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Sample records for ammonium uranyl carbonates

  1. Thermal analysis studies of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis of the ammonium uranyl carbonate powder were performed with heat balance in the following atmosphers: Air, Ar and Ar-8%H2. The thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis curves of the ammonium uranyl carbonate powder obtained from different source were reported and discussed

  2. Pilot scale for preparation of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure adopted for obtaining Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) from uranium hexafluoride (UF sub(6)) or aqueous solutions of uranylnitrate (UO sub(2)(NO sub(3)) sub(2)) is described in the present work. This procedure involves the precipitation of AUC in a chemical reactor by the addition of gaseous UF sub(6) or solutions of uranylnitrate to NH sub(3) and CO sub(2) gases in a solution containing ammonium bicarbonate, where pH and temperature are controlled. Details regarding the characterization and quality control methods in the preparation of AUC are presented along with their physical and chemical properties. Some informations about effluents generated during the process are presented too. An attempt is made to correlate the parameters involved in the precipitation process of AUC and their characteristics. (author)

  3. Purification of uranium from fission products by ammonium uranyl carbonate precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Processing of the oxalate filtrate generated in plutonium reconversion laboratory involves recovery of plutonium by uranous oxalate carrier precipitation and uranium by ammonium diuranate precipitation. The ammonium di-uranate precipitate generally carries most of the fission products which are high energy gamma emitters. Purification of uranium from the fission products has been investigated employing ammonium carbonate which dissolves the slurry and re-precipitates uranium as ammonium uranyl carbonate. Fission product decontamination factor has been evaluated, which indicate the possibility of 99.6% recovery and purification of uranium from fission products. This method simplifies the purification process with less man-rem exposure and high quality end product. (author)

  4. Thermal Analysis of the Decomposition of Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) in Different Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hälldahl, L.; Sørensen, Ole Toft

    1979-01-01

    The intermediate products formed during thermal decomposition of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) in different atmospheres, (air, helium and hydrogen) have been determined by thermal analysis, (TG, and DTA) and X-ray analysis. The endproducts observed are U3O8 and UO2 in air/He and hydrogen...

  5. Studies on the preparation and characterisation of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies have been carried out in the laboratory on the preparation of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC), using concentrated solution of uranyl nitrate. The precipitation of AUC has been done by addition of (NH4)2CO3 solution and injecting gaseous ammonia and carbon dioxide. The precipitates obtained under varying parameter have been characterised by chemical and XRD analysis and the precipitate obtained under ideal conditions have been found to have the formula [(NH4)4UO2(CO3)3]. Though the studies were mainly aimed at standardising the procedures for the identification of precipitates, some of the AUC samples have been tested to see their suitability for conversion to ceramic grade UO2 powder and its pelletisation and sintering properties of the pellets. The data collected during these studies is presented. (author). 15 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Development of fluidized-bed furnace for thermal treatment of ammonium uranyl carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present the ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) route is developed at a scale of 10 kg/day of UO2. This UO2 is directly compactible and sinterable to densities of 10.55-10.65 gm/cc. The equipment developed include precipitation tank with filtration and methanol washing and fluidized bed furnaces for thermal treatment of AUC and U3O8. During the design and development of these furnaces many experiments were conducted to study fluidization of AUC powder. In this paper the findings of these studies are presented. (author)

  7. Preparation of U3O8 by calcination from ammonium uranyl carbonate in microwave fields: Process optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The U3O8 was prepared first from ammonium uranyl carbonate using microwave. • A quadratic model was developed to optimize the process conditions. - Abstract: The effects of process conditions on preparation of U3O8 by calcination from ammonium uranyl carbonate in microwave fields were assessed and optimized for maximizing the total uranium as well as calcination temperature, adopting as Central Composite Design (CCD) methodology. The process variables assessed were calcination temperature, calcination duration and mass of sample. A quadratic model relating the process variables and the total amount of uranium and U3O8 was proposed eliminating the insignificant parameters. The optimal calcination conditions were estimated to be a calcination temperature of 942.75 K, calcination duration of 8.78 min, with the corresponding total uranium and U3O8 to be 82.07% and 31.33%, respectively

  8. Conversion of UF6 to UO2: A quasi-optimization of the ammonium uranyl carbonate process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) wet conversion process, one of the most important routes for preparation of uranium dioxide from UF6, was intensively investigated for process improvement and product identification. Both process variables and unit equipment were concerned. The target of this task was to prepare high quality UO2 ceramic powder and pellets. From the test results of UO2 pelletizing and sintering, the operation conditions were selected for process optimization. The criteria used in optimization condition determination were the reproducibility of the AUC product and the compressibility, the reactivity, as well as the sinterability of UO2 powder. Experimental results showed that UO2 pellets with sintered density higher than 98% TD were achieved. A set of quasi-optimum conditions for this process was also proposed. (orig.)

  9. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-01

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed. PMID:26331776

  10. Carbonated water (CW) process waste reuse for ammonium-uranyl-carbonate (AUC) production and its gains on the environmental, economic and social aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the INB nuclear fuel cycle, the pellets production is based on UO2 powder made by AUC (Ammonium-Uranyl-Carbonate) route. AUC formation occurs by fluidising of UF6, NH3 and CO2 in a vase containing usually pure water, and this exothermal reaction has AUC as direct product. The mass formed is filtered, washed with CW, washed again with methano solution, dried with air and conducted to the fluidized bed furnace, to be converted to UO2 powder. At this point, the dried AUC decompounds to UO3, NH3 and C02, these 2 gases are absorbed at the gases washer, formin go the carbonated water (CW), whit is basically a (NH4)2CO3 solution. The UO2+x is reduced and stabilized to UO2 powder, which is conducted to pellets production. During the process, a considerable amount of this aqueous waste is generated and goes for effluent treatment. After that, the solution is sent for spray-dryer for power formation, and stock. This treatment demands equipment, energy and time, representing considerable costs of the company beyond the human risks involved on the drying step. The purpose of this work is to present a study of the carbonated water use as substitute of pure water in the AUC formation step. At this point, tests were made varying the CW loads for the AUC precipitation, and the control was made by the UO2 powder properties. The carbonated water used for AUC precipitation has been tested at several levels and the results has demonstrated full viability to become a definitive process step (INB, Resende site). It has been demonstrated the great resources economy caused by the waste reuse and the guarantee product quality. This represents such an environmental gain and also economic and social aspects got improved. (author)

  11. Thermal decomposition of ammonium diuranate, uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and uranyl peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviors of three types of starting powder had been investigated during their thermal decomposition processes in nitrogen, air, and hydrogen. The powder types were the products of uranyl nitrate precipitation, i.e. ADU (ammonium diuranate), UNH (uranyl nitrate hexahydrate), and UPO (uranyl peroxide). The objective of the investigation was to find out the best atmosphere that would result in good quality powder in a thermal decomposition process with the lowest temperature and the shortest period of time in order to reduce the cost of UO2 powder preparation. Before the thermal decomposition process was initiated, all powder types were characterized for their crystal structures. The investigation was conducted by TG-DTA instrument at temperature up to 800°C and the heating rate of 10°C/minute. The crystal structures were identified by X-Ray Diffractometer with Cu-Ka radiation. The specific surface area of the powder was also observed using BET method, especially for the powder that underwent the process in hydrogen heated up to 800°C. The Results showed that the process took place faster in hydrogen, and UNH required lower thermal decomposition temperature in relations with other types of powder. (author)

  12. an investigation of the ammonium poly uranate precipitation via uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    a series of experiments were made concerning the interaction of uranyl nitrate with ammonium hydroxide solution, with the aim of preparing ammonium poly uranate (APU) as an intermediate product during nuclear reactors fuel fabrication. the particle size and final product characteristics of the uranium oxide depend greatly on the ways of preparation of the APU , in the present work, the kinetics of deposition and the composition of the formed products upon adding increasing amounts of ammonium hydroxide to uranyl nitrate solution have been followed in a trial to understand the prevailing mechanisms

  13. Procedure for the obtainment of ammonium uranyl-tricarbonate suitable for the preparation of sinterable UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments carried out to obtain Ammonium Uranyl-Tricarbonate (AUC) of nuclear purity and with the appropriate physical characteristics to serve as an intermediate stage for the obtainment of sinterable Uranium Dioxide are described. AUC was obtained by precipitation with gaseous ammonium and carbon dioxide from aqueous solutions re-circulation, controlling, in both cases, the flow of the reactive gases, the pH and the temperature. The analyzed working conditions are described, giving also the results from the distribution of the particle size and morphology of the crystals. (M.E.L.)

  14. Determination of the water content in tetra-ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by the Karl Fischer reagent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two methods are compared for the determination of water content in tetra-ammonium uranyl tricarbonate by the Karl Fischer reagent method. In the first method it is Known that the carbonate reacts stoichiometrically with the iodine content of the Karl Fischer reagent in the same way it reacts with the water (mole of apparent H2O per mole of carbonate is produced). In this case, the carbonate content in the sample is determined and a suitable correction is applied to take into account the apparent water results. In the second method it is performed an extraction of the moisture by adding methanol to the sample in an independent flask. After the decantation, an aliquot of the clear supernatant methanol is taken for the determination of water content by the Karl Fischer reagent method. (author)

  15. Study of stripping cristallization processus of AUC with ammonium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is concerned with direct crystallization of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) from a uranium loaded organic phase (30% TBP in kerosene), with ammonium carbonate (NH4)2CO3. The effects of operating conditions ((NH4)2CO3 concentration, flow-ratio, residence time, temperature) on the physical properties of AUC crystals (particle size distribution, specific surface, density...) are reported. All products were identified (both by chemical analysis, X-Ray diffraction) as being ammonium uranyl carbonate crystals (AUC). The results show that a high phase ratio and (NH4)2CO3 concentration favor the formation of fine AUC grains and aggregates. This is due mainly to the high concentration of NH+4 in the system which leads to a high solution supersaturation and consequently to a rapid formation rate of crystal (germination). The reverse phenomenon is observed at low phase ratio and (NH4)2CO3 concentration, where germination and crystal growth are slow and the product is mainly monocrystal. In the intermediate range, a mixture of polycrystal and aggregates is obtained. Residence and temperature are also shown to have an effect on the processes (the effect of time being more important than temperature). In the course of this study a bench-scale stripper-crystallizer was developped and operated successfully. (author). tables, graphs

  16. A study of adsorption equilibrium on quaternary ammonium resin in uranyl sulphate solution by chemical equivalent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exchange equilibrium between SO42- and HSO4- on quaternary ammonium strong base resin and the effect of ClO4- on the equilibrium are studied by chemical equivalent method. On the basis of the results the adsorption equilibrium of the resin in uranyl sulphate solution which is similar to the solution in uranium hydrometallurgy process is also studied

  17. Preliminary Study On The Precipitation Of Ammonium Carbonate (AUC) From Uranylfluoride (UO2F2) Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preliminary studies on the precipitation process of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC)-(NH4)4UO2(CO3)3 from the UO2F2-HF solution system by using precipitation agent of ammonium carbonate (AC)-(NH4)2CO3 and on preparation ability of UO2 powder via AUC route are shown in this report. Our analysis results suggested that a product, identified as ammonium uranyl fluoride (AUF), was found along with the AUC precipitate. In order to prevent the formation of the undesirable AUF precipitate, the AUC precipitation process was carried out in the stable pH media ∼ 9, uranium concentration of 100 g/L and molar ratio of C to U ≥ 7.5. (author)

  18. Exploring the uranyl organometallic chemistry: from single to double uranium carbon bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl organometallic complexes featuring uranium(VI) carbon single and double bonds have been obtained from uranyl UO2X2 precursors by avoiding reduction of the metal center. X-ray diffraction and density functional theory analyses of these complexes showed that the UC and UdC bonds are polarized toward the nucleophilic carbon. (authors)

  19. 77 FR 50613 - Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate; Exemption From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate... Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Carbonate and Didecyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bicarbonate, jointly referred to as.... Background and Statutory Findings In the Federal Register of December 8, 2011 (76 FR 76674) (FRL-...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1137 - Ammonium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 19, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium carbonate. 184.1137 Section 184.1137 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10099 - Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10099 Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (generic). (a) Chemical... as dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (1:1) (PMN P-03-715) is subject to reporting under...

  2. Studies on the production in small scale batch process of the sinterable uranium dioxide by uranyl nitrate solution-ammonium polyuranate-uranium dioxide route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies on the production of sinterable uranium dioxide by means of precipiation of ammonium polyuranate with NH3 aq. from the aqueous uranyl nitrate solution and on its calcination and reduction with hydrogen were carried out. The influence of the precipiation parameters of ammonium polyuranate on its and uranium dioxide physico-chemical properties and their reproducibility as well as the possibilities to obtain these powders in the batch small scale process were examined. The physico-chemical properties of powders, impurities contents and the ability for pressing and sintering were determined. As a reult the most advantageous conditions of the precipitation has been established. It was found possible to obtain both ammonium polyuranate and uranium dioxide powders in a state o high purity with reproducible physico-chemical properties. The specific density of sintered pellets was higher than 94% of the theoretical density. (author)

  3. A note on the molecular water content in uranyl carbonate mineral andersonite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, Jakub; Čejka, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 3 (2015), s. 181-187. ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : andersonite * uranyl carbonate * crystal structure * molecular water Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  4. Carbonization of solid uranyl-ascorbate gel as an indirect step of uranium carbide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brykala Marcin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies of the synthesis of uranium carbide from uranyl-ascorbate gels using the complex sol-gel process (CSGP have been carried out. The synthesis of uranyl-ascorbate mixture as liquid sol from uranium trioxide and ascorbic acid and solid gel by extraction of water from sol were carefully examined. Ascorbic acid was used as a complexing agent in complex sol-gel process and as a carbon source. The crucial step to obtain final uranium carbides from the aforementioned substrates is the carbonization process. The thermal behavior of ascorbic acid and uranyl-ascorbate gels in a nitrogen atmosphere in the temperature range of 25-900°C were investigated using TG-DTG. Furthermore, the products of the carbonization of uranyl-ascorbate gels in nitrogen, argon and vacuum atmosphere were identified by X-ray diffraction. TG-DTG was used also as a method for determining of carbon residues in the samples.

  5. Complexation or uranyl ion. II. Complexation of uranyl ion in the VP-IAp anion exchanger phase during sorption from carbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complicated process of increased uranium sorption from carbonate medium by the strongly basic anion exchanger VP-1Ap after additional treatment with alkaline solution was studied by IR spectroscopy. The process is related to the formation of certain complex forms of uranyl, differing in degree of polymerization, in which polynuclear forms predominate

  6. Stability and kinetics of uranyl ion complexation by macrocycles in propylene carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic study of uranyl ion complexes formation with different macrocyclic ligands was realized in propylene carbonate as solvent using spectrophotometric and potentiometric techniques. Formation kinetics of two UO2 complexes: a crown ether (18C6) and a coronand (22) was studied by spectrophotometry in propylene carbonate with addition of tetraethylammonium chlorate 0.1M at 250C. Possible structures of complexes in solution are discussed

  7. ESR study of irradiated uranyl salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of ESR measurements on gamma-irradiated single crystals of ammonium uranyl nitrate and potassium uranyl nitrate are reported. In ammonium uranyl nitrate, the observed radical is found to have a similar behaviour to irradiated rubidium uranyl nitrate. However, a pair of satellites to the main lines have been observed and they have been interpreted as the simultaneous proton spin-flips. In the case of potassium uranyl nitrate, the observed radicals are also assigned to NO3. The directions of the principal axes of the g-tensor and their values are reported. These results support theoretical predictions based on the electronic structure. (K.B.)

  8. Kinetic study of uranium residue dissolution in ammonium carbonate media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the kinetics of the dissolution of a uranium residue in ammonium carbonate media. The residue is generated in the production of medical isotopes. The effects of parameters, such as varying peroxide and carbonate concentrations, dissolution time as well as temperature on the extraction rate have been separately studied. Results indicate complete dissolution of the residue at 60 deg C, after 30 min, in ammonium carbonate solution enriched with hydrogen peroxide. The yield and rate of uranium extraction were found to increase as a function of both temperature, in the range of 25-60 deg C, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The extraction process was governed by chemical reaction as the activation energy was found to be 45.5 kJ/mol. The order of reaction with respect to uranium concentration was found to be approximately first order. (author)

  9. 40 CFR 721.10100 - Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (2:1) (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (2... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10100 Dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (2:1) (generic). (a) Chemical... as dialkyl dimethyl ammonium carbonate (2:1) (PMN P-03-716) is subject to reporting under...

  10. Molecular Simulations of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerisit, S.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-01

    water and that of the electrolyte ions differ significantly from those in bulk aqueous solutions. We will then present MD simulations of the diffusion of a series of alkaline-earth uranyl carbonate species in aqueous solutions [7]. The MD simulations show that the alkaline-earth uranyl carbonate complexes have distinct water exchange dynamics, which could lead to different reactivities. Finally, we will present recent results on the diffusion and adsorption of uranyl carbonate species in intragrain micropores, modeled with the feldspar-water interfaces mentioned in the above, to help interpret the diffusion behavior of uranium in contaminated sediments. [1] Liu C. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 68 4519 (2004) [2] McKinley J. P. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 70 1873 (2006) [3] Liu C. et al. Water Resour. Res. 42 W12420 (2006) [4] Ilton E. S. et al. Environ. Sci. Technol. 42 1565 (2009) [5] Kerisit S. et al. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72 1481 (2008) [6] Kerisit S. and Liu C. Environ. Sci. Technol. 43 777 (2009) [7] Kerisit S. and Liu C. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 74 4937 (2010)

  11. Structure, hydrogen bonding and thermal expansion of ammonium carbonate monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, A Dominic; Wood, Ian G; Alfè, Dario; Hernández, Eduardo R; Gutmann, Matthias J; Sparkes, Hazel A

    2014-12-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of ammonium carbonate monohydrate, (NH4)2CO3·H2O, using Laue single-crystal diffraction methods with pulsed neutron radiation. The crystal is orthorhombic, space group Pnma (Z = 4), with unit-cell dimensions a = 12.047 (3), b = 4.453 (1), c = 11.023 (3) Å and V = 591.3 (3) Å(3) [ρcalc = 1281.8 (7) kg m(-3)] at 10 K. The single-crystal data collected at 10 and 100 K are complemented by X-ray powder diffraction data measured from 245 to 273 K, Raman spectra measured from 80 to 263 K and an athermal zero-pressure calculation of the electronic structure and phonon spectrum carried out using density functional theory (DFT). We find no evidence of a phase transition between 10 and 273 K; above 273 K, however, the title compound transforms first to ammonium sesquicarbonate monohydrate and subsequently to ammonium bicarbonate. The crystallographic and spectroscopic data and the calculations reveal a quite strongly hydrogen-bonded structure (EHB ≃ 30-40 kJ mol(-1)), on the basis of H...O bond lengths and the topology of the electron density at the bond critical points, in which there is no free rotation of the ammonium cation at any temperature. The barrier to free rotation of the ammonium ions is estimated from the observed librational frequency to be ∼ 36 kJ mol(-1). The c-axis exhibits negative thermal expansion, but the thermal expansion behaviour of the a and b axes is ormal. PMID:25449618

  12. Reduction of uranyl carbonate and hydroxyl complexes and neptunyl carbonate complexes studied with chemical-electrochemical methods and rixs spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweden and Finland plan to dispose of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants in deep underground repositories sited in granitic rocks. The fuel assemblies will be placed in canisters consisting of an outer corrosion-resistant copper shell with an inner cast iron insert that gives mechanical strength and reduces void space in the canister. The canister will be placed in a disposal borehole lined with compacted bentonite blocks. After sealing of the borehole, groundwater seepage will saturate the bentonite. The water flow path and transport mechanism between the host rock and the canister will be via diffusion through the swollen bentonite. Any oxygen trapped in the repository will be consumed by reaction with the host rock, pyrite in the bentonite and through microbial activity, giving long-term conditions with low redox potentials. Under these conditions, uranium dioxide - the matrix of unirradiated fuel - is a stable phase. This reducing near-field environment can upset by radiolysis of water caused by the radioactivity of the fuel, which after a few hundred years will be primarily alpha activity. Radiolysis of water produces equal amounts of oxidising and reducing species, but the reducing species produced by alpha radiolysis is molecular hydrogen, which is expected to be far less reactive than the produced oxidising species, H2O2. Alpha radiolysis could create locally oxidising conditions close to the fuel surface and oxidise the U(IV) in the uranium dioxide fuel to the more soluble U(VI) oxidation state. Furthermore, the solubility of U(VI) is enhanced in the presence of bicarbonate/carbonate by the formation of strong anionic uranyl carbonate complexes. This increase in solubility can amount to 4 to 5 orders of magnitude depending on the composition of the groundwater in contact with the fuel. The other tetravalent actinides in the fuel, Np and Pu, also have higher solubilities when oxidised beyond 4+ to neptunyl and plutonyl species. Once these

  13. A method for separating uranium from an aqueous solution containing uranyl ions and contaminating ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description is given of a method for separating uranium from contaminating ions in an aqueous solution containing uranyl ions. In a first step, the contaminating ions are extracted by a first solvent containing a reagent capable of forming a soluble complex with the uranyl ions. The solvent is separated by means of a separator liquid, which is subsequently extracted by a solvent containing an amine, then, said amine is separated by means of a sufficient amount of ammonium carbonate solution for precipitating an uranium complex which is subsequently recovered. This can be applied to the extraction of uranium from phosphoric or sulphuric solutions or from sodium carbonate

  14. Thermal Analysis of the Decomposition of Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) in Different Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hälldahl, L.; Sørensen, Ole Toft

    1979-01-01

    , respectively. The following intermediate products were observed in all atmospheres: http://www.sciencedirect.com.globalproxy.cvt.dk/cache/MiamiImageURL/B6THV-44K80TV-FB-1/0?wchp=dGLzVlz-zSkWW X-ray diffraction analysis showed that these phases were amorphous....

  15. Leaching kinetics of malachite in ammonium carbonate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudenne, Paul D.; Olson, Ferron A.

    1983-03-01

    Leaching of malachite was conducted with ammonium carbonate as lixiviant and with temperature, lixiviant concentration, and particle size as variables. Two stages of reaction were found. In Stage I, the initial dissolution of malachite proceeds rapidly, but after about 10 pct reaction the rate is reduced by surface blockage due to the presence of a needle-structured intermediate, presumably Cu(OH)2. Subsequently, malachite and the intermediate dissolve concurrently. In Stage II, after 90 pct reaction, essentially all of the malachite has dissolved and only the intermediate remains. It dissolves in Stage II. The activation energy is 64 kJ/mole (15.3 kcal/mole) for Stage I and 75 kJ/mole (18 kcal/mole) for Stage II. The rate of reaction in Stage I is proportional to the reciprocal of particle size and is 0.8 order with respect to the concentration of ammonium carbonate. The structures of leaching residues were studied using a scanning electron microscope. The kinetic data (activation energy and entropy), particle size and concentration dependence, residue morphology, and general leaching behavior evident from microscopic monitoring during leaching were used to develop the geometric equation for leaching in Stage I. The equation, based on a heterogeneous reaction with geometric rate control, is: 1 - (1 - α 1/3 = K01/r0/[(NH4)2C03]0.8 exp(-64,000/RT)t. It was deduced that initial steps in reaction were: (1) release of Cu2+ from malachite; (2) initial complexing with ammonia to form Cu(NH3)2+; and (3) subsequent complexing to produce Cu(NH3){4/2+} which is stable in solution at pH 8.8, the buffered pH of reaction. Stage II appears to be a similar reaction except that the reaction obeys cylindrical geometry instead of spherical geometry as in Stage I.

  16. Elution of uranyl carbonate from a strong base resin with a mixed carbonate eluant in a fluidized system. Report of investigations 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bureau of Mines evaluated the elution of uranyl carbonate from a strong base resin with a mixed carbonate eluant in a fluidized system. The system consisted of a multiple-compartment ion-exchange (MCIX) elution column with a continuous flow of solution, except for short periods when the resin increments were withdrawn. The exchange of uranyl carbonate from the mill-loaded strong base resin with an eluant composed of 1.0 M Na2CO3 plus 1.0 M NH4HCO3 was studied. The effects of solution flow rate, aqueous-to-resin flow ratio, column diameter, compartment height, initial resin concentration, and column length were examined. The experimental data indicate that for the eluant examined, a resin residence time of 240 minutes is necessary to attain 90-percent elution efficiency. Also provided is a technique for sizing an elution MCIX column from pilot plant experimental data

  17. Quaternary ammonium sulfanilamide: a membrane-impermeant carbonic anhydrase inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitor, quaternary ammonium sulfanilamide (QAS), was tested for potency as a CA inhibitor and for its ability to be excluded from permeating biological membranes. Inhibitor titration plots of QAS vs. pure bovine CA II and CA from the gills of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus, yielded K/sub i/ values of ∼ 15 μM; thus QAS is a relatively weak but effective CA inhibitor. Permeability of the QAS was directly tested by two independent methods. The inhibitor was excluded from human erythrocytes incubated in 5 mM QAS for 24 h as determined using an 18O-labeled mass spectrometer CA assay for intact cells. Also QAS injected into the hemolymph of C. sapidus (1 or 10 mM) did not cross the basal membrane of the gill. The compound was cleared from the hemolymph by 96 h after injection, and at no time during that period could the QAS be detected in homogenates of gill tissue. Total branchial CA activity was only slightly reduced following the QAS injection. These data indicate that QAS is a CA inhibitor to which biological membranes are impermeable and that can be used in vivo and in vitro in the study of membrane-associated CA

  18. Reduction of formaldehyde concentrations in the air and cadaveric tissues by ammonium carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamata, Seiichi; Kodera, Haruo

    2004-01-01

    The reduction of formaldehyde by ammonium carbonate was examined in cadavers and in vitro. Formaldehyde concentrations in the air (10 cm above human cadavers) and in various cadaveric tissues were measured with or without perfusion of ammonium carbonate solution into formaldehyde-fixed cadavers. Air samples were monitored using Kitagawa gas detector tubes. For measurement of formaldehyde in tissues, muscles and organs were cut into small pieces and tissue fluids were separated out by centrifu...

  19. Feasibility study for the obtainment of AUTC (Ammonium uranyl tricarbonate) in San Rafael Fabril Complex - Mendoza. Lab and industrial scale assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studies the possibility to replace the ammonium diuranate produced in the concentration plants (raw material used in almost all the world installations) by a purer oxide, combining the exchange resins methodologies and the tertiary amines in those installations so as to achieve a higher purity product to improve: its transportation, its no wastes production, the possibility of using re-used containers for the final product, the contribution of simplicity for process operations with a minor risk of contaminating elements production (powders, fluids, etc.) and the production of ammonium sulphide. (Author)

  20. Study On Precipitation Of UO2 Ex-AUC Powder. Part I: Precipitation Of AUC By (NH4)2CO3 From Uranyl Fluoride Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) powders were prepared by precipitation method in solution. UO2F2/HF, ammonium carbonate (AC), and ammonium hydroxide solution were used as precursors for precipitation. The influence of C/U ratio (mol/mol), AC concentration (g/L), reaction temperature (oC), on characteristics of AUC powders was also investigated. Then, the synthesized AUC powders were analyzed (to define) phase composition (X-ray), fluorine content, morphology (by SEM), and specific surface area (BET). (author)

  1. Synthesis, characterization and solubility of alkaline earth uranyl carbonates M2[UO2(CO3)3].xH20; M: Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release and dispersion of uranium from closed uranium mining sites and the resulting uranium contamination of the natural environment of such sites is a major problem examined in this dissertation. Knowledge of the pollution pathways and processes is indispensable for an assessment of the radiological implications for the human population, to be taken into account in the planning of site rehabilitation work. The formation of secondary uranium minerals may contribute to an immobilization of the uranium, but it is possible as well that such secondary uranium minerals will release uranium. A major task of this dissertation therefore was to examine the conditions of formation of alkaline earth uranyl carbonates in the context of their natural occurrence as observed at some sites, and to answer the question of whether hitherto unknown alkaline earth uranyl carbonates may form in the natural environment, and ought to be taken into account as new source terms. (orig./CB)

  2. Chemical treatment of ammonium fluoride solution in uranium reconversion plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chemical procedure is described for the treatment of the filtrate, produced from the transformation of uranium hexafluoride (U F6) into ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). This filtrate is an intermediate product in the U F6 to uranium dioxide (U O2) reconversion process. The described procedure recovers uranium as ammonium peroxide fluoro uranate (APOFU) by precipitation with hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2), and as later step, its calcium fluoride (CaF2) co-precipitation. The recovered uranium is recycled to the AUC production plant. (author)

  3. Kinetics of uranium dioxide dissolution in ammonium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of UO2 dissolution in ammoniacal carbonate solutions were studied as a function of total carbonate concentration, oxygen pressure, temperature and pH value. The intrinsic leaching (no external potential) of UO2 agreed well with an electrochemical surface-reaction model, in which anodic oxidation of UO2 is coupled with cathodic reduction of oxygen. The experimental data corroborate an anodic dissolution sequence that includes both charge-transfer and chemical-reaction steps. Experimental evidence indicates that the mechanism involves consecutive one-electron-transfer steps. The rate equation that was developed embraces both electrode and adsorption processes. This equation provides an excellent description of the effects of oxygen pressure, total carbonate and hydroxide-ion concentrations in solution. For a potential region where charge transfer is rate-controlling, and at low total carbonate and high hydroxide-ion concentrations, the theoretical rate equation predicts a one-half and inverse one-half order dependence on total carbonate and hydroxide-ion concentration, respectively. Conversely, at high total carbonate and low hydroxide-ion concentrations, the theoretical rate expression is independent of total carbonate concentration and dependent on the one-half order of hydroxide-ion concentration. The dissolution was characterized by an experimental activation energy between 43 and 47 kJ mol-1. (author)

  4. Enrichment of yttrium from rare earth concentrate by ammonium carbonate leaching and peroxide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rare earth elements (REE) solubility with ammonium carbonate vary progressively from element to element, the heavy rare earth elements (HRE) being more soluble than the light rare earth elements (LRE). Their solubility is function of the carbonate concentration and the kind of carbonate as sodium, potassium and ammonium. In this work, it is explored this ability of the carbonate for the dissolution of the REE and an easy separation of yttrium was achieved using the precipitation of the peroxide from complex yttrium carbonate. For this work is used a REE concentrate containing (%) Y2O3 2.4, Dy2O3 0.6, Gd2O3 2.7, CeO2 2.5, Nd2O3 33.2, La2O3 40.3, Sm2O3 4.1 and Pr6O11 7.5. The mentioned concentrate was produced industrially from the chemical treatment of monazite sand by NUCLEMON in Sao Paulo. The yttrium concentrate was treated with 200 g L-1 ammonium carbonate during 10 and 30 min at room temperature. The experiments indicated that a single leaching operation was sufficient to get a rich yttrium solution with about 60.3% Y2O3. In a second step, this yttrium solution was treated with an excess of hydrogen peroxide (130 volumes), cerium, praseodymium and neodymium peroxides being completely precipitated and separated from yttrium. Yttrium was recovered from the carbonate solution as the oxalate and finally as oxide. The final product is an 81% Y2O3. This separation envisages an industrial application. The work discussed the solubility of the REE using ammonium carbonate and the subsequent precipitation of the correspondent peroxides

  5. Volumetric determination of methanol in ammonium uranil carbonate of nuclear purity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method developed allows to determine methanol in ammonium uranil carbonate (AUC) from a concentration of 0.01 % with great accuracy. The ammonium uranil carbonate is dissolved in pre-established volumes of a potassium dichromate and concentrated sulfuric acid standardized solution. Instantaneously, the methanol presents oxidates at formic acid, reducing an equivalent amount of dichromate. The remaining dichromate still present, is reduced by adding in excess a standardized solution of ferrous sulphate. The titration of this excess with a standardized solution of potassium permanganate, using ferrous o- phenanthroline as indicator, will give a net and sensitive final point which allows to obtain by a simple estimate the percentage of methanol in the analyzed sample with great precision. Besides, essays are included which were carried out with the aim of proving and putting into evidence in a practical way that the high volatility of the methanol contained in an ammonium uranil carbonate will be the main disadvantage causing errors in defect. Observations for those requesting these analyses and for analysts performing them are mentioned in order to minimize the error factor abovementioned. (Author)

  6. Reactivity of Mg-Al hydrotalcites in solid and delaminated forms in ammonium carbonate solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Georgiana; Santiago, Marta; Abelló, Sònia; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2010-10-01

    Treatment of Mg-Al hydrotalcites (LDHs, layered double hydroxides) in aqueous (NH 4) 2CO 3 at 298 K leads to composites of dawsonite, hydrotalcite, and magnesium ammonium carbonate. The mechanism and kinetics of this transformation, ultimately determining the relative amounts of these components in the composite, depend on the treatment time (from 1 h to 9 days), the Mg/Al ratio in the hydrotalcite (2-4), and on the starting layered double hydroxide (solid or delaminated form). The materials at various stages of the treatment were characterized by inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and nitrogen adsorption at 77 K. The progressive transformation of hydrotalcite towards crystalline dawsonite and magnesium ammonium carbonate phases follows a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. A gradual decrease of the Mg/Al ratio in the resulting solids was observed in time due to magnesium leaching in the reacting medium. Dawsonite-hydrotalcite composite formation is favored at high aluminum contents in the starting hydrotalcite, while the formation of magnesium ammonium carbonate is favored at high Mg/Al ratios. The synthetic strategy comprising hydrotalcite delamination in formamide prior to aqueous (NH 4) 2CO 3 treatment is more reactive towards composite formation than starting from the bulk solid hydrotalcite.

  7. Dimethyl carbonate synthesis via transesterification catalyzed by quaternary ammonium salt functionalized chitosan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Zhao; Liang Nian He; Yuan Yi Zhuang; Jin Quan Wang

    2008-01-01

    A quaternary ammonium salt covalently linked to chitosan was first used as a catalyst for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) synthesis by the transesterification of propylene carbonate (PC) with methanol. The effects of various reaction variables like reaction time, temperature and pressure on the catalytic performance were also investigated. 54% DMC yield and 71% PC conversion were obtained under the optimal reaction conditions. Notably, the catalyst was able to be reused with retention of high catalytic activity and selectivity. Consequently, the process presented here has great potential for industrial application due to its advantages such as stability, easy preparation from renewable biopolymer, and simple separation from products.

  8. EXAFS investigations of earth-alkaline metal uranyl tri-carbonate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonate and bicarbonate are the common anions found in significant concentrations in many natural waters, and are exceptionally strong complexation agents for actinide ions. Seepage, flooding and mining waters from the uranium mining area in the south-east of Germany (Saxony and Thuringia) contain relatively high amounts of magnesium, calcium, carbonate and sulphate ions. In these waters the pH values range from 7.0 to 8.0 and the uranium content is about 0.02 mmol/L where magnesium, calcium and carbonate concentrations are 11.6 mmol/L, 6.9 mmol/L and 3.9 mmol/L, respectively. The existence of the natural complexes Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq) and Mg2UO2(CO3)3(aq) were recently able to be confirmed by spectroscopic measurements. We performed extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the uranium LIII-edge to study the structures of these complexes. The results obtained from these complex solutions are compared with those from the corresponding EXAFS and XRD data related to the secondary minerals of uranium, liebigite, Ca2[UO2(CO3)3] . 10 H2O and bayleyite, Mg2[UO2(CO3)3]-10 H2O and they are in good agreement. (authors)

  9. Effects of inorganic carbon limitation on anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuya; Isaka, Kazuichi; Kazama, Futaba

    2011-03-01

    Anammox bacteria are chemoautotrophic bacteria that oxidize ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor and with CO(2) as the main carbon source. The effects of inorganic carbon (IC) limitation on anammox bacteria were investigated using continuous feeding tests. In this study, a gel carrier with entrapped anammox sludge was used. It was clearly shown that the anammox activity deteriorated with a decrease in the influent IC concentration. The relationship between the influent IC concentration and the anammox activity was analyzed using Michaelis-Menten kinetics, and the apparent K(m) was determined to be 1.2mg-C/L. The activity could be recovered by adding IC to the influent. The consumption ratio of IC to ammonium was not constant and mainly depended on the influent ratio of the IC to ammonium concentrations (inf.IC/inf.NH(4)-N). The results indicated that an inf.IC/inf.NH(4)-N ratio of 0.2 in the anammox reactor was ideal for the anammox process using gel cubes. PMID:21256745

  10. Crystal structure of lead uranyl carbonate mineral widenmannite: Precession electron-diffraction and synchrotron powder-diffraction study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, J.; Palatinus, L.; Rohlíček, J.; Houdková, L.; Klementová, Mariana; Goliáš, V.; Škácha, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 99, 2-3 (2014), s. 276-282. ISSN 0003-004X Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Widenmannite * uranyl bicarbonate * crystal structure * precession electron diffraction * synchrotron powder diffraction Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.964, year: 2014

  11. Effect of inorganic carbon on anaerobic ammonium oxidation enriched in sequencing batch reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liao Dexiang; Li Xiaoming; Yang Qi; Zeng Guangming; Guo Liang; Yue Xiu

    2008-01-01

    The present lab-scale research reveals the enrichment of anaerobic ammonium oxidation microorganism from methanogenic anaerobic granular sludge and the effect of inorganic carbon (sodium bicarbonate) on anaerobic ammonium oxidation. The enrichment of anammox bacteria was carried out in a 7.0-L SBR and the effect of bicarbonate on anammox was conducted in a 3.0-L SBR. Research results , especially the biomass, showed first signs of anammox activity after 54 d cultivation with synthetic wastewater, when the pH was controlled between 7.5 and 8.3, the temperature was 35℃. The anammox activity increased as the influent bicarbonate concentration increased from 1.0 to 1.5 g/L and then, was inhibited as the bicarbonate concentration approached 2.0 g/L. However, the activity could be restored by the reduction of bicarbonate concentration to 1.0 g/L, as shown by rapid conversion of ammonium, and nitrite and nitrate production with normal stoichiometry. The optimization of the bicarbonate concentration in the reactor could increase the anammox rate up to 66.4 mgN/(L·d).

  12. Rate of consumption of dissolved oxygen during ammonium carbonate in situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leaching of uranium in situ from sandstone deposits with ammonium carbonate solution containing dissolved oxygen occurs rapidly compared with the leaching of the bulk of the sulfur present as FeS2. However, because of their high reducing capacity and their relative abundance, the FeS2 minerals consume the bulk of the oxidant. A pressure leach apparatus was constructed that permitted measuring oxygen consumption by FeS2, best described by a first-order reaction. The experimental rate constants for various cores are roughly proportional to their FeS2 contents

  13. Determination of halogens, silicon, phosphorus, carbon, sulfur, tributyl phosphate and of free acid in uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-purity uranium compounds are widely used in nuclear field in the form of uranyl nitrate or uranium oxides. In production of uranium material the estimation and the control of products quality is necessary and very important. Halogens was separated from uranium compounds by steam distillation and they were later determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for Cl- , Br- , I- ions. Br- was also determined by spectrophotometric and iodide by the individual pulse polarography. Silicon and phosphorus in uranyl nitrate solutions were determined by the photometric method. Sulfur was determined as sulfate form by the measurement of turbidity by the titrimetry. TBP in kerosene and free acid in aqueous solution were determined by the titration. (author)

  14. Crystal structure of lead uranyl carbonate mineral widenmannite: precession electron-diffraction and synchrotron powder-diffraction study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, Jakub; Palatinus, Lukáš; Rohlíček, Jan; Houdková, L.; Klementová, Mariana; Goliáš, V.; Škácha, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 99, 2-3 (2014), s. 276-282. ISSN 0003-004X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Grant ostatní: AV ČR(CZ) Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : widenmannite * uranyl bicarbonate * crystal structure * precession electron diffraction * synchrotron powder diffraction Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.964, year: 2014

  15. Decontamination of metal surface contaminated by uranyl solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decontamination degrees was measured for the metallic equipments in the uranium conversion plant by a chemical decontamination and contamination degrees also measured. Most equipments was made of stainless steel and contacted with uranium(VI) and nitric acid solution. So, metallic surfaces was contaminated with uranium(VI) materials. And decontamination degrees can be expressed by alpha activity measurements. For the alpha activity measurements, metallic specimens were selected in the three representative processes, dissolution process, solvent extraction, and Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate(AUC) precipitation and were prepared to rectangular parallelepipeds with 18mm width and 18mm length and 5mm height. The metallic surfaces can be decontaminated under 10 Bq/cm2 alpha activity due to uranium by only water decontamination, and under 0.04 Bq/cm2 alpha activity by 10% nitric acid decontamination that is ground activity level

  16. Ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus alkaline chlorate oxidant for recovery of uranium values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from materials containing uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state by contacting the materials containing uranium with an aqueous alkaline leach solution containing an alkaline chlorate in an amount sufficient to oxidize at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In a further embodiment of the present invention, the alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the presence of the ionic species Cu++, Co++, Fe+++, Ni++, Cr+++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, during the contacting of the material containing uranium with the alkaline leach solution and in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a portion of the uranium in its lower valence states to its hexavalent state, is present

  17. Uranyl ion transport across tri-n-butyl phosphate/n-dodecane liquid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrier-facilitated transport of uranium (VI) against its concentration gradient from aqueous nitrate acidic solutions across organic bulk liquid membranes (BLM) and supported liquid membranes (SLM) containing TBP as the mobile carrier and n-dodecane as the membrane solvent was investigated. Extremely dilute uranyl nitrate solutions in about 2.5 M nitric acid generally constituted as the source phase. Uranyl transport appreciably increased with both stirring of the receiving phase and the carrier concentration in the organic membrane, while enhanced acidity of the strip side adversely affected the partioning of the cation into this phase. Among the several reagents tested, diluted ammonium carbonate (∼1M) solutions served efficiently as the stripant. Besides Accurel polypropylene (PP) film as the solid support for SLM, some silicon flat-sheet membranes with different inorganic fillers like silica, calcium silicate, calcium carbonate, chromium oxide, zinc oxide etc. and teflon membranes transported about 70% of uranium in nearly 7-8 hr employing 1 M ammonium carbonate as the strippant. Specifically, 30% TBP supported on Accurel flat-sheet supports transfered better than 70% of uranium from moderate acid feeds (2.5M) under similar conditions. Membranes supporting Aliquat-336, TLA, TOPO etc. yielded somewhat poor uranium recoveries. The feed : strip volume ratio showed an inverse relationship to the fraction of cation transported. (author). 9 refs., 2 tab s

  18. Determination of parameters dissolution of yellow-cake. Production of uranyl nitrate - Gas precipitation of AUC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The different stages of the purification cycle of yellow-cakes have been studied thoroughly in order to obtain an ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) as an intermediate product of uranium dioxide (UO2). The optimal parameters of yellow-cake dissolution, filtration, extraction by solvent, scrubbing and stripping were determined. An original program of thermodynamic calculation was developed for the determination of the free energies of yellow-cake dissolution reactions. Different numerical methods were used to determine the kinetic constant, the reaction order and correlation equations of uranyl nitrate density as a function of U and H+ concentrations, before and after the extraction cycle. For the first time, Algerian filteraids were used for the filtration of uranyl nitrate solutions with satisfactory results. A laboratory designed installation enabled the precipitation of AUC by injection of ammonia and carbon dioxide gases. Interesting results have been obtained and further investigations should be carried out in order to optimize all the paremeters of the gas precipitation of AUC

  19. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Trihalide Perovskite Interface - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przepioski, Joshua [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  20. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Przepioski, Joshua [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene- 2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  1. Precipitation of calcium carbonate from a calcium acetate and ammonium carbamate batch system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prah, J.; Maček, J.; Dražič, G.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we report a novel approach for preparing precipitated calcium carbonate using solutions of ammonium carbamate and calcium acetate as the sources of calcium and carbon dioxide, respectively. Two different concentrations of the starting solutions at three different temperatures (15, 25 and 50 °C) were used for the reaction. The influence of temperature and concentration on the polymorphism and the resulting morphology of calcium carbonate are discussed. The most important parameter for controlling a particular crystal structure and precipitate morphology were the concentrations of the initial solutions. When initial solutions with lower concentrations were used, the crystal form of the precipitate changed with time. Regardless the different polymorphism at different temperatures, after one day only the calcite form was detected in all samples, regardless of at which temperature the samples were prepared. At higher concentrations, pure vaterite or a mixture of vaterite and calcite were present at the beginning of the experiment. After one day, pure vaterite was found in the samples that were prepared at 15 and 25 °C. If calcium carbonate precipitated at 50 °C, the XRD results showed a mixture of calcite and vaterite regardless of the time at which the sample was taken. The morphology of calcium carbonate particles prepared at various conditions changed from calcite cubes to spherical particles of vaterite and aragonite needles. When a low starting concentration was used, the morphology at the initial stage was strongly affected by the temperature at which the experiments were conducted. However, after one day only, cubes were present in all cases at low initial concentrations. In contrast, at high concentrations spherical particles precipitated at all three temperatures at the beginning of the reaction. Spherical particles were made up from smaller particles. Over time, the size of the particles was diminishing due to their disintegration into

  2. Phase equilibrium conditions of semi-calthrate hydrates of (tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride + carbon dioxide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbon dioxide hydrate stability zone was enlarged with the help of TBAC. • Carbon dioxide uptake into TBAC semi-clathrate hydrates is confirmed. • Equilibrium pressure of hydrate decreased with the increase of TBAC mass concentration. • The addition of TBAC reduces the formation pressures of carbon dioxide hydrate by 2.5 MPa. - Abstract: In the present work, hydrate equilibrium conditions for (tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride (TBAC) + carbon dioxide + water) mixtures were investigated. Tetra-n-butyl ammonium chloride was reported to form a semi-clathrate hydrate. The experiments were carried out within the TBAC mass fraction range of (0.05 to 0.3). The experimental results showed that the presence of TBAC decreased the formation pressure of carbon dioxide double hydrate within the experimental temperature range. Moreover, pressure reduction was dependent on the TBAC concentration

  3. Tetraalkylammonium uranyl isothiocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Clare E; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Soderholm, L

    2012-11-01

    Three tetraalkylammonium uranyl isothiocyanates, [(CH(3))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (1), [(C(2)H(5))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (2), and [(C(3)H(7))(4)N](3)UO(2)(NCS)(5) (3), have been synthesized from aqueous solution and their structures determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All of the compounds consist of the uranyl cation equatorially coordinated to five N-bound thiocyanate ligands, UO(2)(NCS)(5)(3-), and charge-balanced by three tetraalkylammonium cations. Raman spectroscopy data have been collected on compounds 1-3, as well as on solutions of uranyl nitrate with increasing levels of sodium thiocyanate. By tracking the Raman signatures of thiocyanate, the presence of both free and bound thiocyanate is confirmed in solution. The shift in the Raman signal of the uranyl symmetric stretching mode suggests the formation of higher-order uranyl thiocyanate complexes in solution, while the solid-state Raman data support homoleptic isothiocyanate coordination about the uranyl cation. Presented here are the syntheses and crystal structures of 1-3, pertinent Raman spectra, and a discussion regarding the relationship of these isothiocyanates to previously described uranyl halide phases, UO(2)X(4)(2-). PMID:23072277

  4. Uranyl salophenes as ionophores for phosphate-selective electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wroblewski, Wojciech; Wojciechowski, Kamil; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew; Egberink, Richard J.M.; Snellink-Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2000-01-01

    Anion selectivities of poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) plasticized membranes containing uranyl salophene derivatives were presented. The influence of the membrane components (i.e. ionophore structure, dielectric constant and structure of plasticizer, the amount of incorporated ammonium salt) on its phosph

  5. 13C and 17O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U02(CO3)34- and (UO2)3(CO3)66- in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = -log(aH+) versus p[H] = -log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA

  6. Revealing Brown Carbon Chromophores Produced in Reactions of Methylglyoxal with Ammonium Sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Peng; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Laskin, Alexander

    2015-12-15

    Atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) is an important contributor to light absorption and climate forcing by aerosols. Reactions between small water-soluble carbonyls and ammonia or amines have been identified as one of the potential pathways of BrC formation. However, detailed chemical characterization of BrC chromophores has been challenging and their formation mechanisms are still poorly understood. Understanding BrC formation is impeded by the lack of suitable methods which can unravel the variability and complexity of BrC mixtures. This study applies high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to photodiode array (PDA) detector and high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) to investigate optical properties and chemical composition of individual BrC components produced through reactions of methylglyoxal (MG) and ammonium sulfate (AS), both of which are abundant in the atmospheric environment. A direct relationship between optical properties and chemical composition of 30 major BrC chromophores was established. Nearly all of these chromophores are nitrogen-containing compounds that account for >70% of the overall light absorption by the MG+AS system in the 300-500 nm range. These results suggest that reduced-nitrogen organic compounds formed in reactions between atmospheric carbonyls and ammonia/amines are important BrC chromophores. It is also demonstrated that improved separation of BrC chromophores by HPLC will significantly advance understanding of BrC chemistry.

  7. Porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts as efficient solid catalysts for the fixation of CO2 into cyclic carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Sheng; Zhu, Dongliang; Zou, Yan; Zhao, Jing

    2016-12-01

    A series of porous polymers bearing functional quaternary ammonium salts were solvothermally synthesized through the free radical copolymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) and functionalized quaternary ammonium salts. The obtained polymers feature highly cross-linked matrices, large surface areas, and abundant halogen anions. These polymers were evaluated as heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of cyclic carbonates from epoxides and CO2 in the absence of co-catalysts and solvents. The results revealed that the synergistic effect between the functional hydroxyl groups and the halide anion Br(-) afforded excellent catalytic activity to cyclic carbonates. In addition, the catalyst can be easily recovered and reused for at least five cycles without significant loss in activity. PMID:27365001

  8. Reuse of ammonium fluoride generated in the uranium hexafluoride conversion; Reutilizacao do fluoreto de amonio gerado na reconversao do hexafluoreto de uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Neto, J.B.; Carvalho, E.F. Urano de; Durazzo, M., E-mail: jbsneto@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Riella, H.G [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Centre of IPEN / CNEN - SP develops and manufactures dispersion fuel with high uranium concentration to meet the demand of the IEA-R1 reactor and future research reactors planned to be constructed in Brazil. The fuel uses uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) dispersed in aluminum. For producing the fuel, the processes for uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) conversion consist in obtaining U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and / or U{sub 3}O{sub 8} through the preparation of intermediate compounds, among them ammonium uranyl carbonate - AUC, ammonium diuranate - DUA and uranium tetrafluoride - UF{sub 4}. This work describes a procedure for preparing uranium tetrafluoride by a dry route using as raw material the filtrate generated when producing routinely ammonium uranyl carbonate. The filtrate consists primarily of a solution containing high concentrations of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}), fluoride (F{sup -}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup --}) and low concentrations of uranium. The procedure is basically the recovery of NH{sub 4}F and uranium, as UF{sub 4}, through the crystallization of ammonium bifluoride (NH{sub 4}HF{sub 2}) and, in a later step, the addition of UO{sub 2}, occurring fluoridation and decomposition. The UF{sub 4} obtained is further diluted in the UF{sub 4} produced routinely at IPEN / CNEN-SP by a wet route process. (author)

  9. 13C NMR spectra of the uranyl tricarbonate-bicarbonate system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C NMR identification of the uranyl tricarbonate complex (important in solution mining of U from ore and conventional carbonate leaching) is reported. The NMR spectra show the transition from slow to fast carbonate exchange between uranyl ion and bulk water in an accessible temperature range. The taller NMR peak at 162.31 ppM is frm HCO3- and the smaller peak at 168.86 ppM is from the uranyl tricarbonate complex

  10. Effect of Electrochemical Treatment in Aqueous Ammonium Bicarbonate on Surface Properties of PAN-based Carbon Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹海琳; 黄玉东; 张志谦; 孙举涛

    2004-01-01

    The surface properties of PAN-based carbon fibers electrochemically treated in aqueous ammonium bicarbonate before and after treatment were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Dynamic Contact Angle Analysis (DCAA). The results of characterization indicated that the oxygen and nitrogen contents in carbon fiber surface were significantly increased by electrochemical treatment, and amide groups was introduced onto it, which was related with the electrolyte. The AFM photographs illustrated that the roughness of the fiber surface was also increased. The wettibality of the fibers was improved after treatment because the surface energy especially the polar part of it was increased.

