly impaired .Whereas about the famous people and public events were relatively impaired. The patients almost had no thalamic aphasia.The events the one described showed spontaneously confabulated. Conclusion We think a probable explanation that the disorders at the thematic retrieval fiomwork ievel of memory and the information reconstruction due to a disconnetion of frontal and medial temperal memory systems.

  1. Towards Solving the Riddle of Forgetting in Functional Amnesia: Recent Advances and Current Opinions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica eStaniloiu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Remembering the past is a core feature of human beings, enabling them to maintain a sense of wholeness and identity and preparing them for the demands of the future. Forgetting operates in a dynamic neural connection with remembering, allowing the elimination of unnecessary or irrelevant information overload and decreasing interference. Stress and traumatic experiences could affect this connection, resulting in memory disturbances, such as functional amnesia. An overview of clinical, epidemiological, neuropsychological and neurobiological aspects of functional amnesia is presented, by preponderantly resorting to own data from patients with functional amnesia. Patients were investigated medically, neuropsychologically and neuroradiologically. A detailed report of a new case is included to illustrate the challenges posed by making an accurate differential diagnosis of functional amnesia, a condition that may encroach on the boundaries between psychiatry and neurology. Several mechanisms may play a role in forgetting in functional amnesia, such as retrieval impairments, consolidating defects, motivated forgetting, deficits in binding and reassembling details of the past, deficits in establishing a first person autonoetic connection with personal events and loss of information. In a substantial number of patients, we observed a synchronization abnormality between a frontal lobe system, important for autonoetic consciousness, and a temporo-amygdalar system, important for evaluation and emotions, which provides empirical support for an underlying mechanism of dissociation (a failure of integration between cognition and emotion. This observation suggests a mnestic blockade in functional amnesia that is triggered by psychological or environmental stress and is underpinned by a stress hormone mediated synchronization abnormality during retrieval between processing of affect-laden events and fact-processing.

  2. Transient Epileptic Amnesia with Preserved Consciousness: a Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soohyun; Lee, Wong-Woo; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kwon, Ohyun; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2017-06-01

    Transient epileptic amnesia (TEA) is defined as recurrent ictal and interictal transient memory disturbances typically occurring upon waking. Patients with TEA usually cannot remember the episodes. Electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities are usually localized on the dominant or bilateral temporal lobes. Here we report two cases of TEA with atypical features. The patients could remember the episodes afterwards, and abnormal discharges on EEG were detected in the temporal lobes of the non-dominant hemisphere. We suggest that confinement of epileptic discharge to the non-dominant temporal lobe can lead to partial preservation of consciousness during seizure attacks that produce transient amnesia.

  3. Effectiveness of lorazepam-assisted interviews in an adolescent with dissociative amnesia A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuna Seo; Mi-Hee Shin; Sung-Gon Kim; Ji-Hoon Kim

    2013-01-01

    To facilitate gathering information during a psychiatric interview, some psychiatrists advocate augmenting the interview using drugs. Rather than barbiturates, benzodiazepines have been used for drug-assisted interviews. Dissociative amnesia is one of the indications for these interviews. Herein, we present the case of a 15-year-old female who was diagnosed as having dissociative amnesia because of conflicts with her friends. She was administered a lorazepam-assisted interview to aid recovery of her memories. In this case, a small dose of lorazepam was sufficient to recover her memories without any adverse effects.

  4. The therapeutic effect of crocin on ketamine-induced retrograde amnesia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namdar Yousefvand

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The glutamatergic system plays an important role in learning and memory. Administration of crocus sativus (Saffron or its constituent, crocin, facilitates the formation of memory. This research investigated the effect of crocin on antagonizing retrograde amnesia induced by ketamine, a glutamatergic receptor antagonist, in rats by shuttle box. Methods: Male Wistar rats were tested to measure their learning behavior in the passive avoidance task. All animals were trained by a 1 mA shock. The drugs were injected immediately after the training was successfully performed. The animals were tested 24h after training to measure Step Through Latency (STL. Results: On the test day, administration of ketamine (12 mg/kg, ip impaired the memory after training. Different doses of crocin (2, 5 or 10 mg/kg, ip were injected 30 min after ketamine, but only 2 mg/kg crocin could improve retrograde amnesia and 5 and 10 mg/kg doses did not have any significant effect on retrograde amnesia. Moreover, administration of crocin (2, 5 or 10 mg/kg, ip after training had no significant impact on passive avoidance memory by itself. Conclusion: Considering the therapeutic effect of post-training administration of crocin on ketamine-induced retrograde amnesia, it can be argued that crocin has an interaction with glutamatergic system in formation of passive avoidance memory in rats.

  5. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  6. Developing an Animal Model of Human Amnesia: The Role of the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Raymond P.; Goodrich-Hunsaker, Naomi J.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes a series of experiments aimed at answering the question whether the hippocampus in rats can serve as an animal model of amnesia. It is recognized that a comparison of the functions of the rat hippocampus with human hippocampus is difficult, because of differences in methodology, differences in complexity of life experiences,…

  7. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  8. A Patient with Difficulty of Object Recognition: Semantic Amnesia for Manipulable Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yamadori

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied a patient who had recognition difficulty for manipulable objects. MRI showed a lesion in the left occipito-parietotemporal area. Differential diagnosis of agnosia, aphasia and apraxia is discussed. We believe this “object meaning amnesia” constitutes a distinct subtype of semantic amnesia.

  9. The Review of Retrograde Amnesia%逆行性遗忘研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓雪

    2015-01-01

    Retrograde amnesia has great important influence on internal memory of the human, especially in cognitive neuro-science. Through literature analysis, the temporal graded retrograde amnesia is the most extensive type. The characteristics of retro-grade amnesia is different and graded, and it is also featured with the full implicit memory. It mainly stems from the brain injury such as medial temporal lobe, diencephalon, and frontal lobe. In addition, drinking, lacking of vitamin B1 and trauma can also cause the symptoms. Now the main methods of memory rehabilitation are operation therapy, implicit memory rehabilitation and error-less learning. In the future, the memory rehabilitation about retrograde amnesia will more effectively promote the progress of the treatment.%遗忘症主要分为逆行性遗忘和顺行性遗忘。逆行性遗忘指病人失去提取脑损伤前事件记忆的能力,即能学习新东西和编码新事件,但是不能回忆发生在脑损伤前的经历和事件。它具有逆行期的梯度性、差异性,语义记忆、内隐记忆正常等特点;受伤脑区多与颞叶内侧、额叶、间脑损伤相关联。

  10. Psychogenic Amnesia for Childhood Sexual Abuse and Risk for Sexual Revictimisation in Both Adolescence and Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    This study was an investigation of the additional risk conferred by the experience of psychogenic amnesia for memories of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) on the likelihood of becoming a victim of sexual assault in later life. A total of 210 community respondents completed a retrospective web-based trauma survey. The majority of respondents were…

  11. Gudden's Ventral Tegmental Nucleus Is Vital for Memory: Re-Evaluating Diencephalic Inputs for Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vann, Seralynne D.

    2009-01-01

    Mammillary body atrophy is present in a number of neurological conditions and recent clinical findings highlight the importance of these nuclei for memory. While most accounts of diencephalic amnesia emphasize the functional importance of the hippocampal projections to the mammillary bodies, the present study tested the importance of the other…

  12. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Delayed puberty can be a source of great concern and anxiety, although it usually is caused by a self-limiting variant of the normal physiological timing named constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). Delayed puberty can, however, also be the first presentation of a permanent condition ...... mineral density) and psychological (e.g., low self-esteem) and underline the importance of careful clinical assessment of the patients.......Delayed puberty can be a source of great concern and anxiety, although it usually is caused by a self-limiting variant of the normal physiological timing named constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDGP). Delayed puberty can, however, also be the first presentation of a permanent condition...

  13. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  14. Antagonism by exifone, a new cognitive enhancing agent, of the amnesias induced by four benzodiazepines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porsolt, R D; Lenègre, A; Avril, I; Doumont, G

    1988-01-01

    Exifone is a novel compound proposed for treating cognitive decline associated with age and shows corrective effects in animal models of memory dysfunction. The present experiments examined the antagonism by exifone of the amnesias induced in mice in a passive avoidance test by four benzodiazepines: bromazepam, diazepam, lorazepam and triazolam. Subsequent experiments investigated the specificity of exifone's antagonism of benzodiazepine-induced amnesia by examining its interaction with the effects of the benzodiazepines in the staircase test (anxiolytic/sedative activity) and the electroshock test (anticonvulsant activity). The results indicated that exifone clearly antagonised the amnesias induced by the four benzodiazepines, but was without intrinsic effects in the staircase or electroshock test and did not antagonise the effects of the benzodiazepines in these two tests. These results suggest that exifone might be useful for decreasing the amnesias induced by commonly used benzodiazepines without affecting their anxiolytic or anticonvulsant activity.

  15. Attenuating effect of bioactive coumarins from Convolvulus pluricaulis on scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Jai; Karan, Maninder; Vasisht, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Convolvulus pluricaulis Chois. (Convolvulaceae) has been used in Ayurveda as Medhya Rasyana (nervine tonic) to treat various mental disorders. This study was designed to isolate the bioactive compound(s) of this plant and to evaluate their effect against scopolamine-induced amnesia. Column chromatography of the chloroform and ethyl-acetate fractions led to the isolation of three coumarins identified as scopoletin, ayapanin and scopolin. All the three compounds at 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg, p.o. were evaluated for memory-enhancing activity against scopolamine-induced amnesia using elevated plus maze and step down paradigms. Effect on acetylcholinesterase activity in mice brain was also evaluated. Scopoletin and scopolin, in both the paradigms, significantly and dose dependently attenuated the scopolamine-induced amnesic effect. Furthermore, these compounds at 10 and 15 mg/kg exhibited activity comparable to that of standard drug, donepezil. The compounds also exhibited significant acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

  16. How we recall (or don't): the hippocampal memory machine and anesthetic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A

    2011-02-01

    The hippocampal formation occupies a central position for the processing of sensory input into learned, remembered, and consciously retrievable information. The mechanisms by which anesthetic drugs interfere with these processes are now emerging. We review the current understanding of the role of the hippocampal formation in the generation of memory traces and how anesthetics might interfere with its function. Intraoperative amnesia is a desired endpoint of general anesthesia from the perspective of both the patient and the practitioner. "Intraoperative awareness with recall" can result when learning and memory do occur. In addition, anesthetics are capable of inducing a state of "conscious amnesia" that can provide insight into the workings of the brain and might be useful clinically. Anesthesiologists routinely induce the most fascinating pharmacologic effects in existence, the reversible interference of anesthetics with higher cognitive functions. Understanding how the drugs in our custody exert their effects should be our contribution to mankind's universal knowledge base.

  17. Amnesia Associated with Bilateral Hippocampal and Bilateral Basal Ganglia Lesions in Anoxia with Stimulant Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haut, Marc W.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Marshalek, Patrick J.; Suter, Blair C.; Miller, Liv E.

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of a 55-year-old man with ischemic lesions of the bilateral hippocampus and bilateral basal ganglia following a myocardial infarction during an episode of multiple drug use with subsequent anoxia requiring resuscitation. He presented for a neuropsychological evaluation with an anterograde amnesia for both explicit and procedural memory. There are two main points to this case, the unique aspects of the bilateral multifocal lesions and the functional, cognitive impact of these lesions. We hypothesize that his rare focal bilateral lesions of both the hippocampus and basal ganglia are a result of anoxia acting in synergy with his stimulant drug use (cocaine and/or 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine). Second, his unique lesions produced an explicit and implicit/procedural anterograde amnesia. PMID:28228745

  18. Amnesia global transitoria : aspectos clínicos y epidemiológicos

    OpenAIRE

    Reguero del Cura, Leandra

    2016-01-01

    La amnesia global transitoria es un síndrome clínico caracterizado por la aparición brusca de amnesia anterógrada acompañada de preguntas reiterativas, que en determinadas ocasiones asocia un componente retrógrado, de duración inferior a 24 horas, sin compromiso de las funciones neurológicas. Aunque hace más de 50 años desde que se describió por primera vez, la etiología de este síndrome permanece aún desconocida, siendo uno de los síndromes más enigmáticos de la neurología clínica. Existen d...

  19. Severe global amnesia presenting as Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome but resulting from atypical lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, L W; Nimmerrichter, A; Kessler, R; King, D; Hoehn, R; Margolin, R; Martin, P R

    1996-03-01

    A female alcoholic presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy subsequent to administration of diazepam and glucose (without thiamine) for treatment of withdrawal seizures. Nystagmus and cerebellar ataxia quickly resolved when administered thiamine, although severe global amnesia consistent with Korsakoff's syndrome persisted. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed infarction of the right temporal lobe with hippocampal atrophy, but no lesions of thalamus or atrophy of mammillary bodies. Positron emission tomography (PET) confirmed decreased cerebral metabolic rates for glucose (CMRglu) in the right temporal lobe corresponding to MRI findings, but also significant metabolic asymmetry of dorsal thalamus, i.e. reduced CMRglu in left versus right. This patient is unique in that neuroradiological findings revealed intact mammillary bodies and suggest asymmetrical dysfunctions (structural right temporal and functional left diencephalic) to produce her profound amnesia.

  20. Repeated intermittent alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent increases expression of the GABA(A) receptor δ subunit in cerebellar granule neurons and delays motor development in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Marvin R; Vollmer, Cyndel C; Zamudio-Bulcock, Paula A; Vollmer, William; Blomquist, Samantha L; Morton, Russell A; Everett, Julie C; Zurek, Agnieszka A; Yu, Jieying; Orser, Beverley A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) during fetal development can lead to long-lasting alterations, including deficits in fine motor skills and motor learning. Studies suggest that these are, in part, a consequence of cerebellar damage. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are the gateway of information into the cerebellar cortex. Functionally, CGNs are heavily regulated by phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition from Golgi cell interneurons; however, the effect of EtOH exposure on the development of GABAergic transmission in immature CGNs has not been investigated. To model EtOH exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy, neonatal pups were exposed intermittently to high levels of vaporized EtOH from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. This exposure gradually increased pup serum EtOH concentrations (SECs) to ∼60 mM (∼0.28 g/dl) during the 4 h of exposure. EtOH levels gradually decreased to baseline 8 h after the end of exposure. Surprisingly, basal tonic and phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs were not significantly affected by postnatal alcohol exposure (PAE). However, PAE increased δ subunit expression at P28 as detected by immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Also, electrophysiological studies with an agonist that is highly selective for δ-containing GABA(A) receptors, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP), showed an increase in THIP-induced tonic current. Behavioral studies of PAE rats did not reveal any deficits in motor coordination, except for a delay in the acquisition of the mid-air righting reflex that was apparent at P15 to P18. These findings demonstrate that repeated intermittent exposure to high levels of EtOH during the equivalent of the last trimester of human pregnancy has significant but relatively subtle effects on motor coordination and GABAergic transmission in CGNs in rats.

  1. Memory without context: amnesia with confabulations after infarction of the right capsular genu.

    OpenAIRE

    Schnider, A.; Gutbrod, K; Hess, C. W.; Schroth,G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To explore the mechanism of an amnesia marked by confabulations and lack of insight in a patient with an infarct of the right inferior capsular genu. The confabulations could mostly be traced back to earlier events, indicating that the memory disorder ensued from an inability to store the temporal and spatial context of information acquisition rather than a failure to store new information. METHODS--To test the patient's ability to store the context of information acquisition, two ...

  2. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Canal, Clinton E.; Chang, Qing; Paul E Gold

    2007-01-01

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured...

  3. Proteome Analysis of Rat Hippocampus Following Morphine-induced Amnesia and State-dependent Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Jafarinejad-Farsangi, Saeideh; Farazmand, Ali; Rezayof, Ameneh; Darbandi, Niloufar

    2015-01-01

    Morphine’s effects on learning and memory processes are well known to depend on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Whereas the role of the hippocampus in morphine-induced amnesia and state-dependent learning is established, the biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are poorly understood. The present study intended to investigate whether administration of morphine can change the expression level of rat hippocampal proteins during learning of a passive avoidance t...

  4. Long-term neuropsychological, neuroanatomical, and life outcome in hippocampal amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, David E.; Duff, Melissa C.; Magnotta, Vincent; Capizzano, Aristides A; Cassell, Martin D.; Tranel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Focal bilateral hippocampal damage typically causes severe and selective amnesia for new declarative information (facts and events), a cognitive deficit that greatly impacts the ability to live a normal, fully-independent life. We describe the case of 1846, a 48-year-old woman with profound hippocampal amnesia following status epilepticus and an associated anoxic episode at age 30. 1846 has undergone extensive neuropsychological testing on many occasions over the 18 years since her injury, and we present data indicating that her memory impairment has remained severe and stable during that time. New, high-resolution structural MRI studies of 1846's brain reveal substantial bilateral hippocampal atrophy resembling that of other well-known amnesic patients. In spite of severe amnesia, 1846 lives a full and mostly independent adult life, facilitated by an extensive social support network of family and friends. Her case provides an example of a rare and unlikely positive outcome in the face of severe memory problems. PMID:22401298

  5. Effect of bacosides, alcoholic extract of Bacopa monniera Linn. (brahmi), on experimental amnesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Kamal; Singh, Manjeet

    2005-07-01

    To investigate the effect of bacosides (alcoholic extract of brahmi) on scopolamine (3 mg kg(-1), ip), sodium nitrite (75 mg kg(-1), ip) and BN52021 (15 mg kg(-1), ip) induced experimental amnesia in mice, using Morris water maze test, all the agents were administered 30 min before the acquisition trials on each day and repeated for 4 consecutive days, and on 5th day during the retrieval trials. Bacosides on anterograde administration (before training) in mice, significantly decreased the escape latency time (ELT) during the acquisition trials for 4 consecutive days and increased the time spent (TS) in target quadrant during the retrieval trials on 5th day, and on retrograde administration (after training) bacosides were found not to affect TS significantly. Bacosides also significantly decreased the ELT and increased the TS in mice treated anterogradely with scopolamine and sodium nitrite. Bacosides did not exhibit any significant effect on TS of mice treated retrogradely with sodium nitrite. On the other hand, bacosides significantly increased the TS of mice treated retrogradely with BN52021. On the basis of the present results it can be concluded that bacosides facilitate anterograde memory and attenuate anterograde experimental amnesia induced by scopolamine and sodium nitrite possibly by improving acetylcholine level and hypoxic conditions, respectively. Beside this bacosides also reversed BN52021 induced retrograde amnesia, probably due to increase in platelet activating factor (PAF) synthesis by enhancing cerebral glutamate level.

  6. Faces are special but not too special: spared face recognition in amnesia is based on familiarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Mariam; Knight, Robert T; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2010-11-01

    Most current theories of human memory are material-general in the sense that they assume that the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is important for retrieving the details of prior events, regardless of the specific type of materials. Recent studies of amnesia have challenged the material-general assumption by suggesting that the MTL may be necessary for remembering words, but is not involved in remembering faces. We examined recognition memory for faces and words in a group of amnesic patients, which included hypoxic patients and patients with extensive left or right MTL lesions. Recognition confidence judgments were used to plot receiver operating characteristics (ROCs) in order to more fully quantify recognition performance and to estimate the contributions of recollection and familiarity. Consistent with the extant literature, an analysis of overall recognition accuracy showed that the patients were impaired at word memory but had spared face memory. However, the ROC analysis indicated that the patients were generally impaired at high confidence recognition responses for faces and words, and they exhibited significant recollection impairments for both types of materials. Familiarity for faces was preserved in all patients, but extensive left MTL damage impaired familiarity for words. These results show that face recognition may appear to be spared because performance tends to rely heavily on familiarity, a process that is relatively well preserved in amnesia. In addition, the findings challenge material-general theories of memory, and suggest that both material and process are important determinants of memory performance in amnesia.

  7. A Single-System Model Predicts Recognition Memory and Repetition Priming in Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, Roy P.C.; Wester, Arie J.; Shanks, David R.

    2014-01-01

    We challenge the claim that there are distinct neural systems for explicit and implicit memory by demonstrating that a formal single-system model predicts the pattern of recognition memory (explicit) and repetition priming (implicit) in amnesia. In the current investigation, human participants with amnesia categorized pictures of objects at study and then, at test, identified fragmented versions of studied (old) and nonstudied (new) objects (providing a measure of priming), and made a recognition memory judgment (old vs new) for each object. Numerous results in the amnesic patients were predicted in advance by the single-system model, as follows: (1) deficits in recognition memory and priming were evident relative to a control group; (2) items judged as old were identified at greater levels of fragmentation than items judged new, regardless of whether the items were actually old or new; and (3) the magnitude of the priming effect (the identification advantage for old vs new items) overall was greater than that of items judged new. Model evidence measures also favored the single-system model over two formal multiple-systems models. The findings support the single-system model, which explains the pattern of recognition and priming in amnesia primarily as a reduction in the strength of a single dimension of memory strength, rather than a selective explicit memory system deficit. PMID:25122896

  8. 5-HT6 receptor memory and amnesia: behavioral pharmacology--learning and memory processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Alfredo; Pérez-García, Georgina; Ponce-Lopez, Teresa; Castillo, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that antagonists of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor6 (5-HT6) improve memory and reverse amnesia, although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Hence, in this paper an attempt was made to summarize recent findings. Available evidence indicates that diverse 5-HT6 receptor antagonists produce promnesic and/or antiamnesic effects in diverse conditions, including memory formation, age-related cognitive impairments, memory deficits in diseases such as schizophrenia, Parkinson, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Notably, some 5-HT6 receptor agonists seem to have promnesic and/or antiamnesic effects. At the present, it is unclear why 5-HT6 receptor agonists and antagonists may facilitate memory or may reverse amnesia in some memory tasks. Certainly, 5-HT6 drugs modulate memory, which are accompanied with neural changes. Likewise, memory, aging, and AD modify 5-HT6 receptors and signaling cascades. Further investigation in different memory tasks, times, and amnesia models together with more complex control groups might provide further clues. Notably, human studies suggest a potential utility of 5-HT6 receptor antagonists in mild-to-moderate AD patients. Even individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) offer a great opportunity to test them.

  9. Amnesia produced by altered release of neurotransmitters after intraamygdala injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal, Clinton E; Chang, Qing; Gold, Paul E

    2007-07-24

    Amnesia produced by protein synthesis inhibitors such as anisomycin provides major support for the prevalent view that the formation of long-lasting memories requires de novo protein synthesis. However, inhibition of protein synthesis might disrupt other neural functions to interfere with memory formation. Intraamygdala injections of anisomycin before inhibitory avoidance training impaired memory in rats tested 48 h later. Release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin, measured at the site of anisomycin infusions, increased quickly by approximately 1,000-17,000%, far above the levels seen under normal conditions. NE and DA release later decreased far below baseline for several hours before recovering at 48 h. Intraamygdala injections of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist or agonist, each timed to blunt effects of increases and decreases in NE release after anisomycin, attenuated anisomycin-induced amnesia. In addition, similar to the effects on memory seen with anisomycin, intraamygdala injections of a high dose of NE before training impaired memory tested at 48 h after training. These findings suggest that altered release of neurotransmitters may mediate amnesia produced by anisomycin and, further, raise important questions about the empirical bases for many molecular theories of memory formation.

  10. The Effects of Delay on Oscillations Rhythm of Neuron Network With Inhibitory Synapses%时滞对化学突触耦合的神经元网络放电节律的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵竞哲; 石霞

    2016-01-01

    大脑中许多功能区可以呈现出不同形式的神经网络振荡活动,它们反映群体神经元的同步活动以及大脑的不同功能状态。高频节律反映的是大脑局部区域较快的信息处理,低频节律则能够反映外部的感觉输入和内部的认知事件的动态驱动在不同脑区的传播过程。这些不同形式的振荡活动分别在大脑处理、传递和整合感觉信息,巩固记忆,以及一些高级认知活动(如注意行为)中发挥重要的作用。其中,调整神经网络活动的振荡特性是实现这些脑功能的可能机制之一。本文发现突触的连接强度增大,可以加强同步。随着时滞的增大,在初始周期 T 的整数倍处,簇中spiking的个数会逐渐增加。神经元的频率会属于不同波段,且会出现混合振荡的状态。对于小的时滞,振荡是低频的。当时滞超过一定的值之后,网络从低频变为高频低频共存的状态,出现了混合振荡状态,并且这种转换快速且稳定。%Many functional areas of the brain can exhibit different forms of oscillatory brain activity, which reflect the synchronous activities of the group of neurons and the different functional states of the brain. The high frequency rhythm reflects the information processing of the local area of the brain. The low frequency rhythm is able to reflect the external sensory input and the internal cognitive events of the dynamic drive in different brain areas of the communica-tion process. These different forms of oscillatory activity play an important role in brain processing, transmission and integration of sensory information, consolidation of memory, and some advanced cognitive activities (such as atten-tional behavior). Among them, adjusting the oscillation characteristics of neural network activity is one of the possible mechanisms to achieve these brain functions. Synchronization is enhanced as the synaptic connection increases

  11. Basin stability in delayed dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Siyang; Lin, Wei; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-02-01

    Basin stability (BS) is a universal concept for complex systems studies, which focuses on the volume of the basin of attraction instead of the traditional linearization-based approach. It has a lot of applications in real-world systems especially in dynamical systems with a phenomenon of multi-stability, which is even more ubiquitous in delayed dynamics such as the firing neurons, the climatological processes, and the power grids. Due to the infinite dimensional property of the space for the initial values, how to properly define the basin’s volume for delayed dynamics remains a fundamental problem. We propose here a technique which projects the infinite dimensional initial state space to a finite-dimensional Euclidean space by expanding the initial function along with different orthogonal or nonorthogonal basis. A generalized concept of basin’s volume in delayed dynamics and a highly practicable calculating algorithm with a cross-validation procedure are provided to numerically estimate the basin of attraction in delayed dynamics. We show potential applicabilities of this approach by applying it to study several representative systems of biological or/and physical significance, including the delayed Hopfield neuronal model with multistability and delayed complex networks with synchronization dynamics.

  12. Specific, personally meaningful cues can benefit episodic prospection in medial temporal lobe amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Donna; Kurczek, Jake; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether severity of episodic prospection impairment in medial temporal lobe (MTL) amnesia is reduced by the types of cues that are used to elicit personal future episodes and, if so, whether episodic memory impairment is similarly affected. Multiple case study of five individuals with MTL amnesia and healthy control participants. Participants were administered two tests of episodic prospection: A commonly used Galton-Crovitz task that uses generic cues (e.g., lemon) and a novel task that includes specific, personally meaningful cues referring to planned or plausible future events (e.g., granddaughter's recital). Narratives were scored for episodic detail using the Autobiographical Interview protocol (Levine et al., 2002), which distinguishes between internal (episodic) details and external (non-episodic) details. Results showed that specific, personally meaningful cues led to an appreciable reduction of episodic memory and prospection impairment in three of the amnesic cases tested. Clinical benefit from more structured, self-related cues may depend on factors such as extent of MTL damage or general severity of episodic memory and prospection impairment, highlighting the importance of methodological approaches to neuropsychological research that treat each case on an individual basis. In cases of mild-moderate amnesia, specific, personal cues afford more detailed episodic remembering and prospective imagining than individual cue words. Previous reports of episodic prospection impairment in medial temporal lobe (MTL) amnesia might misrepresent an individual case's true prospective abilities Specific cues drawn from a patient's everyday life have greater ecological validity than the more typical generic cues used to elicit episodic prospection and can aid some individuals with MTL amnesia in the ability to imagine future experiences Assessment and rehabilitation tools for MTL amnesic populations should attempt to minimize broad, open-ended questions and

  13. Delay-dependent asymptotic stability for neural networks with time-varying delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Liao

    2006-01-01

    ensure local and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium of the neural network. Our results are applied to a two-neuron system with delayed connections between neurons, and some novel asymptotic stability criteria are also derived. The obtained conditions are shown to be less conservative and restrictive than those reported in the known literature. Some numerical examples are included to demonstrate our results.

  14. Anterograde and retrograde amnesia after lormetazepam and flunitrazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, H; Rohloff, A; Aufdembrinke, B; Fichte, K

    1988-01-01

    In a pharmacopsychological study, memory impairments after single oral doses of benzodiazepines or placebo were investigated in 40 healthy men aged 20-40 years. The study was designed as a double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. Four independent groups of 10 subjects randomly received either 1 mg lormetazepam, 2 mg lormetazepam, 2 mg flunitrazepam, or placebo. The tests consisted of word lists, picture tests, and syllable pairs (consonant-vowel-consonant trigrams). Tests were performed before drug ingestion, and 1, 2, 3, and 5 h after application. Different test versions were used on each occasion. The target variables were immediate recall (after presentation and a 10-s distraction task) and delayed recall and recognition (after 30 min). Recognition was also tested after 24 h for all five versions. A distinction must be made between anterograde amnesic effects and retrograde amnesic effects. The greatest anterograde memory impairments were observed after 2 mg flunitrazepam (p less than 0.05). Lormetazepam 2 mg produced less marked impairments than flunitrazepam. Results after 1 mg lormetazepam did not differ from those after placebo. Performance in the memory tests was better under benzodiazepines than under placebo as regards material learned before drug ingestion, i.e. the benzodiazepines had not negative retrograde amnestic effects, but rather "promnesic" effects. The results suggest that the extent of the benzodiazepines' amnesic effects--both negative (anterograde) and positive (retrograde)--depends on the dosage and type of substance.

  15. Pain and intra-operative amnesia evaluation with local anesthesia and sedation in patients subjected to rhinosseptoplasties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Raimar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The local anesthesia practice and sedation to rhinoplasty and others aesthetics procedures of the face are each time more frequents. In the Brazil, the Federal Council of Medicine defines it and regulate its practice. Objective: To analyze the analgesia' effectiveness and of the intro operative amnesia through analogous visual and subjective scales in the rhinosseptoplasties performed under local anesthesia and sedation, looking for associations with the medium quantities of medication utilized. Method: A retrospective study based in reports relatives to 158 aesthetic-functional rhinoplasties. The surgeon recorded in a protocol the data relatives to the use of local anesthetics and sedatives (including concentration and quantities utilized as well as the side effects. In the first return post surgery the patient quantifies the pain that he felt in the intra operative utilizing a analogous visual scale as described by Hasen and collaborators. The Amnesia considered ideal when the patient referred to remind "nothing" or "a few of the procedure. Results: The sample constituted of 80 (73,4% women and 29 26,6% men, average of age of 29,3 ± 9,5 years. The median of the pain by the analogous visual scale was 0,05; 80% under 3,35. The amnesia was ideal in 51 (46,8% surgeries. The midazolam was utilized in all the surgeries. Fentanyl in 32 (29,4% and, pethidine in 77 (70,6%. Had not statistically significants differences between the quantities of medication utilized between the groups of patients with ideal amnesia when compared with those that do not obtained satisfactory amnesia. Conclusion: Local anesthesia and sedation in rhinoplasties are comfortable and secures in the majority of the cases, even without have a satisfactory amnesia.

  16. Efficacy study of Prunus amygdalus (almond nuts in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Kirti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Cognitive disorders such as amnesia, attention deficit and Alzheimer′s disease are emerging nightmares in the field of medicine because no exact cure exists for them, as existing nootropic agents (piractam, tacrine, metrifonate have several limitations. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of Prunus amygdalus (PA nuts on cognitive functions, total cholesterol levels and cholinesterase (ChE activity in scopolamine-induced amnesia in rats. Materials and Methods : The paste of PA nuts was administered orally at three doses (150, 300 and 600 mg/kg for 7 and 14 consecutive days to the respective groups of rats. Piracetam (200 mg/kg was used as a standard nootropic agent. Learning and memory parameters were evaluated using elevated plus maze (EPM, passive avoidance and motor activity paradigms. Brain ChE activity and serum biochemical parameters like total cholesterol, total triglycerides and glucose were evaluated. Results : It was observed that PA at the above-mentioned doses after 7 and 14 days of administration in the respective groups significantly reversed scopolamine (1 mg/kg i.p.-induced amnesia, as evidenced by a decrease in the transfer latency in the EPM task and step-down latency in the passive avoidance task. PA reduced the brain ChE activity in rats. PA also exhibited a remarkable cholesterol and triglyceride lowering property and slight increase in glucose levels in the present study. Conclusion : Because diminished cholinergic transmission and increase in cholesterol levels appear to be responsible for the development of amyloid plaques and dementia in Alzheimer patients, PA may prove to be a useful memory-restorative agent. It would be worthwhile to explore the potential of this plant in the management of Alzheimer′s disease.

  17. Just do it! How performing an action enhances remembering in transient global amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainselin, Mathieu; Quinette, Peggy; Juskenaite, Aurelija; Desgranges, Béatrice; Martinaud, Olivier; de La Sayette, Vincent; Hannequin, Didier; Viader, Fausto; Eustache, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the sudden onset of a massive episodic memory deficit that spares other cognitive functions. As such, it provides a unique human amnesia model for testing the enactment effect (i.e., better memory for performed actions than for verbally encoded sentences). Our main aim was to test whether the enactment effect is preserved in TGA patients, both to have a better understanding and to test the robustness of this effect in a massive amnesia. Object-action pairs were encoded under four conditions: verbal, experimenter-performed, and two enacted conditions (self-performed and self-performed with choice). We tested object-action pair retrieval using cued recall (CR) and recognition tasks, and source memory using a free recall task. We also assessed binding, executive functions, short-term memory, episodic memory, anxiety and mood. We run correlations to control for their putative effects on memory for action. Data were collected from 24 patients, 16 of whom were examined during the acute phase and eight the day-after, as well as from 18 healthy controls. The memory performances of the patients in the acute phase improved for both (i) the CR score, between the verbal, experimenter-performed and self-performed with choice conditions, and (ii) the total recognition score, between the verbal condition and the two enacted conditions. Correlations were found between self-performed task (SPT) enhancement and both the binding and anxiety. In spite of their severely impaired episodic memory, patients with TGA benefit from the enactment effect. These results are discussed in relation to the role of motor components and episodic integration in memory for actions. We suggest that enactment effect can be used in clinical practice and rehabilitation, possible even for patients with a massive memory impairment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Global Stability, Bifurcation, and Chaos Control in a Delayed Neural Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitava Kundu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions for the global asymptotic stability of delayed artificial neural network model of n (≥3 neurons have been derived. For bifurcation analysis with respect to delay we have considered the model with three neurons and used suitable transformation on multiple time delays to reduce it to a system with single delay. Bifurcation analysis is discussed with respect to single delay. Numerical simulations are presented to verify the analytical results. Using numerical simulation, the role of delay and neuronal gain parameter in changing the dynamics of the neural network model has been discussed.

  19. Functional MRI study of diencephalic amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulo, M; Van Hecke, J; Toma, L; Ferretti, A; Tartaro, A; Colosimo, C; Romani, G L; Uncini, A

    2005-07-01

    Anterograde amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is associated with diencephalic lesions, mainly in the anterior thalamic nuclei. Whether diencephalic and temporal lobe amnesias are distinct entities is still not clear. We investigated episodic memory for faces using functional MRI (fMRI) in eight controls and in a 34-year-old man with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and diencephalic lesions but without medial temporal lobe (MTL) involvement at MRI. fMRI was performed with a 1.5 tesla unit. Three dual-choice tasks were employed: (i) face encoding (18 faces were randomly presented three times and subjects were asked to memorize the faces); (ii) face perception (subjects indicated which of two faces matched a third face); and (iii) face recognition (subjects indicated which of two faces belonged to the group they had been asked to memorize during encoding). All activation was greater in the right hemisphere. In controls both the encoding and recognition tasks activated two hippocampal regions (anterior and posterior). The anterior hippocampal region was more activated during recognition. Activation in the prefrontal cortex was greater during recognition. In the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, fMRI did not show hippocampal activation during either encoding or recognition. During recognition, although behavioural data showed defective retrieval, the prefrontal regions were activated as in controls, except for the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. fMRI activation of the visual cortices and the behavioural score on the perception task indicated that the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome perceived the faces, paid attention to the task and demonstrated accurate judgement. In the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, although the anatomical damage does not involve the MTL, the hippocampal memory encoding has been lost, possibly as a consequence of the hippocampal-anterior thalamic axis involvement. Anterograde amnesia could therefore be the expression of

  20. ‘Becoming Mozambicanised’: Nostalgic amnesia among Zimbabweans adapting to ‘disorder’ in Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammar, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which displaced Zimbabweans who migrated to Mozambique’s Manica Province in the 2000s in the wake of political and economic crisis, constructed a largely unreflective discursive dichotomy between remembered ‘order’ in Zimbabwe and perceived ‘disorder’ in Mozambique......-simplifications and stereotypes. It suggests that rememberings and representations of an ‘ordered’ past in Zimbabwe set in contrast to a ‘disordered’ Mozambique, are part of a nostalgic amnesia that assists these ambivalent migrants to deal with (or deny) their displacement and losses, and helps them adapt to the new and strange...

  1. Kv3.1-Kv3.2 channels underlie a high-voltage-activating component of the delayed rectifier K+ current in projecting neurons from the globus pallidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pineda, R; Chow, A; Amarillo, Y; Moreno, H; Saganich, M; Vega-Saenz de Miera, E C; Hernández-Cruz, A; Rudy, B

    1999-09-01

    The globus pallidus plays central roles in the basal ganglia circuitry involved in movement control as well as in cognitive and emotional functions. There is therefore great interest in the anatomic and electrophysiological characterization of this nucleus. Most pallidal neurons are GABAergic projecting cells, a large fraction of which express the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV). Here we show that PV-containing pallidal neurons coexpress Kv3. 1 and Kv3.2 K+ channel proteins and that both Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 antibodies coprecipitate both channel proteins from pallidal membrane extracts solubilized with nondenaturing detergents, suggesting that the two channel subunits are forming heteromeric channels. Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels have several unusual electrophysiological properties when expressed in heterologous expression systems and are thought to play special roles in neuronal excitability including facilitating sustained high-frequency firing in fast-spiking neurons such as interneurons in the cortex and the hippocampus. Electrophysiological analysis of freshly dissociated pallidal neurons demonstrates that these cells have a current that is nearly identical to the currents expressed by Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins in heterologous expression systems, including activation at very depolarized membrane potentials (more positive than -10 mV) and very fast deactivation rates. These results suggest that the electrophysiological properties of native channels containing Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 proteins in pallidal neurons are not significantly affected by factors such as associated subunits or postranslational modifications that result in channels having different properties in heterologous expression systems and native neurons. Most neurons in the globus pallidus have been reported to fire sustained trains of action potentials at high-frequency. Kv3.1-Kv3.2 voltage-gated K+ channels may play a role in helping maintain sustained high-frequency repetitive firing as they probably do

  2. The disruptive effects of processing fluency on familiarity-based recognition in amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozubko, Jason D; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2014-02-01

    Amnesia leads to a deficit in recollection that leaves familiarity-based recognition relatively spared. Familiarity is thought to be based on the fluent processing of studied items compared to novel items. However, whether amnesic patients respond normally to direct manipulations of processing fluency is not yet known. In the current study, we manipulated processing fluency by preceding each test item with a semantically related or unrelated prime item, and measured both recollection and familiarity using a remember-know recognition procedure. In healthy controls, enhancing processing fluency increased familiarity-based recognition responses for both old and new words, leaving familiarity-based accuracy constant. However, in patients with MTL damage, enhancing fluency only increased familiarity-based recognition responses for new items, resulting in decreased familiarity-based recognition accuracy. Importantly, this fluency-related decrease in recognition accuracy was not due to overall lower levels of performance or impaired recollection of studied items because it was not observed in healthy subjects that studied words under conditions that lowered performance by reducing recollection. The results indicate that direct manipulations of processing fluency can disrupt familiarity-based discrimination in amnesia. Potential accounts of these findings are discussed.

  3. Focal retrograde amnesia: voxel-based morphometry findings in a case without MRI lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Sehm

    Full Text Available Focal retrograde amnesia (FRA is a rare neurocognitive disorder presenting with an isolated loss of retrograde memory. In the absence of detectable brain lesions, a differentiation of FRA from psychogenic causes is difficult. Here we report a case study of persisting FRA after an epileptic seizure. A thorough neuropsychological assessment confirmed severe retrograde memory deficits while anterograde memory abilities were completely normal. Neurological and psychiatric examination were unremarkable and high-resolution MRI showed no neuroradiologically apparent lesion. However, voxel-based morphometry (VBM-comparing the MRI to an education-, age-and sex-matched control group (n = 20 disclosed distinct gray matter decreases in left temporopolar cortex and a region between right posterior parahippocampal and lingual cortex. Although the results of VBM-based comparisons between a single case and a healthy control group are generally susceptible to differences unrelated to the specific symptoms of the case, we believe that our data suggest a causal role of the cortical areas detected since the retrograde memory deficit is the preeminent neuropsychological difference between patient and controls. This was paralleled by grey matter differences in central nodes of the retrograde memory network. We therefore suggest that these subtle alterations represent structural correlates of the focal retrograde amnesia in our patient. Beyond the implications for the diagnosis and etiology of FRA, our results advocate the use of VBM in conditions that do not show abnormalities in clinical radiological assessment, but show distinct neuropsychological deficits.

  4. Amnesia of inhibitory avoidance by scopolamine is overcome by previous open-field exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colettis, Natalia C.; Snitcofsky, Marina; Kornisiuk, Edgar E.; Gonzalez, Emilio N.; Quillfeldt, Jorge A.

    2014-01-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic receptor (MAChR) blockade with scopolamine either extended or restricted to the hippocampus, before or after training in inhibitory avoidance (IA) caused anterograde or retrograde amnesia, respectively, in the rat, because there was no long-term memory (LTM) expression. Adult Wistar rats previously exposed to one or two open-field (OF) sessions of 3 min each (habituated), behaved as control animals after a weak though over-threshold training in IA. However, after OF exposure, IA LTM was formed and expressed in spite of an extensive or restricted to the hippocampus MAChR blockade. It was reported that during and after OF exposure and reexposure there was an increase in both hippocampal and cortical ACh release that would contribute to “prime the substrate,” e.g., by lowering the synaptic threshold for plasticity, leading to LTM consolidation. In the frame of the “synaptic tagging and capture” hypothesis, plasticity-related proteins synthesized during/after the previous OF could facilitate synaptic plasticity for IA in the same structure. However, IA anterograde amnesia by hippocampal protein synthesis inhibition with anisomycin was also prevented by two OF exposures, strongly suggesting that there would be alternative interpretations for the role of protein synthesis in memory formation and that another structure could also be involved in this “OF effect.” PMID:25322799

  5. Trachyspermum ammi Seeds Supplementation Helps Reverse Scopolamine, Alprazolam and Electroshock Induced Amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Kapil; Parle, Milind

    2017-01-17

    The present study was designed to explore the beneficial effects of successive 10 days administration of Trachyspermum ammi seed's powder (TASP) along with diet (at the dose of 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0% w/w) on learning and memory of mice. A total of 306 mice divided in 51 equal groups were employed in the study. Passive avoidance paradigm (PAP) and Object recognition Task (ORT) were employed as exteroceptive models. The brain acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), serum cholesterol, brain monoaldehyde (MDA), brain reduced glutathione (GSH) and brain nitrite were estimated and Alprazolam, Scopolamine and Electroshock induced amnesia was employed to describe the actions. Treatment of TASP significantly increased step down latency of PAA and significantly increased discrimination index of ORT in groups with or without amnesia when compared to respective control groups. Furthermore, TASP administration resulted in significant fall in brain AChE activity, brain MDA level and brain nitrite level with simultaneous rise in brain GSH level, thereby decreased oxidative damage. A significant decrease in serum cholesterol was also observed. Ajowan supplementation may prove a remedy for the management of cognitive disorders owing to have pro-cholinergic, antioxidant and hypo-lipidemic activities.

  6. Memory decay and susceptibility to amnesia dissociate punishment--from relief-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelmann, Sören; Preuschoff, Stephan; Appel, Mirjam; Niewalda, Thomas; Gerber, Bertram; Yarali, Ayse

    2013-08-23

    Painful events shape future behaviour in two ways: stimuli associated with pain onset subsequently support learned avoidance (i.e. punishment-learning) because they signal future, upcoming pain. Stimuli associated with pain offset in turn signal relief and later on support learned approach (i.e. relief-learning). The relative strengths of such punishment- and relief-learning can be crucial for the adaptive organization of behaviour in the aftermath of painful events. Using Drosophila, we compare punishment- and relief-memories in terms of their temporal decay and sensitivity to retrograde amnesia. During the first 75 min following training, relief-memory is stable, whereas punishment-memory decays to half of the initial score. By 24 h after training, however, relief-memory is lost, whereas a third of punishment-memory scores still remain. In accordance with such rapid temporal decay from 75 min on, retrograde amnesia erases relief-memory but leaves a half of punishment-memory scores intact. These findings suggest differential mechanistic bases for punishment- and relief-memory, thus offering possibilities for separately interfering with either of them.

  7. Memory decay and susceptibility to amnesia dissociate punishment- from relief-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelmann, Sören; Preuschoff, Stephan; Appel, Mirjam; Niewalda, Thomas; Gerber, Bertram; Yarali, Ayse

    2013-01-01

    Painful events shape future behaviour in two ways: stimuli associated with pain onset subsequently support learned avoidance (i.e. punishment-learning) because they signal future, upcoming pain. Stimuli associated with pain offset in turn signal relief and later on support learned approach (i.e. relief-learning). The relative strengths of such punishment- and relief-learning can be crucial for the adaptive organization of behaviour in the aftermath of painful events. Using Drosophila, we compare punishment- and relief-memories in terms of their temporal decay and sensitivity to retrograde amnesia. During the first 75 min following training, relief-memory is stable, whereas punishment-memory decays to half of the initial score. By 24 h after training, however, relief-memory is lost, whereas a third of punishment-memory scores still remain. In accordance with such rapid temporal decay from 75 min on, retrograde amnesia erases relief-memory but leaves a half of punishment-memory scores intact. These findings suggest differential mechanistic bases for punishment- and relief-memory, thus offering possibilities for separately interfering with either of them. PMID:23658002

  8. Synchronization of Coupled Neurons Controlled by a Pacemaker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Mei-Sheng; ZHANG Hong-Hui; ZHAO Yong; SHI Xia

    2011-01-01

    We investigate synchronization of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with gap junctions under the control of a pacemaker. In a ring Hindmarsh-Rose neuronal network, the coupled neurons with the pacemaker can occur in synchronization more easily than those without the pacemaker. Furthermore, the pacemaker can induce phase synchronization or nearly-complete synchronization of nonidentical neurons. This synchronization can occur more easily when time delay is considered. Theses results can be helpful to understand the activities of the real neuronal system.

  9. Oscillatorylike behavior in feedforward neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payeur, Alexandre; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate how rhythmic activity can arise in neural networks from feedforward rather than recurrent circuitry and, in so doing, we provide a mechanism capable of explaining the temporal decorrelation of γ -band oscillations. We compare the spiking activity of a delayed recurrent network of inhibitory neurons with that of a feedforward network with the same neural properties and axonal delays. Paradoxically, these very different connectivities can yield very similar spike-train statistics in response to correlated input. This happens when neurons are noisy and axonal delays are short. A Taylor expansion of the feedback network's susceptibility—or frequency-dependent gain function—can then be stopped at first order to a good approximation, thus matching the feedforward net's susceptibility. The feedback network is known to display oscillations; these oscillations imply that the spiking activity of the population is felt by all neurons within the network, leading to direct spike correlations in a given neuron. On the other hand, in the output layer of the feedforward net, the interaction between the external drive and the delayed feedforward projection of this drive by the input layer causes indirect spike correlations: spikes fired by a given output layer neuron are correlated only through the activity of the input layer neurons. High noise and short delays partially bridge the gap between these two types of correlation, yielding similar spike-train statistics for both networks. This similarity is even stronger when the delay is distributed, as confirmed by linear response theory.

  10. Route learning in amnesia: a comparison of trial-and-error and errorless learning in patients with the Korsakoff syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, R.P.C.; Loon, E. van; Wester, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the errorless learning approach using a procedural memory task (i.e. learning of actual routes) in patients with amnesia, as compared to trial-and-error learning. DESIGN: Counterbalanced self-controlled cases series. SETTING: Psychiatric hospital (Korsakoff clinic). SUBJECTS: A

  11. Conditional discrimination and reversal in amnesia subsequent to hypoxic brain injury or anterior communicating artery aneurysm rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, C.E.; DeLuca, J.; Hopkins, R.O.; Gluck, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Human anterograde amnesia can develop following bilateral damage to the hippocampus and medial temporal lobes, as in hypoxic brain injury, or following damage to the basal forebrain, as following anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysm rupture. In both cases, the mnestic deficit may be similar when assessed by standard neuropsychological measures. However, animal and computational models suggest that there are qualitative differences in the pattern of impaired and spared memory abilities following damage to hippocampus versus basal forebrain. Here, we show such a dissociation in human amnesia using a single two-stage task, involving conditional discrimination and reversal. Consistent with a prior study, 10 individuals with anterograde amnesia subsequent to hypoxic brain injury were spared on acquisition but impaired at reversal. However, 10 individuals with amnesia subsequent to ACoA aneurysm showed the opposite pattern of impaired acquisition but spared reversal. The differences between groups cannot be easily ascribed to severity of mnestic or cognitive deficit, since the two amnesic groups performed similarly on neuropsychological tests of memory, intelligence and attention. The results illustrate qualitative differences in memory impairments in hypoxic and ACoA amnesics and highlight the importance of considering etiology in evaluating mnemonic deficits in amnesic populations. PMID:15885718

  12. Can postictal suppression of the perforant path - fascia dentata responses account for the ECS-induced anterograde amnesia in rats?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peréz-Saad, H; Valousková, V; Bures, J

    1984-07-15

    Electroconvulsive shock (ECS) decreases fascia dentata responses to entorhinal stimulation by 50% in unanesthetized rats. Synaptic potentials and population spikes return to pre-ECS level during 1 h and 3 h, respectively. This recovery rate is compared with the dynamics of ECS-induced anterograde amnesia.

  13. Phenotypic checkpoints regulate neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    Nervous system development proceeds by sequential gene expression mediated by cascades of transcription factors in parallel with sequences of patterned network activity driven by receptors and ion channels. These sequences are cell type- and developmental stage-dependent and modulated by paracrine actions of substances released by neurons and glia. How and to what extent these sequences interact to enable neuronal network development is not understood. Recent evidence demonstrates that CNS development requires intermediate stages of differentiation providing functional feedback that influences gene expression. We suggest that embryonic neuronal functions constitute a series of phenotypic checkpoint signatures; neurons failing to express these functions are delayed or developmentally arrested. Such checkpoints are likely to be a general feature of neuronal development and constitute presymptomatic signatures of neurological disorders when they go awry.

  14. Measuring information-transfer delays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wibral

    Full Text Available In complex networks such as gene networks, traffic systems or brain circuits it is important to understand how long it takes for the different parts of the network to effectively influence one another. In the brain, for example, axonal delays between brain areas can amount to several tens of milliseconds, adding an intrinsic component to any timing-based processing of information. Inferring neural interaction delays is thus needed to interpret the information transfer revealed by any analysis of directed interactions across brain structures. However, a robust estimation of interaction delays from neural activity faces several challenges if modeling assumptions on interaction mechanisms are wrong or cannot be made. Here, we propose a robust estimator for neuronal interaction delays rooted in an information-theoretic framework, which allows a model-free exploration of interactions. In particular, we extend transfer entropy to account for delayed source-target interactions, while crucially retaining the conditioning on the embedded target state at the immediately previous time step. We prove that this particular extension is indeed guaranteed to identify interaction delays between two coupled systems and is the only relevant option in keeping with Wiener's principle of causality. We demonstrate the performance of our approach in detecting interaction delays on finite data by numerical simulations of stochastic and deterministic processes, as well as on local field potential recordings. We also show the ability of the extended transfer entropy to detect the presence of multiple delays, as well as feedback loops. While evaluated on neuroscience data, we expect the estimator to be useful in other fields dealing with network dynamics.

  15. Activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the ventral hippocampus improved stress-induced amnesia in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadmirzaei, Negin; Rezayof, Ameneh; Ghasemzadeh, Zahra

    2016-09-01

    The ventral hippocampus (VH) has a high distribution of cannabinoid CB1 receptors which are important in modulating stress responses. Stress exposure activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) which can impact hippocampal formation to change hippocampus-based memories. The purpose of the present study was to determine the possible role of the VH cannabinoid CB1 receptors in stress-induced amnesia using a step-through passive avoidance procedure in male Wistar rats. In order to induce acute stress, the animals were placed on an elevated platform for different time periods (10, 20 and 30min). Our results indicated that post-training 20 and 30min exposure to stress, but not 10min, induced amnesia. Post-training microinjection of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, arachydonilcyclopropylamide (ACPA; 2.5-7.5ng/rat) into the VH (intra-VH) induced amnesia. Interestingly, post-training intra-VH microinjection of the same doses of ACPA improved stress-induced amnesia. On the other hand, post-training intra-VH microinjection of a selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM-251 (20-50ng/rat) with exposure to an ineffective stress (10min) potentiated the effect of stress on memory consolidation and induced amnesia. It should be noted that post-training intra-VH microinjection of the same doses of AM-251 alone had no effect on memory consolidation. Our results revealed that post-training intra-VH microinjection of AM-251, prior to ACPA microinjection, inhibited the reversal effect of ACPA on acute elevated platform stress. Taken together, it can be concluded that exposure to post-training inescapable stress impaired memory consolidation. The impairing effects of stress on memory retrieval may be mediated by the VH cannabinoid CB1 receptors.

  16. Large cerebral perfusion defects observed in brain perfusion SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Young; Kim, Hahn Young; Roh, Hong Gee; Han, Seol Heui [Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a memory disorder characterized by an episode of antegrade amnesia and bewilderment which persists for several hours. We analyzed brain perfusion SPECT findings and clinical outcome of patients who suffered from TGA. From September 2005 to August 2007, 12 patients underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT for neuroimaging of TGA. All patients also underwent MRI and MRA including DWI (MRI). Among them, 10 patients who could be chased more than 6 months were included in this study. Their average age was 60.74.0 yrs (M: F = 2: 8) and the average duration of amnesia was 4.42.2 hrs (1 hr {approx} 7 hrs). Duration from episode of amnesia to SPECT was 4.32.4 days (1{approx}9 days). Precipitating factors could be identified in 6 patients: emotional stress 3, hair dyeing 1, taking a nap 1 and angioplasty 1. SPECT and MRI was visually assessed, No cerebral perfusion defect was observed on SPECT in 3 patients and their clinical outcome was all good. Among 7 patients who had cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT, 3 patients had good clinical outcome, while others did not: one had hypercholesterolemia, another had depression, and 2 patients with cerebral perfusion defects at both temporoparetal cortex was later diagnosed as early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). MRI was negative in 6 patients and 3 of them had excellent clinical outcome while other 3 were diagnosed as hypercholesterolemia, early AD and MCI. Among 4 patients with positive MRI, 3 showed good clinical outcome and their MRI showed lesions at medial temporal cortex and/or vertebral artery. One patient with microcalcification at left putamen was diagnosed to have depression. Large cerebral perfusion defects on SPECT may herald psychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases of transient global amnesia patients which usually shows negative MRI.

  17. Midazolam sedation to produce complete amnesia for bronchoscopy: 2 years' experience at a district general hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T J; Bowie, P E

    1999-05-01

    Patients may find bronchoscopy without sedation unpleasant. There is some evidence that patient satisfaction correlates with amnesia for the procedure. For several years we have used doses of midazolam sufficient to put patients lightly asleep hoping to produce complete amnesia. We looked at practical aspects of this technique over a 2-year period. We studied 337 consecutive patients. They were 219 men and 118 women of mean age 63 +/- 12.4 (SD). Sixty-seven patients were aged 75 years or over and the eldest was 86. Sixty-three patients were already hospital inpatients but the remainder were seen as day cases. Midazolam was given by slow i.v. injection over several minutes until the patient was judged to be lightly asleep. Patients were given supplemental oxygen (3 l min-1) and monitored by ECG and pulse oximetry. A note was made of the time at which they awakened, defined as when nursing staff felt the patients were awake enough to have a cup of tea and toast. Patients were asked if they had any memory of the procedure both on awakening and when seen a few days later to discuss the results. The procedures were carried out in a well-staffed Day Case Unit with a recovery area. The mean dose of midazolam used was 10.8 mg (mean +/- SD = 0.16 +/- 0.095 mg kg-1). The midazolam was given over a median of 4 min (range 1-15 min). Patients took 59 +/- 45 min (mean +/- SD) to wake up. Twenty-eight patients were given flumazanil to reverse the sedation (11 for concern over bleeding following biopsies, three for desaturation during and three after procedure, four as they were frail, two as they were restless, two as they were hypotensive after procedure and three for miscellaneous reasons). Only nine patients could remember any part of the procedure. Incremental doses of midazolam given slowly until patients are lightly asleep almost invariably produce complete amnesia for bronchoscopy. This is a safe technique but patients need careful monitoring and may require reversal of

  18. Ginkgolides protects cultured cortical neurons against excitotoxic and oxidative insults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYu-Yang; YUQing-Hai; YOUSong; SHENGLi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The neurotoxicity of glutamate is associated with neurological disorders including hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Studies using cultured cortical neurons have demonstrated that exposure to glutamate produced delayed degeneration of mature neurons. Oxygen free radicals generated during injury have been postulated to be a major cause of neuronal cell

  19. Anterograde amnesia as a possible postoperative complication of Midazolam as an agent for intravenous conscious sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F; Nikchevich, D; Block, J

    1988-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia is often considered to be a beneficial effect of intravenous conscious sedation. The recently introduced benzodiazepine, midazolam, has associated with its administration a significant anterograde amnesic period. In the case presented here, a healthy young female presented for third molar extraction under midazolam conscious sedation and local anesthesia. After uncomplicated removal of the teeth and clinically adequate recovery from sedation, it was noted that the patient had swallowed the postsurgical gauze packs. Efforts at recovery of the gauze packs were futile. Follow-up discussion with the patient revealed a complete lack of recall of all events occurring for up to an hour or more after the administration of intravenous midazolam. The need for written and oral postoperative instructions to both the patient and his/her escort is emphasized.

  20. Naïve Beliefs About the Natural World in a Case of Childhood Onset Amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Winter

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The individual profiled here (M.S. suffered an episode of severe oxygen deprivation (anoxia at the age of eight, damaging memory relevant structures in the mid-temporal lobes, including the hippocampus bilaterally. The resulting anterograde amnesia was characterized by profound deficits in autobiographical memory, but also a compromised ability to acquire new facts and information (semantic memory, resulting in the formation of idiosyncratic and naïve beliefs about the natural world that have persisted into his adult years. This article presents an interview with M.S. in which many of these idiosyncratic beliefs are detailed, and argues that they can be broadly viewed as the interaction of; 1 intact frontal lobe functioning that supports the application of rational analysis to his lived experience, and 2 an impoverished factual knowledge base upon which to construct sophisticated and evidence-based models of his lived experience and of natural world processes.

  1. Unexpected anterograde amnesia associated with Buscopan used as a predmedication for endocscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It has been known that peripheral adverse event is caused by peripheral antimuscarinic action, from hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan; Boehringer Ingelheim, Germany)used as a premedication for endoscopy. However,symptoms or signs associated with the central nervous system are rarely reported in the field of anesthesiology and peripartum labor. This central anticholinergic syndrome is likely caused by blockade of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the central nervous system. There is no report on Buscopan-induced central anticholinergic syndrome in endoscopy room so far. Three middle-aged females unexpectedly suffered from anterograde amnesia after intramuscular injection of hyoscine butylbromide as an antispasmodic premedication for endoscopy at our endoscopy unit in the Health Promotion Center.

  2. The elusive engram: what can infantile amnesia tell us about memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Bridget L; Li, Stella; Richardson, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Revealing the engram is one of the greatest challenges in neuroscience. Many researchers focus on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the formation and maintenance of the engram, but an underutilized approach has been to investigate analogous processes associated with forgetting. Infant rodents present an ideal model for this purpose because they display a rapid form of non-pathological forgetting known as infantile amnesia (IA). Despite the widespread importance of this interesting phenomenon, the study of the neural bases of IA has remained largely neglected. Here, we consider what IA can tell us about memory. We argue that to understand the mechanisms underlying the engram we must also gain an appreciation of the mechanisms that drive forgetting.

  3. Transient Global Amnesia Associated with an Acute Infarction at the Cingulate Gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Gallardo-Tur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transient global amnesia (TGA is a syndrome of sudden, unexplained isolated short-term memory loss. In the majority of TGA cases, no causes can be identified and neuroimaging, CSF studies and EEG are usually normal. We present a patient with TGA associated with a small acute infarct at the cingulate gyrus. Case Report. The patient, a 62 year-old man, developed two episodes of TGA. He had hypertension and hypercholesterolemia. He was found to have an acute ischemic stroke of small size (15 mm of maximal diameter at the right cerebral cingulate gyrus diagnosed on brain magnetic resonance imaging. No lesions involving other limbic system structures such as thalamus, fornix, corpus callosum, or hippocampal structures were seen. The remainder of the examination was normal. Conclusion. Unilateral ischemic lesions of limbic system structures may result in TGA. We must bear in mind that TGA can be an associated clinical disorder of cingulate gyrus infarct.

  4. Anterograde Amnesia as a Possible Postoperative Complication of Midazolam as an Agent for Intravenous Conscious Sedation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F.; Nikchevich, Donald; Block, James

    1988-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia is often considered to be a beneficial effect of intravenous conscious sedation. The recently introduced benzodiazepine, midazolam, has associated with its administration a significant anterograde amnesic period. In the case presented here, a healthy young female presented for third molar extraction under midazolam conscious sedation and local anesthesia. After uncomplicated removal of the teeth and clinically adequate recovery from sedation, it was noted that the patient had swallowed the postsurgical gauze packs. Efforts at recovery of the gauze packs were futile. Follow-up discussion with the patient revealed a complete lack of recall of all events occurring for up to an hour or more after the administration of intravenous midazolam. The need for written and oral postoperative instructions to both the patient and his/her escort is emphasized. PMID:3166354

  5. Posthypnotic amnesia for material learned before or during hypnosis: explicit and implicit memory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnier, A J; Bryant, R A; Briscoe, S

    2001-10-01

    This article focuses on dissociations between explicit and implicit expressions of memory during posthypnotic amnesia (PHA). Despite evidence of such dissociations, experimental design in this area has not always been consistent with contemporary memory research. Within a paradigm that aimed for conceptual and methodological clarity, we presented 40 high and 38 low hypnotizable individuals with a word list either before or during hypnosis, gave them a PHA suggestion for the word list, and tested them on explicit and implicit memory tasks. In the absence of conscious recollection, highs showed equivalent levels of priming (perceptual and semantic) to lows. However, when analysis focused only on those highs who remained amnesic after the implicit memory tasks, we confirmed perceptual, but not semantic, priming. These findings highlight the impact of methodological choices on theoretical interpretations of memory performance following a suggestion for PHA.