  11. Combination of powdered activated carbon and powdered zeolite for enhancing ammonium removal in micro-polluted raw water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhen-Liang; Chen, Hao; Zhu, Bai-Rong; Li, Huai-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Even zeolite is promising in ammonia pollution disposing, its removal efficiency is frequently interfered by organics. As activated carbon has good removal efficiency on organic contaminants, combination of two adsorbents may allow their respective adsorption characteristics into full play. This paper provides a performance assessment of the combination for enhancing ammonium removal in micro-polluted raw water. Gel-filtration chromatography (GFC) was carried out to quantify the molecular weight (MW) range of organic contaminants that powdered activated carbon (PAC) and powdered zeolite (PZ) can remove. The polydispersity difference which also calculated from GFC may indicate the wider organic contaminants removal range of PAC and the relatively centralized removal range of PZ. The jar tests of combination dosing confirm a synergistic effect which promotes ammonium removing. Nevertheless, it also shows an antagonism hindering the due removal performance of the two adsorbents on CODMn, while it is not much evident on UV254. Furthermore, a comparison study with simulated coagulation-sedimentation process was conducted to evaluate the optimum dosing points (spatial and temporal) of PAC and PZ among follows: suction well, pipeline mixer, early and middle phase of flocculation. We suggest to dose both two adsorbents into the early phase of flocculation to maximize the versatile removal efficiency on turbidity, ammonium and organic contaminants. PMID:25929873

  12. Separation of Tetramethyl Ammonium Hydroxide in Waste Water with Ion Exchange Using Activated Carbon Prepared by Bamboo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Nishihama, Syouhei; Yoshizuka, Kazuharu

    Activated carbon is prepared by bamboo for the selective recovery of tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH), contained in waste water from semiconductive industry, at the end of pipe of the plant. The adsorption ability of the activated carbon from bamboo (BAC) is comparable to the commercial activated carbons. The adsorption of TMAH with BAC in batchwise system increases with increase in pH value of the aqueous solution, and the effective adsorption and elution yield is also obtained in column system. Quantitative adsorption-elution processing can be achieved with the present BAC, and thus indicating the BAC is effective material as the adsorbent of TMAH at the end of pipe of the plant.

  13. Effect of ammonium-salt solutions on the surface properties of carbon fibers in electrochemical anodic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Longitudinal grooves on the fiber surface became more well-defined and much deeper after surface treatment. ► The concentration of oxygen and nitrogen on the fiber surface increased after surface treatment. ► The intensity of oxidative reaction varied with the change of ammonium-salt solutions. ► The higher the concentration of OH− ions in the electrolytes, the violent the oxidative reaction happened. - Abstract: The surfaces of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were treated by an electrochemical anodic method. Three different kinds of ammonium-salt solutions namely NH4HCO3, (NH4)2CO3 and (NH4)3PO4 were respectively chosen as the electrolytes. The effect of these electrolytes on the surface structure was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that longitudinal grooves on the fiber surface became more well-defined and much deeper after surface treatment, and the root mean square roughness (RMS) of carbon fiber surface increased from 4.6 nm for untreated fibers to 13.5 nm for treated fibers in (NH4)3PO4 electrolytes. The concentration of oxygen and nitrogen atomic on the fiber surface increased after surface treatment. The tensile strength of oxidized fibers had an obvious decrease, whereas the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) value of corresponding carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) increased in a large extent. The intensity of oxidative reaction varied with the change of ammonium-salt solutions and electrochemical oxidation in (NH4)3PO4 electrolyte was of the most violence. The corresponding mechanism was also discussed and the result showed that the higher the concentration of OH− ions in the electrolytes, the violent the oxidative reaction happened.

  14. Uranium value leaching with ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate plus nitrate oxidant and optionally oxidation-catalytic metal compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the present invention, uranium values are extracted from solid materials containing uranium in lower valence states than its hexavalent state comprising contacting the solid materials containing uranium with an alkaline leach solution containing the ionic species NH4+ and NO3- in an amount sufficient to convert at least a portion of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state. In another embodiment of the present invention, the aqueous alkaline leach solution is an aqueous solution of a carbonate selected from the group consisting of ammonium carbonate, ammonium bicarbonate and mixtures thereof. In a further embodiment, ionic species NO3- is supplied by an alkaline nitrate. In yet another embodiment of the present invention, the aqueous alkaline leach solution additionally contains at least one catalytic compound of a metal selected from the group consisting of copper, cobalt, iron, nickel, chromium and mixtures thereof adapted to assure the pesence of the ionic species Cu++, Co++, Fe+++, Ni++, Cr+++ and mixtures thereof, respectively, is present during the contacting of the solid materials containing uranium with the aqueous alkaline leach solution in an amount sufficient to catalyze the oxidation of at least a part of the uranium in valence states lower than its hexavalent state to its hexavalent state

  15. Construction of flame retardant nanocoating on ramie fabric via layer-by-layer assembly of carbon nanotube and ammonium polyphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Yan, Hongqiang; Peng, Mao; Wang, Lili; Ding, Hongliang; Fang, Zhengping

    2013-03-01

    A new flame retardant nanocoating has been constructed by the alternate adsorption of polyelectrolyte amino-functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT-NH2) and ammonium polyphosphate (APP) onto flexible and porous ramie fabric. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the adsorbed carbon nanotube coating is a randomly oriented and overlapped network structure, which is a promising candidate for flame retardancy applications. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis confirm that the APP is successfully incorporated into the multilayers sequentially. Assessment of the thermal and flammability properties for the pristine and nanocoated ramie fabrics shows that the thermal stability, flame retardancy and residual char are enhanced as the concentration of MWNT-NH2 suspension and number of deposition cycles increases. The enhancements are mostly attributed to the barrier effect of intumescent network structure, which is composed of MWNT-NH2 and the absorbed APP.

  16. Uranyl hydrogel leaching as one of technological nodes of sol-gel process. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of leaching is described of the fine fraction of uranyl hydrogel prepared by internal gelation from aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate under the action of urea and urotropin. For preparing the dispersion a two-liquid jet was used which provided a polydispersion mixture with mean particle size of around 300 μm. Leaching took place in a 0.5 to 2 molar aqueous solution of ammonia at the solid:liquid phase ratio in the range of 1:10 to 1:2 with the addition of a wetting agent in extraction containers for a period of 5 to 60 mins. The effect of the said parameters was studied on the uranium content - the residual content of nitrate ions, carbon and the content of adsorbed NH4OH in the solid phase and the content of leached nitrate ions and uranium in the leaching solution. The leaching process was so rapid that after 5 mins steady state was achieved and further leaching for over 60 mins affected the composition of neither the solid nor the liquid phase. Under the conditions the optimal arrangement of the experiment appears to be leaching with ca. 1 M agueous solution of ammonia at a s:l ratio of 1:5 over 10 mins. The kinetics of leaching carbonaceous substances was evaluated by previously verified equations and the diffusion mechanism of the formation of a stabilized skeleton of ammonium polyuranate was confirmed. (author)

  17. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO2C2O4, 3H2O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO2C2O4 (log β1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log β1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10-8 to 9.2 10-9 and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H+] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10-8. (authors)

  18. Concentration and temperature controlled oxidation and cutting of single-walled carbon nanotubes by ammonium persulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AHMAD; Mirza; Nadeem

    2010-01-01

    SWNTs were oxidized by a simple wet chemical method involving treatment in aqueous ammonium persulfate(APS) solution at a certain temperature.Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) demonstrated that a large amount of oxygen containing groups such as hydroxyl groups and carbonyl groups was attached to the sidewall of SWNTs.The oxidized SWNTs showed good solubility in polar solvents including water and DMF.Atomic force microscopic images showed that SWNTs could be cut into short pipes by the highly concentrated APS solution at 80℃.With the decrease of reaction temperature or APS concentration,the oxidized SWNTs remained uncut.

  19. Effect of ammonium-salt solutions on the surface properties of carbon fibers in electrochemical anodic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Xin, E-mail: qx3023@nimte.ac.cn [National Engineering Laboratory of Carbon Fiber Preparation Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Wang Xuefei; Ouyang Qin; Chen Yousi; Yan Qing [National Engineering Laboratory of Carbon Fiber Preparation Technology, Ningbo Institute of Material Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Longitudinal grooves on the fiber surface became more well-defined and much deeper after surface treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration of oxygen and nitrogen on the fiber surface increased after surface treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intensity of oxidative reaction varied with the change of ammonium-salt solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The higher the concentration of OH{sup -} ions in the electrolytes, the violent the oxidative reaction happened. - Abstract: The surfaces of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were treated by an electrochemical anodic method. Three different kinds of ammonium-salt solutions namely NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3}, (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}CO{sub 3} and (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}PO{sub 4} were respectively chosen as the electrolytes. The effect of these electrolytes on the surface structure was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that longitudinal grooves on the fiber surface became more well-defined and much deeper after surface treatment, and the root mean square roughness (RMS) of carbon fiber surface increased from 4.6 nm for untreated fibers to 13.5 nm for treated fibers in (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}PO{sub 4} electrolytes. The concentration of oxygen and nitrogen atomic on the fiber surface increased after surface treatment. The tensile strength of oxidized fibers had an obvious decrease, whereas the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) value of corresponding carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) increased in a large extent. The intensity of oxidative reaction varied with the change of ammonium-salt solutions and electrochemical oxidation in (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}PO{sub 4} electrolyte was of the most violence. The corresponding mechanism was also discussed and the result showed that the higher the concentration of OH{sup -} ions in the electrolytes, the violent the oxidative

  20. Accelerated OH(-) transport in activated carbon air cathode by modification of quaternary ammonium for microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Cuijuan; Ding, Ning; Zhang, Qingrui; Li, Nan; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-04-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a promising catalyst for the air cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) because of its high performance and low cost. To increase the performance of AC air cathodes, the acceleration of OH(-) transport is one of the most important methods, but it has not been widely investigated. Here we added quaternary ammonium to ACs by in situ anchoring of a quaternary ammonium/epoxide-reacting compound (QAE) or ex situ mixing with anion exchange resins in order to modify ACs from not only the external surface but also inside the pores. In 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the in situ anchoring of QAE was a more effective way to increase the power. The highest power density of 2781 ± 36 mW/m(2), which is 10% higher than that of the control, was obtained using QAE-anchored AC cathodes. When the medium was switched to an unbuffered NaCl solution, the increase in maximum power density (885 ± 25 mW/m(2)) was in accordance with the anion exchange capacity (0.219 mmol/g). The highest power density of the anion exchange resin-mixed air cathode was 51% higher than that of the control, indicating that anion exchange is urgently needed in real wastewaters. Excess anchoring of QAE blocked both the mesopores and micropores, causing the power output to be inhibited. PMID:24597673

  1. Octa-ammonium POSS-conjugated single-walled carbon nanotubes as vehicles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Naderi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have unique physical and chemical properties. Furthermore, novel properties can be developed by attachment or encapsulation of functional groups. These unique properties facilitate the use of CNTs in drug delivery. We developed a new nanomedicine consisting of a nanocarrier, cell-targeting molecule, and chemotherapeutic drug and assessed its efficacy in vitro. Methods: The efficacy of a single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-based nanoconjugate system is assessed in the targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX to cancer cells. SWCNTs were oxidized and reacted with octa-ammonium polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (octa-ammonium POSS to render them biocompatible and water dispersable. The functionalized SWCNTs were loaded with PTX, a chemotherapeutic agent toxic to cancer cells, and Tn218 antibodies for cancer cell targeting. The nanohybrid composites were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, and ultraviolet–visible–near-infrared (UV–Vis–NIR. Additionally, their cytotoxic effects on Colon cancer cell (HT-29 and Breast cancer cell (MCF-7 lines were assessed in vitro. Results: TEM, FTIR, and UV–Vis–NIR studies confirmed side-wall functionalization of SWCNT with COOH-groups, PTX, POSS, and antibodies. Increased cell death was observed with PTX–POSS–SWCNT, PTX–POSS–Ab–SWCNT, and free PTX compared to functionalized-SWCNT (f-SWCNT, POSS–SWCNT, and cell-only controls at 48 and 72 h time intervals in both cell lines. At all time intervals, there was no significant cell death in the POSS–SWCNT samples compared to cell-only controls. Conclusion: The PTX-based nanocomposites were shown to be as cytotoxic as free PTX. This important finding indicates successful release of PTX from the nanocomposites and further reiterates the potential of SWCNTs to deliver drugs directly to targeted cells and tissues.

  2. Specific uranyl binding by macrocyclic ligands attached to resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrocyclic polydentates have attracted enormous attention from chemists because of their unique and significant characteristics of the strong and selective binding of a variety of metal ions. The metal binding is governed mostly by the size of the macroring and the nature of heteroatoms involved. The most important role of the macrocyclic structure is, in general, the so-called macrocyclic effect - to increase (making less negative) a large negative entropy change involved in the polydentate chelation. Basic strategy of uranium binding, is to design a ligand of very strong metal binding to take advantage of this macrocyclic effect, where number of chelating heteroatoms and their spatial arrangement is designed to be most appropriate for uranyl (UO22+) binding, since in natural sea water uranium is dissolved mostly in a form of uranyl carbonate. The following macrocylic ligands, hexamine, hexaketone, hexacarboxylic acid, were prepared and tested. The macrocyclic hexacarboxylic ligand was the most promising. The addition of hexacarboxylic acid to a uranyl tricarbonate solution gave a change of visible absorption due to the competitive formation of the uranyl complex. From this competitive binding, a relative formation constant was estimated to be 10-5, giving a log K/sub f/ value of 16.4 at 250C for the uranyl complex. This value is the largest among the hosts ever reported to bind uranyl ion.The selectivity of the macrocyclic hexacarboxylic ligand was also ascertained by testing with other metal cations. Results indicate that uranyl ions can be extracted efficiently from sea water using the hexacarboxylic acid ligands which are attached to a polymer insoluble in water

  3. Ammonium hydroxide modulated synthesis of high-quality fluorescent carbon dots for white LEDs with excellent color rendering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengda; Zhu, Zhifeng; Chang, Yajing; Wang, Hui; Yuan, Nan; Li, Guopeng; Yu, Dabin; Jiang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    A novel type of aqueous fluorescent carbon dot (CD) was synthesized using citric acid as the only carbon source via an ammonium hydroxide modulated method, providing a blue color gamut. The amino group is considered to be the key factor in the high fluorescence of CDs and a model is established to investigate the mechanism of fluorescence. In addition, white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs) are fabricated by utilizing the prepared CDs and rare earth luminescent materials (SrSi2O2N2:Eu and Sr2Si5N8:Eu) as color conversion layers and UV-LED chips as the excitation light source. The WLEDs produce bright white light with attractive color rendering properties including a color rendering index of up to 95.1, a CIE coordinate of (0.33, 0.37), and a T c of 5447 K under a 100 mA driven current, indicating that the CDs are promising in the field of optoelectronic devices.

  4. Effect of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide concentration on structure, morphology and carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of calcium hydroxide based sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni; Vignesh, K.; Sreekantan, Srimala; Pung, Swee-Yong; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Othman, Radzali; Thant, Aye Aye; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Salim, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has been proposed as an important material for industrial, architectural, and environmental applications. In this study, calcium acetate was used as a precursor and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a surfactant to synthesize Ca(OH)2 based adsorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The effect of CTAB concentration (0.2-0.8 M) on the structure, morphology and CO2 adsorption performance of Ca(OH)2 was studied in detail. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), BET surfaced area and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) techniques. The phase purity, crystallite size, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and CO2 adsorption performance of Ca(OH)2 precursor adsorbents were significantly increased when the concentration of CTAB was increased. XRD results showed that pure Ca(OH)2 phase was obtained at the CTAB concentration of 0.8 M. TGA results exhibited that 0.8 M of CTAB-assisted Ca(OH)2 precursor adsorbent possessed a residual carbonation conversion of ∼56% after 10 cycles.

  5. Layered metal uranyl phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUO2PO4·4H2O (HUP) forms a laminar intercalate with butylamine, c = 29.30(5) angstrom, which accepts cationic metals in exchange for the n-butylammonium ions. Hydrated uranyl metal phosphates M(UO2PO4)2·nH2O (M=Mn,Co,Ni,Cu,Zn,Cd) are obtained by ionic exchange and were studied by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The tetragonal structures of all these product compounds are derived from HUP. The diffuse electronic reflectance spectra of every sample show characteristic UO22+ absorption bands. In the spectra of the Co, Ni and Cu phosphates there are other bands in the 500-800 nm zone compatible with their observed aquocation transitions

  6. Uranyl ion uptake by polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaniline (Pani) was synthesized by the chemical oxidation of aniline. The batch mode experiments showed that Pani could be used for the separation of metal ions like uranyl from a mixture. UO22+ was converted into its anionic complex using suitable complexing agent like thiocyanate and the anionic complex is taken up by Pani. Interference studies showed that uranyl ion can be selectively taken up in presence of transition metal ions present in some binary mixtures. (author)

  7. Precipitation mechanism of ammonium uranate and relative process selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes hydrolytic mechanism of uranyl ion, composition and structure of formed ammonium uranates. Investigations show that uranyl hydrolytic complexes as a main form of dinuclear complexes in solution with further hydrolyze to form sub-stable uranyl hydroxide with the oxonium oxygen bond which can react with cation NH4+, existing in solution, by substituting the hydroxyl bridge hydrogens to form ammonium uranates. Virgin thin grain is small and can easily polymerize into a porous particle by absorption of plate to plate, and the later may aggregate into a second aggregation. Transform of F- system into NO3- system, or use of two-steps precipitation, strictly controlled pH value, in order to quicken speed of formation of the virgin grain, an ADU-derived special UO2 powder can be obtained

  8. Isotherm And Kinetic Studies On The Electrosorption Of Uranyl Tricarbonate Complex [UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup 4-} From Aqueous Solutions By Activated Carbon Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, Aznan Fazli; Yim, Man Sung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Many types of adsorbent materials have been developed over the past 50 years, and the most recognizable is amidoxime based materials which is known to have high affinity in in chelating uranyl ions from seawater. However, the fabrication cost of amidoxime based materials was high which lead to high uranium extraction cost. In recent studies, use of porous carbon materials combined with the electrosorption technique was shown to have high selectivity for uranium separation from seawater. It is clear that the electrosorption capacity increase with the increasing of electrolyte concentration. The investigated activated carbon electrode still not reach the maximum adsorption capacity in the test condition. The morphology analysis confirmed that the fabricated activated carbon electrode has a porous structure, where BET analysis has revealed that the size of the pores can be categorized in mesopores region which is the optimum condition for electrosorption purposes. Other than that, the FT-IR analysis has enough evident that the molecular interaction of the activated carbon electrode involves the intermolecular interaction (physical crosslink/bonding) and stable for electrosorption application.

  9. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang-Won; Leckie, J.O. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Siegel, M.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption.

  10. Surface complexation modeling of uranyl adsorption on corrensite from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrensite is the dominant clay mineral in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The surface characteristics of corrensite, a mixed chlorite/smectite clay mineral, have been studied. Zeta potential measurements and titration experiments suggest that the corrensite surface contains a mixture of permanent charge sites on the basal plane and SiOH and AlOH sites with a net pH-dependent charge at the edge of the clay platelets. Triple-layer model parameters were determined by the double extrapolation technique for use in chemical speciation calculations of adsorption reactions using the computer program HYDRAQL. Batch adsorption studies showed that corrensite is an effective adsorbent for uranyl. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior indicates that adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Adsorption studies were also conducted in the presence of competing cations and complexing ligands. The cations did not affect uranyl adsorption in the range studied. This observation lends support to the hypothesis that uranyl adsorption occurs at the edge sites. Uranyl adsorption was significantly hindered by carbonate. It is proposed that the formation of carbonate uranyl complexes inhibits uranyl adsorption and that only the carbonate-free species adsorb to the corrensite surface. The presence of the organic complexing agents EDTA and oxine also inhibits uranyl sorption

  11. Molecular interactions between carbon nanotubes and ammonium ionic liquids and their catalysis properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We report interactions between multi-walled carbon nanotubes and ionic liquids. • Triethylammonium hydrogen phosphate ionic liquids are studied. • Raman spectroscopy is used to study interactions. • Morphological studies were carried out using scanning electron microscopy. • Bucky gel was used as catalyst for Michael reactions. - Abstract: A new catalytic method has been developed for the synthesis of aza/thia-Michael addition reactions of amines/thiols, which provide higher product yields. This catalyst is a combination of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with triethylammonium hydrogen phosphate (TEAP) ionic liquid (IL), commonly referred to as bucky gel. In order to gain insight into the interactions involved between IL and MWCNT, we utilised Raman spectroscopy for our analysis. The interactions between MWCNT with TEAP were clearly evidenced by the increasing intensity ratios and spectral shift in the wavelength for the Raman D and G bands of MWCNT. The morphological studies of the resulting composite materials of TEAP and MWCNT (bucky gel) were carried out using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The key advantage of using bucky gel as a catalyst is that higher product yield is obtained in reduced reaction time for Michael reactions

  12. Selective determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and dithizone by atomic-absorption spectrometry with a carbon-tube atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, T; Yamamoto, Y

    1977-05-01

    The extraction behaviour of antimony(III) and antimony(V) with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and dithizone in organic solvents has been investigated by means of frameless atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with a carbon-tube atomizer. The selective extraction of antimony(III) and differential determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) have been developed. With ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and methyl isobutyl ketone, when the aqueous phase/solvent volume ratio is 50 ml/10 ml and the injection volume in the carbon tube is 20 mul, the sensitivity for antimony is 0.2 ng/ml for 1% absorption. The relative standard deviations are ca. 2%. Interferences by many metal ions can be prevented by masking with EDTA. The proposed methods have been applied satisfactorily to determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) in various types of water. PMID:18962096

  13. Preparation of Uranium Dioxide by Electrochemical Reduction in Ammonium Carbonate Solutions and Subsequent Precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments in a small scale electrolysis cell on cathodic reduction of uranium (VI) to uranium (IV) show the possibility of an efficient way to obtain uranium (IV) in carbonate solutions. From this solution uranium (IV) hydrous oxide precipitates by merely raising the temperature. To obtain larger quantities of material needed for technological testing, a scale-up of the process was attempted. An electrolysis cell of hard PVC (polyvinylchloride) was constructed with a mercury pool cathode of approximately 2.5 dm2 and platinum anodes. The catholyte was separated from the anolyte by cationexchange membranes. The catholyte was circulated between two 50-1 reservoirs and streamed toward the vigorously stirred mercury cathode. The working potential of mercury was controlled against an Ag/AgCl/KC1 (sat.) reference electrode, the potential being held constant at -1.5 V. The current efficiency is approximately 90%; the power consumed for the reduction process is about 0.8 kWh/kg of uranium dioxide. After the electrolysis was completed the precipitation was initiated only by heating the deeply green clear solution up to 70 deg. C in a separate all-glass vessel of 60-1 volume. From 50, 1 of the catholyte solution 1 kg of a centrifuged product (containing about 20% of water) was obtained. The coulometric analysis of the oxygen-uranium ratio always gave results in the range of 2.04 to 2.09. By the procedure described uranium (IV) hydrous oxide is selectively precipitated, and the oxygen-uranium ratio in the precipitate was found to be independent of the degree of completion of the reduction. The product was identified as the alpha phase of uranium dioxide by the X-ray powder diffraction. Experiments in sintering and characterization of uranium dioxide thus obtained for the ceramic nuclear fuel requirements are under way. (author)

  14. The crystal chemistry of the uranyl carbonate mineral grimselite, (K,Na).sub.3./sub.Na[(UO.sub.2./sub.)(CO.sub.3./sub.).sub.3./sub.](H.sub.2./sub.O), from Jáchymov, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, J.; Fejfarová, Karla; Skála, Roman; Škoda, R.; Meisser, N.; Hloušek, J.; Císařová, I.; Dušek, Michal; Veselovský, F.; Čejka, J.; Sejkora, J.; Ondruš, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 3 (2012), s. 443-453. ISSN 0026-461X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521; CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : uranyl carbonate * grimselite * crystal structure * chemical composition * Jáchymov Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.212, year: 2012

  15. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of actinide complexes. Communication 1. SFE of uranyl trifluoroacetylacetonate adduct with pyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparison of some methods of ascertaining the solubility of metal complexes in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) was made. It is shown that solubility of uranyl trifluoroacetylacetonate adduct with pyridine exceeds 100 g/l (36 mg of uranium per ml) of SC-CO2 under the pressure of 300 atm and temperature of 60 deg C. Partial degrading of the uranyl trifluoroacetylacetonate adduct with pyridine is pointed out

  16. Design requirements for uranium ion exchange from ammonium bicarbonate solutions in a fluidized system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fluidized countercurrent ion-exchange system was developed, operated, and evaluated. The system consisted of integrated multiple-compartment absorption and elution columns in which the solution flows were continuous except for short periods when resin increments were withdrawn. The exchange of uranyl carbonate between a simulated in situ uranium leach liquor and a strong-base ion-exchange resin together with the subsequent elution with an ammonium chloride solution was studied. The effects of the number of sections, section height, amount of resin withdrawal, solution flow rate, and column diameter were investigated. The kinetic and equilibrium relationships for the absorption and elution steps were also examined. The experimental data indicate a strong interdependence between variables. Solution retention time appears to be a major limiting variable in the absorption process, while resin residence time is the determining factor in the elution process. The column was efficient over a range of conditions, but close control was needed for optimum operation. 30 figures

  17. Phosphoric ore treatment by roasting it with sodium carbonate and leaching it with ammonium citrate for the recovery of soluble phosphate and uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By thermal treatment of phosphoric ore, with low phosphorus contents and iron, aluminum, and silicon impurities, basic fertilizers with P2O5 soluble in citric acid or ammonium citrate, can be produced. The phosphoric ore lightly grinded with alkaline salts like CO3Na2 y SiO2 is roasted between 800 to 1 000°C in rotary kilns. The roasted material contains from 25–30% of alkaline phosphates soluble in citrates. Phosphoric ore from the province of Napo-Ecuador with 24% of P2O5, 40% CaO in form of apatite, 20% of SiO2 and 7 g/ton U is tested by thermic differential analysis, roasting at 800°C for 2 hours with 50% w/w of sodium carbonate and 2% w/w of SiO2 by using a Nichols pilot furnace with 15 L of capacity which uses gas (propane-butane) as fuel, and agitated leaching with ammonium citrate (5% w/w). The initial ore and products are characterized by using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (Perkin Elmer AA400) and x-ray diffraction (Bruker D8 Advance). In the best conditions, 32% of phosphorus soluble in water is obtained as well as 40% of phosphorus and 56% uranium soluble in ammonium citrate. (author)

  18. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO2F2. Studies on the effect of added LiNO3 or Na2WO4·2H2O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF6 content of WF6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF6

  19. On the Formation of "Hypercoordinated" Uranyl Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoendorff, George E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Gibson, John K.; Rios, Daniel; Gordon, Mark S.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2011-09-05

    Recent gas phase experimental studies suggest the presence of hypercoordinated uranyl complexes. Coordination of acetone (Ace) to uranyl to form hypercoordinated species is examined using density functional theory (DFT) with a range of functionals and second order perturbation theory (MP2). Complexes with up to eight acetones were studied. It is shown that no more than six acetones can bind directly to uranium and that the observed uranyl complexes are not hypercoordinated.

  20. Hybrid uranyl-vanadium nano-wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchyk, G A; Wylie, E M; Prizio, S; Szymanowski, J E S; Sigmon, G E; Burns, P C

    2015-06-25

    Hybrid uranyl-vanadium oxide clusters intermediate between transition metal polyoxometalates and uranyl peroxide cage clusters were obtained by dissolving uranyl nitrate in the ionic liquid 3-ethyl-1-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate mixed with an aqueous solution containing vanadium. Where sulfate was present, wheel-shaped {U20V20} crystallized and contains ten sulfate tetrahedra, and in the absence of added sulfate, {U2V16}, a derivative of {V18}, was obtained. PMID:26008125

  1. Cholestyramine-enhanced fecal elimination of carbon-14 in rats after administration of ammonium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanoate or potassium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanesulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Gibson, S.J.; Ober, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    After a single intravenous dose of ammonium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanoate (( /sup 14/C)PFO, 13.3 mg/kg) or of potassium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanesulfonate (( /sup 14/C)PFOS, 3.4 mg/kg) to rats, cholestyramine fed daily as a 4% mixture in feed was shown to increase the total carbon-14 eliminated via feces and to decrease liver concentration of carbon-14. Rats were fed cholestyramine in feed for 14 days after administration of (/sup 14/C)PFO and for 21 days after administration of (/sup 14/C)PFOS. Control rats were administered radiolabeled fluorochemical but were not treated with cholestyramine. Cholestyramine treatment increased mean cumulative carbon-14 elimination in feces by 9.8-fold for rats administered (/sup 14/C)PFO and by 9.5-fold for rats administered (/sup 14/C)PFOS. After (/sup 14/C)PFO, a mean of 4% of the dose of carbon-14 was in liver of cholestyramine-treated rats at 14 days versus 7.6% in control rats; after (/sup 14/C)PFOS, 11.3% of the dose was in liver at 21 days versus 40.3% in control rats. After administration of either radiolabeled compound, plasma and red blood cell carbon-14 concentrations, which were relatively lower than liver concentrations, were also significantly reduced by cholestyramine treatment.

  2. Cholestyramine-enhanced fecal elimination of carbon-14 in rats after administration of ammonium [14C]perfluorooctanoate or potassium [14C]perfluorooctanesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a single intravenous dose of ammonium [14C]perfluorooctanoate [( 14C]PFO, 13.3 mg/kg) or of potassium [14C]perfluorooctanesulfonate [( 14C]PFOS, 3.4 mg/kg) to rats, cholestyramine fed daily as a 4% mixture in feed was shown to increase the total carbon-14 eliminated via feces and to decrease liver concentration of carbon-14. Rats were fed cholestyramine in feed for 14 days after administration of [14C]PFO and for 21 days after administration of [14C]PFOS. Control rats were administered radiolabeled fluorochemical but were not treated with cholestyramine. Cholestyramine treatment increased mean cumulative carbon-14 elimination in feces by 9.8-fold for rats administered [14C]PFO and by 9.5-fold for rats administered [14C]PFOS. After [14C]PFO, a mean of 4% of the dose of carbon-14 was in liver of cholestyramine-treated rats at 14 days versus 7.6% in control rats; after [14C]PFOS, 11.3% of the dose was in liver at 21 days versus 40.3% in control rats. After administration of either radiolabeled compound, plasma and red blood cell carbon-14 concentrations, which were relatively lower than liver concentrations, were also significantly reduced by cholestyramine treatment

  3. Complete removal of uranyl nitrate from tissue matrix using supercritical fluid extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The removal of uranyl nitrate from tissue matrix has been studied with supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol alone as well as complexing reagents dissolved in methanol. A systematic study of various complexing agents led to the development of an extraction procedure for the quantitative recovery of uranium from tissue matrix with supercritical carbon dioxide modified with methanol containing small quantities of acetylacetone. The drying time and temperature employed in loading of uranyl nitrate onto tissue paper were found to influence the extraction efficiency significantly

  4. Optical apparatus and method for sensing uranyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

  5. Photochemical study on uranyl(VI) tributylphosphate in supercritical CO2 and the first uranyl(VI) photoreduction carried out in supercritical fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photochemistry of uranyl(VI)-tributylphosphate (TBP) complex in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) was studied in the pressure range of 8-40 MPa and from 289 to 336 K. Deactivation rate constants decreased with the increase of pressure. Temperature dependence analysis of the deactivation rate constants indicated that scCO2 contributes differently to deactivation processes from liquid phase CO2 based on activation barriers. An UV irradiation experiment proved photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)-TBP complex by ethanol in scCO2. (author)

  6. Recovery of uranium values from ammonium diuranate filtrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the conversion of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) to UO2 or U metal powder, ammonium diuranate filtrate (ADUF) is generated by precipitation of uranyl fluoride solution (UO2F2) with ammonium hydroxide solution (NH4OH). This filtrate contains uranium in the range of 150-200 mg/l and fluoride ions in the range of 10-15 g/l. Uranium is present in the filtrate in hexavalent state as mixed fluoride complex particularly, UO2F2.3NH4F, which is quite soluble in aqueous medium and leads to loss of precious uranium in the effluent stream and also poses disposal issues

  7. Thermodynamic properties of uranyl metaborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard enthalpy of formation of crystalline UO2(BO2)2 (-2542.5 ± 3.5 kJ/mol) at 298.15 K was determined by reaction calorimetry. The heat capacity of this compound was measured over the temperature range 6-302 K by adiabatic vacuum calorimetry. The thermodynamic functions were calculated, including the standard entropy (502.8 ± 2.1 J/(mol K)) and Gibbs function of formation (-2392.5 ± 4.0 kJ/mol) at 298.15 K. The standard thermodynamic functions of reactions with the participation of uranyl metaborate were calculated and analyzed

  8. Complexation of uranyl ions. III. Investigation of the sorption of uranium of the VP-1Ap anion exchanger from carbonate media by x-ray spectrometric microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial distribution of uranium in granules of the VP-1Ap anion exchanger during heightened sorption from carbonate media has been investigated by x-ray spectroscopic microanalysis. Variation of the form of the concentration profile as a function of the extent of sorption from a uniform profile across the diameter, then to a meniscus-shaped profile, and finally to a smoothed profile with an increase in the coefficient of nonuniformity of the distribution of uranium in the granules from 0.026 to 0.045 has been established

  9. Synthetic and structural studies of uranyl complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex chemistry of uranyl nitrate with mono and bi-functional neutral extractants shows, that it forms 1:2 and 1:1 complexes respectively. The structures of the isolated complexes show, that the water molecules from the primary coordination sphere of (UO2(NO3)2.2H2O) are replaced by the extractants completely and adopt a hexagonal bi-pyramidal geometry. However, the structural chemistry of uranyl nitrate with the tri-functional extractants show, that one of the nitrates acts as a monodentate ligand to maintain the hexagonal bi-pyramidal geometry. The complex chemistry of uranyl bis(β-diketonates) with the neutral monodentate extractants shows that the water molecule from the primary sphere of (UO2(β-diketonate)2.H2O) is replaced by the ligands, to form a pentagonal bi-pyramidal geometry around uranyl group. However, the structural chemistry of bi-functional neutral extractants with uranyl bis(β-diketonates) shows either mono or bi-nuclear uranyl complexes depending upon the stoichiometry of the uranyl ion used. (author)

  10. Complexation effects on uranyl ion spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranyl complexes of (i) mono furfural 4-(2-pyridyl thio semicarbazonato), (ii) bis-3-methyl-4-(p-methyl phenylazo)-5-pyrazolonato, (iii) bis-2-AC-benzofuranato and (iv) bis-3-acetyl-4-hydroxy coumarinate, are prepared, isolated and characterized by chemical analysis for the first time. The spectra of these complexes along with uranyl nitrate have been recorded at 293 K by using nujol mull technique. The force constants are evaluated by Wilson's FG matrix method and the effects of complexation on U-O force constants and bond distances in uranyl nitrate are discussed. (author)

  11. Influence of organic carbon and nitrate loading on partitioning between dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and N2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, Amber K.; Algar, Christopher K.; Giblin, Anne E.; Rich, Jeremy J.

    2015-09-01

    Biologically available nitrogen is removed from ecosystems through the microbial processes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) or denitrification, while dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) retains it. A mechanistic understanding of controls on partitioning among these pathways is currently lacking. The objective of this study was to conduct a manipulative experiment to determine the influence of organic C and NO3- loading on partitioning. Sediment was collected from a location on the southern New England shelf (78 m water depth) and sieved. Half of the sediment was mixed with freeze-dried phytoplankton and the other half was not. Sediment was then spread into 1.5 mm, "thin discs" closed at the bottom and placed in large aquarium tanks with filtered, N2/CO2 sparged seawater to maintain O2 limited conditions. Half of the discs received high NO3- loading, while the other half received low NO3- loading, resulting in a multifactorial design with four treatments: no C addition, low NO3- (-C-N); C addition, low NO3- (+C-N); no C addition, high NO3- (-C+N); and C addition, high NO3- (+C+N). Sediment discs were incubated in the tanks for 7 weeks, during which time inorganic N (NH4+, NO3-, and NO2-) was monitored, and sediment discs were periodically removed from the tanks to conduct 15N isotope labeling experiments in vials to measure potential rates of anammox, denitrification, and DNRA. Temporal dynamics of inorganic N concentrations in the tanks were indicative of anoxic N metabolism, with strong response of the build up or consumption of the intermediate NO2-, depending on treatments. Vial incubation experiments with added 15NO2- + 14NH4+ indicated significant denitrification and DNRA activity in sediment thin discs, but incubations with added 15NH4+ + 14NO2- indicated anammox was not at all significant. Inorganic N concentrations in the tanks were fit to a reactive transport model assuming different N transformations. Organic C decomposition rates

  12. Extraction chemistry of uranyl nitrate and nitric acid in high concentration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HNO3 is extracted in significant quantities by uranyl nitrate solvates with diferent extractants: TBP (tributyl phosphate), TOPO (trioctyl phosphine oxide) and TDA (tetradecyl ammonium). The effect of diluent nature is not observed on extracting HNO3 and TBP saturated by uranium at equilibrium with its salt using the diluents (CCl4, C6H5Cl, C12H26, CHCl3) which are less polar than UO2(NO3)2(TBP)2 . HNO3 occurs in organic phase as undissociated form and its state is similar to pure anhydrous HNO3 . Solvates of TBP and TDA with uranyl nitrate dissolve HNO3 without displacement of uranium from organic phase. (author) 13 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Direct and indirect effects of ammonia, ammonium and nitrate on phosphatase activity and carbon fluxes from decomposing litter in peatland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we investigate the response of soils and litter to 5 years of experimental additions of ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and ammonia (NH3) to an ombrotrophic peatland. We test the importance of direct (via soil) and indirect (via litter) effects on phosphatase activity and efflux of CO2. We also determined how species representing different functional types responded to the nitrogen treatments. Our results demonstrate that additions of NO3, NH4 and NH3 all stimulated phosphatase activity but the effects were dependent on species of litter and mechanism (direct or indirect). Deposition of NH3 had no effect on efflux of CO2 from Calluna vulgaris litter, despite it showing signs of stress in the field, whereas both NO3 and NH4 reduced CO2 fluxes. Our results show that the collective impacts on peatlands of the three principal forms of nitrogen in atmospheric deposition are a result of differential effects and mechanisms on individual components. - We found that nitrogen deposition affects microbial activity associated with litter through both indirect and direct mechanisms, but these effects were dependent on the chemical form of inorganic nitrogen compounds.

  14. A propeller-like uranyl metallomesogen

    OpenAIRE

    Cardinaels, Thomas; Ramaekers, Jan; Guillon, Daniel; Donnio, Bertrand; Binnemans, Koen

    2005-01-01

    Uranyl triflate forms with three imidazo[4,5-f]-1,10-phenanthroline ligands a propeller-like complex that exhibits a hexagonal columnar phase. The ligand is not liquid-crystalline, but a mesophase is induced upon complex formation with the uranyl salt. The thermal behavior has been investigated by polarizing optical microscopy and by high-temperature X-ray diffraction. A model of the stacking of the molecules in the mesophase is proposed.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy to visualize the localisation of uranyl phosphate precipitate in E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial bioremediation of heavy metal waste can be a superior alternative to physiochemical methods due to its high efficiency and in situ applicability. Among the various processes employed, bioprecipitation of heavy metals with ions like inorganic phosphate is considered to be particularly promising approach for bioremediation of uranium (U). As uranium phosphate precipitate (U(VI)) remains insoluble, it can be a long term and stable sink for U in the environment. Bacterial phosphatases can be efficiently expressed in appropriate host systems and consequently these engineered microbes can be utilized for bioremediation. Our research group has expressed two different phosphatases in E. coli and evaluated the bioremediation potential of these recombinant strains. PhoN, a non-specific acid phosphatase (from Salmonella) exists as a cell-associated protein when expressed in E. coli. On the other hand, when PhoK (alkaline phosphatase from Sphingomonas) is expressed in E. coli, the protein is secreted extracellularly. E. coli-PhoN cells, when incubated with 1 mM uranyl nitrate (pH 6.8) and p-glycerophosphate (GP) as substrate, showed cell-associated uranyl phosphate precipitate. In contrast, E. coli -PhoK cells, exposed to 1 mM uranyl carbonate (pH 9) and β-GP, showed extracellular uranyl phosphate precipitate in solution. Thus, TEM can be effectively used to obtain a vivid pictorial representation of the location of uranyl phosphate precipitate in bacteria. (author)

  16. Effect of plant photosynthesis, carbon sources and ammonium availability on nitrogen fixation rates in the rhizosphere of Zostera noltii

    OpenAIRE

    Welsh, Dt; Bourgues, S; Dewit, R; Auby, Isabelle

    1997-01-01

    Rates of nitrogen fixation (measured as acetylene reduction) in the rhizosphere of the seagrass Zostera noltii were highly dependent upon plant photosynthetic activity being significantly stimulated at elevated CO2 concentrations and by light, both in the short-term and over diurnal cycles. Stimulation by light became insignificant when 5 mM sucrose was added to the sediment porewater, indicating that in the absence of added carbon sources, light stimulation was due to direct inputs of plant ...

  17. Novel quaternary ammonium hydroxide cationic surfactants as corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel and as biocides for sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of alkyl dimethylisopropylammonium hydroxide cationic surfactants (DEDIAOH, DODIAOH and HEDIAOH) was synthesized and characterized. The surface properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC), the effectiveness of surface tension reduction (ΠCMC), surface excess concentration (Γmax) and surface area per molecule (Amin) have been determined by means of surface tension measurements. The degree of counter ion dissociation (β) and the free energy of micellization (ΔGmic) were calculated. The corrosion inhibition of the synthesized cationic surfactants on carbon steel surface in 1 M HCl solution was investigated. For this purpose, a series of techniques such as gravimetric measurement, potentiodynamic polarization and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used. The values of activation energy for carbon steel corrosion and the thermodynamic parameters such as adsorption equilibrium constant (Kads), free energy of adsorption (ΔGadso), adsorption heat (ΔHadso) and adsorption entropy (ΔSadso) values were evaluated. Results showed that HEDIAOH had better inhibition effect than DEDIAOH and DODIAOH of the corrosion of carbon steel in 1 M HCl solution and inhibition efficiency is higher than 96% after 24 h at 1 x 10-2 M concentration of the inhibitor. The inhibition efficiency is discussed in terms of strong adsorption of the inhibitor molecules on the metal surface and formation of a protective film. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed a good surface coverage on the metal surface. The Biological activity was examined against sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) by dilution method.

  18. Experience with a uranyl nitrate/uranium dioxide conversion pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A plant for the precipitation of sinterable nuclear grade UO2 powders is described in this report. The plant has been designed, built and set up by SNIA TECHINT. ENEA has been involved in the job as nuclear consultant. Main process steps are: dissolution of UO2 powder or sintered UO2 pellets, adjustment of uranyl nitrate solutions, precipitation of uranium peroxide by means of hydrogen peroxide, centrifugation of the precipitate, drying, calcination and reduction to uranium dioxide. The report is divided in two main section: the process description and the ''hot test'' report. Some laboratory data on precipitation of ammonium diuranate by means of NH4OH, are also reported

  19. Reactive transport of uranyl: fixation mode on silica and goethite; experiments in columns and closed reactors; simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium contaminated areas are found in mine waste disposal sites, former military areas, etc. The present study focuses on the identification or mechanisms which may lead contaminated soils to become a sudden potential threat to surface and ground waters. Mechanisms were studied on model material at two levels. On the molecular scale, the complexation of uranyl at trace metal concentrations was investigated with amorphous silica. Complexation is shown to occur via the formation of surface complexes, characterised by different time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectra and life times and stoichiometry. On the macro-scale the transport behaviour of uranyl in a cristobalite-goethite-carbonate-uranyl system was investigated with laboratory column and batch experiments. Uranium mobility was found to be controlled by the interaction between physical transport and a reversible, rate-controlled, fixation reaction. Sorption was shown to be an ensemble of competing solution and surface complexation reactions, leading to an apparent non-linear (Langmuir-like) adsorption isotherm. Finally the impact of a sudden change in background geochemistry was studied. Conditions leading to a dramatic mobilization of uranium from mildly contaminated systems were experimentally identified. Maximal uranyl concentration are controlled by the total extractable uranyl in the system and limited by uranyl solubility. Evolution of the background geochemical conditions is thus an important part of contaminated sites risk assessment. (author)

  20. A highly reproducible solenoid micropump system for the analysis of total inorganic carbon and ammonium using gas-diffusion with conductimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henríquez, Camelia; Horstkotte, Burkhard; Cerdà, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a simple, economic, and miniaturized flow-based analyzer based on solenoid micropumps is presented. It was applied to determine two parameters of high environmental interest: ammonium and total inorganic carbon (TIC) in natural waters. The method is based on gas diffusion (GD) of CO₂ and NH3 through a hydrophobic gas permeable membrane from an acidic or alkaline donor stream, respectively. The analytes are trapped in an acceptor solution, being slightly alkaline for CO₂ and slightly acidic for NH₃. The analytes are quantified using a homemade stainless steel conductimetric cell. The proposed system required five solenoid micro-pumps, one for each reagent and sample. Two especially made air bubble traps were placed down-stream of the solendoid pumps, which provided the acceptor solutions, by this increasing the method's reproducibility. Values of RSD lower than 1% were obtained. Achieved limits of detection were 0.27 µmol L⁻¹ for NH₄⁺ and 50 µmol L⁻¹ for TIC. Add-recovery tests were used to prove the trueness of the method and recoveries of 99.5 ± 7.5% were obtained for both analytes. The proposed system proved to be adequate for monitoring purpose of TIC and NH₄⁺ due to its high sample throughput and repeatability. PMID:24274287

  1. Bifunctional quaternary ammonium compounds to inhibit biofilm growth and enhance performance for activated carbon air-cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Liu, Yinan; An, Jingkun; Feng, Cuijuan; Wang, Xin

    2014-12-01

    The slow diffusion of hydroxyl out of the catalyst layer as well as the biofouling on the surface of cathode are two problems affecting power for membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In order to solve both of them simultaneously, here we simply modify activated carbon air-cathode using a bifunctional quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) by forced evaporation. The maximum power density reaches 1041 ± 12 mW m-2 in an unbuffered medium (0.5 g L-1 NaCl), which is 17% higher than the control, probably due to the accelerated anion transport in the catalyst layer. After 2 months, the protein content reduced by a factor of 26 and the power density increases by 33%, indicating that the QAC modification can effectively inhibit the growth of cathodic biofilm and improve the stability of performance. The addition of NaOH and QAC epoxy have a negative effect on power production due to the clogging of pores in catalyst layer.

  2. Thermochemical investigations on uranyl phosphates and arsenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are described of a study of the thermochemical stability of anhydrous uranyl phosphates and arsenates. A number of aspects of chemical technological importance are indicated in detail. The synthesized anhydrous uranyl phosphates and arsenates were very hygroscopic, so that experiments on these compounds had to be carried out under moisture-free conditions. Further characterisation of these compounds are given, including a study of their thermal stabilities and phase relations. The uranyl phosphates reduced reversibly at temperatures of the order of 1100 to 16000C. This makes it possible to express their relative stabilities quantitatively, in terms of the oxygen pressures of the reduction reactions. The thermal decomposition of uranyl arsenates did not occur by reduction, as for the phosphates, but by giving off arsenic oxide vapour. The results of measurements of enthalpies of solution led to the determination of the enthalpies of formation, heat capacity and the standard entropies of the uranyl arsenates. The thermochemical functions at high-temperatures could consequently be calculated. Attention is paid to the possible formation of uranium arsenates, whose uranium has a valency lower than six, hitherto not reported in literature. It was not possible to prepare arsenates of tetravalent uranium. However, three new compounds were observed, one of these, UAsO5, was studied in some detail. (Auth.)

  3. Denitration of Uranyl Nitrate Using Tridodecyl Amine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrate extraction from uranyl nitrate using extractant tridodecyl amine and paraffin has been carried out. The aim of this research was to prepare uranyl nitrate with low nitrate content (acid deficiency uranyl nitrate/ADUN). ADUN is a raw material for making kernels uranium oxide in a spherical from which cannot easily be broken/cracked. This ADUN was prepared by extracting nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution with tridodecyl amine (TDA) and paraffin. Nitric acid in uranyl nitrate solution moved into organic phase due to the complex formation with TDA. The aqueous phase was ADUN, it was than analyzed its nitric and uranium contents using titration method. Tree variables were observed, i.e. uranium contents (80-125 g/l), process temperature (50-100 oC) and TDA/Nitrate molar ratio (0.5-1). Experiment results showed that optimum condition accurate at uranium content of 100 g/l, temperature extraction 60-70 oC and TDA to Nitrate molar ratio 0.75-0.80 with an efficiency of 77 %. (author)

  4. Revision of the biodistribution of uranyl in serum: Is fetuin-A the major protein target?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium is a natural actinide present as uranyl U(VI) species in aqueous environments. Its toxicity is considered to be chemical rather than radio toxicological. Whatever the route of entry, uranyl reaches the blood, is partly eliminated via the kidneys, and accumulated in the bones. In serum, its speciation mainly involves carbonate and proteins. Direct identification of labile uranyl-protein complexes is extremely difficult because of the complexity of this matrix. Thus, until now the biodistribution of the metal in serum has not been described, and therefore, little is known about the metal transport mechanisms leading to bone accumulation. A rapid screening method based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used to determine the apparent affinities for U(VI) of the major serum proteins. A first biodistribution of uranyl was obtained by ranking the proteins according to the criteria of both their serum concentrations and affinities for this metal. Despite its moderate concentration in serum, fetuin-A (FETUA) was shown to exhibit an apparent affinity within the 30 nM range and to carry more than 80% of the metal. This protein involved in bone mineralization aroused interest in characterizing the U(VI) and FETUA interaction. Using complementary chromatographic and spectroscopic approaches, we demonstrated that the protein can bind 3 U(VI) at different binding sites exhibiting Kd from 30 nM to 10 μM. Some structural modifications and functional properties of FETUA upon uranyl complexation were also controlled. To our knowledge, this article presents the first identification of a uranyl carrier involved in bone metabolism along with the characterization of its metal binding sites. (authors)

  5. Revision of the biodistribution of uranyl in serum: is fetuin-A the major protein target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basset, Christian; Averseng, Olivier; Ferron, Pierre-Jean; Richaud, Nicolas; Hagège, Agnès; Pible, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2013-05-20

    Uranium is a natural actinide present as uranyl U(VI) species in aqueous environments. Its toxicity is considered to be chemical rather than radiotoxicological. Whatever the route of entry, uranyl reaches the blood, is partly eliminated via the kidneys, and accumulated in the bones. In serum, its speciation mainly involves carbonate and proteins. Direct identification of labile uranyl-protein complexes is extremely difficult because of the complexity of this matrix. Thus, until now the biodistribution of the metal in serum has not been described, and therefore, little is known about the metal transport mechanisms leading to bone accumulation. A rapid screening method based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used to determine the apparent affinities for U(VI) of the major serum proteins. A first biodistribution of uranyl was obtained by ranking the proteins according to the criteria of both their serum concentrations and affinities for this metal. Despite its moderate concentration in serum, fetuin-A (FETUA) was shown to exhibit an apparent affinity within the 30 nM range and to carry more than 80% of the metal. This protein involved in bone mineralization aroused interest in characterizing the U(VI) and FETUA interaction. Using complementary chromatographic and spectroscopic approaches, we demonstrated that the protein can bind 3 U(VI) at different binding sites exhibiting Kd from ∼30 nM to 10 μM. Some structural modifications and functional properties of FETUA upon uranyl complexation were also controlled. To our knowledge, this article presents the first identification of a uranyl carrier involved in bone metabolism along with the characterization of its metal binding sites. PMID:23527557

  6. Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Chengbao; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

    2011-03-07

    Uranyl complexes of a bis(methylterephthalamide) ligand (LH{sub 4}) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure is an unexpected [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 8}[L(UO{sub 2})]{sub 4} tetramer, formed via coordination of the two MeTAM units of L to two uranyl moieties. Addition of KOH to the tetramer gave the corresponding monomeric uranyl methoxide species [Me{sub 4}N]K{sub 2}[LUO{sub 2}(OMe)].

  7. Photochemical reduction of uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photochemical reduction of uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine has been studied in acetone-water medium in the presence of sulphuric acid at 346nm, 400nm and 434nm wavelengths. The photochemical reduction is of second order and increases with increase in hydrogen ion concentration. Absorption spectra of uranyl ion in acidic medium and uranyl ion with triphenylphosphine do not show any ground state complex formation. The value of quantum yield increases with the wavelength of the radiation increase from 346 to 434nm. Plots of reciprocal of quantum yield for the formation of U(IV) versus reciprocal [triphenylphosphine] are linear. Products characterized by UV and visible, IR and TLC show the formation of U(IV) and triphenylphosphine oxide. On the basis of above observations mechanism of the photochemical reduction has been proposed. (author)

  8. Infrared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Anita K. Gianotto; Michael E. McIlwain; Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Michael Kullman; Travis J. Cooper; David T. Moore; Nick Polfer; Jos Oomens; Ivan Infante; Lucas Visscher; Bertrand Siboulet; Wibe A. de Jong

    2007-12-01

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments, FELIX, was used to study the wavelength-resolved multiphoton dissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO22+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The apparent uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide or acetate, S was water, ammonia, acetone or acetonitrile, and n = 0-2. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations using B3LYP predicted values that were 30 – 40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis set and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which resulted only very modest changes to the uranyl frequency, and did not universally shift values lower. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  9. Infared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Kullman, Michael; Moore, David T.; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos; Infante, Ivan A.; Visscher, Lucas; Siboulet, Bertrand; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2008-01-24

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 30–40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  10. Infrared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 30-40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity

  11. Binding of uranyl by humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding of tracer level UO2+2 to a soil humic acid was measured by a solvent extraction technique. The binding is interpreted as involving only the carboxylate groups of the humate and both 1:1 and 1:2 UO2+2:CO2-binding is observed. Estimates based on these values indicate that uranyl complexing by humic and/or fulvic materials is not significant in sea water but may play a role in fresh water systems. Retention of uranyl from ground water by soil humics would be strong. (author)

  12. Luminescence enhancement of uranyl ion by benzoic acid in acetonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl ion is known for its characteristic green luminescence and therefore luminescence spectroscopy is a suitable technique for characterizing different uranyl species. In aqueous medium, luminescence of uranyl ion is generally weak due to its quenching by water molecules and therefore in order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H3PO4, H2SO4, HCIO4 have been widely used. The other method to enhance the uranyl luminescence is by ligand sensitized luminescence, a method well established for lanthanides. In this work, luminescence of uranyl ion is found to be enhanced by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium. In aqueous medium benzoic acid does not enhance the uranyl luminescence although it forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with uranyl ion. Luminescence spectra of uranyl benzoate revealed that enhancement is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by benzoate ions. UV-Vis spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize the specie formed in the in acetonitrile medium. UV-Vis spectroscopy along with luminescence spectra revealed that the specie to be tribenzoate complex of uranyl (UO2 (C6H5COO)3)- having D3h symmetry. (author)

  13. Treatment of uranyl nitrate and flouride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study on the fluoride complexes contained in uranyl and aluminium solutions has been carried out. Likewise concentration limits and Duhring diagrams for those solutions have been experimentally established. As a result, the optimum operation conditions for concentration by evaporation in the treatment plant, have been deduced. (Author) 12 refs

  14. Identification of Uranyl Minerals Using Oxygen K-Edge X Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Resch, Charles T.; Smith, Steven C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Uranium analysis is consistently needed throughout the fuel cycle, from mining to fuel fabrication to environmental monitoring. Although most of the world’s uranium is immobilized as pitchblende or uraninite, there exists a plethora of secondary uranium minerals, nearly all of which contain the uranyl cation. Analysis of uranyl compounds can provide clues as to a sample’s facility of origin and chemical history. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one technique that could enhance our ability to identify uranium minerals. Although there is limited chemical information to be gained from the uranium X-ray absorption edges, recent studies have successfully used ligand NEXAFS to study the physical chemistry of various uranium compounds. This study extends the use of ligand NEXAFS to analyze a suite of uranium minerals. We find that major classes of uranyl compounds (carbonate, oxyhydroxide, silicate, and phosphate) exhibit characteristic lineshapes in the oxygen K-edge absorption spectra. As a result, this work establishes a library of reference spectra that can be used to classify unknown uranyl minerals.

  15. Development of technology for ammonium nitrate dissociation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonia and ammonium carbonate are frequently used as reagents in fuel production and processing of liquid radioactive wastes. In particular, liquid radioactive wastes that contain ammonium nitrate are generated during operations of metal precipitation. In closed vessels at elevated temperature, for example in evaporators or deposits in tubing, ammonium nitrate may explode due to generation of gaseous nitrogen oxides [2]. In this connection, steps have to be taken to rule out conditions that result in explosion. To do that, ammonium nitrate should be removed even prior to the initial stage of its formation. This report gives results of development of a method of dissociating ammonium nitrate

  16. Elevated ammonium levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Novak, Ivana; MacAulay, Nanna

    2012-01-01

    Increased ammonium (NH(4)(+)/NH(3)) in the brain is a significant factor in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy, which involves altered glutamatergic neurotransmission. In glial cell cultures and brain slices, glutamate uptake either decreases or increases following acute ammonium expos...

  17. New chelation strategies for the uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional approaches to the design of metal-ion-specific complexing agents have relied to a great extent on the creation of a ligand cavity of the appropriate size and coordination number to accommodate the targeted metal ion. Oxo-metal ions, such as uranyl, cannot be dealt with as spherically symmetric charged atoms and thus present both a special challenge and offer a unique advantage for specific chelation in solution. To maximize recognition of the anisotropic UO22+ ion, new tripodal hexadentate ligands have been prepared providing three carboxyl moieties each to act as a bidentate donor group. The novel ligand design concept, ligand syntheses, and thermodynamic results related to the uranyl complex characterization are presented

  18. The bare uranyl(2+) ion, UO22+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-molecule reactions between U2+ and oxygen donors or charge-stripping collisions between singly charged UO22 ions and O2 collision partners generate uranyl(2+) ions in the gas phase. These do not readily dissociate into singly charged fragments. The standard enthalpy of formation for UO22+ is estimated to be 371±60 kcal mol-1, in accord with the results of ab initio calculations. (orig.)

  19. Thermochemical investigations on uranyl phosphates and arsenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are described of a study of the thermochemical stability of anhydrous phosphates and arsenates. The results of phase studies deal with compound formation and characterization, coexisting phases and limiting physical or chemical properties. The uranyl phosphates evolve oxygen at higher temperatures and the arsenates lose arsenic oxide vapour. These phenomena give the possibility to describe their thermodynamic stabilities. Thus oxygen pressures of uranyl phosphates have been measured using a static, non-isothermal method. Having made available the pure anhydrous compounds in the course of this investigation, molar thermodynamic quantities have been measured as well. These include standard enthalpies of formation from solution calorimetry and high-temperature heat-capacity functions derived from enthalpy increments measured. Some attention is given to compounds with uranium in valencies lower than six which have been met during the investigation. An evaluation is made of the thermodynamics of the compounds studied, to result in tabulized high-temperature thermodynamic functions. Relative stabilities within the systems are discussed and comparisons of the uranyl phosphates and the arsenates are made. (Auth.)

  20. A procedure for the preparation of an uranyl salt-based lubricant for pressing powder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lubricant based on uranyl salts can be prepared as follows. A higher fatty acid is dissolved in alcohol and neutralized. The gel formed is dissolved again by adding alcohol, and uranyl nitrate is added in a stoichiometric amount. The mixture is heated at a temperature lower than 52 degC. The precipitate formed is separated (e.g. by filtration), washed (e.g. with water, ethanol and acetone, respectively) and dried (e.g. at 40 degC), and is applicable as lubricant. In applications where the isotopic composition of lubricant residues is of importance, such as production of special kinds of nuclear fuel, care must be exercised when choosing the uranyl nitrate source. Special raw materials or sorted wastes from nuclear fuel production technology can be employed. A single fatty acid or a mixture of fatty acids can be used for the preparation; they can be saturated (unbranched or branched), with a minimum of 10 carbon atoms, or they can contain one double bond and an unbranched or branched alkyl chain with a minimum of 12 carbon atoms. (P.A.)

  1. Structure-configurational entropy and its effect on the thermodynamic stability of uranyl phases: With special application for geological disposal of nuclear waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Fanrong(陈繁荣); Rodney; C.Ewing

    2003-01-01

    Spent UO2 fuel will rapidly be altered to U6+ phases in nuclear waste repositories. Because most uranyl phases are based on sheet or chain structures and usually contain several molecular water groups, site-mixing, vacancies, as well as disorder in the orientation of hydrogen bonds may occur. A systematic survey of the published crystallographic data for uranates, uranyl oxide hydrates, phosphates, silicates, carbonates, and sulfates demonstrates that site-mixing apparently occurs in the structures of at least 31 uranyl phases. Calculations of the ideal site-mixing entropy indicate that the residual contribution that arises from substitution and vacancies to the third-law entropies of some uranyl phases is large. A brief examination of the crystal chemistry of water molecules in uranyl phases suggests that considerable residual entropy may be caused by the disorder of hydrogen bonds associated with interstitial H2O groups. In the geochemical environment that expected to occur in the near-field of nuclear waste repositories, the existence of structure-configurational entropy may reduce the uranium concentration of several log units in solutions equilibrated with some uranyl phases. Therefore, compositional analysis and structural determinations must be made on the samples used in calorimetric measurements, and the calorimetric data must be combined with solubility data to evaluate the thermodynamic stability of the interested phases.

  2. How to make a living from anaerobic ammonium oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartal, B.; De Almeida, N.M.; Maalcke, W.J.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Keltjens, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria primarily grow by the oxidation of ammonium coupled to nitrite reduction, using CO2 as the sole carbon source. Although they were neglected for a long time, anammox bacteria are encountered in an enormous species (micro)diversity in virtually any anoxi

  3. Synthesis and electrochemical characterization of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 by one-step precipitation method with ammonium carbonate as precipitating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Ammonium carbonate is used as the precipitating agent of synthesizing LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 for the first time. → All the metal ions precipitated in one time, no washing process is needed. → Effect of concentration and hydrothermal on the materials are concerned. → The obtained material shows regular quasi-spherical. → The synthesized materials behave excellent electrochemical properties. - Abstract: Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 materials are synthesized by one-step precipitation method. Ammonium carbonate is used as the precipitating agent to obtain a more precise feed ratio without recourse to traditional washing. After annealing at high temperature, the spherical particles become angular and show high levels of crystallinity. The synthesized samples are evaluated using powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and electrochemical testing. The samples synthesized with different metal ion concentrations yield different morphologies and rate performances. The sample synthesized with 0.2 mol L-1 gives the most uniform particle distribution and the best electrochemical performance. The specific discharge capacity values of the sample at 10 and 15 C are as high as 109.5 and 88.7 mAh g-1, respectively. After the high-rate cycling, its discharge capacity at 0.2 C can be reverted to 97.67% of its initial capacity.

  4. Densities concentrations of aqueous of uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratio density-concentration of aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions expressed as U3O8 grams/liter, U grams/liter and hexahydrate uranyl nitrate weight percent at different temperatures, are established. Experimental values are graphically correlated and compared whit some published data. (Author) 2 refs

  5. New insights into the acid mediated disproportionation of pentavalent uranyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougel, Victor; Biswas, Biplab; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, SCIB, UMR-E 3 CEA-UJF FRE 3200 CNRS, INAC, CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France)

    2010-07-01

    The reaction of benzoic acid with the uranyl(V) complex [(UO{sub 2}Py{sub 5})(KI{sub 2}Py{sub 2})] in pyridine leads to immediate disproportionation with formation of a hexa-nuclear U(IV) benzoate cluster, a bis-benzoate complex of uranyl(VI) and water. (authors)

  6. Pro-oxidative, genotoxic and cytotoxic properties of uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is demonstrated that hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide are formed under the action of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions containing no reducing agents. In the presence of uranyl ions, formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA and long-lived protein radicals are observed in vitro. It is shown that the pro-oxidant properties of uranyl at micromolar concentrations mostly result from the physico-chemical nature of the compound rather than its radioactive decay. Uranyl ions lead to damage in DNA and proteins causing death of HEp-2 cells by necrotic pathway. It is revealed that the uranyl ions enhance radiation-induced oxidative stress and significantly increase a death rate of mice exposed to sublethal doses of X-rays

  7. Biomineralization of uraninite and uranyl phosphate controlled by organic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomineralization of uraninite (UO2) and uranyl phosphate minerals are both able to decrease the mobility of uranium in the environment. We examined biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate by Shewanella putrefaciens in the basic medium containing lactate as an electron donor, β- glycerolphosphate as a phosphorous source, and uranyl nitrate in the absence and presence of weak or strong complexing organic acids (WCOA or SCOA) under an anaerobic condition. In the basic medium, only biomineralization of UO2 was observed because of rapid reduction of U(VI). Biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate occurred in the media with WCOA, however the no biomineralization was occurred in the presence of SCOA. It is thought that formation of stable U(VI)-, and U(IV)- organic complexes prevents the biomineralization. These finding suggest that coexisting organic acids control the biomineralization of UO2 and uranyl phosphate minerals by microorganisms. (author)

  8. Quantification of uranyl in presence of citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the influence that has the organic matter of the soil on the uranyl sorption on some solids is necessary to have a detection technique and quantification of uranyl that it is reliable and sufficiently quick in the obtaining of results. For that in this work, it intends to carry out the uranyl quantification in presence of citric acid modifying the Fluorescence induced by UV-Vis radiation technique. Since the uranyl ion is very sensitive to the medium that contains it, (speciation, pH, ionic forces, etc.) it was necessary to develop an analysis technique that stands out the fluorescence of uranyl ion avoiding the out one that produce the organic acids. (Author)

  9. Uranyl hydroael leaching as one of technological nodes of sol-gel process. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics was investigated of the leaching of balast products from the decomposition of urea and hexamethylene tetramine in the sol-gel process using changes in the concentration of carbonaceous and nitrogen-containing substances in particulates of uranyl hydrogel. Alternative functions were tested for the description of leaching kinetics and the dispersion character of this process was confirmed. The proposed model was corrected by introduction of the diffusion resistance coefficient of the stabilized layer of ammonium polyuranate. The thickness of this layer increases progressively with the relative change in the size of the stabilized layer of the skeleton by the so-called age of the particulates. The diffusion kinetics description of particulates age using the alternative function proceeded from the Jandera-Neumann equation. On the basis of experimental results the function was designed and tested of a leaching column in a multi-stage leaching mode. Three-stage leaching of the mono-dispersion of uranyl hydrogel was suggested as optimal. (B.S.)

  10. Uranyl photofootprinting of triple helical DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, P E

    1992-01-01

    Two triple helix structures (15-mers containing only T.A-T triplets or containing mixed T.A-T and C.G-C triplets) have been studied by uranyl mediated DNA photocleavage to probe the accessibility of the phosphates of the DNA backbone. Whereas the phosphates of the pyrimidine strand are at least as accessible as in double stranded DNA, in the phosphates of the purine strand are partly shielded and more so at the 5'-end of the strand. With the homo A/T target increased cleavage is observed towa...

  11. Effect of speciation of uranium on localisation of uranyl phosphate precipitate in recombinant D. radiodurans expressing PhoN/PhoK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphatase mediated enzymatic bioprecipitation of uranium (U) as insoluble uranyl phosphate is an attractive bioremediation strategy. Earlier PhoN (a non specific acid phosphatase) was cloned and over-expressed in Deinococcus radiodurans to achieve bioprecipitation of U from acidic to neutral conditions. Similarly, a PhoK gene encoding an alkaline phosphatase has now been cloned and overexpressed in this microbe for bioprecipitation of U from alkaline waste solutions. In case of Deino-PhoK strain, a high phosphatase activity was detected in the spent medium, while Deino-PhoN cells did not show any activity in the spent medium, suggesting that PhoK is extracellular in nature while PhoN is not. Deino-PhoN cells, when incubated with 1 mM uranyl nitrate (pH 6.8) and 5 mM β-GP as substrate, showed cell surface bound spicule-like precipitate in SEM/TEM. In contrast Deino-PhoK cells, exposed to 1 mM uranyl carbonate (pH 9) and 5 mM β-GP, showed extracellular precipitate in solution. Localisation of uranyl phosphate precipitate depended on the precipitation conditions and Deino-PhoN cells displayed distinct extracellular precipitate crystals with uranyl carbonate (pH 9), while Deino-PhoK cells clearly displayed cell surface bound crystals of uranyl phosphate, when employed with uranyl nitrate (pH 6.8). These results suggest that differential localisation of precipitate may not be affected by localisation of the enzyme alone, but is mainly governed by the species of uranium being used (which is also dependent on pH). This work provides a graphic understanding of pH-dependent interactions of uranium with D. radiodurans cell surfaces. (author)

  12. Electronic structure and properties of uranyl compounds. Quasi-relativistic calculation of uranyl by the MO LCAO method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matrix elements of non-relativiitic secular equation of MO LCAO method of uranyl and the means to correct molecular integrals included in them, taking account of relativistic effects, are described. In the bais 7ssub(1/2), 6dsub(5/2), 6dsub(3/2), 5fsub(7/2), 5fsub(5/2), 6psub(3/2), 6psub(1/2), 6ssub(1/2)-AO of uranium and 2ssub(1/2), 2psub(1/2), and 2psub(3/2)-AO of of oxygen the calculations of quasirelativistic MO of uranyl and clusters, modelling real compounds of uranyl, are made. On the basis of analysis of the chemical bonding nature a conclusion is drawn that in uranyl the contribution of internal 6p-AO of uranium into population of OUO bonds can reach 40% of total population of uranyl MO

  13. Structure and spectroscopy of uranyl salicylaldiminate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamasi, A.L.; Barnes, C.L.; Walensky, J.R. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis of uranyl complexes coordinated to tridentate, monoanionic salicylaldiminate (Schiff base) ligands was achieved by the reaction of UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, 1, with one equivalent of the corresponding sodium salicylaldiminate salts affording [(C{sub 9}H{sub 6}N)N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 2, [(NC{sub 5}H{sub 4})N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 3, and [(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SCH{sub 3})N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 4. These are uncommon examples of uranyl complexes with a monoanionic ancillary ligand to stabilize the coordination sphere and one chloride ligand. Compounds 2-4 have been characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy as well as IR and UVVis spectroscopy and their structures determined by X-ray crystallography. (orig.)

  14. Cement encapsulation of uranyl nitrate waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During decontamination of the former nuclear fuel reprocessing plant at West Valley, New York, low-level radioactive waste streams are being identified which require disposal in an environmentally acceptable manner. One such waste stream, consisting essentially of uranyl nitrate, has been located in one of the processing cells. A study was conducted on this waste stream to determine if it could be stably encapsulated in cement. First, a recipe was developed for cement-encapsulating this highly acidic waste. Samples were then made to perform waste qualification testing as described in the NRC Branch Technical Position-Waste Form to determine the stability of this waste form. The testing showed that the waste form had a compressive strength much greater than the 345 kPA (50 psi) minimum guideline after room-temperature cure, irradiation, thermal cycling, immersion, and biodegradation. In addition, the encapsulated waste had uranium and cerium leachability index values greater than six, which is the minimum recommended by the NRC position paper. The cement-encapsulated uranyl nitrate waste thus met the NRC stability guidelines for the disposal of Class B and Class C radioactive wastes

  15. Method of producing weakly acidic cation exchange resin particles charged with uranyl ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelmonem, N.; Ringel, H.; Zimmer, E.

    1981-07-21

    Weakly acidic cationic ion exchange resin particles are charged with uranyl ions by contacting the particles step wise with aqueous uranyl nitrate solution at higher uranium concentrations from stage to stage. An alkaline medium is added to the uranyl nitrate solution in each stage to increase the successive pH values of the uranyl nitrate solution contacting the particles in dependence upon the uranium concentration effective for maximum charging of the particles with uranyl ions.

  16. Flotation of uranyl ions by alkylcarboxylic acid salts of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Physical and chemical features of uranyl cation flotation by potassium salts of fatty acids from diluted solutions are presented. Maximum degree of uranyl flotation is shown to occur in the range of pH=5-6 which corresponds to flotoactive forms of UO22+(OH)+ and to the form of collector as RCOO-. Efficiency of collector first increases with the length of hydrocarbon radical (due to decreasing sublate solubility) and then declines (due to increasing electrokinetic potential). Increase of the temperature of solutions leads to an increase in sublate solubility and to a decrease in the extent of uranyl flotation. 8 refs.; 4 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Catalytic hydrogenation of uranyl nitrate - engineering scale studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranous nitrate is employed as partitioning agent for the separation of plutonium from uranium in PUREX process, the conventional process for the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. It is currently produced from uranyl nitrate solution by the electrochemical route. Since the conversion is only 50%, an innovative method based on catalytic hydrogenation has been developed. Parametric studies have been carried out on 5 L scale using natural uranyl nitrate solution as fed. Based on these studies, number of runs were carried out on engineering scale using contaminated uranyl nitrate solution. More than 100 kg of uranous nitrate has been made. Performance of the reduction process is described in detail. (author)

  18. METHOD OF INHIBITING CORROSION IN URANYL SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohlmann, E.G.; Griess, J.C. Jr.

    1960-08-23

    A method is given for treating a uranyl sulfate solution to inhibit the corrosiveness of the solution and elevate the phase separation temperature of the solution. Lithium sulfate is added to the solution in an amount ranging from 0.25 to 1.3 times the uranyl sulfate concentration. The corrosiveness of the solution with respect to stainless steel is substantially decreased by this means. This treatment also serves to raise the phase separation temperature of the solution (above 250 deg C), at which time the uranyl sulfate solution separates into two liquid phases of unequal uranium concentration and thus becomes unsuitable as nuclear reactor fuel.

  19. Complexes of uranyl chloride and uranyl nitrate with neutral oxygen-containing bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conditions of complex preparation from uranyl chloride and nitrate crystallohydrates with various neutral organic bases, such as dimethyl sulfoxide, diethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide, acetonitrile, acetone, diethyl ether are studied. It is shown that the composition of the products formed depends on organic molecule basicity: with its increase neutral ligand is able to replace water from uranyl crystallohydrate. Absorption frequencies ν(UO22+) and ν(X=0), responsible for the complexing, are analyzed. It is shown that the values ν3(UO22+) do not manifest linear dependence on donor ability of organic base. Thermal stability of the products prepared is studied. Complexes of the composition UO2X2x2L are shown to decompose in two stages with splitting off of organic base molecule and destruction of monosolvate. Increase in the temperatures of the above- mentioned processes with an increase in the base donor ability is detected

  20. Contribution to the Chemical and Technological Study of Ammonium Diuranate Precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is designed to study the relationship between the conditions for precipitation by ammonia and the properties of ammonium diuranate obtained either from uranyl nitrate solution or from gaseous uranium hexafluoride. In each case the optimum processes are defined leading on the one hand to uranate which can afterwards be treated in a reduction- fluorination oven to give uranium tetrafluoride, and on the other hand to a uranate suitable for the production of a sinterable uranium oxide. In particular it is shown that the treatment of uranyl nitrate solutions by stoichiometric quantities of ammonia leads to the complete precipitation of the uranium leaving less than 1 mg/litre of uranium in the solution, whereas the treatment of uranium hexafluoride necessitates the use of at least 8 times the stoichiometric quantity. (author)

  1. Adamantane-1-ammonium acetate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise J. C. de Vries

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C10H18N+·C2H3O2−, the ammonium H atoms of the cation are linked to three acetate anions via N—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a chain structure extending along the b axis.

  2. Impact of uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes on uranium(VI) adsorption to synthetic and natural sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brandy D; Mayes, Melanie A; Fendorf, Scott

    2010-02-01

    Adsorption on soil and sediment solids may decrease aqueous uranium concentrations and limit its propensity for migration in natural and contaminated settings. Uranium adsorption will be controlled in large part by its aqueous speciation, with a particular dependence on the presence of dissolved calcium and carbonate. Here we quantify the impact of uranyl speciation on adsorption to both goethite and sediments from the Hanford Clastic Dike and Oak Ridge Melton Branch Ridgetop formations. Hanford sediments were preconditioned with sodium acetate and acetic acid to remove carbonate grains, and Ca and carbonate were reintroduced at defined levels to provide a range of aqueous uranyl species. U(VI) adsorption is directly linked to UO(2)(2+) speciation, with the extent of retention decreasing with formation of ternary uranyl-calcium-carbonato species. Adsorption isotherms under the conditions studied are linear, and K(d) values decrease from 48 to 17 L kg(-1) for goethite, from 64 to 29 L kg (-1) for Hanford sediments, and from 95 to 51 L kg(-1) for Melton Branch sediments as the Ca concentration increases from 0 to 1 mM at pH 7. Our observations reveal that, in carbonate-bearing waters, neutral to slightly acidic pH values ( approximately 5) and limited dissolved calcium are optimal for uranium adsorption. PMID:20058915

  3. Gas phase uranyl activation: formation of a uranium nitrosyl complex from uranyl azide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yu; de Jong, Wibe A; Gibson, John K

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO2(2+), was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2(-) was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2(-) resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2(-), in which the "inert" uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2(-) via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2(-) complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO(3-), suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2(-) to form UO(NO)Cl2(-) and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2(-) and UO2Cl2(-). The observation of UO2Cl2(-) during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss. PMID:25906363

  4. Gas Phase Uranyl Activation: Formation of a Uranium Nitrosyl Complex from Uranyl Azide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yu; De Jong, Wibe A.; Gibson, John K.

    2015-05-13

    Activation of the oxo bond of uranyl, UO22+, was achieved by collision induced dissociation (CID) of UO2(N3)Cl2– in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. The gas phase complex UO2(N3)Cl2– was produced by electrospray ionization of solutions of UO2Cl2 and NaN3. CID of UO2(N3)Cl2– resulted in the loss of N2 to form UO(NO)Cl2–, in which the “inert” uranyl oxo bond has been activated. Formation of UO2Cl2– via N3 loss was also observed. Density functional theory computations predict that the UO(NO)Cl2– complex has nonplanar Cs symmetry and a singlet ground state. Analysis of the bonding of the UO(NO)Cl2– complex shows that the side-on bonded NO moiety can be considered as NO3–, suggesting a formal oxidation state of U(VI). Activation of the uranyl oxo bond in UO2(N3)Cl2– to form UO(NO)Cl2– and N2 was computed to be endothermic by 169 kJ/mol, which is energetically more favorable than formation of NUOCl2– and UO2Cl2–. The observation of UO2Cl2– during CID is most likely due to the absence of an energy barrier for neutral ligand loss.

  5. Solid solutions of hydrogen uranyl phosphate and hydrogen uranyl arsenate. A family of luminescent, lamellar hosts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen uranyl phosphate, HUO2PO4 x 4H2O (HUP), and hydrogen uranyl arsenate, HUO2AsO4 x 4H2O (HUAs), form solid solutions of composition HUO2(PO4)1-x(AsO4)x (HUPAs), representing a family of lamellar, luminescent solids that can serve as hosts for intercalation chemistry. The solids are prepared by aqueous precipitation reactions from uranyl nitrate and mixtures of phosphoric and arsenic acids; thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the phases are tetrahydrates, like HUP and HUAs. Powder x-ray diffraction data reveal the HUPAs solids to be single phases whose lattice constants increase with X, in rough accord with Vegard's law Spectral shifts observed for the HUPAs samples. Emission from the solids is efficient (quantum yields of ∼ 0.2) and long-lived (lifetimes of ∼ 150 μs), although the measured values are uniformly smaller than those of HUP and HUAs; unimolecular radiative and nonradiative rate constants for excited-state decay of ∼ 1500 and 5000 s-1, respectively, have been calculated for the compounds. 18 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Recycling of uranyl from contaminated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many separation processes are related to the behavior of ions close to charged surfaces. In this work, we examine uranyl ions, which can be considered as rod-like molecular ions with a spatially distributed charge, embedded in a system of like charged surfaces. The analysis of the system is based on an approximate field theory which is accurate from the weak to the strong electrostatic coupling regimes. The numerical results show that close to the charged surface the ions are oriented parallel to the surface, whereas at distances greater than half of the ion length, they are randomly oriented. Due to the restriction of the orientational degrees of freedom, the density of ions at the charged surface decreases to zero. For large surface charge densities, the force between like charged surfaces becomes attractive, as a result of charge correlations. The theoretical results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation results. (authors)

  7. Adsorption isotherm of uranyl ions by fish scales of corvina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish scale is by-product of fishery. The scales are mainly formed by hydroxyapatite and collagen forming a kind of natural composite with a large specific surface area that intensifies the adsorption process. In this paper the potential of adsorption of scales of Corvina fish for uranyl ions from nitric solutions was studied. The scales were washed several times with faucet water, sun-dried, triturated and sieved. Equilibrium and kinetic studies in adsorption of uranyl ions in batch systems were carried out at room temperature. Equilibrium time was reached at 5 min for 0.1 g L-1 uranyl solution with removal efficiency over 82%, and at 1 min of contact was observed about 60% of removal. The equilibrium isotherm was obtained and the Langmuir model fitted best. These preliminary results are very promising, showing great perspectives of application of the fish scales as biosorbent for uranyl ions in radioactive wastewater treatment processes with a sustainable technology. (author)

  8. Electroreduction of uranyl ion in aqueous calcium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electroreduction of uranyl ions in buffered and unbuffered 0.5 M calcium nitrate has been studied using polarography, cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry, and chronoamperometry. The results are compared with those in molten calcium nitrate tetrahydrate. (author)

  9. Adsorption isotherm of uranyl ions by fish scales of corvina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Caroline Hastenreiter; Santos, Bruno Zolotareff dos; Yamamura, Amanda Pongeluppe Gualberto; Yamaura, Mitiko, E-mail: hc.caroline@gmail.co, E-mail: bzsantos@gmail.co, E-mail: amandaifusp@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: myamaura@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Fish scale is by-product of fishery. The scales are mainly formed by hydroxyapatite and collagen forming a kind of natural composite with a large specific surface area that intensifies the adsorption process. In this paper the potential of adsorption of scales of Corvina fish for uranyl ions from nitric solutions was studied. The scales were washed several times with faucet water, sun-dried, triturated and sieved. Equilibrium and kinetic studies in adsorption of uranyl ions in batch systems were carried out at room temperature. Equilibrium time was reached at 5 min for 0.1 g L{sup -1} uranyl solution with removal efficiency over 82%, and at 1 min of contact was observed about 60% of removal. The equilibrium isotherm was obtained and the Langmuir model fitted best. These preliminary results are very promising, showing great perspectives of application of the fish scales as biosorbent for uranyl ions in radioactive wastewater treatment processes with a sustainable technology. (author)

  10. Association of uranyl with the cell wall of Pseudomonas fluorescens inhibits metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh-Latmani, Rizlan; Leckie, James O.

    2003-11-01

    Citric acid is found along with uranyl in the subsurface of former nuclear facilities because of its use as a decontamination agent in the nuclear industry. Citrate's metal chelating properties affect the mobility of uranyl in the subsurface and consequently, citrate biodegradation may significantly impact uranyl fate and transport. Under the non-growth conditions considered, low (micromolar) uranyl concentrations inhibit the biodegradation of citrate by Pseudomonas fluorescens, a common subsurface denitrifying bacterium. Additionally, uranyl is found readily associated with the cell envelope of P. fluorescens. The observed inhibition appears to be linked to the binding of uranyl to the cell surface and is reversible by desorbing cell-bound uranyl. This study establishes a link between uranyl association with the cell surface and the observed inhibitory effect of uranyl on cell metabolism.

  11. Complexation of the uranyl ion with aquatic humic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexation of the uranyl(VI) ion with aquatic humic acid from Gorleben groundwater (Gohy-573) is studied in 0.1 M NaClO4 at pH 4 under argon atmosphere. The concentration range investigated is from 1 x 10-7 to 1 x 10-5 mol/l for the uranyl ion and from 1 x 10-6 to 1.12 x 10-5 mol/l for the humic acid. Three different experimental methods are applied to separate the uncomplexed uranyl ion from the uranyl humate complex, using differences of the two species in size by ultrafiltration at the pore size of about 1 nm, in charge by anion exchange separation and in spectroscopic properties by time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). No reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) is observed in the course of the humate complexation process. The experimental results confirm that the prevailing complexation reaction is charge neutralization of the UO2+2 ion with two proton exchanging sites of humic acid. At pH 4 in 0.1 M NaClO4, where the hydrolysis of the uranyl ion appears negligible, the fraction of proton exchanging sites of the humic acid that can be occupied by the uranyl ion (called the loading capacity (LC) of the uranyl ion) is determined to be 0.185±0.003. The complexation constant evaluated by taking the loading capacity into account is found to be logβ = 6.16±0.13, which is a grand average of all values determined by the three experimental procedures under consideration. This value is valid for the humate complexation of the non-hydrolyzed uranyl ion, being independent of pH and ionic strength. (orig.)

  12. Some thermodynamic characteristics of uranyl haloacetates and their crystal hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on values of standard formation enthalpies for some uranyl carboxylates, acetates, chloroacetates, trichloroacetates and trifluoroacetates, their crystal hydrates and respective acids and their anions in gaseous state are presented. Thermochemical cycle is suggested, and calculation for lattice enthalpies of mentioned uranyl carboxylates is made. Errors of key and obtained values are discussed. It is shown, that the basic contribution into lattice enthalpies changing in the series considered is determined by anion electrodonor ability changing

  13. Ionothermal synthesis of uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ernest M.; Dustin, Megan K.; Smith, Jeremy S.; Burns, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Ionothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate with various salts in methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids have produced single crystals of three uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives as charge-balancing cations. (C4H7N2)[(UO2)(PO3F)(F)] (1) crystallizes in space group C2, a=17.952(1) Å, b=6.9646(6) Å, c=8.5062(7) Å, β=112.301(1)°, (C6H11N2)2[(UO2)(SO4)2] (2) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=31.90(1) Å, b=9.383(5) Å, c=13.770(7) Å, β=93.999(7)° and (C6H11N2)[(UO2)2(PO4)(HPO4) (3) crystallizes in space group P21/n, a=9.307(2), b=18.067(4), c=9.765(2), β=93.171(2). The U6+ cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions coordinated by three O atoms and two F atoms in 1 and five O atoms in 2 and 3 to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in 1 is composed of F-sharing dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through corner-sharing fluorophosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in 2 is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating sulfate tetrahedron linked into chains by three other corner-sharing sulfate tetrahedra. In 3, the structural unit is composed of chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through edge- and corner-sharing phosphate and hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. N-methylimidazolium cations occupy the interstitial space between the uranyl fluorophosphate sheets in 1, whereas 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cations link the uranyl sulfate and phosphate units in 2 and 3 into extended structures.

  14. Radiolysis studies of uranyl nitrate solution in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiolysis of acidic uranyl nitrate solutions was investigated using Co-60 gamma radiation. Hydrogen peroxide was determined as a function of increasing dose. The UV-vis absorption spectra of the irradiated solutions were measured and the spectral changes were analyzed. The increasing dose increases the absorbance intensities, possibly by an increment in nitrate concentration produced by radiolysis, which can originate the formation of different uranyl complexes in solution. (author)

  15. EXAFS Study of Uranyl Complexation at Pseudomonas fluorescens Cell Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, R.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2002-12-01

    Little is known about the roles of microbial biomass as a sink and source for uranium in contaminated aquifers, nor of the impact of bacterial biochemistry on uranium speciation in the subsurface. A significant role is implied by the high affinities of both Gram positive and Gram negative cells for binding uranyl (UO2{ 2+}). In the present study, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used to identify membrane functional groups involved in uranyl binding to the Gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens from pH 3 to pH 8. Throughout this pH-range, EXAFS spectra can be described primarily in terms of coordination of carboxylic groups to uranyl. U-C distances characteristic of 4-, 5- and 8- membered rings were observed, as well as the possibility of phosphato groups. Both shell-by-shell fits and principle component analyses indicate that the functional groups involved in binding of uranyl to the cell surface do not vary systematically across the pH range investigated. This result contrasts with EXAFS results of uranyl sorbed to Gram positive bacteria, and suggests an important role for long-chain carboxylate-terminated membrane functional groups in binding uranyl.

  16. Hydrothermal oxidation of organic wastes using reclaimed ammonium nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proesmans, P.I.; Luan, L.; Buelow, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Ammonium nitrate is being studied as an alternative for ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizing agent in Department of Defense 1.1 and 1.3 rocket propellants. Use of ammonium nitrate would eliminate the HCl produced by ammonium perchlorate upon thermal decomposition. To stabilize the ammonium nitrate, which suffers from phase instability, potassium dinitramide (KDN) is added. This increased use of ammonium nitrate will ultimately create a need for environmentally responsible processes to reuse ammonium nitrate extracted from demilitarized rocket motors. Ammonium Nitrate was investigated as an oxidizing agent for methanol, acetic acid and phenol. High removal of organic, ammonia and nitrate was achieved at stoichiometric concentrations. The oxidation of ammonia by nitrate was much faster than the oxidation of either methanol or acetic acid. Phenol, however, was in strong competition with ammonia for the oxidizer (nitrate). Nitrogen products included N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2{sup {minus}}} as well as toxic NO and trace amounts of NO{sub 2}. Carbon products were CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3{sup {minus}}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, and CO.

  17. Ionothermal synthesis of uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionothermal reactions of uranyl nitrate with various salts in methylimidazolium-based ionic liquids have produced single crystals of three uranyl compounds that incorporate imidazole derivatives as charge-balancing cations. (C4H7N2)[(UO2)(PO3F)(F)] (1) crystallizes in space group C2, a=17.952(1) Å, b=6.9646(6) Å, c=8.5062(7) Å, β=112.301(1)°, (C6H11N2)2[(UO2)(SO4)2] (2) crystallizes in space group C2/c, a=31.90(1) Å, b=9.383(5) Å, c=13.770(7) Å, β=93.999(7)° and (C6H11N2)[(UO2)2(PO4)(HPO4) (3) crystallizes in space group P21/n, a=9.307(2), b=18.067(4), c=9.765(2), β=93.171(2). The U6+ cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions coordinated by three O atoms and two F atoms in 1 and five O atoms in 2 and 3 to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in 1 is composed of F-sharing dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through corner-sharing fluorophosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in 2 is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating sulfate tetrahedron linked into chains by three other corner-sharing sulfate tetrahedra. In 3, the structural unit is composed of chains of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids linked into sheets through edge- and corner-sharing phosphate and hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. N-methylimidazolium cations occupy the interstitial space between the uranyl fluorophosphate sheets in 1, whereas 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cations link the uranyl sulfate and phosphate units in 2 and 3 into extended structures. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of uranyl compounds by ionothermal treatment is explored, and provides three novel compounds and insights concerning the role of water in controlling the structural units. Highlights: ► Ionothermal syntheses have produced three new uranyl compounds. ► Imidazole derivatives are incorporated as charge-balancing agents. ► X-ray and spectroscopic analyses reveal variability between imidazole derivatives. ► This method offers synthetic insight in the

  18. The effect of pH on the properties of ammonium uranate precipitated with gaseous ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium uranate (AU) powders were precipitated from a uranyl nitrate solution using gaseous ammonia to determine the effect of pH of precipitation on their composition and morphology. Increasing pH of precipitation increased the ammonia and nitrate contents and the specific surface area but decreased the crystallite size of the AU powders. The specific surface area was also increased by increasing the ammonia content of the powder. The composition and morphology of the powders were similar to those reported in the literature for AU precipitated with NH4OH. (author)

  19. Hydrate-based pre-combustion carbon dioxide capture process in the system with tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide solution in the presence of cyclopentane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of 0.29 mol% tetra-n-butyl ammonium bromide (TBAB) solution in conjunction with cyclopentane (CP) on the hydrate-based pre-combustion CO2 capture are investigated by the measurements of the gas uptakes, CO2 separation efficiencies and induction time of the hydrate formation at the different temperature-pressure conditions. The results show that the volume of the TBAB has an effect on the CO2 separation and the induction time, and the addition of the CP into the TBAB solution remarkably enhances the CO2 separation and shortens the induction time. The system with the CP/TBAB solution volume ratio of 5 vol% and TBAB solution/reactor effective volume ratio of 0.54 is optimum to obtain the largest gas uptake and the highest CO2 separation efficiency at 274.65 K and 4.0 MPa. Compared to the results with tetrahydrofuran (THF) as an additive [1], the gas uptake is enhanced by at least 2 times and the induction time is shortened at least 10 times at the similar temperature-pressure condition. In addition, the CO2 concentration in the decomposed gas from the hydrate slurry phase reaches approximately 93 mol% after the first-stage separation at 274.65 K and 2.5 MPa. The gas uptakes of more than 80 mol% are obtained after 400 s at the temperature range of 274.65-277.65 K and the pressure range of 2.5-4.5 MPa. -- Highlights: → Adding the CP into the TBAB-solution enhances the CO2 separation and shortens the induction time. → The optimum volume ratios of CP/TBAB-solution and TBAB-solution/reactor are submitted. → The CO2 concentration in the decomposed gas reaches 93mol% after the first-stage separation.

  20. Effects of the ionization potential of the outer cations on the position of the charge-transfer bands for uranyl trinitrate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors used the low-temperature spectra (T = 4.2 and 77 K) of uranyl trinitrate compounds to examine the effects of outer alkali-metal cations and ammonium on the position of the purely electronic transition band V00. The spectra for the compounds are shown; the data show that cation substitution in the sequence K, Rb, NH4, Cs produces a monotone decrease in the pure electronic transition energy. The electronic transition frequency as a function of the ionization potential of the alkali melt are shown. The effect of the outer cation can be explained in terms of electron-density redistribution in the equitorial plane

  1. Solid state and aqueous behavior of uranyl peroxide cage clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Kristi Lynn

    Uranyl peroxide cage clusters include a large family of more than 50 published clusters of a variety of sizes, which can incorporate various ligands including pyrophosphate and oxalate. Previous studies have reported that uranyl clusters can be used as a method to separate uranium from a solid matrix, with potential applications in reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Because of the potential applications of these novel structures in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle and their likely presence in areas of contamination, it is important to understand their behavior in both solid state and aqueous systems, including complex environments where other ions are present. In this thesis, I examine the aqueous behavior of U24Pp 12, as well as aqueous cluster systems with added mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. The resulting solutions were analyzed using dynamic light scattering and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering to evaluate the species in solution. Precipitates of these systems were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses demonstrate the importance of cation size, charge, and concentration of added cations on the aqueous behavior of uranium macroions. Specifically, aggregates of various sizes and shapes form rapidly upon addition of cations, and in some cases these aggregates appear to precipitate into an X-ray amorphous material that still contains U24Pp12 clusters. In addition, I probe aggregation of U24Pp12 and U60, another uranyl peroxide cage cluster, in mixed solvent water-alcohol systems. The aggregation of uranyl clusters in water-alcohol systems is a result of hydrogen bonding with polar organic molecules and the reduction of the dielectric constant of the system. Studies of aggregation of uranyl clusters also allow for comparison between the newer uranyl polyoxometalate family and century-old transition metal polyoxometalates. To complement the solution studies of uranyl

  2. Molecular design of Calix[4]arene derivatives for uranyl ion extraction from aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl ion extraction is an important part of nuclear waste reprocessing. Use of organic ligands having chelating property with uranyl ions is a promising tool in this area, because of the possibility to improve the selectivity and the affinity of the ligands towards uranyl ions. In this study, Calix[4]arene derivatives containing B, Al, C, Si, N, P, O and S elements in bridging positions were designed and their chelating energetics with uranyl cation are calculated by means of DFT methods.

  3. Some thermodynamic characteristics of uranyl benzenesulfonate and uranyl p-toluenesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enthalpy of dissolution of the anhydrous and hydrated salts in 4 M hydrochloric acid was determined. Based on experimental and published data, the enthalpy of water addition to the anhydrous salts and lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulfonate (UPTS) was evaluated. The enthalpy of addition of a water molecule to UPTS monohydrate was found to be approximately two times lower than in the case of UPTS trihydrate. This is in a good agreement with published data on formation of fairly stable coarse crystals of UPTS pentahydrate in slow crystallization in air. We did not find any published data on the standard enthalpy of formation of the sulfonate ions. However, according to the presented thermo-chemical cycles, from the experimental data we can evaluated the enthalpies of formation of sulfonates from the components, i.e. from amorphous uranium trioxide and aqueous solutions of benzenesulfonic and p-toluenesulfonic acids. It was shown that considering all approximations used in the evaluation, the enthalpy of formation of UPTS is by approximately 20 kJ.mole-1 more negative than in the case of uranyl benzenesulfonate. Along with thermochemical characteristics of hydrates, this allows us to conclude that electron-donor power of p-toluenesulfonate ion is noticeably greater than that of the benzenesulfonate ion, which is responsible for the differences in the characteristics of these salts

  4. Synthesis and some physicochemical characteristics of uranyl benzenesulphonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.; Krylov, S.G.; Suglobova, I.G.; Taranov, A.P.

    1984-11-01

    Crystallohydrate of uranyl benzenesulfonate has been synthesized by the interaction of stoichiometric quantities of UO/sub 3/ with benzene sulphonic acid. The prepared fine crystalline light yellow color powder has the UO/sub 2/(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/S/sub 3/)/sub 2/xH/sub 2/O composition and 73.3 mass% solubility in water at 25 deg C. The salt DT. curve has an intensive endoeffect at 215 deg C which corresponds to the dehydration process and two exo-effects at 350 and 390 deg C corresponding to ion-sulfanate decomposition. The IR-spectra analysis has shown that benzine sulfonate-ion binds two uranyl groupings of the UO/sub 2/-O-S-O-UO/sub 2/ type by two oxygen atoms. The third oxygen atom of the sulfonate group forms stable hydrogen bonds with a water molecule coordinated to uranyl. The uranyl coordination number in the crystallohydrate is 5. The anhydrous uranyl benzene sulfonate is prepared by monohydrate vacuum dehydration at a 1 to 2 Pa pressure, 130 to 150 deg C temperature during 15 h.

  5. Synthesis and some physicochemical characteristics of uranyl benzenesulphonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallohydrate of uranyl benzenesulfonate has been synthesized by the interaction of stoichiometric qulntities of UO3 with benzene sulphonic acid. The prepared f1ne crystalline light yellow color powder has the UO2(C6H5S3)2xH2O composition and 73.3 mass% solubility in water at 25 deg C. The salt DT. curve has an intensive endoeffect at 215 deg C which corresponds to the dehydration process and two exo-effects at 350 and 390 deg C corresponding to ion-sulfanate decomposition. The IR-spectra analysis has shown that benzine sulfonate-ion binds two uranyl groupings of the UO2-O-S-O-UO2 type by two oxygen atoms. The third oxygen atom of the sulfonate group forms stable hydrogen bonds with a water molecule coordinated to uranyl. The uranyl coordination number in the crystallohydrate is 5. The anhydrous uranyl benzene Sulfonate is prepared by monohydrate vacuum dehydration at a 1 to 2 Pa pressure, 130 to 150 deg C temperature during 15 h

  6. The catalytic role of uranyl in formation of polycatechol complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halada Gary P

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To better understand the association of contaminant uranium with natural organic matter (NOM and the fate of uranium in ground water, spectroscopic studies of uranium complexation with catechol were conducted. Catechol provides a model for ubiquitous functional groups present in NOM. Liquid samples were analyzed using Raman, FTIR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Catechol was found to polymerize in presence of uranyl ions. Polymerization in presence of uranyl was compared to reactions in the presence of molybdate, another oxyion, and self polymerization of catechol at high pH. The effect of time and dissolved oxygen were also studied. It was found that oxygen was required for self-polymerization at elevated pH. The potential formation of phenoxy radicals as well as quinones was monitored. The benzene ring was found to be intact after polymerization. No evidence for formation of ether bonds was found, suggesting polymerization was due to formation of C-C bonds between catechol ligands. Uranyl was found to form outer sphere complexes with catechol at initial stages but over time (six months polycatechol complexes were formed and precipitated from solution (forming humic-like material while uranyl ions remained in solution. Our studies show that uranyl acts as a catalyst in catechol-polymerization.

  7. Behind adhesion of uranyl onto montmorillonite surface: A molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We investigated the adsorption of uranyl onto Montmorillonite surface. • We studied the surface energy between layered Montmorillonite sheets. • We studied the work of adhesion between radionuclide and charged Montmorillonite. -- Abstract: We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the adsorption of radionuclide elements species onto substituted Montmorillonite (001) surface in the presence of different counterions. The structure and the dynamics of uranyl ion as well as its aquo, chloride ion, and carbonate complexes are analyzed. In addition, we have studied the surface energy between layered Montmorillonite sheets and the work of adhesion between radionuclide and charged Montmorillonite. The clay model used here is a Wyoming-type Montmorillonite with 0.75e negative charge per unit cell resulting from substitutions in Octahedral and Tetrahedral sheets. The system model was constructed based on CLAYFF force field potential model. To evaluate the thermodynamic work of adhesion, each surface and clay layer regions are converted to a thin film model. One and two species of radionuclide elements (UO2(H2O)5,UO2CO3(H2O)5, and UO2Cl2(H2O)5) were deposited near the clay surface in a pseudo-two-dimensional periodic cell. Analysis shows that the uranyl ion structure is preserved with two axial oxygen atoms detected at 1.8 Å. Radial distribution functions results indicate that average U-Ow distances are 2.45–2.61 Å, and 2.29–2.40 Å for U-Oc distance. Average U-Cl distances are 2.78–3.08 Å, which is relatively larger than that of Uranium atom-Oxygen atom because of electrostatic factors

  8. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  9. The CCAAT box-binding factor stimulates ammonium assimilation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, defining a new cross-pathway regulation between nitrogen and carbon metabolisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, V D; Bohn, C.; Bolotin-Fukuhara, M.; Daignan-Fornier, B

    1996-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, carbon and nitrogen metabolisms are connected via the incorporation of ammonia into glutamate; this reaction is catalyzed by the NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) encoded by the GDH1 gene. In this report, we show that the GDH1 gene requires the CCAAT box-binding activator (HAP complex) for optimal expression. This conclusion is based on several lines of evidence: (1) overexpression of GDH1 can correct the growth defect of hap2 and hap3 mutants on a...

  10. An integrated study of uranyl mineral dissolution processes. Etch pit formation, effects of cations in solution, and secondary precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of uranium-mineral dissolution is crucial for predictive modeling of U mobility in the subsurface. In order to understand how pH and type of cation in solution may affect dissolution, experiments were performed on mainly single crystals of curite, Pb2+3(H2O)2[(UO2)4O4(OH)3]2, becquerelite, Ca(H2O)8[(UO2)6O4(OH)6], billietite, Ba(H2O)7[(UO2)6O4(OH)6], fourmarierite Pb2+1-x(H2O)4[(UO2)4O3-2x(OH)4+2x] (x= 0.00-0.50), uranophane, Ca(H2O)5[(UO2)(SiO3OH)]2, zippeite, K3(H2O)3[(UO2)4(SO4)2O3(OH)], and Na-substituted metaschoepite, Na1-x[(UO2)4O2-x(OH)5+x] (H2O)n. Solutions included: deionized water; aqueous HCl solutions at pH 3.5 and 2; 0.5 mol L-1 Pb(II)-, Ba-, Sr-, Ca-, Mg-, HCl solutions at pH 2; 1.0 mol L-1 Na- and K-HCl solutions at pH 2; and a 0.1 mol L-1 Na2CO3 solution at pH 10.5. Uranyl mineral basal surface microtopography, micromorphology, and composition were examined prior to, and after dissolution experiments on micrometer scale specimens using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of etch pit depth at different pH values and experimental durations can be explained using a stepwave dissolution model. Effects of the cation in solution on etch pit symmetry and morphology can be explained using an adsorption model involving specific surface sites. Surface precipitation of the following phases was observed: (a) a highly-hydrated uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate in ultrapure water (on all minerals), (b) a Na-uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate in Na2CO3 solution of pH 10.5 (on uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate minerals), (c) a Na-uranyl-carbonate on zippeite, (d) Ba- and Pb-uranyl-hydroxy-hydrates in Ba-HCl and Pb-HCl solutions of pH 2 (on uranophane), (e) a (SiOx(OH)4-2x) phase in solutions of pH 2 (uranophane), and (f) sulfate-bearing phases in solutions of pH 2 and 3.5 (on zippeite).

  11. Photostimulated oxygen exchange of uranyl in aqueous-ethanol solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl oxygen exchange (18O/16O) in solution 1 mol/l HClO4 in the presence of ethanol small additions (up to 0.4 mol/l) when irradiated by the light with λmax=400 nm is investigated. Quantum yield of the exchange increases rapidly with an increase in ethanol concentration and reaches the limiting value of ∼ 3500 at ethanol concentrations of ∼ 0.2 mol/l. The conclusion is made that in similar soltuons ethanol oxidation by excited uranyl proceeds mainly with one electron transfer in the unit event. The rate constant of uranyl extinction by ethanol is evaluated to be ∼ 5x107 lxmol-1xs-1

  12. The polarographic electroreduction of uranyl ion in arsenic acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electroreduction of uranyl ion in arsenic acid studied by d.c. polarography shows one reduction wave at all the used arsenic acid concentrations corresponding to one electron reduction mechanism. At low arsenic acid concentration (0,1 - 0,3 M)UO2(ClO4)2 is reduced to HUO2AsO4. At higher acid concentration (0,6 M) the HUO2AsO4 molecules are reduced to UO2+ (pentavalent uranium). It is also reliable to study polarographic behaviour of uranyl ions in arsenic acid solutions up to pH 3,01. It is also possible to apply this method for the analytical determination of uranyl ion concentrations up to 2 mM. (Author)

  13. Mechanistic studies on uranyl ion initiated photopolymerization of acrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of the uranyl ion photoinitiated polymerization of acrylamide has been studied in aqueous solutions and in acetone. Steady-state and dynamic luminescence quenching studies show that initiation proceeds through a thermally activated bimolecular interaction between *UO22+ and monomer involving electron or charge transfer. Results from various studies show that the mechanism previously suggested for this process, involving energy transfer, is incorrect. ESR studies suggest that initiation involves formation of a uranium(V)-radical pair. Polymerization then proceeds through a radical mechanism in both solvents. With the exception of the chloride, the yields do not depend upon the counter-ion. Polymer is frequently produced with adsorbed uranyl ions, which can be separated by dialysis. In agreement with previous studies, photopolymerization proceeds without significant overall reduction in the uranyl concentration. It is shown that this is probably due to any intermediate uranium(V) being reoxidized by monomer, with concurrent thermal initiation of polymerization. (orig.)