  6. Value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in the acute phase of transient global amnesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Förster

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a transitory, short-lasting neurological disorder characterized by a sudden onset of antero- and retrograde amnesia. Perfusion abnormalities in TGA have been evaluated mainly by use of positron emission tomography (PET or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. In the present study we explore the value of dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI in TGA in the acute phase.From a MRI report database we identified TGA patients who underwent MRI including PWI in the acute phase and compared these to control subjects. Quantitative perfusion maps (cerebral blood flow (CBF and volume (CBV were generated and analyzed by use of Signal Processing In NMR-Software (SPIN. CBF and CBV values in subcortical brain regions were assessed by use of VOI created in FIRST, a model-based segmentation tool in the Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB Software Library (FSL.Five TGA patients were included (2 men, 3 women. On PWI, no relevant perfusion alterations were found by visual inspection in TGA patients. Group comparisons for possible differences between TGA patients and control subjects showed significant lower rCBF values bilaterally in the hippocampus, in the left thalamus and globus pallidus as well as bilaterally in the putamen and the left caudate nucleus. Correspondingly, significant lower rCBV values were observed bilaterally in the hippocampus and the putamen as well as in the left caudate nucleus. Group comparisons for possible side differences in rCBF and rCBV values in TGA patients revealed a significant lower rCBV value in the left caudate nucleus.Mere visual inspection of PWI is not sufficient for the assessment of perfusion changes in TGA in the acute phase. Group comparisons with healthy control subjects might be useful to detect subtle perfusion changes on PWI in TGA patients. However, this should be confirmed in larger data sets and serial PWI

  7. Stress-related factors in the emergence of transient global amnesia with hippocampal lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane eDöhring

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The transient global amnesia (TGA is a rare amnesic syndrome that is characterized by an acute onset episode of an anterograde and retrograde amnesia. Its origin is still debated, but there is evidence for psychological factors involved in TGA. In neuroimaging, selective lesions in the CA1 fields of the hippocampus can be detected, a region that is particularly involved in the processing of memory, stress and emotion. The aim of this study was to assess the role of psychological stress in TGA by studying the prevalence of stress related precipitating events and individual stress-related personality profiles as well as coping strategies in patients. The hypothesis of a functional differentiation of the hippocampus in mnemonic and stress-related compartments was also evaluated. From all 113 patients, 18 % (n= 24 patients experienced emotional and psychological stress episodes directly before the TGA. In a cohort of 21 acute patients, TGA patients tend to cope with stress less efficiently and less constructively than controls. Patients who experienced a stress related precipitant event exhibited a higher level of anxiety in comparison to non-stress patients and controls. However, there was no difference between the general experience of stress and the number of stress inducing life events. The majority of patients (73% did show typical MRI lesions in the CA1 region of the hippocampal cornu ammonis. There was no clear association between stressful events, distribution of hippocampal CA1 lesions and behavioral patterns during the TGA. Disadvantageous coping strategies and an elevated anxiety level may increase the susceptibility to psychological stress which may facilitate the pathophysiological cascade in TGA. The findings suggest a role of emotional stress factors in the manifestation of TGA in a subgroup of patients. Stress may be one trigger involved in the emergence of transient lesions in the hippocampal CA1 region, which are thought to be the

  8. Delayed childbearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, H H

    1985-06-01

    In many Western nations, including England and Wales, Sweden, and the US, there is a current trend towards delayed childbearing because of women's pursuit of a career, later marriage, a longer interval between marriage and the 1st birth, and the increasing number of divorcees having children in a 2nd marriage. Wives of men in social classes I and II in England and Wales are, on average, having their 1st child at 27.9 years, 1.6 years later than in 1973, and in social classes IV and V, 1.0 years later than in 1973, at a mean age of 23.7 years. Consequently, the total period fertility rate for British women aged 30-34 years, 35-39 years, and 40 and over increased by 4%, 2%, and 4%, respectively, between 1982-83, in contrast to reductions of 2% and 3%, respectively, in the 15-19 year and 20-24 year age groups, with the 25-29-year-olds remaining static. The average maternal mortality for all parties in England and Wales during 1976-78 was 106/million for adolescents, 70.4/million for 20-24 year-olds, and 1162/million for those aged 40 years and older. The specific obstetric and allied conditions which increase with age are the hypertensive diseases of pregnancy, hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, abortion, cardiac disease, caesarean section, ruptured uterus, and amniotic fluid embolism. The Swedish Medical Birth Registry of all live births and perinatal deaths since 1973 has shown that the risk of late fetal death is significantly greater in women aged 30-39 years than in those of the same parity and gravidity aged 20-24 years. The risk of giving birth to low birth weight babies preterm and at term and of premature labor are similarly increased. The early neonatal death rate also was increased for primigravidas and nulliparas in the 30-39 year age group but not in parous women. This is, in part, due to the rise in incidence of fetal abnormalities with advancing maternal age because of chromosomal and nonchromosomal anomalies. These also appear to be the cause of the

  9. Regenerative memory in time-delayed neuromorphic photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Romeira, B; Figueiredo, José M L; Barland, S; Javaloyes, J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a regenerative memory based upon a time-delayed neuromorphic photonic oscillator and discuss the link with temporal localized structures. Our experimental implementation is based upon a optoelectronic system composed of a nanoscale nonlinear resonant tunneling diode coupled to a laser that we link to the paradigm of neuronal activity, the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with delayed feedback.

  10. Global asymptotic stability of cellular neural networks with multiple delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Global asymptotic stability (GAS) is discussed for cellular neural networks (CNN) with multiple time delays. Several criteria are proposed to ascertain the uniqueness and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point for the CNN with delays. These criteria can eliminate the difference between the neuronal excitatory and inhibitory effects. Two examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the criteria.

  11. Taming desynchronized bursting with delays in the Macaque cortical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qing-Yun; Murks Aleksandra; Perc Matja(z); Lu Qi-Shao

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory coupled bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons are considered as constitutive units of the Macaque cortical network. In the absence of information transmission delay the bursting activity is desynchronized, giving rise to spatiotemporally disordered dynamics. This paper shows that the introduction of finite delays can lead to the synchroization of bursting and thus to the emergence of coherent propagating fronts of excitation in the space-time domain.Moreover, it shows that the type of synchronous bursting is uniquely determined by the delay length, with the transitions from one type to the other occurring in a step-like manner depending on the delay. Interestingly, as the delay is tuned close to the transition points, the synchronization deteriorates, which implies the coexistence of different bursting attractors. These phenomena can be observed be different but fixed coupling strengths, thus indicating a new role for information transmission delays in realistic neuronal networks.

  12. Time-course of 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression during memory consolidation and amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Rivas, A; Pérez-García, G; González-Espinosa, C; Meneses, A

    2010-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that antagonists of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptor(6) (5-HT(6)) improve memory and reverse amnesia although the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Hence, in this paper RT-PCR was used to evaluate changes in mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor in trained and untrained rats treated with the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885 and amnesic drugs scopolamine or dizocilpine. Changes in mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor were investigated at different times in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Data indicated that memory in the Pavlovian/instrumental autoshaping task was a progressive process associated to reduced mRNA expression of 5-HT(6) receptor in the three structures examined. SB-399885 improved long-term memory at 48h, while the muscarinic receptor antagonist scopolamine or the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine impaired it at 24h. Autoshaping training and treatment with SB-399885 increased 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression in (maximum increase) prefrontal cortex and striatum, 24 or 48h. The scopolamine-induced amnesia suppressed 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression while the dizocilpine-induced amnesia did not modify 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression. SB-399885 and scopolamine or dizocilpine were able to reestablish memory and 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression. These data confirmed previous memory evidence and of more interest is the observation that training, SB-399885 and amnesic drugs modulated 5-HT(6) receptor mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Further investigation in different memory tasks, times and amnesia models together with more complex control groups might provide further clues.

  13. Dissociative amnesia in dissociative disorders and borderline personality disorder: self-rating assessment in a college population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sar, Vedat; Alioğlu, Firdevs; Akyuz, Gamze; Karabulut, Sercan

    2014-01-01

    Dissociative amnesia (DA) among subjects with a dissociative disorder and/or borderline personality disorder (BPD) recruited from a nonclinical population was examined. The Steinberg Dissociative Amnesia Questionnaire (SDAQ), the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and the self-report screening tool of the BPD section of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV(SCID-BPD) were administered to 1,301 college students. A total of 80 participants who were diagnosed with BPD according to the clinician-administered SCID-BPD and 111 nonborderline controls were evaluated using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D) by a psychiatrist blind to diagnosis and scale scores. Internal consistency analyses and test-retest evaluations suggested that the SDAQ is a reliable instrument for the population studied. Of the participants, 20.6% reported an SDAQ score of 20 or above and impairment by DA. Those who had both dissociative disorder and BPD (n = 78) had the highest SDAQ scores. Both disorders had significant effects on the SCID-D total and amnesia scores in the variance analysis. On SDAQ scores, however, only BPD had this effect. There was a significant interaction between the 2 disorders for the SCID-D total but not for the SDAQ or SCID-D amnesia scores. BPD represented the severity of dissociation and childhood trauma in this study group. However, in contrast to the dissociative disorders, BPD was characterized by better awareness of DA in self-report. The discrepancies between self-report and clinical interview associated with BPD and dissociative disorders are discussed in the context of betrayal theory (J. J. Freyd, 1994) of BPD and perceptual theory (D. B. Beere, 2009) of dissociative disorders.

  14. A Case of Persistent Generalized Retrograde Autobiographical Amnesia Subsequent to the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Odagaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional retrograde autobiographical amnesia is often associated with physical and/or psychological trauma. On 11 March 2011, the largest earthquake on record in Japan took place, and subsequent huge tsunami devastated the Pacific coast of northern Japan. This case report describes a patient suffering from retrograde episodic-autobiographical amnesia for whole life, persisting for even more than five years after the disaster. A Japanese man, presumably in his 40s, got police protection in April 2016 but was unable to respond to question about his own name. He lost all information about his personal identity, and his memory was wholly lost until the disaster on 11 March 2011. He was able to recall his life after the disaster, and semantic memories and social abilities were largely preserved. A medical examination performed on 1 November 2016 verified that he was awake, alert, and oriented to time, place, and person (except for himself. General physical and neurological examinations revealed no pathological findings. He also experienced some symptoms associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, such as intrusive thoughts, flashbacks, and nightmares. No abnormalities were detected by biochemical test and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Physicians and other professionals who take care of victims of disaster should be aware of dissociative spectrum disorders, such as psychogenic amnesia.

  15. Transient global amnesia as a revealing sign of giant transtentorial meningioma: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, Eduard B; Carron, Romain; Gay, Emmanuel

    2011-06-01

    Since 1974, only 14 papers in MEDLINE-indexed journals have linked transient global amnesia (TGA) to a brain tumor. Among these, two described the entity of transient epileptic amnesia (TEA), whereas most reports lacked the functional investigations that might differentiate the two conditions. Only six cases have linked TGA or TEA to a meningioma, and none of them were transtentorial. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman who presented with one episode of TGA as a sole symptom of a giant transtentorial meningioma in the right hemisphere. A sudden attack of TGA with a rather typical clinical presentation--anterograde amnesia with selective retrograde features that lasted for a few hours, with stereotypic questions, no associated symptoms or neurological impairment, and no recurrence--occurred while she was at home; this was witnessed by her husband. The neurological examination was unremarkable, with the exception of a slight left homonymous superior quadrantonopia. Brain imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) showed a huge meningioma originating from the right tentorium, extending from the cerebellar hemisphere to the midst of the temporal lobe. An electroencephalogram did not reveal temporal spikes. The tumor was completely excised, and she has remained asymptomatic for 6 months. Although TGA is generally a functional entity, without an organic substrate to prompt surgical sanction, a full investigation may be warranted to rule out the possibility of a silent intracranial tumor.

  16. A Case of Persistent Generalized Retrograde Autobiographical Amnesia Subsequent to the Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Functional retrograde autobiographical amnesia is often associated with physical and/or psychological trauma. On 11 March 2011, the largest earthquake on record in Japan took place, and subsequent huge tsunami devastated the Pacific coast of northern Japan. This case report describes a patient suffering from retrograde episodic-autobiographical amnesia for whole life, persisting for even more than five years after the disaster. A Japanese man, presumably in his 40s, got police protection in April 2016 but was unable to respond to question about his own name. He lost all information about his personal identity, and his memory was wholly lost until the disaster on 11 March 2011. He was able to recall his life after the disaster, and semantic memories and social abilities were largely preserved. A medical examination performed on 1 November 2016 verified that he was awake, alert, and oriented to time, place, and person (except for himself). General physical and neurological examinations revealed no pathological findings. He also experienced some symptoms associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), such as intrusive thoughts, flashbacks, and nightmares. No abnormalities were detected by biochemical test and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Physicians and other professionals who take care of victims of disaster should be aware of dissociative spectrum disorders, such as psychogenic amnesia.

  17. Mirror neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal...

  18. Delay-slope-dependent stability results of recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Zheng, Wei Xing; Lin, Chong

    2011-12-01

    By using the fact that the neuron activation functions are sector bounded and nondecreasing, this brief presents a new method, named the delay-slope-dependent method, for stability analysis of a class of recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays. This method includes more information on the slope of neuron activation functions and fewer matrix variables in the constructed Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional. Then some improved delay-dependent stability criteria with less computational burden and conservatism are obtained. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and the benefits of the proposed method.

  19. Bis(7)-tacrine/tacrine对大鼠DRG神经元延时整流钾通道电流的调制作用%Inhibitory effect of Bis(7)-tacrine/tacrine on delayed rectified potassium currents in rat DRG neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李享元; 李之望

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究乙酰胆碱酯酶抑制剂bis(7)-tacrine/tacrine[bis(7)-tetrahydroaminacrine]对大鼠DRG神经元的延时整流钾通道电流的调制作用.方法 在急性分离的DRG神经元标本上,采用全细胞膜片钳技术记录钾通道电流,研究bis(7)-tacrine/tacrine对DRG神经元延时整流钾通道电流的影响和作用.结果 bis(7)-tacrine对延迟整流钾通道电流IDR具有浓度依赖性的抑制作用,其半量效浓度为(IC50)(0.72±0.05)μmol*L-1,而tacrine抑制的半量效浓度(IC50)(58.3±3.7)μmol*L-1.结论 两种药物对DRG延时整流钾通道电流有浓度依赖性的抑制作用,bis(7)-tacrine的抑制强度高一个数量级,有利于抑制神经元的钾通道过于激活和兴奋,预防胞内钾离子过度丢失而引起的神经元凋亡,起到神经保护的作用.%Aim To investigate modulatory effect of bis ( 7 )-tacrine [ bis ( 7 )-tetrahydroaminacrine ], a novel dimeric AChE inhibitor, on rat DRG delayed rectified potassium channels. Methods Experiments were per -formed on neurons acutely isolated from rat dorsal root ganglion ( DRG ) potassium channels, and the delayed rectified currents ( IDR ) were recorded with whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results IDR were inhibited by bis( 7 )-tacrine, which were much more potent ( IC50 = 0. 72 ±0. 05 μmol · L-1 for IDR ) than those by tacrine ( IC50 =58. 3 ± 3. 7 μmol · L-1 for IDR ). bis( 7 )-tac-rine ( 1 μmol · L-1 ) shifts steady state activation curve and inactivation curve of IDR to the hyperpolar-izing direction. Conclusions The inhibitory effect of bis( 7 )-tacrine on IDR may be attributed to reduction of potential ranges of steady state activation and inactivation and delay of decay phase. Drugs may prevent loss of potassium ions and excitory toxicosis for neuron, and may be neuroprotective in A. D treatment.

  20. Magic memories: young children's verbal recall after a 6-year delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Fiona; Simcock, Gabrielle; Hayne, Harlene

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the first prospective study specifically designed to assess children's verbal memory for a unique event 6 years after it occurred. Forty-six 27- to 51-month-old children took part in a unique event and were interviewed about it twice, after 24-hr and 6-year delays. During the 6-year interview, 9 children verbally recalled the event, including 2 who were under 3 years old when the event occurred. This may be the most convincing evidence to date that such early experiences can be verbally recalled after long delays. These data have important implications for current theories of memory development and childhood amnesia and underscore some of the problems associated with evaluating the veracity of early memories under less controlled conditions. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  1. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal network motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, F. S.; Gollo, L. L.; Carelli, P. V.; Copelli, M.; Mirasso, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Two identical dynamical systems coupled unidirectionally (in a so called master-slave configuration) exhibit anticipated synchronization (AS) if the one which receives the coupling (the slave) also receives a negative delayed self-feedback. In oscillatory neuronal systems AS is characterized by a phase-locking with negative time delay τ between the spikes of the master and of the slave (slave fires before the master), while in the usual delayed synchronization (DS) regime τ is positive (slave fires after the master). A 3-neuron motif in which the slave self-feedback is replaced by a feedback loop mediated by an interneuron can exhibits both AS and DS regimes. Here we show that AS is robust in the presence of noise in a 3 Hodgkin-Huxley type neuronal motif. We also show that AS is stable for large values of τ in a chain of connected slaves-interneurons.

  2. ANTIAMNESIC POTENTIAL OF SOLASODINE AGAINST β-AMYLOID PROTEIN INDUCED AMNESIA IN MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai Alpesh B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common form of dementia in the elderly population, is characterized by an insidious onset with memory impairment and an inexorable progression of cognitive decline. Nootropic agents are a heterogeneous groups of drugs developed for use in dementia and other cerebral disorders. Nootropics agents are being primarily used to improve memory, mood and behavior. However, the resulting adverse effects associated with these agents have limited their use. Therefore, it is worthwhile to explore the utility of traditional medicines for the treatment of various cognitive disorders. The present study was undertaken to assess the potential of solasodine on β-amyloid induced amnesia in mice. Elevated plus maze (EPM and Morris water maze (MWM was employed to evaluate learning and memory parameters. Piracetam was used as the standard drug. Solasodine (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, p.o. was screened for claimed potential in mice. Solasodine improved both short term memory and long term memory when assessed on Elevated pluz maze and Morris Water maze respectively. Hence, solasodine might prove to be a useful memory restorative agent in the treatment of dementia seen in the Alzheimer’s disease.

  3. APOE genotype and verbal memory recovery during and after emergence from post-traumatic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, E; Ferri, J; Colomer, C; Moliner, B; Chirivella, J

    2010-01-01

    To determine if APOE genotype is linked to memory function after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Eighty-two patients in post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) and 107 patients who had emerged from PTA were selected from 239 consecutive patients admitted to the facility. Verbal memory assessments, including the Spanish version of the California Verbal Learning Test and the Working-Memory Index of the WAIS-III, were conducted immediately after PTA resolution or during the first week after admission for patients who were out of PTA. Both groups were reassessed 6 months after inclusion in a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. Patients with the APOE-epsilon 4 allele (n = 17 in the PTA group and n = 9 in the out of PTA group) entered rehabilitation at a more impaired level, but made remarkable progress during follow-up. Fifty-five patients from the initial sample emerged from PTA during the follow-up period. Age, GOAT at admission and chronicity, but not APOE genotype or initial trauma severity, were significant predictors of emergence from PTA. APOE genotype seems to be associated with the trajectory of cognitive recovery after TBI, but does not play a determinant role in the efficacy of memory rehabilitation in this population.

  4. Long-term spacing effect benefits in developmental amnesia: case experiments in rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet L; Weston, Tina; Wiseheart, Melody; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2014-09-01

    The spacing effect describes the typical finding that repeated items are remembered best when additional items are introduced between each repetition than when the repetitions occur in immediate succession. In this study, we investigated the nature and limits of the spacing effect in the developmental amnesic case H.C. In Experiment 1, we compared the performance of H.C. to that of controls on a short-term, free recall, verbal learning spacing paradigm while controlling for retention interval (timing of item review and recall). In Experiment 2, we compared the performance of H.C. to that of controls on a multiday, cued recall, verbal learning spacing paradigm, in which memory was assessed after 1 week. In both experiments, H.C. demonstrated a spacing effect comparable to the effect exhibited by controls. In Experiment 1, her final recall memory for long-lag (spaced) items was better than recall for no-lag (massed) items t(23) = 10.99, p memory for next-day-reviewed (spaced) items was better than cued recall for same-day-reviewed (massed) items, t(20) = 17.6, p memory development and is the first to show long-term benefits of spacing in amnesia. Substantially slower learning-to-criterion suggests an alternate mechanism supporting the spacing effect, perhaps independent of the hippocampus. Spacing should be considered as a candidate memory intervention technique given its effectiveness in both short- and long-term learning settings. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Natural sequence of recovery from child post-traumatic amnesia: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Rachel; Birse, Jason; Tate, Robyn; Brookes, Naomi; Epps, Adrienne; Lah, Suncica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the sequence of skills recovery during post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) in children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Fifty children aged 8 to 15 years consecutively admitted to a children's hospital with TBI and PTA>24 were tested in a retrospective cohort study where the main measure was the Westmead PTA Scale (WPTAS). The group analyses show that orientation to time took longer to recover than orientation to person and place, but not memory, while the individual analyses revealed that when orientation to time was grouped with memory, 94% of children recovered orientation to person and place before orientation to time and memory (examiner and pictures). Correlation coefficients between age and the number of days taken to recover skills were not found to be significant. It was established that, in terms of the natural sequence of skills recovery in children aged 8 to 15 years following moderate to severe TBI, recovery of orientation to time is more closely aligned to memory than to orientation to person and place. It was also established that WPTAS items are developmentally appropriate for children aged 8 to 15 years who have sustained TBI. These findings are clinically important because monitoring recovery from PTA both impacts the rehabilitation offered to individuals during acute care and aids discharge planning.

  6. Is there a positive bias in false recognition? Evidence from confabulating amnesia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkathiri, Nura H; Morris, Robin G; Kopelman, Michael D

    2015-10-01

    Although there is some evidence for a positive emotional bias in the content of confabulations in brain damaged patients, findings have been inconsistent. The present study used the semantic-associates procedure to induce false recall and false recognition in order to examine whether a positive bias would be found in confabulating amnesic patients, relative to non-confabulating amnesic patients and healthy controls. Lists of positive, negative and neutral words were presented in order to induce false recall or false recognition of non-presented (but semantically associated) words. The latter were termed 'critical intrusions'. Thirteen confabulating amnesic patients, 13 non-confabulating amnesic patients and 13 healthy controls were investigated. Confabulating patients falsely recognised a higher proportion of positive (but unrelated) words, compared with non-confabulating patients and healthy controls. No differences were found for recall memory. Signal detection analysis, however, indicated that the positive bias for false recognition memory might reflect weaker memory in the confabulating amnesic group. This suggested that amnesia patients with weaker memory are more likely to confabulate and the content of these confabulations are more likely to be positive.

  7. Suggesting a possible role of CA1 histaminergic system in harmane-induced amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasehi, Mohammad; Mashaghi, Elham; Khakpai, Fatemeh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2013-11-27

    A number of tremorogenic β-carboline alkaloids such as harmane are naturally present in the human food chain. They are derived from medicinal plants such as Peganum harmala that have been used as folk medicine in anticancer therapy. In the present study, effects of the histaminergic system of the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) on harmane-induced amnesia were examined. One-trial step-down was used to assess memory retention in adult male mice. The results showed that pre-training intra-CA1 administration of histamine (5μg/mouse), ranitidine (H2 receptor antagonist; at the doses of 0.25 and 0.5μg/mouse) and pyrilamine (H1 receptor antagonist; at the dose of 5μg/mouse) decreased memory formation. Pre-training intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of harmane (12mg/kg) also decreased memory formation. Moreover, pre-training intra-CA1 injection of a sub-threshold dose of histamine (2.5μg/mouse) could reverse harmane (12mg/kg, i.p.)-induced impairment of memory. On the other hand, pre-training intra-CA1 injection of sub-threshold doses of ranitidine (0.0625μg/mouse) and pyrilamine (2.5μg/mouse) increased harmane-induced impairment of memory. In conclusion, the present findings suggest the involvement of the CA1 histaminergic system in harmane-induced impairment of memory formation.

  8. Medial temporal and neocortical contributions to remote memory for semantic narratives: evidence from amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verfaellie, Mieke; Bousquet, Kathryn; Keane, Margaret M

    2014-08-01

    Studies of remote memory for semantic facts and concepts suggest that hippocampal lesions lead to a temporally graded impairment that extends no more than ten years prior to the onset of amnesia. Such findings have led to the notion that once consolidated, semantic memories are represented neocortically and are no longer dependent on the hippocampus. Here, we examined the fate of well-established semantic narratives following medial temporal lobe (MTL) lesions. Seven amnesic patients, five with lesions restricted to the MTL and two with lesions extending into lateral temporal cortex (MTL+), were asked to recount fairy tales and bible stories that they rated as familiar. Narratives were scored for number and type of details, number of main thematic elements, and order in which the main thematic elements were recounted. In comparison to controls, patients with MTL lesions produced fewer details, but the number and order of main thematic elements generated was intact. By contrast, patients with MTL+ lesions showed a pervasive impairment, affecting not only the generation of details, but also the generation and ordering of main steps. These findings challenge the notion that, once consolidated, semantic memories are no longer dependent on the hippocampus for retrieval. Possible hippocampal contributions to the retrieval of detailed semantic narratives are discussed.

  9. Exposure to hypomagnetic field space for multiple generations causes amnesia in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Lu, Huimin; Xi, Wang; Zhou, Xianju; Xu, Shiyu; Zhang, Ke; Jiang, Jinchang; Li, Yan; Guo, Aike

    2004-11-23

    This is the introduction of Drosophila into the study of learning and memory affected by removal of the geomagnetic field (GMF) for successive generations. Using the operant visual learning/memory paradigm at a flight simulator, the present study revealed that wild-type flies raised in a hypomagnetic field environment continuously for 10 successive generations were gradually impaired in visual conditioning learning and memory formation and finally the 10th generation flies became morphs of nonlearners and completely amnesiac. The control experiments show that the impairment could not be ascribed to any apparent sensorimotor problems in Drosophila. The reverse shift from hypomagnetic field (HMF) to natural GMF restored the GMF-free induced amnesia fully after six consecutive generations. Thus, our findings demonstrate conclusively that some serious, but reversible learning and memory impairment may occur for living organisms in a prolonged separation from GMF over many consecutive generations. And Drosophila has the potential to develop into a new model organism for the study of the neurobiology of magnetism for multiple generations.

  10. MEDIAL TEMPORAL LOBE CONTRIBUTIONS TO FUTURE THINKING: EVIDENCE FROM NEUROIMAGING AND AMNESIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verfaellie, Mieke; Race, Elizabeth; Keane, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Following early amnesic case reports, there is now considerable evidence suggesting a link between remembering the past and envisioning the future. This link is evident in the overlap in neural substrates as well as cognitive processes involved in both kinds of tasks. While constructing a future narrative requires multiple processes, neuroimaging and lesion data converge on a critical role for the medial temporal lobes (MTL) in retrieving and recombining details from memory in the service of novel simulations. Deficient detail retrieval and recombination may lead to impairments not only in episodic, but also in semantic prospection. MTL contributions to scene construction and mental time travel may further compound impairments in amnesia on tasks that pose additional demands on these processes, but are unlikely to form the core deficit underlying amnesics’ cross-domain future thinking impairment. Future studies exploring the role of episodic memory in other forms of self-projection or future-oriented behaviour may elucidate further the adaptive role of memory. PMID:23447709

  11. Language and cognitive communication during post-traumatic amnesia: A critical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Joanne; Ferguson, Alison; Spencer, Elizabeth; Togher, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    There is minimal speech pathology literature on communication presentation during post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) and the early recovery period after traumatic brain injury. While a body of research reports on other cognitive and behavioural functions during PTA, language and/or cognitive communication are not routinely the primary focus of current research literature. This critical synthesis provides an overview of research to date on communication during PTA to inform speech pathology assessment practice and to assist with information provision to the multidisciplinary team and family members. A search was conducted of studies reporting on language, cognition, and cognitive communication during the acute, inpatient and early recovery period after TBI. These were examined for relevance to speech pathology practice during PTA and acute confusional state. Historic and recent literature has described types of language and communication impairment during PTA and early recovery after TBI. Recently, aspects of communication impairment during PTA have been found relevant for outcome prediction. Few studies were found originating from speech pathology on communication during PTA. Communication disruption forms a key feature of PTA. Existing literature indicates that speech pathology monitoring of communication during PTA may be of benefit as part of multidisciplinary team management during early recovery.

  12. Prominent and persistent loss of past awareness in amnesia: delusion, impaired consciousness or coping strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Barbara A; Kopelman, Michael; Kapur, Narinder

    2008-01-01

    Profound loss of awareness for the past in amnesia has implications for our understanding of memory and belief systems, and how they may become disrupted in neurological conditions. We report the case of CW, a professional musician who became severely amnesic in 1985 following herpes simplex viral encephalitis (HSVE) at the age of 46 years. For many years CW stated several times a day that he had just woken up. He frequently wrote this in his diary too. When shown examples of his diary entries or videos of himself playing or conducting music, he recognised both his handwriting and himself on the video screen but stated vehemently that he "was not conscious then". In a previous paper (Wilson, Baddeley, & Kapur 1995), it was suggested that this lack of awareness for the past was a delusion, defined as a strongly held belief in the face of contradictory evidence (rather than implying any kind of psychiatric disorder per se). As a contribution to the academic debate regarding theories of "self", in the present paper we will review this explanation of CW's state as it had been in those early years, and we will also consider two other possibilities - namely, that CW had suffered from a loss of "autobiographical self" or "extended consciousness" (see Damasio, 2000, pp. 198-199), and that his verbal reports simply reflected a form of coping strategy to help him deal with the limited evidence he had available in "declarative" memory.

  13. Hippocampal α7-nicotinic cholinergic receptors modulate memory reconsolidation: a potential strategy for recovery from amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, M G; Boccia, M M; Krawczyk, M C; Baratti, C M

    2013-11-01

    When subjects are exposed to new learning experiences, the novel information could be acquired and eventually stored through memory consolidation process. The exposure of mice to a novel experience (a hole-board) after being trained in an inhibitory avoidance apparatus is followed by impaired performance of the avoidance memory in subsequent tests. The same impairing effect is produced when mice are exposed to the novel environment after the reactivation of the avoidance memory. This interfering effect is due to impaired consolidation or reconsolidation of the avoidance memory. The administration of the α7-nicotinic receptor agonist choline (Ch) in the dorsal hippocampus (0.8 μg/hippocampus) immediately after the inhibitory avoidance memory reactivation, allowed memory recovery. This effect of Ch was time-dependent, and retention performance was not affected in drug-treated mice that were not subjected to memory reactivation, suggesting that the effects on performance are not due to non-specific effects of the drug. The effects of Ch also depended on the age of the reactivated memory. Altogether, our results suggest that Ch exerts its effects by modulating memory reconsolidation, and that the memory impairment induced by new learning is a memory expression failure and not a storage deficit. Therefore, reconsolidation, among other functions, might serve to change whether a memory will be expressed in later tests. Summarizing, our results open new avenues about the behavioral significance and the physiological functions of memory reconsolidation, providing new strategies for recovering memories from some types of amnesia.

  14. Historical amnesia and its consequences: the need to build histories of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sioban Nelson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo se centra en dos cuestiones fundamentales: el papel de la historia como un testigo clave de los acontecimientos, los momentos o los cambios en la historia; y el papel de la historia en el actual desarrollo de la identidad - la identidad de los individuos, grupos, naciones y generaciones. Concluyo con algunas observaciones sobre la forma en que el estudio y la enseñanza de la historia puede ser abordada. Mi argumento tiene varias vertientes: en primer lugar, la historia es útil en las especificidades - a veces hay historias que no debemos olvidar. Tenemos esa deuda con los testigos. Cada cultura posee esos momentos de recuerdo. Algunos, como el de Hiroshima o el Holocausto, pertenecen a toda la humanidad. En segundo lugar, existen historias que es sabio no olvidar - nosotros deberíamos aprender con los errores de los que vinieron antes de nosotros y nos mostraron algo de su sabiduría. Por último, demuestro que la amnesia histórica es peligrosa. La memoria es necesaria - necesitamos saber quiénes somos si queremos tener alguna esperanza de saber hacia dónde vamos.

  15. The effects of live, taped, and no music on people experiencing posttraumatic amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, F

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the effects of live, taped, and no music, on agitation and orientation levels of people experiencing posttraumatic amnesia (PTA). Participants (N = 22) were exposed to all 3 conditions, twice over 6 consecutive days. Songs used in the live and taped music conditions were identical and were selected based on participants' own preferred music. Pre and posttesting was conducted for each condition using the Agitated Behavior Scale (Corrigan, 1989) and the Westmead PTA Scale (Shores, Marosszeky, Sandanam, Batchelor, 1986). Participants' memory for the music used was also tested and compared with their memory for pictorial material presented in the Westmead PTA Scale. Results indicate that music significantly reduced agitation (p music was not significant (p =.7). The mean number of pictures in the Westmead PTA scale recalled was 0.84 and the mean number of music selections recalled was 1.22 but this difference was not significant (p =.7). However, the trend suggests that music selections are more easily encoded in memory and then retrieved on request, than that of pictures. Analysis of responses in a follow-up assessment questionnaire showed that 77% of participants recalled the music program while in PTA, indicating that it reached the memory threshold. Sixty-four percent recalled the live music and 55% recalled the taped music condition however this difference was not significant (p =.7). Results suggest that music therapy programs have an important role to play in the management of people in PTA.

  16. Enduring amnesia induced by ICV scopolamine is reversed by sesame oil in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabari, Shabnam-Sadat Seyedi; Babri, Shirin; Mirzaie, Fariba; Farajdokht, Fereshteh; Mohaddes, Gisou

    2016-08-01

    To evaluated the long-term effect of scopolamine and sesame oil on spatial memory. Memory impairment induced by Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of scopolamine hydrochloride (10 μg/ rat). Animals were gavaged for 4 weeks with saline, sesame oil (0.5, 1, or 2 mL/kg/day), or 3 weeks with memantine (30 mg/kg/day) in advance to induction of amnesia. Morris water maze (MWM) test was conducted 6 days after microinjection of scopolamine. Then, blood and brain samples were collected and evaluated for the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities, and total antioxidant status (TAS) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP). Scopolamine significantly decreased traveled distance and time spent in target quadrant in probe test. Pretreatment of rats with sesame oil (0.5 mg/kg) mitigated scopolamine-induced behavioral alterations. Measurement of MDA, SOD, and GPX in brain tissue, and FRAP and TAS in blood showed little changes in animals which had received scopolamine or sesame oil. Intracerebroventricular injection of scopolamine has a residual effect on memory after six days. Sesame oil has an improving effect on spatial memory; however this effect is possibly mediated by mechanisms other than antioxidant effect of sesame oil.

  17. Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: applicability and relation with the Glasgow Coma Scale Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidad y relación con la Escala de Coma de Glasgow Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: aplicabilidade e relação com a Escala de Coma de Glasgow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cristina Fürbringer e Silva

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Restrictions in the application of the Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test and questionings about the relationship between conscience and post-traumatic amnesia motivated this study, which aims to identify, through the Glasgow Coma Scale scores, when to initiate the application of this amnesia test, as well to verify the relationship between the results of these two indicators. The longitudinal prospective study was carried at a referral center for trauma care in São Paulo - Brazil. The sample consisted of 73 victims of blunt traumatic brain injury, admitted at this institution between January 03rd and May 03rd 2001. Regarding the applicability, the test could be applied in patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score > 12; however, the end of post traumatic amnesia was verified in patients who scored > 14 on the scale. A significant relationship (r s = 0.65 was verified between these measures, although different kinds of relationship between the end of the amnesia and changes in consciousness were observed.Restricciones en la aplicación del Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test y los cuestionamientos sobre la relación entre conciencia y amnesia post-traumática motivaron este estudio que visa identificar, a través de la puntuación de la Escala de Coma de Glasgow, el periodo más adecuado para la aplicación de la prueba de amnesia, y observar la relación entre los resultados de esos dos indicadores. El estudio prospectivo y longitudinal fue realizado en un centro de referencia para traumas en São Paulo - Brasil. El número fue de 73 victimas de trauma craneoencefálico contuso, internadas en esta institución en el periodo de 03/01 a 03/05/2001. Con relación a la aplicabilidad, la prueba puede ser aplicada en los pacientes con la Escala de Coma de Glasgow > 12, pero el término de la amnesia post-traumática fue observado en los pacientes con puntuación > 14 en la escala. Correlación significativa (rs = 0,65 fue observada entre esas

  18. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  19. Effects of protein synthesis inhibitors during reactivation of associative memory in the common snail induces reversible and irreversible amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solntseva, S V; Nikitin, V P; Kozyrev, S A; Shevelkin, A V; Lagutin, A V; Sherstnev, V V

    2007-11-01

    The effects of protein synthesis inhibitors on the reactivation of an associative skill consisting of refusing a particular food by common snails were studied. Animals were given single injections of a protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide at 0.6 mg/snail or anisomycin at 0.4 mg) 24 h after three days of training, and were then presented with a "reminding" stimulus (the "conditioned reflex" food-banana) and tested for retention of the skill. Observations revealed an impairment of reproduction of the acquired skill 2.5 h after the "reminder," with spontaneous restoration at 4.5-5.5 h. Other snails were given single 1.8-mg doses of cycloheximide or three 0.6-mg doses with intervals of 2 h. "Reminders" were presented after each injection. In these conditions, impairment of reproduction of the conditioned reflex also appeared 2.5 h after the first "reminder," though amnesia lasted at least 30 days and repeat training of the animals produced only partial recovery of the skill. Thus, we have provided the first demonstration that recovery of a long-term memory "trace" on exposure to relatively low doses of protein synthesis inhibitors produces transient and short-lived amnesia, lasting 2-3 h, while long-term, irreversible amnesia occurs after longer-lasting or more profound suppression of protein synthesis. These results suggest that the "reminding" process induces reconsolidation of the " initial" memory, suppression of which by protein synthesis inhibitors leads to "erasure" of the memory "trace" and impairs consolidation on repeat training.

  20. Neurophysiological evidence for a recollection impairment in amnesia patients that leaves familiarity intact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addante, Richard James; Ranganath, Charan; Olichney, John; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2012-11-01

    In several previous behavioral studies, we have identified a group of amnestic patients that, behaviorally, appear to exhibit severe deficits in recollection with relative preservation of familiarity-based recognition. However, these studies have relied exclusively on behavioral measures, rather than direct measures of physiology. Event-related potentials (ERPs) have been used to identify putative neural correlates of familiarity- and recollection-based recognition memory, but little work has been done to determine the extent to which these ERP correlates are spared in patients with relatively specific memory disorders. ERP studies of recognition in healthy subjects have indicated that recollection and familiarity are related to a parietal old-new effect characterized as a late positive component (LPC) and an earlier mid-frontal old-new effect referred to as an 'FN400', respectively. Here, we sought to determine the extent to which the putative ERP correlates of recollection and familiarity are intact or impaired in these patients. We recorded ERPs in three amnestic patients and six age matched controls while they made item recognition and source recognition judgments. The current patients were able to discriminate between old and new items fairly well, but showed nearly chance-level performance at source recognition. Moreover, whereas control subjects exhibited ERP correlates of memory that have been linked to recollection and familiarity, the patients only exhibited the mid-frontal FN400 ERP effect related to familiarity-based recognition. The results show that recollection can be severely impaired in amnesia even when familiarity-related processing is relatively spared, and they also provide further evidence that ERPs can be used to distinguish between neural correlates of familiarity and recollection.

  1. Evaluating computer-assisted memory retraining programmes for people with post-head injury amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Sing-Fai; Man, Wai-Kwong

    2004-05-01

    The present study was designed to perform theory-driven empirical work that might contribute to a better understanding of computer-assisted training effects adopting theoretically different memory retraining strategies for people who had amnesia as a result of a brain injury. A pre-test and post-test control group quasi-experimental design was adopted to test the differences in effectiveness of four different computer-assisted memory training strategies, which were hypothesized to improve different memory skills of persons with brain injury. Twenty-six persons with brain injury were randomly assigned to four age- and gender-matched memory training groups (self-paced, feedback, personalized, visual presentation) and they were trained using the related computer software, evaluated by the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT), self-efficacy scale and built-up computer performance records. All the four memory training methods showed positive among the persons with brain injury as compared with a control group, although there was no statistically significant difference among the four training methods. However, clinical improvement was found in all four methods and the Feedback group showed significant improvement in self efficacy, in comparison with the other groups. This attempt to develop and evaluate different computer applications for memory retraining was made and the effectiveness of applying customized computer technology in memory rehabilitation was critically evaluated. Results of the present study showed that the unique customized therapeutic characteristics of computer-assisted memory retraining (e.g. self-paced practice, performance feedback, salient visual presentation and personalized training contents) are positive attributes of memory skill retraining outcomes.

  2. Is a cancer diagnosis associated with subsequent risk of transient global amnesia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Zhu

    Full Text Available Psychological stress has been associated with transient global amnesia (TGA. Whether a cancer diagnosis, a severely stressful life event, is associated with subsequent risk of TGA has not been studied.Based on the Swedish Cancer Register and Patient Register, we conducted a prospective cohort study including 5,365,608 Swedes at age 30 and above during 2001-2009 to examine the relative risk of TGA among cancer patients, as compared to cancer-free individuals. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs derived from Poisson regression were used as estimates of the association between cancer diagnosis and the risk of TGA.During the study 322,558 individuals (6.01% received a first diagnosis of cancer. We identified 210 cases of TGA among the cancer patients (incidence rate, 0.22 per 1000 person-years and 4,887 TGA cases among the cancer-free individuals (incidence rate, 0.12 per 1000 person-years. Overall, after adjustment for age, sex, calendar year, socioeconomic status, education and civil status, cancer patients had no increased risk of TGA than the cancer-free individuals (IRR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.86-1.13. The IRRs did not differ over time since cancer diagnosis or across individual cancer types. The null association was neither modified by sex, calendar period or age.Our study did not provide support for the hypothesis that patients with a new diagnosis of cancer display a higher risk of TGA than cancer-free individuals.

  3. Using Post-Traumatic Amnesia To Predict Outcome after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsford, Jennie L; Spitz, Gershon; McKenzie, Dean

    2016-06-01

    Duration of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) has emerged as a strong measure of injury severity after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Despite the growing international adoption of this measure, there remains a lack of consistency in the way in which PTA duration is used to classify severity of injury. This study aimed to establish the classification of PTA that would best predict functional or productivity outcomes. We conducted a cohort study of 1041 persons recruited from inpatient admissions to a TBI rehabilitation center between 1985 and 2013. Participants had a primary diagnosis of TBI, emerged from PTA before discharge from inpatient hospital, and engaged in productive activities before injury. Eight models that classify duration of PTA were evaluated-six that were based on the literature and two that were statistically driven. Models were assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) as well as model-based Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) and Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) statistics. All categorization models showed longer PTA to be associated with a greater likelihood of being nonproductive at 1 year after TBI. Classification systems with a greater number of categories performed better than two-category systems. The dimensional (continuous) form of PTA resulted in the greatest AUC, and lowest AIC as well as BIC, of the classification systems examined. This finding indicates that the greatest accuracy in prognosis is likely to be achieved using PTA as a continuous variable. This enables the probability of productive outcomes to be estimated with far greater precision than that possible using a classification system. Categorizing PTA to classify severity of injury may be reducing the precision with which clinicians can plan the treatment of patients after TBI.

  4. Stronger pharmacological cortisol suppression and anticipatory cortisol stress response in transient global amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eGriebe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a disorder characterized by a sudden attack of severe anterograde memory disturbance that is frequently preceded by emotional or physical stress and resolves within 24 hours. By using MRI following the acute episode in TGA patients, small lesions in the hippocampus have been observed. Hence it has been hypothesized that the disorder is caused by a stress-related transient inhibition of memory formation in the hippocampus. To study the factors that may link stress and TGA, we measured the cortisol day-profile, the dexamethasone feedback inhibition and the effect of experimental exposure to stress on cortisol levels (using the socially evaluated cold pressor test and a control procedure in 20 patients with a recent history of TGA and in 20 healthy controls. We used self-report scales of depression, anxiety and stress and a detailed neuropsychological assessment to characterize our collective. We did not observe differences in mean cortisol levels in the cortisol day-profile between the two groups. After administration of low-dose dexamethasone, TGA patients showed significantly stronger cortisol suppression in the daytime profile compared to the control group (p = 0.027. The mean salivary cortisol level was significantly higher in the TGA group prior to and after the experimental stress exposure (p = 0.008; p = 0.010 respectively, as well as prior to and after the control condition (p = 0.022; p= 0.024 respectively. The TGA group had higher scores of depressive symptomatology (p = 0.021 and anxiety (p = 0.007, but the groups did not differ in the neuropsychological assessment. Our findings of a stronger pharmacological suppression and higher cortisol levels in anticipation of experimental stress in participants with a previous TGA indicate a hypersensitivity of the HPA axis. This suggests that an individual stress sensitivity might play a role in the pathophysiology of TGA.

  5. Transient Global Amnesia Deteriorates the Network Efficiency of the Theta Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, SangHak; Lim, Jae-Sung; Jang, Jae-Won; Im, Chang-Hwan; Kim, SangYun

    2016-01-01

    Acute perturbation of the hippocampus, one of the connector hubs in the brain, is a key step in the pathophysiological cascade of transient global amnesia (TGA). We tested the hypothesis that network efficiency, meaning the efficiency of information exchange over a network, is impaired during the acute stage of TGA. Graph theoretical analysis was applied to resting-state EEG data collected from 21 patients with TGA. The EEG data were obtained twice, once during the acute stage ( 2 months after symptom onset) of TGA. Characteristic path lengths and clustering coefficients of functional networks constructed using phase-locking values were computed and normalized as a function of the degree in the delta, theta, alpha, beta 1, beta 2 and gamma frequency bands of the EEG. We investigated whether the normalized characteristic path length (nCPL) and normalized clustering coefficients (nCC) differed significantly between the acute and resolved stages of TGA at each frequency band using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. For networks where the nCPL or nCC differed significantly between the two stages, we also evaluated changes in the connections of the brain networks. During the acute stage of TGA, the nCPL of the theta band networks with mean degrees of 8, 8.5, 9 and 9.5 significantly increased (P < 0.05). During the acute stage, the lost edges for these networks were mostly found between the anterior (frontal and anterior temporal) and posterior (parieto-occipital and posterior temporal) brain regions, whereas newly developed edges were primarily found between the left and right frontotemporal regions. The nCC of the theta band with a mean degree of 5.5 significantly decreased during the acute stage (P < 0.05). Our results indicate that TGA deteriorates the network efficiency of the theta frequency band. This effect might be related to the desynchronization between the anterior and posterior brain areas. PMID:27741293

  6. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... properties of this facility in the path from synaptic sites to the motor axon is reviewed with emphasis on voltage sensitive ion channels and regulatory metabotropic transmitter pathways. The catalog of the intrinsic response properties, their underlying mechanisms, and regulation obtained from motoneurons...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  7. An Analytical Delay Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Yinghua; LI Zhongcheng

    1999-01-01

    Delay consideration has been a majorissue in design and test of high performance digital circuits. Theassumption of input signal change occurring only when all internal nodesare stable restricts the increase of clock frequency. It is no longertrue for wave pipelining circuits. However, previous logical delaymodels are based on the assumption. In addition, the stable time of arobust delay test generally depends on the longest sensitizable pathdelay. Thus, a new delay model is desirable. This paper explores thenecessity first. Then, Boolean process to analytically describe thelogical and timing behavior of a digital circuit is reviewed. Theconcept of sensitization is redefined precisely in this paper. Based onthe new concept of sensitization, an analytical delay model isintroduced. As a result, many untestable delay faults under thelogical delay model can be tested if the output waveforms can be sampledat more time points. The longest sensitizable path length is computedfor circuit design and delay test.

  8. The role of nondeclarative memory in the skill for language: Evidence from syntactic priming in patients with amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyselaar, Evelien; Segaert, Katrien; Walvoort, Serge J W; Kessels, Roy P C; Hagoort, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Syntactic priming, the phenomenon in which participants adopt the linguistic behaviour of their partner, is widely used in psycholinguistics to investigate syntactic operations. Although the phenomenon of syntactic priming is well documented, the memory system that supports the retention of this syntactic information long enough to influence future utterances, is not as widely investigated. We aim to shed light on this issue by assessing patients with Korsakoff's amnesia on an active-passive syntactic priming task and compare their performance to controls matched in age, education, and premorbid intelligence. Patients with Korsakoff's syndrome display deficits in all subdomains of declarative memory, yet their nondeclarative memory remains intact, making them an ideal patient group to determine which memory system supports syntactic priming. In line with the hypothesis that syntactic priming relies on nondeclarative memory, the patient group shows strong priming tendencies (12.6% passive structure repetition). Our healthy control group did not show a priming tendency, presumably due to cognitive interference between declarative and nondeclarative memory. We discuss the results in relation to amnesia, aging, and compensatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Route learning in amnesia: a comparison of trial-and-error and errorless learning in patients with the Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, Roy P C; van Loon, Eke; Wester, Arie J

    2007-10-01

    To examine the errorless learning approach using a procedural memory task (i.e. learning of actual routes) in patients with amnesia, as compared to trial-and-error learning. Counterbalanced self-controlled cases series. Psychiatric hospital (Korsakoff clinic). A convenience sample of 10 patients with the Korsakoff amnestic syndrome. All patients learned a route in four sessions on separate days using an errorless approach and a different route using trial-and-error. Error rate was scored during route learning and standard neuro-psychological tests were administered (i.e. subtest route recall of the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT) and the Dutch version of the California Verbal Learning Test (VLGT)). A significant learning effect was found in the trial-and-error condition over consecutive sessions (P = 0.006), but no performance difference was found between errorless and trial-and-error learning of the routes. VLGT performance was significantly correlated with a trial-and-error advantage (P amnesia).

  10. Control of spatially patterned synchrony with multisite delayed feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Hauptmann, C.; Omelchenko, O.; Popovych, O. V.; Maistrenko, Y.; Tass, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analytical study describing a method for the control of spatiotemporal patterns of synchrony in networks of coupled oscillators. Delayed feedback applied through a small number of electrodes effectively induces spatiotemporal dynamics at minimal stimulation intensities. Different arrangements of the delays cause different spatial patterns of synchrony, comparable to central pattern generators (CPGs), i.e., interacting clusters of oscillatory neurons producing patterned output, e...

  11. Implicit learning in transient global amnesia and the role of stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frauke Nees

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Transient global amnesia (TGA is a disorder with reversible anterograde disturbance of explicit memory, frequently preceded by an emotionally or physically stressful event. By using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI following an episode of TGA, small hippocampal lesions have been observed. Hence it has been postulated that the disorder is caused by the stress-related transient inhibition of memory formation in the hippocampus. In experimental studies, stress has been shown to affect both explicit and implicit learning – the latter defined as learning and memory processes that lack conscious awareness of the information acquired. To test the hypothesis that impairment of implicit learning in TGA is present and related to stress, we determined the effect of experimental exposure to stress on hippocampal activation patterns during an implicit learning paradigm in patients who suffered a recent TGA and healthy matched control subjects. We used a hippocampus-dependent aversive learning procedure (context conditioning with the phases habituation, acquisition, and extinction during functional MRI following experimental stress exposure (socially evaluated cold pressor test. After a control procedure, controls showed successful learning during the acquisition phase, indicated by increased valence, arousal and contingency ratings to the paired (CON+ versus the non-paired (CON- conditioned stimulus, and successful extinction of the conditioned responses. Following stress, acquisition was still successful, however extinction was impaired with persistently increased contingency ratings. In contrast, TGA patients showed impairment of conditioned responses and insufficient extinction after the control procedure, indicated by a lack of significant differences between CON+ and CON- for valence and arousal ratings after the acquisition phase and by significantly increased contingency ratings after the extinction. After stress, aversive learning was not successful

  12. Evidence of an amnesia-like cued-recall memory impairment in nondementing idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstyn, Nicola M J; John, Christopher M; Shepherd, Thomas A; Drakeford, Justine L; Clark-Carter, David; Ellis, Simon J; Mayes, Andrew R

    2015-10-01

    Medicated, non-dementing mild-to-moderate Parkinson's disease (PD) patients usually show recall/recollection impairments but have only occasionally shown familiarity impairments. We aimed to assess two explanations of this pattern of impairment. Recollection typically improves when effortful planning of encoding and retrieval processing is engaged. This depends on prefrontally-dependent executive processes, which are often disrupted in PD. Relative to an unguided encoding and retrieval of words condition (C1), giving suitable guidance at encoding alone (C2) or at encoding and retrieval (C3) should, if executive processes are disrupted, improve PD recollection more than control recollection and perhaps raise it to normal levels. Familiarity, being a relatively automatic kind of memory, whether impaired or intact, should be unaffected by guidance. According to the second explanation, PD deficits are amnesia-like and caused by medial temporal lobe dysfunction and although poorer recollection, which is caused by hippocampal disruption, may be improved by guidance, it should not improve more than control recollection. Familiarity impairment will also occur if the perirhinal cortex is disrupted, but will be unimproved by guidance. Without guidance, recollection/recall was impaired in thirty PD patients relative to twenty-two healthy controls and remained relatively equally impaired when full guidance was provided (C1 vs C3), both groups improving to broadly the same extent. Although impaired, and markedly less so than recollection, familiarity was not improved by guidance in both groups. The patients showed elevated rates of subclinical depressive symptoms, which weakly correlated with recall/recollection in all three conditions. PD executive function was also deficient and correlated with unguided/C1 recollection only. Our results are consistent with a major cause of the patients' recall/recollection impairments being hippocampal disruption, probably exacerbated by

  13. Implicit Learning in Transient Global Amnesia and the Role of Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, Frauke; Griebe, Martin; Ebert, Anne; Ruttorf, Michaela; Gerber, Benjamin; Wolf, Oliver T; Schad, Lothar R; Gass, Achim; Szabo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Transient global amnesia (TGA) is a disorder with reversible anterograde disturbance of explicit memory, frequently preceded by an emotionally or physically stressful event. By using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following an episode of TGA, small hippocampal lesions have been observed. Hence it has been postulated that the disorder is caused by the stress-related transient inhibition of memory formation in the hippocampus. In experimental studies, stress has been shown to affect both explicit and implicit learning-the latter defined as learning and memory processes that lack conscious awareness of the information acquired. To test the hypothesis that impairment of implicit learning in TGA is present and related to stress, we determined the effect of experimental exposure to stress on hippocampal activation patterns during an implicit learning paradigm in patients who suffered a recent TGA and healthy matched control subjects. We used a hippocampus-dependent aversive learning procedure (context conditioning with the phases habituation, acquisition, and extinction) during functional MRI following experimental stress exposure (socially evaluated cold pressor test). After a control procedure, controls showed successful learning during the acquisition phase, indicated by increased valence, arousal and contingency ratings to the paired (CON+) vs. the non-paired (CON-) conditioned stimulus, and successful extinction of the conditioned responses. Following stress, acquisition was still successful, however extinction was impaired with persistently increased contingency ratings. In contrast, TGA patients showed impairment of conditioned responses and insufficient extinction after the control procedure, indicated by a lack of significant differences between CON+ and CON- for valence and arousal ratings after the acquisition phase and by significantly increased contingency ratings after the extinction. After stress, aversive learning was not successful with non

  14. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up.

  15. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanni Brea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron's firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ.

  16. Modeling distributed axonal delays in mean-field brain dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2008-11-01

    The range of conduction delays between connected neuronal populations is often modeled as a single discrete delay, assumed to be an effective value averaging over all fiber velocities. This paper shows the effects of distributed delays on signal propagation. A distribution acts as a linear filter, imposing an upper frequency cutoff that is inversely proportional to the delay width. Distributed thalamocortical and corticothalamic delays are incorporated into a physiologically based mean-field model of the cortex and thalamus to illustrate their effects on the electroencephalogram (EEG). The power spectrum is acutely sensitive to the width of the thalamocortical delay distribution, and more so than the corticothalamic distribution, because all input signals must travel along the thalamocortical pathway. This imposes a cutoff frequency above which the spectrum is overly damped. The positions of spectral peaks in the resting EEG depend primarily on the distribution mean, with only weak dependences on distribution width. Increasing distribution width increases the stability of fixed point solutions. A single discrete delay successfully approximates a distribution for frequencies below a cutoff that is inversely proportional to the delay width, provided that other model parameters are moderately adjusted. A pair of discrete delays together having the same mean, variance, and skewness as the distribution approximates the distribution over the same frequency range without needing parameter adjustment. Delay distributions with large fractional widths are well approximated by low-order differential equations.

  17. BmT×3B, a novel scorpion toxin from Buthus martensi Karsch, inhibits delayed rectifier potassium current in rat hippocampal neurons%东亚钳蝎中新分离的毒素BmT×3B抑制大鼠海马神经元延迟整流性钾电流

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明华; 王跃丰; 陈学勤; 张乃霞; 吴厚铭; 胡国渊

    2003-01-01

    目的:研究从东亚钳蝎毒素中新分离的短肽BmTx3B对电压门控性钾通道的作用.方法:在酶解打散的新生大鼠海马细胞,采用全细胞电压箝位方式记录,并根据动力学特性分离二种电压依赖性钾电流.结果:BmTx3B(10-100 μmol/L)选择地抑制延迟整流性钾电流(IK),不影响瞬时性快钾电流(IA).此抑制作用是可逆的,呈现浓度依赖性,但无电压依赖性.BmTx3B对延迟整流性钾电流的稳态激活和稳态失活的动力学特性无影响.结论:蝎毒短肽BmTx3B选择地抑制海马神经元延迟整流性钾通道.%AIM: To examine the effect of BmTx3B, a novel short-chain peptide isolated from the venom of Asian scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, on voltage-gated potassium channels. METHODS: Two types of voltage-dependent potassium currents were recorded from dissociated hippocampal neurons of neonatal rat in whole-cell voltageclamp mode, and separated based upon their kinetic properties. RESULTS: BmTx3B (10-100μmol/L) selectively inhibited the delayed rectifier potassium current (IK), without affecting the fast transient potassium current (IA).The inhibition of the peptide on IK was reversible, concentration-dependent and voltage-independent. BmTx3B did not affect the steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of the current. CONCLUSION: The short-chain scorpion peptide BmTx3B selectively blocked the delayed rectifier potassium channel.

  18. American Dream Delayed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorunzhina, Natalia; Miller, Robert A.

    This paper investigates the delay in homeownership and a subsequent reduction in homeownership rate observed over the past decades. We focus on the delay in giving birth to children and increased labor market participation as contributing factors to homeownership dynamics for prime-age female hou...

  19. Synchronization properties of heterogeneous neuronal networks with mixed excitability type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Michael J; Schurter, Brandon N; Letson, Benjamin; Booth, Victoria; Zochowski, Michal; Fink, Christian G

    2015-03-01

    We study the synchronization of neuronal networks with dynamical heterogeneity, showing that network structures with the same propensity for synchronization (as quantified by master stability function analysis) may develop dramatically different synchronization properties when heterogeneity is introduced with respect to neuronal excitability type. Specifically, we investigate networks composed of neurons with different types of phase response curves (PRCs), which characterize how oscillating neurons respond to excitatory perturbations. Neurons exhibiting type 1 PRC respond exclusively with phase advances, while neurons exhibiting type 2 PRC respond with either phase delays or phase advances, depending on when the perturbation occurs. We find that Watts-Strogatz small world networks transition to synchronization gradually as the proportion of type 2 neurons increases, whereas scale-free networks may transition gradually or rapidly, depending upon local correlations between node degree and excitability type. Random placement of type 2 neurons results in gradual transition to synchronization, whereas placement of type 2 neurons as hubs leads to a much more rapid transition, showing that type 2 hub cells easily "hijack" neuronal networks to synchronization. These results underscore the fact that the degree of synchronization observed in neuronal networks is determined by a complex interplay between network structure and the dynamical properties of individual neurons, indicating that efforts to recover structural connectivity from dynamical correlations must in general take both factors into account.

  20. ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOR OF DELAY DISCRETETIME NEURAL NETWORKS WITH CRITICAL THRESHOLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangHongqiang; LiuKaiyu

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a delay discrete-time system arising as a discrete-time network of two neurons with McCulloch-Pitts nonlinearity. We obtain the asymptotic behaviors of the solutions of the system for some cases.The results obtained improve and extend the corresponding results established recently by Zhou, Yu and Huang [1].

  1. In-phase and anti-phase synchronization in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Gerhard; Hanggi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We numerically investigate the influence of intrinsic channel noise on the dynamical response of delay-coupling in neuronal systems. The stochastic dynamics of the spiking is modeled within a stochastic modification of the standard Hodgkin-Huxley model wherein the delay-coupling accounts for the finite propagation time of an action potential along the neuronal axon. We quantify this delay-coupling of the Pyragas-type in terms of the difference between corresponding presynaptic and postsynaptic membrane potentials. In case of a single neuron we analyze the spiking activity in presence of an autaptic feedback loop. With vanishing channel noise the interspike interval increases with increasing delay time. For an elementary neuronal network consisting of two coupled neurons we detect characteristic stochastic synchronization patterns which exhibit multiple phase-flip bifurcations: The phase-flip bifurcations occur in form of alternate transitions from an in-phase spiking activity towards an anti-phase spiking act...

  2. Standing Wave Solutions in Nonhomogeneous Delayed Synaptically Coupled Neuronal Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Linghai; STONER Melissa Anne

    2012-01-01

    The authors establish the existence and stability of standing wave solutions of a nonlinear singularly perturbed system of integral differential equations and a nonlinear scalar integral differential equation.It will be shown that there exist six standing wave solutions ((u(x,t),w(x,t)) =(U(x),W(x)) to the nonlinear singularly perturbed system of integral differential equations.Similarly,there exist six standing wave solutions u(x,t) =U(x) to the nonlinear scalar integral differential equation.The main idea to establish the stability is to construct Evans functions corresponding to several associated eigenvalue problems.

  3. Amnesia in Frontotemporal Dementia with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Masquerading Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yamanami-Irioka

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old man with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD later developed amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, which was confirmed at autopsy at age 72 years. Because neuronal loss and AD-type pathologies (Braak stage II for neurofibrillary tangles were scant, TDP-43-positive intracytoplasmic inclusions in hippocampal dentate granular cells and in neurons in the subiculum and amygdala, even though small in amount, may represent the earliest lesions of ALS-related dementia and could be the cause of dementia in this patient. Although the persistent elevation of creatine kinase from the onset could be a pointer to the presence of motor involvement, more accurate characterization of dementia, which may differentiate ALS-related dementia and AD, is necessary.