  14. Precipitation of ammonium diuranate from UO2F2 solution for fuel ceramic UO2 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium Diuranate (ADU) products with narrow particle size distributions, large specific surface area, and low fluorine content were precipitated from UO2F2 - HF solution in NH4OH solution in combination with a further precipitate aging. Settling rate of the precipitate particles, uranium content left in supernate, composition of the precipitates were determined. Experimental results show that, by converting UO2F2 - HF solution into soluble Ammonium Uranyl Fluoride complex (NH4)3UO2F5 (AUF) before precipitating, ADU precipitated in NH4OH solution at pH values in the range of 11.5 - 12, aged for 4 h possesses particle size distributions of 0.6 - 12 μm, specific surface area of 25 - 27 m2/g, the Fluorine content of about 1% after moderate washing. (author)

  15. A 5-day method for determination of soluble silicon concentrations in nonliquid fertilizer materials using a sodium carbonate-ammonium nitrate extractant followed by visible spectroscopy with heteropoly blue analysis: single-laboratory validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Dennis; Rodrigues, Hugh; Kinsey, Charles; Korndörfer, Gaspar; Pereira, Hamilton; Buck, Guilherme; Datnoff, Lawrence; Miranda, Stephen; Provance-Bowley, Mary

    2013-01-01

    A 5-day method for determining the soluble silicon (Si) concentrations in nonliquid fertilizer products was developed using a sodium carbonate (Na2CO3)-ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) extractant followed by visible spectroscopy with heteropoly blue analysis at 660 nm. The 5-Day Na2CO3-NH4NO3 Soluble Si Extraction Method can be applied to quantify the plant-available Si in solid fertilizer products at levels ranging from 0.2 to 8.4% Si with an LOD of 0.06%, and LOQ of 0.20%. This Si extraction method for fertilizers correlates well with plant uptake of Si (r2 = 0.96 for a range of solid fertilizers) and is applicable to solid Si fertilizer products including blended products and beneficial substances. Fertilizer materials can be processed as received using commercially available laboratory chemicals and materials at ambient laboratory temperatures. The single-laboratory validation of the 5-Day Na2CO3-NH4NO3 Soluble Si Extraction Method has been approved by The Association of American Plant Food Control Officials for testing nonliquid Si fertilizer products. PMID:23767347

  16. Optimization of a uranyl nitrate passive neutron counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, Eric Benton [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bracken, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; West, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freeman, Corey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Matthew R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bourret, Steven C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rothrock, Richard B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ladd - Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL; Schuh, Denise [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding natural uranium as it enters the fuel cycle has become a priority for the safeguards community in recent years. Uranyl nitrate is a material of interest in this endeavor because it is normally a step in the process from converting uranium ores to more concentrated forms like UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This paper will detail the improvements and design optimizations made for a uranyl nitrate neutron detector. The original design of the detector was based on standard neutron counter designs and featured 2 rings of He-3 tubes fully moderated and shielded from background. Several areas for enhancement were identified after months of testing in three different locations. An operating uranyl nitrate facility was included as one of the test locations. Three significant upgrades to the counter addressed in the redesign were: real time background detection, counter reliability improvements, and optimization of the detector design for the detection of neutrons emitted by the uranyl nitrate flowing through the monitored process pipe. The optimized detector design includes significant electronics upgrades, the ability to detect neutrons (background and signal) with 36 degree spatial resolution around the process pipe for signal and 45 degree spatial resolution for background, inner and outer rings of He-3 tubes for real time background corrections, and notably more reliable cabling. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) modeling was used to optimize the signal (neutrons from uranyl nitrate in the monitored process pipe) to noise (background neutrons from all sources) ratio of the inner ring of He-3 tubes. Additionally, MCNP modeling maximized noise to signal on the outer ring of He-3 tubes. Details of the detector optimization as well as all the additional detector enhancements will be discussed. The neutron counter will be field tested on the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  17. Ammonium diphosphitoindate(III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Hamchaoui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, NH4[In(HPO32], is built up from InIII cations (site symmetry 3m. adopting an octahedral environment and two different phosphite anions (each with site symmetry 3m. exhibiting a triangular–pyramidal geometry. Each InO6 octahedron shares its six apices with hydrogen phosphite groups. Reciprocally, each HPO3 group shares all its O atoms with three different metal cations, leading to [In(HPO32]− layers which propagate in the ab plane. The ammonium cation likewise has site symmetry 3m.. In the structure, the cations are located between the [In(HPO32]− layers of the host framework. The sheets are held together by hydrogen bonds formed between the NH4+ cations and the O atoms of the framework.

  18. Extraction of lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) from nitric acid solution by malonamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extractive properties of two malonamide extractants, DMDBO3NPDA and DMDBMA were investigated for the extraction of lanthanide(III) and uranyl(VI) ions in benzene-nitric acid systems. It was found that DMDBO3NPDA has a higher extractive capacity than DMDBMA. The difference in their extracting capacities is discussed, based on the enthalpy changes for the extraction reactions and IR data for complexes of metal nitrates with malonamides. In addition, the applicability of a mixed solvent of n-dodecane and some aliphatic alcohols as a diluent for DMDBO3NPDA was examined. the longer the carbon chain and the higher the concentration of the aliphatic alcohol, the more the phase compatibility improves. The distribution ratios of neodymium(III) ion increase with an increase in the carbon chain length of linear aliphatic alcohol and with a decrease in its concentration

  19. Synthesis of alumina nano-sheets via supercritical fluid technology with high uranyl adsorptive capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supercritical carbon dioxide is beneficial to the synthesis of superior ultrafine and uniform materials due to its high chemical stability, low viscosity, high diffusivity, and 'zero' surface tension. γ-Alumina nano-sheets were obtained by a simple hydrothermal route in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide. XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM and nitrogen sorption isotherm were employed to characterize the samples. Alumina as-prepared has a high specific surface area of up to 200 ± 6 m2 g-1, which presents a high adsorption capacity (4.66 ± 0.02 mg g-1) for uranyl ions from aqueous solution. Furthermore, the adsorption process was found to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature. (authors)

  20. Hydroxyethyl cellulose as efficient organic inhibitor of zinc-carbon battery corrosion in ammonium chloride solution: Electrochemical and surface morphology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyab, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) has been investigated as corrosion inhibitor for zinc-carbon battery by polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. The obtained results show that the maximum inhibition efficiency by HEC in 26% NH4Cl solution at 300 ppm and 298 K is 92.07%. Tafel polarization studies reveal that HEC acts as an efficient mixed inhibitor. The corrosion rate is suppressed by the adsorption of HEC on the zinc surface. HEC adsorption obeys the Langmuir isotherm and the thermodynamic parameters Kads and Δ Gadso have been also calculated and discussed. Both physisorption and chemisorption may occur on the zinc surface. Surface characterization investigation using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to ascertain the nature of the protective film.

  1. Liquid-liquid extraction of cadmium(II) by TIOACl (tri-iso-octyl ammonium chloride) ionic liquid and its application to a TIOACl impregnated carbon nanotubes system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of cadmium(II) by the ionic liquid (R3NH+Cl-) (R: tri-iso-octyl) in Exxsol D100 from hydrochloric acid solution has been investigated. The extraction reaction is exothermic. The numerical analysis of metal distribution data suggests the formation of R3NH+CdCl-3 - and (R3NH+)2CdCl42- species in the organic phase. The results obtained for cadmium(II) distribution have been implemented in an impregnated multi-walled carbon nanotubes system. The influence of aqueous solution stirring speed (250-2000 min-1), adsorbent dosage (0.05-0.2 g) and temperature (20 degree centigrade-60 degree centigrade) on cadmium adsorption have been investigated. (Author)

  2. Liquid-liquid extraction of cadmium(II) by TIOACl (tri-iso-octyl ammonium chloride) ionic liquid and its application to a TIOACl impregnated carbon nanotubes system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alguacil, F. J.; Garcia-Diaz, I.; Lopez, F. A.; Rodriguez, O.

    2015-07-01

    The extraction of cadmium(II) by the ionic liquid (R{sub 3}NH{sup +}Cl{sup -}) (R: tri-iso-octyl) in Exxsol D100 from hydrochloric acid solution has been investigated. The extraction reaction is exothermic. The numerical analysis of metal distribution data suggests the formation of R{sub 3}NH{sup +}CdCl{sup -}{sub 3} - and (R{sub 3}NH{sup +}){sub 2}CdCl{sub 4}{sup 2}- species in the organic phase. The results obtained for cadmium(II) distribution have been implemented in an impregnated multi-walled carbon nanotubes system. The influence of aqueous solution stirring speed (250-2000 min{sup -}1), adsorbent dosage (0.05-0.2 g) and temperature (20 degree centigrade-60 degree centigrade) on cadmium adsorption have been investigated. (Author)

  3. Sequestering agent for uranyl chelation: new bi-naphtyl ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of phosphonate, sulfocatecholamide (CAMS) and hydroxy-pyridinone (HOPO) bi-naphtyl ligands is presented. Their binding abilities for uranyl cation were determined by UV spectrophotometry in aqueous media versus pH. These titrations showed that the efficiency of these chelating agents depends on the nature of the chelating group. Each ligand shows a more or less pronounced affinity towards uranium. While the bis-phosphonate compound did not show any affinity towards the uranyl ion, the BINHOPO derivative exhibits significant affinity at acidic and neutral pH while the BINCAMS is more efficient at basic pH. (authors)

  4. Raman spectroscopic studies of some uranyl nitrate complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser Raman spectra of uranyl trinitrate complexes (KUO2(NO3)3, RbUO2(NO3)3 CsUO2(NO3)3, NH4UO2(NO3)3) have been measured in the region from 2000 to 10 cm-1. Vibrational assignments have been made on the assumption that all the complexes contain discrete UO2X3- (X = NO3) ions belonging to a point group of D/sub 3h/. A brief discussion is made on the ligation effect of nitrate group on the uranyl bond order from a point of view of molecular orbital theory

  5. Some thermodynamic characteristics of uranyl haloacetates and their crystal hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.

    1988-11-01

    Data on the values of the standard heats of formation of a number of uranyl carboxylates and their crystal hydrates, as well as the corresponding acids and their anions in the gaseous state, have been presented. A thermochemical cycle has been proposed, and a calculation of the lattice heats of the uranyl carboxylates indicated has been carried out. The errors of the tabulated values and the values obtained have been discussed. It has been shown that the main contribution to the changes in the lattice heats in the series under consideration is determined by the changes in the electron-donor ability of the anion.

  6. Ammonium generation during SRAT cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the IDMS noble-metal demonstration runs ammonium nitrate deposition was found in the vessel vent system of the feed preparation area. In the bench-scale experiments of studying the hydrogen generation during the sludge treatment cycle, ammonium ion production was also monitored. It was found that: During a simulation of the DWPF Cold Chemical Runs SRAT cycle no detectable amount of ammonium ions was generated when treating a non-noble-metal containing sludge simulant according to the nitric acid flowsheet. Ammonium ions were generated during the SRAT-SME cycle when treating the noble-metal containing sludge with either formic acid or nitric acid/late-washing PHA. This is due to the reaction between formic acid and nitrate catalyzed by the noble metals in the sludge simulant. Ammonium ion production closely followed the hydrogen evolution from the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. This report summarizes the results of the production of ammonia during the SRAT cycle

  7. Waterproofing Materials for Ammonium Nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Damse

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the possibility of overcoming the problem of hygroscopicity of ammonium nitrate by coating the particles with selected waterproofing materials. Gravimetric analysis ofthe samples of ammonium nitrate coated with eight different waterproofing materials, vis-a-vis, uncoated ammonium nitrate, were conducted at different relative humidity and exposuretime. The results indicate that mineral jelly is the promising waterproofing material for ammonium nitrate among the materials tested, viz, calcium stearate, dioctyl phthalate, kaoline, diethylphthalate, dinitrotoluene, shelac varnish, and beeswax. Attempts were made to confirm the waterproofing ability of mineral jelly to ammonium nitrate using differential thermal analysisand x-ray diffraction patterns as an experimental tool. Suitability of mineral jelly as an additive for the gun propellant was also assessed on the basis of theoretical calculations using THERMprogram.

  8. Thermodynamics of Uranyl Minerals: Enthalpies of Formation of Uranyl Oxide Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Kubatko; K. Helean; A. Navrotsky; P.C. Burns

    2005-05-11

    The enthalpies of formation of seven uranyl oxide hydrate phases and one uranate have been determined using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry: [(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}](H{sub 2}O){sub 5}, metaschoepite; {beta}-UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}; CaUO{sub 4}; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}, becquerelite; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}; Na(UO{sub 2})O(OH), clarkeite; Na{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}, the sodium analogue of compreignacite and Pb{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, curite. The enthalpy of formation from the binary oxides, {Delta}H{sub f-ox}, at 298 K was calculated for each compound from the respective drop solution enthalpy, {Delta}H{sub ds}. The standard enthalpies of formation from the elements, {Delta}H{sub f}{sup o}, at 298 K are -1791.0 {+-} 3.2, -1536.2 {+-} 2.8, -2002.0 {+-} 3.2, -11389.2 {+-} 13.5, -6653.1 {+-} 13.8, -1724.7 {+-} 5.1, -10936.4 {+-} 14.5 and -13163.2 {+-} 34.4 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. These values are useful in exploring the stability of uranyl oxide hydrates in auxiliary chemical systems, such as those expected in U-contaminated environments.

  9. Density functional study of uranyl (VI) amidoxime complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl (VI) amidoxime complexes are investigated using relativistic density functional theory. The equilibrium structures, bond orders, and Mulliken populations of the complexes have been systematically investigated under a generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Comparison of (acet) uranyl amidoxime complexes ([UO2(AO)n]2−n, 1 ≤ n ≤ 4) with available experimental data shows an excellent agreement. In addition, the U−O(1), U−O(3), C(1)−N(2), and C(3)−N(4) bond lengths of [UO2(CH3AO)4]2− are longer than experimental data by about 0.088, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.056 Å. The angles of N(3)−O(3)−U, O(2)−N(1)−C(1), N(3)−C(3)−N(4), N(4)−C(3)−C(4), and C(4)−C(3)−N(3) are different from each other, which is due to existing interaction between oxygen in uranyl and hydrogen in amino group. This interaction is found to be intra-molecular hydrogen bond. Studies on the bond orders, Mulliken charges, and Mulliken populations demonstrate that uranyl oxo group functions as hydrogen-bond acceptors and H atoms in ligands act as hydrogen-bond donors forming hydrogen bonds within the complex

  10. Preparation of pure uranyl chloride from crude yellow cake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is described for the preparation of pure uranyl chloride solution from crude yellow cake. The process involves dissolution of the latter in hydrochloric acid followed by uranium extraction using TBP-kerosene mixture. A series of experiments were carried out in order to determine the optimum conditions for both the dissolution and the extraction steps

  11. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dingyuan

    2015-03-04

    Uranyl (UO2 2+) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2 2+) with a detection limit of 1.86 ÎM. In the absence of UO2 2+, the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2 2+, this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2 2+ was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2 2+ and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2 2+ from seawater.

  12. Fabrication of uranium dioxide of different granulation from uranyl nitrate by ammonia diuranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide is most frequently produced by reduction of higher oxides (UO3, U3O8) or reduction of uranium salts (uranium diuranate, uranium peroxide, uranyl oxalate). Reduction is most frequently done in hydrogen or carbon monoxide atmosphere under temperatures from 500 - 1700 deg C. One of the most frequently methods for producing uranium oxide is certainly reduction of ammonia diuranate by hydrogen (ADU method). Properties of uranium dioxide obtained by ADU method depend on properties of the initial substance. Investigations shown in this report are concerned with determining the properties of UO2 powders for determining the connection between their properties and conditions of fabrication and reduction of ADU and U3O8

  13. IR Spectroscopic investigation of the structure of polymeric uranyl di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate molecules in C6H6 and CCl4 solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Types of coordination of POO-groups of di-2-ethylhexylphosphate anions (x-) to uranyl cations in polymeric molecules of (UO2X2)p in benzene and carbon tetrachloride solutions have been studied by the method of IR spectroscopy. It has been ascertained that in the polymers above (MXn)p bridge tridentate coordination type, not encountered in other salts, is realized, in which phosphoryl atom of oxygen forms simultaneously two bonds with uranium(6) atoms. 14 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  14. Dynamic interplay between uranyl phosphate precipitation, sorption, and phase evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • In all experiments, final concentrations of uranium were lower than U.S. EPA standards. • U–P minerals more stable than chernikovite were slow to develop without sorption. • Heterogeneous nucleation was not observed. • U sorbs much more readily to the goethite than mica in the absence of phosphate. • Nucleation-growth-sorption cycles occur over weeks, not hours, at room temperature. - Abstract: Natural examples demonstrate uranyl-phosphate minerals can maintain extremely low levels of aqueous uranium in groundwaters due to their low solubility. Therefore, greater understanding of the geochemical factors leading to uranyl phosphate precipitation may lead to successful application of phosphate-based remediation methods. However, the solubility of uranyl phosphate phases varies over >3 orders of magnitude, with the most soluble phases typically observed in lab experiments. To understand the role of common soil/sediment mineral surfaces in the nucleation and transformation of uranyl phosphate minerals under environmentally relevant conditions, batch experiments were carried out with goethite and mica at pH 6 in mixed electrolyte solutions ranging from 1–800 μM U and 1–800 μM P. All experiments ended with uranium concentrations below the USEPA MCL for U, but with 2–3 orders of magnitude difference in uranium concentrations. Despite the presence of many cations that are well known to incorporate into less soluble autunite-group minerals, chernikovite rapidly precipitated in all experiments containing U and P, except for solutions with 1 μM U and 1 μM P that were calculated to be undersaturated. Textures of uranyl phosphates observed by AFM and TEM indicate that nucleation was homogenous and independent of the initial mineral content. Comparison of time-course U and P concentrations from the experiments with thermodynamic modeling of solution equilibria demonstrated that aqueous uranium concentrations in the experimental systems evolved

  15. Coordination number of uranium in crystal hydrates and hydratoetherates of uranyl halogen acetates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coordination number (CN) of uranyl in some crystal hydrates and crystal solvates of uranyl halogenacetates is discussed. When there is no steric hindrance from the carboxylate ion, the probability of a maximum CN of 6 increases with decrease of the electron-donating capacity of the anion, which can be associated with giometric factors and redistribution of electron density in the inner coordination sphere of uranyl

  16. Coordination number of uranium in crystallohydrates and hydratoethers of uranyl halogenacetates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of coordination number (c. n.) of uranyl in the series of crystallohydrates and crystallosolvates of uranyl halogenacetates is discussed. The probability of the maximum c. n. 6 in the absence of steric obstacles on the part of carboxylate-ion increases with the decrease of electron-donor ability of anion which can be connected both with geometric factors and with electron density redistribution in the internal coordination sphere of uranyl.

  17. On coordination number of uranium in crystallohydrates and hydratoethers of uranyl halogenacetates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of coordination number (c. n.) of uranyl in the series of crystallohydrates and crystallosolvates of uranyl halogenacetates is discussed. The probability of the maximum c. n. 6 in the absence of steric obstacles on the part of carboxylate-ion increases with the decrease of electron-donor ability of anion which can be connected both with geometric factors and with electron density redistribution in the internal coordination sphere of uranyl

  18. Phase equilibria in the ternary uranyl trichloroacetate -water - methylisobutylketone system at 25 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of investigation into mutual solubility within uranyl trichloroacetate - water - methylisobutylketone (MIBK) ternary system under 25 ged C, are presented. The obtained phase diagram is considered from the point of available data on uranyl nitrate - water - organic solvents systems including MIBK, as well as, on similar systems with uranyl trichloroacetonate. Occurrences of anion effects at extraction based on hydrate-solvate mechanism result mainly from the properties of extractants

  19. Coordination number of uranium in crystal hydrates and hydratoetherates of uranyl halogen acetates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    The coordination number (CN) of uranyl in some crystal hydrates and crystal solvates of uranyl halogenacetates is discussed. When there is no steric hindrance from the carboxylate ion, the probability of a maximum CN of 6 increases with decrease of the electron-donating capacity of the anion, which can be associated with giometric factors and redistribution of electron density in the inner coordination sphere of uranyl.

  20. Uranyl sorption by smectites: spectroscopic assessment of thermodynamic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm-Brause, C J; Berg, J M; Little, K M; Matzner, R A; Morris, D E

    2004-09-15

    Batch sorption experiments and thermodynamic modeling of the interaction of UO2(2+) and its hydrolysis products with two smectitic clay minerals, the reference material SWy-1 [McKinley et al., Clays Clay Miner. 43 (1995) 586] and the soil isolate LK-1 [Turner et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 30 (1996) 3399], have established a conceptual framework for uranyl/smectite surface complexation based on general reactions between aqueous uranyl species and the reactive sites on the mineral surfaces. In this report, we have formulated and spectroscopically tested a set of hypotheses based on this conceptual framework using samples prepared under similar or identical conditions to evaluate the agreement between surface complexation/speciation as enumerated by spectroscopic characterization and that elaborated by the surface complexation model. Both steady-state and time-resolved optical emission spectral data are presented for uranyl on both smectite minerals as well as on the analogue phases SiO2 and Al(OH)3 spanning the pH range from approximately 4 to 8 and the background electrolyte concentrations from approximately 0.001 to 0.1 M. The spectral data enable the explicit identification of an outer-sphere exchange-site population of the hydrated cation [UO2(OH2)5(2+) ] in SWy-1. Spectral data also clearly establish the existence of inner-sphere surface complexes on the analogue phases and on the amphoteric clay crystallite edge sites [aluminol (>Al-OH) and silanol (>Si-OH)]. Based on the spectral characteristics of these uranyl edge-site populations, it is possible to readily infer for the SiO2, Al(OH)3, and SWy-1 samples the evolution in surface speciation with increasing pH to more hydrolyzed uranyl-surface complexes consistent with the conceptual model. The spectral domain characteristics of the edge-site populations on LK-1 with increasing pH suggest that there is no change in the hydrolysis of the uranyl-surface species. However, emission lifetime data are interpreted

  1. Evaluation of uranyl nitrate crystallization for spent nuclear fuel separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work in Germany and Japan has indicated that crystallization of uranyl nitrate at low temperatures from nitric acid solution could be a useful process for removing most of the uranium from spent LWR fuel after the fuel is dissolved in nitric acid. The crystallization process potentially could reduce the cost of LWR fuel partitioning because it provides a selective and compact process for removing most of the uranium which is about 96% of the LWR spent fuel mass. Subsequent separation processes would only need to handle the smaller volume of remaining actinides and the fission products. We are evaluating an approach to separating uranyl nitrate that uses a continuous adiabatic reduced-pressure crystallizer to concentrate and cool a nitric acid solution from dissolution of spent fuel. Initial work to define the process flowsheet and obtain data on optimum crystallization conditions and the purity of the uranium product will be presented. (authors)

  2. New chemistry of the uranyl ion in non aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with new aspects of the chemistry of the uranyl(VI) ion {UO2}2+ in anhydrous polar organic solvents such as the activation of the reputedly inert U-Oyl bond and the controlled reduction of this species which represent a particularly active field of research that attracts much attention for both its fundamental aspects and applications. Treatment of uranyl(VI) compounds UO2X'2 (X' = I, OTf, Cl) with Me3SiX (X = Cl, Br, I) reagents, in various anhydrous polar organic solvents, has been first considered. In most cases, reduction into tetravalent species with complete de-oxygenation of the uranyl {UO2}2+ ion is observed. The reaction is particularly efficient in acetonitrile where the tetravalent [UX4(MeCN)4] complexes, which are useful precursors in uranium chemistry, are isolated. In the course of these reactions, the influence of the solvent, the nature of X' and X in the UO2X'2 precursor and the Me3SiX reagent are pointed out. Reaction of the uranyl(VI) UO2X2 (X = I, Cl, OTf, NO3) precursors with the anionic MC5R5 (M = K, R = H, Me; M= Li, R = Me; M= Tl, R = H) reagents did not lead to the organometallic [(η5-C5R5)nUO2X2-n] species (n = 1, 2) but to pentavalent uranyl(V) complexes. This method is a facile and rapid route towards the formation of stable pentavalent uranyl which offers promising sources for further U(V) chemical developments and for fundamental and applied interests. Their structure is strongly dependent on the nature of the solvent, the additional ligands X and of the M+ cation. In pyridine, the {UO2(py)5}+ ion appears to be an ubiquitous and a quite stable entity. The coordinating properties of the basic oxo groups, which coordinate easily to M+ ions (M= Li, K, Tl), favour structural diversity with formation of hetero-polymetallic complexes such as [{UO2(py)5}{MX(py)2}] (M= Li, X I), [{UO2(py)5}{MX2(py)2}]∞ (M= K, Tl, X= OTf; M= K, X= I), [{UO2(py)5}(M2X3)]∞ (M= Li, X= OTf) or [{UO2(py)5}2(M3X5)]∞ (M= K; X= OTf). With

  3. Comparative DFT study of crystalline ammonium perchlorate and ammonium dinitramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weihua; Wei, Tao; Zhu, Wei; Xiao, Heming

    2008-05-22

    The electronic structure, vibrational properties, absorption spectra, and thermodynamic properties of crystalline ammonium perchlorate (AP) and ammonium dinitramide (ADN) have been comparatively studied using density functional theory in the local density approximation. The results shows that the p states for the two solids play a very important role in their chemical reaction. From the low frequency to high frequency region, ADN has more motion modes for the vibrational frequencies than AP. The absorption spectra of AP and ADN display a few, strong bands in the fundamental absorption region. The thermodynamic properties show that ADN is easier to decompose than AP as the temperature increases. PMID:18396853

  4. Structural determination of some uranyl compounds by vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vibrational spectra of different uranyl compounds has been studied and of it spectral information has been used the fundamental asymmetric vibrational frequency, to determine the length and constant bond force U=O by means of the combination of the concept of absorbed energy and the mathematical expression of Badger modified by Jones. It is intended a factor that simplifies the mathematical treatment and the results are compared with the values obtained for other methods. (Author)

  5. In vitro dissolution of uranyl acetate using different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolution rate of a material in the lung is an important parameter in evaluating the risk to humans following accidental inhalation of a substance and is also a parameter that may be useful in characterizing particles for nuclear forensics analysis. Conventional methods of measuring dissolution rates in vitro involve exposing the material or particles to a solvent, such as water, saline, or solutions that simulate lung fluid, and measuring the fraction of material that dissolves with time. A new device for measuring dissolution rates for small samples, especially individual particles, was evaluated that incorporates a regenerated cellulose dialysis membrane fixed to the bottom of a small, 2 mL plastic cup that fits into the top of a 50 mL plastic centrifuge tube. The cup is easily transferred among a series of tubes containing solvent to measure rate of dissolution. The dialysis membrane has a diffusion rating of 20 kDa molecular weight cut off which greatly exceeds the size of the dissolved uranium molecule. The performance of the dialysis cup device was evaluated by measuring the dissolution rate of uranyl acetate in distilled water, phosphate buffered saline (PBS), and simulated lung fluid (SLF). These results were compared to the dissolution rate measured using the traditional filter sandwich method in which a sample is sealed between two hydrophilic membranes. Although the majority of uranyl acetate dissolved in SLF within 30 min using the filter sandwich method, most of the uranyl acetate was undissolved in PBS and SLF using the dialysis membrane device. Reactions between the dissolved uranyl acetate, solvent, and the dialysis membrane likely caused the membrane to swell, shrinking the pore size, and thus reducing the transport of dissolved uranium across the membrane. Use of the dialysis cup device for evaluating dissolution rates for uranium-bearing materials in solvents containing a high concentration of salts is therefore not recommended. (author)

  6. Tritium gettering from air with hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP), a solid proton electrolyte, getters tritium gas and water vapor from air by DC electrical action. We have reduced the formation of residual tritiated water to less than 2%, and demonstrated that HUP can clean a 5.5 m3 working glove box. Data are presented to illustrate the parameters of the gettering and a model is derived. Two other tritium gettering electrolytes have been discovered. 9 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems. PMID:27439180

  8. Variable Denticity in Carboxylate Binding to the Uranyl Coordination Complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tris-carboxylate complexes of the uranyl (UO2)2+ cation with acetate and benzoate were generated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and then isolated in a Fourier transformion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) of the tris-acetatouranyl anion resulted in a redox elimination of an acetate radical, which was used to generate an IR spectrum that consisted of six prominent absorption bands. These were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations in terms of symmetric and antisymmetric -CO2 stretches of both the monodentate and bidentate acetate, CH3 bending and umbrella vibrations, and a uranyl O-U-O asymmetric stretch. The comparison of the calculated and measured IR spectra indicated that the tris-acetate complex contained two acetate ligands bound in a bidentate fashion, while the third acetate was monodentate. In similar fashion, the tris-benzoate uranyl anion was formed and photodissociated by loss of a benzoate radical, enabling measurement of the infrared spectrum that was in close agreement with that calculated for a structure containing one monodentate, and two bidentate benzoate ligands.

  9. Variable Denticity in Carboxylate Binding to the Uranyl Coordination Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewold, G. S.; De Jong, Wibe A.; Oomens, Jos; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.

    2010-05-01

    Tris-carboxylate complexes of the uranyl [UO2]2+ cation with acetate and benzoate were generated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and then isolated in a Fourier transformion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Wavelength-selective infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) of the tris-acetatouranyl anion resulted in a redox elimination of an acetate radical, which was used to generate an IR spectrum that consisted of six prominent absorption bands. These were interpreted with the aid of density functional theory calculations in terms of symmetric and antisymmetric -CO2 stretches of both the monodentate and bidentate acetate, CH3 bending and umbrella vibrations, and a uranyl O-U-O asymmetric stretch. The comparison of the calculated and measured IR spectra indicated that the tris-acetate complex contained two acetate ligands bound in a bidentate fashion, while the third acetate was monodentate. In similar fashion, the tris-benzoate uranyl anion was formed and photodissociated by loss of a benzoate radical, enabling measurement of the infrared spectrum that was in close agreement with that calculated for a structure containing one monodentate, and two bidentate benzoate ligands.

  10. Design of one evaporation system for uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors propose an instant evaporation system with recirculation of the concentrated solution to raise the concentration from 50 to 1500 g of uranium per litre of solution. The capacity of the plant is to be 14.1 kg of uranium per hour. The main equipment used in the system is as follows: 1. Ring-type heat exchanger, for increasing the temperature of the mixture of fresh and recirculated solution from 80 to 1150C; 2. Separation tank, in which instant evaporation is carried out. The absolute pressure inside the tank will be 500 mmHg, with steam separation from a concentrated (78.5 wt.%) uranyl nitrate solution; 3. Desuperheater-condenser of horizontal tubular type for condensing water vapour and recovering any uranyl nitrate that may have been entrained; 4. Storage tank for the concentrate, with a capacity for one day's normal operation, and a heating coil to prevent crystallization of the concentrated solution; 5. Two storage tanks for feed and condensate with capacity for one day's normal operation; 6. Supporting structure for the above components. Virtually all equipment in contact with the uranyl nitrate solution will be made of 304 stainless steel. Saturated steam at 143.30C will be required. The cost of the proposed system is $543 030.00. (author)

  11. Structural Phase Transitions and Water Dynamics in Uranyl Fluoride Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiec, Andrew; Kirkegaard, Marie C; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Herwig, Kenneth W; Trowbridge, Lee; Rondinone, Adam; Anderson, Brian

    2015-12-10

    We report a novel production method for uranium oxyfluoride [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O, referred to as structure D. Structure D is produced as a product of hydrating anhydrous uranyl fluoride, UO2F2, through the gas phase at ambient temperatures followed by desiccation by equilibration with a dry environment. We follow the structure of [(UO2)7F14(H2O)7]·4H2O through an intermediate, liquid-like phase, wherein the coordination number of the uranyl ion is reduced to 5 (from 6 in the anhydrous structure), and a water molecule binds as an equatorial ligand to the uranyl ion. Quasielastic neutron scattering results compare well with previous measurements of mineral hydrates. The two groups of structurally distinct water molecules in D perform restricted motion on a length scale commensurate with the O-H bond (r = 0.92 Å). The more tightly bound equatorial ligand waters rotate slower (Dr = 2.2 ps(-1)) than their hydrogen-bonded partners (Dr = 28.7 ps(-1)). PMID:26575434

  12. Preparation of maleic anhydride using a catalyst containing a uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process is described for converting benzene, an ethylenically unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbon having from 4 to 5 carbon atoms per molecule and from 1 to 2 olefinic double bonds, and in which the 4 carbon atom hydrocarbon is unbranched, or a monoethylenically unsaturated straight-chain aldehyde having from 4 to 5 carbon atoms per molecule and wherein the olefinic double bond is in the beta position with respect to the carbonyl group, to maleic anhydride by catalytic oxidation in the presence of a catalyst comprising a uranyl ion, especially uranium phosphate. One preferred form of the catalyst consists of an intimate chemical admixture of vanadium, uranium, phosphorus, and oxygen in which the uranium to phosphorus mole ratio is from 0.2:1 to 2:1, the phosphorus to oxygen mole ratio is from 0.1:1 to 0.35:1; and the vanadium to uranium atomic ratio is from 0.1:1 to 2:1. A method of preparation of the catalyst composition is also disclosed

  13. SERS detection of uranyl using functionalized gold nanostars promoted by nanoparticle shape and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Grace; Forbes, Tori Z; Haes, Amanda J

    2016-08-15

    The radius of curvature of gold (Au) nanostar tips but not the overall particle dimensions can be used for understanding the large and quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal of the uranyl (UO2)(2+) moiety. The engineered roughness of the Au nanostar architecture and the distance between the gold surface and uranyl cations are promoted using carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiols containing 2, 5, and 10 methylene groups. By systematically varying the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) thickness with these molecules, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectral properties are used to quantify the SAM layer thickness and to promote uranyl coordination to the Au nanostars in neutral aqueous solutions. Successful uranyl detection is demonstrated for all three functionalized Au nanostar samples as indicated by enhanced signals and red-shifts in the symmetric U(vi)-O stretch. Quantitative uranyl detection is achieved by evaluating the integrated area of these bands in the uranyl fingerprint window. By varying the concentration of uranyl, similar free energies of adsorption are observed for the three carboxylic acid terminated functionalized Au nanostar samples indicating similar coordination to uranyl, but the SERS signals scale inversely with the alkanethiol layer thickness. This distance dependence follows previously established models assuming that roughness features associated with the radius of curvature of the tips are considered. These results indicate that SERS signals using functionalized Au nanostar substrates can provide quantitative detection of small molecules and that the tip architecture plays an important role in understanding the resulting SERS intensities. PMID:27326897

  14. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to other Siderophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-05-27

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  15. High-affinity uranyl-specific antibodies suitable for cellular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have proved to be valuable models for the study of protein-metal interactions, and previous reports have described very specific antibodies to chelated metal ions, including uranyl. We raised specific mAbs against UO22+-DCP-BSA (DCP, 1, 10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) to generate new sets of antibodies that might cross-react with various complexed forms of uranyl in different environments for further application in the field of toxicology. Using counter-screening with UO22+-DCP-casein, we selected two highly specific mAbs against uranyl-DCP (KD = 10-100 pM): U04S and U08S. Competitive assays in the presence of different metal ions (UO22+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Ca2+) showed that uranyl in solution can act as a good competitor, suggesting some antibody ability to cross-react with chelating groups other than DCP in the UO22+ equatorial coordination plane. Interestingly, one of the antibodies could be used for revealing uranyl cations in cell samples. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analyses after immuno-labeling revealed the interaction of uranyl with human kidney cells HK2. The intracellular accumulation of uranyl could be directly visualized by metal-immunostaining using fluorescent-labeled mAb. Our results suggest that U04S mAb epitopes mostly include the uranyl fraction and its para-topes can accommodate a wide variety of chelating groups. (authors)

  16. Two uranyl-organic frameworks with pyridinecarboxylate ligands. A novel hetero-metallic uranyl-copper(II) complex with a cation-cation interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction of uranyl nitrate with pyridine-2-carboxylic acid (HL1) under hydrothermal conditions gives the complex [(UO2)3(L1)4(NO3)2], 1, which differs from the previously reported molecular complex, obtained at room temperature, by the absence of water, coordinated and free, and the extended carboxylate bridging. Although the tri-metallic basic unit is similar in both cases, 1 crystallizes as a two-dimensional assembly. A hetero-metallic complex results from the reaction of uranyl nitrate and copper(II) trifluoromethanesulfonate with nicotinic acid (pyridine-3-carboxylic acid, HL2), [UO2Cu(L2)2(NO3)2], 2, in which copper nicotinate two-dimensional subunits are bridged by uranyl nitrate groups to give a three-dimensional framework. The copper atom environment geometry is elongated octahedral. with one of the axial donors being a uranyl oxo group (cation-cation interaction). (author)

  17. Behavior of the extraction of metallic ions in carbonate medium, using N-benzoylphenylhydroxylamine (BPHA) - benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of separating quantitatively trace impurities like Cu, Fe, In and Pb, present in uranium base materials of nuclear grade, is demonstrated. A solvent extraction is employed which makes use of -benzoylphenylhydroxylamine(BPHA)-benzene solution and separation is effected in a medium containing 252 moles per liter of sodium-uranyl tricarbonate at pH of 9,0. Carbonate ions under such conditions inhibit uranium extraction by masking uranyl ion-BPHA reaction. The uranyl ions show a demasking action, releasing, thereby, Pb(II) ions which are being extracted from carbonate medium. The Atomic Absorption Spectrophometry technique is used to obtain the experimental data

  18. Quantification of uranyl in presence of citric acid; Cuantificacion de uranilo en presencia de acido citrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N.; Barrera D, C.E. [UAEM, Facultad de Quimica, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ordonez R, E. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: nidgg@yahoo.com.mx

    2007-07-01

    To determine the influence that has the organic matter of the soil on the uranyl sorption on some solids is necessary to have a detection technique and quantification of uranyl that it is reliable and sufficiently quick in the obtaining of results. For that in this work, it intends to carry out the uranyl quantification in presence of citric acid modifying the Fluorescence induced by UV-Vis radiation technique. Since the uranyl ion is very sensitive to the medium that contains it, (speciation, pH, ionic forces, etc.) it was necessary to develop an analysis technique that stands out the fluorescence of uranyl ion avoiding the out one that produce the organic acids. (Author)

  19. Spectroscopic studies on uranyl complexes with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complexes formed from uranyl salts and tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) in ionic liquids (ILs) were studied by spectroscopic methods. [UO2(TBP)4]2+ is formed from UO2(ClO4)2· xH2O with excess of TBP in ILs. The coordination number of uranyl in [UO2(TBP)4]2+ is determined as 4 by ATR-FTIR study. In [Bmim][NTf2], though TBP cannot replace the NO3- coordinated to uranyl, TBP/[Bmim][NTf2] can extract 'nitrate-free' uranyl complex from diluted HNO3 medium and the extracted complex is converted into [UO2(TBP)4]2+ after drying. The formation of [UO2(TBP)4]2+ provides spectroscopic evidence for the cation-exchange mechanism of uranyl extraction by TBP/[Bmim][NTf2] from diluted HNO3 medium. (author)

  20. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  1. Mineral replacement reactions in naturally occurring hydrated uranyl phosphates from the Tarabau deposit: Examples in the Cu–Ba uranyl phosphate system

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, André Filipe Jorge; Conçalves, Mário A.; Praceres, Cátia; Astilleros García-Monge, José Manuel; Batista, Maria Joao

    2012-01-01

    Uranyl phosphates are a mineral group which include a wide range of different species, each containing specific cations within the hydrated interlayer, and often display a geochemical/mineralogical relationship with Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides. The environmental relevance of these U-phases arises from their low solubility at most surface and groundwater conditions, where they can ultimately control aqueous U levels. In the present work, samples of naturally occurring uranyl phosphates ...

  2. Fugitive binder-containing nuclear fuel material and method of production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel material green body of density from about 30 to 70% of theoretical density having tensile strength and plastici adequate to maintain the integrity of the body during processing leading to ultimate sintered condition is produced by adding one or more amines to a particulate mass of the nuclear fuel containing about five percent of ammonium uranyl carbonate under conditions resulting in reaction of the amine with the ammonium uranyl carbonate, liberation of ammonia and formation of a watersoluble uranyl compound more effective as a binder than the ammonium uranyl carbonate

  3. Existence, characterization and decomposition of uranyl difluoride hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heart of a pressurized water nuclear reactor is composed of assemblies of fuel rods of principally uranium dioxide powder. The 'pyro-hydrolysis process' is currently a preferred route for the preparation of UO2 from enriched uranyl hexafluoride UF6. In this technology, the reaction is carried out under flow of dihydrogen (for its reducing function) and in the presence of water. Between the gaseous fluoride UF6 and the ceramic UO2, uranyl difluoride, UO2F2, is the solid intermediate, that contains the oxygen, but in which uranium is not yet reduced. The study of the interactions between this intermediate and water is of academic interest but is clearly of importance to the industrial process. The aim of this work was to specify the conditions of existence of the hydrates of uranyl fluoride and the reaction mechanism leading from the hydrates to anhydrous UO2F2, precursor in the industrial reaction. The study has been performed using a combination of X-ray diffraction as a function of hygrometry, temperature or pressure and gravimetric analysis. Several hydrated phases have been characterized: two solid solutions, the compositions of which can vary respectively between UO2F2.5 H2O and UO2F2. 4 H2O and between UO2F2. 2.5 H2O and UO2F2.1.6 H2O and one hydrate of defined composition UO2F2.3.5 H2O. Thermal dehydration from the higher hydrates shows the existence of a new phase termed δ, the structure of which is similar to that of UO2F2.3.5 H2O. Hydration of the anhydrous compound under a controlled atmosphere enables us to observe this phase and confirms the strongly lamellar character of these hydrates. (authors)

  4. U3O8 and UO2 obtained from ADU (ammonium diuranate) ultrasonically treated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, obtention of U3O8 used in the manufacturing of MTR plates nuclear fuels, is performed by hydrolysis of UF6 to obtain uranyl fluoride. Uranyl fluoride is precipitated with ammonium hydroxide to get ammonium polyuranate (ADU). Afterwards ADU is calcinated to U3O8 and mechanical and thermally treated in order to obtain a powder in a determined specification. In the present work, ultrasound has been applied in the stage of precipitation of ADU and for different times in the stage of digestion in order to fasten the stages of ADU filtering and eliminate the U3O8 milling and sieving. Experiences on UO2 have also been performed. The aspect of ADU changes considerably when they have been ultrasonically treated, its filtering rate is faster and it is easier to dry as it contains less humidity. U3O8 obtained after 800degreeC calcination of treated ADU results in an easy to desagregate powder. Only a soft mechanical treatment is needed to be performed on it before starting thermal treatment at 1400degreeC. After thermal treatment at 1400degreeC treated U3O8 has shown adequate characteristics of size, shape and density (8.2 g/cm3). Regarding UO2, the shape of the agglomerates is almost spherical, leading to a free-flowing powder, whose apparent and TAP density showed to be adequate. The characteristics of the different compounds were followed by electron scanning micrographies, X-Rays, specific area measurements and differential thermal analysis. The great advantage of ultrasound appliance is that hard mechanical treatment is avoided in the obtention of U3O8, saving time and effort. Furthermore, UO2 proves to be adequate to make pellets, the same precursor could be used in the obtention of both uranium oxides. (author). 5 refs., 6 figs

  5. Biosolubilization of uranyl ions in uranium ores by hydrophyte plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigated the bioleaching of uranyl ions from uranium ores, in aqueous medium by hydrophyte plants: Lemna minor, Azolla caroliniana and Elodea canadensis under different experimental conditions. The oxidation of U(IV) to U(VI) species was done by the atomic oxygen generated in the photosynthesis process by the aquatic plants in the solution above uranium ores. Under identical experimental conditions, the capacity of bioleaching of uranium ores decreases according to the following series: Lemna minor > Elodea canadensis > Azolla caroliniana. The results of IR spectra suggest the possible use of Lemna minor and Elodea canadensis as a biological decontaminant of uranium containing wastewaters. (author)

  6. Spectroscopy and Photochemistry in Single Crystals of Uranyl Formate Monohydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jack Neal

    1982-03-01

    UO(,2)CH(OO)(,2)(.)H(,2)O, (UFM) is an orthorhombic crystal (Fdd2, C(,2v)('19)) with two uranyls per unit cell. Above 210(DEGREES)K, when uranyl is excited by visible light, a two-step reaction occurs. The primary photochemical step is. U(VI)O(,2)('++) + HCOO('-) (--->) U(V) + (HCOO(.) or CO(,2)('-)). (1). A study of UFM in the oriented solid explores one of the most basic chemical reactions--the redox reaction. High resolution, polarized absorption and excitation specta were taken on single crystals at liquid helium temperatures. Eight electronic origins are identified, each split into doublets by factor group interactions. Uranyl (a)symmetric stretch vibronic progressions (do not) preserve the factor group splittings and polarizations of their origins. The spectrum of UFM lies closer to the (omega)-(omega) limit, as opposed to Russell-Saunders, than Cs(,2)UO(,2)Cl(,4). Low site symmetry depolarizes the B-symmetry components of the origins. Below 2(DEGREES)K, where UFM exhibits non-single exponential luminescence decay, migration to traps is limited. By 20(DEGREES)K, where the curves become single exponential and drop tenfold in the value of the lifetime, emission is occurring from UFM in thermal equilibrium with a population of killer traps. Above 70(DEGREES)K, the lifetime slowly rises. It peaks at 135(DEGREES)K, and then drops steeply, falling below detectability by 210(DEGREES)K. The drop is accompanied by the onset of photoreactivity. The rise in emission is attributed either to a decrease in trapping efficiency or to a hindered migration to traps due to a thermal population of bound (DELTA)(,g) excitons. ESR studies show that a signal at g = 2.0 observed at 77(DEGREES)K is from surface radicals. Below 20(DEGREES)K, a signal near g = 2.1 is due to organic radicals in the bulk generated by the photochemical step. Studies on a single crystal resolve these signals into components that reflect the crystallographic symmetry elements. A signal near g = 3.4 is

  7. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF6) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF6 and UO2F2 exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF6, UO2F2, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Uranyl complexes of n-alkanediaminotetra-acetic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranyl complexes of n-propanediaminetetra-acetic acid, n-butanediaminetetra-acetic acid and n-hexanediaminetetra-acetic acid have been studied by potentiometry, with computer evaluation of the titration data by the MINIQUAD program. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 2:1 metal:ligand chelates have been determined as well as the respective hydrolysis and polymerization constants at 25 deg in 0.10M and 1.00M KNO3. The influence of the length of the alkane chain of the ligands on the complexes formed is discussed. (author)

  9. Start-up of simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate from an anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process in an anaerobic up-flow bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A laboratory testing of simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate (SRAS) was studied from an anammox process in an anaerobic bioreactor filled with granular activated carbon. Two different phases of experiment were investigated to start up the SRAS process, and final batch tests were performed to analyze the SRAS process. The experiment included an anammox process and an SRAS process. During the anammox process, the highest removal efficiency of ammonium and nitrite was up to 97 and 98%, respectively. After 160 days in the stationary phase of anammox process, the ratio of ammonium to nitrite consumption was approximately 1:1.15, which is much higher than 1:1.32 in the traditional anammox process. The extra electron acceptor, such as sulfate, was thought to react with ammonium by bacteria. Synthetic wastewater containing ammonium chlorine and sodium sulfate was used as the feed for the bioreactor in the second phase of experiment. During the SRAS process, the influent concentrations of ammonium and sulfate were controlled to be 50-60 and 210-240 mg L-1 respectively. After start-up and acclimatization of this process for 60 days, the average effluent concentrations of ammonium and sulfate were 30 and 160 mg L-1, respectively. The simultaneous ammonium and sulfate removal was detected in the reactor. In order to further validate the biochemical interaction between ammonium and sulfate, batch tests was carried out. Abiotic tests were carried out to demonstrate that the pure chemical action between ammonium and sulfate without microorganism was not possible. Biotic assays with different ammonium and sulfate concentrations were further investigated that high concentrations of ammonium and sulfate could promote simultaneous removal of ammonium and sulfate. And elemental sulfur and nitrogen gas as the products measured in the SRAS process helped to demonstrate the occurrence of new interaction between nitrogen and sulfur. The new process of SRAS in the inorganic

  10. Ammonium assmilation in spruce ectomycorrhizas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assimilation of labelled NH4+ into amino acids has been followed in ectomycorrhizal roots of spruce. Over an 18 h period of NH4+ feeding, Gln, Glu and Ala became the most abundant amino acids. Gln was also the most highly labelled amino acid during the experiment, followed by Glu and Ala. This result indicates that Gln synthesis is an important ammonium utilization reaction in spruce mycorrhizas. Addition of MSX to NH4+ fed mycorrhizas caused an inhibition of Gln accumulation with a corresponding increase in Glu, Ala and Asn levels. The supply of MSX induced a sharp diminution of 15N enrichment in both amino and amido groups of glutamine. In contrast, the 15N incorporation into Glu and derivatives (Ala and Asp) remained very high. This study demonstrates that the fungal glutamate dehydrogenase is quite operative in spruce ectomycorrhizas since it is able to sustain ammonium assimilation when glutamine synthetase is inhibited

  11. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  12. Analysis of the influence of temperature and atmosphere on the reduction process of ammonium and uranyl tricarbonate-AUC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the effect of temperature and atmosphere on the physical and chemical characteristcs of uranium dioxide powder produced from the reduction of AUC have been analysed. The chemical composition and the physical parameters (specific surface area, granulometry and loose density) are directly influenced by the temperature and atmosphere during the reduction of AUC. Uranium dioxide powders produced by direct reduction temperature range 500-8000C and by prior, calcination of AUC have been analysed. (Author)

  13. Influence of surfactants on the properties of precipitates of difficulty soluble actinide and lanthanide compounds. 1. Ammonium diuranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main characteristics have been ascertained of the influence of various kinds of surfactants on the properties of a precipitate of ammonium diuranate thrown down by a concentrated ammonia solution from a nitric acid solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been shown that monomolecular cationogenic surfactants have no effect on the properties of the precipitate. Nonionogenic and anionogenic monomolecular surfactants promote an increase of the rate of sedimentation of ammonium diuranate. High-molecular-weight cationogenic surfactants have a negative effect on the rates of sedimentation and filtration of a suspension, and increase the moisture content of a precipitate. The action of high-molecular-weight nonionogenic surfactants is analogous to that of monomolecular surfactants of the same type. It has been shown that the most effective flocculants of ammonium diuranate are anionogenic polyelectrolytes. Low concentrations of these substances in a suspension enable the rates of sedimentation and filtration to be increased and the moisture content of an ammonium diuranate precipitate to be reduced owing to formation of stable flakes possessing elasticity

  14. Stripping study of U(IV) from loaded TBP/n-paraffin using ammonium nitrate as a strippant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increase in uranium loading in the organic, there was an increase in % stripping of uranium for ammonium nitrate whereas for distilled water it became reversed. With the increase of pH of the aqueous ammonium nitrate solution, it was found that stripping increased up to a pH of 8.5 and after that precipitation starts. Increase in temperature of the biphasic system shows an enhancing effect of uranium stripping. Evaluation of thermodynamic data like ΔH and ΔS indicated that the process is endothermic. Equilibrium isotherms at various operating conditions were generated for both water and ammonium nitrate. Based on the optimized conditions, Mc-Cabe Thiele diagrams were constructed using ammonium nitrate (50 g/L) of pH 7.5 at room temperature. Result showed that at an O/A ratio of 2/5, at least 7 theoretical countercurrent stages are needed at room temperature with an initial uranium loading of 115.4 g/L to get 40 g/L of uranyl nitrate pure solution in the rich end leaving only 3 g/L uranium in the lean solvent whereas for water to strip all the uranium (from 100 g/L) requires only 4 numbers of countercurrent stages at an O/A ratio of 2/3 at room temperature

  15. Construction of Uranyl Selective Electrode Based on Complex of Uranyl Ion with New Ligand Carboxybenzotriazole in PVC Matrix Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Dalo, M. A.; Al-Rawashdeh, N. A. F.; Al-Mheidat, I. R.; Nassory, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    In the present study uranyl selective electrodes in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) matrix membrane were prepared based on a complex of uranyl ion (UO2) with carboxybenzotriazole (CBT) as ligand. The effect of the nature of plasticizer in PVC matrix were evaluated using three different plasticizers, these are dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BHS). The results of this study indicated that the best plasticizer could be used is the DBP, which may be attributed to its lowest viscosity value compared to DOP and BHS. The electrodes with DBP as plasticizer exhibits a Nernstian response with a slope of 28.0 mV/ decade, over a wide range of concentration from 3.0×10-5-6.0×10-2 M and a detection limit of 4.0×10-6 M. It can be used in the pH range of 4.0-10.0 with a response time of less than 10 s for DBP and 25 s for both DOP and BHS. The effects of ions interferences on the electrode response were evaluated. The di- and tri-valent cations were found to interfere less than univalent cations, which was attributed to the high diffusion and the exchange rate between the univalent ions and the uranyl ion solution. The electrodes were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). The results of the standard addition method were satisfactory with errors less than 7%. The developed electrode was found to be fast, sensitive and reliable indicated its potential use in measuring the uranly ion concentration in the field.