  4. Spiking Neurons for Analysis of Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks comprising spiking neurons of a novel type have been conceived as improved pattern-analysis and pattern-recognition computational systems. These neurons are represented by a mathematical model denoted the state-variable model (SVM), which among other things, exploits a computational parallelism inherent in spiking-neuron geometry. Networks of SVM neurons offer advantages of speed and computational efficiency, relative to traditional artificial neural networks. The SVM also overcomes some of the limitations of prior spiking-neuron models. There are numerous potential pattern-recognition, tracking, and data-reduction (data preprocessing) applications for these SVM neural networks on Earth and in exploration of remote planets. Spiking neurons imitate biological neurons more closely than do the neurons of traditional artificial neural networks. A spiking neuron includes a central cell body (soma) surrounded by a tree-like interconnection network (dendrites). Spiking neurons are so named because they generate trains of output pulses (spikes) in response to inputs received from sensors or from other neurons. They gain their speed advantage over traditional neural networks by using the timing of individual spikes for computation, whereas traditional artificial neurons use averages of activity levels over time. Moreover, spiking neurons use the delays inherent in dendritic processing in order to efficiently encode the information content of incoming signals. Because traditional artificial neurons fail to capture this encoding, they have less processing capability, and so it is necessary to use more gates when implementing traditional artificial neurons in electronic circuitry. Such higher-order functions as dynamic tasking are effected by use of pools (collections) of spiking neurons interconnected by spike-transmitting fibers. The SVM includes adaptive thresholds and submodels of transport of ions (in imitation of such transport in biological

  5. Fragile X astrocytes induce developmental delays in dendrite maturation and synaptic protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doering Laurie C

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental impairment characterized by cognitive impairment, attention deficit and autistic behaviours. The mouse model of Fragile X is used to study the underlying neurobiology associated with behavioral deficiencies. The effect of Fragile X glial cells on the development of neurons has not been studied. We used a co-culture technique in combination with morphometrics on immunostained neurons to investigate the role of astrocytes in the development delays associated with hippocampal neuron development. Results We found that hippocampal neurons grown on Fragile X astrocytes exhibited a significant difference from the neurons grown with normal astrocytes after 7 days in vitro for many parameters including increases in dendritic branching and in area of the cell body. However, after 21 days in culture, the neurons grown on Fragile X astrocytes exhibited morphological characteristics that did not differ significantly from the neurons grown on normal astrocytes. With antibodies to the pre-synaptic protein, synapsin, and to the excitatory post-synaptic protein, PSD-95, we quantified the number of developing excitatory synapses on the dendrites. In addition to the delays in dendritic patterning, the development of excitatory synapses was also delayed in the hippocampal neurons. Conclusions These experiments are the first to establish a role for astrocytes in the delayed growth characteristics and abnormal morphological features in dendrites and synapses that characterize the Fragile X syndrome.

  6. [Neuronal network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmeier, M; Maresová, D

    2005-01-01

    Function of the central nervous system is based on mutual relations among the nerve cells. Description of nerve cells and their processes, including their contacts was enabled by improvement of optical features of the microscope and by the development of impregnation techniques. It is associated with the name of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), J. Ev. Purkyne (1787-1869), Camillo Golgi (1843-1926), and Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934). Principal units of the neuronal network are the synapses. The term synapse was introduced into neurophysiology by Charles Scott Sherrington (1857-1952). Majority of the interactions between nerve cells is mediated by neurotransmitters acting at the receptors of the postsynaptic membrane or at the autoreceptors of the presynaptic part of the synapse. Attachment of the vesicles to the presynaptic membrane and the release of the neurotransmitter into the synaptic cleft depend on the intracellular calcium concentration and on the presence of several proteins in the presynaptic element.

  7. Mutations in KPTN Cause Macrocephaly, Neurodevelopmental Delay, and Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baple, Emma L.; Maroofian, Reza; Chioza, Barry A.; Izadi, Maryam; Cross, Harold E.; Al-Turki, Saeed; Barwick, Katy; Skrzypiec, Anna; Pawlak, Robert; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Zainy, Tala; Patton, Michael A.; Mansour, Sahar; Rich, Phillip; Qualmann, Britta; Hurles, Matt E.; Kessels, Michael M.; Crosby, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    The proper development of neuronal circuits during neuromorphogenesis and neuronal-network formation is critically dependent on a coordinated and intricate series of molecular and cellular cues and responses. Although the cortical actin cytoskeleton is known to play a key role in neuromorphogenesis, relatively little is known about the specific molecules important for this process. Using linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing on samples from families from the Amish community of Ohio, we have demonstrated that mutations in KPTN, encoding kaptin, cause a syndrome typified by macrocephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, and seizures. Our immunofluorescence analyses in primary neuronal cell cultures showed that endogenous and GFP-tagged kaptin associates with dynamic actin cytoskeletal structures and that this association is lost upon introduction of the identified mutations. Taken together, our studies have identified kaptin alterations responsible for macrocephaly and neurodevelopmental delay and define kaptin as a molecule crucial for normal human neuromorphogenesis. PMID:24239382

  8. commensurate point delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. de la Sen

    2005-01-01

    nominal controller is maintained. In the current approach, the finite spectrum assignment is only considered as a particular case of the designer's choice of a (delay-dependent arbitrary spectrum assignment objective.

  9. Time Delay Cosmography

    OpenAIRE

    Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational time delays, observed in strong lens systems where the variable background source is multiply-imaged by a massive galaxy in the foreground, provide direct measurements of cosmological distance that are very complementary to other cosmographic probes. The success of the technique depends on the availability and size of a suitable sample of lensed quasars or supernovae, precise measurements of the time delays, accurate modeling of the gravitational potential of the main deflector,...

  10. Amnesia and the DRM Paradigm: How Encoding Factors (Do Not Affect Lure Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Van Damme

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the DRM paradigm, participants are presented with, and their memory is tested for, lists of words that are associatively related to a non-presented lure word. Recent studies have revealed that amnesic patients show heightened immediate, but diminished delayed false recognition of such related lure words as compared to healthy controls. These findings may reflect deficient encoding, retrieval, or both. In two experiments, the importance of encoding factors was evaluated by investigating whether story contexts would increase delayed lure recognition, and whether personally-relevant content would decrease immediate lure recognition in Korsakoff patients. With delayed testing, patients' lure recognition was consistently lower than controls'. With immediate testing, lure recognition was less frequent for personally-relevant than for neutral materials. However, as opposed to controls, Korsakoff patients did not show a difference in source memory, but merely a change in response bias. Results point to the conclusion that deficient explicit recollection is the main factor determining the difference in false recognition between amnesic patients and controls.

  11. Effects of 0.5mT power frequency electromagnetic fields on delayed rectifier potassium channels in hippocampus CA3 pyramidal neurons%0.5 mT工频磁场对小鼠海马CA3区锥体神经元延迟整流钾离子通道和动作电位的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈佩同; 毕平; 李刚; 林凌

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of 0.5mT power frequency electromagnetic fields on hippocampus CA3 pyramidal neurons. Methods Hippocampus CA3 pyramidal neurons of rats were prepared by acute isolation and then exposed to an electromagnetic fields, with frequency of 50 Hz and the intensity of 0.5 mT,for 30 minutes. The delayed rectifier potassium channel currents were recorded by whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Results The results showed that after 30 minutes exposure to the electromagnetic fields, the delayedrectifier potassium channel current density of the rats' hippocampus CA3 area pyramidal neurons decreased, with the maximum value of control group was(171.05±1.32) pA/pF, and that of the exposure group was(139.65±2.37)pA/pE(n=12, P<0.05). The half-activation potential of control group and that of exposure group were (7.44±0.64)mV and (34.09±6.48) mV(n=12, P<0.05), respectively and the slope factor were 11.36±0.57 and 19.97 ±3.45(n=12, P<0.05), respectively. APD90 extended from (14.63±0.34) ms to (21.74±1.47) ms (n=12, P<0.05). Conclusion It can be speculated that the electromagnetic fields can reduce the currents of delayed rectifier potassium,change the process of activation and increase the half activation potential. After exposure, the activation speed decreased, while the APD increases.%目的 研究与日常生活密切相关的0.5 mT工频磁场对小鼠海马CA3区锥体神经元的影响.方法 采用急性分离的方法制备小鼠海马CA3区锥体神经元,用0.5 mT、50 Hz磁场对小鼠海马CA3区锥体神经元刺激30 min后,运用全细胞膜片钳技术研究其延迟整流钾通道电流,Ik和动作电位特性.结果 0.5 mT工频磁场照射小鼠海马CA3区锥体神经元30 min后,其电流密度减小,对照组和曝磁组最大电流密度分别为(171.05+1.32)pA/pF、(139.65±2.37)pA/pF(n=12,P<0.05);对照组和曝磁组半数激活电压分别为(7.44±0.64)mV、(34.09+6.48)mV(n=12,P<0.05);斜率因子分别为11.36±0.57

  12. A global amnesia associated with the specific variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed due to severe preeclampsia and malignant hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Božić, Joško; Žaja, Nikola; Kolić, Krešimir; Hrboka, Vedran

    2016-01-01

    A case is reported of a 26-year-old primiparous woman in the 32nd week of gestation who presented to the emergency department with the symptoms of a severe headache, nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia that later progressed to eclampsia. This state was characterized by a sudden onset of a headache and diplopia that advanced to cortical blindness and precipitated significant alterations in mental status, most notable being global amnesia that resolved within 48 h. A post-partum magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in FLAIR mode revealed multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense signals suggestive of edematous lesions that chiefly involved occipital and parietal lobes with additional atypical manifestations. Such radiologic findings suggested a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome variant with the global amnesia as an extraordinary constituent. This unique feature should be acknowledged when treating a preeclamptic or hypertensive patient that exhibits neurological symptomatology and vision disturbances. PMID:27099774

  13. A global amnesia associated with the specific variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) that developed due to severe preeclampsia and malignant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovac, Josip Anđelo; Božić, Joško; Žaja, Nikola; Kolić, Krešimir; Hrboka, Vedran

    2016-04-01

    A case is reported of a 26-year-old primiparous woman in the 32nd week of gestation who presented to the emergency department with the symptoms of a severe headache, nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia that later progressed to eclampsia. This state was characterized by a sudden onset of a headache and diplopia that advanced to cortical blindness and precipitated significant alterations in mental status, most notable being global amnesia that resolved within 48 h. A post-partum magnetic resonance imaging of the brain in FLAIR mode revealed multiple cortico-subcortical areas of hyperintense signals suggestive of edematous lesions that chiefly involved occipital and parietal lobes with additional atypical manifestations. Such radiologic findings suggested a posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome variant with the global amnesia as an extraordinary constituent. This unique feature should be acknowledged when treating a preeclamptic or hypertensive patient that exhibits neurological symptomatology and vision disturbances.

  14. Oscillation, Conduction Delays, and Learning Cooperate to Establish Neural Competition in Recurrent Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hideyuki; Ikeguchi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Specific memory might be stored in a subnetwork consisting of a small population of neurons. To select neurons involved in memory formation, neural competition might be essential. In this paper, we show that excitable neurons are competitive and organize into two assemblies in a recurrent network with spike timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) and axonal conduction delays. Neural competition is established by the cooperation of spontaneously induced neural oscillation, axonal conduction delays, and STDP. We also suggest that the competition mechanism in this paper is one of the basic functions required to organize memory-storing subnetworks into fine-scale cortical networks.

  15. Effects of 50 Hz Magnetic Fields With Different Intensities Exposure on Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channel of Neurons%不同强度工频磁场对神经元延迟整流钾通道特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 李丹丹; 李媛媛; 林凌

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the relationship between the human health and the biological effects caused by the magnetic fields exposure. The cortical neurons isolated from the mice were exposed to 50 Hz magnetic fields (EMF 1 mT, 5 mT, 10 mT) for 15 min, and then the currents of the delayed rectifier potassium channel were recorded off-line using the whole-cell patch clamp technique to investigate the effects of EMF on channels for the first time. Compared to the control group, there was a significant inhibition on the Ik after exposure to EMF, and with the increase of the voltage depolarization, the inhibition rates of 1 mT and 5 mT almost unchanged and the inhibition rates were (30.0 ± 4.2)% and (20.0 ± 2.2)%, respectively. While the inhibition rate of 10 mT became larger and the maximum inhibition rate was 43.4%. Additionally, 1 mT and 5 mT magnetic fields both affected the activation characteristics of delayed rectifier potassium channel, the half activation voltage became larger and the slope factor unchanged, while 10 mT magnetic fields did not changed anything. This paper indicated that the structure and function of the channel protein on cell membrane may be altered by 50 Hz EMF, and there were different effects on the channel for different strength of magnetic fields, the window effects of strength of magnetic fields were improved in this study.%工频磁场是人类生活中接触最多的一类磁场,其引起的生物效应与人类健康的关系备受关注.本文选用1 mT、5 mT及10mT工频磁场照射急性分离的小鼠皮层神经元(15 min),应用全细胞膜片钳技术离线记录通道电流,研究了工频磁场对神经元延迟整流钾通道特性的影响.结果显示,1 mT、5mT及10 mT3个强度的工频磁场对Iκ均有抑制作用,但随着去极化电压的增加,发现1 mT和5 mT工频磁场的抑制率几乎不变,抑制率分别为(30±4.2)%和(20±2.2)%,而10 mT工频磁场的抑制率增加,最大抑制率为43.4

  16. Mean-field equations for stochastic neural fields with spatio-temporal delays

    CERN Document Server

    Touboul, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Neurons form large-scale cell assemblies sharing the same individual properties and receiving the same input, in charge of certain functions. Such assemblies have specific space locations and hence interact after some (space dependent) delay due the transport and transfer of the information. Both delays and spatial connectivity structures are understood to shape the collective response of neural assemblies and brain states that are observed through usual recording techniques. Abstracting this setting, we consider here the problem of the asymptotics, as the number of neurons increases, of bio-inspired neuronal networks composed of several populations (up to a continuum), interacting with spatio-temporal delays. The propagation of chaos property is proved under mild assumptions on the neuronal dynamics, valid for most models used in neuroscience, in both the case of finite number and infinite continuum populations (called neural fields). The mean-field equations in these cases are derived and analyzed from the ...

  17. Time Delay Cosmography

    CERN Document Server

    Treu, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Gravitational time delays, observed in strong lens systems where the variable background source is multiply-imaged by a massive galaxy in the foreground, provide direct measurements of cosmological distance that are very complementary to other cosmographic probes. The success of the technique depends on the availability and size of a suitable sample of lensed quasars or supernovae, precise measurements of the time delays, accurate modeling of the gravitational potential of the main deflector, and our ability to characterize the distribution of mass along the line of sight to the source. We review the progress made during the last 15 years, during which the first competitive cosmological inferences with time delays were made, and look ahead to the potential of significantly larger lens samples in the near future.

  18. Prediction of delayed subsidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, K.

    A predictive model of delayed subsidence is discussed. A numerical implementation is tested on one of the best-described study areas, Allegheny County in Pennsylvania. In planning insurance of restitution measures, a predictive model is of value in estimating the magnitude of the problem and the size of long-term budgetary commitments. Contrary to active subsidence, which occurs concurrently with mining operations, or is completed within a few days following coal extraction, delayed subsidence may take many years to appear at the surface after coal mines are abandoned. There are two principal morphological types of delayed subsidence: troughs, which are shallow depressions, and sinks, which are steep-sided crown pits. Both types are damaging to surface structures, and a variety of methods were introduced to deal with the problem, ranging from subsidence insurance to site restitution.

  19. Time delay cosmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, Tommaso; Marshall, Philip J.

    2016-07-01

    Gravitational time delays, observed in strong lens systems where the variable background source is multiply imaged by a massive galaxy in the foreground, provide direct measurements of cosmological distance that are very complementary to other cosmographic probes. The success of the technique depends on the availability and size of a suitable sample of lensed quasars or supernovae, precise measurements of the time delays, accurate modeling of the gravitational potential of the main deflector, and our ability to characterize the distribution of mass along the line of sight to the source. We review the progress made during the last 15 years, during which the first competitive cosmological inferences with time delays were made, and look ahead to the potential of significantly larger lens samples in the near future.

  20. General artificial neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeratu, Vasile; Schiopu, Paul; Degeratu, Stefania

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the authors present a model of artificial neuron named the general artificial neuron. Depending on application this neuron can change self number of inputs, the type of inputs (from excitatory in inhibitory or vice versa), the synaptic weights, the threshold, the type of intensifying functions. It is achieved into optoelectronic technology. Also, into optoelectronic technology a model of general McCulloch-Pitts neuron is showed. The advantages of these neurons are very high because we have to solve different applications with the same neural network, achieved from these neurons, named general neural network.

  1. Delayed Random Relays

    CERN Document Server

    Ohira, Toru

    2016-01-01

    We present here a system with collection of random walks relaying a signal in one dimension with a presence of a delay. We are interested in the time for a signal to travel from one end (start) to the other end (finish) of the lined group of random walkers. It is found that there is an optimal number of walkers for the signal to travel fastest if the delay is present. We discuss implications of this model and associated behaviors to physical and biological systems.

  2. Approximation of distributed delays

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Hao; Eberard, Damien; Simon, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    We address in this paper the approximation problem of distributed delays. Such elements are convolution operators with kernel having bounded support, and appear in the control of time-delay systems. From the rich literature on this topic, we propose a general methodology to achieve such an approximation. For this, we enclose the approximation problem in the graph topology, and work with the norm defined over the convolution Banach algebra. The class of rational approximates is described, and a constructive approximation is proposed. Analysis in time and frequency domains is provided. This methodology is illustrated on the stabilization control problem, for which simulations results show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  3. Autapse-induced multiple coherence resonance in single neurons and neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ergin; Ozer, Mahmut; Baysal, Veli; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-08-01

    We study the effects of electrical and chemical autapse on the temporal coherence or firing regularity of single stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons and scale-free neuronal networks. Also, we study the effects of chemical autapse on the occurrence of spatial synchronization in scale-free neuronal networks. Irrespective of the type of autapse, we observe autaptic time delay induced multiple coherence resonance for appropriately tuned autaptic conductance levels in single neurons. More precisely, we show that in the presence of an electrical autapse, there is an optimal intensity of channel noise inducing the multiple coherence resonance, whereas in the presence of chemical autapse the occurrence of multiple coherence resonance is less sensitive to the channel noise intensity. At the network level, we find autaptic time delay induced multiple coherence resonance and synchronization transitions, occurring at approximately the same delay lengths. We show that these two phenomena can arise only at a specific range of the coupling strength, and that they can be observed independently of the average degree of the network.

  4. Autapse-induced multiple coherence resonance in single neurons and neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ergin; Ozer, Mahmut; Baysal, Veli; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-08-02

    We study the effects of electrical and chemical autapse on the temporal coherence or firing regularity of single stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons and scale-free neuronal networks. Also, we study the effects of chemical autapse on the occurrence of spatial synchronization in scale-free neuronal networks. Irrespective of the type of autapse, we observe autaptic time delay induced multiple coherence resonance for appropriately tuned autaptic conductance levels in single neurons. More precisely, we show that in the presence of an electrical autapse, there is an optimal intensity of channel noise inducing the multiple coherence resonance, whereas in the presence of chemical autapse the occurrence of multiple coherence resonance is less sensitive to the channel noise intensity. At the network level, we find autaptic time delay induced multiple coherence resonance and synchronization transitions, occurring at approximately the same delay lengths. We show that these two phenomena can arise only at a specific range of the coupling strength, and that they can be observed independently of the average degree of the network.

  5. Studies on effects of Emblica officinalis (Amla) on oxidative stress and cholinergic function in scopolamine induced amnesia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golechha, Mahaveer; Bhatia, Jagriti; Arya, Dharmveer Singh

    2012-01-01

    Emblica officinalis, commonly known as amla, is an important medicinal plant of India. Its fruits have potent antioxidant activity due to the presence of tannoids, tannins, vitamin C and flavonoids. The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of the fruits of Emblica officinalis (EO) on memory impairment in Swiss albino mice. Scopolamine (1 mg kg(-1), i.p)was administered to induce amnesia and the memory was evaluated by using elevated plus-maze and passive avoidance tests. Piracetam (200 mg kg(-1), i.p.) was used as a standard nootropic agent. The EO extract was administered intraperitoneally in four graded doses (150, 300, 450 and 600 mg kg(-1)) for 7 consecutive days to different groups of mice. The mice were sacrificed on the 8th day following assessment of memory. The brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) as well as acetylcholinesterase (AchE)) activity was determined. It was observed that EO extract reversed the amnesia induced by scopolamine. The mean transfer latency and retention latency in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group vs the vehicle treated scopolamine group was 13.46 sec (p<0.001) and 134.4 sec (p<0.001) vs 23.99 sec and 44.55 sec, respectively. EO extract treatment also significantly (p<0.001) ameliorated the oxidative stress induced by scopolamine administration. The mice brain MDA and GSH levels in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group vs the scopolamine group were 29.95 nmol g(-1) of wet tissue and 51.87 microg g(-1) tissue vs 55.22 nmol g(-1) of wet tissue and 28.33 microg g(-1) tissue, respectively. Further, EO extract (300, 450 and 600 mg kg(-1), i.p) significantly (p<0.001) reversed the rise in brain acetyl cholinesterase (AchE) level induced by scopolamine. The mice brain Ach E levels in the EO extract 600 mg kg(-1) group as compared to the scopolamine group was 70.23 vs 151.49 U mg(-1) protein(-1), respectively. These results suggestthat EO possesses memory enhancing, antioxidant

  6. Delay Bounds for Multiclass FIFO

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yuming; Misra, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    FIFO is perhaps the simplest scheduling discipline. For single-class FIFO, its delay guarantee performance has been extensively studied: The well-known results include a stochastic delay bound for $GI/GI/1$ by Kingman and a deterministic delay bound for $D/D/1$ by Cruz. However, for multiclass FIFO, few such results are available. To fill the gap, we prove delay bounds for multiclass FIFO in this work, considering both deterministic and stochastic cases. Specifically, delay bounds are present...

  7. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne;

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy....

  8. Delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wang, Bo; Che, Xiangming; Li, Xuqi; Qiu, Guanglin; He, Shicai; Fan, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Traumatic diaphragmatic hernias (TDHs) are sometimes difficult to identify at an early stage and can consequently result in diagnostic delays with life-threatening outcomes. It is the aim of this case study to highlight the difficulties encountered with the earlier detection of traumatic diaphragmatic hernias. Methods: Clinical data of patients who received treatment for delayed traumatic diaphragmatic hernias in registers of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi’an Jiaotong University from 1998 to 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Six patients were included in this study. Left hemidiaphragm was affected in all of them. Most of the patients had a history of traffic accident and 1 a stab-penetrating injury. The interval from injury to developing symptoms ranged from 2 to 11 years (median 5 years). The hernial contents included the stomach, omentum, small intestine, and colon. Diaphragmatic injury was missed in all of them during the initial managements. All patients received operations once the diagnosis of delayed TDH was confirmed, and no postoperative mortality was detected. Conclusions: Delayed TDHs are not common, but can lead to serious consequences once occurred. Early detection of diaphragmatic injuries is crucial. Surgeons should maintain a high suspicion for injuries of the diaphragm in cases with abdominal or lower chest traumas, especially in the initial surgical explorations. We emphasize the need for radiographical follow-up to detect diaphragmatic injuries at an earlier stage. PMID:27512848

  9. 'No delays achiever'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The latest version of the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement's 'no delays achiever', a web based tool created to help NHS organisations achieve the 18-week target for GP referrals to first treatment, is available at www.nodelaysachiever.nhs.uk.

  10. Permissible Delay in Payments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Fu Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper wants to investigate the optimal retailer's lot-sizing policy with two warehouses under partially permissible delay in payments within the economic order quantity (EOQ framework. In this paper, we want to extend that fully permissible delay in payments to the supplier would offer the retailer partially permissible delay in payments. That is, the retailer must make a partial payment to the supplier when the order is received. Then the retailer must pay off the remaining balance at the end of the permissible delay period. In addition, we want to add the assumption that the retailer's storage space is limited. That is, the retailer will rent the warehouse to store these exceeding items when the order quantity is larger than retailer's storage space. Under these conditions, we model the retailer's inventory system as a cost minimization problem to determine the retailer's optimal cycle time and optimal order quantity. Three theorems are developed to efficiently determine the optimal replenishment policy for the retailer. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate these theorems and obtained a lot of managerial insights.

  11. Juvenil neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, J R; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases which are characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipopigment in neuronal and extraneuronal cells. The diseases can be differentiated into several subgroups according to age of onset, the clinical picture...

  12. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  13. NEURON and Python

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hines; Davison, Andrew P.; Eilif Muller

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because ...

  14. Relative contribution of attention and memory toward disorientation or post-traumatic amnesia in an acute brain injury sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittle, Ashana; Burgess, Gerald H

    2011-01-01

    To examine the relative contribution of attention and memory to orientation/disorientation following moderate-to-severe brain injury. It was hypothesized that attention would be a comparable contributor to orientation, compared to memory; suggesting assessing attention has a role in understanding and estimating duration of post-traumatic amnesia. One hundred and five brain-injured inpatients were divided into three groups of high, moderate or low orientation. ANOVA was run on attention, memory and (as a control) language scores to examine group differences. Correlational analysis was run between orientation items and attention and memory indexes to examine the relative contribution of attention and memory on specific orientation item performance. Multiple regression examined the contribution of memory and attention to being oriented. METHODS AND POCEDURES: Patients' orientation, attention, memory and language were assessed during their inpatient rehabilitation. Groups differed significantly and attention recovered more sharply between low and moderate orientation states compared to memory and language recovery. Memory contributed most to orientation, followed closely by attention, both surpassing language. Attention most related to temporal estimation, while memory most related to retrieval of well-consolidated memories. Attention contributes significantly to orientation, although to a slightly lesser degree than memory. Attention should be assessed routinely. The relative 'load' and contribution of attention to orientation and answering orientation-type questions is discussed.

  15. Time of flight MR angiography assessment casts doubt on the association between transient global amnesia and intracranial jugular venous reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeonah; Kim, Eunhee; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheolkyu; Bae, Yun Jung; Lee, Kyung Mi [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Hoon [Seoul Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Evidence of intracranial venous reflux flow due to jugular venous reflux (JVR) on time of flight (TOF) MR angiography (MRA) is thought to be highly associated with transient global amnesia (TGA) - evidence that supports the venous congestion theory of TGA pathophysiology. However, recent studies indicate that intracranial JVR on TOF MRA is occasionally observed in normal elderly. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the prevalence of intracranial JVR on TOF MRA in patients with TGA and two control groups. Three age- and sex-matched groups of subjects that received MRI and MRA were enrolled. The groups comprised 167 patients with TGA, 167 visitors to the emergency room (ER) and 167 visitors to a health promotion centre (HPC). Intracranial JVR was defined as abnormal venous signals in the inferior petrosal, sigmoid and/or transverse sinuses on TOF MRA. The prevalence of intracranial JVR was assessed across the three groups. Intracranial JVR was seen in seven (4.2 %) TGA patients, eight (4.8 %) ER visitors and three (1.8 %) HPC visitors, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed among the three groups. TGA patients showed a low prevalence of intracranial JVR on TOF MRA, and no statistical differences were found in comparison with control groups. (orig.)

  16. Language and cognitive communication disorder during post-traumatic amnesia: Profiles of recovery after TBI from three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Joanne; Ferguson, Alison; Spencer, Elizabeth; Togher, Leanne

    2017-09-25

    There has been limited empirical speech-language pathology (SLP) study of language and cognitive communication during post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) and the early stages after TBI. The purpose of the current research was to explore the potential means and utility of assessing cognitive communication during PTA and the post-acute recovery period. This research used a longitudinal mixed methods design to describe language and cognitive communication assessment and recovery profiles of three patients with TBI. Cognitive communication was assessed with repeated standardised and non-standardised methods during PTA (rated with Westmead PTA Scale) and at follow-up 3 months after PTA emergence. All participants demonstrated a profile of language and cognitive communication strengths and weaknesses during PTA and the post-acute period, also evident at follow-up. Improvement occurred gradually throughout PTA, although with individual fluctuation across test occasions. There was no marked change in communication function immediately before and after PTA emergence, indicating that cognitive communication ability and those functions measured on the Westmead PTA Scale (memory and orientation) did not recover at the same rate. It was feasible to assess language and cognitive communication throughout PTA and the post-acute period, and early assessment results were relevant to the patient's ongoing communicative function. It is suggested that early and repeated SLP assessment may contribute to the prediction of persisting cognitive communication issues.

  17. Delayed hippocampal damage in humans following cardiorespiratory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petito, C K; Feldmann, E; Pulsinelli, W A; Plum, F

    1987-08-01

    Transient ischemia in animals produces delayed cell death in vulnerable hippocampal neurons. To see if this occurs in humans, we reexamined brain slides from all patients with anoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and a well-documented cardiorespiratory arrest. Eight patients dying 18 hours or less after cardiac arrest had minimal damage in hippocampus and moderate damage in cerebral cortex and putamen. Six patients living 24 hours or more had severe damage in all four regions. The increase in damage with time postarrest was significant only in the hippocampus. Delayed hippocampal injury now documented in humans provides a target for possible therapy that can be initiated after cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

  18. Numerical and asymptotic studies of delay differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Mohit Hemchandra

    studied in this dissertation. Two coupled nonlinear diffusion equations of the Fitzhugh-Nagurno type are used to model this system with the delay introduced in the coupling term. A multiple-scale perturbation approach is used for the analysis of these equations in the limit of weak coupling. In the absence of delay, it is shown that two pulses with identical speeds can synchronize. However, as the delay is increased beyond a critical value, this synchrony is destroyed. A quantitative estimate for the actual values of delay at which this can occur in the case of squid giant neurons is found and compared with the relevant time-scales involved.

  19. Single or multiple synchronization transitions in scale-free neuronal networks with electrical or chemical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Yinghang [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Gong, Yubing, E-mail: gongyubing09@hotmail.co [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China); Wang Li; Ma Xiaoguang; Yang Chuanlu [School of Physics, Ludong University, Yantai 264025 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: Single synchronization transition for gap-junctional coupling. Multiple synchronization transitions for chemical synaptic coupling. Gap junctions and chemical synapses have different impacts on synchronization transition. Chemical synapses may play a dominant role in neurons' information processing. - Abstract: In this paper, we have studied time delay- and coupling strength-induced synchronization transitions in scale-free modified Hodgkin-Huxley (MHH) neuron networks with gap-junctions and chemical synaptic coupling. It is shown that the synchronization transitions are much different for these two coupling types. For gap-junctions, the neurons exhibit a single synchronization transition with time delay and coupling strength, while for chemical synapses, there are multiple synchronization transitions with time delay, and the synchronization transition with coupling strength is dependent on the time delay lengths. For short delays we observe a single synchronization transition, whereas for long delays the neurons exhibit multiple synchronization transitions as the coupling strength is varied. These results show that gap junctions and chemical synapses have different impacts on the pattern formation and synchronization transitions of the scale-free MHH neuronal networks, and chemical synapses, compared to gap junctions, may play a dominant and more active function in the firing activity of the networks. These findings would be helpful for further understanding the roles of gap junctions and chemical synapses in the firing dynamics of neuronal networks.

  20. Delay-independent stabilization for teleoperation with time varying delay

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Namerikawa, Toru

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the stability for nonlinear teleoperation with time varying communication delays. The proposed method is passivity-based controllers with time varying gains which depend on the rate of change of time varying delay. In our proposed method, stability condition is independent of the magnitude of the communication delay and the damping of the system. The delay-independent stability is shown via Lyapunov stability methods. Several experimental results show the effectiveness o...

  1. [Striated and delayed nephrography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlois, O; Padovani, J; Faure, F; Devred, P; Grangier, M L; Panuel, M

    1985-10-01

    About a case of striated and delayed nephrogram seen on a diabetic child, authors come back to the different etiologies. Among them, the tubular precipitation of Tamm-Horsfall protein seems to be given like on the right possibilities. Whatever is its etiology, the mechanism of striated appearance is always the same, being founded on the radiated disposal of the collecting ducts and on a tubular stasis beeing with iodine concentration.

  2. Theoretical Delay Time Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Nelemans, Gijs; Bours, Madelon

    2012-01-01

    We briefly discuss the method of population synthesis to calculate theoretical delay time distributions of type Ia supernova progenitors. We also compare the results of the different research groups and conclude that although one of the main differences in the results for single degenerate progenitors is the retention efficiency with which accreted hydrogen is added to the white dwarf core, this cannot explain all the differences.

  3. Theoretical Delay Time Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelemans, Gijs; Toonen, Silvia; Bours, Madelon

    2013-01-01

    We briefly discuss the method of population synthesis to calculate theoretical delay time distributions of Type Ia supernova progenitors. We also compare the results of different research groups and conclude that, although one of the main differences in the results for single degenerate progenitors is the retention efficiency with which accreted hydrogen is added to the white dwarf core, this alone cannot explain all the differences.

  4. Geometric Time Delay Interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Vallisneri, Michele

    2005-01-01

    The space-based gravitational-wave observatory LISA, a NASA-ESA mission to be launched after 2012, will achieve its optimal sensitivity using Time Delay Interferometry (TDI), a LISA-specific technique needed to cancel the otherwise overwhelming laser noise in the inter-spacecraft phase measurements. The TDI observables of the Michelson and Sagnac types have been interpreted physically as the virtual measurements of a synthesized interferometer. In this paper, I present Geometric TDI, a new an...

  5. Time-Delay Interferometry

    OpenAIRE

    Dhurandhar Sanjeev V.; Tinto Massimo

    2005-01-01

    Equal-arm interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (...

  6. Parallel network simulations with NEURON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, M; Cannia, C; Lytton, W W; Markram, Henry; Hines, M L

    2006-10-01

    The NEURON simulation environment has been extended to support parallel network simulations. Each processor integrates the equations for its subnet over an interval equal to the minimum (interprocessor) presynaptic spike generation to postsynaptic spike delivery connection delay. The performance of three published network models with very different spike patterns exhibits superlinear speedup on Beowulf clusters and demonstrates that spike communication overhead is often less than the benefit of an increased fraction of the entire problem fitting into high speed cache. On the EPFL IBM Blue Gene, almost linear speedup was obtained up to 100 processors. Increasing one model from 500 to 40,000 realistic cells exhibited almost linear speedup on 2,000 processors, with an integration time of 9.8 seconds and communication time of 1.3 seconds. The potential for speed-ups of several orders of magnitude makes practical the running of large network simulations that could otherwise not be explored.

  7. Delay in atomic photoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Kheifets, A S

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the time delay between emission of photoelectrons from the outer valence $ns$ and $np$ sub-shells in noble gas atoms following absorption of an attosecond XUV pulse. By solving the time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation and carefully examining the time evolution of the photoelectron wave packet, we establish the apparent "time zero" when the photoelectron leaves the atom. Various processes such as elastic scattering of the photoelectron on the parent ion and many-electron correlation affect the quantum phase of the dipole transition matrix element, the energy dependence of which defines the emission timing. This qualitatively explains the time delay between photoemission from the $2s$ and $2p$ sub-shells of Ne as determined experimentally by attosecond streaking [{\\em Science} {\\bf 328}, 1658 (2010)]. However, with our extensive numerical modeling, we were only able to account for less than a half of the measured time delay of $21\\pm5$~as. We argue that the XUV pulse alone cannot produce such a larg...

  8. Time-Delay Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tinto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Equal-arm detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers, the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called time-delay interferometry (TDI. This article provides an overview of the theory, mathematical foundations, and experimental aspects associated with the implementation of TDI. Although emphasis on the application of TDI to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA mission appears throughout this article, TDI can be incorporated into the design of any future space-based mission aiming to search for gravitational waves via interferometric measurements. We have purposely left out all theoretical aspects that data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the TDI data combinations.

  9. Autaptic regulation of electrical activities in neuron under electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ying, Heping; Jia, Ya; Ma, Jun; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-01-01

    Realistic neurons may hold complex anatomical structure, for example, autapse connection to some internuncial neurons, which this specific synapse can connect to its body via a close loop. Continuous exchanges of charged ions across the membrane can induce complex distribution fluctuation of intracellular and extracellular charged ions of cell, and a time-varying electromagnetic field is set to modulate the membrane potential of neuron. In this paper, an autapse-modulated neuron model is presented and the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux. Bifurcation analysis and sampled time series for membrane potentials are calculated to investigate the mode transition in electrical activities and the biological function of autapse connection is discussed. Furthermore, the Gaussian white noise and electromagnetic radiation are considered on the improved neuron model, it is found appropriate setting and selection for feedback gain and time delay in autapse can suppress the bursting in neuronal behaviors. It indicates the formation of autapse can enhance the self-adaption of neuron so that appropriate response to external forcing can be selected, this biological function is helpful for encoding and signal propagation of neurons. It can be useful for investigation about collective behaviors in neuronal networks exposed to electromagnetic radiation. PMID:28240314

  10. Autaptic regulation of electrical activities in neuron under electromagnetic induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Ying, Heping; Jia, Ya; Ma, Jun; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-02-01

    Realistic neurons may hold complex anatomical structure, for example, autapse connection to some internuncial neurons, which this specific synapse can connect to its body via a close loop. Continuous exchanges of charged ions across the membrane can induce complex distribution fluctuation of intracellular and extracellular charged ions of cell, and a time-varying electromagnetic field is set to modulate the membrane potential of neuron. In this paper, an autapse-modulated neuron model is presented and the effect of electromagnetic induction is considered by using magnetic flux. Bifurcation analysis and sampled time series for membrane potentials are calculated to investigate the mode transition in electrical activities and the biological function of autapse connection is discussed. Furthermore, the Gaussian white noise and electromagnetic radiation are considered on the improved neuron model, it is found appropriate setting and selection for feedback gain and time delay in autapse can suppress the bursting in neuronal behaviors. It indicates the formation of autapse can enhance the self-adaption of neuron so that appropriate response to external forcing can be selected, this biological function is helpful for encoding and signal propagation of neurons. It can be useful for investigation about collective behaviors in neuronal networks exposed to electromagnetic radiation.

  11. Delayed Speech or Language Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old Delayed Speech or Language Development KidsHealth > For Parents > Delayed Speech or Language Development ... child is right on schedule. Normal Speech & Language Development It's important to discuss early speech and language ...

  12. Study of a new neuron

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen Louis; Weckel, J D

    1994-01-01

    We study a modular neuron alternative to the McCulloch-Pitts neuron that arises naturally in analog devices in which the neuron inputs are represented as coherent oscillatory wave signals. Although the modular neuron can compute XOR at the one neuron level, it is still characterized by the same Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension as the standard neuron. We give the formulas needed for constructing networks using the new neuron and training them using back-propagation. A numerical study of the modular neuron on two data sets is presented, which demonstrates that the new neuron performs at least as well as the standard neuron.

  13. Advances in motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumer, Dirk; Talbot, Kevin; Turner, Martin R

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND), the commonest clinical presentation of which is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is regarded as the most devastating of adult-onset neurodegenerative disorders. The last decade has seen major improvements in patient care, but also rapid scientific advances, so that rational therapies based on key pathogenic mechanisms now seem plausible. ALS is strikingly heterogeneous in both its presentation, with an average one-year delay from first symptoms to diagnosis, and subsequent rate of clinical progression. Although half of patients succumb within 3-4 years of symptom onset, typically through respiratory failure, a significant minority survives into a second decade. Although an apparently sporadic disorder for most patients, without clear environmental triggers, recent genetic studies have identified disease-causing mutations in genes in several seemingly disparate functional pathways, so that motor neuron degeneration may need to be understood as a common final pathway with a number of upstream causes. This apparent aetiological and clinical heterogeneity suggests that therapeutic studies should include detailed biomarker profiling, and consider genetic as well as clinical stratification. The most common mutation, accounting for 10% of all Western hemisphere ALS, is a hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72. This and several other genes implicate altered RNA processing and protein degradation pathways in the core of ALS pathogenesis. A major gap remains in understanding how such fundamental processes appear to function without obvious deficit in the decades prior to symptom emergence, and the study of pre-symptomatic gene carriers is an important new initiative.

  14. 间充质祖细胞源性神经元样细胞肌内移植延缓骨骼肌萎缩%Delay of Skeletal Muscle Atrophy after Transplantation of Neuron-like Cells from MPC Into the Muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽娟; 赵文勇

    2015-01-01

    目的::探讨间充质祖细胞(Mesenchymal progenitor cell,MPC)源性神经元样细胞移植于靶肌肉内延缓失神经性骨骼肌萎缩。方法:取GFP转基因C57小鼠后肢长骨进行MPC培养、诱导及鉴定。选取C57小鼠36只,随机分为MPC移植组、神经断离组及对照组,MPC移植组腓肠肌内散点注入5μL MPC悬液,神经断离组腓肠肌对应部位散点注入等量PBS,对照组不作处理。观察小鼠后肢活动能力,术后2和4周测量腓肠肌湿重、肌纤维横截面积维持率及观察超微结构,用Western blot检测α-actin、MHC及RT-PCR检测Myogenin。MyoD的表达。结果:术后2和4周,MPC移植组腓肠肌湿重及肌纤维横截面积维持率显著高于神经断离组(P<0.01);术后4周,MPC移植组肌细胞核、线粒体、内质网的退变及肌肉纤维化程度明显低于神经断离组,α-actin、MHC、Myogenin、MyoD表达强度显著高于神经断离组(P<0.01)。结论:异体间充质祖细胞靶肌肉内移植可有效延缓失神经肌肉萎缩,为临床上周围神经损伤后肌肉萎缩的防治提供了新的思路和方法。%Objective:To study the delaying denervated skeletal muscle atrophy after transplantation of neuron-like cells from mesenchymal progenitor cell (MPC) into the target muscle. Methods:MPC were isolated from bones of hind limbs of GFP transgenic C57 mice for cultivation ,induction ,and identification. 36 C57 mice were divided into 3 groups evenly in random, MPC transplantation group, the transected group and the control group. 5μL of MPC suspension and 5μL of Phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected into the gastrocnemius in the MPC transplantation group and the transected group respectively while nothing was injected in the control group. The activity ability of hind limbs of mice were observed. At the time point of 2 and 4 weeks after the operation, the retain ratio of wet weight of gastrocnemius muscle and cross

  15. Cajal bodies in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarga, Miguel; Tapia, Olga; Romero, Ana M; Berciano, Maria T

    2016-09-14

    Cajal is commonly regarded as the father of modern neuroscience in recognition of his fundamental work on the structure of the nervous system. But Cajal also made seminal contributions to the knowledge of nuclear structure in the early 1900s, including the discovery of the "accessory body" later renamed "Cajal body" (CB). This important nuclear structure has emerged as a center for the assembly of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for splicing, ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance. The modern era of CB research started in the 1990s with the discovery of coilin, now known as a scaffold protein of CBs, and specific probes for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). In this review, we summarize what we have learned in the recent decades concerning CBs in post-mitotic neurons, thereby ruling out dynamic changes in CB functions during the cell cycle. We show that CBs are particularly prominent in neurons, where they frequently associate with the nucleolus. Neuronal CBs are transcription-dependent nuclear organelles. Indeed, their number dynamically accommodates to support the high neuronal demand for splicing and ribosome biogenesis required for sustaining metabolic and bioelectrical activity. Mature neurons have canonical CBs enriched in coilin, survival motor neuron protein and snRNPs. Disruption and loss of neuronal CBs associate with severe neuronal dysfunctions in several neurological disorders such as motor neuron diseases. In particular, CB depletion in motor neurons seems to reflect a perturbation of transcription and splicing in spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality.

  16. Compensating for Language Deficits in Amnesia II: H.M.'s Spared versus Impaired Encoding Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Donald G; Johnson, Laura W; Hadley, Chris

    2013-03-27

    Although amnesic H.M. typically could not recall where or when he met someone, he could recall their topics of conversation after long interference-filled delays, suggesting impaired encoding for some categories of novel events but not others. Similarly, H.M. successfully encoded into internal representations (sentence plans) some novel linguistic structures but not others in the present language production studies. For example, on the Test of Language Competence (TLC), H.M. produced uncorrected errors when encoding a wide range of novel linguistic structures, e.g., violating reliably more gender constraints than memory-normal controls when encoding referent-noun, pronoun-antecedent, and referent-pronoun anaphora, as when he erroneously and without correction used the gender-inappropriate pronoun "her" to refer to a man. In contrast, H.M. never violated corresponding referent-gender constraints for proper names, suggesting that his mechanisms for encoding proper name gender-agreement were intact. However, H.M. produced no more dysfluencies, off-topic comments, false starts, neologisms, or word and phonological sequencing errors than controls on the TLC. Present results suggest that: (a) frontal mechanisms for retrieving and sequencing word, phrase, and phonological categories are intact in H.M., unlike in category-specific aphasia; (b) encoding mechanisms in the hippocampal region are category-specific rather than item-specific, applying to, e.g., proper names rather than words; (c) H.M.'s category-specific mechanisms for encoding referents into words, phrases, and propositions are impaired, with the exception of referent gender, person, and number for encoding proper names; and (d) H.M. overuses his intact proper name encoding mechanisms to compensate for his impaired mechanisms for encoding other functionally equivalent linguistic information.

  17. Short-term retention of relational memory in amnesia revisited: accurate performance depends on hippocampal integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Lydia T S; Hannula, Deborah E; Tranel, Daniel; Cohen, Neal J

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, it has been proposed that the hippocampus and adjacent medial temporal lobe cortical structures are selectively critical for long-term declarative memory, which entails memory for inter-item and item-context relationships. Whether the hippocampus might also contribute to short-term retention of relational memory representations has remained controversial. In two experiments, we revisit this question by testing memory for relationships among items embedded in scenes using a standard working memory trial structure in which a sample stimulus is followed by a brief delay and the corresponding test stimulus. In each experimental block, eight trials using different exemplars of the same scene were presented. The exemplars contained the same items but with different spatial relationships among them. By repeating the pictures across trials, any potential contributions of item or scene memory to performance were minimized, and relational memory could be assessed more directly than has been done previously. When test displays were presented, participants indicated whether any of the item-location relationships had changed. Then, regardless of their responses (and whether any item did change its location), participants indicated on a forced-choice test, which item might have moved, guessing if necessary. Amnesic patients were impaired on the change detection test, and were frequently unable to specify the change after having reported correctly that a change had taken place. Comparison participants, by contrast, frequently identified the change even when they failed to report the mismatch, an outcome that speaks to the sensitivity of the change specification measure. These results confirm past reports of hippocampal contributions to short-term retention of relational memory representations, and suggest that the role of the hippocampus in memory has more to do with relational memory requirements than the length of a retention interval.

  18. Short-term Retention of Relational Memory in Amnesia Revisited: Accurate Performance Depends on Hippocampal Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia T.S. Yee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, it has been proposed that the hippocampus and adjacent medial temporal lobe cortical structures are selectively critical for long-term declarative memory, which entails memory for inter-item and item-context relationships. Whether the hippocampus might also contribute to short-term retention of relational memory representations has remained controversial. In two experiments, we revisit this question by testing memory for relationships among items embedded in scenes using a standard working memory trial structure in which a sample stimulus is followed by a brief delay and the corresponding test stimulus. In each experimental block, eight trials using different exemplars of the same scene were presented. The exemplars contained the same items but with different spatial relationships among them. By repeating the pictures across trials, any potential contributions of item or scene memory to performance were minimized, and relational memory could be assessed more directly than has been done previously. When test displays were presented, participants indicated whether any of the item-location relationships had changed. Then, regardless of their responses (and whether any item did change its location, participants indicated on a forced-choice test, which item might have moved, guessing if necessary. Amnesic patients were impaired on the change detection test, and were frequently unable to specify the change after having reported correctly that a change had taken place. Comparison participants, by contrast, frequently identified the change even when they failed to report the mismatch, an outcome that speaks to the sensitivity of the change specification measure. These results confirm past reports of hippocampal contributions to short-term retention of relational memory representations, and suggest that the role of the hippocampus in memory has more to do with relational memory requirements than the length of a retention interval.

  19. Delayed excitatory and inhibitory feedback shape neural information transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacron, Maurice J.; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2017-01-01

    Feedback circuitry with conduction and synaptic delays is ubiquitous in the nervous system. Yet the effects of delayed feedback on sensory processing of natural signals are poorly understood. This study explores the consequences of delayed excitatory and inhibitory feedback inputs on the processing of sensory information. We show, through numerical simulations and theory, that excitatory and inhibitory feedback can alter the firing frequency response of stochastic neurons in opposite ways by creating dynamical resonances, which in turn lead to information resonances (i.e., increased information transfer for specific ranges of input frequencies). The resonances are created at the expense of decreased information transfer in other frequency ranges. Using linear response theory for stochastically firing neurons, we explain how feedback signals shape the neural transfer function for a single neuron as a function of network size. We also find that balanced excitatory and inhibitory feedback can further enhance information tuning while maintaining a constant mean firing rate. Finally, we apply this theory to in vivo experimental data from weakly electric fish in which the feedback loop can be opened. We show that it qualitatively predicts the observed effects of inhibitory feedback. Our study of feedback excitation and inhibition reveals a possible mechanism by which optimal processing may be achieved over selected frequency ranges. PMID:16383655

  20. Spectral components of cytosolic [Ca2+] spiking in neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kardos, J; Szilágyi, N; Juhász, G

    1998-01-01

    . Delayed complex responses of large [Ca2+]c spiking observed in cells from a different set of cultures were synthesized by a set of frequencies within the range 0.018-0.117 Hz. Differential frequency patterns are suggested as characteristics of the [Ca2+]c spiking responses of neurons under different...

  1. Standardized extract of Lactuca sativa Linn. and its fractions abrogates scopolamine-induced amnesia in mice: A possible cholinergic and antioxidant mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Jai; Kaur, Jagpreet; Choudhary, Sunayna

    2017-02-28

    The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of Lactuca sativa (LS) Linn. (Asteraceae) against scopolamine- induced amnesia and to validate its traditional claim as memory enhancer. Ethanol extract of fresh LS leaves (LSEE), standardized on the basis of quercetin content, was successively partitioned using various solvents viz., hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol in increasing order of polarity. LSEE (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) and its various fractions (at a dose equivalent to dose of LSEE exhibiting maximum activity), administered orally for 14 days, were evaluated for their memory enhancing effect against scopolamine-induced (1 mg/kg, i.p.) amnesia in 3-4 months old male Laca mice (n = 6 in each group). The memory enhancing effect was evaluated using behavioural (elevated plus maze, novel object recognition and Morris water maze tests) and biochemical parameters (acetylcholinesterase activity, malonaldehyde, superoxide dismutase, nitrite, catalase, and reduced gultathione content). The results of the test substances were compared with both scopolamine and donepezil that was used as a standard memory enhancer and acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. Scopolamine elicit marked deterioration of memory and alteration in biochemical parameters in comparison to the control group. LSEE and its n-butanol and aqueous fractions significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated the scopolamine- induced amnesia that was evident in all the behavioural and biochemical test parameters. LSEE (200 mg/kg) and n-butanol fraction (15 mg/kg) exhibited maximum anti-amnesic effect among various tested dose levels. The results exhibited that LS prophylaxis attenuated scopolamine- induced memory impairment through its acetylcholinesterase inhibitory and antioxidant activity validating its traditional claim.

  2. Delay Choice vs. Delay Maintenance: Different Measures of Delayed Gratification in Capuchin Monkeys (Cebus apella)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addessi, Elsa; Paglieri, Fabio; Beran, Michael J.; Evans, Theodore A.; Macchitella, Luigi; De Petrillo, Francesca; Focaroli, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Delaying gratification involves two components: (i) delay choice (selecting a delayed reward over an immediate one), and (ii) delay maintenance (sustaining the decision to delay gratification even if the immediate reward is available during the delay). In primates, two tasks most commonly have explored these components, the Intertemporal choice task and the Accumulation task. It is unclear whether these tasks provide equivalent measures of delay of gratification. Here, we compared the performance of the same capuchin monkeys, belonging to two study populations, between these tasks. We found only limited evidence of a significant correlation in performance. Consequently, in contrast to what is often assumed, our data provide only partial support to the hypothesis that these tasks provide equivalent measures of delay of gratification. PMID:23544770

  3. Impact of size and delay on neural activity in the rat limbic corticostriatal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Roesch

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of factors influence an animal’s economic decisions. Two most commonly studied are the magnitude of and delay to reward. To investigate how these factors are represented in the firing rates of single neurons, we devised a behavioral task that independently manipulated the expected delay to and size of reward. Rats perceived the differently delayed and sized rewards as having different values and were more motivated under short-delay and big-reward conditions than under long-delay and small-reward conditions as measured by percent choice, accuracy and reaction time. Since the creation of this task, we have recorded from several different brain areas including, orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala, substantia nigra pars reticulata, and midbrain dopamine neurons. Here, we review and compare those data with a substantial focus on those areas that have been shown to be critical for performance on classic time discounting procedures and provide a potential mechanism by which they might interact when animals are deciding between differently delayed rewards. We found that most brain areas in the cortico-limbic circuit encode both the magnitude and delay to reward delivery in one form or another, but only a few encode them together at the single neuron level.

  4. Impact of Size and Delay on Neural Activity in the Rat Limbic Corticostriatal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Matthew R.; Bryden, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    A number of factors influence an animal’s economic decisions. Two most commonly studied are the magnitude of and delay to reward. To investigate how these factors are represented in the firing rates of single neurons, we devised a behavioral task that independently manipulated the expected delay to and size of reward. Rats perceived the differently delayed and sized rewards as having different values and were more motivated under short delay and big-reward conditions than under long delay and small reward conditions as measured by percent choice, accuracy, and reaction time. Since the creation of this task, we have recorded from several different brain areas including, orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala, substantia nigra pars reticulata, and midbrain dopamine neurons. Here, we review and compare those data with a substantial focus on those areas that have been shown to be critical for performance on classic time discounting procedures and provide a potential mechanism by which they might interact when animals are deciding between differently delayed rewards. We found that most brain areas in the cortico-limbic circuit encode both the magnitude and delay to reward delivery in one form or another, but only a few encode them together at the single neuron level. PMID:22363252

  5. Impact of size and delay on neural activity in the rat limbic corticostriatal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Matthew R; Bryden, Daniel W

    2011-01-01

    A number of factors influence an animal's economic decisions. Two most commonly studied are the magnitude of and delay to reward. To investigate how these factors are represented in the firing rates of single neurons, we devised a behavioral task that independently manipulated the expected delay to and size of reward. Rats perceived the differently delayed and sized rewards as having different values and were more motivated under short delay and big-reward conditions than under long delay and small reward conditions as measured by percent choice, accuracy, and reaction time. Since the creation of this task, we have recorded from several different brain areas including, orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala, substantia nigra pars reticulata, and midbrain dopamine neurons. Here, we review and compare those data with a substantial focus on those areas that have been shown to be critical for performance on classic time discounting procedures and provide a potential mechanism by which they might interact when animals are deciding between differently delayed rewards. We found that most brain areas in the cortico-limbic circuit encode both the magnitude and delay to reward delivery in one form or another, but only a few encode them together at the single neuron level.

  6. A neuronal learning rule for sub-millisecond temporal coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Wulfram; Kempter, Richard; van Hemmen, J. Leo; Wagner, Hermann

    1996-09-01

    A PARADOX that exists in auditory and electrosensory neural systems1,2 is that they encode behaviourally relevant signals in the range of a few microseconds with neurons that are at least one order of magnitude slower. The importance of temporal coding in neural information processing is not clear yet3-8. A central question is whether neuronal firing can be more precise than the time constants of the neuronal processes involved9. Here we address this problem using the auditory system of the barn owl as an example. We present a modelling study based on computer simulations of a neuron in the laminar nucleus. Three observations explain the paradox. First, spiking of an 'integrate-and-fire' neuron driven by excitatory postsynaptic potentials with a width at half-maximum height of 250 μs, has an accuracy of 25 μs if the presynaptic signals arrive coherently. Second, the necessary degree of coherence in the signal arrival times can be attained during ontogenetic development by virtue of an unsupervised hebbian learning rule. Learning selects connections with matching delays from a broad distribution of axons with random delays. Third, the learning rule also selects the correct delays from two independent groups of inputs, for example, from the left and right ear.

  7. Effect of Phase Response Curve Skew on Synchronization with and without Conduction Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eCanavier

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A central problem in cortical processing including sensory binding and attentional gating is how neurons can synchronize their responses with zero or near-zero time lag. For a spontaneously firing neuron, an input from another neuron can delay or advance the next spike by different amounts depending upon the timing of the input relative to the previous spike. This information constitutes the phase response curve (PRC. We present a simple graphical method for determining the effect of PRC shape on synchronization tendencies and illustrate it using type 1 PRCs, which consist entirely of advances (delays in response to excitation (inhibition. We obtained the following generic solutions for type 1 PRCs, which include the pulse coupled leaky integrate and fire model. For pairs with mutual excitation, exact synchrony can be stable for strong coupling because of the stabilizing effect of the causal limit region of the PRC in which an input triggers a spike immediately upon arrival. However, synchrony is unstable for short delays, because delayed inputs arrive during a refractory period and cannot trigger an immediate spike. Right skew destabilizes antiphase and enables modes with time lags that grow as the conduction delay is increased. Therefore, right skew favors near-synchrony at short conduction delays and a gradual transition between synchrony and antiphase for pairs coupled by mutual excitation. For pairs with mutual inhibition, zero time lag synchrony is stable for conduction delays ranging from zero to a substantial fraction of the period for pairs. However, for right skew there is a preferred antiphase mode at short delays. In contrast to mutual excitation, left skew destabilizes antiphase for mutual inhibition so that synchrony dominates at short delays as well. These pairwise synchronization tendencies constrain the synchronization properties of neurons embedded in larger networks.

  8. Amnésia Global Transitória: Relato de Caso/ Transitory Global Amnesia: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpio Antônio Cornehl da Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: A amnésia global transitória (AGT consiste na ocorrência de sintomas como perda da memória e perda da orientação temporal e/ou espacial, de caráter temporário, e cuja causa não está associada às condições neurológicas mais comuns e clássicas, como epilepsia ou acidente vascular cerebral (AVC. Os maiores fatores de risco conhecidos para a AGT são a idade, geralmente ocorrendo em maiores de 50 anos, a ocorrência de episódios de estresse ou esforço físico antes do evento, sendo comum ocorrer em pessoas com antecedentes de enxaqueca. Casuística: Neste trabalho foi relatado o caso de um paciente de 61 anos, do sexo masculino, com história de amnésia com duração de um período de 5 horas. O mesmo foi submetido ao exame de ressonância magnética no dia seguinte que não evidenciou alterações; devido à suspeita de AGT, um novo exame de RM foi realizado três dias depois, demonstrando pequena área de alteração de sinal no hipocampo direito. Discussão: Os testes diagnósticos a serem realizados incluem exames para investigar um possível AVC ou episódio epiléptico. Além disso, é importante a investigação de fatores psicossomáticos e pesquisa de transtornos psiquiátricos associados, bastante relacionados à ocorrência de AGT. Conclusão: Atualmente, ainda há estudos sobre esta patologia, principalmente em relação a sua causa subjacente, levantando-se a hipótese de que seja um sintoma comum a diversas doenças e não uma patologia em si, tornando de suma importância os exames complementares de imagem no seu diagnóstico. Introduction: Transient global amnesia (TGA is the occurrence of symptoms such as loss of memory and orientation to time and/or space, with a temporary character, and whose cause is not linked to the most common classic and neurological conditions, such as epilepsy or stroke. The major known risk factors for TGA are age, usually occurring in greater than 50 year-old people the

  9. La experiencia truncada: estudio de la amnesia anterógrada como representación del sujeto empirista en Memento

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso Cano, Oriol

    2000-01-01

    Este lacónico estudio pretende ser una reflexión en torno a la problemática de la amnesia anterógrada, y sus diferentes consecuencias. Una de ellas, que es la que se va a defender a lo largo del texto, radica en que, el sujeto amnésico anterógrado, representa, de una forma diáfana, la subjetividad empirista establecida por John Locke1 y radicalizada por David Hume2. Asimismo, para realizar esta investigación, se ha escogido un caso concreto para poder determinar con absoluta precisión el f...

  10. Amnesiacs might get the gist: reduced false recognition in amnesia may be the result of impaired item-specific memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissan, Jack; Abrahams, Sharon; Sala, Sergio Della

    2013-01-01

    It is a common finding in tests of false recognition that amnesic patients recognize fewer related lures than healthy controls, and this has led to assumptions that gist memory is damaged in these patients (Schacter, Verfaellie, & Anes, 1997, Neuropsychology, 11; Schacter, Verfaellie, Anes, & Racine, 1998, Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 10; Schacter, Verfaellie, & Pradere, 1996, Journal of Memory and Language, 35). However, clinical observations find that amnesic patients typically hold meaningful conversations and make relevant remarks, and there is some experimental evidence highlighting preserved immediate recall of prose (Baddeley & Wilson, 2002, Neuropsychologia, 40; Gooding, Isaac, & Mayes, 2005, Neuropsychologia, 43; Rosenbaum, Gilboa, Levine, Winocur, & Moscovitch, 2009, Neuropsychologia, 47), which suggests that amnesiacs can get the gist. The present experiment used false recognition paradigms to assess whether the reduced rate of false recognition found in amnesic patients may be a consequence of their impaired item-specific memory. It examined the effect of increasing the item-specific memory of amnesic patient DA by bringing her to criterion on relevant study-lists and compared her performance on a false recognition paradigm with a group of 32 healthy young adults. Results indicated that when DA's item-specific memory was increased she was more able to gist and her performance was no different to the healthy young adults. Previous assumptions that gist memory is necessarily damaged in amnesia might therefore be revisited, since the reduced rate of false recognition could be caused by impaired item-specific memory. The experiment also highlights a positive relationship between item-specific and gist memory which has not previously been accounted for in false-recognition experiments.

  11. Delaying information search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Shani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In three studies, we examined factors that may temporarily attenuate information search. People are generally curious and dislike uncertainty, which typically encourages them to look for relevant information. Despite these strong forces that promote information search, people sometimes deliberately delay obtaining valuable information. We find they may do so when they are concerned that the information might interfere with future pleasurable activities. Interestingly, the decision to search or to postpone searching for information is influenced not only by the value and importance of the information itself but also by well-being maintenance goals related to possible detrimental effects that negative knowledge may have on unrelated future plans.

  12. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct networks of neurons that extend the range. The range increases more rapidly with network size when we make use of heterogeneous populations of neurons with a variety of thresholds, rather than homogeneous populations of neurons all with the same threshold. The limited precision of neural responses thus can have a direct effect on the optimal network structure, with diverse functional properties of the constituent neurons supporting an economical information processing strategy that reduces the metabolic costs of handling a broad...