  16. Intrinsic hydration of monopositive uranyl hydroxide, nitrate, and acetate cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Winnie; Anbalagan, Victor; Zandler, Melvin; Van Stipdonk, Michael; Hanna, Dorothy; Gresham, Garold; Groenewold, Gary

    2004-06-01

    The intrinsic hydration of three monopositive uranyl-anion complexes (UO(2)A)(+) (where A = acetate, nitrate, or hydroxide) was investigated using ion-trap mass spectrometry (IT-MS). The relative rates for the formation of the monohydrates [(UO(2)A)(H(2)O)](+), with respect to the anion, followed the trend: Acetate > or = nitrate > hydroxide. This finding was rationalized in terms of the donation of electron density by the strongly basic OH(-) to the uranyl metal center, thereby reducing the Lewis acidity of U and its propensity to react with incoming nucleophiles, viz., H(2)O. An alternative explanation is that the more complex acetate and nitrate anions provide increased degrees of freedom that could accommodate excess energy from the hydration reaction. The monohydrates also reacted with water, forming dihydrates and then trihydrates. The rates for formation of the nitrate and acetate dihydrates [(UO(2)A)(H(2)O)(2)](+) were very similar to the rates for formation of the monohydrates; the presence of the first H(2)O ligand had no influence on the addition of the second. In contrast, formation of the [(UO(2)OH)(H(2)O)(2)](+) was nearly three times faster than the formation of the monohydrate. PMID:15144967

  17. Modulation of the unpaired spin localization in Pentavalent Uranyl Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetere, V.; Maldivi, P.; Mazzanti, M. [CEA Grenoble, INAC, SCIB, laboratoire de reconnaissance ionique et chimie de coordination, 38 (France); Vetere, V. [UMR5626, laboratoire de chimie et physique quantique, universite de Toulouse, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2010-06-15

    The electronic structure of various complexes of pentavalent uranyl species, namely UO{sub 2}{sup +}, is described, using DFT methods, with the aim of understanding how the structure of the ligands may influence the localisation of the unpaired 5f electron of uranium (V) and, finally, the stability of such complexes towards oxidation. Six complexes have been inspected: [UO{sub 2}py{sub 5}]{sup +} (1), [(UO{sub 2}py{sub 5})KI{sub 2}] (2), [UO{sub 2}(salan-{sup t}Bu{sub 2})(py)K] (3), [UO{sub 2}(salophen-{sup t}Bu{sub 2})(thf)K] (4), [UO{sub 2}(salen-{sup t}Bu{sub 2})(py)K] (5), [and UO{sub 2}-cyclo[6]pyrrole]{sup 1-} (6), chosen to explore various ligands. In the five first complexes, the UO{sub 2}{sup +} species is well identified with the unpaired electron localized on the 5f uranium orbital. Additionally, for the salan, salen and salophen ligands, some covalent interactions have been observed, resulting from the presence of both donor and acceptor binding sites. In contrast, the last complex is best described by a UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} uranyl (VI) coordinated by the anionic radical cyclo-pyrrole, the highly delocalized p orbitals set stabilizing the radical behaviour of this ligand. (authors)

  18. Reaction of uranyl fluoride with sodium fluoride in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of complex uranyl fluorides in the system NaF-VO2F2-H2O has been studied and some of their properties have been investigated. It has been shown that, depending on the mole ratio of the components (from 0.5:1 to 5:1), fluorouranylates Na(VO2)2F5x4H2O, Na3(VO2)2F7x2H2O, and Na3VO2F5 are formed. Infrared spectra have demonstrated that H2O molecules are not coordinated by the central atom. Dehydration of hydrated complexes proceeds in two stages. Non-aqueous Na3(VO2)2F5 melts at 540 deg C. The synthesized complexes are studied by X-ray structural analysis. The compositions of complex uranyl fluorides formed in the systems MF-VO2F2-H2O (M=Na,K,Rb,Cs,NH4, CN3H6) have been compared

  19. Density functional theory and molecular dynamics study of the uranyl ion (UO₂)²⁺.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Jeangros, Nicolás; Seminario, Jorge M

    2014-03-01

    The detection of uranium is very important, especially in water and, more importantly, in the form of uranyl ion (UO₂)²⁺, which is one of its most abundant moieties. Here, we report analyses and simulations of uranyl in water using ab initio modified force fields for water with improved parameters and charges of uranyl. We use a TIP4P model, which allows us to obtain accurate water properties such as the boiling point and the second and third shells of water molecules in the radial distribution function thanks to a fictitious charge that corrects the 3-point models by reproducing the exact dipole moment of the water molecule. We also introduced non-bonded interaction parameters for the water-uranyl intermolecular force field. Special care was taken in testing the effect of a range of uranyl charges on the structure of uranyl-water complexes. Atomic charges of the solvated ion in water were obtained using density functional theory (DFT) calculations taking into account the presence of nitrate ions in the solution, forming a neutral ensemble. DFT-based force fields were calculated in such a way that water properties, such as the boiling point or the pair distribution function stand. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations of a water box containing uranyl cations and nitrate anions are performed at room temperature. The three peaks in the oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function for water were found to be kept in the presence of uranyl thanks to the improvement of interaction parameters and charges. Also, we found three shells of water molecules surrounding the uranyl ion instead of two as was previously thought. PMID:24573498

  20. 8102 and 7601 as antidotes for acute uranyl nitrate intoxication in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of phenolic chelating agents, 8102 and 7601, as antidotes for acute uranyl nitrate (100-500 mg/kg) intoxication was examined. The results show that after intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg of uranyl nitrate per kg, all the control rats died at 3rd and 4th days and exhibited acute renal tubular necrosis and protein casts. 8102 and 7601 could promote the animals survival and reduce the histologic lesion of kidneys in rats intoxicated with uranyl nitrate (100-350 mg/kg). 8102 is more effective than 7601

  1. Spectroscopic studies of 2-thenoyltrifluoro acetonate of uranyl salts doped with europium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl compounds present a great potential as luminescence materials. Some examples of applications are: in laser technology, cathode ray tube, X-rays diagnostic. In this work it was studied the synthesis, characterization and spectroscopic properties study of uranyl 2-thenoyl trifluoroacetonate and uranyl 2- thenoyl trifluoroacetonate doped with europium. The compounds were synthesized and characterized by infrared absorption spectroscopy, thermal analysis, scanning electronic microscopy, and electronic spectroscopy of emission and excitation. The Eu3+ ion acted as an effective luminescent probe, however the process of energy transfer from UO22+ to Eu3+ ion has not been efficient. (author)

  2. EDTA and DTPA modified ligands as sequestering agents for uranyl decorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis of modified EDTA and DTPA ligands and determination of their binding affinities for the uranyl cation are described. Thanks to a screening method, based on a chromophoric complex displacement procedure, chelating properties were studied in aqueous media under various pH conditions for evaluation of their in vivo uranyl-removal efficacy. Each ligand showed a more or less pronounced affinity for uranium. Specific ligands based on EDTA or DTPA analogues containing sulfo-catechol-amide (CAMS) were found to exhibit a significant affinity towards uranyl ion in acidic, neutral or basic conditions. (authors)

  3. Effect of organic solvent properties on enthalpies of their mixing with uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of studying dissolution enthalpies of anhydrons uranyl nitrate and its hexahydrate in different organic solvents and water are generalized. Analysis of different solvation effects during uranyl nitrate and its hexahydrate dissolution in 26 solvents shows that the main contribution to dissolution enthalpy is made by acidic-basic interaction of uranyl-nitrates with donor lone electron pairs. The obtained equations permit to predict with acceptable accuracy the values of dissolution enthalpies of the mentioned compounds in other midea on the basis of their physico-chemical properties

  4. Tailored Architectures of Ammonium Ionenes

    OpenAIRE

    Tamami, Mana

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a variety of ammonium ionenes from water-soluble coatings to high-performance elastomers are discussed. Water-soluble random copolymer ionenes were synthesized using the Menshutkin reaction from 1,12-dibromododecane, N,N,Nâ ²,Nâ ²-tetramethyl-1,6-hexanediamine, and 1,12-bis(N,N-dimethylamino)dodecane. The absolute molecular weights were determined for the first time using a multiangle laser light scattering detector in aqueous size exclusion chromatograph...

  5. Charge-density matching in organic-inorganic uranyl compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of [C10H26N2][(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)](H2SeO4)0.85(H2O)2 (1), [C10H26N2][(UO2)(SeO4)2] (H2SeO4)0.50(H2O) (2), and [C8H20N]2[(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)] (H2O) (3) were prepared by evaporation from aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate, selenic acid and the respective amines. The structures of the compounds have been solved by direct methods and structural models have been obtained. The structures of the compounds 1, 2, and 3 contain U and Se atoms in pentagonal bipyramidal and tetrahedral coordinations, respectively. The UO7 and SeO4 polyhedra polymerize by sharing common O atoms to form chains (compound 1) or sheets (compounds 2 and 3). In the structure of 1, the layers consisting of hydrogen-bonded [UO2(SeO4)2(H2O)]2- chains are separated by mixed organic-inorganic layers comprising from [NH3(CH2)10NH3]2+ molecules, H2O molecules, and disordered electroneutral (H2SeO4) groups. The structure of 2 has a similar architecture but a purely inorganic layer is represented by a fully connected [UO2(SeO4)2]2- sheet. The structure of 3 does not contain disordered (H2SeO4) groups but is based upon alternating [UO2(SeO4)2(H2O)]2- sheets and 1.5-nm-thick organic blocks consisting of positively charged protonated octylamine molecules, [NH3(CH2)7CH3]+. The structures may be considered as composed of anionic inorganic sheets (2D blocks) and cationic organic blocks self-organized according to competing hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions. Analysis of the structures allows us to conclude that the charge-density matching principle is observed in uranyl compounds. In order to satisfy some basic peculiarities of uranyl (in general, actinyl) chemistry, it requires specific additional mechanisms: (a) in long-chain-amine-templated compounds, protonated amine molecules inter-digitate; (b) in long-chain-diamine-templated compounds, incorporation of acid-water interlayers into an organic substructure is necessary; (c) the inclination angle of the amine chains may vary in order to modify

  6. Ammonium assmilation in spruce ectomycorrhizas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalot, M.; Brun, A.; Botton, B. (Univ. of nancy, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)); Stewart, G. (University College, London (England))

    1990-05-01

    Assimilation of labelled NH{sub 4}{sup +} into amino acids has been followed in ectomycorrhizal roots of spruce. Over an 18 h period of NH{sub 4}{sup +} feeding, Gln, Glu and Ala became the most abundant amino acids. Gln was also the most highly labelled amino acid during the experiment, followed by Glu and Ala. This result indicates that Gln synthesis is an important ammonium utilization reaction in spruce mycorrhizas. Addition of MSX to NH{sub 4}{sup +} fed mycorrhizas caused an inhibition of Gln accumulation with a corresponding increase in Glu, Ala and Asn levels. The supply of MSX induced a sharp diminution of {sup 15}N enrichment in both amino and amido groups of glutamine. In contrast, the {sup 15}N incorporation into Glu and derivatives (Ala and Asp) remained very high. This study demonstrates that the fungal glutamate dehydrogenase is quite operative in spruce ectomycorrhizas since it is able to sustain ammonium assimilation when glutamine synthetase is inhibited.

  7. Synthesis of Chitosan Quaternary Ammonium Salts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A series of N-alkyl or N-aryl chitosan quaternary ammonium salts were prepared via Schiffs base intermediates. Quaternization of N-substituted chitosan derivatives was carried out using methyl iodide to produce water-soluble cationic chitosan quaternary ammonium salt. The products were characterized by IR, 1HNMR and elemental analysis. The degree of substitution of chitosan quaternary ammonium salt was calculated by elemental analysis.

  8. Nitritation and N2O Emission in a Denitrification and Nitrification Two-Sludge System Treating High Ammonium Containing Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Guangxue Wu; Derui Zheng; Lizhen Xing

    2014-01-01

    The effective management of high ammonium containing wastewater is important for the sustainable development of the wastewater industry. A pre-denitrification and post-nitrification two-sludge system was proposed to treat high ammonium containing wastewater with low carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratios. In the system, pre-denitrification was adopted to use organic carbon in raw wastewater efficiently for nitrogen removal, while post-nitrification was adopted to achieve nitritation. System performa...

  9. First Synthesis of Uranyl Aluminate nano-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes, for the first time, a simple method for the synthesis of uranyl aluminate (URAL) nano-particles. URAL was prepared by U(VI) hydrolytic precipitation with ammonia at pH = 11 in the presence of meso-porous alumina MSU-X under 20 kHz of sonication followed by annealing of the obtained solids at 800 C. TEM, XAFS, powder XRD, and 27Al MAS NMR studies revealed that the speciation of uranium in this system strongly depends on uranium concentration. The sample with 5 wt % of uranium yields air-stable nano-particles (similar to 5 nm) of URAL. Presumably, UO22+ cations in this compound are coordinated with bidentate AlO2- groups. The increase of uranium concentration to 30 wt % causes mostly formation of U3O8 fine particles (similar to 50 nm) and small amounts of URAL. (authors)

  10. First Synthesis of Uranyl Aluminate nano-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chave, T.; Nikitenko, S. I. [UMII, ICSM, CEA, CNRS, ENSCM, Ctr Marcoule, UMR 5257, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Scheinost, A. C. [European Synchrotron Radiat Facil, Rossendorf Beamline CRG BM20, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Scheinost, A. C. [FZD, Inst Radiochem, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Berthon, C.; Arab-Chapelet, B.; Moisy, Ph. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DRCP, Ctr Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes, for the first time, a simple method for the synthesis of uranyl aluminate (URAL) nano-particles. URAL was prepared by U(VI) hydrolytic precipitation with ammonia at pH = 11 in the presence of meso-porous alumina MSU-X under 20 kHz of sonication followed by annealing of the obtained solids at 800 C. TEM, XAFS, powder XRD, and {sup 27}Al MAS NMR studies revealed that the speciation of uranium in this system strongly depends on uranium concentration. The sample with 5 wt % of uranium yields air-stable nano-particles (similar to 5 nm) of URAL. Presumably, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} cations in this compound are coordinated with bidentate AlO{sub 2}{sup -} groups. The increase of uranium concentration to 30 wt % causes mostly formation of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} fine particles (similar to 50 nm) and small amounts of URAL. (authors)

  11. On extraction of uranyl trichloroacetate with tri-n-butylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relationship between uranium distribution coefficient and salt concentration in an aqueous phase has been studied during the extraction of uranyl trichloroacetate with trbutylphosphate (TBP). Extraction has been performed at (25.00+-0.05)deg C in glass ampoules kept from light due to the tendency of salt to hydrolysis. The equilibrium between phases has been attained for 60 minutes. It is shown that UO2(CCl3COO)2 is extracted from aqueous solutions in TBP much better than UO2(NO3)2 in the concentration range of 0-0.3 mol/kg in the aqueous phase. Maximum value of the uranium distribution coefficient for UO2(CCl3OO)2 is about 90

  12. Complex formation between uranyl and various thiosemicarbazide derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuguryan, D.G.; Dzyubenko, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    Complex formation between hexavalent uranium and salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/L), salicylaldehyde S-methyl-isothiosemicarbazone (H/sub 2/Q), S-methyl-N/sub 1/,N/sub 4/-bis(salicylidene)isothiosemicarbazide(H/sub 2/Z), and thiosemicarbazidodiacetic acid (H/sub 2/R) has been studied spectrophotometrically in solution. Stability constants for complexes having the composition UO/sub 2/A have been calculated. Solid uranyl derivatives having the composition UO/sub 2/L x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Q x 2H/sub 2/O, UO/sub 2/Z x 2H/sub 2/O, and UO/sub 2/R x 2H/sub 2/O have been obtained. These derivatives were isolated and their IR spectroscopic behavior and thermal properties were investigated.

  13. Investigation of the Uranyl(II)-3-Hydroxyflavone complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the application of suitable spectrophotometric methods and pH-metric measurements it has been established that uranyl ion and 3-hydroxyflavone from a [UO2(C15H9O3)]+ complex. The concentration stability constant of the complex was determined by Bent-French's (β1 = 8,59 at pH = 3,5) and Bjerrum's (from 8,68 at pH = 4 to 6,14 at pH = 7) methods. Conditions are given for the spectrophotometric determination of 3-hydroxyflavone by means of the complex. The regression equation is calculated and the accuracy of the method is determined. All investigations were carried out with 80 % ethanolic solutions at room temperature (20 %), the spectrophotometric measurements being performed at a constant pH (3,5) and a constant ionic strength (0,01 M). (Authors)

  14. On thermal decomposition of double manganese and uranyl sulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal decomposition of MnUO2(SO4)2x5H2O was studied by differential thermal, thermogravimetric, and X-ray phase analysis. The parameters of rhombic unit cells of α-MnU3O10 a=6.563, b=3.790, c=8.273 A, Z=1; β-MnU3O10 - a=6.564, b=7.581, c=16.54 A, Z=4; (U,Mn)3O8 - a=6.389, b=11.32, c=8.262 A, Z=4; and MnUO4 - a=6.645, b=6.747, c=6.980 A, Z=4; space group Imam were determined. The interplane distances for anhydrous manganese sulphate and uranyl are given

  15. Investigation into uranyl sulfate crystallohydrate interaction with pyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The product of UO2SO4x2.5H2O interaction with pyridine is investigated. It is detected that as a result of interaction one of the aqueous molecules of band hydrate of uranyl sulfate is subjected to intramolecular dissociation with the formation of hydroxy compound and transfer of proton to pyridine. Protonated amine is kept in the structure of the compound investigated in the interlayer space by means of hydrogen bonds. The (PyH((UO2SO4xOHH2O) formula is prescribed to the complex prepared. The substance is characterized by the methods of chemical, X-ray phase, spectral and thermal analyses. Decomposition of the sulfate group is established to begin about 450 deg C with separation of pyridinium sulfate to the gaseous phase. Change in pyridinium and water molecule removal in thermal decomposition of the complex is discussed

  16. Reaction of gallocyanine methyl ester with uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of gallocyanine methyl ester with uranyl ions was studied spectrophotometrically in slightly acid or neutral solutions of 40% (m/m) ethanol. A violet complex of UO2L2 is formed at pH>5. The conditional stability constants of the complex in the pH range 6-7.4 and the equilibrium constants of the coordination reaction were derived from the concentration curves and the continuous variations curves. The optimum conditions were sought for the spectrophotometric determination of uranium based on the occurrence of the UO2L2 complex. The relative standard deviation obtained for a uranium concentration of 106 μg.l-1 was ssub(r)=2.13%. (author)

  17. Reaction of gallocyanine methyl ester with uranyl ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotoucek, M.; Hrbkova, M. (Palackeho Univ., Olomouc (Czechoslovakia). Prirodovedecka Fakulta)

    1984-09-01

    The reaction of gallocyanine methyl ester with uranyl ions was studied spectrophotometrically in slightly acid or neutral solutions of 40% (m/m) ethanol. A violet complex of UO/sub 2/L/sub 2/ is formed at pH>5. The conditional stability constants of the complex in the pH range 6-7.4 and the equilibrium constants of the coordination reaction were derived from the concentration curves and the continuous variations curves. The optimum conditions were sought for the spectrophotometric determination of uranium based on the occurrence of the UO/sub 2/L/sub 2/ complex. The relative standard deviation obtained for a uranium concentration of 106 ..mu..g.l/sup -1/ was ssub(r)=2.13%.

  18. Evaluation of lanthanide salts as alternative stains to uranyl acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogi, Naoki; Nishioka, Hideo; Nakakoshi, Masamichi

    2015-12-01

    Uranyl acetate (UAc) has been generally used not only as a superb staining reagent for ultrathin sections of plastic-embedded biological materials, but also as high-contrast negative stains for biological macromolecules such as particles of protein or virus. However, the use and purchase of radioactive UAc have been restricted. In this study, we determine the performance of ytterbium triacetate, lutetium triacetate, samarium triacetate and gadolinium triacetate as new staining reagents for biological electron microscopy. We observed chemically fixed spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves stained with these reagents. Ultrathin sections were stained with these reagents. Some of them were counterstained with lead citrate. The transmission electron microscopy contrast of spinach organelles was evaluated in sections exposed to the conventional stain and new stains. We show acetate salts of samarium, gadolinium, ytterbium and lutetium could be excellent substitutes for UAc for thin section staining and for negative staining. In addition, each reagent showed appreciable negative-staining effects. PMID:26374081

  19. Mutual solubility in the system uranyl trifluoroacetate--water--diethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovenko, V.M.; Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of mutual solubility in the system uranyl trifluoroacetate--water--diethyl ether at 25/sup 0/C. It was found that uranyl trifluoroacetate, like the trichloroacetate which was investigated previously, is extracted by diethyl ether much better than uranyl nitrate over a wide range of concentrations. The solubility of UO/sub 2/(CF/sub 3/COO)/sub 2/ in ether depends strongly on the water content of the system. While the anhydrous salt is practically insoluble, the addition of two H/sub 2/O molecules to a molecule of UO/sub 2/(CF/sub 3/COO)/sub 2/ leads to an increase in solubility to approximately 75 wt. percent. On the basis of the ir spectra of ether solutions of uranyl trifluoroacetate in the presence of semiheavy water (HDO) it was established that the hydration envelope of the complex in diethyl ether has a layer structure.

  20. On extraction of uranyl trifluoro- and monochloracetate with tri-n-butylphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studied is the distribution of uranyl trifluorine-and monochlorineacetate between the water phase and the tributylphosphate phase. It has been shown that UO2(CF3COO)2 can be extracted, when there are no salinators from diluted aqueous solutions (the maximum distribution coefficient, α, is approximately equal to 16), more effectively than uranyl nitrate (αmax approximately equal to 4), but less effectively than uranyl trichlorineacetate. The extraction capacity of UO2(Ch2ClCOO)2 is about the same at low salt concentration in the water phase as that of UO2(NO3)2 (αmax approximately equal to 3.5). It was found that the extraction row of anions changed in case of the extraction to TBP when there was a change of salt concentration in such a way that among the concentrated solutions the greatest distribution coefficient in the studied row of salts possessed uranyl monochlorineacetate

  1. The uranyl influence on a mutation process in germ and somatic cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutagenic effect of uranyl was revealed by the chromosome rearrangement test in germ and somatic cells of mice. The effect value depended on duration of substance administration into organism. (authors)

  2. Uranyl determination using pyridylazoresorcinol as complexing active by adsorb voltametry technique with cathodic redissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development method for uranyl ion determination by the optimization of chemical reaction and instrumental parameters is shown. This method is based on preconcentration stage, where in adsorptive accumulation of metallic complex in a static electrode is presented. (author)

  3. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry

  4. Electrochemical Studies on Uranyl Chloride Complexes in 1-Butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium Based Ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuhisa Ikeda; Katsuyuki Hiroe; Nobutaka Ohta; Masanobu Nogami; Atsushi Shirai [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology 2-12-1-N1-34 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Noriko Asanuma [Department of Energy Science and Engineering, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Sample solutions were prepared by dissolving UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}-nH{sub 2}O or Cs{sub 2}UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} into 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride (BMICl). Their UV-visible absorption spectra showed that uranyl species in BMICl exist as [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}]{sup 2-}. Cyclic voltammograms were measured using a glassy carbon working electrode, a platinum wire counter electrode, and an Ag/AgCl reference electrode with a liquid junction filled with BMIBF{sub 4} at 80 {+-} 1 deg. C in glove box under an Ar atmosphere. Peaks of one redox couple were observed at around -0.73 V and -0.65 V on both systems. Potential differences between two peaks ({delta}E{sub p}) at scan rates in the range of 10 to 50 mV/s are 70 - 80 mV, which are almost consistent with theoretical {delta}E{sub p} value (67 mV) for the reversible one electron transfer reaction at 80 deg. C. From these results, it is concluded that [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}]{sup 2-} in BMICl is reduced quasi-reversibly to [UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 4}]{sup 3-}. (authors)

  5. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  6. Ježekite, Na.sub.8./sub.[(UO.sub.2./sub.)(CO.sub.3./sub.).sub.3./sub.](SO.sub.4./sub.).sub.2./sub..3H.sub.2./sub.O, a new uranyl mineral from Jáchymov, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášil, Jakub; Hloušek, J.; Kasatkin, A.V.; Belakovskiy, D. I.; Čejka, J.; Chernyshov, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 60, č. 4 (2015), 259-267. ISSN 1802-6222 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-31276P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ježekite * new mineral * uranyl carbonate-sulfate * crystal structure * Jáchymov Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.405, year: 2014

  7. Chlorimetric studies on the chelation of uranyl ion with 2:4-dihydroxy acetophenone oxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a non-aqueous medium, uranyl ion forms an orange yellow complex with 2:4-dihydroxy acetophenone oxime (DHAO). The composition of the complex has been found to be UO2(DHAO)2. The stability constant of the complex was found to be 3.78x108 and the free energy formation ΔF=11.90K. cal at 300C. the phenolic hydrogen has been replaced by uranyl ion and coordinated through the oxime's nitrogen. (author)

  8. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of uranyl tungstates with electro-neutral structural units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two uranyl tungstates, (UO2)(W2O7)(H2O)3 (1) and (UO2)3(W2O8)F2(H2O)3 (2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 220 C and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 Crystallizes in space group Pbcm, a = 6.673(5) Aa, b = 12.601(11) Aa, c = 11.552 Aa; 2 is in C2/m, a = 13.648(1) Aa, b = 16.852(1) Aa, c = 9.832(1) Aa, β = 125.980(1) circle. In 1 the U(VI) cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions that are coordinated by five oxygen atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. These share two edges with two tungstate octahedra and single vertices with four additional octahedra, resulting in a sheet with the iriginite-type anion topology. Only water molecules are located in the interlayer. The structural units of 2 consist of (UO2)2+ uranyl oxy-fluoride pentagonal bipyramids present as either [UO2F2O3]-6 or [UO2FO4]-5, and strongly distorted tungstate octahedra. The linkage of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tungstate octahedra gives a unique sheet anion topology consisting of pentagons, squares and triangles. In 2, the uranyl tungstates sheets are connected into a novel electro-neutral three-dimensional framework through dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. These dimers connecting the sheets share an edge defined by F anions. 2 is the first example of a uranyl tungstate oxy-fluoride, and 1 and 2 are rare examples of uranyl compounds containing electro-neutral structural units.

  9. Critical experiments on STACY homogeneous core containing 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate criticality properties of low enriched uranyl nitrate solution treated in the reprocessing facility for LWR fuel cycle, systematic and high precision critical experiments have been performed at the Static Experiment Critical Facility, STACY since 1995. Criticality benchmark data on 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution for single core and multiple core systems have been accumulated using cylindrical and slab type core tanks. This paper overviews mains data and related criticality calculation results using standard criticality safety calculation code system. (author)

  10. Mutual solubility in the system uranyl trichloroacetate--water--diethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovenko, V.M.; Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of mutual solubility in the system uranyl trichloroacetate--water--diethyl ether at 25/sup 0/C. It was found that the solubility of the salt in ether and the composition of the lower phase depend on the water content of the ternary system. On the basis of ir spectra of ether solutions of uranyl trichloroacetate in the presence of semiheavy water (HDO) the structure of the hydration envelope of the complex in diethyl ether was established.

  11. Studies of crystalline water at low temperatures by selective laser excitation of impurity uranyl ion fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine-structure fluorescence spectrum of uranyl aqueous solution is obtained for the first time at low temperatures. It is established that the uranyl local surrounding in crystals of ice is characterized by low ordering, more typical for glasses. Temperature dependence of the width of the fluorescence resonance 0-0 line is measured. This dependence at temperatures above 20 K is described by interaction with phonons within the frames of the Debye model

  12. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of uranyl tungstates with electro-neutral structural units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Enviromental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2015-11-01

    Two uranyl tungstates, (UO{sub 2})(W{sub 2}O{sub 7})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1) and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(W{sub 2}O{sub 8})F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 220 C and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 Crystallizes in space group Pbcm, a = 6.673(5) Aa, b = 12.601(11) Aa, c = 11.552 Aa; 2 is in C2/m, a = 13.648(1) Aa, b = 16.852(1) Aa, c = 9.832(1) Aa, β = 125.980(1) {sup circle}. In 1 the U(VI) cations are present as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions that are coordinated by five oxygen atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. These share two edges with two tungstate octahedra and single vertices with four additional octahedra, resulting in a sheet with the iriginite-type anion topology. Only water molecules are located in the interlayer. The structural units of 2 consist of (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl oxy-fluoride pentagonal bipyramids present as either [UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sup -6} or [UO{sub 2}FO{sub 4}]{sup -5}, and strongly distorted tungstate octahedra. The linkage of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tungstate octahedra gives a unique sheet anion topology consisting of pentagons, squares and triangles. In 2, the uranyl tungstates sheets are connected into a novel electro-neutral three-dimensional framework through dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. These dimers connecting the sheets share an edge defined by F anions. 2 is the first example of a uranyl tungstate oxy-fluoride, and 1 and 2 are rare examples of uranyl compounds containing electro-neutral structural units.

  13. Uranyl coordination environment in hydrophobic ionic liquids: an in situ investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ann E; Jensen, Mark P; Laszak, Ivan; Nash, Kenneth L; Choppin, Gregory R; Rogers, Robin D

    2003-04-01

    Different inner-sphere coordination environments are observed for the uranyl nitrate complexes formed with octyl-phenyl-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide and tributyl phosphate in dodecane and in the hydrophobic ionic liquids (ILs) [C(4)mim][PF(6)] and [C(8)mim][N(SO(2)CF(3))(2)]. Qualitative differences in the coordination environment of the extracted uranyl species are implied by changes in peak intensity patterns and locations for uranyl UV-visible spectral bands when the solvent is changed. EXAFS data for uranyl complexes in dodecane solutions is consistent with hexagonal bipyramidal coordination and the existence of UO(2)(NO(3))(2)(CMPO)(2). In contrast, the complexes formed when uranyl is transferred from aqueous nitric acid solutions into the ILs exhibit an average equatorial coordination number of approximately 4.5. Liquid/liquid extraction results for uranyl in both ILs indicate a net stoichiometry of UO(2)(NO(3))(CMPO)(+). The concentration of the IL cation in the aqueous phase increases in proportion to the amount of UO(2)(NO(3))(CMPO)(+) in the IL phase, supporting a predominantly cation exchange mechanism for partitioning in the IL systems. PMID:12665350

  14. Effect of the temperature and oxalic acid in the uranyl sorption in zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the results of the temperature effect study are presented on uranyl solutions adsorbed on zirconium silicate (ZrSiO4) and also on the compounds formed in surface with oxalic acid. The adsorption isotherms of uranyl on hydrated zircon with NaClO4 0.5 M, show an increase of the uranyl sorption efficiency when increasing the temperature from 20 to 4 C with a sudden descent in this efficiency when changing the temperature at 60 C. The uranyl sorption efficiency increases to hydrate the zircon with a solution of oxalic acid 0.1 M, maintaining the same tendency regarding to the temperatures of the sorption in medium NaClO4 0.5 M. The complex formation in the zircon surface with organic acids of low molecular weight increases the fixation of the uranyl in solution due to the formation of ternary systems, in the order Zircon/A. Organic/Uranyl, without altering their response to the temperature. (Author)

  15. Temperature and pH driven association in uranyl aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Druchok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An association behavior of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions is explored. For this purpose a set of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is performed. During the simulation, the fractions of uranyl ions involved in dimer and trimer formations were monitored. To accompany the fraction statistics one also collected distributions characterizing average times of the dimer and trimer associates. Two factors effecting the uranyl association were considered: temperature and pH. As one can expect, an increase of the temperature decreases an uranyl capability of forming the associates, thus lowering bound fractions/times and vice versa. The effect of pH was modeled by adding H+ or OH- ions to a "neutral" solution. The addition of hydroxide ions OH- favors the formation of the associates, thus increasing bound times and fractions. The extra H+ ions in a solution produce an opposite effect, thus lowering the uranyl association capability. We also made a structural analysis for all the observed associates to reveal the mutual orientation of the uranyl ions.

  16. Geochemical constraints on mobility of uranyl ions in the palaeoproterozoic lithofacies associations of Jhamarkotra formation from Aravalli Supergroup of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ., 2005). On the basis of mineralization and 13C isotope geochemistry Jhamarkotra Formation can be divided into two domains. First domain can be characterized by the stromatolitic rockphosphates mineralization with normal d13C values and second domain with uranium mineralization with enriched d13C values. The positive correlation between uranium occurrences and positive d13C enrichment in the second domain indicates that the mobility of uranyl ions was influenced with the cause of d13C enrichment. Purohit et al., (2005) suggested that microenvironmental factors were responsible for d13C enrichment in the Jhamarkotra Formation. Emphasizing on the uranium bearing, second domain it is suggested that there are two sub-basins. The two sub-basins are divided on the basis of tectono-spatial relationship and depositional environment. One of the sub-basins is the isolated Umra sub-basin which is characterized by hypersaline evaporitic conditions of deposition. Later on the rocks of the sub-basin underwent upper green-schist facies metamorphism and boron metasomatism. Moderately high d13C values observed in the carbonate lithofacies are probably due to precipitation of carbonate under nonequilibrium hypersaline conditions. Umra sub-basin is in close affinity to Ahar River granite Archaean basement, which is the primary source of uranium. Hypersaline fluids generated in the basin represent exceptionally aggressive fluid for uranyl ion mobilization. These brines percolate not only at the base of the basin but also deeply in the basement. Hypersaline conditions led to increased uranyl ion mobility from the proximal basement in the sub-basin leading to accumulation of uranium minerals. The other sub-basin is tectonically designated as the Ghasiar-Karouli shelf-bank belt characterized by hyposaline conditions of deposition. The d13C values of carbonates in the sub-basin are characterized by wide range of values ranging from moderately negative to high positive. Archaeal methanogenesis

  17. Separation and recovery of molybdenum values from uranium process waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described of recovering molybdenum and uranium values from a process waste generated from the production of nuclear-grade uranium hexafluoride which consists of: (a) hydrolysing the process waste which contains UF6, MoF6 and MoOF4 in an aqueous solution containing ammonium carbonate and ammonium hydroxide thereby forming ammonium uranyl carbonate; (b) digesting while maintaining a pH > 9, the resulting mother liquor at a temperature of about 600-800C. to evolve CO2 and convert the ammonium uranyl carbonate to solid ammonium diuranate; (c) filtering, washing and drying the solid ammonium diuranate

  18. Phase equilibria at 25 degree C in the three-component system uranyl trichloroacetate-water-methylisobutylketone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of an investigation of the mutual solubility in the three-component system uranyl trichloroacetate-water-methylisobutylketone (MIBK) at 25 degree C. The resulting phase diagram is examined from the viewpoint of existing data for uranyl nitrate-water-organic solvent systems, including those with MIBK, in addition to analogous systems with uranyl trichloroacetate. Manifestations of anion effects during extraction by a hydrate-solvate mechanism are largely mediated through extractant properties

  19. Synthesis and Surface Active Properties of Cardanol-based Cyclic Carbonate and Its Quaternary Ammonium Salt Derivatives%腰果酚基环碳酸酯及其季铵盐衍生物的合成与表面活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘贵锋; 陈彩凤; 霍淑平; 孔振武

    2013-01-01

    以腰果酚环氧化物与CO2反应合成了新型腰果酚环碳酸酯及3种含氨基甲酸酯链段的季铵盐衍生物,并采用IR、1H NMR及13C NMR等方法表征了腰果酚环碳酸酯及其季铵盐衍生物的化学结构.研究了此类季铵盐衍生物的表面张力、乳化力、泡沫性能等,测定了产物的临界胶束浓度(CMC)及其饱和吸附量(Tmax)、最小分子截面积(Amin).实验结果表明,3种季铵盐衍生物水溶液的临界胶束浓度分别为8.55、6.97、11.93 mg/L,相应临界胶束浓度下的表面张力分别为26.67、25.32、38.92 mN/m,Гmax分别为0.384、0.345、0.217 mol/m2,Amin分别为4.3×10-6、4.81×10-6、7.65 × 10-6 nm2.产物乳化性能、起泡能力较强,泡沫稳定性好.%Three carbamate group-containing quaternary ammonium salt derivatives were synthesized from the novel biomass car-danol-based cyclic carbonate (C-CC) which was prepared by reaction of carbon dioxide with cardanol-based epoxides (C-E). The chemical structures of the novel cardanol-based cyclic carbonate, cardanol-based carbamate ( C-Ca) and its quaternary ammonium salt derivatives (C-QAS) were characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. Surface tension, emulsifying ability and the foaming power of the quaternary ammonium salt derivatives were investigated. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) , the surface excess concentration (Γmax) and the minimum surface area at the interface occupied by each molecule (Amin) were determined. The results showed that the critical micelle concentrations (CMC) of the three quaternary ammonium salt derivatives 'aqueous solutions were 8.55, 6.97 and 11.93 mg/L, respectively; the surface tensions of the three aqueous solutions at CMC were 26.67,25.32 and 38.92 mN/m, respectively; the Γmax of the three C-QAS were 0.384, 0.345 and 0. 217 mol/m2, respectively; the Amin of the three C-QAS were 4. 3 × 10-6 , 4. 81 × 10-6 and 7. 65 × 10-6 nm2, respectively; and the products with strong

  20. Evolution of Electrogenic Ammonium Transporters (AMTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Tami R; Ward, John M

    2016-01-01

    The ammonium transporter gene family consists of three main clades, AMT, MEP, and Rh. The evolutionary history of the AMT/MEP/Rh gene family is characterized by multiple horizontal gene transfer events, gene family expansion and contraction, and gene loss; thus the gene tree for this family of transporters is unlike the organismal tree. The genomes of angiosperms contain genes for both electrogenic and electroneutral ammonium transporters, but it is not clear how far back in the land plant lineage electrogenic ammonium transporters occur. Here, we place Marchantia polymorpha ammonium transporters in the AMT/MEP/Rh phylogeny and we show that AMTs from the liverwort M. polymorpha are electrogenic. This information suggests that electrogenic ammonium transport evolved at least as early as the divergence of bryophytes in the land plant lineage. PMID:27066024

  1. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  2. Uranium (VI) chemistry at the interface solution/minerals (quartz and aluminium hydroxide): experiments and spectroscopic investigations of the uranyl surface species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study deals with the understanding of the uranyl chemistry at the 0.1 M NaNO3 solution/mineral (quartz and aluminium hydroxide) interface. The aims are:(i) to identify and to characterize the different uranyl surface species (mononuclear, polynuclear complexes and/or precipitates...), i.e. the coordination environments of sorbed/precipitated uranyl ions, by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), and;(ii) to investigate the influence of pH, initial uranyl aqueous concentration and hydroxyl ligand concentration on the uranyl surface speciation. Our study on the speciation of uranyl ions at the quartz surface (i) confirms the formation of uranyl polynuclear/oligomers on quartz from moderate (1 μmol/m2) to high (26 μmol/m2) uranyl surface concentrations and (ii) show that theses polynuclear species coexist with uranyl mononuclear surface species over a pH range ≅ 5-8.5 and a wide range of initial uranyl concentration o f the solutions (10-100 μM). The uranyl concentration of these surface species depends on pH and on the initial uranyl aqueous concentration. Hydrate (surface-) precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species and monomeric uranyl surface complexes are formed on aluminium hydroxide. Uranyl mononuclear complexes are predominant at acidic pH, as well as uranyl in solution or on the surface. Besides mononuclear species, precipitates and/or adsorbed polynuclear species are predominantly formed at neutral pH values on aluminium hydroxide. A main contribution of our investigations is that precipitation and/or adsorption of polynuclear species seem to occur at low uranyl surface concentrations (0.01-0.4 μmol/m2). The uranyl surface speciation is mainly dependent on the pH and the aluminol ligand concentration. (author)

  3. The nucleation kinetics of ammonium metavanadate precipitated by ammonium chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guangchao; Sun, Zhaohui; Xian, Yong; Jing, Han; Chen, Haijun; Yin, Danfeng

    2016-05-01

    The nucleation kinetics of ammonium metavanadate (NH4VO3) was investigated under conditions of the simulated process for precipitation of NH4VO3 from the vanadium-containing solution. Induction periods for the nucleation of NH4VO3 were experimentally determined as a function of supersaturation at temperatures from 30 to 45 °C. Using the classical nucleation theory, the interfacial tension between NH4VO3 and supersaturated solution, the nucleation rate and critical radius of nucleus for the homogeneous nucleation of NH4VO3 were estimated. With temperature increasing, the calculated interfacial tension gradually decreased from 29.78 mJ/m2 at 30 °C to 23.66 mJ/m2 at 45 °C. The nucleation rate was found to proportionally increase but the critical radius of nucleus exponentially decreased, with increase in supersaturation ratio at a constant temperature. The activation energy for NH4VO3 nucleation was obtained from the relationship between temperature and induction period, ranging from 79.17 kJ/mol at S=25 to 115.50 kJ/mol at S=15. FT-IR and Raman spectrum indicated that the crystals obtained in the precipitation process were NH4VO3.

  4. Ammonium photo-production by heterocytous cyanobacteria: potentials and constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizeau, Dominique; Bui, Lan Anh; Dupré, Catherine; Legrand, Jack

    2016-08-01

    Over the last decades, production of microalgae and cyanobacteria has been developed for several applications, including novel foods, cosmetic ingredients and more recently biofuel. The sustainability of these promising developments can be hindered by some constraints, such as water and nutrient footprints. This review surveys data on N2-fixing cyanobacteria for biomass production and ways to induce and improve the excretion of ammonium within cultures under aerobic conditions. The nitrogenase complex is oxygen sensitive. Nevertheless, nitrogen fixation occurs under oxic conditions due to cyanobacteria-specific characteristics. For instance, in some cyanobacteria, the vegetative cell differentiation in heterocyts provides a well-adapted anaerobic microenvironment for nitrogenase protection. Therefore, cell cultures of oxygenic cyanobacteria have been grown in laboratory and pilot photobioreactors (Dasgupta et al., 2010; Fontes et al., 1987; Moreno et al., 2003; Nayak & Das, 2013). Biomass production under diazotrophic conditions has been shown to be controlled by environmental factors such as light intensity, temperature, aeration rate, and inorganic carbon concentration, also, more specifically, by the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the culture medium. Currently, there is little information regarding the production of extracellular ammonium by heterocytous cyanobacteria. This review compares the available data on maximum ammonium concentrations and analyses the specific rate production in cultures grown as free or immobilized filamentous cyanobacteria. Extracellular production of ammonium could be coupled, as suggested by recent research on non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria, to that of other high value metabolites. There is little information available regarding the possibility for using diazotrophic cyanobacteria as cellular factories may be in regard of the constraints due to nitrogen fixation. PMID:25613641

  5. Anaerobic ammonium oxidation by Nitrosomonas spp. and anammox bacteria in a sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lek Noophan, Pongsak; Sripiboon, Siriporn; Damrongsri, Mongkol; Munakata-Marr, Junko

    2009-02-01

    A sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was inoculated with mixed nitrifying bacteria from an anoxic tank at the conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment plant in Nongkhaem, Bangkok, Thailand. This enriched nitrifying culture was maintained under anaerobic conditions using ammonium (NH(4)(+)) as an electron donor and nitrite (NO(2)(-)) as an electron acceptor. Autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria survived under these conditions. The enrichment period for anammox culture was over 100 days. Both ammonium and nitrite conversion rates were proportional to the biomass of ammonium oxidizing bacteria; rates were 0.08 g N/gV SS/d and 0.05 g N/g VSS/d for ammonium and nitrite, respectively, in a culture maintained for 3 months at 42 mg N/L ammonium. The nitrogen transformation rate at a ratio of NH(4)(+)-N to NO(2)(-)-N of 1:1.38 was faster, and effluent nitrogen levels were lower, than at ratios of 1:0.671, 1:2.18, and 1:3.05. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to identify specific autotrophic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (Nitrosomonas spp., Candidatus Brocadia anammoxidans, and Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis). The ammonium oxidizing culture maintained at 42 mg N/L ammonium was enriched for Nitrosomonas spp. (30%) over Candidati B. anammoxidans and K. stuttgartiensis (2.1%) while the culture maintained at 210 mg N/L ammonium was dominated by Candidati B. anammoxidans and K. stuttgartiensis (85.6%). The specific nitrogen removal rate of anammox bacteria (0.6 g N/g anammox VSS/d) was significantly higher than that of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (0.4 g N/g Nitrosomonas VSS/d). Anammox bacteria removed up to 979 mg N/L/d of total nitrogen (ammonium:nitrite concentrations, 397:582 mg N/L). These results suggest significant promise of this approach for application to wastewater with high nitrogen but low carbon content, such as that found in Bangkok. PMID:18423965

  6. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Rapid Screening of Uranyl Affine Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive immunoassay based on SPR analysis was developed to measure uranyl cation (UO22+) affinity for any protein in a free state under physiological conditions. The technique involves immobilization of a specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) raised against UO22+ and 1, 10-phenanthroline-2, 9-dicarboxylic acid (DCP) used as a probe of UO22+ captured by the mAb. Calibration curves were established for accurate determination of UO22+ concentrations with a detection limit of 7 nM. The remaining free UO22+ could be accurately quantified from the different protein-metal equilibrium and a dose-response curve established for KD determination. This generic method was applied not only to proteins such as transferrin and albumin but also to small phosphonated ligands. Its robustness allows the fast UO22+ KD determination of any kind of macromolecules and small ligands using very few amount of compounds, thus opening new prospects in the field of uranium toxicity. (authors)

  7. Ultrastructural and metabolic changes in osteoblasts exposed to uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to uranium is an occupational hazard to workers who continually handle uranium and an environmental risk to the population at large. Since the cellular and molecular pathways of uranium toxicity in osteoblast cells are still unknown, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the adverse effects of uranyl nitrate (UN) on osteoblasts both in vivo and in vitro. Herein we studied the osteoblastic ultrastructural changes induced by UN in vivo and analyzed cell proliferation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase (APh) activity in osteoblasts exposed to various UN concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 μM) in vitro. Cell proliferation was quantified by means of the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, ROS was determined using the nitro blue tetrazolium test, apoptosis was morphologically determined using Hoechst 3332 and APh activity was assayed spectrophotometrically. Electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructure of active and inactive osteoblasts exposed to uranium presented cytoplasmic and nuclear alterations. In vitro, 1-100 μM UN failed to modify cell proliferation ratio and to induce apoptosis. ROS generation increased in a dose-dependent manner in all tested doses. APh activity was found to decrease in 1-100 μM UN-treated cells vs. controls. Our results show that UN modifies osteoblast cell metabolism by increasing ROS generation and reducing APh activity, suggesting that ROS may play a more complex role in cell physiology than simply causing oxidative damage. (orig.)

  8. Removal of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions using barium titanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remediation of water sources contaminated with radioactive waste products is a major environmental issue that demands new and more efficient technologies. For this purpose, we report a highly efficient ion-exchange material for the removal of radioactive nuclides from aqueous solutions. The kinetic characteristics of adsorption of uranyl ions on the surface of barium titanate were investigated using a spectrophotometric method under a wide range of conditions. By controlling the pH it was possible to exert fine control over the speciation of uranium, and by optimizing the temperature and grain size of the exchanger, almost total removal was achieved in a matter of just hours. The highest efficiency (>90 % removal) was realized at high temperature (80 deg C). Moreover, the effect of competitive ion adsorption from a range of different cations and anions was quantified. Adsorption was found to follow first-order kinetics and both Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms could be applied to this system. The results of a mathematical treatment of the kinetic data combined with the observation that adsorption was independent of stirring speed and dependent on the ion-exchanger grain size, indicate that the dominant mechanism influencing adsorption is particle spreading. The adsorption behavior was not influenced by exposure to high-intensity gamma radiation, indicating potential for use of this ion-exchanger in systems containing radioactive material. These results will be of use in the development of uranium extraction systems for contaminated water sources. (author)

  9. Tritium gettering from air with hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The managers of all tritium facilities now worry about their emissions into the atmosphere. The only method for cleaning tritium out of air is to catalyze the formation of tritiated water which is adsorbed, along with the overwhelming bulk of naturally occurring water vapor, on a zeolite molecular sieve. This method generally costs several million dollars for a small system, because of the necessary steel ducting, compressors and holding tanks. We have long had the dream of finding another getter that might be cheaper to use and would, hopefully, not make tritiated water (HTO). In a previous paper, we discovered that hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP, with the formula HUO2PO4 x 4H2O) getters 1 ppM of tritium gas out of moist air. This makes HUP the first known ''direct'' tritium getter to work in air. However, the tritium enters a hydroxyl network within the HUP, so that it is effectively still in ''water'' form within the HUP. Worse yet, we found up to 10% tritiated water formed during the previous gettering experiments. HUP is unusual in possessing the exceptionally low vapor pressure of 0.6 torr water vapor at 2980K. This allows HUP to be used in fairly dry environments. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Ultrastructural and metabolic changes in osteoblasts exposed to uranyl nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasat, D.R. [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Pcia de Bs.As. (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Orona, N.S. [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Pcia de Bs.As. (Argentina); Mandalunis, P.M. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cabrini, R.L. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Radiobiologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ubios, A.M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Radiobiologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-05-15

    Exposure to uranium is an occupational hazard to workers who continually handle uranium and an environmental risk to the population at large. Since the cellular and molecular pathways of uranium toxicity in osteoblast cells are still unknown, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the adverse effects of uranyl nitrate (UN) on osteoblasts both in vivo and in vitro. Herein we studied the osteoblastic ultrastructural changes induced by UN in vivo and analyzed cell proliferation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase (APh) activity in osteoblasts exposed to various UN concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 {mu}M) in vitro. Cell proliferation was quantified by means of the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, ROS was determined using the nitro blue tetrazolium test, apoptosis was morphologically determined using Hoechst 3332 and APh activity was assayed spectrophotometrically. Electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructure of active and inactive osteoblasts exposed to uranium presented cytoplasmic and nuclear alterations. In vitro, 1-100 {mu}M UN failed to modify cell proliferation ratio and to induce apoptosis. ROS generation increased in a dose-dependent manner in all tested doses. APh activity was found to decrease in 1-100 {mu}M UN-treated cells vs. controls. Our results show that UN modifies osteoblast cell metabolism by increasing ROS generation and reducing APh activity, suggesting that ROS may play a more complex role in cell physiology than simply causing oxidative damage. (orig.)

  11. Adsorption of uranyl in SiO2 porous glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitreous SiO2 porous matrices can be used in many applications involving the uptake of chemical species on its solid surface. In this work, vitreous silica sponges were prepared from a sodium borosilicate glass manufactured in our laboratory. The product obtained was then separated into phases with subsequent leaching of the soluble phase rich in B and Na. The resulting porous matrices have a specific surface of 35 m2/gr. Adsorption of uranyl ions onto the SiO2 porous surface was studied to evaluate the use of this material as a filter for treatment of uranium containing water. The effects of contact time, adsorbent mass and equilibrium concentration of solution were studied. The porous adsorbent exhibits a pseudo-second-order kinetic behavior. The sponges with adsorbed uranium were thermally sealed as a way of U immobilization. Retention of uranium was confirmed during the matrix sealing by TGA. Uranium concentration before and after adsorption tests were made by means of ICP-OES. For uranium concentration of 800 ppm, 72 hours contact time and pH of 3.5, the amount of uranium adsorbed was 21.06 ± 0.02 mg U per gram of vitreous porous SiO2. (author)

  12. Status Update: Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful completion of a field trial of safeguards monitoring equipment at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) demonstrated the need for a facility in which to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of safeguards systems at additional plants. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in an NUCP. In addition to calibrating instruments such as the neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, UNCLE will be used to test other in-line instruments (mass and volumetric flowmeters, spectrophotometers, etc.). UNCLE will be able to test commercially available equipment, such as the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter that was used in the field test and other equipment that is presently under development. UNCLE is designed to accommodate different pipe sizes, flow rates, solution concentrations, and other variables of interest. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of September 2008 with initial testing beginning later that year. The design and current status of UNCLE will be presented, along with the capabilities of the facility and the proposed test plans.