  13. Neurons and tumor suppressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-08-20

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to enhance neuron plasticity and improve outcome from damage or disease.

  14. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C.; Lapresle, J. (Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France))

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. ..gamma..EG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed.

  15. Epidemiology of delayed ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Sante, Stefania; Mollaioli, Daniele; Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Ciocca, Giacomo; Limoncin, Erika; Carosa, Eleonora; Lenzi, Andrea; Jannini, Emmanuele A

    2016-08-01

    A large body of literature on diminished ejaculatory disorders has been generated without the use of a clear diagnostic definition. Many studies have not distinguished between the orgasm and ejaculation disorders leading to doubtful results. Delayed ejaculation (DE) is one of the diminished ejaculatory disorders, which range from varying delays in ejaculatory latency to a complete inability to ejaculate. The present review is aimed at providing a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the definition and epidemiology of diminished ejaculatory disorders. We focus on the acquired diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and specific drug regimens that may cause an iatrogenic form of ejaculatory disorder. In addition, the impact of aging is discussed since the prevalence of DE appears to be moderately but positively related to age. Finally, we also focus on the importance of the hormonal milieu on male ejaculation. To date, evidence on the endocrine control of ejaculation is derived from small clinical trials, but the evidence suggests that hormones modulate the ejaculatory process by altering its overall latency.

  16. Stability and delay sensitivity of neutral fractional-delay systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Shi, Min; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the stability test method via integral estimation for integer-order neutral time-delay systems to neutral fractional-delay systems. The key step in stability test is the calculation of the number of unstable characteristic roots that is described by a definite integral over an interval from zero to a sufficient large upper limit. Algorithms for correctly estimating the upper limits of the integral are given in two concise ways, parameter dependent or independent. A special feature of the proposed method is that it judges the stability of fractional-delay systems simply by using rough integral estimation. Meanwhile, the paper shows that for some neutral fractional-delay systems, the stability is extremely sensitive to the change of time delays. Examples are given for demonstrating the proposed method as well as the delay sensitivity.

  17. In-phase and anti-phase synchronization in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Xue; Hänggi, Peter; Schmid, Gerhard

    2013-09-01

    We numerically investigate the influence of intrinsic channel noise on the dynamical response of delay-coupling in neuronal systems. The stochastic dynamics of the spiking is modeled within a stochastic modification of the standard Hodgkin-Huxley model wherein the delay-coupling accounts for the finite propagation time of an action potential along the neuronal axon. We quantify this delay-coupling of the Pyragas-type in terms of the difference between corresponding presynaptic and postsynaptic membrane potentials. For an elementary neuronal network consisting of two coupled neurons we detect characteristic stochastic synchronization patterns which exhibit multiple phase-flip bifurcations: The phase-flip bifurcations occur in form of alternate transitions from an in-phase spiking activity towards an anti-phase spiking activity. Interestingly, these phase-flips remain robust for strong channel noise and in turn cause a striking stabilization of the spiking frequency.

  18. Transient voltage-dependent potassium currents are reduced in NTS neurons isolated from renal wrap hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belugin, Sergei; Mifflin, Steve

    2005-12-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp measurements were made in neurons enzymatically dispersed from the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) to determine if alterations occur in voltage-dependent potassium channels from rats made hypertensive (HT) by unilateral nephrectomy/renal wrap for 4 wk. Some rats had the fluorescent tracer DiA applied to the aortic nerve before the experiment to identify NTS neurons receiving monosynaptic baroreceptor afferent inputs. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was greater in 4-wk HT (165 +/- 5 mmHg, n = 26, P NTS neurons from NT and HT rats. At activation voltages from -10 to +10 mV, TOCs were significantly less in HT neurons compared with those observed in NT neurons (P NTS neurons from NT and HT rats and was not different comparing neurons from NT and HT rats. However, examination of the subset of NTS neurons exhibiting somatic DiA fluorescence revealed that DiA-labeled neurons from HT rats had a significantly shorter duration delayed excitation (n = 8 cells, P = 0.022) than DiA-labeled neurons from NT rats (n = 7 cells). Neurons with delayed excitation from HT rats had a significantly broader first action potential (AP) and a slower maximal downstroke velocity of repolarization compared with NT neurons with delayed excitation (P = 0.016 and P = 0.014, respectively). The number of APs in the first 200 ms of a sustained depolarization was greater in HT than NT neurons (P = 0.012). These results suggest that HT of 4-wk duration reduces TOCs in NTS neurons, and this contributes to reduced delayed excitation and increased AP responses to depolarizing inputs. Such changes could alter baroreflex function in hypertension.

  19. Pacemaking Kisspeptin Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin J.; Zhang, Chunguang; Qiu, Jian; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons are vital for reproduction. GnRH neurons express the kisspeptin receptor, GPR 54, and kisspeptins potently stimulate the release of GnRH by depolarising and inducing sustained action potential firing in GnRH neurons. As such Kiss1 neurons may be the pre-synaptic pacemaker neurons in the hypothalamic circuitry that controls reproduction. There are at least two different populations of Kiss1 neurons: one in the rostral periventricular area (RP3V) that is stimulated by oestrogens and the other in the arcuate nucleus that is inhibited by oestrogens. How each of these Kiss1 neuronal populations participate in the regulation of the reproductive cycle is currently under intense investigation. Based on electrophysiological studies in the guinea pig and mouse, Kiss1 neurons in general are capable of generating burst firing behavior. Essentially all Kiss1 neurons, which have been studied thus far in the arcuate nucleus, express the ion channels necessary for burst firing, which include hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated cation (HCN) channels and the T-type calcium (Cav3.1) channels. Under voltage clamp conditions, these channels produce distinct currents that under current clamp conditions can generate burst firing behavior. The future challenge is to identify other key channels and synaptic inputs involved in the regulation of the firing properties of Kiss1 neurons and the physiological regulation of the expression of these channels and receptors by oestrogens and other hormones. The ultimate goal is to understand how Kiss1 neurons control the different phases of GnRH neurosecretion and hence reproduction. PMID:23884368

  20. Stochastic resonance enhancement of small-world neural networks by hybrid synapses and time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    The synergistic effect of hybrid electrical-chemical synapses and information transmission delay on the stochastic response behavior in small-world neuronal networks is investigated. Numerical results show that, the stochastic response behavior can be regulated by moderate noise intensity to track the rhythm of subthreshold pacemaker, indicating the occurrence of stochastic resonance (SR) in the considered neural system. Inheriting the characteristics of two types of synapses-electrical and chemical ones, neural networks with hybrid electrical-chemical synapses are of great improvement in neuron communication. Particularly, chemical synapses are conducive to increase the network detectability by lowering the resonance noise intensity, while the information is better transmitted through the networks via electrical coupling. Moreover, time delay is able to enhance or destroy the periodic stochastic response behavior intermittently. In the time-delayed small-world neuronal networks, the introduction of electrical synapses can significantly improve the signal detection capability by widening the range of optimal noise intensity for the subthreshold signal, and the efficiency of SR is largely amplified in the case of pure chemical couplings. In addition, the stochastic response behavior is also profoundly influenced by the network topology. Increasing the rewiring probability in pure chemically coupled networks can always enhance the effect of SR, which is slightly influenced by information transmission delay. On the other hand, the capacity of information communication is robust to the network topology within the time-delayed neuronal systems including electrical couplings.

  1. Synchronizing time delay systems using variable delay in coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambika, G., E-mail: g.ambika@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune 411 021 (India); Amritkar, R.E., E-mail: amritkar@prl.res.in [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Delay and anticipation in coupling function varies with system dynamics. > Delay or anticipation of the synchronized state is independent of system delay. > Stability analysis developed is quite general. > We demonstrate enhanced security in communication. > Generalized synchronization possible over a wide range of parameter mismatch. - Abstract: We present a mechanism for synchronizing time delay systems using one way coupling with a variable delay in coupling that is reset at finite intervals. We present the analysis of the error dynamics that helps to isolate regions of stability of the synchronized state in the parameter space of interest for single and multiple delays. We supplement this by numerical simulations in a standard time delay system like Mackey Glass system. This method has the advantage that it can be adjusted to be delay or anticipatory in synchronization with a time which is independent of the system delay. We demonstrate the use of this method in communication using the bi channel scheme. We show that since the synchronizing channel carries information from transmitter only at intervals of reset time, it is not susceptible to an easy reconstruction.

  2. Small delay approximation of stochastic delay differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillouzic, Steve; L'heureux, Ivan; Longtin, André

    1999-04-01

    Delay differential equations evolve in an infinite-dimensional phase space. In this paper, we consider the effect of external fluctuations (noise) on delay differential equations involving one variable, thus leading to univariate stochastic delay differential equations (SDDE's). For small delays, a univariate nondelayed stochastic differential equation approximating such a SDDE is presented. Another approximation, complementary to the first, is also obtained using an average of the SDDE's drift term over the delayed dynamical variable, which defines a conditional average drift. This second approximation is characterized by the fact that the diffusion term is identical to that of the original SDDE. For small delays, our approach yields a steady-state probability density and a conditional average drift which are in close agreement with numerical simulations of the original SDDE. We illustrate this scheme with the delayed linear Langevin equation and a stochastic version of the delayed logistic equation. The technique can be used with any type of noise, and is easily generalized to multiple delays.

  3. Delay tolerant networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Longxiang; Luan, Tom H

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents emerging and promising communication methods for network reliability via delay tolerant networks (DTNs). Different from traditional networks, DTNs possess unique features, such as long latency and unstable network topology. As a result, DTNs can be widely applied to critical applications, such as space communications, disaster rescue, and battlefield communications. The brief provides a complete investigation of DTNs and their current applications, from an overview to the latest development in the area. The core issue of data forward in DTNs is tackled, including the importance of social characteristics, which is an essential feature if the mobile devices are used for human communication. Security and privacy issues in DTNs are discussed, and future work is also discussed.

  4. Experience-near but not experience-far autobiographical facts depend on the medial temporal lobe for retrieval: Evidence from amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Matthew D; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2016-01-29

    This paper addresses the idea that there may be two types of autobiographical facts with distinct cognitive and neural mechanisms: "Experience-near" autobiographical facts, which contain spatiotemporal content derived from personal experience and thus depend on the medial temporal lobe (MTL) for retrieval, and "experience-far" autobiographical facts, which are abstract memories and thus rely on neocortical brain regions involved in retrieval of general semantic memory. To investigate this conceptual model of autobiographical fact knowledge, we analyzed the nature of autobiographical facts that were generated by 8 individuals with MTL amnesia and 12 control participants in a recent study of identity and memory [Grilli, M.D., & Verfaellie, M. (2015). Supporting the self-concept with memory: insight from amnesia. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 10, 1684-1692]. Results revealed that MTL amnesic participants generated fewer experience-near autobiographical facts than controls. Experience-far autobiographical fact generation was not impaired in amnesic participants with damage restricted to the MTL, but there was preliminary evidence to suggest that it may be impaired in amnesic participants with damage to the MTL and anterior lateral temporal lobe. These results support a cognitive and neural distinction between experience-near and experience-far autobiographical facts and have implications for understanding the contribution of autobiographical fact knowledge to self-related cognition.

  5. Prenatal cocaine exposure decreases parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons and GABA-to-projection neuron ratio in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Deirdre M; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy produces harmful effects not only on the mother but also on the unborn child. The neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin are known as the principal targets of the action of cocaine in the fetal and postnatal brain. However, recent evidence suggests that cocaine can impair cerebral cortical GABA neuron development and function. We sought to analyze the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on the number and distribution of GABA and projection neurons (inhibitory interneurons and excitatory output neurons, respectively) in the mouse cerebral cortex. We found that the prenatal cocaine exposure decreased GABA neuron numbers and GABA-to-projection neuron ratio in the medial prefrontal cortex of 60-day-old mice. The neighboring prefrontal cortex did not show significant changes in either of these measures. However, there was a significant increase in projection neuron numbers in the prefrontal cortex but not in the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, the effects of cocaine on GABA and projection neurons appear to be cortical region specific. The population of parvalbumin-immunoreactive GABA neurons was decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex following the prenatal cocaine exposure. The cocaine exposure also delayed the developmental decline in the volume of the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, prenatal cocaine exposure produced persisting and region-specific effects on cortical cytoarchitecture and impaired the physiological balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. These structural changes may underlie the electrophysiological and behavioral effects of prenatal cocaine exposure observed in animal models and human subjects.

  6. Inhibition of propofol on single neuron and neuronal ensemble activity in prefrontal cortex of rats during working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinyu; Tian, Yu; Wang, Guolin; Tian, Xin

    2014-08-15

    Working memory (WM) refers to the temporary storage and manipulation of information necessary for performance of complex cognitive tasks. There is a growing interest in whether and how propofol anesthesia inhibits WM function. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible inhibition mechanism of propofol anesthesia from the view of single neuron and neuronal ensemble activities. Adult SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: propofol group (0.9 mg kg(-1)min(-1), 2h via a tail vein catheter) and control group. All the rats were tested for working memory performances in a Y-maze-rewarded alternation task (a task of delayed non-matched-to-sample) at 24, 48, 72 h after propofol anesthesia, and the behavior results of WM tasks were recorded at the same time. Spatio-temporal trains of action potentials were obtained from the original signals. Single neuron activity was characterized by peri-event time histograms analysis and neuron ensemble activities were characterized by Granger causality to describe the interactions within the neuron ensemble. The results show that: comparing with the control group, the percentage of neurons excited and related to WM was significantly decreased (pneuron ensemble were significantly weakened (p0.05), which were consistent with the behavior results. These findings could lead to improved understanding of the mechanism of anesthesia inhibition on WM functions from the view of single neuron activity and neuron ensemble interactions.

  7. Ablation of the Ferroptosis Inhibitor Glutathione Peroxidase 4 in Neurons Results in Rapid Motor Neuron Degeneration and Paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liuji; Hambright, William Sealy; Na, Ren; Ran, Qitao

    2015-11-20

    Glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4), an antioxidant defense enzyme active in repairing oxidative damage to lipids, is a key inhibitor of ferroptosis, a non-apoptotic form of cell death involving lipid reactive oxygen species. Here we show that GPX4 is essential for motor neuron health and survival in vivo. Conditional ablation of Gpx4 in neurons of adult mice resulted in rapid onset and progression of paralysis and death. Pathological inspection revealed that the paralyzed mice had a dramatic degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord but had no overt neuron degeneration in the cerebral cortex. Consistent with the role of GPX4 as a ferroptosis inhibitor, spinal motor neuron degeneration induced by Gpx4 ablation exhibited features of ferroptosis, including no caspase-3 activation, no TUNEL staining, activation of ERKs, and elevated spinal inflammation. Supplementation with vitamin E, another inhibitor of ferroptosis, delayed the onset of paralysis and death induced by Gpx4 ablation. Also, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial dysfunction appeared to be involved in ferroptosis of motor neurons induced by Gpx4 ablation. Taken together, the dramatic motor neuron degeneration and paralysis induced by Gpx4 ablation suggest that ferroptosis inhibition by GPX4 is essential for motor neuron health and survival in vivo.

  8. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  9. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  10. Electrical Identification and Selective Microstimulation of Neuronal Compartments Based on Features of Extracellular Action Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivojevic, Milos; Jäckel, David; Altermatt, Michael; Müller, Jan; Viswam, Vijay; Hierlemann, Andreas; Bakkum, Douglas J.

    2016-08-01

    A detailed, high-spatiotemporal-resolution characterization of neuronal responses to local electrical fields and the capability of precise extracellular microstimulation of selected neurons are pivotal for studying and manipulating neuronal activity and circuits in networks and for developing neural prosthetics. Here, we studied cultured neocortical neurons by using high-density microelectrode arrays and optical imaging, complemented by the patch-clamp technique, and with the aim to correlate morphological and electrical features of neuronal compartments with their responsiveness to extracellular stimulation. We developed strategies to electrically identify any neuron in the network, while subcellular spatial resolution recording of extracellular action potential (AP) traces enabled their assignment to the axon initial segment (AIS), axonal arbor and proximal somatodendritic compartments. Stimulation at the AIS required low voltages and provided immediate, selective and reliable neuronal activation, whereas stimulation at the soma required high voltages and produced delayed and unreliable responses. Subthreshold stimulation at the soma depolarized the somatic membrane potential without eliciting APs.

  11. Neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of HSV-1 latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Pamela C; Katzenell, Sarah; Pesola, Jean M; North, Brian; Coen, Donald M; Leib, David A

    2016-10-01

    IFN responses control acute HSV infection, but their role in regulating HSV latency is poorly understood. To address this we used mice lacking IFN signaling specifically in neural tissues. These mice supported a higher acute viral load in nervous tissue and delayed establishment of latency. While latent HSV-1 genome copies were equivalent, ganglia from neuronal IFN signaling-deficient mice unexpectedly supported reduced reactivation. IFNβ promoted survival of primary sensory neurons after infection with HSV-1, indicating a role for IFN signaling in sustaining neurons. We observed higher levels of latency associated transcripts (LATs) per HSV genome in mice lacking neuronal IFN signaling, consistent with a role for IFN in regulating LAT expression. These data show that neuronal IFN signaling modulates the expression of LAT and may conserve the pool of neurons available to harbor latent HSV-1 genome. The data also show that neuronal IFN signaling is dispensable for the establishment of latency.

  12. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  13. NEURON and Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including GUI tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the XML module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  14. NEURON and Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  15. On the Gravitomagnetic Time Delay

    OpenAIRE

    Ciufolini, I.; Kopeikin, S.; Mashhoon, B.; Ricci, F

    2002-01-01

    We study the gravitational time delay in ray propagation due to rotating masses in the linear approximation of general relativity. Simple expressions are given for the gravitomagnetic time delay that occurs when rays of radiation cross a slowly rotating shell and propagate in the field of a distant rotating source. Moreover, we calculate the local gravitational time delay in the Goedel universe. The observational consequences of these results in the case of weak gravitational lensing are disc...

  16. Demographic determinants of delayed divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, L Y; Heaton, T B

    1989-01-01

    This study identifies factors that predict delayed divorce in the US. The findings show that factors which influence marital stability in general also correlate with delayed divorce in the same direction. Wife's age at marriage, age of the youngest child, wife's religion, region of residence, and metropolitan residence have substantial effects of delayed divorce, but the effects of race, parental divorce, premarital pregnancy, and socioeconomic status are small.

  17. Location Estimation using Delayed Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Larsen, Thomas Dall; Nørgård, Peter Magnus

    1998-01-01

    When combining data from various sensors it is vital to acknowledge possible measurement delays. Furthermore, the sensor fusion algorithm, often a Kalman filter, should be modified in order to handle the delay. The paper examines different possibilities for handling delays and applies a new techn...... technique to a sensor fusion system for estimating the location of an autonomous guided vehicle. The system fuses encoder and vision measurements in an extended Kalman filter. Results from experiments in a real environment are reported...

  18. Neuronal actin dynamics, spine density and neuronal dendritic complexity are regulated by CAP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Actin remodeling is crucial for dendritic spine development, morphology and density. CAP2 is a regulator of actin dynamics through sequestering G-actin and severing F-actin. In a mouse model, ablation of CAP2 leads to cardiovascular defects and delayed wound healing. This report investigates the role of CAP2 in the brain using Cap2gt/gt mice. Dendritic complexity, the number and morphology of dendritic spines were altered in Cap2gt/gt with increased number of excitatory synapse. This was accompanied by increased F-actin content and F-actin accumulation in cultured Cap2gt/gt neurons. Moreover, reduced surface GluA1 was observed in mutant neurons under basal condition and after induction of chemical LTP. Additionally, we show an interaction between CAP2 and n-cofilin, presumably mediated through the C-terminal domain of CAP2 and dependent on cofilin ser3 phosphorylation. In vivo, the consequences of this interaction were altered phosphorylated cofilin levels and formation of cofilin aggregates in the neurons. Thus, our studies identify a novel role of CAP2 in neuronal development and neuronal actin dynamics.

  19. Concurrent Delay in Construction Disputes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleri, Sylvie Cécile

    period of delay can potentially be attributed to several events falling within both parties' spheres of responsibility, commonly termed concurrent delay, is rarely regulated in construction contracts in spite of its common occurrence. This book analyses both the theoretical foundations and the practical......Delay is one of the issues most frequently encountered in today’s construction industry; it causes significant economic damage to all parties involved. Construction contracts, standard and bespoke, almost invariably consider delay from a perspective of single liability. If the event causing...

  20. Time Delay of CGM Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Schoemaker, Michael; Kirchsteiger, Harald; Freckmann, Guido; Heinemann, Lutz; del Re, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a powerful tool to support the optimization of glucose control of patients with diabetes. However, CGM systems measure glucose in interstitial fluid but not in blood. Rapid changes in one compartment are not accompanied by similar changes in the other, but follow with some delay. Such time delays hamper detection of, for example, hypoglycemic events. Our aim is to discuss the causes and extent of time delays and approaches to compensate for these. Methods: CGM data were obtained in a clinical study with 37 patients with a prototype glucose sensor. The study was divided into 5 phases over 2 years. In all, 8 patients participated in 2 phases separated by 8 months. A total number of 108 CGM data sets including raw signals were used for data analysis and were processed by statistical methods to obtain estimates of the time delay. Results: Overall mean (SD) time delay of the raw signals with respect to blood glucose was 9.5 (3.7) min, median was 9 min (interquartile range 4 min). Analysis of time delays observed in the same patients separated by 8 months suggests a patient dependent delay. No significant correlation was observed between delay and anamnestic or anthropometric data. The use of a prediction algorithm reduced the delay by 4 minutes on average. Conclusions: Prediction algorithms should be used to provide real-time CGM readings more consistent with simultaneous measurements by SMBG. Patient specificity may play an important role in improving prediction quality. PMID:26243773

  1. Concurrent Delay in Construction Disputes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleri, Sylvie Cécile

    Delay is one of the issues most frequently encountered in today’s construction industry; it causes significant economic damage to all parties involved. Construction contracts, standard and bespoke, almost invariably consider delay from a perspective of single liability. If the event causing...... period of delay can potentially be attributed to several events falling within both parties' spheres of responsibility, commonly termed concurrent delay, is rarely regulated in construction contracts in spite of its common occurrence. This book analyses both the theoretical foundations and the practical...

  2. The identification and characteristics of sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groat, W C; Ryall, R W

    1968-06-01

    1. Sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurones were identified by intracellular and extracellular micro-electrode recording of antidromic potentials in response to stimulation of the pelvic nerve or the second or third sacral ventral roots.2. The segmental distribution of autonomic neurones varied in different cats. In some cats they were mainly in S2 segment, in others in S3 and in the remainder, in both S2 and S3.3. The antidromic potentials showed initial segment-somadendritic (IS-SD) inflexions and delayed depolarizations and were slightly less prolonged than those of sympathetic neurones but more prolonged than those of spinal motoneurones. After-hyperpolarization was observed after the antidromic spike potential.4. The conduction velocities for sacral parasympathetic preganglionic fibres were less than 12.5 m/sec and thus were similar to those of sympathetic preganglionic fibres.5. Parasympathetic neurones were not excited by micro-electro-phoretically applied 5-hydroxytryptamine, noradrenaline or acetylcholine.

  3. Social memory, amnesia, and autism: brain oxytocin secretion is regulated by NAD+ metabolites and single nucleotide polymorphisms of CD38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Huang, Jian-Jun; Liu, Li; Ma, Wen-Jie; Akther, Shirin; Higashida, Chiharu; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Minabe, Yoshio; Munesue, Toshio

    2012-11-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that CD38, a transmembrane protein with ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity, plays a critical role in mouse social behavior by regulating the release of oxytocin (OXT), which is essential for mutual recognition. When CD38 was disrupted, social amnesia was observed in Cd38 knockout mice. The autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), characterized by defects in reciprocal social interaction and communication, occur either sporadically or in a familial pattern. However, the etiology of ASDs remains largely unknown. Therefore, the theoretical basis for pharmacological treatments has not been established. Hence, there is a rationale for investigating single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human CD38 gene in ASD subjects. We found several SNPs in this gene. The SNP rs3796863 (C>A) was associated with high-functioning autism (HFA) in American samples from the Autism Gene Resource Exchange. Although this finding was partially confirmed in low-functioning autism subjects in Israel, it has not been replicated in Japanese HFA subjects. The second SNP of interest, rs1800561 (4693C>T), leads to the substitution of an arginine (R) at codon 140 by tryptophan (W; R140W) in CD38. This mutation was found in four probands of ASD and in family members of three pedigrees with variable levels of ASD or ASD traits. The plasma levels of OXT in ASD subjects with the R140W allele were lower than those in ASD subjects lacking this allele. The OXT levels were unchanged in healthy subjects with or without this mutation. One proband with the R140W allele receiving intranasal OXT for approximately 3years showed improvement in areas of social approach, eye contact and communication behaviors, emotion, irritability, and aggression. Five other ASD subjects with mental deficits received nasal OXT for various periods; three subjects showed improved symptoms, while two showed little or no effect. These results suggest that SNPs in CD38 may be possible risk factors for ASD by

  4. Characterization of neuronal intrinsic properties and synaptic transmission in layer I of anterior cingulate cortex from adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiang-Yao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The neurons in neocortex layer I (LI provide inhibition to the cortical networks. Despite increasing use of mice for the study of brain functions, few studies were reported about mouse LI neurons. In the present study, we characterized intrinsic properties of LI neurons of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, a key cortical area for sensory and cognitive functions, by using whole-cell patch clamp recording approach. Seventy one neurons in LI and 12 pyramidal neurons in LII/III were recorded. Although all of the LI neurons expressed continuous adapting firing characteristics, the unsupervised clustering results revealed five groups in the ACC, including: Spontaneous firing neurons; Delay-sAHP neurons, Delay-fAHP neurons, and two groups of neurons with ADP, named ADP1 and ADP2, respectively. Using pharmacological approaches, we found that LI neurons received both excitatory (mediated by AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptors, and inhibitory inputs (which were mediated by GABAA receptors. Our studies provide the first report characterizing the electrophysiological properties of neurons in LI of the ACC from adult mice.

  5. Neuron-type-specific signals for reward and punishment in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremiah Y; Haesler, Sebastian; Vong, Linh; Lowell, Bradford B; Uchida, Naoshige

    2012-01-18

    Dopamine has a central role in motivation and reward. Dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) signal the discrepancy between expected and actual rewards (that is, reward prediction error), but how they compute such signals is unknown. We recorded the activity of VTA neurons while mice associated different odour cues with appetitive and aversive outcomes. We found three types of neuron based on responses to odours and outcomes: approximately half of the neurons (type I, 52%) showed phasic excitation after reward-predicting odours and rewards in a manner consistent with reward prediction error coding; the other half of neurons showed persistent activity during the delay between odour and outcome that was modulated positively (type II, 31%) or negatively (type III, 18%) by the value of outcomes. Whereas the activity of type I neurons was sensitive to actual outcomes (that is, when the reward was delivered as expected compared to when it was unexpectedly omitted), the activity of type II and type III neurons was determined predominantly by reward-predicting odours. We 'tagged' dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons with the light-sensitive protein channelrhodopsin-2 and identified them based on their responses to optical stimulation while recording. All identified dopaminergic neurons were of type I and all GABAergic neurons were of type II. These results show that VTA GABAergic neurons signal expected reward, a key variable for dopaminergic neurons to calculate reward prediction error.

  6. Collective dynamics of delay-coupled limit cycle oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abhijit Sen; Ramana Dodla; George L Johnston

    2005-04-01

    Coupled limit cycle oscillators with instantaneous mutual coupling offer a useful but idealized mathematical paradigm for the study of collective behavior in a wide variety of biological, physical and chemical systems. In most real-life systems however the interaction is not instantaneous but is delayed due to finite propagation times of signals, reaction times of chemicals, individual neuron firing periods in neural networks etc. We present a brief overview of the effect of time-delayed coupling on the collective dynamics of such coupled systems. Simple model equations describing two oscillators with a discrete time-delayed coupling as well as those describing linear arrays of a large number of oscillators with time-delayed global or local couplings are studied. Analytic and numerical results pertaining to time delay induced changes in the onset and stability of amplitude death and phase-locked states are discussed. A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies reveal interesting new directions of research in this field and suggest exciting future areas of exploration and applications.

  7. Kv2 channel regulation of action potential repolarization and firing patterns in superior cervical ganglion neurons and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin W; Bean, Bruce P

    2014-04-02

    Kv2 family "delayed-rectifier" potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and action potentials. In both rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E produced near-saturating block of a component of current typically constituting ∼60-80% of the total delayed-rectifier current. GxTX-1E also reduced A-type potassium current (IA), but much more weakly. In SCG neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes and voltage clamp experiments using action potential waveforms showed that Kv2 channels carry ∼55% of the total outward current during action potential repolarization despite activating relatively late in the spike. In CA1 neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes evoked from -70 mV, but not -80 mV, likely reflecting a greater role of Kv2 when other potassium channels were partially inactivated at -70 mV. In both CA1 and SCG neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels produced dramatic depolarization of interspike voltages during repetitive firing. In CA1 neurons and some SCG neurons, this was associated with increased initial firing frequency. In all neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels depressed maintained firing because neurons entered depolarization block more readily. Therefore, Kv2 channels can either decrease or increase neuronal excitability depending on the time scale of excitation.

  8. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  9. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxygen/glucose deprivation induces a reduction in synaptic AMPA receptors on hippocampal CA3 neurons mediated by mGluR1 and adenosine A3 receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Siobhan; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighboring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+, resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear whether the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensi...

  11. Oxygen/glucose Deprivation Induces a Reduction in Synaptic AMPA Receptors on Hippocampal CA3 Neurons Mediated by mGluR1 and A3 Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Dennis, Siobhan H.; Jaafari, Nadia; Cimarosti, Helena; Hanley, Jonathan G.; Henley, Jeremy M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are highly sensitive to ischemic damage, whereas neighbouring CA3 pyramidal neurons are less susceptible. It is proposed that switching of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunits on CA1 neurons during an in vitro model of ischemia, oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD), leads to an enhanced permeability of AMPARs to Ca2+ resulting in delayed cell death. However, it is unclear if the same mechanisms exist in CA3 neurons and whether this underlies the differential sensitivit...

  12. Registration Delay and Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefken, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Tracking the difference between the time a first-year student is allowed to register for a course and the time he or she does register for a course (a student's registration delay), we notice a negative correlation between registration delay and final grade in a course. The difference between a student who registers within the first two minutes…

  13. 78 FR 59422 - Delayed Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Delayed Applications AGENCY: Office of Hazardous... applications delayed more than 180 days. SUMMARY: In accordance with the requirements of 49 U.S.C. 5117(c), PHMSA is publishing the following list of special permit applications that have been in process for 180...

  14. High resolution digital delay timer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Albert D.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for generating an output pulse following a trigger pulse at a time delay interval preset with a resolution which is high relative to a low resolution available from supplied clock pulses. A first lumped constant delay (20) provides a first output signal (24) at predetermined interpolation intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution time interval. Latching circuits (26, 28) latch the high resolution data (24) to form a first synchronizing data set (60). A selected time interval has been preset to internal counters (142, 146, 154) and corrected for circuit propagation delay times having the same order of magnitude as the desired high resolution. Internal system clock pulses (32, 34) count down the counters to generate an internal pulse delayed by an interval which is functionally related to the preset time interval. A second LCD (184) corrects the internal signal with the high resolution time delay. A second internal pulse is then applied to a third LCD (74) to generate a second set of synchronizing data (76) which is complementary with the first set of synchronizing data (60) for presentation to logic circuits (64). The logic circuits (64) further delay the internal output signal (72) to obtain a proper phase relationship of an output signal (80) with the internal pulses (32, 34). The final delayed output signal (80) thereafter enables the output pulse generator (82) to produce the desired output pulse (84) at the preset time delay interval following input of the trigger pulse (10, 12).