  13. Dehydration of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to Uranyl Nitrate Trihydrate under Ambient Conditions as Observed via Dynamic Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-05-22

    the hexahydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] (UNH) and the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3] (UNT) forms. Their stabilities depend on both relative humidity and temperature. Both phases have previously been studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but the data were limited by both instrumental resolution and the ability to prepare the samples as pellets without desiccating them. We report time-resolved infrared (IR) measurements using an integrating sphere that allow us to observe the transformation from the hexahydrate to the trihydrate simply by flowing dry nitrogen gas over the sample. Hexahydrate samples were prepared and confirmed via known XRD patterns, then measured in reflectance mode. The hexahydrate has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample dehydrates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a blue edge shoulder but ultimately resulting in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT since UNT has two non-equivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a morphological and structural change that has the lustrous lime green crystals changing to the dull greenish yellow of the trihydrate. Crystal structures and phase transformation were confirmed theoretically using DFT calculations and experimentally via microscopy methods. Both methods showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, as opposed to a single crystallographic site in the hexahydrate.

  14. Structure and Reactivity of X-ray Amorphous Uranyl Peroxide, U2O7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoh, Samuel O; Shamblin, Jacob; Colla, Christopher A; Hickam, Sarah; Lobeck, Haylie L; Lopez, Rachel A K; Olds, Travis; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Sigmon, Ginger E; Neuefeind, Joerg; Casey, William H; Lang, Maik; Gagliardi, Laura; Burns, Peter C

    2016-04-01

    Recent accidents resulting in worker injury and radioactive contamination occurred due to pressurization of uranium yellowcake drums produced in the western U.S.A. The drums contained an X-ray amorphous reactive form of uranium oxide that may have contributed to the pressurization. Heating hydrated uranyl peroxides produced during in situ mining can produce an amorphous compound, as shown by X-ray powder diffraction of material from impacted drums. Subsequently, studtite, [(UO2)(O2)(H2O)2](H2O)2, was heated in the laboratory. Its thermal decomposition produced a hygroscopic anhydrous uranyl peroxide that reacts with water to release O2 gas and form metaschoepite, a uranyl-oxide hydrate. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the most stable U2O7 conformer consists of two bent (UO2)(2+) uranyl ions bridged by a peroxide group bidentate and parallel to each uranyl ion, and a μ2-O atom, resulting in charge neutrality. A pair distribution function from neutron total scattering supports this structural model, as do (1)H- and (17)O-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The reactivity of U2O7 in water and with water in air is higher than that of other uranium oxides, and this can be both hazardous and potentially advantageous in the nuclear fuel cycle. PMID:26974702

  15. Kinetic studies of uranyl ion adsorption on acrylonitrile (AN) / polyethylene glycol (PEG) interpenetrating networks (IPN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of the adsorption of uranyl ions on amidoximated acrylonitrile (AN)/ polyethylene glycol (PEG) interpenetrating network (IPNs) from aqueous solutions was studied as a function of time and temperature. Adsorption analyses were performed for definite uranyl ion concentrations of 1x10-2M and at four different temperatures as 290K, 298K, 308K and 318K. Adsorption time was increased from zero to 48 hours. Adsorption capacities of uranyl ions by PEG/AN IPNS were determined by gamma spectrometer. The results indicate that adsorption capacity increases linearly with increasing temperature. The max adsorption capacity was found as 602 mgu/g IPN at 308K. Adsorption rate was evaluated from the curve plotted of adsorption capacity versus time, for each temperature. Rate constants for uranyl ions adsorption on amidoximated ipns were calculated for 290K, 298K, 308K and 318K at the solution concentration of 1x10-2M . The results showed that as the temperature increases the rate constant increases exponentially too. The mean activation energy of uranyl ions adsorption was found as 34.6 kJ/mole by using arrhenius equation. (author)

  16. Electron microscopy studies of natural and synthetic zeolites impregnated with uranyl dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text. The use of Y zeolite and erionite to remove uranyl dioxide ions from aqueous solution is focussed on catalysis and energy transfer problems but it can be oriented to recovery uranyl dioxide ions, among other radioactive compounds. The samples impregnated with uranyl dioxide at several concentrations and contact times were studied using conventional, high resolution and scanning electron microscopy in order to detect changes as consequence of contact with a radioactive material and to verify mechanical stability of zeolites. Also X ray diffraction, thermal analysis, neutron activation were used to characterize the samples at several steps of treatment. The crystallinity of zeolites was maintained only when using dilute uranyl nitrate solution (up to 0.0100 N for y zeolite and 0.0300 N for erionite). The samples impregnated with highest nitrate concentrations partially lost their crystallinity. From selected area electron diffraction pattern, lattice parameter variations were detected and from high resolution electron microscopy localization of uranyl ions in and on zeolite structure was determined. Surface modification in zeolites was observed by scanning electron microscopy just for samples with long contact time with radioactive solutions. (author)

  17. Synthesis of uranyl ion imprinted polymer and its application in analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl ion imprinted polymer beads were prepared by the copolymerization of styrene monomer and divinyl benzene as crosslinking agent in methanol solution,with the UO22+-o-dihydroxybenzene-4-vinyl pyridine ternary complex as template, the 2, 2'-azo-bis-isobutyronitrile as initiator and UO22+ as the imprinting ion. The uranyl ions were removed from the polymer beads by treating with 6 mol/L HCl, leaving behind cavities that match uranyl ion in size. The treated polymer beads can preconcentrate uranyl ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The adsorption efficiency can reach 99% or above with good selectivity when pH is in the range of 5-7 and the adsorption time is more than 20 min. The elution rate can reach above 99% under the conditions of concentration of HCl being above 1.0 mol/L, elution time more than 20 min and the elution Janume more than 5 times the Janume of ion imprinted polymer. The uranyl ion imprinted polymer beads have been successfully applied to determine micro-uranium in brine samples. The results are satisfactory compared with NBS method.(authors)

  18. Adsorption of uranyl ion by chelate-type adsorbent with amidoxime and amidoxime/carboxyl group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Uranium recovery from seawater is important for security of future energy supply. The main difficulty in the recovery process arises from the low concentration (∼3 ppb) of the uranyl ion in seawater, whereas other metal ions are abundantly present. Thus, development of selective adsorbents with a high adsorption rate and a large adsorption capacity is essential for the economic recovery uranyl ion. The polymeric adsorbents containing the amidoxime group are mostly promising, but information on their adsorption characterization in the presence of other abundantly metal ions such as sodium, calcium, etc. is still insufficient. In order to obtain uranium from seawater, the resins with amidoxime and amidoxime/carboxylic acid group were prepared by radiation-induced polymerization of aclylonitrile (AN) and AN/acrylic acid and by the subsequent amidoximation of cyano group of poly(AN), respectively. The resins with amidoxime and amidoxime/carboxylic acid groups were characterized by FT-IR, FT-Raman, solid state 13C-NMR, SEM, thermal (TGA/DSC) analysis, and elemental analysis, respectively. The adsorption of uranyl ion was examined. In resin with amidoxime group, the uranyl uptake increased with increasing amidoxime content. The adsorption rate of uranyl ion by resin with amidoxime/carboxylic acid was higher than that of resin with amidoxime group

  19. Electrochemically and bioelectrochemically induced ammonium recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildemyn, Sylvia; Luther, Amanda K; Andersen, Stephen J; Desloover, Joachim; Rabaey, Korneel

    2015-01-01

    Streams such as urine and manure can contain high levels of ammonium, which could be recovered for reuse in agriculture or chemistry. The extraction of ammonium from an ammonium-rich stream is demonstrated using an electrochemical and a bioelectrochemical system. Both systems are controlled by a potentiostat to either fix the current (for the electrochemical cell) or fix the potential of the working electrode (for the bioelectrochemical cell). In the bioelectrochemical cell, electroactive bacteria catalyze the anodic reaction, whereas in the electrochemical cell the potentiostat applies a higher voltage to produce a current. The current and consequent restoration of the charge balance across the cell allow the transport of cations, such as ammonium, across a cation exchange membrane from the anolyte to the catholyte. The high pH of the catholyte leads to formation of ammonia, which can be stripped from the medium and captured in an acid solution, thus enabling the recovery of a valuable nutrient. The flux of ammonium across the membrane is characterized at different anolyte ammonium concentrations and currents for both the abiotic and biotic reactor systems. Both systems are compared based on current and removal efficiencies for ammonium, as well as the energy input required to drive ammonium transfer across the cation exchange membrane. Finally, a comparative analysis considering key aspects such as reliability, electrode cost, and rate is made. This video article and protocol provide the necessary information to conduct electrochemical and bioelectrochemical ammonia recovery experiments. The reactor setup for the two cases is explained, as well as the reactor operation. We elaborate on data analysis for both reactor types and on the advantages and disadvantages of bioelectrochemical and electrochemical systems. PMID:25651406

  20. The first uranyl-lanthanide hetero metallic complexes: metal-organic frameworks with DOTA and oxalato ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction of uranyl and lanthanide nitrates with DOTA (H4L) under hydrothermal conditions gave the first uranyl-lanthanide hetero metallic complexes, [(UO2)2Ln(L)(C2O4)(OH)(H2O)]· 3H2O [Ln = Gd (1) or Eu (2)]. (author)

  1. Evaluation of quaternary ammonium halides for removal of methyl iodide from flowing air streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quaternary ammonium halides of several tertiary amines were used as impregnants on activated carbon and were tested for methyl iodide penetration in accordance with test Method A, ASTM D3803, 1979, ''Standard Test Methods for Radio-iodine Testing of Nuclear Grade Gas Phase Adsorbents''. The results suggest that the primary removal mechanism for methyl iodide-131 is isotopic exchange with the quaternary ammonium halide. For example, a 5 wt% impregnation of each of the tetramethyl, tetraethyl, tetrapropyl and tetrabutyl ammonium iodides on activated carbon yielded percent penetrations of 0.47, 0.53, 0.78, and 0.08 respectively when tested according to Method A of ASTM D3803. A sample impregnated with 5% tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide gave a methyl iodide penetration of 64.87%, thus supporting the isotopic exchange mechanism for removal. It has been a generally held belief that the success of tertiary amines as impregnants for radioiodine removal is a result of their ability to complex with the methyl iodide. The results of the work indicates that the superiority of the tertiary amines similar to triethylene diamine and quinuclidine, when compared to their straight chain analogs, is a result of their ease in reacting with methyl iodide-127 to form the quaternary ammonium iodide followed by isotopic exchange

  2. Isolation and identification of bacteria responsible for simultaneous anaerobic ammonium and sulfate removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation is a novel biological reaction,in which ammonium is oxidized with sulfate as the electron acceptor under anoxic conditions.Ammonium and sulfate are cosmopolitan chemical species which are an integral part of the global nitrogen and sulfur cycles.A detailed exploration of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation is quite practical.In this work,a bacterial strain named ASR has been isolated from an anaerobic ammonia and sulfate removing reactor working under steady-state.On the basis of electron microscopy,physiological tests and 16S rDNA phylogenetic sequence analysis,the strain ASR is found to be related to Bacillus benzoevorans.According to the biological carbon source utilization test,the strain ASR could use many carbon sources.Its optimum pH value and temperature were 8.5 and 30 °C,respectively.The test proves that the strain ASR is able to use sulfate to oxidize ammonia anaerobically.The maximum ammonia and sulfate removal rates were 44.4% and 40.0%,respectively.The present study provided biological evidence for the confirmation and development of sulfate-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation and brought new insights into the global nitrogen and sulfur cycles.

  3. Photocontrolled selective isolation of uranyl cation from aqueous solution onto a photo-responsive Langmuir-Blodgett film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We applied a photo-responsive Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film to selective isolation of uranyl cation from aqueous solutions. Uranyl cation was isolated onto a quartz plate covered with 5-octadecyloxy-2-(2-pyridylazo)phenol (PARC18) LB film which possesses the potential to form a complex with transition metal cations. The isolation process could be switched on by photoillumination. On the other hand, lanthanides (La, Ce, Nd, Gd, Er and Yb) were hardly isolated onto this film. Therefore, it was suggested that uranyl can selectively be collected from mixed solutions containing uranyl and lanthanides and that this process can be controlled by photoillumination. Detection limit of uranyl concentration in this system was also determined to be about 1.5 ppb. (author)

  4. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study of the uranyl behaviour at the gibbsite/water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lectez, Sébastien; Roques, Jérôme; Salanne, Mathieu; Simoni, Eric

    2012-10-01

    The uranyl cation UO22+ adsorption on the basal face of gibbsite is studied via Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics. In a first step, we study the water sorption on a gibbsite surface. Three different sorption modes are observed and their hydrogen bond patterns are, respectively, characterized. Then we investigate the sorption properties of an uranyl cation, in the presence of water. In order to take into account the protonation state of the (001) gibbsite face, both a neutral (001) face and a locally deprotonated (001) face are modeled. In the first case, three adsorbed uranyl complexes (1 outer sphere and 2 inner spheres) with similar stabilities are identified. In the second case, when the gibbsite face is locally deprotonated, two adsorbed complexes (1 inner sphere and 1 outer one) are characterized. The inner sphere complex appears to be the most strongly linked to the gibbsite face.

  5. Sorption of uranyl and thorium(IV) ions by dodecavanadium acid from diluted nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of uranyl by dodecavanadium acid (DDVA) proceeds according to ion exchange mechanism in the region of relatively low values of its concentration - (0.8-2.0) x 10-3 mol/l. Th(IV) sorption practically not depends on solution pH value in interval of pH 1.5-2.5 and changes significantly in dependence on its initial concentration. Maximal values of DDVA capacity differ for Th(IV) and UO22+ (9 and 6.3 mg-equi/g) respectively. X-ray phase analysis establishes the composition of uranyl compounds obtained during DDVA contact with concentrated solutions of uranyl nitrate that is UO2(VO3)2·nH2O

  6. Time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of trace uranyl in wet sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the project was to develop a technique to observe and characterize the behaviour of uranium in unsaturated groundwater flow systems, particularly with regard to unstable ''fingered'' flow, which could drastically reduce time of travel. The actual experimental work described was a study of the feasibility of detecting uranyl at the parts-per-billion level in aqueous solution by means of its luminescence spectrum. A high-power UV laser was used to excite aqueous uranyl in a wet sand mixture; the characteristic green phosphorescence emitted in the decay transition was detected by a photomultiplier tube; and the amplified signal was sent to an oscilloscope in communication with Macintosh data acquisition software. At the time of the conference, a more sophisticated sample configuration for imaging the flow of uranyl was already under development. 5 refs., 3 figs

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles with an imprinted polymer coating for the selective extraction of uranyl ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have synthesized ferromagnetic nanoparticles with an imprinted polymer coating that is capable of adsorbing and extracting uranyl ions. The adsorbent was characterized using infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of sample pH, sample volume, weight of the adsorbent, contact time and of other ions have been investigated in the batch extraction mode. The performance of the material was compared to that of particles coated with a non-imprinted polymer. The adsorbent containing the imprinted coating displays higher sorption capacity and better selectivity to uranyl ions. The method was successfully applied to the determination of uranyl ions in water samples. (author)

  8. Contribution to the study of uranyl salts in butyl phosphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spectroscopic study in the normal infrared region and involving the following associations: tri-alkyl phosphates (tri-butyl, tri-ethyl, tri-methyl), uranyl salts (nitrate, chloride, acetate) has confirmed the existence of an interaction between the phosphoryl group and the uranium atom, as shown by a movement of absorption band for the valency P = 0 from ∼ 1270 cm-1 to ∼ 1180 cm-1. A study of the preparation, analysis and spectroscopy of the solids obtained by the precipitation of uranyl salts by acid butyl phosphates has been carried out. By infrared spectrophotometry it has been shown that the tri-butyl and di-butyl phosphates are associated in non-polar diluents even before the uranium is introduced. The extraction of uranyl salts from acid aqueous solutions by a diluted mixture of tri-butyl and di-butyl phosphates proceeds by different mechanisms according to the nature of the ion (nitrate or chloride). (author)

  9. Copper(I) and copper(II) uranyl heterometallic hybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zhehui; Zhang, Zhi-hui; Olds, Travis; Sterniczuk, Marcin; Burns, Peter C

    2014-08-01

    Two copper-uranium heterometallic compounds, [(UO2)3Cu(II)O2(C6NO2)5] (1) and [(UO2)Cu(I)(C6NO2)3] (2), have been synthesized by the reaction of uranyl acetate with copper salts in the presence of isonicotinic acid. Both compounds have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, Raman, and UV-vis spectroscopy. In compound 1, interactions between copper and uranium centers occur and result in a three-dimensional pillar layered structure. Compound 1 is also the first example of a heterometallic uranyl organic framework with a trinuclear U3O18 building block. Compound 2 is the first uranyl organic framework that contains monovalent copper, which arises from the reaction of Cu(II) chloride and is assumed to be due to the oxidation of chloride at low pH. PMID:25029287

  10. Acceptor extraction of uranyl salts with mixtures of organophosphoric acids with neutral additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium solvent extraction by mixtures of organophosphoric acids (HX) with neutral additives (L) (phosphine oxides, sulfoxides, tbp) excibits, along with the widely known synergic effect at low HX saturation with uranium, a new synergic effect occurring after complete HX saturation. Three types of isotherms of uranyl salt extraction by benzene solutions of HX and mixtures of HX with L were revealed. Their forms depend on superposition of cation-exchange and noncation-exchange synergic effects. Similarity of synergic effect of acid and neutral mixture components during solvent extraction from diluted and concentrated solutions of uranyl salts testified to the same nature of these two effects; both of them are determined by acceptor properties of uranium atom in monomeric UO2(HX2)2 and polymeric (UO2X2)p complexes. The established reqularities were confirmed, when studying uranyl sulfate extraction by UO2X2 mixture with L

  11. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  12. Characterization of osteopontin-uranyl interaction: role of multiple phosphorylations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While some metals are essential for Life, other ones are only toxicants for living organisms, tolerated below well-definite concentrations. This is the case for uranium, a natural element which has no known biological function. It is a low α emitter and its chemical toxicity rather than its radiological toxicity is a subject of concern. Once in the body, this metal reaches the blood and accumulates in the bones under the action of unknown mechanisms. Uranium mainly exists in form of uranyl ion (UO22+) in aqueous media and particularly reacts with carboxylates, phenolates and phosphates of the proteins. Previous studies have highlighted that UO22+ modulates the SPP1 expression, a gene which codes for osteopontin (OPN). This highly phosphorylated glycoprotein plays an important role in bone homeostasis. This role and its biochemical properties led us to hypothesize that OPN might be a potential target of UO22+ and involved in its accumulation in bones. A simple and original purification process was optimized to produce very highly purified OPN starting from human and bovine milk. Various biophysical approaches were set up and confirmed that both bovine and human OPN display very high affinity for UO22+. Moreover, the formation of stable UO2-protein complexes originating from structural changes was evidenced. The major role of phosphorylations, both on the OPN's affinity for UO22+ and the stability of the UO2-protein complexes, was confirmed. These results demonstrate that OPN presents all the characteristics to be a major UO22+ binding-protein in vitro, and they open new insights in the understanding of the UO22+ mineralization process mechanisms. (author)

  13. Multispecies diffusion models: A study of uranyl species diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigorous numerical description of multi-species diffusion requires coupling of species, charge, and aqueous and surface complexation reactions that collectively affect diffusive fluxes. The applicability of a fully coupled diffusion model is, however, often constrained by the availability of species self-diffusion coefficients, as well as by computational complication for imposing charge conservation. In this study, several diffusion models with variable complexity in charge and species coupling were formulated and compared to describe reactive multi-species diffusion in groundwater. Diffusion of uranyl (U(VI)) species was used as an example in demonstrating the effectiveness of the models in describing multi-species diffusion. Numerical simulations found that a diffusion model with a single, common diffusion coefficient for all species was sufficient to describe multi-species U(VI) diffusion under steady-state condition of major chemical composition, but not under transient chemical conditions. Simulations revealed that a fully coupled diffusion model can be well approximated by a component-based diffusion model, which considers difference in diffusion coefficients between chemical components, but not between the species within each chemical component. This treatment significantly enhanced computational efficiency at the expense of minor charge conservation. The charge balance in the component-based diffusion model can be rigorously enforced, if necessary, by adding an artificial kinetic reaction term induced by the charge separation. The diffusion models were applied to describe U(VI) diffusive mass transfer in intragranular domains in two sediments collected from US Department of Energy's Hanford 300A where intragrain diffusion is a rate-limiting process controlling U(VI) adsorption and desorption. The grain-scale reactive diffusion model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption/desorption kinetics that has been described using a semi-empirical, multi-rate model

  14. Structure and vibrational spectra of uranyl dinitrate complexes with water and DMSO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural models were designed and spectral characteristics were computed based on DFT calculations for uranyl dinitrate complexes with H2O and DMSO [UO2(NO3)2×2DMSO, UO2(NO3)2×2H2O×2DMSO, UO2(NO3)2×2H2O×4DMSO]. Vibrational IR and Raman spectra of UO2(NO3)2×2DMSO were interpreted using models for bidentate and monodentate coordination of nitrate ions to uranyl. Several spectral signatures that characterized DMSO complexation in the second coordination sphere were identified and had analytical significance. (authors)

  15. Synthesis, structure, and spectroscopic characterization of three uranyl phosphates with unique structural units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of Zn4(OH)2[(UO2)(PO4)2(OH)2(H2O)] (UZnP), Cs[(UO2)(HPO4)NO3] (UCsP), and In3[(UO2)2(PO4)4OH(H2O)6].2H2O (UInP) were obtained from hydrothermal reactions and have been structurally and chemically characterized. UZnP crystallizes in space group Pbcn, a=8.8817(7), b=6.6109(5), c=19.569(1) Å; UCsP crystallizes in P−1, a=7.015(2), b=7.441(1), c=9.393(2) Å, α=72.974(2), β=74.261(2), γ=79.498(2); and UInP crystallizes in P−1, a=7.9856(5), b=9.159(1), c=9.2398(6) Å α=101.289(1), β=114.642(1), γ=99.203(2). The U6+ cations are present as (UO2)2+ uranyl ions coordinated by five O atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. The structural unit in UZnP is a finite cluster containing a uranyl pentagonal bipyramid that shares corners with two phosphate tetrahedra. The structural unit in UCsP is composed of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with one chelating nitrate group that are linked into chains by three bridging hydrogen phosphate tetrahedra. In UInP, the structural unit contains pairs of edge-sharing uranyl pentagonal bipyramids with two chelating phosphate tetrahedra that are linked into chains through two bridging phosphate tetrahedra. Indium octahedra link these uranyl phosphate chains into a 3-dimensional framework. All three compounds exhibit unique structural units that deviate from the typical layered structures observed in uranyl phosphate solid-state chemistry. - Graphical abstract: Three new uranyl phosphates with unique structural units are reported. ▪ Highlights: ► Three new uranyl phosphates have been synthesized hydrothermally. ► Single crystal analyses reveal unique structural units. ► The dimensionality of these compounds deviate from typical U6+ layered structures

  16. K8(K5F)U6Si8O40: An Intergrowth Uranyl Silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Gregory; Tran, T Thao; Halasyamani, P Shiv; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    Single crystals of K8(K5F)U6Si8O40 were grown from a mixed alkali halide flux. K8(K5F)U6Si8O40 is the first intergrowth uranyl silicate, being composed of alternating slabs related to two previously reported uranyl silicates: Cs2USiO6 and [Na9F2][(UO2)(UO2)2(Si2O7)2]. It exhibits intense luminescence, which is influenced by the [(UO2)2O] dimers present in the structure. PMID:26974872

  17. Synthesis, dehydration and hydration processes of uranyl p-toluenesulfonate and its crystal hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl p-toluenesulfonate was synthesized and studied. This salt crystallizes from aqueous solution as pentahydrate. Its solubility is 2.57 mol/kg at 25 Deg C. Anhydrous salt and lower hydrates were prepared. Hydration of the anhydrous salt in the air at various steam pressures are studied. Thermogravimetric data show that uranyl p-toluenesulfonate pentahydrate has the layered structure of hydration shell. IR spectra of crystal hydrates with the same composition obtained by means of dehydration-hydration procedure are the same in the region of frequencies of sulfonate group and differ in the region of water vibrations

  18. Mutual solubility in the system uranyl monochloroacetate--water--diethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovenko, V.M.; Baluev, A.V.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    The mutual solubility in the system uranyl monochloroacetate--water--diethyl ether at the temperature 25/sup 0/C was studied. It was found that UO/sub 2/(CH/sub 2/ClCOO)/sub 2/ is extracted by diethyl ether substantially less effectively than uranyl trifluoro- and trichloroacetates. An attempt was made to explain the difference in extractability and solubility in the series of haloacetates studied from the standpoint of the influence of the change in the electron donor capacity of the anion on processes of association, hydration, and solvation.

  19. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Polly L.; Jones, Guy M.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d(0)f(0) uranyl ion [UO(2)](2+) in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo grou...

  20. Complexation of uranyl ion by polyvinylimidazole. Electrochemical preparation and leaching tests investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we intend to check the claims of an U.S. Patent (Westinghouse E.C.) which describes an original treatment for low level activity radioactive wastes. The process deals with electrochemical preparation of polyvinylimidazole (PVI) which is a polymer capable of complexing uranyl ions. We confirm the complexation of uranyl ions by PVI in various media by FT-IR and UV-Visible analysis but all these complexes were found to be soluble in water so we put forward new complexes with an additional polymer to shape out insoluble complex. Leaching tests demonstrate the efficiency of our process. (author)

  1. Complexation of uranyl ion by three polyacrylamide type polymers. Electrochemical preparation and leaching tests investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An original process for the treatment of low level activity radioactive liquid waste is described. Electrochemical preparation of three polyacrylate polymers: polyacrylamide (PAam), polyacrylamidoglycolic acid (PAAG), polyacrylamidomethylpropanesulfonic acid (PAMPS) which are capable of complexing uranyl ions is delt with. Complexation of uranyl is demonstrated by FT-IR and UV-Visible spectroscopy. All these complexes are soluble in water and we insolubilize in turn the complexes by crosslinking or by neutralization of positively charged complexes by the addition of polyanions to the medium. Dynamic and static leaching tests on these insoluble complexes were then done. (author)

  2. Extraction of uranyl nitrate from aqueous nitrate solutions by open cell polyurethane foam sponge (OCPUFS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate into open cell polyurethane foam sponge (OCPUFS) from aqueous solution, in the presence of salting agents, was examined. The extraction efficiency was observed to depend on the concentration of uranyl and nitrate ions. The charge of the cation was also found to influence the distribution ratio. The effect of the change in temperature and pH was also studied. The results are interpreted in terms of OCPUFS acting as a viscous organic ether of moderate dielectric constant. (author) 14 refs.; 6 figs

  3. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Ioana-Carmen [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources–ICPMRR, B-dul Carol I No.70, Sector 2, Bucharest 020917 (Romania); Petru, Filip [“C.D. Nenitescu” Institute of Organic Chemistry, Splaiul Independentei 202B, Sector 6, Bucharest 71141 (Romania); Humelnicu, Ionel [“Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Mateescu, Marina [National R and D Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Splaiul Independenţei No. 202, Bucharest 060021 (Romania); Militaru, Ecaterina [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources–ICPMRR, B-dul Carol I No.70, Sector 2, Bucharest 020917 (Romania); Humelnicu, Doina, E-mail: doinah@uaic.ro [“Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania)

    2014-10-15

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  4. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu (Hoştuc), Ioana-Carmen; Petru, Filip; Humelnicu, Ionel; Mateescu, Marina; Militaru, Ecaterina; Humelnicu, Doina

    2014-10-01

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  5. Deciphering the Energy Landscape of the Interaction Uranyl-DCP with Antibodies Using Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the D...

  6. Study of the extraction mechanisms by TBP saturated by uranyl nitrate; Etude des mecanismes d'extraction du TBP sature par le nitrate d'uranyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meze, F

    2004-02-15

    This work deals with a particular phenomenon likely to occur in the nuclear waste reprocessing process PUREX. It was shown earlier by Russian works that the extractant molecule, tributyl phosphate (TBP), saturated by uranyl nitrate keeps its extraction capacities for nitric acid and tetravalent actinides. This study is composed of three parts. Firstly, some liquid-liquid extraction experiments were conducted to verify the ability of TBP saturated by uranyl nitrate to conserve its extraction capacities for nitric acid. Then, during these experiments, the UV and infrared spectra of both phases were recorded to obtain the organic phase speciation. At last, the informations gathered during the experimental part were used to build a general species distribution model of the H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3}/UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/TBP system. (author)

  7. Natural Nitrogen—15 Abundance of Ammonium Nitrogen and Fixed Ammonium in Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHISHU-LIAN; XINGGUANG-XI; 等

    1992-01-01

    The present article deals with the natural nitrogen-15 abundance of ammonium nitrogen and fixed ammonium in different soils.Variations in the natural 15N abundance of ammonium nitrogen mineralized in soils under anaerobic incubation condition were related to soil pH.The δ 15N of mineralizable N in acid soils was lower but that in neutral and calcareous soils was higher compared with the δ 15N of total N in the soils.A variation tendence was also found in the δ 15N of amino-acid N in the hydrolysates of soils.The natural 15N abundance of fixed ammonium was higher than that of total N in most surface soils and other soil horizons,indicating that the increase of δ 15N in the soil borizons beneath subsurface horizon of some forest soils and acid paddy soils was related to the higher δ 15N value of fixed ammonium in the soil.

  8. The system uranyl nitrate-dietyl ether-water. Extraction by water in spray and packed columns from uranyl nitrate-either solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a continuation of the one published in Chemical Engineering Progress. Symposium Series, 50, n. 12, 127 (1954). New runs for spray columns, are given and other concentrations in uranyl nitrate for the packed columns. New correlations for the overall H.T.U. are also given. The individual H.T.U. have been grapycally calculated and show that the film resistances have similar values, being independent of the concentration of the ether phase. (Author) 24 refs

  9. Benchmark binding energies of ammonium and alkyl-ammonium ions interacting with water. Are ammonium-water hydrogen bonds strong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallet, Valérie; Masella, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl-ammonium ion/water interactions are investigated using high level quantum computations, yielding thermodynamics data in good agreement with gas-phase experiments. Alkylation and hydration lead to weaken the NHsbnd O hydrogen bonds. Upon complete hydration by four water molecules, their main features are close to those of the OHsbnd O bond in the isolated water dimer. Energy decomposition analyses indicate that hydration of alkyl-ammonium ions are mainly due to electrostatic/polarization effects, as for hard monoatomic cations, but with a larger effect of dispersion.

  10. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  11. Reduction in Ammonium Ions in Sludge Liquor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglė Šlajūtė

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquor rejected from the centrifugation of the digested sludge can contain the concentrations of ammonium ions up to 1750 mg/L. These loads are usually returned to the intake of wastewater treatment plants (WWTP without additional treatment and can have a negative impact on biological wastewater and/or sludge treatment processes, e.g. phosphorus and nitrogen removal. This article deals with the use of naturally obtained sorbent, zeolite, in batch and column test procedure for removing ammonium from the rejected liquor. This research study was carried out using different sizes of zeolite particles: 0.8–1.6 mm and 1.6–2.5 mm. The highest efficiency of ammonium removal (up to 98 % was achieved by applying the zeolite particles of 0.8–1.6 mm.Article in Lithuanian

  12. Preparation of uranium dioxide by thermal decomposition and direct reduction of ammonium uranate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium uranate has been studied by infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It has been show that ammonia remains in the solid until substantially 350 Centigrade degrees, when gaseous nitrogen is released. It is concluded that compounds derived from the calcination of ammonium uranate at atmospheric pressure, produced amorphous U O3 at about 350-400 Centigrade degrees and transform to U3 O8 via α - U O3 and/or α - U O3. The object of this study was to obtain reliable fundamental information regarding the character of the pure carbon monoxide-ammonium uranate-uranium trioxide-uranium octaoxide reaction, in the range of temperatures that has been used in commercial reduction processes. Through the use of high-purity samples and by the proper control of incidental variable, this object was realized. (Author)

  13. Formation of Uranyl-Silicate Nanoparticles at Ambient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, K. L.; Sturchio, N. C.; Klie, R. F.; Skanthakumar, S.; Soderholm, L.

    2008-12-01

    Uranium(VI)-silicates are the dominant crystalline form of U(VI) at and near Earth's surface, but are difficult to form as pure phases under ambient conditions because of slow reaction kinetics aided by similar thermodynamic stabilities of the many possible minerals. We have investigated the effects of pH (2 to 11) and time (1 to 10 days) on the formation of U(VI)-silicates from initial solutions with U = 0.05 M and a fixed molar ratio of U:Si = 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:5 using high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and solution thermodynamic modeling. Previously, we used HEXS to identify from solutions with U:Si = 1:2 at pH 5 to 9, aged for one day, a trimeric U-silicate structural unit, or synthon, approximately one nanometer in dimension with U-U correlation lengths of about 0.4 nm. This synthon is a structural building block in uranyl silicate minerals such as soddyite, boltwoodite, and weeksite. ATR-FTIR results on the full set of samples show systematic changes in peak positions along with appearance and disappearance of vibrational modes that occurred with reaction time, pH and/or U:Si ratio; whereas, XRD indicated only a crystalline Na-boltwoodite-like phase at pH 11 and without the correlation length-scale resolution of HEXS. HRTEM results show few particles in a matrix of material containing areas having the lower correlation length visible in HEXS data. The data show clearly different mixtures of solids, including silica, and precipitate sizes under all conditions that transform over the 1 to 10 day aging period. The experimental reactions simulate conditions in the subsurface at sites contaminated with uranium, and the results are relevant to processes of uranium adsorption and colloid formation. [This work is supported by DOE's Environmental Remediation Science Program].

  14. Kinetics of thermal decomposition and kinetics of substitution reaction of nano uranyl Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Zeinali, A.; Dušek, Michal; Eigner, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 12 (2014), s. 718-729. ISSN 0538-8066 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranyl * Schiff base * kinetics * anticancer activity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.517, year: 2014

  15. Synthesis, structural investigation and kinetic studies of uranyl(VI) unsymmetrical Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Asadi, M.; Zeinali, A.; Ranjkeshshorkaei, M.; Fejfarová, Karla; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal; Dehnokhalaji, A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 6 (2014), s. 1673-1683. ISSN 0974-3626 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : uranyl schiff base complexes * kinetic study * kinetics of thermal decomposition * X-ray crystallography * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.191, year: 2014

  16. Uranyl ion complexation by citric and citramalic acids in the presence of di-amines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranyl nitrate reacts with citric (H4cit) or D-(-)-citramalic (H3citml) acids under mild hydrothermal conditions and in the presence of di-amines to give different complexes which are all characterized by the presence of 2:2 uranyl/poly-carboxylate di-anionic dimers or of polymeric chains based on the same dimeric motif. Each uranium ion is chelated by the two ligands through the alkoxide and the α- or β-carboxylate groups, the second β-carboxylic group in citrate being uncoordinated. The uranium coordination sphere is completed by either a water molecule or the β-carboxylate group of a neighboring unit, thus giving zero- or one-dimensional assemblages, respectively. The evidence for [UO2(Hcit)]2 dimers in the solid state confirms previous results from potentiometric and EXAFS measurements on solutions. Depending on the diamine used (DABCO, 2,2'- and 4,4'-bipyridine, [2.2.2]cryptand) and its ability to form divergent hydrogen bonds or not, different uranyl/poly-carboxylate topologies are obtained, thus evidencing template effects, and extended hydrogen bonding gives two- or three-dimensional assemblages. These results, together with those previously obtained with NaOH as a base, add to the knowledge of the uranyl/citrate system, which is much investigated for its environmental relevance. (author)

  17. Sorption efficiency of a new sorbent towards uranyl. Phosphonic acid grafted Merrifield resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel sorbent resin consisting of a Phosphonic Acid grafted on Merrifield Resin (PA-MR) for the extraction of uranyl from nitrate media is described. The sorption behaviour of uranyl cation on PA-MR was investigated using batch equilibrium technique. The effects of parameters such as shaking speed, pH levels, contact time, metal concentrations, ionic strength and temperature were reported. The results show that the sorption capacity increases with increasing both initial uranyl ion concentration and temperature and decreases with increasing ionic strength. Therefore, the optimum condition for the present study should be using 6.6 mg adsorbent per 1.0 mg uranyl in solution with pH 3.6 and shaking at 250 rpm for 180 min. The adsorption behavior of the system was also investigated and found to be in line with Langmuir isotherm. The kinetic data was well described by the pseudo second-order. Thermodynamics data leads to endothermic process ΔH = + 31.03 kJ-1 mol-1, ΔS = + 146.64 J mol-1 K-1 and ΔG = -11.96 kJ mol-1 at 20 K. ΔG decreased to negatives values with increasing temperature indicating that the process was more favoured at high temperature. (author)

  18. On the retention of uranyl and thorium ions from radioactive solution on peat moss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humelnicu, Doina, E-mail: doinah@uaic.ro [' Al.I. Cuza' University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. 11 Carol I Boulevard, 700506 Iasi (Romania); Bulgariu, Laura; Macoveanu, Matei [Technical University ' Gh. Asachi' of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Department of Environmental Engineering and Management, Bd. D. Mangeron, 71A, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

    2010-02-15

    The efficiency of the radioactive uranyl and thorium ions on the peat moss from aqueous solutions has been investigated under different experimental conditions. The sorption and desorption of uranyl and thorium ions on three types (unmodified peat moss, peat moss treated with HNO{sub 3} and peat moss treated with NaOH) of peat moss were studied by the static method. Peat moss was selected as it is available in nature, in any amount, as a cheap and accessible sorbent. Study on desorption of such ions led to the conclusion that the most favourable desorptive reagent for the uranyl ions is Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} 1 M while, for the thorium ions is HCl 1 M. The results obtained show that the parameters here under investigation exercise a significant effect on the sorption process of the two ions. Also, the investigations performed recommend the peat moss treated with a base as a potential sorbent for the uranyl and thorium ions from a radioactive aqueous solution.

  19. Quenching of the luminescent state of the uranyl ion (UO22+) by metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quenching of the luminescence of the uranyl ion by other metal ions has been studied in aqueous solution. The quenching is shown to be a dynamic process, and the correlation of the logarithm of the quenching rate with the metal ion ionization potential suggests that intermolecular electron transfer is the predominant mechanism. Evidence that this involves complete electron transfer comes from flash photolysis of solutions of UO2+2 and manganese (11), where a broad absorption lambdasub(max) = 505 nm) is observed which is assigned to Mn3+. Consideration of the energetics of the quenching process suggests that in the quenching of uranyl by silver(1), the products (U0+2 and Ag2+) are produced in their electronic ground states. Studies of the effect of temperature on the quenching suggest that if an intermediate complex (exciplex) is involved in the quenching then this must involve only very weak binding. With silver(I), the quenching is sensitive to the ionic strength of the solution. Further studies suggest that the lifetime of the luminescent state of the uranyl ion in aqueous solution varies with both temperature and uranyl ion concentration. (author)

  20. Nucleobase assemblies supported by uranyl cation coordination and other non-covalent interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jitendra Kumar; Sandeep Verma

    2011-11-01

    We describe synthesis and solid state structural description of uranyl complexes of carboxylate functionalized adenine and uracil derivatives. The metal coordination through carboxylate pendant leads to the formation of dimeric assemblies, whereas the directional nature of hydrogen bonding interaction supported by nucleobases and aqua ligands, result in the generation of complex 3-D architectures containing embedded nucleobase ribbons.

  1. Application of the NICADonnan model for proton, copper and uranyl binding to humic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saito, T.; Nagasaki, S.; Tanaka, S.; Koopal, L.K.

    2004-01-01

    Humic acids are natural organic materials that play an important role in the migration of heavy metal and actinide ions in aquatic and soil systems. In the present study, the binding of protons, copper ions and uranyl ions to the purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) is investigated and the results are

  2. Vibrational spectra of monouranates and uranium hydroxides as reaction products of alkali with uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibrational (IR absorption and Raman scattering) spectra for the reaction products of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate with NaOH and KOH have been studied. As a result of exchange reactions, the uranyl-ion coordinated nitrate groups are completely replaced by hydroxyl ions and various uranium and uranyl oxides or hydrates are formed. An analysis of the vibrations has been performed in terms of the frequencies of a free or coordinated nitrate group; comparison with the vibrations of the well-known uranium oxides and of the uranyl group UO22+ has been carried out. Vibrational spectra of a free nitrate group are characterized by four vibrational frequencies 1050, 724, 850, and 1380 cm-1, among which the frequencies at 724 and 1380 cm-1 are doubly degenerate and attributed to E’ symmetry of the point group D3h. When this group is uranium coordinated, its symmetry level is lowered to C2v, all vibrations of this group being active both in Raman and IR spectra. The doubly degenerate vibrations are exhibited as two bands and a frequency of the out-of-plane vibration is lowered to 815 cm-1. (authors)

  3. Occupational Exposure in Ammonium Phosphate Fertilizer Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposures and activity concentrations have been assessed in two industrial plants producing mono-ammonium phosphate and di-ammonium phosphate fertilizers, located in south-western Spain. The annual effective doses received by the workers are below 1 mSv/a, with the contribution from external exposure being similar to that from internal exposure. The dose contribution from inhalation of dust has been estimated to be about 0.12 mSv/a, while the 222Rn concentrations inside the plants are of no concern. Consequently, no additional radiation protection measures need to be taken to protect the workers in these facilities. (author)

  4. On the evaporation of ammonium sulfate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drisdell, Walter S.; Saykally, Richard J.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2009-07-16

    Aqueous evaporation and condensation kinetics are poorly understood, and uncertainties in their rates affect predictions of cloud behavior and therefore climate. We measured the cooling rate of 3 M ammonium sulfate droplets undergoing free evaporation via Raman thermometry. Analysis of the measurements yields a value of 0.58 {+-} 0.05 for the evaporation coefficient, identical to that previously determined for pure water. These results imply that subsaturated aqueous ammonium sulfate, which is the most abundant inorganic component of atmospheric aerosol, does not affect the vapor-liquid exchange mechanism for cloud droplets, despite reducing the saturation vapor pressure of water significantly.

  5. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  6. Metabolic adaptation of microbial communities to ammonium stress in a high solid anaerobic digester with dewatered sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaohu; Yan, Han; Li, Ning; He, Jin; Ding, Yueling; Dai, Lingling; Dong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A high solid digester with dewatered sludge was operated for 110 days to ascertain the interactions between bacterial and archaeal communities under ammonium stress, as well as the corresponding changes in bio-degradation mechanisms. The volatile solids reduction (95% confidence intervals in mean) changed from 31.6 ± 0.9% in the stable period (day 40-55) to 21.3 ± 1.5% in the last period (day 71-110) when ammonium concentration was elevated to be within 5,000-6,000 mgN/L. Biogas yield dropped accordingly from 11.9 ± 0.3 to 10.4 ± 0.2 L/d and carbon dioxide increased simultaneously from 35.2% to 44.8%. Anaerobranca better adapted to the ammonium stress, while the initially dominant protein-degrading microbes-Tepidimicrobium and Proteiniborus were suppressed, probably responsible for the increase of protein content in digestate. Meanwhile, Methanosarcina, as the dominant Archaea, was resistant to ammonium stress with the constant relative abundance of more than 92% during the whole operation. Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) analysis was thus conducted which indicated that the gradually increased TAN dictated the bacterial clusters. The dominant Methanosarcina and the increased carbon dioxide content under ammonium stress suggested that, rather than the commonly acknowledged syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) with hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, only SAO pathway was enhanced during the initial 'ammonium inhibition'. PMID:27312792

  7. Manufacture of ammonium sulfate fertilizer from gypsum-rich byproduct of flue gas desulfurization - A prefeasibility cost estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Ming; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lytle, J.M.; Achorn, F.P.

    1996-01-01

    Costs for constructing and operating a conceptual plant based on a proposed process that converts flue gas desulfurization (FGD)-gypsum to ammonium sulfate fertilizer has been calculated and used to estimate a market price for the product. The average market price of granular ammonium sulfate ($138/ton) exceeds the rough estimated cost of ammonium sulfate from the proposed process ($111/ ton), by 25 percent, if granular size ammonium sulfate crystals of 1.2 to 3.3 millimeters in diameters can be produced by the proposed process. However, there was at least ??30% margin in the cost estimate calculations. The additional costs for compaction, if needed to create granules of the required size, would make the process uneconomical unless considerable efficiency gains are achieved to balance the additional costs. This study suggests the need both to refine the crystallization process and to find potential markets for the calcium carbonate produced by the process.

  8. Carbonate-H₂O₂ leaching for sequestering uranium from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Liao, Weisheng; Wai, Chien M; Oyola, Yatsandra; Janke, Christopher J; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2014-07-28

    Uranium adsorbed on amidoxime-based polyethylene fiber in simulated seawater can be quantitatively eluted at room temperature using 1 M Na2CO3 containing 0.1 M H2O2. This efficient elution process is probably due to the formation of an extremely stable uranyl-peroxo-carbonato complex in the carbonate solution. After washing with water, the sorbent can be reused with minimal loss of uranium loading capacity. Possible existence of this stable uranyl species in ocean water is also discussed. PMID:24710325

  9. Detonation characteristics of ammonium nitrate products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, R.J.A.; Hengel, E.I.V. van den; Steen, A.C. van der

    2006-01-01

    The detonation properties of ammonium nitrate (AN) products depend on many factors and are therefore, despite the large amount of information on this topic, difficult to assess. In order to further improve the understanding of the safety properties of AN, the European Fertilizer Manufacturers Associ

  10. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... common example is when fertilizer-grade ammonium nitrate is mixed with fuel oil and creates an explosive... Requirements 1. Mixture Requirement 2. Threshold Weight and Individual Products Exemptions 3. Explosives... Federal Bureau of Investigation FR Federal Register HMR Hazardous Materials Regulations HMT...

  11. Montmorillonite modification by quaternary ammonium epoxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duchek, P.; Špírková, Milena; Šabata, Stanislav

    Kochi: India n Society of Nanoscience And Nanotechnology, 2010. s. 1. [Nanotech India 2010. 19.11.2010-21.11.2010, Kochi] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX08240901 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : montmorillonite * quaternary ammonium epoxide * intercalation Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  12. 21 CFR 184.1135 - Ammonium bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ingredient meets the specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 19, which is incorporated... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium bicarbonate. 184.1135 Section 184.1135 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1139 - Ammonium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... specifications of the Food Chemicals Codex, 3d Ed. (1981), p. 20, which is incorporated by reference. Copies are... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium hydroxide. 184.1139 Section 184.1139 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1143 - Ammonium sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 22-23, which is incorporated by... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ammonium sulfate. 184.1143 Section 184.1143 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD...

  15. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]-: infrared spectrum and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenewold, G. S.; van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Oomens, Jos; De Jong, Wibe A.; McIIwain, Michael E.

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO2)2(NO3)5]- compared to the mono-complex [UO2(NO3)3]-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  16. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO2)(2)(NO3)(5)](-): infrared spectrum and structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Michael J. van Stipdonk; Jos Oomens; Wibe de Jong; Michael E. McIlwain

    2011-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex [(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 5}]{sup -} compared to the mono-complex [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}]{sup -}, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the {nu}{sub 3} frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  17. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)-: infrared spectrum and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate nu3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)- compared to the mono-complex (UO2(NO3)3)-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (nu3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the ν3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The structure was calculated using density functional theory (B3LYP functional), which produced a structure in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  18. The gas-phase bis-uranyl nitrate complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)-: infrared spectrum and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrared spectrum of the bis-uranyl nitrate complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)- was measured in the gas phase using multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD). Intense absorptions corresponding to the nitrate symmetric and asymmetric vibrations, and the uranyl asymmetric vibration were observed. The nitrate v3 vibrations indicate the presence of nitrate in a bridging configuration bound to both uranyl cations, and probably two distinct pendant nitrates in the complex. The coordination environment of the nitrate ligands and the uranyl cations were compared to those in the mono-uranyl complex. Overall, the uranyl cation is more loosely coordinated in the bis-uranyl complex ((UO2)2(NO3)5)- compared to the mono-complex (UO2(NO3)3)-, as indicated by a higher O-U-O asymmetric stretching (v3) frequency. However, the pendant nitrate ligands are more strongly bound in the bis-complex than they are in the mono-uranyl complex, as indicated by the v3 frequencies of the pendant nitrate, which are split into nitrosyl and O-N-O vibrations as a result of bidentate coordination. These phenomena are consistent with lower electron density donation per uranyl by the nitrate bridging two uranyl centers compared to that of a pendant nitrate in the mono-uranyl complex. The lowest energy structure predicted by density functional theory (B3LYP functional) calculations was one in which the two uranyl molecules bridged by a single nitrate coordinated in a bis-bidentate fashion. Each uranyl molecule was coordinated by two pendant nitrate ligands. The corresponding vibrational spectrum was in excellent agreement with the IRMPD measurement, confirming the structural assignment.

  19. Process for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention is an improvement in the process for recovering uranyl uranium from solutions in which the uranyl uranium is recovered with an liquid-liquid solvent extraction agent dissolved in an inert solvent, the loaded agent scrubbed with water, the scrubbed agent stripped with ammonium carbonate solution to form a slurry of ammonium uranyl tricarbonate, the stripped agent returned to the liquid-liquid solvent extraction step, and the ammonium uranyl tricarbonate calcined to a uranium oxide product, the improvement which comprises stripping the uranium from the ion exchange agent with an alkali metal carbonate rather than ammonium carbonate, scrubbing the loaded agent with acidified alkali carbonate strip solution prior to stripping, and regenerating the stripped liquid-liquid solvent extraction agent with a mineral acid before return to the liquidliquid solvent extraction circuit

  20. A facile synthesis of ω-aminoalkyl ammonium hydrogen phosphates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Bo Kong; Xiao Yong Zhou; Yang Yang; Xing Yi Xie

    2012-01-01

    A series of ω-aminoalkyl ammonium hydrogen phosphates were synthesized through a simple and efficient three-step method.The starting materials,ω-aminoalkyl alcohols (AC-n,with carbon number n =3,4,5,6),were amino-protected with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (Fmoc-Cl),followed by phosphorylation with POCl3 and deprotection in piperidine/DMF The structures of each intermediate and final product were confirmed by 1H NMR,FTIR and mass spectrum.The yield of each step was about 77-92%,with a total yield higher than 56%.This new method was superior in low-cost raw materials,mild reaction temperatures (0-25 ℃) and easy purification methods.

  1. Investigation of the effect of the uranyl ion on proton-spin-relaxation times in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project was to determine the effect of the uranyl ion on the spin-lattice relaxation time of protons in aqueous solutions. A flowmeter using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques is being designed for monitoring the flow rate of aqueous solutions which are acidic, contain plutonium and uranium ions, chemical waste, and radioactive waste materials. The spin-lattice relaxation time is critical to the design of a flowmeter using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. Experimental studies showed that spin-lattice relaxation time did not change for different molar concentrations of sample solutions of uranyl nitrate and uranyl acetate prepared from pure laboratory chemicals dissolved in distilled water. Therefore, it was concluded that the uranyl ion does not contribute to the relaxation process for protons in water

  2. 40 CFR 721.4095 - Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... trialkylamine halides. 721.4095 Section 721.4095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4095 Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides. (a... generically as quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides (PMNs...

  3. Impact of Ammonium on Syntrophic Organohalide-Respiring and Fermenting Microbial Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Anca G; Fajardo-Williams, Devyn; Kegerreis, Kylie L; Parameswaran, Prathap; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Syntrophic interactions between organohalide-respiring and fermentative microorganisms are critical for effective bioremediation of halogenated compounds. This work investigated the effect of ammonium concentration (up to 4 g liter(-1) NH4 (+)-N) on trichloroethene-reducing Dehalococcoides mccartyi and Geobacteraceae in microbial communities fed lactate and methanol. We found that production of ethene by D. mccartyi occurred in mineral medium containing ≤2 g liter(-1) NH4 (+)-N and in landfill leachate. For the partial reduction of trichloroethene (TCE) to cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) at ≥1 g liter(-1) NH4 (+)-N, organohalide-respiring dynamics shifted from D. mccartyi and Geobacteraceae to mainly D. mccartyi. An increasing concentration of ammonium was coupled to lower metabolic rates, longer lag times, and lower gene abundances for all microbial processes studied. The methanol fermentation pathway to acetate and H2 was conserved, regardless of the ammonium concentration provided. However, lactate fermentation shifted from propionic to acetogenic at concentrations of ≥2 g liter(-1) NH4 (+)-N. Our study findings strongly support a tolerance of D. mccartyi to high ammonium concentrations, highlighting the feasibility of organohalide respiration in ammonium-contaminated subsurface environments. IMPORTANCE Contamination with ammonium and chlorinated solvents has been reported in numerous subsurface environments, and these chemicals bring significant challenges for in situ bioremediation. Dehalococcoides mccartyi is able to reduce the chlorinated solvent trichloroethene to the nontoxic end product ethene. Fermentative bacteria are of central importance for organohalide respiration and bioremediation to provide D. mccartyi with H2, their electron donor, acetate, their carbon source, and other micronutrients. In this study, we found that high concentrations of ammonium negatively correlated with rates of trichloroethene reductive dehalogenation and

  4. Coordination of the uranyl ion in solution and ionic liquids : a combined UV-Vis absorption and EXAFS study

    OpenAIRE

    Servaes, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    The uranyl ion (UO22+) has been extensively studied for decades and nowadays it is still a hot topic in a number of contemporary issues like nuclear waste treatment and the Balkan syndrome. Therefore, besides our fundamental interest in this complex system, the aim of this study was to provide a convenient and straightforward approach to identify the structure of various uranyl complexes formed in solution. To achieve this goal, spectroscopic techniques like UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, ...

  5. Examination on colour reaction of nicotinic acid-ethyl violet-uranyl ternary complex by solvent extraction spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The test examination was made on solvent extraction colour reaction of the ternary complex formed by nicotinic acid, ethyl violet and uranyl in cyclohexane+MIBK (methyl isobutyl ketone) or benzene+MIBK. A difference was found between the published results and the authors'. It was shown that there is no chromomagnetic dependence with uranyl ion, but the approximate linear correlation is present with NO3- ion

  6. Rapid separation of thorium-234 from uranyl nitrate hexahydrate by adsorption on filter paper from ether solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple method was developed for the rapid separation of 234Th (UX1) from uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. The method is based on selective dissolution of uranyl nitrate by diethyl ether on a filter paper. It is shown that almost all UX1 is adsorbed by the filter paper which can be desorbed and brought into solution by 5N HCl or HNO3. The effect of different parameters on the separation was also investigated. (author)

  7. Leaching of uranyl-silica complexes from the host metapelite rock favoring high radon activity of subsoil air: case of Castanar cave (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castanar cave is a subterranean site with an outstanding natural environmental radioactivity. The maintaining of high radon activity of cave air and the detection of spatially anomalies of this gas in some cave emplacements, suggests that some natural geochemical processes are involved on the mobilization of radioactivity sources to cave environment, other than a simple exhalation of radon from the host-rock. The host rocks are interlaid dolostone-metapelite beds with radioactive nuclides of the three actinium, thorium and uranium decay series. In situ measurements on the spatial distribution of radioactivity, uranyl group's luminescence and radon gas concentrations inside cave were main focus of this work to model lixiviation and deposition mechanisms of radioactive elements from the host rock to the karstic system. In addition, collected micro-samples were also analyzed by a multi-approach suite of analytical techniques: inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, environmental scanning electron microscopy with an attached X-ray energy dispersive system and spectral cathodoluminescence detector, thermoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential-thermal and thermogravimetry analysis, Alpha-spectrometry and Gamma-spectrometry techniques. The host metapelitic beds contain Zr(Hf)-Th(U)-Ti-P-REE phases such as zircon, xenotime-(Y), monazite-(Ce, La) and poly-metallic mineralization veins of hydrothermal origin. Carbonated host beds and speleothems show frequently chemical elements leaked from the upper host rock masses. The weathering leakage processes are favored by the existence of pyrite and limonite in the dolostone masses. The cave exhibits under UV lamps abundant hydrous silica-uranyl coatings covering carbonated speleothems with radionuclides of 238U natural decay series. The long-lived radio-nuclides of the radium radioactive decay chain are responsible of the continuous regeneration of radon gas inside cave. The experimental work was

  8. Density functional studies of uranyl ion sorption on TiO{sub 2} (110) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perron, H. [Universite Paris XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)]|[EDF-R et D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur loing Cedex (France); Domain, C.; Catalette, H. [EDF-R et D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur loing Cedex (France); Roques, J.; Vandenborre, J.; Drot, R.; Simoni, E. [Universite Paris XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: One of the most important processes affecting safety during the storage of nuclear waste in underground disposal is the migration of radio-toxic elements through the geosphere. The major factor involved in the retention of these elements, in the case of water infiltration, would be their sorption at the water/mineral interface. In order to predict if a disposal will be safe, retardation process must be correctly understood. Among the radionuclides of interest, an experimental team of our laboratory is studying the interaction between uranyl ions (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) and the TiO{sub 2} (110) surface. Under experimental conditions, using XPS and TRLFS measurements two uranyl surface complexes were identified on the TiO{sub 2} (110) surface and it was shown that only the free aquo uranyl ion reacts with the surface sites. The relative intensities of these two structures change with the surface coverage indicating two different stabilities. The purpose of this work is to provide a theoretical support to the experimental investigation. With this aim in view, we report first principles density functional calculations on the adsorption of water and uranyl ions on the TiO{sub 2} (110) surface. Two different approaches were used. First, TiO{sub 2} (110) surface was modeled with periodic slabs in order to investigate clean surface relaxations, water adsorption, and finally interaction of uranyl ions with the mineral surface. The goal of this first step was to identify the most probable UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} adsorption sites and to establish their relative energy stabilities as a function of the surface coverage. Then, starting from the previous TiO{sub 2} (110) relaxed structure, (TiO{sub 2}){sub n} clusters were used to simulate the (110) rutile surface. This second step was done in order to study, from a local point of view, the interaction of one uranyl ion with the TiO{sub 2} (110) surface for the different possible adsorption sites. Each

  9. Determination of the stability of the uranyl ion sipped in τ-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodic form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of the uranyl sipped in the zirconium τ-hydrogen phosphate in sodic form (τ-NaZrP), was carried out characterizing the complexes formed by Laser spectroscopy in the visible region and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material was prepared by a new synthesis technique working in nitrogen atmosphere and to low temperatures. The sorption of the uranyl ion was made in acid media with concentrations of 10-4 and 10-5 of uranyl nitrate and with ion forces of 0.1 and 0.5 M of NaClO4. The spectra of induced fluorescence with laser (TRLFS) show that the uranyl is fixed in very acid media in three well differentiated species, to pH less acid, the specie of long half life disappears and are only those of short half life. The results of the binding energy obtained by XPS indicate that the binding energy of the uranyl confer it a stable character to the complex formed in the τ-NaZP, that makes to this material appropriate to retain to the uranyl in solution to high ion forces and in acid media. (Author)

  10. Oxidation behavior of ammonium in a 3-dimensional biofilm-electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jinjing; Guo, Jinsong; Fang, Fang; Chen, Youpeng; Lei, Lijing; Yang, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Excess nitrogenous compounds are detrimental to natural water systems and to human health. To completely realize autohydrogenotrophic nitrogen removal, a novel 3-dimensional biofilm-electrode reactor was designed. Titanium was electroplated with ruthenium and used as the anode. Activated carbon fiber felt was used as the cathode. The reactor was separated into two chambers by a permeable membrane. The cathode chamber was filled with granular graphite and glass beads. The cathode and cathode chamber were inhabited with domesticated biofilm. In the absence of organic substances, a nitrogen removal efficiency of up to 91% was achieved at DO levels of 3.42 +/- 0.37 mg/L when the applied current density was only 0.02 mA/cm2. The oxidation of ammonium in biofilm-electrode reactors was also investigated. It was found that ammonium could be oxidized not only on the anode but also on particle electrodes in the cathode chamber of the biofilm-electrode reactor. Oxidation rates of ammonium and nitrogen removal efficiency were found to be affected by the electric current loading on the biofilm-electrode reactor. The kinetic model of ammonium at different electric currents was analyzed by a first-order reaction kinetics equation. The regression analysis implied that when the current density was less than 0.02 mA/cm2, ammonium removal was positively correlated to the current density. However, when the current density was more than 0.02 mA/cm2, the electric current became a limiting factor for the oxidation rate of ammonium and nitrogen removal efficiency. PMID:24649670

  11. Quaternary ammonium compounds – New occupational hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Lipińska-Ojrzanowska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs, quats belong to organic ionic chemical agents which display unique properties of both surfactants and disinfectants. Their wide distribution in the work environment and also in private households brings about new occupational hazards. This paper reviews reports about the health effects of QACs. QACs could play a role of sensitizers and irritants to the skin and mucous membranes. It is suspected that particular QACs can display an immunologic crossreactivity between each other and with other chemical compounds containing ammonium ion, such as muscle relaxants widely used in anesthesia. They may promote the development of airway allergy, however, the background mechanisms are still unclear and need to be further investigated. Until now, a few cases of occupational asthma induced by QACs have been described and their involvement in contact dermatitis has been documented. The possibility of anaphylaxis due to QACs cannot be excluded as well. Med Pr 2014;65(5:675–682

  12. Detonation Properties of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätterstam, A.; Östmark, H.; Helte, A.; Karlsson, S.

    1999-06-01

    Ammonium Dinitramide, ADN, has a potential as an oxidizer for underwater high explosives. Pure ADN has a large reaction-zone length and shows a strong non-ideal behaviour. The work presented here is an extension of previous work.(Sensitivity and Performance Characterization of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN). Presented at 11th International Detonation Symposium, Snowmass, CO, 1998.) Experiments for determining the detonation velocity as a function of inverse charge radius and density, reaction-zone length and curvature, and the detonation pressure are presented. Measurements of pressure indicates that no, or weak von-Neumann spike exists, suggesting an immediate chemical decomposition. Experimental data are compared with predicted using thermochemical codes and ZND-theory.

  13. Proton dynamics investigation for dimethyl ammonium cation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton dynamics in dimethyl ammonium cation has been investigated by means of NMR and spin echo methods in polycrystalline salts [NH2(CH3)2]+Bi2J9- and [NH2(CH3)2]+SbJ9-. Spin-lattice relaxation time as well as second moment of NMR line have been measured for influence study of crystal structure changes on proton dynamics

  14. Study of hydrolysis and complexing of uranyl ions in sulfate solutions at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of uranyl ion hydrolysis at elevated temperatures in the absence of complex formation in dilute nitrate solutions by measuring the pH. It was found that hydrolysis in the temperature range from 50 to 1500C and a total U(VI) concentration of 10-2 to 10-5 M occurs basically by the three reactions. The data was processed by computer to calculate the equilibrium constants of these reactions and to obtain equations for these constants as functions of temperature. Taking into account hydrolysis, the pH measurements for the uranyl sulfate solutions were used to calculate the equilibrium constants of the dissociation reaction of the sulfate complex. The dissociation constants as functions of temperature were also found. 22 refs., 3 tabs

  15. Synthesis and characterization of uranyl acetate complexes with some potentially bidentate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexes of uranyl acetate with three potentially bidentate ligands-nicotinic acid (NA), 2,2'-bipyridyl(2,2'-Bipy) and 4,4'-bipyridyl N,N'-dioxide (4,4'-BipyO2) have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of analytical data, electrical conductance, electronic and IR spectral studies. Uranyl acetate forms 1:1 complexes with 2,2'-Bipy and 4,4'-BipyO2 and a 1:2 complex with NA. It is shown that UO2(NA)2(CH3COO)2 and UO2(2,2'-Bipy)(CH3COO)2 have monomeric structures while UO2(4,4'-BipyO2)(CH3COO)2 has a polymeric chain structure. The acetate groups act as bidentate chelating ligands in these complexes. All the compounds studied are considered to have an overall coordination number eight around uranium(VI). (author). 16 refs

  16. Determination of uranyl nitrate diffusion coefficients in organic and aqueous media using the porous diaphragm method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion coefficient is one of the parameters necessary for the obtention of the extraction exponential coefficients, that are contained within the H.T.U. (height of transfer unity) calculation expression, when operating with continuous organic phase. The organic phase used was tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) and varsol in the 35% and 65% proportions respectively. After each experiment, the uranium content present in each compartment was spectrophotometrically determined and the quantities contained in the aqueous phases were determined by means of volumetric titration. It was found out that the uranyl ion diffusion coefficient is two and one half times less in organic phase, this just being attributed to the greater interactions of the uranyl ions in organic than in aqueous medium

  17. Interaction of uranyl ions with snake venom proteins from Lachesis muta muta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction product of uranyl nitrate with whole-protein Bushmaster snake venom in nitrate buffer at pH 3.5 has been studied. The maximum uptake of uranium was 291 μmol U x g-1 of venom. The infrared spectrum of the product showed an asymmetric O-U-O vibration at 921 cm-1 typical of complex formation with the uranyl ion. Stability measurements with the UO22+-protein complex in neutral medium indicated moderate hydrolytic stability, with 14% dissociation after 16 hours at 0 deg C. Neutron irradiation and desorption studies with a 235U-labelled complex showed that generated fission products such as lanthanides and barium were readily lixiviated at pH 7, whereas Ru and Zr were highly retained by the protein substrate. (author)

  18. Flotation extraction of uranium (6) in the form of uranyl hydroxide from diluted aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of flotation extraction of uranium (6) as uranyl hydroxide, waterproofed by decyl-, dodecyl-, tetradecyl- and hexadecyl pyridine bromides is studied. It is shown that 95-100 % flotation extraction of uranium is reached at a consumption of 0.6-1.0 mole of hexadecyl pyridine bromide per a mole of uranium. It is established that at a consumption of 1.2 mole of hexadecyl pyridine bromide per a mole of uranium, the flotation of uranyl hydroxide is carried out at positive values of ξ-potential of extracted particles (in this case the degree of flotation extraction of uranium is only 10-20 %). An increase in time period of flotation results in changing the values of ξ-potential of extracted particles close to isoelectric state ( in this case the degree of flotation extraction of uranium is 95-100 % )

  19. Effect of uranyl intoxication on renal corticomedullary gradient of orthoiodohippurate in laboratory rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment is attempted of the intrarenal distribution (by means of the cortico-medullary gradient and the cortico-pelvic gradient) of a model diagnostic substance (o-125I-hippurate) for the analysis of mechanisms causing damage to the renal function during intoxication induced by uranyl ions (uranyl nitrate). The findings were correlated with other indicators of the renal lesion (creatinine and urea plasma levels). Relative shifts of different gradients, i.e. mutual shifts and shifts in relation to hippurate blood levels, make it possible to describe the stepwise character of functional changes in the damaged kidney. The method used is suitable for investigating the dynamics of substances transport during functional renal changes in particular when combined with the determination the intensity of the uptake of model substances by renal tissue slices. (author)

  20. Heating efficiency of microwave heating direct denitration of a mixture of uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixture of plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate is co-converted to MOX powder by the microwave heating method developed by JAEA. The heating efficiency is very important for improving the energy-saving performance in this conversion process. In this study, the heating efficiency was measured using both experimental and engineering-scale microwave ovens in water, nitric acid and a mixture of plutonium nitrate and uranyl nitrate as a function of distance between the specimen and the base of the oven. In addition, the distribution of electromagnetic field strength and its absorption concentration in the solution were numerically evaluated by an electromagnetic field analysis code, MWS 2009. The experimental results could almost be explained by the numerical analysis results. When the distance of the specimen and the base of the oven was beyond 1/4 wavelength, the efficiency became constant because the influence disappeared. (author)

  1. Ammonium Chloride Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-Induced mRNA Levels in Human Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Edge, Johann; Muendel, Toby; Pilegaard, Henriette; Hawke, Emma; Leikis, Murray; Lopez-Villalobos, Nicolas; Oliveira, Rodrigo S. F.; Bishop, David J

    2015-01-01

    Minimizing the decrease in intracellular pH during high-intensity exercise training promotes greater improvements in mitochondrial respiration. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that pH may affect the exercise-induced transcription of genes that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis. Eight males performed 10x2-min cycle intervals at 80% V ˙ O 2 peak intensity on two occasions separated by ~2 weeks. Participants ingested either ammonium chloride (ACID) or calcium carbonate (PLA) the day before...

  2. DETECTION OF THE AMMONIUM ION IN SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernicharo, J.; Tercero, B. [Deparment of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon-Ajalvir Km 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Fuente, A. [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Apdo. 112, E-28803 Alcala de Henares (Spain); Domenech, J. L.; Cueto, M.; Carrasco, E.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Marcelino, N. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Roueff, E. [Luth, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8102, Place J. Janssen F-92190 Meudon (France); Gerin, M. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8112 and Ecole Normale Superieure, 61 Avenue de lObservatoire, F-75014 Paris (France); Pearson, J., E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MC 168-314, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We report on the detection of a narrow feature at 262816.73 MHz toward Orion and the cold prestellar core B1-bS which we attribute to the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} line of the deuterated ammonium ion, NH{sub 3}D{sup +}. The observations were performed with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope. The carrier has to be a light molecular species as it is the only feature detected over 3.6 GHz of bandwidth. The hyperfine structure is not resolved, indicating a very low value for the electric quadrupolar coupling constant of nitrogen which is expected for NH{sub 3}D{sup +} as the electric field over the N nucleus is practically zero. Moreover, the feature is right at the predicted frequency for the 1{sub 0}-0{sub 0} transition of the ammonium ion, 262817 {+-} 6 MHz (3{sigma}), using rotational constants derived from new infrared data obtained in our laboratory in Madrid. The estimated column density is (1.1 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. Assuming a deuterium enhancement similar to that of NH{sub 2}D, we derive N(NH{sub 4}{sup +}) {approx_equal} 2.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, i.e., an abundance for ammonium of a few 10{sup -11}.

  3. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiko, R.; Hauss, H.; Buchholz, F.; Melzner, F.

    2015-10-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2 and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply considerably fuels bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a downregulation of ammonium excretion. Here we show that exposure to OMZ conditions can result in strong depression of respiration and ammonium excretion in calanoid copepods and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific. These physiological responses need to be taken into account when estimating DVM-mediated fluxes of carbon and nitrogen into OMZs.

  4. Photosensitized decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by the uranyl ion, production of hydroperoxide radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The photosensitized decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by the uranyl ion in sulfuric acid media has been demonstrated and the kinetics of oxygen evolution have been measured as a function of the initial concentrations. The HO2 radical stabilized by complexation with UO22+ is an intermediate in this decomposition. This reaction can be employed in the photoassisted oxidation of diverse organic molecules using UO22+ as the sensitizer

  5. Synthesis, characterization and photo luminescence studies of uranyl doped SrBPO5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SrBPO5: UO22+ was synthesized using solid state reaction method and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction. PXRD data showed the formation of single phase confirming successful doping of UO22+. Photo luminescence investigation informed stabilization of Uranium as Uranyl (UO22+) in SrBPO5 matrix. Luminescence decay time data suggested two possible environments for UO22+ with two different life time values

  6. Complex formation of uranyl acetate with tetracycline and its utilization for their microdetermination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conductometric and spectrophotometric (covering the visible, uv, and ir ranges) studies as well as microanalyses of uranyl complexes with tetracycline revealed the existence of the 1:1 complex species. The mean stability constant of the 1:1 complex, as determined spectrophotometrically, amounted to 1.2 x 105. This finding permits the use of the procedure for the microdetermination of tetracycline using UO2+2 ion or vice versa. (U.S.)

  7. A bibliographical review on the radiolysis of uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliographical study on the effects of ionizing radiation on uranyl nitrate solutions in nitric acid medium was performed, and the state of knowledge on this subject is presented. The main experimental and theoretical results on water, nitric acid and uranium solutions radiolysis are reviewed and critically evaluated. This paper provides a collection of references as an aid to the development of practical applications, and to stimulate new research on fundamental processes in these systems. (author)

  8. Ternary system uranyl monochloroacetate/water/tri-n-butyl phosphate (ir spectroscopic study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baluev, A.V.; Lumpov, A.A.; Suglobova, I.G.

    1986-01-01

    The phase equilibria in the ternary system uranyl monochloroacetate/water/TBP are examined from the standpoint of IR spectroscopic data obtained in the present work for the equilibrium phases in various concentration regions. A number of hypotheses are advanced relative to the composition of the solvated complex of this salt in the organic phases, and also in connection with the relationship between solvation and hydration processes and the electron-donor properties of the haloacetate ions.

  9. Solubility of uranyl nitrate in nitric acid solutions of aluminum nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solubility of uranyl nitrate in nitric acid solutions of aluminum nitrate at 250C containing 10, 20 and 30 mass % of nitric acid has been studied by the isothermal method. The Schreinemakers method has been used to establish the composition of the solid phases, which has been confirmed by crystallographic and thermographic studies. Data are presented on the viscosity and density of saturated solutions

  10. NMR study of inorganic mesophase in water-acetone solutions of uranyl fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the method of PMR spectroscopy a macroscopic ordering, dependence of orientation de.gree of acetone molecules on temperature and composition of the uranuyl fluoride-water- acetone system is investigated. It is shown that physical processes determining the formation of a mesophase in the investigated system are analogous to the processes in organic liquid crystals. It is pointed out that the matrix of the given liquid crystal is a dimeric complex of uranyl fluoride

  11. Calculation of phase equilibria in ternary systems uranyl salt-water-organic solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience in modeling extraction equilibria in systems with uranyl nitrate and halogen acetates with oxygen-containing organic solvents and tributylphosphate is presented. A method of calculating the equilibria on the basis of thermodynamic approach was suggested, phase diagrams for 12 extractive mixtures being calculated. Comparative analysis with the known experimental data was concluded, efficiency of the systems, that had not been previously considered by experiments, was predicted

  12. Determination of the stability constants of uranyl/polymer complexes by differential pulse polarography

    OpenAIRE

    Leroy, D.; Martinot, Lucien; Jérôme, Christine; Jérôme, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Differential pulse polarography (DPP) allows for the determination of the stability constants (K) and the stoichiometry (n) for the complexation of the UO22+ ion by various monomers and the parent polymers. The experimental observation is the shift of the totally reversible reduction wave UO22++e- UO2+ toward more cathodic potentials when the complexing monomer or polymer is added to an uranyl nitrate aqueous solution. This shift is, however, much greater when the polymer is used rather than ...

  13. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, spectroscopy, electrochemistry, thermal and kinetic study of uranyl Schiff base complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Asadi, Z.; Golzard, F.; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 20 (2013), s. 3629-3646. ISSN 0095-8972 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/0809 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : X-ray crystallography * uranyl Schiff base complex * kinetics of thermal decomposition * cyclic voltammetry * kinetics and mechanism Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.224, year: 2013

  14. The Uranyl Cation as a Visible-Light Photocatalyst for C(sp(3) )-H Fluorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Julian G; Bedell, T Aaron; Sorensen, Erik J

    2016-07-25

    The fluorination of unactivated C(sp(3) )-H bonds remains a desirable and challenging transformation for pharmaceutical, agricultural, and materials scientists. Previous methods for this transformation have used bench-stable fluorine atom sources; however, many still rely on the use of UV-active photocatalysts for the requisite high-energy hydrogen atom abstraction event. Uranyl nitrate hexahydrate is described as a convenient, hydrogen atom abstraction catalyst that can mediate fluorinations of certain alkanes upon activation with visible light. PMID:27320442

  15. Uranyl Solvation by a Three-Dimensional Reference Interaction Site Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Alexei; Li, Bo; Rösch, Notker

    2015-08-13

    We report an implementation of the three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D RISM) that in particular addresses the treatment of the long-range Coulomb field of charged species, represented by point charges and/or a distributed charge density. A comparison of 1D and 3D results for atomic ions demonstrates a reasonable accuracy, even for a moderate size of the unit cell and a moderate grid resolution. In an application to uranyl complexes with 4-6 explicit aqua ligands and an implicit bulk solvent modeled by RISM, we show that the 3D technique is not susceptible to the deficiencies of the 1D technique exposed in our previous work [Li, Matveev, Krüger, Rösch, Comp. Theor. Chem. 2015, 1051, 151]. The 3D method eliminates the artificial superposition of explicit aqua ligands and the RISM medium and predicts essentially the same values for uranyl and uranyl-water bond lengths as a state-of-the-art polarizable continuum model. With the first solvation shell treated explicitly, the observables are nearly independent of the order of the closure relationship used when solving the set of integral equations for the various distribution functions. Furthermore, we calculated the activation barrier of water exchange with a hybrid approach that combines the 3D RISM model for the bulk aqueous solvent and a quantum mechanical description (at the level of electronic density functional theory) of uranyl interacting with explicitly represented water molecules. The calculated result agrees very well with experiment and the best theoretical estimates. PMID:26167741

  16. Anion recognition in water with use of a neutral uranyl-salophen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Cort, Antonella; Forte, Gianpiero; Schiaffino, Luca

    2011-09-16

    A new water-soluble uranyl-salophen complex incorporating two glucose units has been synthesized. This neutral derivative shows noteworthy binding affinity for fluoride in water thanks to the Lewis acid-base interaction occurring between the metal and the anion. Such interaction is strong enough to overcome the high hydration enthalpy of fluoride. Moreover this complex effectively binds hydrogen phosphate and exhibits remarkably strong association for nucleotide polyanions ADP(3-) and ATP(4-). PMID:21812437

  17. Method and apparatus for producing uranyl peroxide (U0/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium and uranium alloy pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of producing uranyl peroxide (UO/sub 4/ . 2H/sub 2/O) from uranium-bearing metal pieces comprising: dissolving the uranium-bearing metal pieces in a first aqueous solution containing nitric acid and at least 0.5% but no greater than 5.0% fluoboric acid to provide a second aqueous solution which includes uranyl ions (UO/sub 2//sup +2/) and nitric and fluoboric acids; adding hydrogen peroxide to the second aqueous solution to precipitate uranyl peroxide out of the second solution and provide a third aqueous solution containing nitric and fluoboric acids; and separating the uranyl peroxide from the third aqueous solution

  18. Process for recovering uranium from wet process phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for recovering uranium from phosphoric acid solutions uses an acidified alkali metal carbonate solution for the second-stage strip of uranyl uranium from the ion-exchange solution. The stripped solution is then recycled to the ion-exchange circuit. In the first stripping stage the ion-exchange solution containing the recovered uranyl uranium and an inert organic diluent is stripped with ammonium carbonate, producing a slurry of ammonium uranyl tricarbonate. The second strip, with a solution of 50-200 grams per litre of sodium carbonate eliminates the problems of inadequate removal of phosphorus, iron and vanadium impurities, solids accumulation, and phase separation in the strip circuit

  19. Conversion of Uric Acid into Ammonium in Oil-Degrading Marine Microbial Communities: a Possible Role of Halomonads

    KAUST Repository

    Gertler, Christoph

    2015-04-29

    Uric acid is a promising hydrophobic nitrogen source for biostimulation of microbial activities in oil-impacted marine environments. This study investigated metabolic processes and microbial community changes in a series of microcosms using sediment from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea amended with ammonium and uric acid. Respiration, emulsification, ammonium and protein concentration measurements suggested a rapid production of ammonium from uric acid accompanied by the development of microbial communities containing hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria after 3 weeks of incubation. About 80 % of uric acid was converted to ammonium within the first few days of the experiment. Microbial population dynamics were investigated by Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis and Illumina sequencing as well as by culture-based techniques. Resulting data indicated that strains related to Halomonas spp. converted uric acid into ammonium, which stimulated growth of microbial consortia dominated by Alcanivorax spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Several strains of Halomonas spp. were isolated on uric acid as the sole carbon source showed location specificity. These results point towards a possible role of halomonads in the conversion of uric acid to ammonium utilized by hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York

  20. EFFECTS OF GLYPHOSATE AMMONIUM SALT ON THE BIOAVAILABLE PHOSPHORUS CONTENT AND THE ACTIVITY OF SELECTED PHOSPHATASES IN LOAMY SAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płatkowski

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of glyphosatę ammonium salt on the activity of some enzymes involved in the metabolism of phosphorus in the soil: acid phosphomonoeaterase (EC 3.1.3.2, alkaline phosphomonoeaterase (EC 3.1.3.1, phosphotrieaterase (EC 3.1.5.1, inorganic pyrophosphatase (EC 3.1.6.1, and a phosphorus content in a form available to plants. The experiment was carried out on loamy sand samples with organic carbon content 8.7 g kg-1. Into soil samples the aqueous solutions of Avans Premium 360 SC (360 g glyphosate ammonium salt in 1 dm3 were added. The amount of introduced glyphosate ammonium salt was 0 (control, 1, 10, 50 and 100 mg·kg-1, on days 0 (1 hour after glyphosate application, 7, 14, 28 and 56 measured parameters were determined spectrophotometrically. The obtained results showed that the application of glyphosate ammonium salt resulted in changes of available phosphorus content and the activity of enzymes involved in the metabolism of this element in loamy sand. The effects glyphosate ammonium salt dosage and effect of day of experiment were ambiguous. Among the determined parameters the most sensitive to the presence of the glyphosate ammonium was alkaline phosphomonoesterase.

  1. Selective colorimetric and fluorescent quenching determination of uranyl ion via its complexation with curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing-Hui; Zhao, Xin; Yang, Jidong; Tan, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Shao-Pu; Liu, Zhong-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Under pH 4.0 HAc-NaAc buffer medium, curcumin alone possesses extraordinary weak fluorescence emission. Nevertheless, the introduction of Triton X-100 micelles can largely enhance the fluorescence intensity of curcumin. Uranyl ions can complex with micelles-capped curcumin, along with the slight red shift of curcumin fluorescence (about 1-7 nm), a clear decrement of absorbance (424 nm) and fluorescence (507 nm) intensities, and a distinct color change from bright yellow to orange. The fluorescence decrements (ΔF, 507 nm) are positively correlated to the amount of uranyl ions in the concentration range of 3.7 × 10- 6-1.4 × 10- 5 mol L- 1. The detection limit of this fluorescence quenching methods is 3.7 × 10- 6 mol L- 1, which is nearly 9000 times lower than the maximum allowable level in drinking water proposed by World Health Organization. Good selectivity is achieved because of a majority of co-existing substances (such as Ce4 +, La3 +, and Th4 +) do not affect the detection. The content of uranyl ions in tap water samples was determined by the proposed method with satisfactory results.

  2. Uranyl p-toluenesulfonate and its crystal hydrates, synthesis, and dehydration-hydration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While uranyl benzenesulfonate (UBS) crystallizes from aqueous solutions as monohydrate, uranyl p-toluenesulfonate (UPTS) crystallizes as pentahydrate, UPTS solubility in water is 2.57 mol.kg-1, which is about one-half the solubility of UBS (4.85 mol.kg-1). We synthesized the lowest hydrates of UPTS and the anhydrous salt and studied the hydration of anhydrous UPTS in air at various water vapour pressures. Thermogravimetry and gravimetry in air under standard conditions revealed that the hydrate shell of UPTS.5H2O possess a layer structure. After thorough grinding and storage of the product in air for 3-4 days we obtained stable UPTS.3H20. In conditions of slow crystallization from aqueous solutions, crystals of UO2(CH3C6H4S03)2.5H20 were obtained. Their size was 5 mm x 3 mm, the crystal had regular faces. The coordination of sulfonate ions to uranyl (apparently bidentate) in UPTS and its hydrates is similar to that in UBS

  3. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  4. The thermal denigration in fluid-bed to make uranyl product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing plant used the thermal denigration to high concentration of uranyl nitrate solution in fluid-bed to make uranyl product. First the uranyl nitrate solution were concentrated in evaporator, into 300 gU/L, 600 gU/L, 750 gU/L and 1000 gU/L.When the fluid-bed was in good fluidity state at 320 degree C, the solution was sprayed all over the surface of the fine crystal seeds through the dual-channel air-blast nozzles to make new crystal seed and to make them grow up. The denigration reaction occurred when the internal temperature of the fluid-bed was kept at about 300 degree C by the outside and inside heat apparatus. The product were transported crossing the valve and spiral transfer to pack. The tail gas was purified and discharged. Through the fluid-bed's running, the variation discipline of temperature and the pressure, the effect curve of the quality of product accumulated to pressure drop were determined. At the same time, the gentrification temperature, the distributed heat and the transfer mode were tested. (authors)

  5. Model-based evaluation on the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite in a nitritation process for ammonium-rich wastewater treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-ming; YANG Qi; ZENG Guang-ming; A. Cornelius; K. H. Rosenwinkel; S. Kunst; D. Weichgrebe

    2004-01-01

    Modeling for nitritation process was discussed and analyzed quantlitatively for the factors that influence nitrite accumulation. The results indicated that pH, inorganic carbon source and Hydraulic Retention Time(HRT) as well as biomass concentration are the main factors that influenced the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite. A constant high pH can lead to a high nitritation rate and results in high conversion ratio on condition that free ammonia inhibition do not happen. In a CSTR system, without pH control, this conversion ratio can be monitored by pH variation in the reactor. The pH goes down far from the inlet level means a strongly nitrite accumulation. High concentration of alkalinity can promoted the conversion ratio by means of accelerating the nitritation rate through providing sufficient inorganic carbon source(carbon dioxide). When inorganic carbon source was depleted, the nitritation process stopped. HRT adjustment could be an efficient way to make the nitritation system run more flexible, which to some extent can meet the requirements of the fluctuant of inlet parameters such as ammonium concentration, pH, and temperature and so on. Biomass concentration is the key point, especially for a CSTR system in steady state, which was normally circumscribed by the characteristics of bacteria and may also affected by aeration mode and can be increased by prolonging the HRT on the condition of no nitrate accumulation when no recirculation available. The higher the biomass concentration is, the better the nitrite accumulation can be obtained.

  6. An investigation of the interactions of Eu(3+) and Am(3+) with uranyl minerals: implications for the storage of spent nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Steudtner, Robin; Schmidt, Moritz; McKenna, Cora; León Vintró, Luis; Twamley, Brendan; Baker, Robert J

    2016-04-12

    The reaction of a number of uranyl minerals of the (oxy)hydroxide, phosphate and carbonate types with Eu(iii), as a surrogate for Am(iii), have been investigated. A photoluminescence study shows that Eu(iii) can interact with the uranyl minerals Ca[(UO2)6(O)4(OH)6]·8H2O (becquerelite) and A[UO2(CO3)3]·xH2O (A/x = K3Na/1, grimselite; CaNa2/6, andersonite; and Ca2/11, liebigite). For the minerals [(UO2)8(O)2(OH)12]·12H2O (schoepite), K2[(UO2)6(O)4(OH)6]·7H2O (compreignacite), A[(UO2)2(PO4)2]·8H2O (A = Ca, meta-autunite; Cu, meta-torbernite) and Cu[(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2]·6H2O (cuprosklodowskite) no Eu(iii) emission was observed, indicating no incorporation into, or sorption onto the structure. In the examples with Eu(3+) incorporation, sensitized emission is seen and the lifetimes, hydration numbers and quantum yields have been determined. Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluroescence Spectroscpoy (TRLFS) at 10 K have also been measured and the resolution enhancements at these temperatures allow further information to be derived on the sites of Eu(iii) incorporation. Infrared and Raman spectra are recorded, and SEM analysis show significant morphology changes and the substitution of particularly Ca(2+) by Eu(3+) ions. Therefore, Eu(3+) can substitute Ca(2+) in the interlayers of becquerelite and liebigite and in the structure of andersonite, whilst in grimselite only sodium is exchanged. These results have guided an investigation into the reactions with (241)Am on a tracer scale and results from gamma-spectrometry show that becquerelite, andersonite, grimselite, liebigite and compreignacite can include americium in the structure. Shifts in the U[double bond, length as m-dash]O and C-O Raman active bands are similar to that observed in the Eu(iii) analogues and Am(iii) photoluminescence measurements are also reported on these phases; the Am(3+) ion quenches the emission from the uranyl ion. PMID:27028717

  7. Uranyl nitrate-exposed rat alveolar macrophages cell death: Influence of superoxide anion and TNF α mediators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium compounds are widely used in the nuclear fuel cycle, military and many other diverse industrial processes. Health risks associated with uranium exposure include nephrotoxicity, cancer, respiratory, and immune disorders. Macrophages present in body tissues are the main cell type involved in the internalization of uranium particles. To better understand the pathological effects associated with depleted uranium (DU) inhalation, we examined the metabolic activity, phagocytosis, genotoxicity and inflammation on DU-exposed rat alveolar macrophages (12.5–200 μM). Stability and dissolution of DU could differ depending on the dissolvent and in turn alter its biological action. We dissolved DU in sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 100 mM) and in what we consider a more physiological vehicle resembling human internal media: sodium chloride (NaCl 0.9%). We demonstrate that uranyl nitrate in NaCl solubilizes, enters the cell, and elicits its cytotoxic effect similarly to when it is diluted in NaHCO3. We show that irrespective of the dissolvent employed, uranyl nitrate impairs cell metabolism, and at low doses induces both phagocytosis and generation of superoxide anion (O2−). At high doses it provokes the secretion of TNFα and through all the range of doses tested, apoptosis. We herein suggest that at DU low doses O2− may act as the principal mediator of DNA damage while at higher doses the signaling pathway mediated by O2− may be blocked, prevailing damage to DNA by the TNFα route. The study of macrophage functions after uranyl nitrate treatment could provide insights into the pathophysiology of uranium‐related diseases. -- Highlights: ► Uranyl nitrate effect on cultured macrophages is linked to the doses and independent of its solubility. ► At low doses uranyl nitrate induces generation of superoxide anion. ► At high doses uranyl nitrate provokes secretion of TNFα. ► Uranyl nitrate induces apoptosis through all the range of doses tested.

  8. Effects of high ammonium level on biomass accumulation of common duckweed Lemna minor L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenguo; Yang, Chuang; Tang, Xiaoyu; Gu, Xinjiao; Zhu, Qili; Pan, Ke; Hu, Qichun; Ma, Danwei

    2014-12-01

    Growing common duckweed Lemna minor L. in diluted livestock wastewater is an alternative option for pollutants removal and consequently the accumulated duckweed biomass can be used for bioenergy production. However, the biomass accumulation can be inhibited by high level of ammonium (NH4 (+)) in non-diluted livestock wastewater and the mechanism of ammonium inhibition is not fully understood. In this study, the effect of high concentration of NH4 (+) on L. minor biomass accumulation was investigated using NH4 (+) as sole source of nitrogen (N). NH4 (+)-induced toxicity symptoms were observed when L. minor was exposed to high concentrations of ammonium nitrogen (NH4 (+)-N) after a 7-day cultivation. L. minor exposed to the NH4 (+)-N concentration of 840 mg l(-1) exhibited reduced relative growth rate, contents of carbon (C) and photosynthetic pigments, and C/N ratio. Ammonium irons were inhibitory to the synthesis of photosynthetic pigments and caused C/N imbalance in L. minor. These symptoms could further cause premature senescence of the fronds, and restrain their reproduction, growth and biomass accumulation. L. minor could grow at NH4 (+)-N concentrations of 7-84 mg l(-1) and the optimal NH4 (+)-N concentration was 28 mg l(-1). PMID:25056754

  9. A macrocyclic approach to transition metal and uranyl Pacman complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Love, J. B.

    2009-01-01

    Multielectron redox chemistry involving small molecules such as O-2, H2O, N-2, CO2, and CH4 is intrinsic to the chemical challenges surrounding sustainable, low-carbon energy generation and exploitation. Compounds with more than one metal reaction site facilitate this chemistry by providing both unique binding environments and combined redox equivalents. However, controlling the aggregation of metal cations is problematic, as both the primary coordination spheres of the metals and the metal-m...

  10. Structural evolution of a uranyl peroxide nano-cage fullerene: U60, at elevated pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, K. M.; Lin, Y.; Zhang, F.; McGrail, B.; Burns, P. C.; Mao, W. L.; Ewing, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    U60 is a uranyl peroxide nano-cage that adopts a highly symmetric fullerene topology; it is topologically identical to C60. Several studies on the aqueous-phase of U60 clusters, [UO2(O2)(OH)]6060-, have shown its persistence in complex solutions and over lengthy time scales. Peroxide enhances corrosion of nuclear fuel in a reactor accident-uranyl peroxides often form near contaminated sites. U60 (Fm-3) crystallizes with approximate formula: Li68K12(OH)20[UO2(O2)(OH)]60(H2O)310. Here, we have used the diamond anvil cell (DAC) to examine U60 to understand the stability of this cluster at high pressures. We used a symmetric DAC with 300 μm culet diamonds and two different pressure-transmitting media: a mixture of methanol+ethanol and silicone oil. Using a combination of in situ Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron XRD, and electrospray ionization mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) ex situ, we have determined the pressure-induced evolution of U60. Crystalline U60 undergoes an irreversible phase transition to a tetragonal structure at 4.1 GPa, and irreversibly amorphizes at 13 GPa. The amorphous phase likely consists of clusters of U60. Above 15 GPa, the U60 cluster is irreversibly destroyed. ESI-MS shows that this phase consists of species that likely have between 10-20 uranium atoms. Raman spectroscopy complements the diffraction measurements. U60 shows two dominant vibrational modes: a symmetric stretch of the uranyl U-O triple bond (810 cm-1), and a symmetric stretch of the U-O2-U peroxide bond (820 cm-1). As pressure is increased, these modes shift to higher wavenumbers, and overlap at 4 GPa. At 15 GPa, their intensity decreases below detection. These experiments reveal several novel behaviors including a new phase of U60. Notably, the amorphization of U60 occurs before the collapse of its cluster topology. This is different from the behavior of solvated C60 at high pressure, which maintains a hcp structure up to 30 GPa, while the clusters disorder. These results suggest

  11. Organomontmorillonites Modified with 2-Methacryloyloxy Ethyl Alkyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bromide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-quan; WU Wen-hui

    2007-01-01

    Organomontmorillonites (organo-MMT) were synthesized by means of montmorillonites (MMT) modified with a series of 2-methacryloyloxy ethyl alkyl dimethyl ammonium bromide (MAAB) having different alkyl chain lengths as cationic surfactants through a cationic exchanging reaction, and were characterized by FTIR, TG, elemental analysis, and XRD. The microenvironment of the organic interlayer such as the orientation and arrangement of the alkyl chains of MAAB, as well as the properties of nanocomposite hydrogels, were also investigated. The amount of organic components absorbed on interlayer and the basal spacing of organo-MMT both increase with the increasing of alkyl length of MAAB. When carbon number of alkyl chain is in the region of 8 to 14, the alkyl chains between layers would adopt a disordered gauche conformation; while the carbon number is 16, an ordered all-trans conformation with a vertical orientation would be found together with the disordered gauche conformation according to the results of XRD and FTIR. Due to the difference of microenvironment of organic interlayer, the Young's moduli of the nanocomposite hydrogels increased as the alkyl chains of MAAB became longer.

  12. Review:Anaerobic ammonium oxidation for treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei ZHANG; Ping ZHENG; Chongojian TANG; Ren-cun JIN

    2008-01-01

    The concept of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX) is presently of great interest.The functional bacteria belonging to the Planctomycete phylum and their metabolism are investigated by microbiologists.Meanwhile,the ANAMMOX is equally valuable in treatment of ammonium-rich wastewaters.Related processes including partial nitritation-ANAMMOX and completely autotrophic nitrogen removal over nitrite (CANON) have been developed,and lab-scale experiments proved that both processes were quite feasible in engineering with appropriate control.Successful full-scale practice in the Netherlands will ac-celerate application of the process in future.This review introduces the microbiology and more focuses on application of the ANAMMOX process.

  13. Aluminium trihydroxide in combination with ammonium polyphosphate as flame retardants for unsaturated polyester resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The thermal and reaction to fire characteristics of a flame retardant unsaturated polyester (UP ternary system are presented here. Thermal gravimetric analysis showed an improved thermal stability between 200–600°C with the addition of ammonium polyphosphate (APP and aluminium trihydroxide (ATH formulation. Cone calorimetry tests indicated that ATH is more efficient than calcium carbonate at delaying the ignition time, lowering the carbon monoxide yield and lowering the peak heat release (PHRR. However the addition of APP and ATH to the formulation failed to demonstrate any significant synergistic effect at reducing the PHRR.

  14. Review: Mechanisms of ammonium toxicity and the quest for tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Raquel; Ariz, Idoia; Cruz, Cristina; Moran, Jose Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Ammonium sensitivity of plants is a worldwide problem, constraining crop production. Prolonged application of ammonium as the sole nitrogen source may result in physiological and morphological disorders that lead to decreased plant growth and toxicity. The main causes of ammonium toxicity/tolerance described until now include high ammonium assimilation by plants and/or low sensitivity to external pH acidification. The various ammonium transport-related components, especially the non-electrogenic influx of NH3 (related to the depletion of (15)N) and the electrogenic influx of NH4(+), may contribute to ammonium accumulation, and therefore to NH3 toxicity. However, this accumulation may be influenced by increasing K(+) concentration in the root medium. Recently, new insights have been provided by "omics" studies, leading to a suggested involvement of GDP mannose-pyrophosphorylase in the response pathways of NH4(+) stress. In this review, we highlight the cross-talk signaling between nitrate, auxins and NO, and the importance of the connection of the plants' urea cycle to metabolism of polyamines. Overall, the tolerance and amelioration of ammonium toxicity are outlined to improve the yield of ammonium-grown plants. This review identifies future directions of research, focusing on the putative importance of aquaporins in ammonium influx, and on genes involved in ammonium sensitivity and tolerance. PMID:27181951

  15. Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes Supporting Bismuth Oxide Nanometer Particle and Its Catalysis on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Dinitramide%碳纳米管负载氧化铋的制备及催化二硝酰胺铵热分解的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓东; 杨燕; 杨荣杰

    2007-01-01

    采用微波辐射法制备了沉积于碳纳米管(CNTs)表面的氧化铋(Ri2O3)纳米粒子(Bi2O3/CNTs),用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、光电子能谱(XPS)和X射线衍射(XRD)对制备的Bi2OO3CNTs纳米粒子进行了表征.研究了Bi2O3/CNTs纳米粒子对二硝酰胺铵(ADN)的催化热分解.结果表明,纳米Bi2O3均匀沉积在CNTs表面,平均粒径为8nm;添加3%Bi2O3/CNTs纳米粒子的ADN的初始热分解温度降低了12.8℃,热分解终止温度降低了29.3℃;NH4N(NO2)2→NH4NO3+N2O为ADN初始热分解的主导反应.%Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supporting bismuth oxide ( Bi2O3 ) nanometer particle ( Bi2O3/CNTs) was prepared by the microwave radiation method. Bi2O3/CNTs nanometer particle was determined by means of scan electron microscopy ( SEM ), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ( XPS ) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The catalytic property of Bi2O3/CNTs nanometer particle on thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide (AND) was investigated by TG and DSC. The results show that nanometer Bi2O3 was coated uniformly on the surface of CNTs. Average size of nanometer Bi2O3 is 8nm. Initial thermal decomposition temperature and ending thermal decomposition temperature of AND decrease 12.8℃ and 29.3℃, respectively when addition amount of Bi2O3/CNTs nanometer particle is 3%. NwH4N(NO2 )2→ NH4NO3 + N2O is dominant reaction of initial thermal decomposition of AND.

  16. Sulphate removal from uraniferous liquors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A process for the recovery of uranium from liquor resulting from the attack of sulphur containing uraniferous ores by an alkaline solution of sodium carbonate and/or sodium bicarbonate is claimed. An ion exchange resin is used to separate the uranium from the solution of sodium carbonate and/or bicarbonate and sodium sulphate. The ion exchange resin is then eluted with a solution of ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate to provide an eluate containing ammonium uranyl tricarbonate, ammonium carbonate and/or bicarbonate and ammonium sulphate. The eluate is heated to boiling to convert the ammonium uranyl tricarbonate to ammonium uranate and/or diuranate. Ammonia, carbon dioxide and water vapor are released. The precipitated ammonium uranate and/or diuranate is separated from the remaining liquor and calcined to give uranium trioxide

  17. [Achievement of Sulfate-Reducing Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Reactor Started with Nitrate-Reducting Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng-chuan; Yuan, Lin-jiang; Zhou, Guo-biao; Li, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The transformation of nitrite-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation to sulfate-reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation in an UASB was performed and the changes in microbial community were studied. The result showed that the sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation process was successfully accomplished after 177 days' operation. The removal rate of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were up to 58. 9% and 15. 7%, the removing load of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate were 74. 3 mg.(L.d)-1 and 77. 5 mg.(L.d)-1 while concentration of ammonium nitrogen and sulfate of influent were 130 mg.(L.d)-1 and 500 mg.(L.d)-1, respectively. The lost nitrogen and sulphur was around 2 in molar ratio. The pH value of the effluent was lower than that of the influent. Instead of Candidatus brocadia in nitrite reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation granular sludge, Bacillus benzoevorans became the dominant species in sulfate reducing anaerobic ammonium oxidation sludge. The dominant bacterium in the two kinds of anaerobic ammonium oxidation process is different. Our results imply that the two anaerobic ammonium oxidation processes are carried out by different kind of bacterium. PMID:26717697

  18. Quaternary Ammonium Polyethyleneimine: Antibacterial Activity Ira

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaternary ammonium polyethyleneimine- (QA-PEI-) based nanoparticles were synthesized using two synthetic methods, reductive amination and N-alkylation. According to the first method, QA-PEI nanoparticles were synthesized by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde followed by reductive amination with octanal and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. The second method is based on crosslinking with dialkyl halide followed by N-alkylation with octyl halide and further N-methylation with methyl iodide. QA-PEI nanoparticles completely inhibited bacterial growth (>106 bacteria), including both Gram-positive, that is, Staphylococcus aureus at 80 μ/mL, and Gram-negative, that is, Escherichia coli at 320 μ/mL. Activity analysis revealed that the degree of alkylation and N-methylation of the QA-PEI nanoparticles plays a significant role in antibacterial activity of the reagent. The most potent compound was octyl alkylated QA-PEI alkylated at 1 : 1 mole ratio (primary amine of PEI monomer units/alkylating agent). Also, cytotoxicity studies on MAT-LyLu and MBT cell lines were performed with QA-PEI nanoparticles. These findings confirm previous reports that poly cations bearing quaternary ammonium moieties inhibit bacterial growth in vitro and have a potential use as additives in medical devices which need antibacterial properties.