  15. Calibrating for Ionospheric Phase Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdoran, P. F.

    1985-01-01

    Technique determines ionospheric phase delay on real-time universally applicable basis in terms of electrons per meter squared by coherently modulating two L-band carrier frequencies received from two Global Positioning System satelites. Two pseudorandom number sequences cross-correlated to derive delay time.

  16. #FakeNobelDelayReasons

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Tuesday’s hour-long delay of the Nobel Prize in Physics announcement was (and still is) quite the cause for speculation. But on the Twittersphere, it was simply the catalyst for some fantastic puns, so-bad-they're-good physics jokes and other shenanigans. Here are some of our favourite #FakeNobelDelayReasons.    

  17. Imitation dynamics with time delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shi-Chang; Yu, Jie-Ru; Kurokawa, Shun; Tao, Yi

    2017-05-07

    Based on the classic imitation dynamics (Hofbauer and Sigmund, 1998, Evolutionary Games and Population Dynamics, Cambridge University Press), the imitation dynamics with time delay is investigated, where the probability that an individual will imitate its opponent's own strategy is assumed to depend on the comparison between the past expected payoff of this individual's own strategy and the past expected payoff of its opponent's own strategy, i.e. there is a time delay effect. For the two-phenotype model, we show that if the system has an interior equilibrium and this interior equilibrium is stable when there is no time delay, then there must be a critical value of time delay such that the system tends to a stable periodic solution when the time delay is larger than the critical value. On the other hand, for three-phenotype (rock-scissors-paper) model, the numerical analysis shows that for the stable periodic solution induced by the time delay, the amplitude and the period will increase with the increase of the time delay. These results should help to understand the evolution of behavior based on the imitation dynamics with time delay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic bearing optical delay line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dool, T.C. van den; Kamphues, F.G.; Fouss, B.; Henrioulle, K.; Hogenhuis, H.

    2004-01-01

    TNO TPD, in close cooperation with Micromega-Dynamics and Dutch Space, has developed an advanced Optical Delay Line (ODL) for use in PRIMA, GENIE and other ground based interferometers. The delay line design is modular and flexible, which makes scaling for other applications a relatively easy task.

  19. Disrupting astrocyte–neuron lactate transfer persistently reduces conditioned responses to cocaine

    KAUST Repository

    Boury-Jamot, B

    2015-10-27

    A central problem in the treatment of drug addiction is the high risk of relapse often precipitated by drug-associated cues. The transfer of glycogen-derived lactate from astrocytes to neurons is required for long-term memory. Whereas blockade of drug memory reconsolidation represents a potential therapeutic strategy, the role of astrocyte–neuron lactate transport in long-term conditioning has received little attention. By infusing an inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase into the basolateral amygdala of rats, we report that disruption of astrocyte-derived lactate not only transiently impaired the acquisition of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference but also persistently disrupted an established conditioning. The drug memory was rescued by L-Lactate co-administration through a mechanism requiring the synaptic plasticity-related transcription factor Zif268 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling pathway but not the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf). The long-term amnesia induced by glycogenolysis inhibition and the concomitant decreased expression of phospho-ERK were both restored with L-Lactate co-administration. These findings reveal a critical role for astrocyte-derived lactate in positive memory formation and highlight a novel amygdala-dependent reconsolidation process, whose disruption may offer a novel therapeutic target to reduce the long-lasting conditioned responses to cocaine.

  20. Neuronal Reward and Decision Signals: From Theories to Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-07-01

    Rewards are crucial objects that induce learning, approach behavior, choices, and emotions. Whereas emotions are difficult to investigate in animals, the learning function is mediated by neuronal reward prediction error signals which implement basic constructs of reinforcement learning theory. These signals are found in dopamine neurons, which emit a global reward signal to striatum and frontal cortex, and in specific neurons in striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex projecting to select neuronal populations. The approach and choice functions involve subjective value, which is objectively assessed by behavioral choices eliciting internal, subjective reward preferences. Utility is the formal mathematical characterization of subjective value and a prime decision variable in economic choice theory. It is coded as utility prediction error by phasic dopamine responses. Utility can incorporate various influences, including risk, delay, effort, and social interaction. Appropriate for formal decision mechanisms, rewards are coded as object value, action value, difference value, and chosen value by specific neurons. Although all reward, reinforcement, and decision variables are theoretical constructs, their neuronal signals constitute measurable physical implementations and as such confirm the validity of these concepts. The neuronal reward signals provide guidance for behavior while constraining the free will to act.

  1. Neuronal Reward and Decision Signals: From Theories to Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Rewards are crucial objects that induce learning, approach behavior, choices, and emotions. Whereas emotions are difficult to investigate in animals, the learning function is mediated by neuronal reward prediction error signals which implement basic constructs of reinforcement learning theory. These signals are found in dopamine neurons, which emit a global reward signal to striatum and frontal cortex, and in specific neurons in striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex projecting to select neuronal populations. The approach and choice functions involve subjective value, which is objectively assessed by behavioral choices eliciting internal, subjective reward preferences. Utility is the formal mathematical characterization of subjective value and a prime decision variable in economic choice theory. It is coded as utility prediction error by phasic dopamine responses. Utility can incorporate various influences, including risk, delay, effort, and social interaction. Appropriate for formal decision mechanisms, rewards are coded as object value, action value, difference value, and chosen value by specific neurons. Although all reward, reinforcement, and decision variables are theoretical constructs, their neuronal signals constitute measurable physical implementations and as such confirm the validity of these concepts. The neuronal reward signals provide guidance for behavior while constraining the free will to act. PMID:26109341

  2. Emergence of assortative mixing between clusters of cultured neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Teller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the activity of neuronal cultures is considered to be a good proxy of the functional connectivity of in vivo neuronal tissues. Thus, the functional complex network inferred from activity patterns is a promising way to unravel the interplay between structure and functionality of neuronal systems. Here, we monitor the spontaneous self-sustained dynamics in neuronal cultures formed by interconnected aggregates of neurons (clusters. Dynamics is characterized by the fast activation of groups of clusters in sequences termed bursts. The analysis of the time delays between clusters' activations within the bursts allows the reconstruction of the directed functional connectivity of the network. We propose a method to statistically infer this connectivity and analyze the resulting properties of the associated complex networks. Surprisingly enough, in contrast to what has been reported for many biological networks, the clustered neuronal cultures present assortative mixing connectivity values, meaning that there is a preference for clusters to link to other clusters that share similar functional connectivity, as well as a rich-club core, which shapes a 'connectivity backbone' in the network. These results point out that the grouping of neurons and the assortative connectivity between clusters are intrinsic survival mechanisms of the culture.

  3. Emergence of Assortative Mixing between Clusters of Cultured Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teller, Sara; Granell, Clara; De Domenico, Manlio; Soriano, Jordi; Gómez, Sergio; Arenas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the activity of neuronal cultures is considered to be a good proxy of the functional connectivity of in vivo neuronal tissues. Thus, the functional complex network inferred from activity patterns is a promising way to unravel the interplay between structure and functionality of neuronal systems. Here, we monitor the spontaneous self-sustained dynamics in neuronal cultures formed by interconnected aggregates of neurons (clusters). Dynamics is characterized by the fast activation of groups of clusters in sequences termed bursts. The analysis of the time delays between clusters' activations within the bursts allows the reconstruction of the directed functional connectivity of the network. We propose a method to statistically infer this connectivity and analyze the resulting properties of the associated complex networks. Surprisingly enough, in contrast to what has been reported for many biological networks, the clustered neuronal cultures present assortative mixing connectivity values, meaning that there is a preference for clusters to link to other clusters that share similar functional connectivity, as well as a rich-club core, which shapes a ‘connectivity backbone’ in the network. These results point out that the grouping of neurons and the assortative connectivity between clusters are intrinsic survival mechanisms of the culture. PMID:25188377

  4. Time-delay damping theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪峰

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, existing damping theories are briefly reviewed. On the basis of the existing damping theories, a new kind of damping theory, i.e., the time-delay damping theory, is developed. In the time-delay damping theory, the damping force is considered to be directly proportional to the increment of displacement. The response analysis of an SDOF time-delay damping system is carried out, and the methods for obtaining the solution for a time-delay damping system in the time domain as well as the frequency domain are given. The comparison between results from different damping theories shows that the time-delay damping theory is both reasonable and convenient.

  5. Asynchronous Bounded Expected Delay Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhshi, Rena; Fokkink, Wan; Pang, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The commonly used asynchronous bounded delay (ABD) network models assume a fixed bound on message delay. We propose a probabilistic network model, called asynchronous bounded expected delay (ABE) model. Instead of a strict bound, the ABE model requires only a bound on the expected message delay. While the conditions of ABD networks restrict the set of possible executions, in ABE networks all asynchronous executions are possible, but executions with extremely long delays are less probable. In contrast to ABD networks, ABE networks cannot be synchronised efficiently. At the example of an election algorithm, we show that the minimal assumptions of ABE networks are sufficient for the development of efficient algorithms. For anonymous, unidirectional ABE rings of known size N we devise a probabilistic leader election algorithm having average message and time complexity O(N).

  6. Synchronous bursts on scale-free neuronal networks with attractive and repulsive coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyun Wang

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dependence of synchronization transitions of bursting oscillations on the information transmission delay over scale-free neuronal networks with attractive and repulsive coupling. It is shown that for both types of coupling, the delay always plays a subtle role in either promoting or impairing synchronization. In particular, depending on the inherent oscillation period of individual neurons, regions of irregular and regular propagating excitatory fronts appear intermittently as the delay increases. These delay-induced synchronization transitions are manifested as well-expressed minima in the measure for spatiotemporal synchrony. For attractive coupling, the minima appear at every integer multiple of the average oscillation period, while for the repulsive coupling, they appear at every odd multiple of the half of the average oscillation period. The obtained results are robust to the variations of the dynamics of individual neurons, the system size, and the neuronal firing type. Hence, they can be used to characterize attractively or repulsively coupled scale-free neuronal networks with delays.

  7. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  8. La experiencia truncada: estudio de la amnesia anterógrada como representación del sujeto empirista en Memento (2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol ALONSO CANO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Este lacónico estudio pretende ser una reflexión en torno a la problemática de la amnesia anterógrada, y sus diferentes consecuencias. Una de ellas, que es la que se va a defender a lo largo del texto, radica en que, el sujeto amnésico anterógrado, representa, de una forma diáfana, la subjetividad empirista establecida por John Locke1 y radicalizada por David Hume2.Asimismo, para realizar esta investigación, se ha escogido un caso concreto para poder determinar con absoluta precisión el fenómeno amnésico anterógrada. En particular, este caso en el que se ha acogido el estudio es el personaje Leonard Shelby (Lenny del film de culto Memento (2000 de Christopher Nolan.En la primera parte del estudio, se explica de una forma sinóptica la estructura del film, así como los acontecimientos que le ocurren a Lenny y que determinan su patología. Unida a esta explicación, se sacan a la luz varias cuestiones problemáticas que el caso de Lenny acarrea, como, verbigracia, el problema de la identidad y la ruptura de la conciencia inmutable y “substancialista”.Ulteriormente, el estudio se dirige hacia una dilucidación del fenómeno de la amnesia anterógrada. Para ello, la investigación se encaminará por uno de los primeros casos detectados (el paciente HM, y se destacarán las diferentes características de esta realidad patológica. Se observarán las diferentes estructuras cerebrales implicadas en la enfermedad, así como a varias cuestiones que parecen problematizar la definición inicial de amnesia anterógrada.Finalmente, se observará como, una vez dilucidadas todas las características, la figura del amnésico anterógrada encarna el sujeto empirista que impulsan tanto Locke1 como Hume2, debido a la ruptura de toda perspectiva futurista, al carecer de la facultad de generar nuevas experiencias y, por consiguiente, encarnar un sujeto que transita por la pura instantaneidad.

  9. Neuronal activity in primate orbitofrontal cortex reflects the value of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Matthew R; Olson, Carl R

    2005-10-01

    Neurons in monkey orbitofrontal cortex (OF) are known to respond to reward-predicting cues with a strength that depends on the value of the predicted reward as determined 1) by intrinsic attributes including size and quality and 2) by extrinsic factors including the monkey's state of satiation and awareness of what other rewards are currently available. We pose here the question whether another extrinsic factor critical to determining reward value-the delay expected to elapse before delivery-influences neuronal activity in OF. To answer this question, we recorded from OF neurons while monkeys performed a memory-guided saccade task in which a cue presented early in each trial predicted whether the delay before the monkey could respond and receive a reward of fixed size would be short or long. OF neurons tended to fire more strongly in response to a cue predicting a short delay. The tendency to fire more strongly in anticipation of a short delay was correlated across neurons with the tendency to fire more strongly before a large reward. We conclude that neuronal activity in OF represents the time-discounted value of the expected reward.

  10. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Beppu, H.; Hirose, K.; Yamada, K. (Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author).

  11. Motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-23

    Essential facts Motor neurone disease describes a group of related diseases, affecting the neurones in the brain and spinal cord. Progressive, incurable and life-limiting, MND is rare, with about 1,100 people developing it each year in the UK and up to 5,000 people affected at any one time. One third of people will die within a year of diagnosis and more than half within two years. About 5% to 10% are alive at ten years.

  12. Neurons and Tumor Suppressors

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas W Zochodne

    2014-01-01

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to e...

  13. The flavonoid apigenin delays forgetting of passive avoidance conditioning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Miroljub; Caballero-Bleda, María; Benavente-García, Obdulio; Castillo, Julián

    2014-05-01

    The present experiments were performed to study the effect of the flavonoid apigenin (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p.), 1 h before acquisition), on 24 h retention performance and forgetting of a step-through passive avoidance task, in young male Wistar rats. There were no differences between saline- and apigenin-treated groups in the 24 h retention trial. Furthermore, apigenin did not prevent the amnesia induced by scopolamine (1mg/kg, i.p., 30 min before the acquisition). The saline- and apigenin-treated rats that did not step through into the dark compartment during the cut-off time (540 s) were retested weekly for up to eight weeks. In the saline treated group, the first significant decline in passive avoidance response was observed at four weeks, and complete memory loss was found five weeks after the acquisition of the passive avoidance task. At the end of the experimental period, 60% of the animals treated with apigenin still did not step through. These data suggest that 1) apigenin delays the long-term forgetting but did not modulate the 24 h retention of fear memory and 2) the obtained beneficial effect of apigenin on the passive avoidance conditioning is mediated by mechanisms that do not implicate its action on the muscarinic cholinergic system.

  14. Neuron division or enucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotnikov, O S; Laktionova, A A; Solovieva, I A; Krasnova, T V

    2010-10-01

    The classical Bielschowsky-Gross neurohistological method was used to reproduce all the morphological phenomena interpreted by many authors as signs of neuron division, budding, and fission. It is suggested that these signs are associated with the effects of enucleation, which occurs in many cells of other tissue types in response to a variety of chemical and physical treatments. Studies were performed using neurons isolated from the mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis and exposed in tissue culture to the actin microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin B. Phase contrast time-lapse video recording over periods of 4-8 h demonstrated nuclear displacement, ectopization, and budding, to the level of almost complete fission of the neuron body. This repeats the pattern seen in static fixed preparations in "normal" conditions and after different experimental treatments. Budding of the cytoplasm was also sometimes seen at the early stages of the experiments. Control experiments in which cultured neurons were exposed to the solvent for cytochalasin B, i.e., dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), did not reveal any changes in neurons over a period of 8 h. We take the view that the picture previously interpreted as neuron division and fission can be explained in terms of the inhibition of actin microfilaments, sometimes developing spontaneously in cells undergoing individual metabolic changes preventing the maintenance of cytoskeleton stability.

  15. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paul S; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models.

  16. NeuronBank: a tool for cataloging neuronal circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S Katz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models.

  17. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  18. Theory of oscillatory firing induced by spatially correlated noise and delayed inhibitory feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Benjamin; Doiron, Brent; Longtin, André

    2005-12-01

    A network of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with global inhibitory feedback and under the influence of spatially correlated noise is studied. We calculate the spectral statistics of the network (power spectrum of the population activity, cross spectrum between spike trains of different neurons) as well as of a single neuron (power spectrum of spike train, cross spectrum between external noise and spike train) within the network. As shown by comparison with numerical simulations, our theory works well for arbitrary network size if the feedback is weak and the amount of external noise does not exceed that of the internal noise. By means of our analytical results we discuss the quality of the correlation-induced oscillation in a large network as a function of the transmission delay and the internal noise intensity. It is shown that the strongest oscillation is obtained in a system with zero internal noise and adiabatically long delay (i.e., the delay period is longer than any other time scale in the system). For a neuron with a strong intrinsic frequency, the oscillation becomes strongly anharmonic in the case of a long delay time. We also discuss briefly the kind of synchrony introduced by the feedback-induced oscillation.

  19. Spectral components of cytosolic [Ca2+] spiking in neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kardos, J; Szilágyi, N; Juhász, G;

    1998-01-01

    into evolutionary spectra of a characteristic set of frequencies. Non-delayed small spikes on top of sustained [Ca2+]c were synthesized by a main component frequency, 0.132+/-0.012 Hz, showing its maximal amplitude in phase with the start of depolarization (25 mM KCI) combined with caffeine (10 mM) application....... Delayed complex responses of large [Ca2+]c spiking observed in cells from a different set of cultures were synthesized by a set of frequencies within the range 0.018-0.117 Hz. Differential frequency patterns are suggested as characteristics of the [Ca2+]c spiking responses of neurons under different...

  20. Time Delay in Molecular Photoionization

    CERN Document Server

    Hockett, P; Villeneuve, D M; Corkum, P B

    2015-01-01

    Time-delays in the photoionization of molecules are investigated. As compared to atomic ionization, the time-delays expected from molecular ionization present a much richer phenomenon, with a strong spatial dependence due to the anisotropic nature of the molecular scattering potential. We investigate this from a scattering theory perspective, and make use of molecular photoionization calculations to examine this effect in representative homonuclear and hetronuclear diatomic molecules, nitrogen and carbon monoxide. We present energy and angle-resolved maps of the Wigner delay time for single-photon valence ionization, and discuss the possibilities for experimental measurements.

  1. An animal model of amnesia that uses Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analysis to distinguish recollection from familiarity deficits in recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenbaum, H; Fortin, N; Sauvage, M; Robitsek, R J; Farovik, A

    2010-07-01

    Here we review our development of an animal model of episodic memory and amnesia that employs a signal detection analyses to characterize recognition memory performance in rats. This approach aims to distinguish episodic recollection of studied items from mere familiarity for recently experienced stimuli, and then to examine the neural basis of these memory processes. Our findings on intact animals indicate that it is possible to distinguish independent components of recognition that are associated with features of recollection and familiarity in humans. Furthermore, we have found that damage limited to the hippocampus results in a selective deficit in recollection and not familiarity. Also, aging and prefrontal damage result in a similar pattern of impaired recollection and spared familiarity. However, whereas the recollection deficit following hippocampal damage can be attributed to the forgetting of studied materials, the impairment following prefrontal damage is due to false alarms, likely reflecting a deficit in source monitoring.

  2. Communicating using the eyes without remembering it: cognitive rehabilitation in a severely brain-injured patient with amnesia, tetraplegia and anarthria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojano, Luigi; Moretta, Pasquale; Estraneo, Anna

    2009-04-01

    We describe here a case of cognitive rehabilitation in a young patient with closed head injury, who had dense anterograde amnesia and such disabling neurological defects (tetraplegia and anarthria) that the condition evoked some features of an incomplete locked-in syndrome. After a prolonged period of no communicative possibility, the patient underwent a specific training, based on principles of errorless learning, with the aim of using a computerized eye-tracker system. Although, due to memory disturbances, the patient always denied ever having used the eye-tracker system, learned to use the computerized device and improved interaction with the environment. This favourable outcome may serve as a stimulus for devising new training approaches in patients with complex patterns of cognitive impairments, even when associated with severe motor impairments.

  3. Long-term outcome in transient global amnesia patients with and without focal hyperintensities in the CA1 region of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttner, Ingo; Prexl, Sascha; Freund, Wolfgang; Unrath, Alexander; Bengel, Dietmar; Huber, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Focal hippocampal diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) lesion patterns are detected in transient global amnesia (TGA) patients in different frequency. It has been speculated that acute diffusion restrictions are associated with a worse outcome. Therefore, we evaluated the influence of acute DWI lesions on the cognitive long-term outcome in TGA patients. Seventeen otherwise healthy patients with the clinical syndrome of TGA, who had MRI investigations on admission as well as 1 day later, were investigated with a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery 2 years later. Acute hippocampal DWI lesions in TGA patients were detected in almost two thirds of the patients. Psychometric evaluation revealed no differences in cognitive performance between patients with and without DWI lesions as well as compared to healthy subjects. In addition, no relapse of the attack has been recognized in either group of TGA patients.

  4. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  5. Bifurcation and synchronization of synaptically coupled FHN models with time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Qingyun [School of Science, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China); Inner College of Mongolia Finance and Economics, Huhhot 010051 (China); Lu Qishao [School of Science, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Guanrong [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Feng Zhaosheng [Department of Mathematics, University of Texas - Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78441 (United States)], E-mail: zsfeng@utpa.edu; Duan Lixia [School of Science, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2009-01-30

    This paper presents an investigation of dynamics of the coupled nonidentical FHN models with synaptic connection, which can exhibit rich bifurcation behavior with variation of the coupling strength. With the time delay being introduced, the coupled neurons may display a transition from the original chaotic motions to periodic ones, which is accompanied by complex bifurcation scenario. At the same time, synchronization of the coupled neurons is studied in terms of their mean frequencies. We also find that the small time delay can induce new period windows with the coupling strength increasing. Moreover, it is found that synchronization of the coupled neurons can be achieved in some parameter ranges and related to their bifurcation transition. Bifurcation diagrams are obtained numerically or analytically from the mathematical model and the parameter regions of different behavior are clarified.

  6. Transient Global Amnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptom, which is the inability to form new memories and to recall the recent past. Once that symptom is confirmed, ... president — and assess his or her ability to recall a random list of words. The doctor may ask you: When did the person's memory loss begin? Did the memory loss come on ...

  7. Effects of luteolin on spatial memory, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in a scopolamine-induced amnesia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woosuk; Nam, Sung Min; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Hwang, In Koo

    2013-10-01

    Luteolin, a common flavonoid from many plants, has various pharmacological activities, including a memory-improving effect. In this study, we investigated the effects of luteolin on spatial memory, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in a rat model of scopolamine (SCO)-induced amnesia. Scopolamine was subcutaneously administered for 28 days via an Alzet minipump (44 mg/ml delivered at 2·5 μl/h) along with a daily intraperitoneal administration of vehicle (saline) 10 mg/kg luteolin or 5 mg/kg galantamine (GAL) (a control drug for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor) for 28 days. The administration of SCO significantly decreased the spatial alteration percentage in the Y-maze test compared to that in the vehicle (saline)-treated group. The administration of luteolin or GAL significantly improved the spatial alteration percentage compared to that in the SCO-treated group. Similarly, the administration of SCO significantly decreased the cell proliferation (Ki67-positive cells) and neuroblast differentiation (doubleocortin-positive cells) in the dentate gyrus. The administration of luteolin or GAL significantly mitigated the SCO-induced reduction of Ki67- and doublecortin-immunoreactive cells in the dentate gyrus. In addition, the administration of luteolin significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) levels) and increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and AChE levels in the hippocampal homogenates compared to the SCO-treated group. These results suggest that the luteolin treatment improves the SCO-induced reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus. The mechanism underlying the amelioration of SCO-induced amnesia by luteolin may be associated with the increase in BDNF, acetylcholine, and the decrease in lipid peroxidation.

  8. Cognitive enhancing and antioxidant activity of ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of Hibiscus rosa sinensis in scopolamine-induced amnesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana S Nade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cognitive enhancing and antioxidant activity of Hibiscus rosa sinensis. Materials and Methods : The learning and memory was impaired by administration of scopolamine (1 mg/kg, i.p. in mice which is associated with altered brain oxidative status. The object recognition test (ORT and passive avoidance test (PAT were used to assess cognitive enhancing activity. Animals were treated with an ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of H. sinensis (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o. Results : The ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanol extract of H. sinensis (EASF attenuated amnesia induced by scopolamine and aging. The discrimination index (DI was significantly decreased in the aged and scopolamine group in ORT. Pretreatment with EASF significantly increased the DI. In PAT, scopolamine-treated mice exhibited significantly shorter step-down latencies (SDL. EASF treatment showed a significant increase in SDL in young, aged as well as in scopolamine-treated animals. The biochemical analysis of brain revealed that scopolamine treatment increased lipid peroxidation and decreased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione reductase (GSH. Administration of extract significantly reduced LPO and reversed the decrease in brain SOD and GSH levels. The administration of H. sinensis improved memory in amnesic mice and prevented the oxidative stress associated with scopolamine. The mechanism of such protection of H. sinensis may be due to augmentation of cellular antioxidants. Conclusion : The results of the present study suggested that H. sinensis had a protective role against age and scopolamine-induced amnesia, indicating its utility in management of cognitive disorders.

  9. Systemic or intra-amygdala infusion of an endocannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 blocked propofol-induced anterograde amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y; Wang, J; Xu, P B; Xu, Y J; Miao, C H

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is well-known for its anterograde amnesic actions. However, a recent experiment showed that propofol can also produce retrograde memory enhancement effects via an interaction with the endocannabinoid CB1 system. Therefore, the authors hypothesized that the regulating effect of propofol on the endocannabinoid CB1 system might also decrease the anterograde amnesic effect of propofol under some conditions, which might be a risk factor for intraoperative awareness. Since, the basolateral amygdala (BLA) has been confirmed to mediate propofol-induced anterograde amnesia and the BLA contains a high concentration of CB1 receptors, the authors investigated whether and how the endocannabinoid system, particularly the CB1 receptor within BLA, influences propofol-induced anterograde amnesia. Male Sprague-Dawley rats trained with inhibitory avoidance (IA) were systematically pre-trained using a memory-impairing dose of propofol (25 mg/kg). Before propofol administration, rats received an intraperitoneal injection of a CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 (1 mg/kg or 2 mg/kg) or a bilateral intra-BLA injection of AM251 (0.6 ng or 6 ng per 0.5 μl). Twenty-four hours after IA training, the IA retention latency was tested. It was found that systemic or intra-BLA injection of a non-regulating dose of AM251 (2 mg/kg or 6 ng per 0.5 μl, respectively) blocked the memory-impairing effect of propofol. These results indicate that the anterograde amnesic effect of propofol is mediated, in part, by activation of the CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the BLA.

  10. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, Lucilla de, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  11. Leibniz Dynamics with Time Delay

    OpenAIRE

    Albu, I. D.; Opris, D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we show that several dynamical systems with time delay can be described as vector fields associated to smooth functions via a bracket of Leibniz structure. Some examples illustrate the theoretical considerations.

  12. Delays and networked control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hetel, Laurentiu; Daafouz, Jamal; Johansson, Karl

    2016-01-01

    This edited monograph includes state-of-the-art contributions on continuous time dynamical networks with delays. The book is divided into four parts. The first part presents tools and methods for the analysis of time-delay systems with a particular attention on control problems of large scale or infinite-dimensional systems with delays. The second part of the book is dedicated to the use of time-delay models for the analysis and design of Networked Control Systems. The third part of the book focuses on the analysis and design of systems with asynchronous sampling intervals which occur in Networked Control Systems. The last part of the book exposes several contributions dealing with the design of cooperative control and observation laws for networked control systems. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of control theory, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students. .

  13. A Kac CROW Delay Line

    CERN Document Server

    Sumetsky, M

    2013-01-01

    A low-loss CROW delay line with a weak inter-resonator coupling determined by the Kac matrix is dispersionless and can be easily impedance-matched by adjusting the coupling to the input/output waveguide.

  14. Systematics in delayed neutron yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsawa, Takaaki [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    1998-03-01

    An attempt was made to reproduce the systematic trend observed in the delayed neutron yields for actinides on the basis of the five-Gaussian representation of the fission yield together with available data sets for delayed neutron emission probability. It was found that systematic decrease in DNY for heavier actinides is mainly due to decrease of fission yields of precursors in the lighter side of the light fragment region. (author)

  15. Time Delay in Molecular Photoionization

    OpenAIRE

    Hockett, P.; Frumker, E.; Villeneuve, D M; Corkum, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    Time-delays in the photoionization of molecules are investigated. As compared to atomic ionization, the time-delays expected from molecular ionization present a much richer phenomenon, with a strong spatial dependence due to the anisotropic nature of the molecular scattering potential. We investigate this from a scattering theory perspective, and make use of molecular photoionization calculations to examine this effect in representative homonuclear and hetronuclear diatomic molecules, nitroge...

  16. Pattern Formation and Continuation in a Trineuron Ring with Delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shang Jiang GUO; Li Hong HUANG

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a single-directional ring of three neurons with delays. First, linear stability of the model is investigated by analyzing the associated characteristic transcendental equation. Next, we studied the local Hopf bifurcations and the spatio-temporal patterns of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits. Basing on the normal form approach and the center manifold theory, we derive the formula for determining the properties of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbit, such as the direction of Hopf bifurcation. Finally, global existence conditions for Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits are derived by using degree theory methods.

  17. Intrinsic modulation of pulse-coupled integrate-and-fire neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, S.; Lord, G. J.

    1997-11-01

    Intrinsic neuromodulation is observed in sensory and neuromuscular circuits and in biological central pattern generators. We model a simple neuronal circuit with a system of two pulse-coupled integrate-and-fire neurons and explore the parameter regimes for periodic firing behavior. The inclusion of biologically realistic features shows that the speed and onset of neuronal response plays a crucial role in determining the firing phase for periodic rhythms. We explore the neurophysiological function of distributed delays arising from both the synaptic transmission process and dendritic structure as well as discrete delays associated with axonal communication delays. Bifurcation and stability diagrams are constructed with a mixture of simple analysis, numerical continuation and the Kuramoto phase-reduction technique. Moreover, we show that, for asynchronous behavior, the strength of electrical synapses can control the firing rate of the system.

  18. Pattern reverberation in networks of excitable systems with connection delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücken, Leonhard; Rosin, David P.; Worlitzer, Vasco M.; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-01-01

    We consider the recurrent pulse-coupled networks of excitable elements with delayed connections, which are inspired by the biological neural networks. If the delays are tuned appropriately, the network can either stay in the steady resting state, or alternatively, exhibit a desired spiking pattern. It is shown that such a network can be used as a pattern-recognition system. More specifically, the application of the correct pattern as an external input to the network leads to a self-sustained reverberation of the encoded pattern. In terms of the coupling structure, the tolerance and the refractory time of the individual systems, we determine the conditions for the uniqueness of the sustained activity, i.e., for the functionality of the network as an unambiguous pattern detector. We point out the relation of the considered systems with cyclic polychronous groups and show how the assumed delay configurations may arise in a self-organized manner when a spike-time dependent plasticity of the connection delays is assumed. As excitable elements, we employ the simplistic coincidence detector models as well as the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron models. Moreover, the system is implemented experimentally on a Field-Programmable Gate Array.

  19. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-03-02

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development.

  20. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.