  19. Phase diagram of uranyl acetate-water-tri-n-butyl phosphate system in the region of high salt concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of investigations into mutual solubility in the system of uranyl acetate-water-tributyl phosphate (the range of high salt concentrations) at 25 deg C are presented. The phase diagram of the system in the solubility range is shown to differ sharply from the most of diagrams of the known systems of salt-water-tributyl phosphate. An attempt is made to associate the unusual character of the solubility isotherm with change of the role of water in extraction and dissolution processes at transition from halogenoacetates to uranyl acetate. Based on IR spectroscopic data the conclusion is made on uranyl acetate solvation in the organic phase only with one molecule of tributyl phosphate, but not two molecules, as it was considered earlier

  20. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Megan E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bowers, Delbert L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  1. A relativistic study of the photochemistry of the uranyl(VI) ion in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, F.; Wahlgren, U. [Alballova University Center, Stockholm University, Fysikum, 104-91 Stockholm, (Sweden); Vallet, V. [Laboratoire PhLAM, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1 CNRS UMR8523, 59655 Villeneuve d Ascq Cedex, (France); Marian, C. [Institut fur Theoretische Chemie und Computerchemie Heinrich-Heine-Universitat Universitatsstr. 40225 Dusseldorf (Georgia); Grenthe, I. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Inorganic Chemistry Se-10044 Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows: The U-O bond in the uranyl(VI) ion is in general considered to be kinetically inert in thermal reactions, such as isotope exchange reactions. However, a fast isotope exchange can take place in photochemical reactions under UV irradiation as exemplified by the reaction: U{sup 17}O{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}*0 {yields} U{sup 17}O{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}{sup 2+} + H{sub 2}O (1) Under daylight, no exchange takes place, or the rate of exchange is very slow. This suggests that the reaction involves the excited-states of the uranyl(VI). 1) A comparison between wave-function theory and density-functional theory: The first part of this talk will discuss benchmark calculations of the excited states of the bare uranyl(VI) ion so that we can choose the computational cost effective ab initio method for the study of the photochemistry of actinide compounds. Before exploring the mechanism of exchange it is necessary to have information on the chemistry of the excited states and their electronic structure. It seems reasonable to assume that 'yl'-isotope exchange is related to the U-O{sub yl} stretching modes and following the work of Pierloot and van Besien [1] we have therefore studied the a{sub g}- and a{sub u}-modes of the U-O{sub yl} bond using different methods such as CASPT2, TD-DFT and DFT-MRCI and different basis set and description of the heavy-element. The scalar-relativistic effects were included using either the Douglas-Kroll Hamiltonian in the case of all-electron calculations or an RECP small core from the Stuttgart Library. The {sup 3}{gamma}{sub g} state seems to be a good candidate for the photochemically 'active' state where the increase of the U-O{sub yl} localizes the wave function and gives distant 'yl' oxygen attains radical character. 2) Photochemistry of the uranyl(VI) in aqueous solution: In the case of the photochemistry of the uranyl(VI), we suggest that the first step

  2. Effect of temperature on the mechanisms of interaction between uranyl ion and zirconium oxo-phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium sorption onto Zr2O(PO4)2 has been studied between 298 K and 363 K, in 0.1 M NaClO4 medium. Potentiometric titrations were realized to determine temperature dependency of the acid-base properties (pHpcn, acidity constants). Classical batch experiments were performed at different temperatures. The sorption experiments revealed that the uranium sorption onto Zr2O(PO4)2 is favoured with the temperature. Structural characterization of the surface complexes was performed by both Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) and EXAFS spectroscopy. The TRLIF measurements vs. temperature revealed two uranyl surface complexes. No influence of the temperature onto the nature surface complex was observed. The EXAFS analysis showed a splitting of the equatorial oxygen atoms in two shells, corresponding to uranyl bidentate, inner-sphere complexes. The obtained structural uranyl surface complex information was used to simulate (using a constant capacitance model) the sorption edges. The proposed complexes equilibrium model consists of the following surface complexes: (≡ZrOH)2UO22+ and (≡PO)2UO2. Besides the stability constants for the surface complexes, the thermodynamic parameters ΔH0 and ΔS0 were determined using the van't Hoff equation. The enthalpy values associated to the U(VI) retention onto Zr2O(PO4)2, determined by the temperature dependence of the stability constants, testify that the formation of the complex (≡PO)2UO2 (55 kJ/mol) is endothermic, while no influence of the temperature was observed for the formation of the complex (≡ZrOH)2UO22+. The adsorption reaction of the last complex is then driven by entropy. In addition, calorimetric measurements of uranium sorption onto Zr2O(PO4)2 were carried out to directly quantify the enthalpy associated to the retention processes. (author)

  3. Computer simulation of uranyl uptake by the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Roberto D; Vorpagel, Erich R; Guglielmi, Matteo; Straatsma, T P

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal environmental contaminants cannot be destroyed but require containment, preferably in concentrated form, in a solid or immobile form for recycling or final disposal. Microorganisms are able to take up and deposit high levels of contaminant metals, including radioactive metals such as uranium and plutonium, into their cell wall. Consequently, these microbial systems are of great interest as the basis for potential environmental bioremediation technologies. The outer membranes of Gram-negative microbes are highly nonsymmetric and exhibit a significant electrostatic potential gradient across the membrane. This gradient has a significant effect on the uptake and transport of charged and dipolar compounds. However, the effectiveness of microbial systems for environmental remediation will depend strongly on specific properties that determine the uptake of targeted contaminants by a particular cell wall. To aid in the design of microbial remediation technologies, knowledge of the factors that determine the affinity of a particular bacterial outer membrane for the most common ionic species found in contaminated soils and groundwater is of great importance. Using our previously developed model for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, this work presents the potentials of mean force as the estimate of the free energy profile for uptake of sodium, calcium, chloride, uranyl ions, and a water molecule by the bacterial LPS membrane. A compatible classical parameter set for uranyl has been developed and validated. Results show that the uptake of uranyl is energetically a favorable process relative to the other ions studied. At neutral pH, this nuclide is shown to be retained on the surface of the LPS membrane through chelation with the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups located in the outer core. PMID:18067253

  4. Features of structural function of selenito group in uranyl complexes with neutral ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structures of three uranyl selenitocomplexes are determined. All the crystals are monoclinic, in [UO2SeO3x2CO(NH2)2] (1) a=9.427 (2), b=13.855 (2), c=6.556 (2) A, #betta#=105.35 (4) deg, sp. gr. P21/m, Z=2, R=0.C36 for 1573 reflections; in [UO2(HSeO3)2H2O] (2) a=6.354 (1), b=12.578 (2), c=9.972 (2) A, #betta#=82.35 (1), sp. gr. A2/a, Z=4, R=0.046 for 975 reflections, and in [UO2SeO3CH2(CONH2)2] (3) a=8.935 (2), b=10.698 (2), c=10.037 (2) A, #betta#=90.37 (3) deg, ph. gr. P21/n, Z=4, R=0.036 for 1756 reflections. Uranium polyhedron in 1-3 has a pentagonal-bipyranidal structure, axial positions are taken by O-atoms of the uranyl group (U-O 1.76-1.79 (1) A, selenite group and the neutral ligand are coordinated in the equatorial plane. In all the compounds the motives of structures are different: in 1 - the bands are on the basis of tridentate bridge cyclic SeO32--groups (U-O bridge 2.35 (1) A, U-Osub(br-cycle) 2.45 (1) A), in 2-bands are on the basis of bridge hydroselenite groups (U-O 2.36-2.38 (1) A), and in 3-layers are on the basis of tridentate bridge SeO32--groups (U-O 2.316-2.346 (8) A). The comparison is made with uranyl phosphite complexes

  5. Synthesis and structures of new uranyl malonate complexes with carbamide derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serezhkina, L. B., E-mail: Lserezh@samsu.ru [Samara State University (Russian Federation); Grigor’ev, M. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry (Russian Federation); Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkin, V. N. [Samara State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Crystals of new malonate-containing uranyl complexes [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Imon)(H{sub 2}O)] (I) and [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O4)(Meur){sub 3}] (II), where Imon is imidazolidin-2-one (ethylenecarbamide) and Meur is methyl-carbamide, have been synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. Both compounds crystallize in the monoclinic system with the following unit-cell parameters (at 100 K): a = 11.1147(10) Å, b = 6.9900(6) Å, c = 14.4934(12) Å, β = 92.042(2)°, V = 1125.30(17) Å{sup 3}, sp. gr. P2{sub 1}/n, Z = 4, R{sub 1} = 0.0398 (I); a = 16.6613(5) Å, b = 9.5635(3) Å, c = 22.9773(6) Å, β = 103.669(2)°, V = 3557.51(18) Å{sup 3}, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 8, R{sub 1} = 0.0207 (II). The crystals are composed of electroneutral chains [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Imon)(H{sub 2}O)] and mononuclear groups [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Meur){sub 3}] as the structural units belonging to the crystal-chemical groups AT{sup 11}M{sub 2}{sup 1} and AB{sup 01}M{sub 3}{sup 1} (A =UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, T{sup 11} and B{sup 01} = C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, M{sup 1} = Imon, H{sub 2}O, or Meur), respectively, of uranyl complexes. The packing modes of the uranyl-containing complexes were analyzed by the method of molecular Voronoi—Dirichlet polyhedra.

  6. Structural variability in uranyl-lanthanide hetero-metallic complexes with DOTA and oxalato ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four novel 4f-5f hetero-metallic complexes could be obtained from the reaction of uranyl and lanthanide nitrates with DOTA (H4L) under hydrothermal conditions. In all cases, as in the previous examples reported, additional oxalato ligands are formed in situ. Variations in the stoichiometry of the final products and the presence of hydroxo ions in some cases appear to result in a large structural variability. In the two isomorphous complexes [(UO2)2Ln2(L)2(C2O4)] with Ln = Sm(1) or Eu(2), the lanthanide ion is located in the N4O4 site and is also bound to a carboxylate oxygen atom from a neighbouring unit, to give zigzag chains which are further linked to one another by [(UO2)2(C2O4)]2+ di-cations, resulting in the formation of a 3D framework. In [(UO2)4Gd2(L)2(C2O4)3(H2O)6].2H2O (3), 2D bilayer subunits of the 'double floor' type with uranyl oxalate pillars are assembled into a 3D framework by other, disordered uranyl ions. [(UO2)2Gd(L)(C2O4)(OH)].H2O (4) is a 2D assembly in which cationic {[(UO2)2(C2O4)(OH)]+}n chains are linked to one another by the [Gd(L)]- groups. The most notable feature of this compound is the environment of the 4f ion, which is eight-coordinate and twisted square anti-prismatic (TSA'), instead of nine-coordinate mono-capped square anti-prismatic (SA), as generally observed in DOTA complexes of gadolinium(III) and similarly-sized ions. (author)

  7. Role of Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) in Nitrogen Removal from a Freshwater Aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L; Böhlke, J K; Song, Bongkeun; Tobias, Craig R

    2015-10-20

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) couples the oxidation of ammonium with the reduction of nitrite, producing N2. The presence and activity of anammox bacteria in groundwater were investigated at multiple locations in an aquifer variably affected by a large, wastewater-derived contaminant plume. Anammox bacteria were detected at all locations tested using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantification of hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) gene transcripts. Anammox and denitrification activities were quantified by in situ (15)NO2(-) tracer tests along anoxic flow paths in areas of varying ammonium, nitrate, and organic carbon abundances. Rates of denitrification and anammox were determined by quantifying changes in (28)N2, (29)N2, (30)N2, (15)NO3(-), (15)NO2(-), and (15)NH4(+) with groundwater travel time. Anammox was present and active in all areas tested, including where ammonium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were low, but decreased in proportion to denitrification when acetate was added to increase available electron supply. Anammox contributed 39-90% of potential N2 production in this aquifer, with rates on the order of 10 nmol N2-N L(-1) day(-1). Although rates of both anammox and denitrification during the tracer tests were low, they were sufficient to reduce inorganic nitrogen concentrations substantially during the overall groundwater residence times in the aquifer. These results demonstrate that anammox activity in groundwater can rival that of denitrification and may need to be considered when assessing nitrogen mass transport and permanent loss of fixed nitrogen in aquifers. PMID:26401911

  8. The effect of quaternary ammonium on discharge characteristic of a non-aqueous electrolyte Li/O2 battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of quaternary ammonium on discharge characteristic of Li/O2 cells was studied by using Super-P carbon as air cathode, a 0.2 mol kg-1 LiSO3CF3 1:3 (wt.) PC/DME solution as baseline electrolyte, and tetrabutylammonium triflate (NBu4SO3CF3) as an electrolyte additive or a co-salt. Results show that Li/O2 cells can run normally in an electrolyte with NBu4SO3CF3 as the sole conductive salt. However, such cells suffer lower voltage and capacity as compared with those using the lithium ionic baseline electrolyte. This is due to the larger molar volume of quaternary ammonium cation, which results in less deposition of oxygen reduction products on the surface of carbon. When used as an electrolyte additive or a co-salt, the ammonium is shown to increase capacity of Li/O2 cells. The plot of differential capacity versus cell voltage shows that the Li/O2 cell with ammonium added has broad and scatted differential capacity peaks between the voltages of two reactions of '2Li + O2 → Li2O2' and '2Li + Li2O2 → 2Li2O'. This phenomenon can be attributed to the phase transfer catalysis (PTC) property of quaternary ammonium on the second reaction. Due to inverse effects of the cation geometric volume and the PTC property of ammonium ions on the discharge capacity, there is an optimum range for the concentration of ammonium. It is shown that the addition of NBu4SO3CF3 increases discharge capacity of Li/O2 cell only when its concentration is in a range from 5 mol% to 50 mol% vs. the total of Li/ammonium mixed salt, and that the optimum concentration is about 5 mol%. In this work we show that the addition of 5 mol% NBu4SO3CF3 into the baseline electrolyte can increase discharge capacity of a Li/O2 cell from 732 mAh g-1 to 1068 mAh g-1 (in reference to the weight of Super-P carbon) when the cell is discharged at 0.2 mA cm-2.

  9. Uranyl incorporation into calcite and aragonite: XAFS and luminescence studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray absorption, luminescence, and Raman spectroscopic studies of U(VI)-containing calcite and aragonite show that the UO22+ ion, the dominant and mobile form of dissolved uranium in near-surface waters, has a disordered and apparently less stable coordination environment when incorporated into calcite in comparison to aragonite, both common polymorphs of CaCO3. Their findings suggest that calcite, a widely distributed authigenic mineral in soils and near-surface sediments and a principal weathering product of concrete-based containment structures, is not likely to be a suitable host for the long-term sequestration of U(VI). The more stable coordination provided by aragonite suggests that its long-term retention should be favored in this phase, until it inverts to calcite. Consequently, future remobilization of U(VI) coprecipitated with calcium carbonate minerals should not be ruled out in assessments of contaminated sites. Their observation of a similar equatorial coordination of UO22+ in aragonite and the dominant aqueous species [UO2(CO3)34-] but a different coordination in calcite indicates that a change in UO22+ coordination is required for its incorporation into calcite. This may explain the observed preferential uptake of U(VI) by aragonite relative to calcite

  10. Interaction of 4-amino 6-hydroxy 2-thiopyrimidine with uranyl ion in presence of other ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of uranyl ion with 4-amino 6-hydroxy 2-thiopyrimidine(AHTP) in presence of other ligands such as oxalic acid (Ox), malonic acid (Mal), O-aminophenol (OAP), o-phenylenediamine (OPDA), 2, 2'-bipyridyl (Bipy), 1, 10-phenanthrolene (Phen) and ethylenediamine (En) has been investigated by potentiometric method. The ternary complexes are formed in stepwise manner in which AHTP behaves as secondary ligand. The formation constants of ternary complexes have been reported at 35 degC and μ = 0.10 M (KNO3) in aqueous medium. (author)

  11. The Complexes of Bisphosphonate and Magnetite Nanoparticles to Remove Uranyl Ions from Aqueous Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using tetraethyl-3-amino-propane-1,1-bisphosphonate (BP) as the functional molecule, we functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles via dopamine (DA) linkage to create a system with an Fe3O4-DA-BP nanostructure, which possesses high specificity for removing uranyl ions from water or blood. This work demonstrates that magnetic nanoparticles, combined with specific receptor-ligand interactions, promise a sensitive and rapid platform for the detection, recovery, and decorporation of radioactive metal toxins from biological environment

  12. Uranyl ion behaviour in perchloric media and its extraction by TBP CCl/sub 4/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahia, A. (Centre de Developpement des Materiaux, Commissariat aux Energies Nouvelles, Alger (Algeria)); Benali-Baitich, O. (Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene (USTHB), Institut de Chimie, Alger (Algeria))

    The behaviour of uranyl ion in aqueous solution of perchloric acid (O < Cub(HC104) < 13 mol.1/sup -1/) shows that for an acidity higher than 9 mol.1/sup -1/, there is formation of a monoperchlorato complex. The extraction of uranly perchlorate from aqueous perchloric solutions by TBP diluted CC1/sub 4/ as a function of uranium and perchloric acid concentrations enabled us on one hand, to concluded that UO/sub 2//sup + +/ is solvated by 2 TBP molecules, and on the other hand, to determine the composition of the coextracted HC1O/sub 4/ solvated species.

  13. Cyclic voltammetric reduction studies of uranyl-di-potassium oxalate (DPO) in acetate buffered solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The eletrochemical reduction of uranyl perchlorate -DPO (Di-potassium oxalate) complex was studied cyclic voltammetrically in the pH range of 1 to 6.5, by using supporting electrolyte 0.1 M KNO3. The cyclic voltammograms were recorded at different voltage scan rates, so as to understand the diffusion controlled nature of the electrode reaction as well as the reversibility of the electrode reaction. Kinetic parameters like current -potential data, transfer coefficients (αn a) and Ksh were calculated for all the pH values studied. (author)

  14. Quenching of excited uranyl ion during its photochemical reduction by triphenylphosphine: Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relative rates of bimolecular quenching of excited uranyl ion by some mono and di-substituted benzene derivatives have been measured during its photochemical reduction with triphenylphosphine. For the related compounds in a series it has been found that substituent groups enriching the aromatic π-electron cloud due to resonance stabilization, show an enhanced photophysical quenching action. The substituents decreasing the π-electron cloud and delocalization of positive charger over the benzene ring decrease the quenching action. (author). 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Uranyl benzosulfonate and anion effects in processes of solvent extraction and salt dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation results of mutual solubility in the ternary system of uranyl benzosulfonate (UBS)-water-tributyl phosphate at 25 deg C are given. The character of the phase diagram obtained is compared with the known types of diagrams: salt-water-TBP. Data on UBS extractability and solubility, as well as on hydration-solvation processes in the system together with IR data permit to conclude that specificity of UBS behaviour is determined by effective hydration of the oxygen atom of the sulfonate group, which is not connected at once with cation

  16. Uranyl benzenesulfonate and anionic effects in processes of salt extraction and dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are reported of an investigation of the mutual solubility in the ternary uranylbenzenesulfonate-water-tributyl phosphate system at 25 degree C. The character of the phase diagram obtained is compared with known types of salt-water-TBP diagrams. Data on the extractability and solubility of UO2(C6H5SO3)2, and also for hydration-solvation processes in the system, together with IR data, permit the inference that the specific features of the behavior of uranyl benzenesulfonate are determined by the efficiency of the hydration of an oxygen atom of the sulfonate group not directly bonded to the cation

  17. Investigation of some uranyl halogenoacetates and their crystalohydrates using the method of thermogravimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of thermogravimetry is used to study thermal stability of uranyl trichloro-, trifluoro-, and monochloroacetate and their crystallohydrates. It is established that dehydration temperature coordinated to a cation of water rises with decreasing electron-donor ability of halogenacetate-ion. The results obtained and the data of spectroscopy permit to assume that heat stability of hydrates in the salt series considered is mainly determined by the strength of water uranium-oxygen bond. Hydrogen bonds with anion play a less significant role in the process of dehydration

  18. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups. (author)

  19. Uranyl p-toluenesulphonate and its crystal hydrates. Synthesis and dehydration-hydration processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluev, A. V.; Mityakhina, V. S.; Bogachev, S. V.; Suglobova, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    Lowest hydrates of uranyl p-toluenesulphonate (UPTS) and anhydrous salt were synthesised. The dehydration-hydration processes were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis. It has been established that the hydrate shell of UPTS has a layered structure. The IR spectra of UPTS and its hydrates were recorded. It was found that the IR spectra of UPTS crystal hydrates of the same composition, produced in dehydration-hydration, noticeably differ in the range of water vibrations and are the same in the range corresponding to vibrations of sulphonate groups.

  20. New complexes of heteroaromatic N-oxides with europium, uranyl and zinc ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zbigniew Hnatejko

    2012-01-01

    New solid complexes of europium,uranyl and zinc ions with N-oxides of 4-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyridine,quinoline and 4-methoxyquinaldinic acid in presence different anions were obtained and characterized by elemental and TG analyses,IR and luminescence spectra.The compounds are crystalline,hydrated or anhydrous salts with colours typical of metal ions.Thermal studies showed that in hydrated salts lattice or coordination water molecules are present.A role of different anions in the formation of various types of the complexes is presented.

  1. Investigation of uranyl sulfate complexes with N-methyl substituted amides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of IR spectroscopy, thermal and X-ray analyses were used for physicochemical investigation into UO2SO4·2L (L-N,N-dimethylformamide; N,N-dimethylacetamide or N,N,N',N'-tetramethylcarbamide). Belonging of compounds to AT11M1/2 crystallochemical group of uranyl complexes with trans-position of neutral ligands and tridentate bridge-cyclic (T11) type of sulfate-group coordination was established. Crystallographic characteristics of compounds were obtained. Spectroscopic criterion of distinguishing types of sulfate-ion coordination (T3 or T11) was suggested

  2. Uranyl hydrogel leaching as one of technological nodes of sol-gel process. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transport processes are described on the basis of ideas of the mechanism of the transport of leachable components from gel particles of a solidified uranyl. A mathematical model was constructed describing the process of the leaching of the monodispersion of gel particles. An apparatus was developed for testing the process of leaching gel particles of the coarse fraction, which meets the demands of semicontinuous operation, remote control, pneumatic mixing and the pneumatic transport of leaching solutions, attaining optimal concentration gradient for leaching. The diagram of the leaching apparatus and the mode of operation are given. (J.P.)

  3. Synthesis of New Bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) Ligands as Chelating Agents for Uranyl Complexation

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Jin; Rongzong Zheng; Rufang Peng; Shijin Chu

    2016-01-01

    Five new bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) tetradentate chelators were synthesized in this study. The structures of these tetradentate chelators were characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, FT-IR, UV-vis, and mass spectral analyses. The binding abilities of these tetradentate chelators for uranyl ion at pH 7.4 were also determined by UV spectrophotometry in aqueous media. Results showed that the efficiencies of these chelating agents are dependent on the linker length. Ligand 4b is the best chelator and ...

  4. Synthesis of New Bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) Ligands as Chelating Agents for Uranyl Complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bo; Zheng, Rongzong; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Shijin

    2016-01-01

    Five new bis(3-hydroxy-4-pyridinone) tetradentate chelators were synthesized in this study. The structures of these tetradentate chelators were characterized by ¹H-NMR, (13)C-NMR, FT-IR, UV-vis, and mass spectral analyses. The binding abilities of these tetradentate chelators for uranyl ion at pH 7.4 were also determined by UV spectrophotometry in aqueous media. Results showed that the efficiencies of these chelating agents are dependent on the linker length. Ligand 4b is the best chelator and suitable for further studies. PMID:27005598

  5. Study on the transport behavior of uranyl nitrate in aqueous and non-aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical ultracentrifuge has proven itself through diffusion measurements to be well suited for studying radioactive compounds. In the framework of this paper the extent to which the UV and schlieren optics of an analytical ultracentrifuge can be used for extraction-kinetic tests was tested. With this method there is also the possibility of determining the distribution coefficients right at the phase boundary. The results show the good possibility of application of the absorption and schlieren optics to the study of the transport behavior of uranyl nitrate in practice oriented solutions. (orig.)

  6. Benchmark calculation for water reflected STACY cores containing low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Takemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    In order to validate the availability of criticality calculation codes and related nuclear data library, a series of fundamental benchmark experiments on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution have been performed with a Static Experiment Criticality Facility, STACY in JAERI. The basic core composed of a single tank with water reflector was used for accumulating the systematic data with well-known experimental uncertainties. This paper presents the outline of the core configurations of STACY, the standard calculation model, and calculation results with a Monte Carlo code and JENDL 3.2 nuclear data library. (author)

  7. Recovery of uranium from uranyl nitrate raffinate. Contributed Paper PE-06

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At New Uranium Oxide Fuel Plant, NUOFP(O) of Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC), the Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate (UNR) generated during solvent extraction process is washed with Treated Lean Solvent(TLS) to recover residual U. Earlier this UNR consisting of 0.5-1 gm/l and 2.5 FA was neutralised with vapour ammonia. The slurry was then filtered over pre coat drum filter and the resultant Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate cake (UNRC) was stored in polyethylene lined MS drums. The valuable U was thus being locked up in UNRC. Also, the storage of UNRC drums required lot of floor space which have to be repacked frequently to contain the radioactivity. Hence the need has come to avoid the generation of UNRC and the recovery of U from the already generated UNRC. The generation of UNRC was avoided by developing alternate process of UNR treatment with Treated Lean Solvent for the removal of residual U and the resulting Acidic Raffinate Slurry (ARS) is disposed. The Uranium recovery from UNRC is done by dissolving the cake in Uranyl Nitrate Raffinate solution to leach the hexavalent Uranium by utilizing the free acidity in UNR. The leaching time is about six hours and the uranium forms uranyl nitrate. The resulting leach solutions are relatively dilute but complex acidic nitrate solutions containing wide variety of ions. Metallic ions commonly present include uranium, iron, magnesium, aluminium, sodium, calcium etc. The uranium concentration is normally 1-1.5 g/L. This uranium is separated by solvent extraction. The active agent in solvent extraction is Tri Butyl Phosphate in kerosene that can selectively extract uranium into an organic complex which is insoluble in aqueous. The organic used for extraction is Treated Lean Solvent in the quality of freshly prepared solvent and the resulting Acidic Raffinate Slurry is disposed by sale. The leaching of Uranium from UNRC was done in plant scale and about 1200 kgs of UNRC was successfully processed in trial batch. The paper deals with details of

  8. Luminescent properties of [UO2(TFA)2(DMSO)3], a promising material for sensing and monitoring the uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An uranyl complex [UO2(TFA)2(DMSO)3] (TFA=deprotonated trifluoroacetic acid; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide) has been successfully synthesized by reacting UO2(CH3COO)2 ·H2 O with one equivalent of (CF3 CO)2 O and DMSO. The complex has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and absorption and emission spectroscopies. The spectroscopic properties of the material make it suitable for its application in the sensing and monitoring of uranyl in the PUREX process. (author)

  9. Synergistic cytotoxicity and DNA strand breaks in cells and plasmid DNA exposed to uranyl acetate and ultraviolet radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Janice; Zuniga, Mary C.; Yazzie, Filbert; Stearns, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) has a chemical toxicity that is independent of its radioactivity. The purpose of this study was to explore the photoactivation of uranyl ion by ultraviolet (UV) radiation as a chemical mechanism of uranium genotoxicity. The ability of UVB (302 nm) and UVA (368 nm) radiation to photoactivate uranyl ion to produce single strand breaks was measured in pBR322 plasmid DNA, and the presence of adducts and apurinic/apyrimidinic sites that could be converted to single strand bre...

  10. High-rate partial nitrification treatment of reject water as a pretreatment for anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Jiachun; Hira, Daisuke; Fujii, Takao; Furukawa, Kenji

    2011-02-01

    In this study, a lab-scale swim-bed partial nitrification reactor was developed to treat ammonium-rich reject water to achieve an appropriate NO(2)(-)-N/NH(4)(+)-N mixture that could serve as a pretreatment for anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Strictly controlling the DO concentration was adopted as the main operational strategy. In addition, the influent concentrations of inorganic carbon/ammonium (IC/NH(4)(+)) and alkalinity/ammonium (Alk/NH(4)(+)) that were approximately 0.8 and 4.8, respectively, were regarded as the suitable ratios for the steady and high-rate operation of the reactor in this study. When reject water that was not diluted was introduced to this system, the maximum nitrogen loading rate was 5.9 kg-N/m(3)/day, the ammonium conversion rate was 3.1 kg-N/m(3)/day, and the effluent NO(2)-N/(NO(2)-N+NO(3)-N) percentage ratio was over 99.9%. Furthermore, DNA analysis confirmed the existence of AOB, which was responsible for the stable performance that was achieved in the PN reactor. PMID:21190840

  11. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  12. The Structure of Ammonium D,L-Tartrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The single crystals of the title compound NH4+C4H5O6- (C4H9NO6, Mr = 167.1) were obtained from a hot aqueous solution containing L-glutamine and D,L-tartaric acid in mole ratio1:1.5. The crystal belongs to monoclinic space group P21/c with a = 7.646(2), b = 7.804(2), c = 11.502(3)?, β = 102.26(2)o, V = 670.7(3)?3, Z = 4, F(000) = 352, Dc = 1.655 g.cm-3, ((MoK() = 0.16 mm-1, R = 0.035, wR = 0.094 for 1028 observed reflections (I>2((I)). The enatiomeric anions of the tartrate with both (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)-configuration co-exist in the unit cell. The carbon skeleton assumes a coplanar arrangement with a torsion angle of 181.5o. The three- dimensional H-bonding network exists in the crystal. While tartrate groups link each other by H-bonds between carboxyl and hydroxyl groups, the ammonium cations insert between the tartrate groups to form a sandwich-like crystal structure.

  13. Studies on inorganic exchangers - ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP) and ammonium phosphotungstate (APW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separation of fission product cesium from other accompanying fission products by use of inorganic ion exchangers, namely, ammonium phosphomolybdate (AMP) and ammonium phosphotungstate (APW) has been investigated. The gross fission product solution is passed through a column of AMP or APW conditioned with HNO3 of appropriate molarity say 2M. The column is thoroughly washed with HNO3 till no activity is left in it . Cesium is eluted by 3M NH4NO3 at 40 deg C. The eluate is converted into cesium chloride by wet decomposition method. The radioactive cesium obtained by this procedure is found to be of high purity and free from any other active contaminants. (M.G.B.)

  14. Surge ammonium uptake in macroalgae from a coral atoll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, V.; Wafar, M.V.M.

    (Phaeophyta)) from Kavaratti atoll (Lakshadweep, India). Addition of ammonium (up to 20 mmol L-1) led to pronounced uptake within 4–6 min, with the amount of ammonium taken up during surge phase (<4 min) accounting for from about half to 10 times that taken up...

  15. Racer (Ammonium Nonanoate) weed control evaluation for onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racer has been labeled as a herbicide for food use and is currently under consideration as an organic herbicide for organically grown food crops. The main component (40%) of Racer is ammonium nonanoate (ammonium pelargonate), which occurs in nature and primarily formed from biodegradation of higher...

  16. Thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate during gamma-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess radiation damage effects in propellants, pyrotechnics, and similar materials, thermal decomposition measurements were made on ammonium perchlorate powders and crystals during gamma-ray irradiation. Gas evolution studies were made on single crystals and powders of ammonium perchlorate, both at room temperature and at 2270C. The results are discussed. (U.S.)

  17. New thermo-sensitive chelating surfactants for selective solvent-free extraction of uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional surfactants were synthesised by grafting a chelating group (amino-acid residue) to the tip of a poly-ethoxylated nonionic surfactant chain (CiEj: CiH2i+1(OCH2CH2)jOH)) or in a branched position. CiEj nonionic surfactants are known to be thermo-reversible and to exhibit a clouding phenomenon associated to phase separation of micelles. The functional surfactants retain both surface-active properties, characteristic thermo-reversible behaviour and have efficient complexing properties toward uranyl. In the presence of uranyl nitrate, small micelles are formed at ambient temperature and the de-mixing leads to a separation of the target ion trapped by the functional surfactant (cloud point extraction). Those surfactants are more efficient than mixture of classical CiEj and complexing agent solubilized in the micelles. This reveals a synergistic effect of the covalent bond between the chelating group and the nonionic surfactant CiEj. This paper presents a systematic study of the extraction and aggregation properties and the influence of the nature of the ions. (authors)

  18. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660±0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46±0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 x 106±3.56 x 104 at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610±0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412±0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72±1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured

  19. Uranyl-Lanthanide Hetero-metallic Complexes with Cucurbit[6]uril and Perrhenate Ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of uranyl and lanthanide nitrates with cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) in the presence of perrhenic acid and under hydrothermal conditions yields the novel hetero-metallic uranyl-lanthanide molecular complexes [UO2Ln(CB6)(ReO4)2(NO3)(H2O)7](ReO4)2 (Ln = Sm, Eu, Gd, Lu). Both metal cations are bound to carbonyl groups of the same CB6 portal, one for UO22+ and two for Ln3+. The uranium atom is also bound to one monodentate perrhenate ion and three aquo ligands, while the lanthanide is bound to one monodentate perrhenate and one nitrate ions, and four aquo ligands. Not only are these complexes rare examples of ReO4- bonding to f element ions, but the perrhenate bound to Ln is included in the CB6 cavity, thus providing the first case of inclusion of a tetrahedral oxo-anion in this macrocycle. (author)

  20. Structure and spectroscopy of uranyl and thorium complexes with substituted phosphine oxide ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breshears, Andrew T.; Barnes, Charles L.; Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Walensky, Justin R. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Takase, Michael K. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Beckman Institute

    2015-05-01

    Phosphine oxide ligands are important in the chemistry of the nuclear fuel cycle. We have synthesized and characterized a series of phosphine oxide ligands with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) groups to enhance the spectroscopic features of uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and to make detection more efficient. Complexation of OPPh{sub 2}R, R = C{sub 10}H{sub 7} (naphthyl); C{sub 14}H{sub 9} (phenanthrenyl); C{sub 14}H{sub 9} (anthracenyl); and C{sub 16}H{sub 9} (pyrenyl), to UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} afforded the eight-coordinate complexes, UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OPPh{sub 2}R){sub 2}. An eleven-coordinate complex, Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}[OPPh{sub 2}(C{sub 14}H{sub 9})]{sub 3}, C{sub 14}H{sub 9} = phenanthrenyl, was structurally characterized, and was found to be the first thorium compound isolated with three phosphine oxide ligands bound. The phosphine oxide ligands were not fluorescent but the anthracenyl-substituted ligand showed broad, red-shifted emission at approximately 50 nm relative to typical anthracene, making this ligand set a possibility for use in detection. The synthesis and spectroscopy of the uranyl and thorium complexes are presented.

  1. Establishment of a luminescence technique for the quantification of uranyl ion in a KNO3 media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the storage of high level radioactive residuals that contain uranium, it makes necessary that in the sorption studies is counted with a reliable technique and not pollutant for the quantification of this element. Presently work intends a technique for the quantification of the uranyl ion using the luminescence technique, which allows not to generate radioactive or industrial residuals. It was used a solution of uranyl nitrate in KNO3 0.5 M media. The solutions were adjusted to a pH of 1.48+0.03. A statistical study for the analysis of the data of fluorescence, about the maximum value of the peak, total area under the curve and area under the it curves is shown, being the best correlation for the concentration curve versus maximum of the peak, adjusted with a polynomial of second grade. The study of stability of the solutions with regard to the time is reported and that the technique proposal works for the interval of concentrations among 1 x 10-2 M and 6 x 10-5 M. (Author)

  2. Determination of trace uranyl ions in aquatic medium by a useful and simple method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of trace uranyl ions was performed by using mixed micellar system and spectrophotometric determination. The method is based on cloud point extraction of uranyl ions after formation of an ion-association complex in the presence of Celestine Blue and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Then, the formed complex was extracted to non-ionic surfactant phase of Triton X-114 at pH 8.0. The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. concentrations and types of surfactants, concentration of complex forming agent, incubation conditions) were studied and analytical characteristics of the method (e.g. limit of detection, linear range, pre-concentration factor) were obtained by experimental studies. Linearity was obeyed in the range of 50-1,500 ng mL-1 for uranium(VI) ion and the detection limit of is 14.20 ng mL-1. The interference effects of common ions were also tested and validation studies were performed by using recovery test. The method was applied to the determination of uranium(VI) in several real samples. (author)

  3. Strongly coupled binuclear uranium-oxo complexes from uranyl oxo rearrangement and reductive silylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Polly L.; Jones, Guy M.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Schreckenbach, Georg; Magnani, Nicola; Love, Jason B.

    2012-03-01

    The most common motif in uranium chemistry is the d0f0 uranyl ion [UO2]2+ in which the oxo groups are rigorously linear and inert. Alternative geometries, such as the cis-uranyl, have been identified theoretically and implicated in oxo-atom transfer reactions that are relevant to environmental speciation and nuclear waste remediation. Single electron reduction is now known to impart greater oxo-group reactivity, but with retention of the linear OUO motif, and reactions of the oxo groups to form new covalent bonds remain rare. Here, we describe the synthesis, structure, reactivity and magnetic properties of a binuclear uranium-oxo complex. Formed through a combination of reduction and oxo-silylation and migration from a trans to a cis position, the new butterfly-shaped Si-OUO2UO-Si molecule shows remarkably strong UV-UV coupling and chemical inertness, suggesting that this rearranged uranium oxo motif might exist for other actinide species in the environment, and have relevance to the aggregation of actinide oxide clusters.

  4. X-ray diffraction study of uranyl sulfate complexes with acetamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray diffraction study of UO2SO4xLx2H2O (1), UO2SO4x2Lx2H2O (2) and UO2SO4x3LxH2O (3) (L-acetamide) complexes, which crystals were prepared by slow evaporation at room temperature uranyl sulfate and acetamide aqueous solutions with a definite molar ratio, is carried out. The lattice parameters for (1) are: a=17.520; b=6.917; c=8.759 A; β=104.40 deg sp.gr. s2/mC2 or Cm; for (2): a=7.248; b=9.451; c=10.623 A; α=109.15; β=107.79; γ=74.55 deg; sp.gr. P1-bar; for (3): a=8.494; b=10.170; c=10.606 A; α=118.81; β=102.92; γ=90.10 deg; sp.gr. P1-bar. Peculiarities of crystal-structure transformations in acetamide and carbamide uranyl sulfate complexes with change of UO2SO4:L ratio (L-acetamide or carbamide) are discussed

  5. Structural study of the uranyl and rare earth complexation functionalized by the CMPO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of reducing the volume of nuclear waste solutions, a possible way is to extract simultaneously actinide and lanthanide ions prior to their ulterior separation.. Historically, the two extractant families used for nuclear waste reprocessing are the phosphine oxides and the CMPO (Carbamoyl Methyl Phosphine Oxide). For a better understanding of the complexes formed during extraction, we undertook structural studies of the complexes formed between uranyl and lanthanide (III) ions and the two classes of ligands cited above. These studies have been performed by X-ray diffraction on single crystals. Recently, a new type of extractants of lanthanide (III) and actinide (III) ions has been developed. When the Organic macrocycle called calixarene (an oligomeric compound resulting from the poly-condensation of phenolic units) is functionalized by a CMPO ligand, the extracting power, in terms of yield and selectivity towards lightest lanthanides, is greatly enhanced compared to the one measured for the single CMPO. Our X-ray diffraction studies allowed us to characterise, in terms of stoichiometry and monodentate or bidentate coordination mode of the CMPO functions, the complexes of calix[4]arene-CMPO (with four phenolic units) with lanthanide nitrates and uranyl. These different steps of characterisation enabled us to determine the correlation between the structures of the complexes and both selectivity and exacerbation of the extracting power measured in the liquid phase. (author)

  6. Removal of uranyl ions in aquatic mediums by using a new material: gallocyanine grafted hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulusoy, Halil İbrahim; Simşek, Selçuk

    2013-06-15

    A new material containing gallocyanine (GC) grafted polyacyril amide (PAA) was synthesized and its adsorption ability was examined for the removal of uranyl ions from aqueous media. The new developed adsorbent was characterized by FTIR, SEM, and PZC analysis. Adsorption of UO₂(2+) ions from aqueous solution as a function of ion concentration, pH, ionic strength, temperature, and reusability of adsorbent was investigated in detail. The adsorption data were analyzed by using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) models. The adsorption of UO₂(2+) increased with pH and reached a plateau value in the pH range 5-6. The adsorption of UO₂(2+) ions were not affected by increasing ionic strength. The adsorption mechanism followed an endothermic and spontaneous process with increased disorderliness at adsorbate/adsorbent interface. The adsorption process followed a pseudo-second-order kinetics. The new developed material is a potential adsorbent for effective removal of uranyl ions from aquatic solutions. PMID:23669652

  7. Thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Study of intermediate reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate has been carried but at constant pressure and constant rate of reaction. The following intermediary products have been shown to exist and isolated: UO2(NO3)2.3H2O; UO2(NO3)2. 2H2O; UO2(NO3)2. H2O; UO2(NO3)2 and UO3. These products, together with the hexahydrate UO2 (NO3)2.6H2O, have been studied by: - X-ray diffraction, using the Debye-Scherrer method.- infra-red spectrography: determination of the type of bonding for the water and the nitrate groups. - nuclear magnetic resonance: study of the mobility of water molecules. The main results concern: - the water molecule bonds in the series of hydrates with 6.3 and 2 H2O. - isolation and characterization of uranyl nitrate monohydrate, together with the determination of its molecular structure. - the mobility of the water molecules in the series of the hydrates with 6.3 and 2 H2O. An analysis is made of the complementary results given by infra-red spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance; they are interpreted for the whole of the hydrate series

  8. Structural elucidation and physicochemical properties of mononuclear Uranyl(VI) complexes incorporating dianionic units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohammad; Velmurugan, Gunasekaran; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Al-Resayes, Saud I; Al-Othman, Zeid A; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2016-01-01

    Two derivatives of organouranyl mononuclear complexes [UO2(L)THF] (1) and [UO2(L)Alc] (2), where L = (2,2'-(1E,1'E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-dyl)bis(azanylylidene, THF = Tetrahydrofuran, Alc = Alcohol), have been prepared. These complexes have been determined by elemental analyses, single crystal X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic studies. Moreover, the structure of these complexes have also been studied by DFT and time dependent DFT measurements showing that both the complexes have distorted pentagonal bipyramidal environment around uranyl ion. TD-DFT results indicate that the complex 1 displays an intense band at 458.7 nm which is mainly associated to the uranyl centered LMCT, where complex 2 shows a band at 461.8 nm that have significant LMCT character. The bonding has been further analyzed by EDA and NBO. The photocatalytic activity of complexes 1 and 2 for the degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) under the irradiation of 500W Xe lamp has been explored, and found more efficient in presence of complex 1 than complex 2 for both dyes. In addition, dye adsorption and photoluminescence properties have also been discussed for both complexes. PMID:27595801

  9. Uranyl complexation with acetate studied by means of affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladkov, Vladimir

    2013-05-10

    The interaction of uranyl with acetate is studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis in aqueous acid solutions at the pH values 2.0 and 2.5. The use of data on metal ion mobilities at different pHs allows to establish the ligand species interacting with metal ion and complex species formed. The formation of two complex species UO2CH3COO(+) and UO2(CH3COO)2 is observed (acetic acid concentration is up to 0.8M). In the case of uranyl-acetic acid system, the viscosity of solution is significantly changed with an increase of acid concentration. For calculation of ion mobilities the viscosity changes are taken into account. The stability constants are calculated at the ionic strengths 0.02 and 0.05 mol L(-1). The logarithms of the thermodynamic stability constants (β°) calculated with Davies equation for the activity coefficients of the ions are log β1(°)=2.94±0.08 and log β2(°)=5.50±0.15 at 25 °C. Obtained values are compared with literature data. PMID:23570853

  10. Deciphering the energy landscape of the interaction uranyl-DCP with antibodies using dynamic force spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teulon, J.M.; Parot, P.; Odorico, M.; Pellequer, J.L. [CEA, DSV, Inst Biotechnol et Environm Biol IBEB, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the DCP chelator. This work allowed us to obtain a reallocation of the respective contributions of the metal ion itself and that of the chelator. Results led us to propose a 2D schematic model representing two energy barriers observed in the systems Mabs U04S- and U08S-[UO{sub 2}-DCP] where the outer barrier characterizes the interaction between UO{sub 2} and Mab whereas the inner barrier characterizes the interaction between DCP and Mab. Using dynamic force spectroscopy, it is thus possible to dissect molecular interactions during the unbinding between proteins and ligands. (authors)

  11. Model-based evaluation on the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite in a nitritation process for ammonium-rich wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Cornelius, A; Rosenwinkel, K H; Kunst, S; Weichgrebe, D

    2004-01-01

    Modeling for nitritation process was discussed and analyzed quantitatively for the factors that influence nitrite accumulation. The results indicated that pH, inorganic carbon source and Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) as well as biomass concentration are the main factors that influenced the conversion ratio of ammonium to nitrite. A constant high pH can lead to a high nitritation rate and results in high conversion ratio on condition that free ammonia inhibition do not happen. In a CSTR system, without pH control, this conversion ratio can be monitored by pH variation in the reactor. The pH goes down far from the inlet level means a strongly nitrite accumulation. High concentration of alkalinity can promoted the conversion ratio by means of accelerating the nitritation rate through providing sufficient inorganic carbon source(carbon dioxide). When inorganic carbon source was depleted, the nitritation process stopped. HRT adjustment could be an efficient way to make the nitritation system run more flexible, which to some extent can meet the requirements of the fluctuant of inlet parameters such as ammonium concentration, pH, and temperature and so on. Biomass concentration is the key point, especially for a CSTR system in steady state, which was normally circumscribed by the characteristics of bacteria and may also affected by aeration mode and can be increased by prolonging the HRT on the condition of no nitrate accumulation when no recirculation available. The higher the biomass concentration is, the better the nitrite accumulation can be obtained. PMID:15900739

  12. Sodium dodecyl sulfate coated alumina modified with a new Schiff's base as a uranyl ion selective adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and selective method was used for the preconcentration and determination of uranium(VI) by solid-phase extraction (SPE). In this method, a column of alumina modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and a new Schiff's base ligand was prepared for the preconcentration of trace uranyl(VI) from water samples. The uranium(VI) was completely eluted with HCl 2 M and determined by a spectrophotometeric method with Arsenazo(III). The preconcentration steps were studied with regard to experimental parameters such as amount of extractant, type, volume and concentration of eluent, pH, flow rate of sample source and tolerance limit of diverse ions on the recovery of uranyl ion. A preconcentration factor more than 200 was achieved and the average recovery of uranyl(VI) was 99.5%. The relative standard deviation was 1.1% for 10 replicate determinations of uranyl(VI) ion in a solution with a concentration of 5 μg mL-1. This method was successfully used for the determination of spiked uranium in natural water samples.

  13. Mechanochemistry of the 5f-element compounds. Part 3. Mechanochemically stimulated formation of nitrosyl uranyl nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the mechanical treatment of UO2(NO3)2 x 6H2O in a planetary ball mill in air and as a suspension in toluene has been studied. The Xray diffractometry results strongly suggest that part of the mechanoactivated material is transformed in nitrosyl uranyl nitrate. (author)

  14. Annual report of STACY in 1995. 600mm diameter cylindrical core and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STACY, a critical assembly for static criticality safety experiments in NUCEF, had achieved the first criticality on February 23, 1995, with a 600mm diameter cylindrical core tank and 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution. Since then, 56 experiments were performed with various conditions of fuel concentration and reflecting conditions: bare and water. Operation data of STACY in 1995 are summarized in this report. (author)

  15. Treatment of uranyl nitrate and flouride solutions; Tratamiento de soluciones que contienen nitrato de uranilo y fluoruros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo Otero, A.; Rodrigo Vilaseca, F.; Morales Calvo, G.

    1977-07-01

    A theoretical study on the fluoride complexes contained in uranyl and aluminium solutions has been carried out. Likewise concentration limits and Duhring diagrams for those solutions have been experimentally established. As a result, the optimum operation conditions for concentration by evaporation in the treatment plant, have been deduced. (Author) 12 refs.

  16. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and responsible microflora in two contrasting paddy-rice soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to compare nitrate reduction, and the responsible microflora, in two soils contrasting in their potential for dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA). A soil from Griffith (NSW) reduced 14.5% of applied 15N-labelled nitrate to ammonium and organic-N under laboratory incubation without any exogenous carbon sources. A soil from Yangzhou (China) reduced only 4.7%. Addition of reducing agents (sodium thioglycollate and L-cysteine) enhanced the DNRA process, with most of the product of nitrate reduction being ammonium. Additions of glucose also facilitated DNRA, with most of the product being organic-N. There was a small but measurable amount of nitrous oxide production during nitrate reduction. Nitrous oxide production accounted for 0.05 to 4.2% of added nitrate by the end of experiments. Nitrous oxide tended to dissipate as the incubation proceeded in all non-glucose treatments, whereas in glucose treatments it tended to accumulate. The denitrifier population in the Griffith soil was about a tenth of the size of that in the Yangzhou soil. The DNRA population in Griffith soil, in contrast, was larger than that in Yangzhou soil. Of DNRA bacteria and denitrifiers isolated, spore-former dominated. (author)

  17. Extraction of tetravalent berkelium and cerium by aliquate-336-S-NO3 quaternary ammonium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extraction of tetravalent berkelium and cerium by aliquate-336-S-NO3 quaternary ammonium salt from nitric acid solutions is investigated. The effect of concentrations of nitric acid and extracting agent, nature of an oxidant (potassium bromate, potassium bichromate, mixture of AgNO3 and (NH4)2S2O8) and solvent on the distribution coefficient of berkelium(4) and cerium(4) is studied. It is established that solutions of aliquate-336-S-NO3 in carbon tetrachloride and dichloroethane extract quantitatively tetravalent berkelium from 10-12 M nitric acid solutions and cerium - from 1-10 M nitric acid solutions containing potassium bichromate as an oxidant. It is shown that the value of distribution coefficient for berkelium and cerium depends on the nature of an oxidant and extracting agent concentration. It is established that in the case of extraction by quaternary ammonium salt with one berkelium(4) mole four aliquate-336-SNO3 moles are associated and 1.5-1.6 mole of extracting agent are associated with one cerium(4) mole. It permits to make a conclusion that stoichiometry of extraction reactions by quaternary ammonium salt is not the same for tetravalent berkelium and cerium. It is shown that trivalent transplutonium and rare earth elements are not practically extracted by aliquate-336-S-NO3 from nitric acid solutions

  18. The role of the anion in the reaction of reducing sugars with ammonium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyei-Aye, Kwasi; Chian, May X; Lauterbach, John H; Moldoveanu, Serban C

    2002-11-19

    Reactions of reducing sugars with ammonia and its compounds are important commercially, particularly in the preparation of flavors and caramel colors. However, such reactions generally produce a complex series of products ranging from simple molecules to complex polymeric materials, particularly since commercial systems generally involve mixtures of sugars as opposed to single sugars. This complexity has made understanding the mechanisms of such reactions difficult. Therefore, investigatory work has generally been focused on model systems. Herein we report one such study with model systems: the effects of the nature of the anion of the reactions of reducing sugars with ammonium salts. D-Glucose was reacted in aqueous solution with each of the following ammonium salts: acetate, bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, citrate, formate, monohydrogenphosphate (DAP), sulfate, and sulfite. These reactions were carried out in a Parr bomb at 93 degrees C for 2.5 h. The initial pH of the reaction mixtures was adjusted to pH 8.0 at 25 degrees C. The resulting mixtures were analyzed by LC-MS, and the results were analyzed by comparing the product yields and distributions with those obtained with DAP. The major reaction product of interest was 2,6-deoxyfructosazine, as it had been shown to be a marker for the polymeric material formed from such reactions. It was found that ammonium salts of weak acids were much more effective in effecting the desired reactions than were those of strong acids; however, none was as effective as DAP. PMID:12433492

  19. Some properties of a new electrogenic transport system: the ammonium (methylammonium) carrier from Clostridium pasteurianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, D; Fitzke, E

    1981-02-20

    Clostridium pasteurianum is able to build up about 100-fold gradients of methylammonium across the cell membrane. Methylammonium enters the cell by means of a carrier as shown by the energy requirement, saturation kinetics and a pH profile with a narrow maximum between pH 6.2 and 6.8. The methyl ammonium transport (apparent Km = 150 microM, V = 100 mumol/min per g dry weight) is competitively inhibited by ammonium (apparent Ki = 9 microM). The low Ki value and the observation that methylammonium cannot serve as a carbon or nitrogen source for Cl. pasteurianum strongly indicate that ammonium rather than methylammonium is the natural substrate. Uncouplers and inhibitors of energy metabolism or of the membrane-bound ATPase inhibit transport. Cl. pasteurianum maintains a membrane potential (interior negative) in the range 80-130 mV. This membrane potential was identified as the energy source: the same agents that block transport also decrease the membrane potential, and artificial generation of a membrane potential (by addition of valinomycin to K+-loaded cells) induces concentrative uptake of methylammonium. Thus NH4+ (or CH3NH3+) must be the transported species. Digestion of the cell wall by lysozyme does not abolish the transport activity. PMID:7213710

  20. Voltammetry of uranyl chloride in the LiCl - KCl eutectic; Voltammetrie du chlorure d'uranyle dans l'eutectique LiCl - KC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fondanaiche, J.C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Spent UO{sub 2} - PuO{sub 2} fuels can be reprocessed in a molten salt media. Uranium dioxide can easily be dissolved as UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} in a molten salt bath using chlorine gas. A study of quantitative analysis of an uranyl chloride solution in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 400 C has been performed here using voltammetry (a large area-graphite indicator electrode has been employed). The precision which is obtained is around 6 per cent for concentrations below 10{sup -2} M. Precision decreases slightly for more concentrated solutions. The study of polarization curves allowed to give a reduction mechanism for the UO{sub 2}{sup ++} ion. For dilute solutions, this reduction proceeds through the UO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. But interpretation of current-potential curves is made difficult by the dismutation reaction of the UO{sub 2} ion and by the fact that the surface of the indicator electrode is not renewed. (author) [French] Le traitement des combustibles a base d'oxydes (UO{sub 2} - PUO{sub 2}) peut etre effectue au moyen des sels fondus. Le bioxyde d'uranium passe aisement en solution sous forme de UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} dans un bain de sels fondus par action du chlore. Nous avons etudie ici l'analyse quantitative d'une solution de chlorure d'uranyle dans l'eutectique LiCl - KCl a 400 C par voltammetrie (electrode indicatrice de graphite d'assez grande surface). La precision est d'environ 6 pour cent pour les concentrations inferieures a 10{sup -2} M; elle est legerement moins bonne pour les solutions plus concentrees. L'examen des courbes de polarisation a permis de donner un mecanisme de reduction de l'ion UO{sub 2}: pour les solutions diluees, cette reduction se fait par l'intermediaire de l'ion UO{sub 2}{sup +}. Mais l'interpretation des courbes intensite-potentiel est rendue delicate par la reaction de dismutation de l'ion UO{sub 2}{sup +} et par le fait que la surface de l'electrode indicatrice n